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Sample records for nmr structural study

  1. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  2. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  3. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  4. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  5. NMR Studies of Enzyme Structure and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildvan, Albert

    2006-03-01

    At least three NMR methodologies pioneered by Al Redfield, have greatly benefited enzymology: (1) the suppression of strong water signals without pre-saturation; (2) sequence specific NH/ND exchange; and (3) dynamic studies of mobile loops of proteins. Water suppression has enabled us to identify unusually short, strong H-bonds at the active sites of five enzymes (three isomerases and two esterases), and to measure their lengths from both the chemical shifts and D/H fractionation factors of the deshielded protons involved (J. Mol. Struct. 615, 163 (2002)). Backbone NH exchange studies were used to detect regions of an NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in which NH groups became selectively protected against exchange on Mg(2+) binding, and further protected on product (NMP) binding, thus locating binding sites as well as conformationally linked remote sites (Biochemistry 42, 10140 (2003)). Dynamic studies were used to elucidate the frequency of motion of a flexible loop of GDP-mannose hydrolase (66,000/sec) containing the catalytic base His-124, from exchange broadening of the side chain NH signals of His-124 in the free enzyme. The binding of Mg(2+) and GDP-mannose lock His-124 in position to deprotonate the entering water and complete the reaction.

  6. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  7. NMR studies of structure and dynamics in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Stark, R E; Yan, B; Ray, A K; Chen, Z; Fang, X; Garbow, J R

    2000-05-01

    Cutin and suberin are support polymers involved in waterproofing the leaves and fruits of higher plants, regulating the flow of nutrients among various plant organs, and minimizing the deleterious impact of microbial pathogens. Despite the complexity and intractable nature of these plant biopolyesters, their molecular structure and development are amenable to study by suitable solid-state and solution-state NMR techniques. Interactions of tomato cutin with water were examined by solid-state 2H and 13C NMR, showing that water films enhance rapid segmental motions of the acyl chains and are associated with a fivefold increase in surface elasticity upon cutin hydration. The suberization of wounded potato tissues was studied by solid-state 13C NMR, revealing the likely phenylpropanoid structures that permit dense cross-linking of the suberin structure and their proximity to the cell-wall polysaccharides. Finally, two new approaches were developed to elucidate the molecular structures of these biopolymers: partial depolymerization followed by spectroscopic analysis of the soluble oligomers; and swelling of the intact materials followed by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR analysis. PMID:10811427

  8. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  9. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  10. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing results obtained on the Argonne coals. We have extended our fitting procedure to include carbons of all types in the analysis.

  11. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  12. Solid State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid state NMR methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid state NMR techniques and technology. PMID:21219138

  13. Deuterium NMR Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Gramicidin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, Andrew William

    1990-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the membrane peptide gramicidin are investigated by deuterium NMR. A specific structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the alpha carbon of the third alanine residue. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on this analog in oriented lipid bilayers indicate that the c_alpha- ^2H bond makes an angle relative to the helical axis that is in agreement with the bond angle predicted by the beta^{6.3} helical model. A second structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the formyl group of two different analogs. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on these analogs show that the spectra of the two analogs are very similar. However, the analog possessing D-leucine as the second residue also appears to exist in a second, minor conformation which does not seem to exist for the analog possessing glycine as the second residue.

  14. An NMR structural study of nickel-substituted rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Brian J; Duarte, Iven C N; Macedo, Anjos L; Volkman, Brian F; Nunes, Sofia G; Moura, I; Markley, John L; Moura, José J G

    2010-03-01

    The Ni(II) and Zn(II) derivatives of Desulfovibrio vulgaris rubredoxin (DvRd) have been studied by NMR spectroscopy to probe the structure at the metal centre. The beta CH(2) proton pairs from the cysteines that bind the Ni(II) atom have been identified using 1D nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) difference spectra and sequence specifically assigned via NOE correlations to neighbouring protons and by comparison with the published X-ray crystal structure of a Ni(II) derivative of Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin. The solution structures of DvRd(Zn) and DvRd(Ni) have been determined and the paramagnetic form refined using pseudocontact shifts. The determination of the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy tensor allowed the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed chemical shifts to be obtained. Analysis of the pseudocontact and contact chemical shifts of the cysteine H beta protons and backbone protons close to the metal centre allowed conclusions to be drawn as to the geometry and hydrogen-bonding pattern at the metal binding site. The importance of NH-S hydrogen bonds at the metal centre for the delocalization of electron spin density is confirmed for rubredoxins and can be extrapolated to metal centres in Cu proteins: amicyanin, plastocyanin, stellacyanin, azurin and pseudoazurin. PMID:19997764

  15. Perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy for structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckel, Sina; Hiller, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses future perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy to study structures and functions of integral membrane proteins at atomic resolution, based on a review of recent progress in this area. Several selected examples of structure determinations, as well as functional studies of integral membrane proteins are highlighted. We expect NMR spectroscopy to make future key scientific contributions to understanding membrane protein function, in particular for large membrane protein systems with known three-dimensional structure. Such situations can benefit from the fact that functional NMR studies have substantially less limitations by molecular size than a full de novo structure determination. Therefore, the general potential for NMR spectroscopy to solve biologic key questions associated with integral membrane proteins is very promising.

  16. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  17. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Raman, Srivatsan; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Xiao, Rong; Ma, Li-Chung; Acton, Thomas B.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta.1 Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints, have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the RPF scores. Upon further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared to the X-ray structure MR performance were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures, demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of non-bivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results in NMR structures with improved MR performance PMID:18816799

  18. Preparation of Protein Samples for NMR Structure, Function, and Small Molecule Screening Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Anderson, Stephen; Aramini, James; Buchwald, William A.; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Conover, Ken; Everett, John; Hamilton, Keith; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Janjua, Haleema; Kornhaber, Gregory; Lau, Jessica; Lee, Dong Yup; Liu, Gaohua; Maglaqui, Melissa; Ma, Lichung; Mao, Lei; Patel, Dayaban; Rossi, Paolo; Sahdev, Seema; Shastry, Ritu; Swapna, G.V.T.; Tang, Yeufeng; Tong, Saichiu; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Huang; Zhao, Li; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we concentrate on the production of high quality protein samples for NMR studies. In particular, we provide an in-depth description of recent advances in the production of NMR samples and their synergistic use with recent advancements in NMR hardware. We describe the protein production platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, and outline our high-throughput strategies for producing high quality protein samples for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Our strategy is based on the cloning, expression and purification of 6X-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems and isotope enrichment in minimal media. We describe 96-well ligation-independent cloning and analytical expression systems, parallel preparative scale fermentation, and high-throughput purification protocols. The 6X-His affinity tag allows for a similar two-step purification procedure implemented in a parallel high-throughput fashion that routinely results in purity levels sufficient for NMR studies (> 97% homogeneity). Using this platform, the protein open reading frames of over 17,500 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as over 28,000 constructs. Nearly 5,000 of these proteins have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html), resulting in more than 950 new protein structures, including more than 400 NMR structures, deposited in the Protein Data Bank. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium pipeline has been effective in producing protein samples of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Although this paper describes our entire pipeline for producing isotope-enriched protein samples, it focuses on the major updates introduced during the last 5 years (Phase 2 of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative). Our advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening

  19. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  20. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  1. Solution structure of sialyl Lewis X mimics studied by two-dimensional NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Makoto; Noda, Masatoshi; Kajimoto, Tetsuya; Uchiyama, Taketo; Umemoto, Kimiko; Wong, Chi-Huey; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    A structure of the peptidic mimic of sialyl Lewis X (Sle X) (α- N-acetyl-neuraminyl-(2,3)-β- D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-[α- L-fucopyranosyl-(1,3)-β- D- N-acetyl-glucosamine]) in an aqueous solution was studied using two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. Complete assignments of 1H NMR chemical shift of the SLe X mimic have been performed. The presence of three conformers of the SLe X mimic in a solution was proposed by using distance geometry calculation based on NOE constraints, which were obtained from NOESY experiments. In addition, intermolecular interaction between the mimic and the crystal structure of E-selectin was refined using molecular dynamics. This suggested the conformational rearrangement of the functional groups of the conformers to the active sites of E-selectin. The relationship between the binding activities toward E-selectin and the three-dimensional structures of other mimics was also discussed.

  2. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ~20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  3. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  4. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags.

  5. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a {open_quote}receiver domain{close_quote} in the family of {open_quote}two-component{close_quote} regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  6. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  7. Structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins. A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, D.B.; Chana, R.S.; Parmar, Y.I.; Treleaven, W.D.; Cushley, R.J. )

    1990-04-24

    The structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins have been studied by using {sup 31}P NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients, D{sub T}, obtained from the viscosity dependence of the {sup 31}P NMR line widths, were obtained for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoproteins (HDL{sub 2}, HDL{sub 3}), and egg PC/TO microemulsions at 25{degree}C, for VLDL at 40{degree}C, and for LDL at 45{degree}C. In order to prove the orientation and/or order of the phospholipid head-group, estimates of the residual chemical shift anistropy, {Delta}{sigma}, have been obtained for all the lipoproteins and the microemulsions from the viscosity and field dependence for the {sup 31}P NMR line widths. These results suggest differences in the orientation and/or ordering of the head-group in the HDLs. The dynamic behavior of the phosphate moiety in LDL and HDL{sub 3} has been obtained from the temperature dependence of the {sup 31}P spin-lattice relaxation rates. Values of the correlation time for phosphate group reorientation and the activation energy for the motion are nearly identical in LDL and HDL{sub 3} and are similar to values obtained for phospholipid bilayers. This argues against long-lived protein-lipid interactions being the source of either the slow diffusion in LDL or the altered head-group orientation in the HDLs.

  8. [sup 31]P NMR study of immobilized artificial membrane surfaces. Structure and dynamics of immobilized phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Pidgeon, C. )

    1993-11-25

    Chromatography surfaces were prepared by immobilizing a single-chain ether phospholipid at approximately a monolayer density on silica particles. The chromatography particles are denoted as [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3], and they are stable to all solvents. The structure and dynamics of the interphase created by immobilizing phospholipids on silica particles were studied by [sup 31]P NMR methods. [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] spontaneously wets when suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents, and [sup 31]P NMR spectra were obtained in water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, and acetone. [sup 31]P NMR spectra were subjected to line-shape analysis. From line-shape analysis, the correlation times for rapid internal motion ([tau]-PLL) and wobbling ([tau]-PRP) of the phospholipid headgroup were calculated for each solvent. Immobilized phospholipid headgroups comprising the IAM interfacial region undergo rapid reorientation similar to the case of the phospholipids forming liposome membranes with [tau]-PLL approximately 1 ns. Phospholipids in liposome membranes exhibit slower wobbling motion ([tau]-PRP approximately 1 ms) in the plane of the membrane. However, the immobilized phospholipids on [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surfaces wobble with correlation times [tau]-PRP that depend on the solvent bathing the [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surface. 41 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 {Angstrom} to 8.0 {Angstrom} after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 {Angstrom} to 8.4 {Angstrom}.

  10. Structural heterogeneity in microcrystalline ubiquitin studied by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Shi, Chaowei; Giller, Karin; Wolff, Sebastian; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    By applying [1-13C]- and [2-13C]-glucose labeling schemes to the folded globular protein ubiquitin, a strong reduction of spectral crowding and increase in resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectra could be achieved. This allowed spectral resonance assignment in a straightforward manner and the collection of a wealth of long-range distance information. A high precision solid-state NMR structure of microcrystalline ubiquitin was calculated with a backbone rmsd of 1.57 to the X-ray structure and 1.32 Å to the solution NMR structure. Interestingly, we can resolve structural heterogeneity as the presence of three slightly different conformations. Structural heterogeneity is most significant for the loop region β1-β2 but also for β-strands β1, β2, β3, and β5 as well as for the loop connecting α1 and β3. This structural polymorphism observed in the solid-state NMR spectra coincides with regions that showed dynamics in solution NMR experiments on different timescales. PMID:25644665

  11. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  12. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  13. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-11-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P/sub 2/ and P/sub 3/ sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions.

  14. Structural studies of homoisoflavonoids: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievänen, Elina; Toušek, Jaromír; Lunerová, Kamila; Marek, Jaromír; Jankovská, Dagmar; Dvorská, Margita; Marek, Radek

    2010-08-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for five homoisoflavonoids, molecules important from the pharmacological point of view. For studying the electron distribution as well as its influence on the physicochemical properties, NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations have been used. Nuclear magnetic shieldings obtained by using DFT calculations for optimized molecular geometries are correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The theoretical data are well in agreement with the experimental values. The single crystal X-ray structures of homoisoflavonoid derivatives 1, 3, and 4 have been solved. The molecular geometries and crystal packing determined by X-ray diffraction are used for characterizing the intermolecular interactions. Electron distribution is crucial for the stability of radicals and hence the antioxidant efficiency of flavonoid structures. The hydrogen bonding governs the formation of complexes of homoisoflavonoids with biological targets.

  15. Comparative NMR study of copper-based intermetallics with ZrCuSiAs-type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; ChangJen, W. J.; Su, T. H.

    2010-07-01

    The electronic characteristics of ZrCuGe2, ZrCuSi2, and HfCuSi2 are systematically investigated using C63u NMR spectroscopy. The quadrupole splittings, Knight shifts, and spin-lattice relaxation times on each individual compound have been identified. We found that the observed electric field gradient is consistent with the covalent bonding nature within the Cu atomic layers. The Knight shifts together with relaxation rates provide a measure of Cu d partial Fermi-level density of states, Nd(EF). Universally small Nd(EF) was found in all studied materials, suggests that the Cu d states are well below the Fermi energy and therefore the characteristic electronic structure near EF is primarily of sp type. We further pointed out that the low Nd(EF) value is an important factor for the lack of superconductivity in these Cu-based intermetallics within the ZrCuSiAs-type structure.

  16. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Nohaile, M J

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five {alpha}-helices and a five-stranded {beta}-sheet in a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 5} topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  17. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  18. Porous Structure of Pharmaceutical Tablets Studied Using PGSTE-NMR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porion, Patrice; Tchoreloff, Pierre; Busignies, Virginie; Leclerc, Bernard; Evesque, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of pharmaceutical tablets at high pressure (250 MPa) is a complex process that depends on the nature of the chemical compound. The purpose of this work is to characterize the porous structure of tablets obtained by uniaxial compaction, the most used process in pharmaceutical technology. First, three pharmaceutical excipients (microcrystalline cellulose, lactose and anhydrous calcium phosphate) were compacted and their compressibility properties determined. Secondly, the study of the self-diffusion process of a molecular fluid inside the pore space was performed by using pulsed-gradient stimulated-echo (PGSTE) NMR method, for tablets compacted under various pressure, in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the compaction axis. The results are used to determine the tortuosity factor and the anisotropy of the porous space of such compacted materials.

  19. Effect of hydrogenated cardanol on the structure of model membranes studied by EPR and NMR.

    PubMed

    Santeusanio, Stefania; Attanasi, Orazio Antonio; Majer, Roberta; Cangiotti, Michela; Fattori, Alberto; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogenated cardanol (HC) is known to act as an antiobesity, promising antioxidant, and eco-friendly brominating agent. In this respect, it is important to find the way to transport and protect HC into the body; a micellar structure works as the simplest membrane model and may be considered a suitable biocarrier for HC. Therefore, it is useful to analyze the impact of HC in the micellar structure and properties. This study reports a computer aided electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and (1)H NMR investigation of structural variations of cetyltrimetylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles upon insertion of HC at different concentrations and pH variations. Surfactant spin probes inserted in the micelles allowed us to get information on the structure and dynamics of the micelles and the interactions between HC and CTAB. The formation of highly packed HC-CTAB mixed micelles were favored by the occurrence of both hydrophobic (chain-chain) and hydrophilic (between the polar and charged lipid heads) interactions. These interactions were enhanced by neutralization of the acidic HC heads. Different HC localizations into the micelles and micellar structures were identified by changing HC/CTAB relative concentrations and pH. The increase in HC concentration generated mixed micelles characterized by an increased surfactant packing. These results suggested a rod-like shape of the mixed micelles. The increase in pH promoted the insertion of deprotonated HC into less packed micelles, favored by the electrostatic head-head interactions between CTAB and deprotonated-HC surfactants. PMID:23915214

  20. The structure of an integral membrane peptide: a deuterium NMR study of gramicidin.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, R S; Daleman, S I; Davis, J H

    1994-01-01

    Solid state deuterium NMR was employed on oriented multilamellar dispersions consisting of 1,2-dilauryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine and deuterium (2H) exchange-labeled gramicidin D, at a lipid to protein molar ratio (L/P) of 15:1, in order to study the dynamic structure of the channel conformation of gramicidin in a liquid crystalline phase. The corresponding spectra were used to discriminate between several structural models for the channel structure of gramicidin (based on the left- and right-handed beta 6.3 LD helix) and other models based on a structure obtained from high resolution NMR. The oriented spectrum is complicated by the fact that many of the doublets, corresponding to the 20 exchangeable sites, partially overlap. Furthermore, the asymmetry parameter, eta, of the electric field gradient tensor of the amide deuterons is large (approximately 0.2) and many of the amide groups are involved in hydrogen bonding, which is known to affect the quadrupole coupling constant. In order to account for these complications in simulating the spectra in the fast motional regime, an ab initio program called Gaussian 90 was employed, which permitted us to calculate, by quantum mechanical means, the complete electric field gradient tensor for each residue in gramicidin (using two structural models). Our results indicated that the left-handed helical models were inconsistent with our observed spectra, whereas a model based on the high-resolution structure derived by Arseniev and coworkers, but relaxed by a simple energy minimization procedure, was consistent with our observed spectra. The molecular order parameter was then estimated from the motional narrowing assuming the relaxed (right-handed) Arseniev structure. Our resultant order parameter of SZZ = 0.91 translates into an rms angle of 14 degrees, formed by the helix axis and the local bilayer normal. The strong resemblance between our spectra (and also those reported for gramicidin in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3

  1. 15N NMR study of nitrate ion structure and dynamics in hydrotalcite-like compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hou, X.; James, Kirkpatrick R.; Yu, P.; Moore, D.; Kim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic study of the dynamical and structural behavior of nitrate on the surface and in the interlayer of hydrotalcite-like compounds (15NO3--HT). Spectroscopically resolvable surface-absorbed and interlayer NO3- have dramatically different dynamical characteristics. The interlayer nitrate shows a well defined, temperature independent uniaxial chemical shift anisotropy (CS A) powder pattern. It is rigidly held or perhaps undergoes rotation about its threefold axis at all temperatures between -100 ??C and +80 ??C and relative humidities (R.H.) from 0 to 100% at room temperature. For surface nitrate, however, the dynamical behavior depends substantially on temperature and relative humidity. Analysis of the temperature and R.H. dependences of the peak width yields reorieritational frequencies which increase from essentially 0 at -100 ??C to 2.6 ?? 105 Hz at 60 ??C and an activation energy of 12.6 kJ/mol. For example, for samples at R.H. = 33%, the surface nitrate is isotropically mobile at frequencies greater than 105 Hz at room temperature, but it becomes rigid or only rotates on its threefold axis at -100 ??C. For dry samples and samples heated at 200 ??C (R.H. near 0%), the surface nitrate is not isotropically averaged at room temperature. In contrast to our previous results for 35Cl--containing hydrotalcite (35Cl--HT), no NMR detectable structural phase transition is observed for 15NO3--HT. The mobility of interlayer nitrate in HT is intermediate between that of carbonate and chloride.

  2. NMR Studies on the Internal Structure of High- T c Superconductors and Other Anorganic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, K.; Kakuyanagi, K.; Saitoh, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Takashima, S.; Nohara, M.; Takagi, H.

    2004-12-01

    Spatially-resolved NMR is used to probe internal structures in highly correlated superconductors of optimally-doped {text{Tl}}2 {text{Ba}}2 {text{CuO}}_{{6 + δ }} ( T c = 85 K) and a heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 ( T c = 2.3 K). The characteristic change of the properties of 205Tl-NMR in the vortex state provides a clear evidence of the antiferromagnetic order in the vortex cores below 20 K in {text{Tl}}2 {text{Ba}}2 {text{CuO}}_{{6 + δ }} . We also obtain anomalous 115In-NMR spectra of CeCoIn5, which provides a microscopic evidence for the occurrence of a spatially-modulated superconducting order parameter expected in a Fulde Ferrel Larkin Ovchinnkov (FFLO) state.

  3. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  4. Understanding the structural specificity of Tn antigen for its receptor: an NMR solution study.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Coslovi, Anna; Rossi, Marco; Uggeri, Fulvio; Paoletti, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    The present work aims at understanding the structural basis of the biological recognition of Tn antigen (GalNAc-α-O-L-Ser), a specific epitope expressed by tumor cells, and the role of its amino acidic moiety in the interaction with its receptor (the isolectin B4 extracted from Vicia villosa). An NMR structural characterization of the α and β anomers, based on J couplings and molecular modeling revealed a structure in very good agreement with data reported in literature for variants of the same molecules. In order to demonstrate the involvement of the amino acid in the ligand-receptor recognition, also GalNAc-α-O-D-Ser was studied; the change in the stereochemistry is in fact expected to impact on the interaction only in case the serine is part of the epitope. Relaxation properties in the presence of the receptor clearly indicated a selective recognition of the natural L form, probably due to the formation of a water-mediated hydrogen bond with Asn 129 of the protein. PMID:22341503

  5. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  6. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  7. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, September 13, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  8. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-12-31

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  9. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  10. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    PubMed

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in <0.5 % of the dry weight of the sample. This usually involves a minimum of several chromatographic purification steps. The second issue is the stability of the compound isolated. It must always be assumed when dealing with the isolation of natural products that the compound may rapidly degrade during and/or after the isolation, due to sensitivity to light, air oxidation, and/or temperature. In this way, precautions need to be taken, as much as possible to avoid any such chemical inter-conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived

  11. Layered structure of room-temperature ionic liquids in microemulsions by multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Falcone, R Dario; Baruah, Bharat; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Rithner, Christopher D; Correa, N Mariano; Silber, Juana J; Crans, Debbie C; Levinger, Nancy E

    2011-06-01

    Microemulsions form in mixtures of polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic molecules. Typical microemulsions employ water as the polar phase. However, microemulsions can form with a polar phase other than water, which hold promise to diversify the range of properties, and hence utility, of microemulsions. Here microemulsions formed by using a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as the polar phase were created and characterized by using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. (1)H, (11)B, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy was applied to explore differences between microemulsions formed by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)]) as the polar phase with a cationic surfactant, benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC), and a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX-100). NMR spectroscopy showed distinct differences in the behavior of the RTIL as the charge of the surfactant head group varies in the different microemulsion environments. Minor changes in the chemical shifts were observed for [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) in the presence of TX-100 suggesting that the surfactant and the ionic liquid are separated in the microemulsion. The large changes in spectroscopic parameters observed are consistent with microstructure formation with layering of [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) and migration of Cl(-) within the BHDC microemulsions. Comparisons with NMR results for related ionic compounds in organic and aqueous environments as well as literature studies assisted the development of a simple organizational model for these microstructures. PMID:21547960

  12. High-resolution NMR studies of structure and dynamics of human ERp27 indicate extensive interdomain flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nader T.; Wallis, A. Katrine; Wells, Stephen A.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.; Freedman, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    ERp27 (endoplasmic reticulum protein 27.7 kDa) is a homologue of PDI (protein disulfide-isomerase) localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERp27 is predicted to consist of two thioredoxin-fold domains homologous with the non-catalytic b and b′ domains of PDI. The structure in solution of the N-terminal b-like domain of ERp27 was solved using high-resolution NMR data. The structure confirms that it has the thioredoxin fold and that ERp27 is a member of the PDI family. 15N-NMR relaxation data were obtained and ModelFree analysis highlighted limited exchange contributions and slow internal motions, and indicated that the domain has an average order parameter S2 of 0.79. Comparison of the single-domain structure determined in the present study with the equivalent domain within full-length ERp27, determined independently by X-ray diffraction, indicated very close agreement. The domain interface inferred from NMR data in solution was much more extensive than that observed in the X-ray structure, suggesting that the domains flex independently and that crystallization selects one specific interdomain orientation. This led us to apply a new rapid method to simulate the flexibility of the full-length protein, establishing that the domains show considerable freedom to flex (tilt and twist) about the interdomain linker, consistent with the NMR data. PMID:23234573

  13. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  14. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  15. Reconstitution of the Cytb5 -CytP450 Complex in Nanodiscs for Structural Studies using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Huang, Rui; Ackermann, Rose; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Schwendeman, Anna; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-03-24

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are a superfamily of enzymes responsible for the catalysis of a wide range of substrates. Dynamic interactions between full-length membrane-bound P450 and its redox partner cytochrome b5 (cytb5 ) have been found to be important for the enzymatic activity of P450. However, the stability of the circa 70 kDa membrane-bound complex in model membranes renders high-resolution structural NMR studies particularly difficult. To overcome these challenges, reconstitution of the P450-cytb5 complex in peptide-based nanodiscs, containing no detergents, has been demonstrated, which are characterized by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. In addition, NMR experiments are used to identify the binding interface of the P450-cytb5 complex in the nanodisc. This is the first successful demonstration of a protein-protein complex in a nanodisc using NMR structural studies and should be useful to obtain valuable structural information on membrane-bound protein complexes. PMID:26924779

  16. A structural study of pyrazole-1-carboxamides by X-ray crystallography and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Sobrados, Isabel; Jagerovic, Nadine; Elguero, José

    1999-03-01

    The crystal structures of the first two pyrazole N-substituted primary amides (3-methyl and 4-bromo) were determined. The amide groups from the R 22 (8) hydrogen-bond dimeric pattern in all cases, in accordance with the higher rate found for the formation of this pattern in monosubstituted benzamides (81%) compared with the whole group of primary amide structures (34%). These two compounds and four other N-CONH 2 pyrazoles were studied by solid state NMR (CPMAS technique).

  17. Structural studies of pravastatin and simvastatin and their complexes with SDS micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, I. Z.; Galiullina, L. F.; Klochkova, E. A.; Latfullin, I. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational features of pravastatin and simvastatin molecules in solution and in their complexes with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles (SDS) were studied by 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiments it was established that pravastatin and simvastatin can form molecular complex with SDS micelles which were considered as the model of cell membrane. In addition, interatomic distances for studied compounds were calculated based on 2D NOESY NMR experiments. It was shown that pravastatin interacts only with a surface of model membrane. However, in contrast to pravastatin, simvastatin penetrates into the inner part of SDS micelles. Observed distinctions in the mechanisms of interaction of pravastatin and simvastatin with models of cell membranes could explain the differences in their pharmacological properties.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies on the NMR and X-ray structures of rabbit prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Zhang, Yuanli

    2014-02-01

    Prion diseases, traditionally referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species, manifesting as scrapie in sheep and goats, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad-cow disease) in cattle, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal familial insomnia, and kulu in humans, etc. These neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions (PrP(Sc)), and the conversion of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc) is believed to involve conformational change from a predominantly α-helical protein to one rich in β-sheet structure. Such a conformational change may be amenable to study by molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. For rabbits, classical studies show that they have a low susceptibility to be infected by PrP(Sc), but recently it was reported that rabbit prions can be generated through saPMCA (serial automated Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification) in vitro and the rabbit prion is infectious and transmissible. In this paper, we first do a detailed survey on the research advances of rabbit prion protein (RaPrP) and then we perform MD simulations on the NMR and X-ray molecular structures of rabbit prion protein wild-type and mutants. The survey shows to us that rabbits were not challenged directly in vivo with other known prion strains and the saPMCA result did not pass the test of the known BSE strain of cattle. Thus, we might still look rabbits as a prion resistant species. MD results indicate that the three α-helices of the wild-type are stable under the neutral pH environment (but under low pH environment the three α-helices have been unfolded into β-sheets), and the three α-helices of the mutants (I214V and S173N) are unfolded into rich β-sheet structures under

  19. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, September 1, 1995--February 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  20. NMR study on the network structure of a mixed gel of kappa and iota carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bingjie; Du, Lei; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2016-10-01

    The temperature dependencies of the (1)H T2 and diffusion coefficient (D) of a mixed solution of kappa-carrageenan and iota-carrageenan were measured by NMR. Rheological and NMR measurements suggested an exponential formation of rigid aggregates of kappa-carrageenan and a gradual formation of fine aggregates of iota-carrageenan during two step increases of G'. The results also suggested that longer carrageenan chains are preferentially involved in aggregation, thus resulting in a decrease in the average Mw of solute carrageenans. The results of diffusion measurements for poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) suggested that kappa-carrageenan formed thick aggregates that decreased hindrance to PEO diffusion by decreasing the solute kappa-carrageenan concentration in the voids of the aggregated chains, and that iota-carrageenan formed fine aggregates that decreased the solute iota-carrageenan concentration less. DPEO in a mixed solution of kappa-carrageenan and iota-carrageenan suggested two possibilities for the microscopic network structure: an interpenetrating network structure, or micro-phase separation. PMID:27312613

  1. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties. PMID:25494341

  2. The chemical structure of highly aromatic humic acids in three volcanic ash soils as determined by dipolar dephasing NMR studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Schnitzer, M.; Vassallo, A.M.; Wilson, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR studies of three highly aromatic humic acids, one from a modern soil and two from paleosols, have permitted the determination of the degree of aromatic substitution. From these data and the normal solid-state 13C NMR data we have been able to develop a model for the average chemical structure of these humic acids that generally correlates well with permanganate oxidation data. The models depict these humic acids as benzene di- and tricarboxylic acids interconnected by biphenyl linkages. An increasing degree of substitution is observed with increasing geologic age. These structures may be characteristic of the resistant aromatic part of the "core" of humic substances that survives degradation. ?? 1989.

  3. Structural Biology by NMR: Structure, Dynamics, and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Malliavin, Thérèse; Nilges, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both protein structure and dynamics in solution. Typically, NMR experiments are sensitive both to structural features and to dynamics, and hence the measured data contain information on both. Despite major progress in both experimental approaches and computational methods, obtaining a consistent view of structure and dynamics from experimental NMR data remains a challenge. Molecular dynamics simulations have emerged as an indispensable tool in the analysis of NMR data. PMID:18818721

  4. NMR cryoporometry characterisation studies of the relation between drug release profile and pore structural evolution of polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Navin; Yang, Bin; Lowe, John P.; Edler, Karen J.; Rigby, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    PLGA/PLA polymeric nanoparticles could potentially enhance the effectiveness of convective delivery of drugs, such as carboplatin, to the brain, by enabling a more sustained dosage over a longer time than otherwise possible. However, the link between the controlled release nanoparticle synthesis route, and the subsequent drug release profile obtained, is not well-understood, which hinders design of synthesis routes and availability of suitable nanoparticles. In particular, despite pore structure evolution often forming a key aspect of past theories of the physical mechanism by which a particular drug release profile is obtained, these theories have not been independently tested and validated against pore structural information. Such validation is required for intelligent synthesis design, and NMR cryoporometry can supply the requisite information. Unlike conventional pore characterisation techniques, NMR cryoporometry permits the investigation of porous particles in the wet state. NMR cryoporometry has thus enabled the detailed study of the evolving, nanoscale structure of nanoparticles during drug release, and thus related pore structure to drug release profile in a way not done previously for nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with different types of carboplatin drug release profiles were compared, including burst release, and various forms of delayed release. ESEM and TEM images of these nanoparticles also provided supporting data showing the rapid initial evolution of some nanoparticles. Different stages, within a complex, varying drug release profile, were found to be associated with particular types of changes in the nanostructure which could be distinguished by NMR. For a core-coat nanoparticle formulation, the development of smaller nanopores, following an extended induction period with no structural change, was associated with the onset of substantial drug release. This information could be used to independently validate the rationale for a particular synthesis

  5. Synthesis of a new quaternary phosphonium salt: NMR study of the conformational structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aganova, Oksana V; Galiullina, Leysan F; Aganov, Albert V; Shtyrlin, Nikita V; Pugachev, Mikhail V; Strel'nik, Alexey D; Koshkin, Sergey A; Shtyrlin, Yurii G; Klochkov, Vladimir V

    2016-04-01

    A novel phosphonium salt based on pyridoxine was synthesized. Conformational analysis of the compound in solution was performed using dynamic NMR experiments and calculations. The obtained results revealed some differences in the conformational transitions and the energy parameters of the conformational exchange of the studied compound in comparison to previously reported data for other phosphorus-containing pyridoxine derivatives. It was shown that increasing the substituent at the C-11 carbon leads to greater differences in the populations of stable states and the corresponding equilibrium energies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26661926

  6. 29Si NMR study of structural ordering in aluminosilicate geopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Duxson, Peter; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; Separovic, Frances; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2005-03-29

    A systematic series of aluminosilicate geopolymer gels was synthesized and then analyzed using 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) in combination with Gaussian peak deconvolution to characterize the short-range ordering in terms of T-O-T bonds (where T is Al or Si). The effect of nominal Na2O/(Na2O + K2O) and Si/Al ratios on short-range network ordering was quantified by deconvolution of the 29Si MAS NMR spectra into individual Gaussian peaks representing different Q4(mAl) silicon centers. The deconvolution procedure developed in this work is applicable to other aluminosilicate gel systems. The short-range ordering observed here indicates that Loewenstein's Rule of perfect aluminum avoidance may not apply strictly to geopolymeric gels, although further analyses are required to quantify the degree of aluminum avoidance. Potassium geopolymers appeared to exhibit a more random Si/Al distribution compared to that of mixed-alkali and sodium systems. This work provides a quantitative account of the silicon and aluminum ordering in geopolymers, which is essential for extending our understanding of the mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability, and fundamental structure of these systems. PMID:15779981

  7. Molecular structure and spectroscopic analysis of homovanillic acid and its sodium salt - NMR, FT-IR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Kowczyk-Sadowy, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of the electronic charge distribution in metal complex or salt allows to predict what kind of deformation of the electronic system of ligand would undergo during complexation. It also permits to make more precise interpretation of mechanism by which metals affect the biochemical properties of ligands. The influence of sodium cation on the electronic system of homovanillic acid was studied in this paper. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G** method. Mulliken, MK and ChelpG atomic charges were analyzed. The theoretical NMR and IR spectra were obtained. 1H and 13C NMR as well as FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of studied compounds were also recorded and analyzed. The calculated parameters are compared with experimental characteristics of these molecules.

  8. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  9. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Devi, L; Subbalakshmi, R; Rani, T; Mohan, S

    2014-09-15

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO's, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated. PMID:24792193

  10. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Devi, L.; Subbalakshmi, R.; Rani, T.; Mohan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO’s, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated.

  11. Probing NMR parameters, structure and dynamics of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Density functional study of prototypical radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; Bühl, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The 15N chemical shifts of metronidazole (1), secnidazole (2), nimorazole (3) and tinidazole (4), radiosensitizers based on the 5-nitroimidazole motif, are reported. A detailed computational study of 1 is presented, calling special attention to the performance of various theoretical methods in reproducing the 13C and 15N data observed in solution. The most sophisticated approach involves density functional-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations (CPMD) of 1 in aqueous solution (BP86 level) and averaging chemical shifts over snapshots from the trajectory. In the NMR calculations for these snapshots (performed at the B3LYP level), a small number of discrete water molecules are retained, and the remaining bulk solution effects are included via a polarizable continuum model (PCM). A similarly good accord with experiment is obtained from much less involved, static geometry optimization and NMR computation of pristine 1 employing a PCM approach. Solvent effects on delta(15N), which are of the order of up to 20 ppm, are not due to changes in geometric parameters upon solvation, but arise from the direct response of the electronic wavefunction to the presence of the solvent, which can be represented by discrete molecules and/or the dielectric bulk. PMID:15558660

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Cholesterol-Containing Polyunsaturated Lipid Membranes Studied by Neutron Diffraction and NMR

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Soubias, Olivier; Worcester, David; White, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    A direct and quantitative analysis of the internal structure and dynamics of a polyunsaturated lipid bilayer composed of 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0-22:6n3-PC) containing 29 mol% cholesterol was carried out by neutron diffraction, 2H-NMR and 13C-MAS NMR. Scattering length distribution functions of cholesterol segments as well as of the sn-1 and sn-2 hydrocarbon chains of 18:0-22:6n3-PC were obtained by conducting experiments with specifically deuterated cholesterol and lipids. Cholesterol orients parallel to the phospholipids, with the A-ring near the lipid glycerol and the terminal methyl groups 3 Å away from the bilayer center. Previously, we reported that the density of polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) chains was higher near the lipid–water interface. Addition of cholesterol partially redistributes DHA density from near the lipid–water interface to the center of the hydrocarbon region. Cholesterol raises chain-order parameters of both stearic acid and DHA chains. The fractional order increase for stearic acid methylene carbons C8–C18 is larger, reflecting the redistribution of DHA chain density toward the bilayer center. The correlation times of DHA chain isomerization are short and mostly unperturbed by the presence of cholesterol. The uneven distribution of saturated and polyunsaturated chain densities and the cholesterol-induced balancing of chain distributions may have important implications for the function and integrity of membrane receptors, such as rhodopsin. PMID:21161517

  13. Deuterium NMR study of structural and dynamic properties of horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    La Mar, G.N.; Thanabal, V.; Johnson, R.D.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.

    1989-04-05

    High field deuterium NMR spectra have been recorded for various horseradish peroxidase complexes reconstituted with hemins possessing specific 2H labels. The line width of the 2H NMR signals of deuteroheme reconstituted-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its cyano complex for the immobilized skeletal 2-2H and 4-2H labels yield the overall protein rotational correlation time (22 ms at 55 degrees C), which is consistent with expectations based on molecular weight. Meso-2H4 labels yield broad (1.3 kHz) signals just upfield from the diamagnetic protein envelope for HRP, and in the central portion of the protein envelope for the CN- ligated resting state HRP. Meso-2H4-labeled mesohemin-reconstituted HRP exhibits a similar signal but shifted further upfield by approximately 10 ppm. The net upfield meso-H hyperfine shifts confirm a five-coordinate structure for resting state HRP. 2Ha resonances for essentially rotationally immobile vinyl groups were detected in both resting state HRP and CN- ligated resting state HRP. Heme methyl-2H-labeling yields relatively narrow lines (approximately 80 Hz) indicative of effective averaging of the quadrupolar relaxation by rapid methyl rotation. Thus the 2H line width of rapidly rotating methyls in hemoproteins can be used effectively to determine the overall protein tumbling rate. Preliminary 2H experiments in meso-2H4-labeled compound I do not support large pi spin density at these positions on the porphyrin cation radical, and argue for a a1u rather than a a2u orbital ground state.

  14. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  15. Experimental and theoretical studies on compositions, structures, and IR and NMR spectra of functionalized protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yingna; Yin, Jingmei; Li, Changping; Li, Shenmin; Wang, Ailing; Yang, Guang; Jia, Yingping

    2016-07-20

    The compositions and structures of amine-based functionalized protic ionic liquids (PILs), namely N,N-dimethyl(cyanoethyl)ammonium propionate (DMCEAP) and N,N-dimethyl(hydroxyethyl)ammonium propionate (DMEOAP) have been investigated systematically by IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Analysis of the IR spectra suggests that both DMCEAP and DMEOAP are composed of neutral and ionized species in the liquid phase, the former one mainly existing in the state of precursor molecules, and the latter mainly as ion-pairs. The ratio of precursor molecules to ion-pairs in the liquid phase depends on the types of precursors, especially the functional groups of cations. (1)H NMR spectra indicate that there is a dynamic equilibrium between the neutral and ionized species, probably due to the formation of some intermediates in the PILs. The DFT calculations have been carried out to reveal the conformation, and obtain the corresponding IR and (1)H NMR spectra of the neutral and ionized species, so that the theoretical support to the experimental results can be provided. The present study will help understand the properties of PILs and provide guidance for further applications of PILs. PMID:27385035

  16. Salt-dependent structure change and ion binding in cytochrome c studied by two-dimensional proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yiqing; Englander, S.W. )

    1990-04-10

    To search for salt-dependent structure changes that might help to explain physicochemical differences observed in previous solution studies, two-dimensional proton NMR spectra of reduced and oxidized cytochrome c were recorded at relatively high and low salt concentrations. The results rule out substantial ionic strength dependent structure change in either redox form over the salt concentrations tested. Chemical shift changes were found for several residues within a limited segment of the oxidized protein, most prominently in the sequence Lys-86, Lys-87, Lys-88, Thr-89. A salt-dependent binding of phosphate anion(s) at this site, as observed earlier by others, is indicated. The binding of one or two phosphates at the cytochrome c surface can explain earlier small-angle X-ray scattering observations of an increase in the calculated radius of gyration of the oxidized protein at the same low-salt condition used here. The results obtained support the view that the absence of sizeable redox-dependent structure change observed in X-ray and NMR studies at varying salt conditions is characteristic of the protein at all salt conditions above the low millimolar range. Physicochemical differences between oxidized and reduced cytochrome c apparently represent differences in stability without patent structure change.

  17. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  18. Structure and dynamics of homoleptic beryllocenes: a solid-state 9Be and 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Macdonald, Charles L B; Schurko, Robert W

    2004-11-19

    The correlation between anisotropic 9Be NMR (quadrupolar and chemical shielding) interactions and the structure and dynamics in [Cp2Be], [Cp2*Be], and [(C5Me4H)2Be] is examined by solid-state 9Be NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ab initio and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The 9Be quadrupole coupling constants in the three compounds correspond well to the relative degrees of spherical ground-state electronic symmetry of the environment about beryllium. Theoretical computations of NMR interaction tensors are in excellent agreement with experimental values and aid in understanding the origins of NMR interaction tensors and their correlation to molecular symmetry. Variable-temperature (VT) 9Be and 13C NMR experiments reveal a highly fluxional structure in the condensed phase of [Cp2Be]. In particular, the pathway by which the Cp rings of [Cp2Be] 'invert' coordination modes is examined in detail using hybrid density functional theory in order to inspect variations of the 9Be NMR interaction tensors. The activation energy for the 'inversion' process is found to be 36.9 kJ mol(-1) from chemical exchange analysis of 13C VT CP/MAS NMR spectra. The low-temperature (ca. -100 degrees C) X-ray crystal structures of all three compounds have been collected and refined, and are in agreement with previously reported structures. In addition, the structure of the same Cp2Be crystal was determined at 20 degrees C and displays features consistent with increased intramolecular motion, supporting observations by 9Be VT NMR spectroscopy. PMID:15484199

  19. Structure of 3-aminopyridine betaine hydrochloride studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, I.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2010-08-01

    The structure of 3-aminopyridine betaine hydrochloride (1-carboxymethyl-3-aminopyridinium chloride), 3-NH 2PBH·Cl, has been studied by X-ray diffraction, B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculations, FTIR and NMR spectra. The compound crystallized in monoclinic, space group P2 1/c in the crystal, the Cl - anion is connected with protonated betaine via the hydrogen bond O-H⋯Cl of 2.946(3) Å. Both protons of the NH 2 group are engaged in hydrogen bonds with the neighboring molecules: N(2)-H(2B)⋯O(2) of 2.905(6) Å and N(2)-H(2B)⋯Cl(1) of 3.324(3) Å. The Cl - ion interacts electrostatically with three neighboring molecules. The probable assignments of the anharmonic experimental solid state vibrational frequencies of the investigated compound, based on the calculated frequencies in vacuum at the same level of theory for optimized structure, have been made. Correlations between the experimental 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts ( δexp) and the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculated magnetic isotropic shielding ( σcal) in DMSO and D 2O, δexp = a + b · σcalc, are reported.

  20. Local structure of spin Peierls compound TiPO4: 47/49Ti and 31P NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Raivo; Heinmaa, Ivo; Leitmäe, Alexander; Joon, Enno; Tsirlin, Alexander; Kremer, Reinhard; Glaum, Robert

    TiPO4 structure is made of slightly corrugated TiO2 ribbon chains of edge-sharing TiO6 octahedra. The almost perfect 1D spin 1/2 Ti3 + chains are well separated by PO4 tetrahedra. By magnetic susceptibility and MAS-NMR measurements [1] it was shown that TiPO4 has nonmagnetic singlet ground state with remarkably high Spin-Peierls (SP) transition temperature. The high-T magnetic susceptibility of TiPO4 follows well that of a S =1/2 Heisenberg chain with very strong nearest-neighbor AF spin-exchange coupling constant of J =965K. On cooling TiPO4 shows two successive phase transitions at 111K and 74K, with incommensurate (IC) SP phase between them. We studied local structure and dynamics in TiPO4 single crystal using 47/49Ti and 31P NMR in the temperature range 40K to 300K, and determined the principal values and orientation of the magnetic shift tensors for 31P and 47,49Ti nuclei. Since 47,49Ti (S =5/2 and S =7/2, respectively) have quadrupolar moments, we also found the principal axis values and orientations of the electric field gradient (efg) tensor in SP phase and at 295K. In SP phase the structure contains 2 magnetically inequivalent P sites and only one Ti site. From the T-dependence of the relaxation rate of 31P and 47Ti nuclei we determined activation energy Ea = 550 K for spin excitations in SP phase. J. Law et al ., PRB 83, 180414(R) (2011).

  1. Dipolar-dephasing 13C NMR studies of decomposed wood and coalified xylem tissue: Evidence for chemical structural changes associated with defunctionalization of lignin structural units during coalification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A series of decomposed and coalified gymnosperm woods was examined by conventional solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and by dipolar-dephasing NMR techniques. The results of these NMR studies for a histologically related series of samples provide clues as to the nature of codification reactions that lead to the defunctionalization of lignin-derived aromatic structures. These reactions sequentially involve the following: (1) loss of methoxyl carbons from guaiacyl structural units with replacement by hydroxyls and increased condensation; (2) loss of hydroxyls or aryl ethers with replacement by hydrogen as rank increases from lignin to high-volatile bituminous coal; (3) loss of alkyl groups with continued replacement by hydrogen. The dipolar-dephasing data show that the early stages of coalification in samples examined (lignin to lignite) involve a decreasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings and suggest that condensation is significant during coalification at this early stage. An increasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings is observed as the rank of the sample increases from lignite to anthracite.

  2. Use of NMR spectroscopy to study the effects of hydroprocessing on structure and thermo-oxidative stability of base oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydroprocessing technologies such as hydrocracking, hydrofinishing provide an opportunity to modify the chemistry of hydrocarbons to improve the properties of petroleum base oils. Quantitative 1H and 13C NMR data has been used to generate average structural profile for a variety of base oil sam...

  3. NMR Studies of Heat-Induced Transitions in Structure and Cation Binding Environments of a Strontium-Saturated Swelling Mica

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Davis, Michael C.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2007-12-03

    In this work we combined Al, Si, F, and Na magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to characterize the structure and interlayer cation environments in a strontium-saturated member of the swelling mica family before and after a heat induced collapse of the interlayer space.

  4. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  5. Insights into hERG K+ channel structure and function from NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chai Ann; Torres, Allan M; Pagès, Guilhem; Kuchel, Philip W; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2013-01-01

    The unique gating kinetics of hERG K(+) channels are critical for normal cardiac repolarization, and patients with mutations in hERG have a markedly increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. HERG K(+) channels are also remarkably promiscuous with respect to drug binding, which has been a very significant problem for the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we review the progress that has been made in understanding the structure and function of hERG K(+) channels with a particular focus on nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the domains of the hERG K(+) channel. PMID:22552870

  6. Real structure of formamide entrapped by AOT nonaqueous reverse micelles: FT-IR and 1H NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Correa, N Mariano; Pires, Paulo Augusto R; Silber, Juana J; El Seoud, Omar A

    2005-11-10

    Noninvasive techniques such as FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the solubilization of formamide, FA, and its aqueous solution, FA-water, by sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate, AOT, in heptane or isooctane reverse micelles, respectively. Partially deuterated FA (FADH) was used in the FT-IR experiments and nu(OD), n(ND) were analyzed. Also, the nu(C=O) band of FA was investigated. For AOT, the changes of the SO(3)(-) group's symmetric, nu(s), and asymmetric, nu(a), bands were also studied. The results are showing that FA is interacting strongly with the Na+ counterions of the surfactant through electrostatic interactions maintaining their hydrogen bond network present in the FA bulk. Accordingly, partially deuterated FA is "frozen" inside the aggregates and it is possible to detect, by FT-IR technique, the cis and trans isomers. Curve fitting of the nu(OD) (in the FA-water mixture) band requires use of two peaks because the band is asymmetric, not because the solubilizate molecules are present in layers of different structure. The chemical shifts of the (1)H bound to N and C of FA were studied by (1)H NMR. The comparison of the chemical shift of AOT in reverse micelles with FA and the FA-water mixture in the polar core of the aggregate shows that there is a strong preferential solvation of Na+ by FA (through electrostatic interaction) and the AOT's sulfonate group by water (through hydrogen bond interaction). PMID:16853748

  7. sup 19 F NMR studies of the D-galactose chemosensory receptor. (1) Sugar binding yields a global structural change

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, L.A.; Falke, J.J. )

    1991-04-30

    The Escherichia coli D-galactose and D-glucose receptor is an aqueous sugar-binding protein and the first component in the distinct chemosensory and transport pathways for these sugars. Activation of the receptor occurs when the sugar binds and induces a conformational change, which in turn enable docking to specific membrane proteins. Only the structure of the activated receptor containing bound D-glucose is known. To investigate the sugar-induced structural change, the authors have used {sup 19}F NMR to probe 12 sites widely distributed in the receptor molecule. Five sites are tryptophan positions probed by incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan; the resulting {sup 19}F NMR resonances were assigned by site-directed mutagenesis. The other seven sites are phenylalanine positions probed by incorporation of 3-fluorophenylaline. Sugar binding to the substrate binding cleft was observed to trigger a global structural change detected via {sup 19}F NMR frequency shifts at 10 of the 12 labeled sites. The results are consistent with a model in which multiple secondary structural elements, known to extend between the substrate cleft and the protein surface, undergo shifts in their average positions upon sugar binding to the cleft. Such structural coupling provides a mechanism by which sugar binding to the substrate cleft can cause structural changes at one or more docking sites on the receptor surface.

  8. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Anita I.; Mayer, Michael R.; Prestegard, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3′ in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1′ in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C–13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution. PMID:16254075

  9. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  10. Improving dipolar recoupling for site-specific structural and dynamics studies in biosolids NMR: windowed RN-symmetry sequences.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingyu; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Manman; Vega, Alexander J; Hou, Guangjin; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-02-01

    Experimental characterization of one-bond heteronuclear dipolar couplings is essential for structural and dynamics characterization of molecules by solid-state NMR. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar tensor parameters in magic-angle spinning NMR requires that the recoupling sequences efficiently reintroduce the desired heteronuclear dipolar coupling term, fully suppress other interactions (such as chemical shift anisotropy and homonuclear dipolar couplings), and be insensitive to experimental imperfections, such as radio frequency (rf) field mismatch. In this study, we demonstrate that the introduction of window delays into the basic elements of a phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequence results in a greatly improved protocol, termed windowed PARS (wPARS), which yields clean dipolar lineshapes that are unaffected by other spin interactions and are largely insensitive to experimental imperfections. Higher dipolar scaling factors can be attained in this technique with respect to PARS, which is particularly useful for the measurement of relatively small dipolar couplings. The advantages of wPARS are verified experimentally on model molecules N-acetyl-valine (NAV) and a tripeptide Met-Leu-Phe (MLF). The incorporation of wPARS into 3D heteronuclear or homonuclear correlation experiments permits accurate site-specific determination of dipolar tensors in proteins, as demonstrated on dynein light chain 8 (LC8). Through 3D wPARS recoupling based spectroscopy we have determined both backbone and side chain dipolar tensors in LC8 in a residue-resolved manner. We discuss these in the context of conformational dynamics of LC8. We have addressed the effect of paramagnetic relaxant Cu(ii)-EDTA doping on the dipolar coupling parameters in LC8 and observed no significant differences with respect to the neat sample permitting fast data collection. Our results indicate that wPARS is advantageous with respect to the windowless version of the sequence and is applicable

  11. Genetically unstable CXG repeats are structurally dynamic and have a high propensity for folding. An NMR and UV spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M; Huang, X; Smith, G K; Yang, X; Gao, X

    1996-11-29

    Recent molecular genetics studies have revealed a correlation between spontaneous, progressive expansion of several DNA trinucleotide repeats and certain hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. Triplet repeat (TR) sequences may be present in structured forms that can mediate the processes interrupting normal cellular replication, transcription, or repair activities, eventually leading to gene mutation. Using high resolution NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods, we probed the solution structures and properties of single-stranded TR sequences. These studies have led to the discovery of a new duplex motif (e-motif), present in CCG repeats, and to the elucidation of the structure of the (CTG)3 duplex. In this paper we provide a global picture of the solution behavior of the human disease-related CXG (X = A, C, G, or T) and the comparison GXC (X = A, or T) TR sequences. All six triplet repeats form antiparallel duplexes. The mismatched bases in CAG and CGG repeat duplexes are rather flexible and they do not appear to form stable, paired conformations. By comparison, GAC repeat duplexes and their mismatched A residues are well-structured. Most interestingly, the structures of the disease-related CXG repeats exhibit a propensity for folding at chain lengths as short as 12 residues. Furthermore, the energy barrier for the formation of homo-duplexes from the corresponding complementary hetero-duplexes are much lower for the CXG TR sequences than for the GAC or GTC TR sequences. These results provide insights into the conformation and physiochemical properties of TR sequences. Thus, a basis is provided for further studies of the behavior of long TR sequences in an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of in vivo expansion and function of TR sequences. PMID:8951379

  12. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  13. Structural Requirements for Bisphosphonate Binding on Hydroxyapatite: NMR Study of Bisphosphonate Partial Esters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen different bisphosphonates, including four clinically used bisphosphonate acids and their phosphoesters, were studied to evaluate how the bisphosphonate structure affects binding to bone. Bisphosphonates with weak bone affinity, such as clodronate, could not bind to hydroxyapatite after the addition of one ester group. Medronate retained its ability to bind after the addition of one ester group, and hydroxy-bisphosphonates could bind even after the addition of two ester groups. Thus, several bisphosphonate esters are clearly bone binding compounds. The following conclusions about bisphosphonate binding emerge: (1) a hydroxyl group in the geminal carbon takes part in the binding process and increases the bisphosphonate’s ability to bind to bone; (2) the bisphosphonate’s ability to bind decreases when the amount of ester groups increases; and (3) the location of the ester groups affects the bisphosphonate’s binding ability. PMID:25893039

  14. Two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies on HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus: Complete sequential assignments and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbitzer, H.R.; Neidig, K.P. ); Hengstenberg, W. )

    1991-11-19

    Complete sequence-specific assignments of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus were obtained by two-dimensional NMR methods. Important secondary structure elements that can be derived from the observed nuclear Overhauser effects are a large antiparallel {beta}-pleated sheet consisting of four strands, A, B, C, D, a segment S{sub AB} consisting of an extended region around the active-center histidine (His-15) and an {alpha}-helix, a half-turn between strands B and C, a segment S{sub CD} which shows no typical secondary structure, and the {alpha}-helical, C-terminal segment S{sub term}. These general structural features are similar to those found earlier in HPr proteins from different microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptococcus faecalis.

  15. Study of electrostatic potential surface distribution of wild-type plastocyanin Synechocystis solution structure determined by homonuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Daniel; Celda, Bernardo

    2003-10-01

    Plastocyanin is a small (approximately 10 kDa), type I blue copper protein that works as an electron donor to photosystem I from cytochrome f in both chloroplast systems and in some strains of cyanobacteria. Comparative studies of the kinetic mechanisms of plastocyanins in different organisms show that the electron transfer from photosystem I happens by simple collision in cyanobacteria but through a intermediate transition complex in green algae and superior plants. Previous work has proved that this effect cannot be explained by structural variations across the different plastocyanins but it can be explained by differences in the electrostatic potential distribution at the protein surface. In that case, minor conformational errors at the amino acid side chain level may imply an important effect in the electrostatic potential distribution calculation. In this work we present a high resolution study of side chain conformation by homonuclear NMR for the reduced wild-type plastocyanin Synechocystis using intensity ratios for 2D-NOESY and 2D-H,H-TOCSY cross peaks at different mixing times. We also present the corresponding comparison with different plastocyanin structures and the effect in the electrostatic potential distribution at the protein surface. We discuss the importance of indirect J-coupling information from TOCSY-type experiments as complement for intraresidue distances derived from NOESY experiments in the determination of side chain orientation and stereo-specific assignments. PMID:14517909

  16. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  17. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  18. Structural studies of the 5'-phenazinium-tethered matched and G-A-mismatched DNA duplexes by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, T; Sandström, A; Ivanova, I M; Sergeyev, D S; Zarytova, V F; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1993-05-01

    The mechanism through which modified oligo-DNA analogues act as antisense repressors at the transcriptional and translational level of gene expression is based on the information content in the nucleotide sequence which is determined by the specific base pairing. The efficiency of such action is largely determined by the stability of the duplex formed between the oligonucleotide reagent and the target sequence and also by the mismatched base pairing, such as G-A, that occurs during replication or recombination. We herein report that the phenazinium (Pzn)-tethered matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(CCAAACA)) (III) (Tm = 50 degrees C) has a much larger stability than the parent matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(CCAAACA)) (I) (Tm = 30 degrees C). On the other hand, the Pzn-tethered G-A-mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(ACAAACA)) (IV) (Tm = 34 degrees C) is only slightly more stable than its parent mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(ACAAACA)) (Tm = 25 degrees C). A detailed 500 MHz NMR study and constrained MD refinements of NMR-derived structures have been undertaken for the DNA duplexes (I), (II), (III) and (IV) in order to understand the structural basis of stabilization of Pzn-tethered matched DNA duplex (delta Tm = 20 degrees C) compared to mismatched duplex (delta Tm = 9 degrees C). Assignment of the 1H-NMR (500 MHz) spectra of the duplexes has been carried out by 2D NOESY, HOHAHA and DQF-COSY experiments. The torsion angles have been extracted from the J-coupling constants obtained by simulation of most of the DQF-COSY cross-peaks using program SMART. The solution structure of the duplexes were assessed by an iterative hybride relaxation matrix method (MORASS) combined with NOESY distances and torsion angles restrained molecular dynamics (MD) using program Amber 4.0. The standard Amber 4.0 force-field parameters were used for the oligonucleotide in conjunction with the new parameters for Pzn residue which was obtained by full geometry

  19. Broadband cross-polarization-based heteronuclear dipolar recoupling for structural and dynamic NMR studies of rigid and soft solids.

    PubMed

    Kharkov, B B; Chizhik, V I; Dvinskikh, S V

    2016-01-21

    Dipolar recoupling is an essential part of current solid-state NMR methodology for probing atomic-resolution structure and dynamics in solids and soft matter. Recently described magic-echo amplitude- and phase-modulated cross-polarization heteronuclear recoupling strategy aims at efficient and robust recoupling in the entire range of coupling constants both in rigid and highly dynamic molecules. In the present study, the properties of this recoupling technique are investigated by theoretical analysis, spin-dynamics simulation, and experimentally. The resonance conditions and the efficiency of suppressing the rf field errors are examined and compared to those for other recoupling sequences based on similar principles. The experimental data obtained in a variety of rigid and soft solids illustrate the scope of the method and corroborate the results of analytical and numerical calculations. The technique benefits from the dipolar resolution over a wider range of coupling constants compared to that in other state-of-the-art methods and thus is advantageous in studies of complex solids with a broad range of dynamic processes and molecular mobility degrees. PMID:26801025

  20. NMR Studies of Structure-Reactivity Relationships in Carbonyl Reduction: A Collaborative Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marincean, Simona; Smith, Sheila R.; Fritz, Michael; Lee, Byung Joo; Rizk, Zeinab

    2012-01-01

    An upper-division laboratory project has been developed as a collaborative investigation of a reaction routinely taught in organic chemistry courses: the reduction of carbonyl compounds by borohydride reagents. Determination of several trends regarding structure-activity relationship was possible because each student contributed his or her results…

  1. 13C, 2h NMR studies of structural and dynamical modifications of glucose-exposed porcine aortic elastin.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Moshe C; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S

    2015-04-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin-a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. (13)C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the (13)C-(1)H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The (13)C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive

  2. 13C, 2H NMR Studies of Structural and Dynamical Modifications of Glucose-Exposed Porcine Aortic Elastin

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Moshe C.; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W.; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin—a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. 13C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the 13C-1H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The 13C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive force

  3. Study of molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and NMR spectra of oncocalyxone A using DFT and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Honorato, Sara Braga; Tandon, Poonam; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Oncocalyxone A (C17H18O5) is the major secondary metabolite isolated from ethanol extract from the heartwood of Auxemma oncocalyx Taub popularly known as “pau branco”. Oncocalyxone A (Onco A) has many pharmaceutical uses such as: antitumor, analgesic, antioxidant and causative of inhibition of platelet activation. We have performed the optimized geometry, total energy, conformational study, molecular electrostatic potential mapping, frontier orbital energy gap and vibrational frequencies of Onco A employing ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and/or charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded in DMSO and MeOH solvent. The TD-DFT calculations have been performed to explore the influence of electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase, as well as in solution environment using IEF-PCM and 6-31G basis set. The 13C NMR chemical shifts have been calculated with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) basis set and compared with the experimental values. These methods have been used as tools for structural characterization of Onco A.

  4. Structural studies of the exopolysaccharide from Lactobacillus plantarum C88 using NMR spectroscopy and the program CASPER.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Li, Shengyu; Yang, Zhennai; Widmalm, Göran

    2015-01-30

    Some lactic acid bacteria, such as those of the Lactobacillus genus, have the ability to produce exopolysaccharides (EPSs) that confer favorable physicochemical properties to food and/or beneficial physiological effects on human health. In particular, the EPS of Lactobacillus plantarum C88 has recently demonstrated in vitro antioxidant activity and, herein, its structure has been investigated using NMR spectroscopy and the computer program CASPER (Computer Assisted Spectrum Evaluation of Regular polysaccharides). The pentasaccharide repeating unit of the O-deacetylated EPS consists of a trisaccharide backbone, →4)-α-D-Galp-(1→2)-α-D-Glcp-(1→3)-β-D-Glcp-(1→, with terminal D-Glc and D-Gal residues (1.0 and 0.8 equiv per repeating unit, respectively) extending from O3 and O6, respectively, of the →4)-α-D-Galp-(1→ residue. In the native EPS an O-acetyl group is present, 0.85 equiv per repeating unit, at O2 of the α-linked galactose residue; thus the repeating unit of the EPS has the following structure: →4)[β-D-Glcp-(1→3)][β-D-Galp-(1→6)]α-D-Galp2Ac-(1→2)-α-D-Glcp-(1→3)-β-D-Glcp-(1→. These structural features, and the chain length (∼10(3) repeating units on average, determined in a previous study), are expected to play an important role in defining the physicochemical properties of the polymer. PMID:25497338

  5. Use of solid-state 13C NMR in structural studies of humic acids and humin from Holocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; VanderHart, D.L.; Earl, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of solid humic substances in Holocene sediments have been obtained using cross polarization with magic-angle sample spinning techniques. The results demonstrate that this technique holds great promise for structural characterizations of complex macromolecular substances such as humin and humic acids. Quantifiable distinctions can be made between structural features of aquatic and terrestrial humic substances. The aliphatic carbons of the humic substances are dominant components suggestive of input from lipid-like materials. An interesting resemblance is also noted between terrestrial humic acid and humin spectra. ?? 1980.

  6. NMR studies on the structure and dynamics of lac operator DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate the relationships between structure, dynamics and function of the gene regulatory sequence corresponding to the lactose operon operator of Escherichia coli. The length of the DNA fragments examined varied from 13 to 36 base pair, containing all or part of the operator sequence. These DNA fragments are either derived genetically or synthesized chemically. Resonances of the imino protons were assigned by one dimensional inter-base pair nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) measurements. Imino proton exchange rates were measured by saturation recovery methods. Results from the kinetic measurements show an interesting dynamic heterogeneity with a maximum opening rate centered about a GTG/CAC sequence which correlates with the biological function of the operator DNA. This particular three base pair sequence occurs frequently and often symmetrically in prokaryotic nd eukaryotic DNA sites where one anticipates specific protein interaction for gene regulation. The observed sequence dependent imino proton exchange rate may be a reflection of variation of the local structure of regulatory DNA. The results also indicate that the observed imino proton exchange rates are length dependent.

  7. Photoisomerization and structural dynamics of two nitrosylruthenium complexes: a joint study by NMR and nonlinear IR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianru; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Pengyun; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-11-21

    In this work, the photoisomerization and structural dynamics of two isomeric nitrosylruthenium(ii) complexes [Ru(OAc)(2cqn)2NO] (H2cqn = 2-chloro-8-quinolinol) in CDCl3 and DMSO are examined using NMR and IR spectroscopic methods. The two N atoms in the 2cqn ligand are in trans position in the synthesized cis-1 isomer, while they are in cis position in the cis-2 isomer. Kinetics monitored by NMR spectroscopy shows that the rate constant of photoisomerization from cis-2 to cis-1 isomer depends on the wavelength of irradiation and solvent polarity; it proceeds faster on irradiating near the absorption peak in the UV-Vis region, and also in more polar solvents (DMSO). Density functional theory computation indicates that the peculiarity of [Ru(ii)-NO(+)] group affects the structure and reactivity of the nitrosylruthenium complexes. Using the nitrosyl stretching (νNO) to be vibrational probe, the structural dynamics and structural distributions of the cis-1 and cis-2 isomers are examined by steady-state linear infrared and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopies. The structural and photochemical aspects of the observed spectroscopic parameters are discussed in terms of solute-solvent interactions for the two nitrosylruthenium complexes. PMID:25285659

  8. Molecular structure of actein: 13C CPMAS NMR, IR, X-ray diffraction studies and theoretical DFT-GIAO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Bąk, Joanna; Gliński, Jan A.; Koczorowska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Iwona

    2009-09-01

    Actein is a prominent triterpene glycoside occurring in Actaea racemosa. The triterpene glycosides are believed to be responsible for the estrogenic activity of an extract prepared from this herb. We determined in the crystal structure of actein by X-ray crystallography to be monoclinic P2(1) chiral space group. Refining the disorder, we determined 70% and 30% of contributions of ( S)- and ( R)-actein, respectively. The IR and Raman spectra suggest that actein forms at least four different types of hydrogen bonds. The 13C NMR spectra of actein were recorded both in solution and solid state. The 13C CPMAS spectrum of actein displays multiplet signals, in agreement with the crystallographic data. The NMR shielding constants were calculated for actein using GIAO approach and a variety of basis sets: 6-31G**, 6-311G**, 6-31+G**, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVDZ-su1 and 6-31G**-su1, as well as IGLO approach combined with the IGLO II basis set. The best results (RMSD of 1.6 ppm and maximum error of 3.4 ppm) were obtained with the 6-31G**-su1 basis set. The calculations of the shielding constants are helpful in the interpretation of the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of actein and actein's analogues.

  9. DFT study of molecular structures and 13C NMR parameters of two fluorinated biphenyls and their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryff-Keller, Adam; Szczeciński, Przemysław

    2015-07-01

    The molecular structures of 2,2‧-difluoro-6,6‧-dimethylbiphenyl, 4,5-difluoro-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and of their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes have been discussed in the light of the results of molecular energy calculations. Also the isotropic magnetic shielding constants and carbon-fluorine spin-spin coupling constants for these objects have been calculated and compared with the experimental values of 13C NMR chemical shifts and J constants. The calculational methods used were: DFT/BHandH/6-311++G(2d,p) and/or DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p). It has been confirmed that experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts for η6-arene tricarbonylchromium complexes can be satisfactorily predicted using both methods, although the method exploiting BHandH functional is not able to reproduce the 13C NMR chemical shifts of Cr(CO)3 carbon atoms. On the other hand, this method provides the J(13C, 19F) values which are close to the experimental ones.

  10. Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Brown, Heather M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Holladay, John E.

    2007-03-21

    Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining macrofibrils studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) under various magnifications. The crystal region (microfibril bundles) in the macrofibrils was not altered by hydrolysis, and only amorphous cellulose was hydrolyzed and leached out from the macrofibrils. The diameter of microfibril bundles was 20-30 nm after the amorphous cellulose was removed by hydrolysis. XRD experiments confirm the unaltered diameter of the microfibrils after hydrolysis. The strong stability of these microfibril bundles in hydrolysis limits both the total sugar monomer yield and the size of nano particles or rods produced in hydrolysis. The large surface potential on the remaining microfibril bundles drives the agglomeration of macrofibrils.

  11. An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ribo; Du Qishi Wang Chenghua; Chou, K.-C.

    2008-12-26

    The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

  12. Double threading through DNA: NMR structural study of a bis-naphthalene macrocycle bound to a thymine–thymine mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Muriel; Granzhan, Anton; Guillot, Regis; Dumy, Pascal; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2012-01-01

    The macrocyclic bis-naphthalene macrocycle (2,7-BisNP), belonging to the cyclobisintercalator family of DNA ligands, recognizes T–T mismatch sites in duplex DNA with high affinity and selectivity, as evidenced by thermal denaturation experiments and NMR titrations. The binding of this macrocycle to an 11-mer DNA oligonucleotide containing a T–T mismatch was studied using NMR spectroscopy and NMR-restrained molecular modeling. The ligand forms a single type of complex with the DNA, in which one of the naphthalene rings of the ligand occupies the place of one of the mismatched thymines, which is flipped out of the duplex. The second naphthalene unit of the ligand intercalates at the A-T base pair flanking the mismatch site, leading to encapsulation of its thymine residue via double stacking. The polyammonium linking chains of the macrocycle are located in the minor and the major grooves of the oligonucleotide and participate in the stabilization of the complex by formation of hydrogen bonds with the encapsulated thymine base and the mismatched thymine remaining inside the helix. The study highlights the uniqueness of this cyclobisintercalation binding mode and its importance for recognition of DNA lesion sites by small molecules. PMID:22362757

  13. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  14. Structure of hydrous aluminosilicate glasses along the diopside anorthite join: A comprehensive one- and two-dimensional 1H and 27Al NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xianyu; Kanzaki, Masami

    2008-05-01

    We have taken a systematic approach utilizing advanced solid-state NMR techniques to gain new insights into the controversial issue concerning the dissolution mechanisms of water in aluminosilicate melts (glasses). A series of quenched anhydrous and hydrous (˜2 wt% H 2O) glass samples along the diopside (Di, CaMgSi 2O 6)—anorthite (An, CaAl 2Si 2O 8) join with varying An components (0, 20, 38, 60, 80, and 100 mol %) have been studied. A variety of NMR techniques, including one-dimensional (1D) 1H and 27Al MAS NMR, and 27Al → 1H cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, as well as two-dimensional (2D) 1H double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR, 27Al triple-quantum (3Q) MAS NMR, and 27Al → 1H heteronuclear correlation NMR (HETCOR) and 3QMAS/HETCOR NMR, have been applied. These data revealed the presence of SiOH, free OH ((Ca,Mg)OH) and AlOH species in the hydrous glasses, with the last mostly interconnected with Si and residing in the more polymerized parts of the structure. Thus, there are no fundamental differences in water dissolution mechanisms for Al-free and Al-bearing silicate melts (glasses), both involving two competing processes: the formation of SiOH/AlOH that is accompanied by the depolymerization of the network structure, and the formation of free OH that has an opposite effect. The latter is more important for depolymerized compositions corresponding to mafic and ultramafic magmas. Aluminum is dominantly present in four coordination (Al IV), but a small amount of five-coordinate Al (Al V) is also observed in all the anhydrous and hydrous glasses. Furthermore, six-coordinate Al (Al VI) is also present in most of the hydrous glasses. As Al of higher coordinations are favored by high pressure, Al VIOH and Al VOH may become major water species at higher pressures corresponding to those of the Earth's mantle.

  15. Solution NMR studies provide structural basis for endotoxin pattern recognition by the innate immune receptor CD14

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Seth; Chen Bin; Holbrook, Kristen; Jain, Nitin U.

    2008-04-04

    CD14 functions as a key pattern recognition receptor for a diverse array of Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell-wall components in the host innate immune response by binding to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) at partially overlapping binding site(s). To determine the potential contribution of CD14 residues in this pattern recognition, we have examined using solution NMR spectroscopy, the binding of three different endotoxin ligands, lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and a PGN-derived compound, muramyl dipeptide to a {sup 15}N isotopically labeled 152-residue N-terminal fragment of sCD14 expressed in Pichia pastoris. Mapping of NMR spectral changes upon addition of ligands revealed that the pattern of residues affected by binding of each ligand is partially similar and partially different. This first direct structural observation of the ability of specific residue combinations of CD14 to differentially affect endotoxin binding may help explain the broad specificity of CD14 in ligand recognition and provide a structural basis for pattern recognition. Another interesting finding from the observed spectral changes is that the mode of binding may be dynamically modulated and could provide a mechanism for binding endotoxins with structural diversity through a common binding site.

  16. γ-(S)-Trifluoromethyl proline: evaluation as a structural substitute of proline for solid state (19)F-NMR peptide studies.

    PubMed

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Budisa, Nediljko; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-03-21

    γ-(4S)-Trifluoromethyl proline was synthesised according to a modified literature protocol with improved yield on a multigram scale. Conformational properties of the amide bond formed by the amino acid were characterised using N-acetyl methyl ester model. The amide populations (s-trans vs. s-cis) and thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization were found to be similar to the corresponding values for intact proline. Therefore, the γ-trifluoromethyl proline was suggested as a structurally low-disturbing proline substitution in peptides for their structural studies by (19)F-NMR. Indeed, the exchange of native proline for γ-trifluoromethyl proline in the peptide antibiotic gramicidin S was shown to preserve the overall amphipathic peptide structure. The utility of the amino acid as a selective (19)F-NMR label was demonstrated by observing the re-alignment of the labelled gramicidin S in oriented lipid bilayers. PMID:25703116

  17. Overview on the use of NMR to examine protein structure.

    PubMed

    Breukels, Vincent; Konijnenberg, Albert; Nabuurs, Sanne M; Doreleijers, Jurgen F; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Vuister, Geerten W

    2011-04-01

    Any protein structure determination process contains several steps, starting from obtaining a suitable sample, then moving on to acquiring data and spectral assignment, and lastly to the final steps of structure determination and validation. This unit describes all of these steps, starting with the basic physical principles behind NMR and some of the most commonly measured and observed phenomena such as chemical shift, scalar and residual coupling, and the nuclear Overhauser effect. Then, in somewhat more detail, the process of spectral assignment and structure elucidation is explained. Furthermore, the use of NMR to study protein-ligand interaction, protein dynamics, or protein folding is described. PMID:21488042

  18. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  19. NMR structural studies of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmpX in oriented lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Franzin, Carla M.; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The β-barrels found in the outer membranes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms constitute an important functional class of proteins. Here we present solid-state NMR spectra of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmpX in oriented lipid bilayer membranes. We show that OmpX is folded in both glass-supported oriented lipid bilayers and in lipid bicelles that can be magnetically oriented with the membrane plane parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. The presence of resolved peaks in these spectra demonstrates that OmpX undergoes rotational diffusion around an axis perpendicular to the membrane surface. A tightly hydrogen-bonded domain of OmpX resists exchange with D2O for days and is assigned to the transmembrane β-barrel, while peaks at isotropic resonance frequencies that disappear rapidly in D2O are assigned to the extracellular and periplasmic loops. The two-dimensional 1H/15N separated local field spectra of OmpX have several resolved peaks, and agree well with the spectra calculated from the crystal structure of OmpX rotated with the barrel axis nearly parallel (5° tilt) to the direction of the magnetic field. The data indicate that it will be possible to obtain site-specific resonance assignments and to determine the structure, tilt, and rotation of OmpX in membranes using the solid-state NMR methods that are currently being applied to α-helical membrane proteins. PMID:17916325

  20. Structural studies of an arabinan from the stems of Ephedra sinica by methylation analysis and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-You; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-05-01

    Plant arabinan has important biological activity. In this study, a water-soluble arabinan (Mw∼6.15kDa) isolated from the stems of Ephedra sinica was found to consist of (1→5)-Araƒ, (1→3,5)-Araƒ, T-Araƒ, (1→3)-Araƒ and (1→2,5)-Araƒ residues at proportions of 10:2:3:2:1. A tentative structure was proposed by methylation analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY) and literature. The structure proposed includes a branched (1→5)-α-Araf backbone where branching occurs at the O-2 and O-3 positions of the residues with 7.7% and 15.4% of the 1,5-linked α-Araf substituted at the O-2 and O-3 positions. The presence of a branched structure was further observed by atomic force microscopy. This polymer was characterized as having a much longer linear (1→5)-α-Araf backbone as a repeating unit. In particular, the presence of α-Araf→3)-α-Araf-(1→3)-α-Araf-(1→ attached at the O-2 is a new finding. This study may facilitate a deeper understanding of structure-activity relationships of biological polysaccharides from the stems of E. sinica. PMID:25659720

  1. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  2. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  3. Effects of decreased pH on membrane structural organization of Escherichia coli grown in different fatty acid-supplemented media: a 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Ianzini, F; Guidoni, L; Simone, G; Viti, V; Yatvin, M B

    1990-04-01

    Total membranes from Escherichia coli cells grown in different fatty acid-supplemented media have been examined by 31P NMR at different pH values. The isolated inner and outer membranes were also studied and compared to the liposomes formed with the corresponding extracted lipids. While the liposomes show structures that are correlated with lipid composition, degree of fatty acid unsaturation, and pH, the membrane structure is mainly bilayer. The presence of two bilayer phases characterized by different chemical shift anisotropy values (delta nu csa) is detectable at neutral pH; a perturbation of the bilayer phase characterized by the smallest delta nu csa is produced by low pH. Moreover, an isotropic peak is always present in the membrane NMR spectra: its attribution to cardiolipin molecules is discussed on the basis of digestion experiments with phospholipase C. PMID:2181934

  4. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  5. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis C104: A 600-MHz NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-09-03

    Specific lectin-carbohydrate interactions between certain oral streptococci and actinomyces contribute to the microbial colonization of teeth. The receptor molecules of Streptococcus oralis, 34, ATCC 10557, and Streptococcus mitis J22 for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii are antigenically distinct polysaccharides, each formed by a different phosphodiester-linked oligosaccharide repeating unit. Receptor polysaccharide was isolated form S. oralis C104 cells and was shown to contain galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, ribitol, and phosphate with molar ratios of 4:1:1:1. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the polysaccharide shows that it contains a repeating structure. The individual sugars in the repeating unit were identified by {sup 1}H coupling constants observed in E-COSY and DQF-COSY spectra. NMR methods included complete resonance assignments ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) by various homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation experiments that utilize scalar couplings. Sequence and linkage assignments were obtained from the heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectrum. This analysis shows that the receptor polysaccharide of S. oralis C104 is a ribitol teichoic acid polymer composed of a linear hexasaccharide repeating unit containing two residues each of galactopyranose and galactofuranose and a residue each of GalNAc and ribitol joined end to end by phosphodiester linkages.

  6. Investigation of structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of oxycodone and naltrexone: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakol, Hossein; Esfandyari, Maryam; Taheri, Salman; Heydari, Akbar

    2011-08-01

    In this work, two important opioid antagonists, naltrexone and oxycodone, were prepared from thebaine and were characterized by IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, computational NMR and IR parameters were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Complete NMR and vibrational assignment were carried out using the observed and calculated spectra. The IR frequencies and NMR chemical shifts, determined experimentally, were compared with those obtained theoretically from DFT calculations, showed good agreements. The RMS errors observed between experimental and calculated data for the IR absorptions are 85 and 105 cm -1, for the 1H NMR peaks are 0.87 and 0.17 ppm and for those of 13C NMR are 5.6 and 5.3 ppm, respectively for naltrexone and oxycodone.

  7. NMR-spectroscopic analysis of mixtures: from structure to function

    PubMed Central

    Forseth, Ry R.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy as a particularly information-rich method offers unique opportunities for improving the structural and functional characterization of metabolomes, which will be essential for advancing the understanding of many biological processes. Whereas traditionally NMR spectroscopy was mostly relegated to the characterization of pure compounds, the last few years have seen a surge of interest in using NMR spectroscopic techniques for characterizing complex metabolite mixtures. Development of new methods was motivated partly by the realization that using NMR for the analysis of metabolite mixtures can help identify otherwise inaccessible small molecules, for example compounds that are prone to chemical decomposition and thus cannot be isolated. Furthermore, comparative metabolomics and statistical analyses of NMR-spectra have proven highly effective at identifying novel and known metabolites that correlate with changes in genotype or phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of the range of NMR spectroscopic techniques recently developed for characterizing metabolite mixtures, including methods used in discovery-oriented natural product chemistry, in the study of metabolite biosynthesis and function, or for comparative analyses of entire metabolomes. PMID:21071261

  8. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  9. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  10. NMR structure improvement: A structural bioinformatics & visualization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Jeremy N.

    The overall goal of this project is to enhance the physical accuracy of individual models in macromolecular NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) structures and the realism of variation within NMR ensembles of models, while improving agreement with the experimental data. A secondary overall goal is to combine synergistically the best aspects of NMR and crystallographic methodologies to better illuminate the underlying joint molecular reality. This is accomplished by using the powerful method of all-atom contact analysis (describing detailed sterics between atoms, including hydrogens); new graphical representations and interactive tools in 3D and virtual reality; and structural bioinformatics approaches to the expanded and enhanced data now available. The resulting better descriptions of macromolecular structure and its dynamic variation enhances the effectiveness of the many biomedical applications that depend on detailed molecular structure, such as mutational analysis, homology modeling, molecular simulations, protein design, and drug design.

  11. Atomic resolution structure of a protein prepared by non-enzymatic His-tag removal. Crystallographic and NMR study of GmSPI-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Edyta; Bal, Wojciech; Lenarčič Živkovič, Martina; Dvornyk, Angela; Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Grzelak, Krystyna; Zhukov, Igor; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Krzywda, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    Purification of suitable quantity of homogenous protein is very often the bottleneck in protein structural studies. Overexpression of a desired gene and attachment of enzymatically cleavable affinity tags to the protein of interest made a breakthrough in this field. Here we describe the structure of Galleria mellonella silk proteinase inhibitor 2 (GmSPI-2) determined both by X-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy methods. GmSPI-2 was purified using a new method consisting in non-enzymatic His-tag removal based on a highly specific peptide bond cleavage reaction assisted by Ni(II) ions. The X-ray crystal structure of GmSPI-2 was refined against diffraction data extending to 0.98 Å resolution measured at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Anisotropic refinement with the removal of stereochemical restraints for the well-ordered parts of the structure converged with R factor of 10.57% and Rfree of 12.91%. The 3D structure of GmSPI-2 protein in solution was solved on the basis of 503 distance constraints, 10 hydrogen bonds and 26 torsion angle restraints. It exhibits good geometry and side-chain packing parameters. The models of the protein structure obtained by X-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy are very similar to each other and reveal the same β2αβ fold characteristic for Kazal-family serine proteinase inhibitors. PMID:25233114

  12. Atomic Resolution Structure of a Protein Prepared by Non-Enzymatic His-Tag Removal. Crystallographic and NMR Study of GmSPI-2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Edyta; Bal, Wojciech; Lenarčič Živkovič, Martina; Dvornyk, Angela; Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Grzelak, Krystyna; Zhukov, Igor; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Krzywda, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    Purification of suitable quantity of homogenous protein is very often the bottleneck in protein structural studies. Overexpression of a desired gene and attachment of enzymatically cleavable affinity tags to the protein of interest made a breakthrough in this field. Here we describe the structure of Galleria mellonella silk proteinase inhibitor 2 (GmSPI-2) determined both by X-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy methods. GmSPI-2 was purified using a new method consisting in non-enzymatic His-tag removal based on a highly specific peptide bond cleavage reaction assisted by Ni(II) ions. The X-ray crystal structure of GmSPI-2 was refined against diffraction data extending to 0.98 Å resolution measured at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Anisotropic refinement with the removal of stereochemical restraints for the well-ordered parts of the structure converged with R factor of 10.57% and Rfree of 12.91%. The 3D structure of GmSPI-2 protein in solution was solved on the basis of 503 distance constraints, 10 hydrogen bonds and 26 torsion angle restraints. It exhibits good geometry and side-chain packing parameters. The models of the protein structure obtained by X-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy are very similar to each other and reveal the same β2αβ fold characteristic for Kazal-family serine proteinase inhibitors. PMID:25233114

  13. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. PMID:25178811

  14. Topological Constraints on Chain-Folding Structure of Semicrystalline Polymer as Studied by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youlee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    Chain-folding process is a prominent feature of long polymer chains during crystallization. Over the last half century, much effort has been paid to reveal the chain trajectory. Even though various chain-folding models as well as theories of crystallization at molecule levels have been proposed, they could be not reconciled due to the limited experimental evidences. Recent development of double quantum NMR with selective isotope labeling identified the chain-trajectory of 13C labeled isotactic poly(1-butene). The systematic experiments covered a wide range of parameters, i.e. kinetics, concentration, and molecular weight (Mw) . It was demonstrated that i) adjacent re-entry site was invariant as a function of crystallization temperature (Tc) , concentration, andMw, ii) long-range order of adjacent re-entry sequence is independence of kinetics at a given concentration while it decreased with increasing the polymer concentration at a given Tc due to the increased interruption between the chains, and iii) high Mw chains led to the multilayer folded structures in single crystals, but the melt state induced the identical short adjacent sequences of long and short polymer over a wide range of Tc due to the entanglements. The behaviors indicated that the topological restriction plays significant roles in the chain-folding process rather than the kinetics. The proposed framework to control the chain-folding structure presents a new perspective into the chain organization by either the intra- or inter-chain interaction. National Science Foundation Grants DMR-1105829 and 1408855.

  15. X-ray and DFT studies of the structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of 2-amino-pyridine betaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Kowalczyk, I.; Koput, J.; Katrusiak, A.

    2005-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen bonding, inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions on the conformation of 2-amino-pyridine betaine hydrochloride (1-carboxymethyl-2-amino-pyridinium chloride), 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(c), in the crystal and its isolated molecules has been studied by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies, and by DFT calculations. In the crystal, the Cl - anion is connected with protonated betaine via hydrogen bond, O-H⋯Cl -= 2.975(2) Å, two N(12)-H⋯Cl - hydrogen bonds and two N(1) H⋯Cl - intermolecular electrostatic interactions. Two minima are located in the potential energy surface at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level, 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(t) and 2-NH 2PB⋯HCl(c), with the latter being 20,7 kcal/mol higher in energy. The optimized bond lengths and angles of 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(t) at B3LYP level of theory are in good agreement with X-ray data, except for the conformation of the COOH group, which is cis ( syn) in the crystal and trans ( anti) in the single molecule. The probable assignments for the anharmonic experimental solid state vibrational spectra of 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(c) and 2-ND 2PBD⋯Cl(c) based on the calculated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) harmonic frequencies have been made. 1H and 13C NMR screening constants for both single molecules have been calculated in the GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach. Linear correlation between the calculated and experimental 1H chemical shifts holds only for cis conformer. The lack of such a correlation for trans conformer indicates that it is absent in D 2O solution.

  16. 99Tc NMR as a promising technique for structural investigation of biomolecules: theoretical studies on the solvent and thermal effects of phenylbenzothiazole complex.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Daiana T; Souza, Eugenio F; Caetano, Melissa S; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2014-04-01

    The phenylbenzothiazole compounds show antitumor properties and are highly selective. In this paper, the (99)Tc chemical shifts based on the ((99m)Tc)(CO)3 (NNO) complex conjugated to the antitumor agent 2-(4'-aminophenyl)benzothiazole are reported. Thermal and solvent effects were studied computationally by quantum-chemical methods, using the density functional theory (DFT) (DFT level BPW91/aug-cc-pVTZ for the Tc and BPW91/IGLO-II for the other atoms) to compute the NMR parameters for the complex. We have calculated the (99)Tc NMR chemical shifts of the complex in gas phase and solution using different solvation models (polarizable continuum model and explicit solvation). To evaluate the thermal effect, molecular dynamics simulations were carried, using the atom-centered density matrix propagation method at the DFT level (BP86/LanL2dz). The results highlight that the (99)Tc NMR spectroscopy can be a promising technique for structural investigation of biomolecules, at the molecular level, in different environments. PMID:24446055

  17. A theoretical study of the stationary structures of the methane surface with special emphasis on NMR properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2010-04-01

    The seven stationary points of the methane hypersurface were first explored concerning geometries and energies to check previous data. On these geometries, absolute 1H and 13C NMR shieldings as well as 1J(CH) and 2J(HH) coupling constants were calculated. The results show important variations in the NMR parameters depending on the stationary point considered. Relationships have been found between the 1H and 13C shieldings and between these NMR parameters and the relative energy of the different species.

  18. NMR study on the structural changes of cytochrome P450cam upon the complex formation with putidaredoxin. Functional significance of the putidaredoxin-induced structural changes.

    PubMed

    Tosha, Takehiko; Yoshioka, Shiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimori, Koichiro; Shimada, Hideo; Morishima, Isao

    2003-10-10

    We investigated putidaredoxin-induced structural changes in carbonmonoxy P450cam by using NMR spectroscopy. The resonance from the beta-proton of the axial cysteine was upfield shifted by 0.12 ppm upon the putidaredoxin binding, indicating that the axial cysteine approaches to the heme-iron by about 0.1 A. The approach of the axial cysteine to the heme-iron would enhance the electronic donation from the axial thiolate to the heme-iron, resulting in the enhanced heterolysis of the dioxygen bond. In addition to the structural perturbation on the axial ligand, the structural changes in the substrate and ligand binding site were observed. The resonances from the 5-exo- and 9-methyl-protons of d-camphor, which were newly identified in this study, were upfield shifted by 1.28 and 0.20 ppm, respectively, implying that d-camphor moves to the heme-iron by 0.15-0.7 A. Based on the radical rebound mechanism, the approach of d-camphor to the heme-iron could promote the oxygen transfer reaction. On the other hand, the downfield shift of the resonance from the gamma-methyl group of Thr-252 reflects the movement of the side chain away from the heme-iron by approximately 0.25 A. Because Thr-252 regulates the heterolysis of the dioxygen bond, the positional rearrangement of Thr-252 might assist the scission of the dioxygen bond. We, therefore, conclude that putidaredoxin induces the specific heme environmental changes of P450cam, which would facilitate the oxygen activation and the oxygen transfer reaction. PMID:12842870

  19. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  20. Comparative NMR study of hybridization effect and structural stability in D022 -type NbAl3 and NbGa3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Su, T. H.; Xie, B. X.; Cheng, C.

    2006-09-01

    With the aim of providing experimental information for the correlation between p-d hybridization and phase stability in the D022 structure, we performed a comparative investigation on NbAl3 and NbGa3 using Nb93 NMR spectroscopy. The quadrupole splittings, Knight shifts, and spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1 ’s) for each individual compound have been identified. The larger quadrupole interaction and higher anisotropic Knight shift have been observed in NbAl3 , indicative of the stronger hybridization effect for this material, as compared with its isostructural compound NbGa3 . Results of experimental T1 together with theoretical band structure calculations provide a measure of d -character Fermi-level density of states Nd(EF) and an indication of orbital weights. In addition, we found evidence that Nd(EF) correlates with the structural stability of the studied materials. Our NMR measurements confirm that NbAl3 is more stable than NbGa3 with respect to the D022 structure, attributed to the stronger p-d hybridization in the former material.

  1. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  2. Synthetic analogues of the histidine-chlorophyll complex: a NMR study to mimic structural features of the photosynthetic reaction center and the light-harvesting complex.

    PubMed

    van Gammeren, Adriaan J; Hulsbergen, Frans B; Erkelens, Cornelis; De Groot, Huub J M

    2004-01-01

    Mg(II)-porphyrin-ligand and (bacterio)chlorophyl-ligand coordination interactions have been studied by solution and solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N coordination shifts due to ring currents, electronic perturbations and structural effects are resolved for imidazole (Im) and 1-methylimidazole (1-MeIm) coordinated axially to Mg(II)-OEP and (B)Chl a. As a consequence of a single axial coordination of Im or 1-MeIm to the Mg(II) ion, 0.9-5.2 ppm (1)H, 0.2-5.5 ppm (13)C and 2.1-27.2 ppm (15)N coordination shifts were measured for selectively labeled [1,3-(15)N]-Im, [1,3-(15)N,2-(13)C]-Im and [1,3-(15)N,1,2-(13)C]-1-MeIm. The coordination shifts depend on the distance of the nuclei to the porphyrin plane and the perturbation of the electronic structure. The signal intensities in the (1)H NMR spectrum reveal a five-coordinated complex, and the isotropic chemical shift analysis shows a close analogy with the electronic structure of the BChl a-histidine in natural light harvesting 2 complexes. The line broadening of the ligand responses support the complementary IR data and provide evidence for a dynamic coordination bond in the complex. PMID:14663650

  3. X-ray, FT-IR, NMR and PM5 structural studies and antibacterial activity of unexpectedly stable salinomycin-benzotriazole intermediate ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczyński, Adam; Janczak, Jan; Antoszczak, Michał; Stefańska, Joanna; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2012-08-01

    The unexpectedly stable benzotriazole ester of salinomycin (SAL-HOBt) - an intermediate product of the amidation reaction of salinomycin has been isolated and structurally characterised (using a single crystal) by X-ray, FT-IR, NMR and semiempirical methods. The results of the X-ray and spectroscopic studies demonstrated that this intermediate ester exist in the solid state and in solution exclusively as the stable O-acyl form. The molecular structure of SAL-HOBt is stabilised by relatively weak intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The PM5 calculation of possible structures of SAL-HOBt has shown that the O-acyl form is more energetically favourable than its N-oxide-N-acyl isomers. The antimicrobial tests show that SAL-HOBt is active against Gram-positive bacteria and clinical isolates methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 1-2 μg/ml).

  4. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  5. Studies on silicon NMR characterization and kinetic modeling of the structural evolution of siloxane-based materials and their applications in drug delivery and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Jyothirmai

    This dissertation presents studies of the synthetic processes and applications of siloxane-based materials. Kinetic investigations of bridged organoalkoxysilanes that are precursors to organic-inorganic hybrid polysilsesquioxanes are a primary focus. Quick gelation despite extensive cyclization is found during the polymerization of bridged silane precursors except for silanes with certain short bridges. This work is an attempt to characterize and understand some of the distinct features of bridged silanes using experimental characterization, kinetic modeling and simulation. In addition to this, the dissertation shows how the properties of siloxane-materials can be engineered for drug delivery and adsorption. The phase behavior of polymerizing mixtures is first investigated to identify the solutions that favor kinetic characterization. Microphase separation is found to cause gradual loss of NMR signal for certain initial compositions. Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer 29Si NMR is employed to identify the products of polymerization of some short-bridged silanes under no signal loss conditions. This technique requires knowing indirect 29Si-1H scalar coupling constants which sometimes cannot be measured due to second-order effects. However, the B3LYP density functional method with 6-31G basis set is found to predict accurate 29Si- 1H coupling constants of organoalkoxysilanes and siloxanes. The scalar coupling constants thus estimated are employed to resolve non-trivial coupled NMR spectra and quantitative kinetic modeling is performed using the DEPT Si NMR transients. In order to investigate the role of the organic bridging group, the structural evolution of bridged and non-bridged silanes are compared using Monte Carlo simulations. Kinetic and simulation models suggest that cyclization plays a key role right from the onset of polymerization for bridged silanes even more than in non-bridged silanes. The simulations indicate that the carbosiloxane

  6. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  7. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN)2Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. F.; Gargouri, M.

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS) hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH3)2(CH2)2]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N) = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z" versus Z') plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3) eV.

  8. Cell-free expression of the APP transmembrane fragments with Alzheimer's disease mutations using algal amino acid mixture for structural NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Urban, Anatoly S; Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    Structural investigations need ready supply of the isotope labeled proteins with inserted mutations n the quantities sufficient for the heteronuclear NMR. Though cell-free expression system has been widely used in the past years, high startup cost and complex compound composition prevent many researches from the developing this technique, especially for membrane protein production. Here we demonstrate the utility of a robust, cost-optimized cell-free expression technique for production of the physiologically important transmembrane fragment of amyloid precursor protein, APP686-726, containing Alzheimer's disease mutations in the juxtamembrane (E693G, Arctic form) and the transmembrane parts (V717G, London form, or L723P, Australian form). The protein cost was optimized by varying the FM/RM ratio as well as the amino acid concentration. We obtained the wild-type and mutant transmembrane fragments in the pellet mode of continuous exchange cell-free system consuming only commercial algal mixture of the (13)C,(15)N-labeled amino acids. Scaling up analytical tests, we achieved milligram quantity yields of isotope labeled wild-type and mutant APP686-726 for structural studies by high resolution NMR spectroscopy in membrane mimicking environment. The described approach has from 5 to 23-fold cost advantage over the bacterial expression methods described earlier and 1.5 times exceeds our previous result obtained with the longer APP671-726WT fragment. PMID:27071311

  9. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  10. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  11. Study of angiotensin-(1-7) vasoactive peptide and its beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: complete sequence-specific NMR assignments and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Lula, Ivana; Denadai, Angelo L; Resende, Jarbas M; de Sousa, Frederico B; de Lima, Guilherme F; Pilo-Veloso, Dorila; Heine, Thomas; Duarte, Hélio A; Santos, Robson A S; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2007-11-01

    We report the complete sequence-specific hydrogen NMR assignments of vasoactive peptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)). Assignments of the majority of the resonances were accomplished by COSY, TOCSY, and ROESY peak coordinates at 400MHz and 600MHz. Long-side-chain amino acid spin system identification was facilitated by long-range coherence transfer experiments (TOCSY). Problems with overlapped resonance signals were solved by analysis of heteronuclear 2D experiments (HSQC and HMBC). Nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) results were used to probe peptide conformation. We show that the inclusion of the angiotensin-(1-7) tyrosine residue is favored in inclusion complexes with beta-cyclodextrin. QM/MM simulations at the DFTB/UFF level confirm the experimental NMR findings and provide detailed structural information on these compounds in aqueous solution. PMID:17904691

  12. Bulge-out structures in the single-stranded trimer AUA and in the duplex (CUGGUGCGG).(CCGCCCAG). A model-building and NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    van den Hoogen, Y T; van Beuzekom, A A; de Vroom, E; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1988-01-01

    Model-building studies were carried out on the trimer AUA. Bulge-out structures which allow incorporation into a continuous RNA helix were generated and energy-minimized. All geometrical features obtained by previous NMR studies on purine-pyrimidine-purine sequences are accounted for in these models. One of the models was used to fit into a double helical fragment. Only minor changes were necessary to construct a central bulge-out in an otherwise intact duplex. NMR and model-building studies were performed on the duplex (CUGGUGCGG).(CCGCCCAG) which contains an unpaired uridine residue. NOE data, chemical-shift profiles and imino-proton resonances provided evidence that the extra U is bulged out of the duplex. The relatively small dispersion in 31P chemical shifts (approximately equal to 0.7 ppm) indicate the absence of t/g or g/t combinations for the phosphodiester angles zeta/alpha. An energy-minimized model of the duplex, which fits the present collection of data, is presented. PMID:3387215

  13. Synthesis, NMR spectral and structural studies on mixed ligand complexes of Pd(II) dithiocarbamates: First structural report on palladium(II) dithiocarbamate with SCN-ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakasam, Balasubramaniam Arul; Lahtinen, Manu; Peuronen, Anssi; Muruganandham, Manickavachagam; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Haapaniemi, Esa; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-03-01

    Three new mixed ligand complexes of palladium(II) dithiocarbamates; [Pd(4-dpmpzdtc)(PPh3)(SCN)] (1), [Pd(4-dpmpzdtc)(PPh3)Cl] (2) and [Pd(bzbudtc)(PPh3)Cl] (3), (where, 4-dpmpzdtc = 4-(diphenylmethyl)piperazinecarbodithioato anion, bzbudtc = N-benzyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato anion and PPh3 = triphenylphosphine) have been synthesized from their respective parent dithiocarbamates by ligand exchange reactions and characterized by IR and NMR (1H, 13C and 31P) spectroscopy. IR and NMR spectral data support the isobidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamate ligands in all complexes (1-3) in solid and in solution, respectively. Single crystal diffraction analysis of complexes 1-3 evidences that all three complexes are exhibiting distorted square planar geometry. The Pd-S distances in 1-3 vary in accordance with the differences in trans influences of PPh3, SCN- and Cl- and it is in the order of PPh3 > SCN- > and Cl-. Interchange of the anionic auxiliary ligand (SCN- to Cl-) induces asymmetry to the dithiocarbamate-metal bonds. Thioureide C-N bond distances are short in 1-3, supporting a contribution of thioureide form to the structures. The observed distortions in the square planar geometry for 1-3, are in the order of 1 > 2 > 3.

  14. Structural and conformational study of the aluminum-thymulin complex using 1-D and 2-D NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laussac, J.P.; Lefrancier, P.; Dardenne, M.; Bach, J.F.; Marraud, M.; Cung, M.T.

    1988-11-16

    The interaction between aluminum and thymulin, a linear nonapeptide of thymic origin isolated from serum, was investigated by means of one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. These experiments were performed in dimethyl-d/sub 6/ sulfoxide solution at different metal:peptide ratios. The results lead the following conclusions: (i) the Al(III) complexation corresponds to a fast exchange on the NMR time scale; (ii) the evolution of /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts indicates the existence of one type of complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry, associating two peptide molecules and one Al(III) ion; (iii) analysis of the spectra suggests that Al(III) has a specific binding site involving the Asn/sup 9/COO/sup /minus// terminal group and the hydroxyl group of the Ser/sup 4/ residue; (iv) from the NOESY data a conformation has been proposed and compared to the biologically active Zn(II)-thymulin complex. 23 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J.; Laue, Ernest D.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  16. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  17. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  18. Combined experimental and quantum chemical studies on spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, and NMR) and structural characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet; Kocademir, Mustafa; Küçük, Vesile; Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Şaşmaz, İbrahim

    2016-12-01

    Comparative experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the structure and spectral (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis and NMR) features of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out at Hartree-Fock and density functional B3LYP levels with the triple-zeta 6-311++G** basis set. Two stable conformers of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde arising from the orientation of the carboxaldehyde moiety have been located at the room temperature. The energetic separation of these conformers is as small as 2.5 kcal/mol with a low transition barrier (around 9 kcal/mol). Therefore, these conformers are expected to coexist at the room temperature. Several molecular characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde obtained through B3LYP and time-dependent B3LYP calculations, such as conformational stability, key geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis vertical excitation energies and the corresponding oscillator strengths have been analyzed. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde were also investigated.

  19. Structural characterization, solvent effects on nuclear magnetic shielding tensors, experimental and theoretical DFT studies on the vibrational and NMR spectra of 3-(acrylamido)phenylboronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Kaya, Mehmet Fatih; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2015-12-01

    Structural elucidation of 3-(acrylamido)phenylboronic acid (C9H10BNO3) was carried out with 1H, 13C and HETCOR NMR techniques. Solvent effects on nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined with deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, methanol and water solvents. The correct order of appearance of carbon and hydrogen atoms on NMR scale from highest magnetic field region to the lowest one were investigated using different types of theoretical levels and the details of the levels were presented in this study. Stable structural conformers and vibrational band analysis of the title molecule (C9H10BNO3) were studied both experimental and theoretical viewpoints using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopic methods and density functional theory (DFT). FT-IR and Raman spectra were obtained in the region of 4000-400 cm-1, and 3700-10 cm-1, respectively. Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-31++G(d, p) basis set was included in the search for optimized structures and vibrational wavenumbers. Experimental and theoretical results show that after application of a suitable scaling factor density functional B3LYP method resulted in acceptable results for predicting vibrational wavenumbers except OH and NH stretching modes which is most likely arising from increasing unharmonicity in the high wave number region and possible intra and inter molecular interaction at OH edges those of which are not fully taken into consideration in theoretical processes. To make a more quantitative vibrational assignments, potential energy distribution (PED) values were calculated using VEDA 4 (Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis) program.

  20. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  1. Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Light Harvesting Complex 1 of R. Sphaeroides by Solid State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Ann E

    2014-11-14

    Studies of the structure and dynamics of a light harvesting complex from photosynthetic bacteria are described. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance methods, we explored the idea that optical properties are modulated via a conformational switch in the BChl chromophores, in a way that provides benefits for the efficiency of energy conversion.

  2. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Structural Polymorphism of Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Fibrils as Controlled by an E22 Switch: A Solid-State NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Matthew R; Wang, Tuo; Nick, Mimi; Jo, Hyunil; Lemmin, Thomas; Prusiner, Stanley B; DeGrado, William F; Stöhr, Jan; Hong, Mei

    2016-08-10

    The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide of Alzheimer's disease (AD) forms polymorphic fibrils on the micrometer and molecular scales. Various fibril growth conditions have been identified to cause polymorphism, but the intrinsic amino acid sequence basis for this polymorphism has been unclear. Several single-site mutations in the center of the Aβ sequence cause different disease phenotypes and fibrillization properties. The E22G (Arctic) mutant is found in familial AD and forms protofibrils more rapidly than wild-type Aβ. Here, we use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the structure, dynamics, hydration and morphology of Arctic E22G Aβ40 fibrils. (13)C, (15)N-labeled synthetic E22G Aβ40 peptides are studied and compared with wild-type and Osaka E22Δ Aβ40 fibrils. Under the same fibrillization conditions, Arctic Aβ40 exhibits a high degree of polymorphism, showing at least four sets of NMR chemical shifts for various residues, while the Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils show a single or a predominant set of chemical shifts. Thus, structural polymorphism is intrinsic to the Arctic E22G Aβ40 sequence. Chemical shifts and inter-residue contacts obtained from 2D correlation spectra indicate that one of the major Arctic conformers has surprisingly high structural similarity with wild-type Aβ42. (13)C-(1)H dipolar order parameters, (1)H rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and water-to-protein spin diffusion experiments reveal substantial differences in the dynamics and hydration of Arctic, Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils. Together, these results strongly suggest that electrostatic interactions in the center of the Aβ peptide sequence play a crucial role in the three-dimensional fold of the fibrils, and by inference, fibril-induced neuronal toxicity and AD pathogenesis. PMID:27414264

  4. Isoxazole derivatives of alpha-pinene isomers: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR/NMR/GC-MS) and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eryılmaz, Serpil; Gül, Melek; İnkaya, Ersin; Taş, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the alpha-pinene isoxazole derivatives (3a-b-c, 4a-b) were synthesized via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and characterized with FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and GC-MS. Isoxazole (C21H23NO) compound (4a) 6,6,7a,-trimethyl-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)-3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydro-5,7-methanobenzo[d] was characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P 212121, with Z = 4. The molecular geometry of the compound was optimized by applying Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(d,p) basis sets in the ground state and geometric parameters were compared with the X-ray analysis results of the structure. Results of the experimental FT-IR and NMR spectral analysis were examined in order to determine the compliance with vibrational frequencies, 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts values by using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method calculated over the optimized structure. Besides molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), some global reactivity descriptors, thermodynamic properties, non-linear optical (NLO) behaviour and Mulliken charge analysis of the (4a) compound were computed with the same method in gas phase, theoretically.

  5. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole. PMID:27454747

  6. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  7. NMR and protein folding: equilibrium and stopped-flow studies.

    PubMed Central

    Frieden, C.; Hoeltzli, S. D.; Ropson, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    NMR studies are now unraveling the structure of intermediates of protein folding using hydrogen-deuterium exchange methodologies. These studies provide information about the time dependence of formation of secondary structure. They require the ability to assign specific resonances in the NMR spectra to specific amide protons of a protein followed by experiments involving competition between folding and exchange reactions. Another approach is to use 19F-substituted amino acids to follow changes in side-chain environment upon folding. Current techniques of molecular biology allow assignments of 19F resonances to specific amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis. It is possible to follow changes and to analyze results from 19F spectra in real time using a stopped-flow device incorporated into the NMR spectrometer. PMID:8298453

  8. Internal Nanoparticle Structure of Temperature-Responsive Self-Assembled PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM Triblock Copolymers in Aqueous Solutions: NMR, SANS, and Light Scattering Studies.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey K; Bogomolova, Anna; Kaberov, Leonid; Velychkivska, Nadiia; Starovoytova, Larisa; Cernochova, Zulfiya; Rogers, Sarah E; Lau, Wing Man; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Cook, Michael T

    2016-05-31

    In this study, we report detailed information on the internal structure of PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM nanoparticles formed from self-assembly in aqueous solutions upon increase in temperature. NMR spectroscopy, light scattering, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to monitor different stages of nanoparticle formation as a function of temperature, providing insight into the fundamental processes involved. The presence of PEG in a copolymer structure significantly affects the formation of nanoparticles, making their transition to occur over a broader temperature range. The crucial parameter that controls the transition is the ratio of PEG/PNIPAM. For pure PNIPAM, the transition is sharp; the higher the PEG/PNIPAM ratio results in a broader transition. This behavior is explained by different mechanisms of PNIPAM block incorporation during nanoparticle formation at different PEG/PNIPAM ratios. Contrast variation experiments using SANS show that the structure of nanoparticles above cloud point temperatures for PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM copolymers is drastically different from the structure of PNIPAM mesoglobules. In contrast with pure PNIPAM mesoglobules, where solidlike particles and chain network with a mesh size of 1-3 nm are present, nanoparticles formed from PNIPAM-b-PEG-b-PNIPAM copolymers have nonuniform structure with "frozen" areas interconnected by single chains in Gaussian conformation. SANS data with deuterated "invisible" PEG blocks imply that PEG is uniformly distributed inside of a nanoparticle. It is kinetically flexible PEG blocks which affect the nanoparticle formation by prevention of PNIPAM microphase separation. PMID:27159129

  9. Impact of reduction on the properties of metal bisdithiolenes: multinuclear solid-state NMR and structural studies on Pt(tfd)2 and its reduced forms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joel A; Kogut, Elzbieta; Norton, Danielle; Lough, Alan J; McGarvey, Bruce R; Fekl, Ulrich; Schurko, Robert W

    2009-03-19

    Transition-metal dithiolene complexes have interesting structures and fascinating redox properties, making them promising candidates for a number of applications, including superconductors, photonic devices, chemical sensors, and catalysts. However, not enough is known about the molecular electronic origins of these properties. Multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy and first-principles calculations are used to examine the molecular and electronic structures of the redox series [Pt(tfd)(2)](z-) (tfd = S(2)C(2)(CF(3))(2); z = 0, 1, 2; the anionic species have [NEt(4)](+) countercations). Single-crystal X-ray structures for the neutral (z = 0) and the fully reduced forms (z = 2) were obtained. The two species have very similar structures but differ slightly in their intraligand bond lengths. (19)F-(195)Pt CP/CPMG and (195)Pt magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments are used to probe the diamagnetic (z = 0, 2) species, revealing large platinum chemical shielding anisotropies (CSA) with distinct CS tensor properties, despite the very similar structural features of these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to rationalize the large platinum CSAs and CS tensor orientations of the diamagnetic species using molecular orbital (MO) analysis, and are used to explain their distinct molecular electronic structures in the context of the NMR data. The paramagnetic species (z = 1) is examined using both EPR spectroscopy and (13)C and (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy. Platinum g-tensor components were determined by using solid-state EPR experiments. The unpaired electron spin densities at (13)C and (19)F nuclei were measured by employing variable-temperature (13)C and (19)F NMR experiments. DFT and ab initio calculations are able to qualitatively reproduce the experimentally measured g-tensor components and spin densities. The combination of experimental and theoretical data confirm localization of unpaired electron density in the pi-system of the

  10. Inter-cage dynamics in structure I, II, and H fluoromethane hydrates as studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Trueba, Alondra Torres; Kroon, Maaike C.; Peters, Cor J.; Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A.; Alavi, Saman

    2014-06-07

    Prospective industrial applications of clathrate hydrates as materials for gas separation require further knowledge of cavity distortion, cavity selectivity, and defects induction by guest-host interactions. The results presented in this contribution show that under certain temperature conditions the guest combination of CH{sub 3}F and a large polar molecule induces defects on the clathrate hydrate framework that allow intercage guest dynamics. {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of a CH{sub 3}F/CH{sub 4}/TBME sH hydrate and a temperature analysis of the {sup 2}H NMR powder lineshapes of a CD{sub 3}F/THF sII and CD{sub 3}F/TBME sH hydrate, displayed evidence that the populations of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}F in the D and D{sup ′} cages were in a state of rapid exchange. A hydrogen bonding analysis using molecular dynamics simulations on the TBME/CH{sub 3}F and TBME/CH{sub 4} sH hydrates showed that the presence of CH{sub 3}F enhances the hydrogen bonding probability of the TBME molecule with the water molecules of the cavity. Similar results were obtained for THF/CH{sub 3}F and THF/CH{sub 4} sII hydrates. The enhanced hydrogen bond formation leads to the formation of defects in the water hydrogen bonding lattice and this can enhance the migration of CH{sub 3}F molecules between adjacent small cages.

  11. Natural abundance 17O, 6Li NMR and molecular modeling studies of the solvation structures of lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide/1,2-dimethoxyethane liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Borodin, Oleg; Qian, Jiangfeng; Qin, Zhaohai; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Natural abundance 17O and 6Li NMR experiments, quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics studies were employed to investigate the solvation structures of Li+ at various concentrations of LiFSI in DME electrolytes. It was found that the chemical shifts of both 17O and 6Li changed with the concentration of LiFSI, indicating the changes of solvation structures with concentration. For the quantum chemistry calculations, the coordinated cluster LiFSI(DME)2 forms at first, and its relative ratio increases with increasing LiFSI concentration to 1 M. Then the solvation structure LiFSI(DME) become the dominant component. As a result, the coordination of forming contact ion pairs between Li+ and FSI- ion increases, but the association between Li+ and DME molecule decreases. Furthermore, at LiFSI concentration of 4 M the solvation structures associated with Li+(FSI-)2(DME), Li+2(FSI-)(DME)4 and (LiFSI)2(DME)3 become the dominant components. For the molecular dynamics simulation, with increasing concentration, the association between DME and Li+ decreases, and the coordinated number of FSI- increases, which is in perfect accord with the DFT results.

  12. NMR solution structure of the neurotrypsin Kringle domain.

    PubMed

    Ozhogina, Olga A; Grishaev, Alexander; Bominaar, Emile L; Patthy, László; Trexler, Maria; Llinás, Miguel

    2008-11-25

    Neurotrypsin is a multidomain protein that serves as a brain-specific serine protease. Here we report the NMR structure of its kringle domain, NT/K. The data analysis was performed with the BACUS (Bayesian analysis of coupled unassigned spins) algorithm. This study presents the first application of BACUS to the structure determination of a 13C unenriched protein for which no prior experimental 3D structure was available. NT/K adopts the kringle fold, consisting of an antiparallel beta-sheet bridged by an overlapping pair of disulfides. The structure reveals the presence of a surface-exposed left-handed polyproline II helix that is closely packed to the core beta-structure. This feature distinguishes NT/K from other members of the kringle fold and points toward a novel functional role for a kringle domain. Functional divergence among kringle domains is discussed on the basis of their surface and electrostatic characteristics. PMID:18956887

  13. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  14. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  15. NMR Structure of a Viral Peptide Inserted in Artificial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Galloux, Marie; Libersou, Sonia; Alves, Isabel D.; Marquant, Rodrigue; Salgado, Gilmar F.; Rezaei, Human; Lepault, Jean; Delmas, Bernard; Bouaziz, Serge; Morellet, Nelly

    2010-01-01

    Nonenveloped virus must penetrate the cellular membrane to access the cytoplasm without the benefit of membrane fusion. For birnavirus, one of the peptides present in the virus capsid, pep46 for infectious bursal disease virus, is able to induce pores into membranes as an intermediate step of the birnavirus-penetration pathway. Using osmotic protection experiments, we demonstrate here that pep46 and its pore-forming N-terminal moiety (pep22) form pores of different diameters, 5–8 and 2–4 nm, respectively, showing that both pep46 moieties participate to pore formation. The solution structures of pep46, pep22, and pep24 (the pep46 C-terminal moiety) in different hydrophobic environments and micelles determined by 1H NMR studies provide structural insights of the pep46 domain interaction. In CDCl3/CD3OH mixture and in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, the N-terminal domain of pep46 is structured in a long kinked helix, although the C terminus is structured in one or two helices depending upon the solvents used. We also show that the folding and the proline isomerization status of pep46 depend on the type of hydrophobic environment. NMR spectroscopy with labeled phospholipid micelles, differential scanning calorimetry, and plasmon waveguide resonance studies show the peptides lie parallel to the lipid-water interface, perturbing the fatty acid chain packing. All these data lead to a model in which the two domains of pep46 interact with the membrane to form pores. PMID:20385550

  16. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. PMID:27095695

  17. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  18. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. A combined solid-state NMR and synchrotron x-ray diffraction powder study on the structure of the antioxidant(+)-catechin 4.5 hydrate.

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J. K.; Doebbler, J. A.; Jaccques, E.; Grant, D. M.; Von Dreele, R. B.; Univ. of Utah

    2010-03-10

    Analyses combining X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data can now provide crystal structures in challenging powders that are inaccessible by traditional methods. The flavonoid catechin is an ideal candidate for these methods, as it has eluded crystallographic characterization despite extensive study. Catechin was first described nearly two centuries ago, and its powders exhibit numerous levels of hydration. Here, synchrotron XRD data provide all heavy-atom positions in (+)-catechin 4.5-hydrate and establish the space group as C2. SSNMR data ({sup 13}C tensor and {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C correlation) complete the conformation by providing catechin's five OH hydrogen orientations. Since 1903, this phase has been erroneously identified as a 4.0 hydrate, but XRD and density data establish that this discrepancy is due to the facile loss of the water molecule located at a Wyckoff special position in the unit cell. A final improvement to heavy-atom positions is provided by a geometry optimization of bond lengths and valence angles with XRD torsion angles held constant. The structural enhancement in this final structure is confirmed by the significantly improved fit of computed {sup 13}C tensors to experimental data.

  20. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  1. Structural, conformational, and theoretical binding studies of antitumor antibiotic porfiromycin (N-methylmitomycin C), a covalent binder of DNA, by X-ray, NMR, and molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Arora, S K; Cox, M B; Arjunan, P

    1990-11-01

    X-ray, NMR, and molecular mechanics studies on antitumor antibiotic porfiromycin (C16H20N4O5), a covalent binder of DNA, have been carried out to study the structure, conformation, and theoretical interactions with DNA. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined to an R value of 0.052. The configurations at C(9), C(9a), C(1), and C(2) are S, R, S, and S, except for the orientation of the aziridine ring and (carbamoyloxy)methyl side chain. The five-membered ring attached to the aziridine ring adopts an envelope conformation. The solution conformation is similar to that observed in the solid state except for the (carbamoyloxy)methyl side chain. Monovalent and cross-linked models of the drug bound to DNA have been energetically refined by using molecular mechanics. The results indicate that, in the case of monocovalent binding, the drug clearly prefers a d(CpG) sequence rather than a d(GpC) sequence. In the case of the cross-linked model there is no clear-cut preference of d(CpG) over d(GpC), indicating that the binding preference of the drug may be kinetic rather than thermodynamic. PMID:2231597

  2. Electrochemical and NMR spectroscopic studies of distal pocket mutants of nitrophorin 2: Stability, structure, and dynamics of axial ligand complexes

    PubMed Central

    Shokhireva, Tatjana Kh.; Berry, Robert E.; Uno, Elizabeth; Balfour, Celia A.; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F. Ann

    2003-01-01

    WT and leucine → valine distal pocket mutants of nitrophorin 2 (NP2) and their NO complexes have been investigated by spectroelectrochemistry. NO complexes of two of the mutants exhibit more positive reduction potential shifts than does the WT protein, thus indicating stabilization of the Fe(II)–NO state. This more positive reduction potential for NP2-L132V and the double mutant is consistent with the hypothesis that smaller valine residues may allow the heme to regain planarity instead of being significantly ruffled, as in WT NP2. Thus, ruffling may stabilize the Fe(III)–NO state, which is required for facile NO dissociation. NMR spectroscopic investigations show that the sterically demanding 2-methylimidazole ligand readily binds to all three distal pocket mutants to create low-spin Fe(III) complexes having axial ligands in nearly perpendicular planes; it also binds to the WT protein in the presence of higher concentrations of 2-methylimidazole, but yields a different ligand plane orientation than is present in any of the three distal pocket mutants. NOESY spectra of NP2–ImH mutants exhibit chemical exchange cross peaks, whereas WT NP2–ImH shows no chemical exchange. Chemical exchange in the case of the distal leucine → valine mutants is caused by ImH ligand orientational dynamics. The two angular orientations of the ImH ligand could be determined from the 1H chemical shifts of the heme methyls, and the rate of interconversion of the two forms could be estimated from the NOESY diagonal and cross peak intensities. Keq is 100 or larger and favors an orientation similar to that found for the WT NP2–ImH complex. PMID:12642672

  3. Application of Roof-Shape Amines as Chiral Solvating Agents for Discrimination of Optically Active Acids by NMR Spectroscopy: Study of Match-Mismatch Effect and Crystal Structure of the Diastereomeric Salts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Riddhi; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Bedekar, Ashutosh V

    2016-09-01

    Optically active roof-shape amines were prepared and scanned as chiral solvating agents to study molecular recognition of acids by NMR analysis. Three types of amines were studied to establish a match-mismatch effect for structurally diverse acid analytes. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was performed on the diastereomeric salts of roof-shape amines and both isomers of mandelic acid to establish molecular conformation and correlate the absolute configuration with the observed NMR shift. The present system also recognizes the two isomers of weakly acidic BINOL and its derivatives. PMID:27484455

  4. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  5. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  6. High-Field NMR Studies of Molecular Recognition and Structure-Function Relationships in Antimicrobial Piscidins at the Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Jones, Shiela M.; Nikolayeva, Yelena; Vollmar, Breanna S.; Wagner, Timothy J.; Gorkov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Manion, Mckenna N.; Daugherty, Kenneth C.; Cotten, Myriam L.

    2006-04-26

    Piscidins are the first amphipathic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides (ACAPs) to be found in the mast cells of fish, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the fight against many aquatic infections.1 Many ACAPs have been characterized functionally, and some models for their mechanism of action exist, including the barrel-stave model, the wormhole model, the carpet mechanism, and the intracellular activation of fatal pathways.2-9 Much information remains to be learned about the details of their structure, initial interactions with membranes, and the ultimate mechanism for disrupting cellular function. To this end, we employed solid-state NMR (ssNMR) to probe the structure and topology of isotopically labeled piscidins in the membrane-bound state.

  7. Local structures of polar wurtzites Zn1-xMgxO studied by raman and 67Zn/25Mg NMR spectroscopies and by total neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Proffen, Thomas E; Kim, Yiung- Il; Cadars, Sylvian; Shayib, Ramzy; Feigerle, Charles S; Chmelka, Bradley F; Seshadri, Ram

    2008-01-01

    Research in the area of polar semiconductor heterostructures has been growing rapidly, driven in large part by interest in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems. 2DEGs are known to form at heterojunction interfaces that bear polarization gradients. They can display extremely high electron mobilities, especially at low temperatures, owing to spatial confinement of carrier motions. Recent reports of 2DEG behaviors in Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N/GaN and Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO heterostructures have great significance for the development of quantum Hall devices and novel high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). 2DEG structures are usually designed by interfacing a polar semiconductor with its less or more polar alloys in an epitaxial manner. Since the quality of the 2DEG depends critically on interface perfection, as well as the polarization gradient at the heterojunction, understanding compositional and structural details of the parent and alloy semiconductors is an important component in 2DEG design and fabrication. Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO is one of the most promising heterostructure types for studies of 2DEGs, due to the large polarization of ZnO, the relatively small lattice mismatch, and the large conduction band offsets in the Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO heterointerface. Although 2DEG formation in Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO heterostructures have been researched for some time, a clear understanding of the alloy structure of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O is currently lacking. Here, we conduct a detailed and more precise study of the local structure of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O alloys using Raman and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in conjunction with neutron diffraction techniques.

  8. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the application of low-field NMR to both surface area and pore structure analysis of catalyst supports will be presented. Low-field (20 MHz) spin-lattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) experiments are performed on fluids contained in alumina and silica catalyst supports. Pore size distributions (PSD) calculated from these NMR experiments are compared to those obtained from mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  10. Liquid structure of acetic acid-water and trifluoroacetic acid-water mixtures studied by large-angle X-ray scattering and NMR.

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Kyoshoin, Yasuhiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kusano, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    The structures of acetic acid (AA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and their aqueous mixtures over the entire range of acid mole fraction xA have been investigated by using large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and NMR techniques. The results from the LAXS experiments have shown that acetic acid molecules mainly form a chain structure via hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In acetic acid-water mixtures hydrogen bonds of acetic acid-water and water-water gradually increase with decreasing xA, while the chain structure of acetic acid molecules is moderately ruptured. Hydrogen bonds among water molecules are remarkably formed in acetic acid-water mixtures at xAstructure but cyclic dimers through hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In TFA-water mixtures O...O hydrogen bonds among water molecules gradually increase when xA decreases, and hydrogen bonds among water molecules are significantly formed in the mixtures at xANMR chemical shifts of acetic acid and TFA molecules for acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures have indicated strong relationships between a structural change of the mixtures and the acid mole fraction. On the basis of both LAXS and NMR results, the structural changes of acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures with decreasing acid mole fraction and the effects of fluorination of the methyl group on the structure are discussed at the molecular level. PMID:17628099

  11. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  12. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P. )

    1988-09-01

    The pore structures of two types of catalyst support material were studied: {gamma}-alumina and silica aerogel. The alumina samples were commercial catalyst supports made in 1/8 inch diameter pellet form by Harshaw Chemical. Aerogels were prepared by forming a gel in a two-step, base-catalyzed process using TEOS, followed by supercritical drying to form the aerogel. Two different aerogels were made, one undergoing the drying process immediately after gel formation (non-aged), and the other being aged in the gel state for two weeks in a basic solution of 0.1 molar NH{sub 4}OH at 323 K before being supercritically dried (aged). The aging process is believed to alter the aerogel pore structure. The pore size distribution of the alumina material was determined via NMR and compared to results obtained by mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption/condensation techniques. The pore size distributions of the two aerogel samples were measured via NMR and nitrogen adsorption/condensation; the material was too compressible for porosimetry.

  13. Solid-state NMR: An emerging technique in structural biology of self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Protein self-assemblies are ubiquitous biological systems involved in many cellular processes, ranging from bacterial and viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Studying the atomic three-dimensional structures of protein self-assemblies is a particularly demanding task, as these systems are usually insoluble, non-crystalline and of large size. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is an emerging method that can provide atomic-level structural data on intact macromolecular assemblies. We here present recent progress in magic-angle spinning ssNMR to study protein assemblies and give an overview on its combination with complementary techniques such as cryo-EM, mass-per-length measurements, SAXS and X-ray diffraction. Applications of ssNMR on its own and in hybrid approaches have revealed precious atomic details and first high-resolution structures of complex biological assemblies, including amyloid fibrils, bacterial filaments, phages or virus capsids. PMID:26234527

  14. Hydrogen motion and local structure of metals in β-Ti1-yVyHx as studied by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-09-01

    Hydrogen motion in β-Ti1-yVyHx (y=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8; x~1) alloys was studied by 1H NMR, with which the temperature and frequency dependences of proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured over the temperature range 105-400 K and at frequencies 9, 22.5, 52, and 90 MHz. The temperature dependences of T1 change systematically with the metal composition; with a decrease in the concentration of V, the minimum value of T1 increases and the temperature at which T1 is minimized shifts to the higher-temperature side. These results are analyzed with two-site jumps of a proton between unequal potential wells, in which Brouwer's model is assumed to describe local structure of the alloys. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated T1 values is given by this treatment, unlike the isotropic diffusion model. The following three parameters are used for the calculation: activation energies for Ti and V are ETi=16 and EV=9.5 kJ/mol, respectively, and the frequency prefactor is τ0=1.5×10-11 s for 0.4<=y<=0.8. The obtained ETi and EV values agree with those of pure metal hydrides such as TiHx and VHx, respectively.

  15. NMR studies of bond arrangements in alkali phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Brow, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the investigation of local structure and medium range order in glasses. Previous {sup 31}P MAS NMR studies have detailed the local structure for a series of phosphate glasses. Phosphate tetrahedra within the glass network are commonly described using the Q{sup n} notation, where n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and represents the number of bridging oxygens attached to the phosphate. Using {sup 31}P MAS NMR different phosphate environments are readily identified and quantified. In this paper, the authors present a brief description of recent one dimensional (1D) {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li and {sup 31}P MAS experiments along with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 31}P exchange NMR experiments for a series of lithium ultraphosphate glasses. From the 2D exchange experiments the connectivities between different Q{sup n} phosphate tetrahedra were directly measured, while the 1D experiments provided a measure of the P-O-P bond angle distribution and lithium coordination number as a function of Li{sub 2}O concentration.

  16. Time-resolved NMR studies of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Fürtig, Boris; Buck, Janina; Manoharan, Vijayalaxmi; Bermel, Wolfgang; Jäschke, Andres; Wenter, Philipp; Pitsch, Stefan; Schwalbe, Harald

    The application of real-time NMR experiments to the study of RNA folding, as reviewed in this article, is relatively new. For many RNA folding events, current investigations suggest that the time scales are in the second to minute regime. In addition, the initial investigations suggest that different folding rates are observed for one structural transition may be due to the hierarchical folding units of RNA. Many of the experiments developed in the field of NMR of protein folding cannot directly be transferred to RNA: hydrogen exchange experiments outside the spectrometer cannot be applied since the intrinsic exchange rates are too fast in RNA, relaxation dispersion experiments on the other require faster structural transitions than those observed in RNA. On the other hand, information derived from time-resolved NMR experiments, namely the acquisition of native chemical shifts, can be readily interpreted in light of formation of a single long-range hydrogen bonding interaction. Together with mutational data that can readily be obtained for RNA and new ligation technologies that enhance site resolution even further, time-resolved NMR may become a powerful tool to decipher RNA folding. Such understanding will be of importance to understand the functions of coding and non-coding RNAs in cells. PMID:17595685

  17. In situ microscopic studies on the structures and phase behaviors of SF/PEG films using solid-state NMR and Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Congheng; Yao, Ting; Tu, Sidong; Xu, Weijie; Han, Yi; Zhou, Ping

    2016-06-28

    In order to overcome the drawbacks of silk fibroin (SF)-based materials, SF has been blended with some polymers. Before using the blend material, understanding of the structures and phase behaviors of the blend is thought to be essential. In this study, solid-state (13)C CP-MAS NMR and Raman imaging techniques were used to study the structures and phase behaviors of blends of SF with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at a molecular weight that varied from 2 to 20 kDa and a blend ratio of SF/PEG from 95/5 to 70/30 (w/w%) at the molecular and microscopic levels. It is found that the conformational transition of SF to the β-sheet increased as the PEG content increased, while the amount of the formed β-sheet conformers was decreased as the PEG molecular weight increased for a given content. It is also observed that SF was incompatible with PEG to some extent. The phase separation into "sea" and "island" domains took place in the SF/PEG blend films. SF was dominantly present in the "sea" domain, while PEG in the "island" domains. The conformation of SF in the interface between SF and PEG was changed to the β-sheet, while that in the protein-rich domain remained in the random coil and/or helix conformation. These observations suggest that the specifically expected materials, for example, the silk-based microspheres or scaffold materials can be manufactured by controlling the molecular weight and content of PEG in the blend system. PMID:27255417

  18. Glyphosate complexation to aluminium(III). An equilibrium and structural study in solution using potentiometry, multinuclear NMR, ATR-FTIR, ESI-MS and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Purgel, Mihály; Takács, Zoltán; Jonsson, Caroline M; Nagy, Lajos; Andersson, Ingegärd; Bányai, István; Pápai, Imre; Persson, Per; Sjöberg, Staffan; Tóth, Imre

    2009-11-01

    The stoichiometries and stability constants of a series of Al(3+)-N-phosponomethyl glycine (PMG/H(3)L) complexes have been determined in acidic aqueous solution using a combination of precise potentiometric titration data, quantitative (27)Al and (31)P NMR spectra, ATR-FTIR spectrum and ESI-MS measurements (0.6M NaCl, 25 degrees C). Besides the mononuclear AlH(2)L(2+), Al(H(2)L)(HL), Al(HL)(2)(-) and Al(HL)L(2-), dimeric Al(2)(HL)L(+) and trinuclear Al(3)H(5)L(4)(2+) complexes have been postulated. (1)H and (31)P NMR data show that different isomers co-exist in solution and the isomerization reactions are slow on the (31)P NMR time scale. The geometries of monomeric and dimeric complexes likely double hydroxo bridged and double phosphonate bridged isomers have been optimized using DFT ab initio calculations starting from rational structural proposals. Energy calculations using the PCM solvation method also support the co-existence of isomers in solutions. PMID:19766319

  19. Synthetic, structural, NMR, and computational study of a geminally bis(peri-substituted) tridentate phosphine and its chalcogenides and transition-metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Ray, Matthew J; Randall, Rebecca A M; Arachchige, Kasun S Athukorala; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Bühl, Michael; Lebl, Tomas; Kilian, Petr

    2013-04-15

    Coupling of two acenaphthene backbones through a phosphorus atom in a geminal fashion gives the first geminally bis(peri-substituted) tridentate phosphine 1. The rigid nature of the aromatic backbone and overall crowding of the molecule result in a rather inflexible ligand, with the three phosphorus atoms forming a relatively compact triangular cluster. Phosphine 1 displays restricted dynamics on an NMR time scale, which leads to the anisochronicity of all three phosphorus nuclei at low temperatures. Strained bis- and tris(sulfides) 2 and 3 and the bis(selenide) 4 have been isolated from the reaction of 1 with sulfur and selenium, respectively. These chalcogeno derivatives display pronounced in-plane and out-of-plane distortions of the aromatic backbones, indicating the limits of their angular distortions. In addition, we report metal complexes with tetrahedral [(1)Cu(MeCN)][BF4] (5), square planar [(1)PtCl][Cl] (6), trigonal bipyramidal [(1)FeCl2] (7), and octahedral fac-[(1)Mo(CO)3] (8) geometries. In all of these complexes the tris(phosphine) backbone is distorted, however to a significantly smaller extent than that in the mentioned chalcogenides 2-4. Complexes 5 and 8 show fluxionality in (31)P and (1)H NMR. All new compounds 1-8 were fully characterized, and their crystal structures are reported. Conclusions from dynamic NMR observations were augmented by DFT calculations. PMID:23534381

  20. Crystal structure, NMR study, dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity of a new compound [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. Ferid; Arous, M.

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure, the 13C NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance have been carried out on [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n. Crystal structure shows a 2D polymeric network built up of two crystallographically independent cadmium atoms with two different octahedral coordinations. This compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=355±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays powder diffraction, AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. Examination of 13C CP/MAS line shapes shows indirect spin-spin coupling (14N and 13C) with a dipolar coupling constant of 1339 Hz. The AC conductivity of this compound has been carried out in the temperature range 325-376 K and the frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 10 MHz. The impedance data were well fitted to two equivalent electrical circuits. The results of the modulus study reveal the presence of two distinct relaxation processes. One, at low frequency side, is thermally activated due to the ionic conduction of the crystal and the other, at higher frequency side, gradually disappears when temperature reaches 355 K which is attributed to the localized dipoles in the crystal. Moreover, the temperature dependence of DC-conductivity in both phases follows the Arrhenius law and the frequency dependence of σ(ω,T) follows Jonscher's universal law. The near values of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and impedance confirm that the transport is through the ion hopping mechanism.

  1. Lanthanide complexes of new nonadentate imino-phosphonate ligands derived from 1,4,7-triazacyclononane: synthesis, structural characterisation and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Tei, Lorenzo; Blake, Alexander J; Wilson, Claire; Schröder, Martin

    2004-07-01

    The polyamino ligand 1,4,7-tris(2-aminoethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (1) has been used to synthesise two new ligands by Schiff-base condensation with methyl sodium acetyl phosphonate to give ligand L and methyl sodium 4-methoxybenzoyl phosphonate to give ligand L1 in the presence of lanthanide ion as templating agent to form the complexes [Ln(L)] and [Ln(L1)](Ln = Y, La, Gd, Yb). Both ligands L and L1 have nine donor atoms comprising three amine and three imine N-donors and three phosphonate O-donors and form Ln(III) complexes in which the three pendant arms of the ligands wrap around the nine-coordinate Ln(III) centres. Complexes with Y(III), La(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III) have been synthesised and the complexes [Y(L)], [Gd(L)] and [Gd(L1)] have been structurally characterised. In all the complexes the coordination polyhedron about the lanthanide centre is slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prismatic with the two triangular faces of the prism formed by the macrocyclic N-donors and the phosphonate O-donors. Interestingly, given the three chiral phosphorus centres present in [Ln(L)] and [Ln(L1)] complexes, the three crystal structures reported show the presence of only one diastereomer of the four possible. 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopic studies on diamagnetic [Y(L)] and [La(L)] and on paramagnetic [Yb(L)] complexes indicate the presence in solution of all the four different diastereomers in varying proportions. The stability of complexes [Y(L)] and [Y(L1)] in D2O in both neutral and acidic media, and the relaxivity of the Gd(III) complexes, have also been investigated. PMID:15252581

  2. Determination of Membrane Protein Structure by Rotational Resonance NMR: Bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creuzet, F.; McDermott, A.; Gebhard, R.; van der Hoef, K.; Spijker-Assink, M. B.; Herzfeld, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Levitt, M. H.; Griffin, R. G.

    1991-02-01

    Rotationally resonant magnetization exchange, a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique for measuring internuclear distances between like spins in solids, was used to determine the distance between the C-8 and C-18 carbons of retinal in two model compounds and in the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. Magnetization transfer between inequivalent spins with an isotropic shift separation, δ, is driven by magic angle spinning at a speed ω_r that matches the rotational resonance condition δ = nω_r, where n is a small integer. The distances measured in this way for both the 6-s-cis- and 6-s-trans-retinoic acid model compounds agreed well with crystallographically known distances. In bacteriorhodopsin the exchange trajectory between C-8 and C-18 was in good agreement with the internuclear distance for a 6-s-trans configuration [4.2 angstroms (overset{circ}{mathrm A})] and inconsistent with that for a 6-s-cis configuration (3.1 overset{circ}{mathrm A}). The results illustrate that rotational resonance can be used for structural studies in membrane proteins and in other situations where diffraction and solution NMR techniques yield limited information.

  3. The structure of the aggregate form of bacteriochlorophyll c showing the Q y absorption above 740 nm: a 1H-NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll c (3 1S, 8-isobutyl-12-ethyl, farnesyl) was dissolved in a mixture of methylene chloride and carbon tetrachloride (1 : 3), and changes in the 1H-NMR spectrum caused by the titration of methanol were traced. On the basis of the changes in chemical shift due to the ring-current effect of the neighboring macrocycles and in peak intensity (broadening) due to their stacking, the structure of the aggregate form showing the Q y absorption band above 740 nm is proposed: the macrocycles are stacked to form a one-dimensional inclined column, the y axis of each macrocycle being parallel to the long axis of the column.

  4. Correlation between local structural dynamics of proteins inferred from NMR ensembles and evolutionary dynamics of homologues of known structure.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Offmann, Bernard; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Conformational changes in proteins are extremely important for their biochemical functions. Correlation between inherent conformational variations in a protein and conformational differences in its homologues of known structure is still unclear. In this study, we have used a structural alphabet called Protein Blocks (PBs). PBs are used to perform abstraction of protein 3-D structures into a 1-D strings of 16 alphabets (a-p) based on dihedral angles of overlapping pentapeptides. We have analyzed the variations in local conformations in terms of PBs represented in the ensembles of 801 protein structures determined using NMR spectroscopy. In the analysis of concatenated data over all the residues in all the NMR ensembles, we observe that the overall nature of inherent local structural variations in NMR ensembles is similar to the nature of local structural differences in homologous proteins with a high correlation coefficient of .94. High correlation at the alignment positions corresponding to helical and β-sheet regions is only expected. However, the correlation coefficient by considering only the loop regions is also quite high (.91). Surprisingly, segregated position-wise analysis shows that this high correlation does not hold true to loop regions at the structurally equivalent positions in NMR ensembles and their homologues of known structure. This suggests that the general nature of local structural changes is unique; however most of the local structural variations in loop regions of NMR ensembles do not correlate to their local structural differences at structurally equivalent positions in homologues. PMID:23730714

  5. sup 1 H NMR studies of plastocyanin from Scenedesmus obliquus: Complete sequence-specific assignment, secondary structure analysis, and global fold

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Chazin, W.J.; Wright, P.E. ); Powls, R. )

    1988-10-04

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods have been used to make sequence-specific resonance assignments for the 97 amino acid residues of the plastocyanin from the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Assignments were obtained for all backbone protons and the majority of the side-chain protons. Spin system identification relied heavily on the observation of relayed connectivities to the backbone amide proton. Sequence-specific assignments were made by using the sequential assignment procedure. During this process, an extra valine residue was identified that had not been detected in the original amino acid sequence. Elements of regular secondary structure were identified from characteristic NOE connectivities between backbone protons, coupling constant values, and the observation of slowly exchanging amide protons. The protein in solution contains eight {beta}-strands, one short segment of helix, five reverse turns, and five loops. The {beta}-strands may be arranged into two {beta}sheets on the basis of extensive cross-strand NOE connectivities. The chain-folding topology determined from the NMR experiments is that of a Greek key {beta}-barrel and is similar to that observed for French bean plastocyanin in solution and poplar plastocyanin in the crystalline state. While the overall structures are similar, several differences in local structure between the S. obliquus and higher plant plastocyanins have been identified.

  6. Solid state NMR strategy for characterizing native membrane protein structures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Das, Nabanita; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-09-17

    Unlike water soluble proteins, the structures of helical transmembrane proteins depend on a very complex environment. These proteins sit in the midst of dramatic electrical and chemical gradients and are often subject to variations in the lateral pressure profile, order parameters, dielectric constant, and other properties. Solid state NMR is a collection of tools that can characterize high resolution membrane protein structure in this environment. Indeed, prior work has shown that this complex environment significantly influences transmembrane protein structure. Therefore, it is important to characterize such structures under conditions that closely resemble its native environment. Researchers have used two approaches to gain protein structural restraints via solid state NMR spectroscopy. The more traditional approach uses magic angle sample spinning to generate isotropic chemical shifts, much like solution NMR. As with solution NMR, researchers can analyze the backbone chemical shifts to obtain torsional restraints. They can also examine nuclear spin interactions between nearby atoms to obtain distances between atomic sites. Unfortunately, for membrane proteins in lipid preparations, the spectral resolution is not adequate to obtain complete resonance assignments. Researchers have developed another approach for gaining structural restraints from membrane proteins: the use of uniformly oriented lipid bilayers, which provides a method for obtaining high resolution orientational restraints. When the bilayers are aligned with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer, researchers can obtain orientational restraints in which atomic sites in the protein are restrained relative to the alignment axis. However, this approach does not allow researchers to determine the relative packing between helices. By combining the two approaches, we can take advantage of the information acquired from each technique to minimize the challenges and maximize the quality of the

  7. MOTOR: model assisted software for NMR structure determination.

    PubMed

    Schieborr, Ulrich; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Elshorst, Bettina; Maurer, Marcus; Saxena, Krishna; Stehle, Tanja; Kudlinzki, Denis; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Schwalbe, Harald

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic proteins with important biological function can be partially unstructured, conformational flexible, or heterogenic. Crystallization trials often fail for such proteins. In NMR spectroscopy, parts of the polypeptide chain undergoing dynamics in unfavorable time regimes cannot be observed. De novo NMR structure determination is seriously hampered when missing signals lead to an incomplete chemical shift assignment resulting in an information content of the NOE data insufficient to determine the structure ab initio. We developed a new protein structure determination strategy for such cases based on a novel NOE assignment strategy utilizing a number of model structures but no explicit reference structure as it is used for bootstrapping like algorithms. The software distinguishes in detail between consistent and mutually exclusive pairs of possible NOE assignments on the basis of different precision levels of measured chemical shifts searching for a set of maximum number of consistent NOE assignments in agreement with 3D space. Validation of the method using the structure of the low molecular-weight-protein tyrosine phosphatase A (MptpA) showed robust results utilizing protein structures with 30-45% sequence identity and 70% of the chemical shift assignments. About 60% of the resonance assignments are sufficient to identify those structural models with highest conformational similarity to the real structure. The software was benchmarked by de novo solution structures of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and the extracellular fibroblast growth factor receptor domain FGFR4 D2, which both failed in crystallization trials and in classical NMR structure determination. PMID:23852655

  8. Overcoming the Solubility Limit with Solubility-Enhancement Tags: Successful Applications in Biomolecular NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pei; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Although the rapid progress of NMR technology has significantly expanded the range of NMR-trackable systems, preparation of NMR-suitable samples that are highly soluble and stable remains a bottleneck for studies of many biological systems. The application of solubility-enhancement tags (SETs) has been highly effective in overcoming solubility and sample stability issues and has enabled structural studies of important biological systems previously deemed unapproachable by solution NMR techniques. In this review, we provide a brief survey of the development and successful applications of the SET strategy in biomolecular NMR. We also comment on the criteria for choosing optimal SETs, such as for differently charged target proteins, and recent new developments on NMR-invisible SETs. PMID:19731047

  9. NMR structural analysis of Sleeping Beauty transposase binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    E Carpentier, Claire; Schreifels, Jeffrey M; Aronovich, Elena L; Carlson, Daniel F; Hackett, Perry B; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2014-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is the most widely used DNA transposon in genetic applications and is the only DNA transposon thus far in clinical trials for human gene therapy. In the absence of atomic level structural information, the development of SB transposon relied primarily on the biochemical and genetic homology data. While these studies were successful and have yielded hyperactive transposases, structural information is needed to gain a mechanistic understanding of transposase activity and guides to further improvement. We have initiated a structural study of SB transposase using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the DNA-binding domain of SB transposase in solution. We show that at physiologic salt concentrations, the SB DNA-binding domain remains mostly unstructured but its N-terminal PAI subdomain forms a compact, three-helical structure with a helix-turn-helix motif at higher concentrations of NaCl. Furthermore, we show that the full-length SB DNA-binding domain associates differently with inner and outer binding sites of the transposon DNA. We also show that the PAI subdomain of SB DNA-binding domain has a dominant role in transposase's attachment to the inverted terminal repeats of the transposon DNA. Overall, our data validate several earlier predictions and provide new insights on how SB transposase recognizes transposon DNA. PMID:24243759

  10. X-ray and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies of the structures and conformations of the new nootropic agents RU-35929, RU-47010 and RU-35965

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Maria E.; Bandoli, Giuliano; Casellato, Umberto; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Toja, Emilio

    1990-10-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of the nootropics (±)1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine ( 1), (±)1-(3-pyridinylsulphonyl)-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine ( 2) and (±)1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-isopropyloxypyrrolidine ( 3) have been determined by X-ray analysis. The solution conformation of 1, 2 and 3 has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. In the solid state, the main feature consists of the similar structural parameters and conformations, with the exception of the conformation adopted by the 5-ethoxy moiety which changes on passing from 1 to 2. The solid state overall enveloped conformation of the 2-pyrrolidinone ring for the three nootropics is found to be retained in solution on the basis of NMR evidence. Comparison between calculated and experimental coupling constant values shows that one of the two possible puckered opposite conformational isomers (half-chair shapes) occurs in solution. The relative pharmacological potencies of 1, 2 and 3 cannot therefore be interpreted in terms of the different conformation features presently detectable by available experimental methods.

  11. NMR structural studies reveal a novel protein fold for MerB, the organomercurial lyase involved in the bacterial mercury resistance system.

    PubMed

    Di Lello, Paola; Benison, Gregory C; Valafar, Homayoun; Pitts, Keith E; Summers, Anne O; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2004-07-01

    Mercury resistant bacteria have developed a system of two enzymes (MerA and MerB), which allows them to efficiently detoxify both ionic and organomercurial compounds. The organomercurial lyase (MerB) catalyzes the protonolysis of the carbon-mercury bond resulting in the formation of ionic mercury and a reduced hydrocarbon. The ionic mercury [Hg(II)] is subsequently reduced to the less reactive elemental mercury [Hg(0)] by a specific mercuric reductase (MerA). To better understand MerB's unique enzymatic activity, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the structure of the free enzyme. MerB is characterized by a novel protein fold consisting of three noninteracting antiparallel beta-sheets surrounded by six alpha-helices. By comparing the NMR data of free MerB and the MerB/Hg/DTT complex, we identified a set of residues that likely define a Hg/DTT binding site. These residues cluster around two cysteines (C(96) and C(159)) that are crucial to MerB's catalytic activity. A detailed analysis of the structure revealed the presence of an extensive hydrophobic groove adjacent to this Hg/DTT binding site. This extensive hydrophobic groove has the potential to interact with the hydrocarbon moiety of a wide variety of substrates and may explain the broad substrate specificity of MerB. PMID:15222745

  12. Structural NMR of Protein Oligomers using Hybrid Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Solving structures of native oligomeric protein complexes using traditional high resolution NMR techniques remains challenging. However, increased utilization of computational platforms, and integration of information from less traditional NMR techniques with data from other complementary biophysical methods, promises to extend the boundary of NMR-applicable targets. This article reviews several of the techniques capable of providing less traditional and complementary structural information. In particular, the use of orientational constraints coming from residual dipolar couplings and residual chemical shift anisotropy offsets are shown to simplify the construction of models for oligomeric complexes, especially in cases of weak homo-dimers. Combining this orientational information with interaction site information supplied by computation, chemical shift perturbation, paramagnetic surface perturbation, cross-saturation and mass spectrometry allows high resolution models of the complexes to be constructed with relative ease. Non-NMR techniques, such as mass spectrometry, EPR and small angle X-ray scattering, are also expected to play increasingly important roles by offering alternative methods of probing the overall shape of the complex. Computational platforms capable of integrating information from multiple sources in the modeling process are also discussed in the article. And finally a new, detailed example on the determination of a chemokine tetramer structure will be used to illustrate how a non-traditional approach to oligomeric structure determination works in practice. PMID:21074622

  13. Two- and three-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies of a wheat phospholipid transfer protein: Sequential resonance assignments and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simorre, J.P.; Caille, A. ); Marion, D. ); Marion, D. ); Ptak, M. Univ. d'Orleans )

    1991-12-10

    Two- and three-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR experiments have been used to sequentially assign nearly all proton resonances of the 90 residues of wheat phospholipid transfer protein. Only a few side-chain protons were not identified because of degeneracy or overlapping. The identification of spin systems and the sequential assignment were made at the same time by combining the data of the two- and three-dimensional experiments. The classical two-dimensional COSY, HOHAHA, and NOESY experiments benefit from both good resolution and high sensitivity, allowing the detection of long-range dipolar connectivities. The three-dimensional HOHAHA-NOESY experiment offers the advantage of a faster and unambiguous assignment. As a matter of fact, homonuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy prove to be a very efficient method for resonance assignments of protein {sup 1}H NMR spectra which cannot be unraveled by 2D methods. An assignment strategy which overcomes most of the ambiguities has been proposed, in which each individual assignment toward the C-terminal end is supported by another in the opposite direction originating from a completely different part of the spectrum. Location of secondary structures of the phospholipid transfer protein was determined by using the method of analysis introduced here and was confirmed by {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}NH} coupling and NH exchange rates. Except for the C-terminal part, the polypeptide chain appears to be organized mainly as helical fragments connected by disulfide bridges. Further modeling will display the overall folding of the protein and should provide a better understanding of its interactions with lipids.

  14. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    Nanoscience is an emerging field that can provide potential routes towards addressing critical issues such as clean and sustainable energy, environmental remediation and human health. Specifically, porous nanomaterials, such as zeolites and mesoporous silica, are found in a wide range of applications including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, environmental protection, and sensing. The characterization of the physical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline materials is essential to the realization of these innovative applications. The great advantage of porous nanocrystals is their increased external surface area that can control their biological, chemical and catalytic activities. Specific functional groups synthesized on the surface of nanoparticles are able to absorb heavy metals from the solution or target disease cells, such as cancer cells. In these studies, three main issues related to functionalized nanomaterials will be addressed through the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including: 1) surface composition and structure of functionalized nanocrystalline particles; 2) chemical properties of the guest molecules on the surface of nanomaterials, and 3) adsorption and reactivity of surface bound functional groups. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the major spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of molecular structure and conformational dynamics with atomic level detail. This thesis deals with the application of 1H solution state NMR to porous nanomaterial in an aqueous environment. Understanding the aqueous phase behavior of functionalized nanomaterials is a key factor in the design and development of safe nanomaterials because their interactions with living systems are always mediated through the aqueous phase. This is often due to a lack of fundamental knowledge in interfacial chemical and physical phenomena that occur on the surface of nanoparticles. The use of solution NMR spectroscopy results

  15. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  16. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  17. Structural, NMR, and EPR studies of S = (1)/(2) and S = (3)/(2) Fe(III) bis(4-cyanopyridine) complexes of dodecasubstituted porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Walker, F Ann

    2004-01-26

    The NMR and EPR spectra for three complexes, iron(III) octamethyltetraphenylporphyrin bis(4-cyanopyridine) perchlorate, [FeOMTPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4), and its octaethyl- and tetra-beta,beta'-tetramethylenetetraphenylporphyrin analogues, [FeOETPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) and [FeTC(6)TPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4), are presented. The crystal structures of two different forms of [FeOETPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) and one form of [FeOMTPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) are also reported. Attempts to crystallize [FeTC(6)TPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) were not successful. The crystal structure of [FeOMTPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) reveals a saddled porphyrin core, a small dihedral angle between the axial ligand planes, 64.3 degrees, and an unusually large tilt angle (24.4 degrees ) of one of the axial 4-cyanopyridine ligands with respect to the normal to the porphyrin mean plane. There are 4 and 2 independent molecules in the asymmetric units of [FeOETPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) crystallized from CD(2)Cl(2)/dodecane (1-4) and CDCl(3)/cyclohexane (5-6), respectively. The geometries of the porphyrin cores in 1-6 vary from purely saddled to saddled with 15% ruffling admixture. In all structures, the Fe-N(p) distances (1.958-1.976 A) are very short due to strong nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin cores, while the Fe-N(ax) distances are relatively long ( approximately 2.2 A) compared to the same distances in S = (1)/(2) bis(pyridine)iron(III) porphyrin complexes. An axial EPR signal is observed (g( perpendicular ) = 2.49, g( parallel ) = 1.6) in frozen solutions of both [FeOMTPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) and [FeTC(6)TPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) at 4.2 K, indicative of the low spin (LS, S = (1)/(2)), (d(yz)d(xz))(4)(d(xy))(1) electronic ground state for these two complexes. In agreement with a recent publication (Ikeue, T.; Ohgo, Y.; Ongayi, O.; Vicente, M. G. H.; Nakamura, M. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 5560-5571), the EPR spectra of [FeOETPP(4-CNPy)(2)]ClO(4) are typical of the S = (3)/(2) state, with g values of 5.21, 4.25, and 2.07. A small amount of

  18. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either. PMID:24177877

  19. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  20. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  1. Solution NMR studies of recombinant Aβ(1-42): from the presence of a micellar entity to residual β-sheet structure in the soluble species.

    PubMed

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Orts, Julien; Vögeli, Beat; Campioni, Silvia; Riek, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is the major component found in senile plaques of Alzheimer's disease patients. The 42-residue fragment Aβ(1-42) is proposed to be one of the most pathogenic species therein. Here, the soluble Aβ(1-42) species were analyzed by various liquid-state NMR methods. Transient formation of a micelle species was observed at the onset of the aggregation kinetics. This micelle is dissolved after approximately one day. Subsequent loss of this species and the formation of protofibrils are proposed to be the route of fibril formation. Consequently, the observed micelle species is suggested to be on an off-pathway mechanism. Furthermore, characterization of the NMR-observable soluble species shows that it is a random-coil-like entity with low propensities for four β-strands. These β-strands correlate with the β-strand segments observed in Aβ fibrils. This finding indicates that the 3D structure of the fibrils might already be predisposed in the soluble species. PMID:25676345

  2. Crystal structure and theoretical study of IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cordatin, a natural product with antiulcerogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, Davi S. B.; Alves, Cláudio N.; Guilhon, Giselle M. S. P.; Muller, Adolfo H.; Secco, Ricardo De S.; Peris, Gabriel; Llusar, Rosa

    Cordatin is a furan diterpenoid with a clerodane skeleton isolated from Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). This natural product shows significant antiulcerogenic activity, similar to cimetidine (Tagamet®), a compound used for the treatment of peptic ulcers. The crystal structure of cordatin was obtained by X-ray diffraction and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP theory level. The IR and NMR (1H and 13C chemical shifts and coupling constants) spectra were obtained and compared with the theoretical calculations. The B3LYP theory level, with the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis set, provided IR absorption values close to the experimental data. Moreover, theoretical NMR parameters obtained in both gas phase and chloroform solvent at the B3PW91/DGDZVP, B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p), and B3PW91/6-311+G(2d,p) levels showed good correlations with the experimental results.

  3. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  4. High-Temperature NMR Studies of Quasicrystals and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Edward Arthur

    1995-01-01

    Icosahedral alloys such as rm Al _{65}Cu_{20}Ru_ {15}, Al_{62.5}Cu_ {24.5}Fe_{13}, and rm Al_{70}Pd_{20}Re _{10} have motivated a great deal of experimental and theoretical effort to understand fundamental issues such as the electronic structure, "lattice" dynamics, and thermodynamic stability of quasicrystalline materials. It has been shown here that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a useful tool for exploring many of the essential properties of quasicrystal alloys and the so-called approximant phase alloys. Specifically, the ^{27 }Al Knight shift has been used here to study the electronic density of states in these alloys up to temperatures of 1200 K. Furthermore, ^{27}Al nuclear spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation measurements across a wide temperature range have been used to show that the dynamic processes found in quasicrystals are quite different from those found in some crystalline alloys of similar compositions. In addition, two-dimensional exchange experiments have been employed to study the dynamics of these materials. Finally, the semiconducting alloy rm Al_2Ru has also been studied by the techniques mentioned above. It has also been demonstrated here that high temperature NMR techniques are useful in the study of organic polymers. These experiments focus on determining the timescales and other aspects of molecular motion for several specific samples. ^2H NMR measurements, including the ^2H two-dimensional exchange technique, on the high temperature polymer polybenzamidazole (PBI) are described here. ^2H NMR results for high melting temperature copolyester liquid crystals of the PCnNBB family will also be discussed. An assessment of the high temperature motion in these samples is relevant to an understanding of the physical properties that influence their high temperature applications and high temperature processing.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis, X-ray structure refinement, 31P NMR spectra and vibrational study of NaLa(HPO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hassen, C.; Boujelbene, M.; Mhiri, T.

    2013-10-01

    NaLa(HPO4)2 was obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The structure of NaLa(HPO4)2 was determined by X-ray powder diffraction methods. The results of Rietveld refinement revealed a space group P21/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters of a = 9.7151(17) Å, b = 8.320(12) Å, c = 9.83(2) Å, beta = 114.65(17)°, V = 722 (8) Å3 and Z = 4. Final refinement led to RF = 4.86% and RB = 12.35%.The existence of bound O-H and bound P-O in the structure has been confirmed by IR and Raman spectroscopy. The existence of two crystallographically independent phosphorus atoms in the structure has been confirmed by NMR spectrum. The structure is characterized by LaO6 octahedra which are solely connected to six adjacent HPO4 tetrahedra via common O-corners. This structure contains twelve- and four-membered rings forming channels along [1 1¯ 1]. The cross sections of the channels are given by twelve-membered rings consisting of four lanthanum coordination octahedral and eight hydrogenphosphate groups as well as four-membered rings consisting of two lanthanum coordination octahedra and two hydrogenphosphate tetrahedra. Sodium ions are located within those channels of the twelve-membered rings.

  6. NMR studies of DOXP reductoisomerase and its inhibitor complex.

    PubMed

    Englert, Nadine E; Richter, Christian; Wiesner, Jochen; Hintz, Martin; Jomaa, Hassan; Schwalbe, Harald

    2011-02-11

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) reductoisomerase (EC1.1.1.267) catalyses the second step of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. The enzyme is used by most bacteria, apicomplexan parasites and the plastids of plants, but not by humans, and therefore represents an attractive target for antibacterial, antiparasitic and herbicidal compounds. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXR, has been found to be active against bacterial infections and malaria in early clinical studies. Here, we report sample optimisation, partial backbone assignment and secondary-structure prediction of E. coli DXR by heteronuclear NMR analysis for further NMR-aided drug discovery. Perdeuterated (15)N,(13)C-labelled samples were prepared under oxygen exclusion in the presence of Mg(2+), NADPH and the inhibitor FR-900098, a close derivative of fosmidomycin. (1)H and (15)N backbone assignment was achieved for 44 % of the primary structure, and (13)C backbone assignment was achieved for 50 % of the primary structure. Comparison with previously solved crystal structures revealed that the assigned fragments were located mainly in helical regions on the solvent-exposed surface of the enzyme. Torsion angle likelihood obtained from shift and sequence similarity (TALOS) was used for secondary structure prediction, resulting in agreement with eight available crystal structures; deviations could be observed for the catalytic loop region. PMID:21290548

  7. X-ray structure, NMR and stability-in-solution study of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine - A new active compound for cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walla, Jan; Szüčová, Lucie; Císařová, Ivana; Gucký, Tomáš; Zatloukal, Marek; Doležal, Karel; Greplová, Jarmila; Massino, Frank J.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine ( 1) was determined at 150(2) K. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic P2 1/ c space group with a = 10.5642(2), b = 13.6174(3), c = 10.3742(2) Å, V = 1460.78(5) Å 3, Z = 4, R( F) = for 3344 unique reflections. The purine moiety and furfuryl ring are planar and the tetrahydropyran-2-yl is disordered in the ratio 1:3, probably due to the chiral carbon atom C(17). The individual 1H and 13C NMR signals were assigned by 2D correlation experiments such as 1H- 1H COSY and ge-2D HSQC. Stability-in-solution was determined in methanol/water in acidic pH (3-7).

  8. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  9. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-05-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  10. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  11. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of zeolite SAPO-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freude, D.; Ernst, H.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H.; Jahn, E.

    1988-01-01

    SAPO-5 was synthesized using triethylamine as template. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR of 1H, 27Al, 29Si and 31P was used to study the silicon incorporation into the framework and the nature of the Brønsted sites. 1H MAS NMR shows two types of bridging hydroxyl groups. 29Si MAS NMR indicates that silicon substitutes mostly for phosphorus and that there is a small amount of crystalline SiO 2 in the zeolite powder.

  12. Structural Aspects of Several Oxide Glasses as Elucidated by Multinuclear NMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianhui

    1988-03-01

    NMR is sensitive to many interactions that the nucleus experiences with its environment. Included among these interactions are two that were heavily exploited in this thesis. They are the electric quadrupole interaction and the chemical shift interaction. These interactions yield structural information on short-range order and atom coordinations, which are very valuable and important to the understanding of properties and microstructures of glasses. Both the static or MASS NMR at high field and low field CW NMR were utilized to obtain information concerning the coordinations and local environments of several oxide glasses. For some systems, other spectroscopic methods (thermal analysis, X-ray and IR spectroscopies) were also used to assist NMR studies. In Chapter I relevant NMR theory and detection techniques used for this work are introduced. In Chapters 2-4, some structural aspects of alkali borate, borosilicate or alkali boroaluminate glasses are studied. In particular, boron coordinations in these glasses are carefully reinvestigated. The relationship between the change in boron coordinations and the changes in macroscopic characteristics of the glasses (such as electric conductivity and the mixed alkali effects) are studied. In mixed alkali glasses, the postulated alkali -pairing model provides a reasonable explanation for the structural changes. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the ^{71}Ga and ^{69 }Ga NMR studies of alkali gallate glasses. The glassforming range is explored and the gallium atom coordinations are studied. A structural model for the glass systems is suggested based on the distribution of galliums of different coordinations and structural parameters (quadrupole coupling constants, asymmetry parameters, and isotropic chemical shifts, etc.). A study of ^{31} P spectra in lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glasses is presented in Chapter 6. By subjecting the samples to various magnetic field strengths and different temperatures, information on the local

  13. Comprehensive multiphase NMR: a promising technology to study plants in their native state.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Heather L; Soong, Ronald; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Botana, Adolfo; Fortier-Mcgill, Blythe; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Campbell, Malcolm M; Simpson, Andre

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is arguably one the most powerful tools to study the interactions and molecular structure within plants. Traditionally, however, NMR has developed as two separate fields, one dealing with liquids and the other dealing with solids. Plants in their native state contain components that are soluble, swollen, and true solids. Here, a new form of NMR spectroscopy, developed in 2012, termed comprehensive multiphase (CMP)-NMR is applied for plant analysis. The technology composes all aspects of solution, gel, and solid-state NMR into a single NMR probe such that all components in all phases in native unaltered samples can be studied and differentiated in situ. The technology is evaluated using wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the cellulose-deficient mutant ectopic lignification1 (eli1) as examples. Using CMP-NMR to study intact samples eliminated the bias introduced by extraction methods and enabled the acquisition of a more complete structural and metabolic profile; thus, CMP-NMR revealed molecular differences between wild type (WT) and eli1 that could be overlooked by conventional methods. Methanol, fatty acids and/or lipids, glutamine, phenylalanine, starch, and nucleic acids were more abundant in eli1 than in WT. Pentaglycine was present in A. thaliana seedlings and more abundant in eli1 than in WT. PMID:25855560

  14. Using NMR to Determine Protein Structure in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnero, Silvia

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a marvelous spectroscopic technique that chemists, physicists, and biochemists routinely employ for their research around the world. This year half of the Nobel Prize for chemistry went to Kurt Wüthrich, who was recognized for the development of NMR-based techniques that lead to the structure determination of biomolecules in solution. In addition to implementing novel pulse sequences and software packages, Wüthrich also applied his methods to several biological systems of key importance to human health. These include the prion protein, which is heavily involved in the spongiform encephalopathy (best known as 'mad cow disease'), which recently caused numerous human deaths, particularly in the UK, due to ingestion of contaminated meat. Transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) is the most intriguing new NMR method recently developed by Wüthrich and coworkers. This and other closely related pulse sequences promise to play a pivotal role in the extension of NMR to the conformational analysis of very large (up to the megadalton range) macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. More exciting new developments are expected in the near future.

  15. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  16. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  17. NMR study of new ruthenates with high magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, P. L.; Chakrabarty, Tanmoy

    The Ru based compounds, Ca3LiRuO6 and Ca3NaRuO6 show unusually high magnetic ordering temperature. Extended super exchange model is invoked to explain the magnetic behavior in the isostructural compound Ca3LiOsO6. We have carried out NMR investigation on these two Ru-based compounds. Ca3LiRuO6 is a weak ferromagnet with a magnetic ordering temperature (TC) of 115 K which is explored by the temperature dependence of 7Li NMR line shift, line-width and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) . Above TC, a broad maximum is observed in the evolution of line-width of the spectra. We speculate that this feature might be attributed to some low-dimensional magnetic behavior. Contrastingly, Ca3NaRuO6 with similar structure and local geometry of the Ru5+ ions is a conventional antiferromagnet with a transition temperature of 90 K. The temperature dependence of 23Na NMR line shift and 1/T1 is studied across magnetic transition in Ca3NaRuO6. The temperature variation of line-width is found to be different compared to Ca3LiRuO6. In both these systems, 1/T1 decreases significantly below ordering temperature, characteristic of many antiferromagnetic systems.

  18. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  19. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  20. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe Solid State [sup 13]C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of new approaches to the study of native wood tissue complementary to our earlier Raman spectroscopy including solid state [sup 13]C NMR and X-ray diffractometry. A wide variety of native cellulosic tissues were examined which led to the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. We have also explored charge transport characteristics of lignified tissue. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have advanced our understanding of key spectral features and confirmed the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. A major effort was dedicated to assessing the contributions of electronic factors such as conjugation and the resonance Raman effect to enhancement of the spectra features associated with lignin. We have now established a solid foundation for spectral mapping of different regions in cell walls.

  1. Effect of iron content on the structure and disorder of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses: A high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Im; Sur, Jung Chul; Lee, Sung Keun

    2016-01-01

    increase with iron content and that Fe3+ is predominantly a network-former. The 17O NMR spectra suggest a moderate degree of preferential partitioning of iron between NBO and BO clusters. The present results bear strong promise for studying iron-bearing silicate glasses using solid-state NMR techniques, constraining the effect of iron content on the degree of polymerization. The observed changes in atomic structures of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses will be helpful for unraveling atomic origins of the properties of natural silicate melts.

  2. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  3. Application of NMR techniques for studying coking of FCC catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bonardet, J.J.; Barrage, M.C.; Fraissard, J.

    1995-12-31

    NMR occupies an important place in the study of the deactivation of zeolites by coking. Indeed, association of the resonances of several nuclei has shown that it is possible to investigate: the nature of the, carbonaceous; deposits; under certain conditions, the coke content; the mode of zeolite deactivation; the exact location of the internal coke and the evolution of its distribution with the coke content, the presence of carbonaceous; residues at the crystallite surface; the effect of zeolite structure and the nature of the reactant on coking and regeneration. It also reveals the role of extra framework aluminium species and that of certain lattice Al atoms in the coking process.

  4. New methods of structure refinement for macromolecular structure determination by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Clore, G. Marius; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in multidimensional NMR methodology have permitted solution structures of proteins in excess of 250 residues to be solved. In this paper, we discuss several methods of structure refinement that promise to increase the accuracy of macromolecular structures determined by NMR. These methods include the use of a conformational database potential and direct refinement against three-bond coupling constants, secondary 13C shifts, 1H shifts, T1/T2 ratios, and residual dipolar couplings. The latter two measurements provide long range restraints that are not accessible by other solution NMR parameters. PMID:9600889

  5. An experimental study of the structural and vibrational properties of sesquiterpene lactone cnicin using FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Fernando; Romano, Elida; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Catalán, César Atilio Nazareno; Fortuna, Mario Antonio; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2014-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of cnicin is presented, combining the use of infrared, Raman, NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies with density functional theory (DFT) that employs hybrid B3LYP exchange correlation functional and a 6-31G∗ basis set. The molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies, topological properties and energy gap are presented by performing NBO, AIM and HOMO-LUMO calculations at the same level of theory as cnicin. A complete vibrational compound assignment was performed by employing internal coordinate analysis and a scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. Comparisons between the theoretical and experimental vibrational and ultraviolet-visible spectra show a strong concordance. The geometrical parameters and NBO studies suggest a probable negative Cotton effect for cnicin, which can be attributed to the π → π∗ transition for an α,β-unsaturated γ-lactone, as reported in the literature.

  6. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  7. Assessment of structural changes of human teeth by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    A technique of low-field pulsed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is described for assessment of age-related structural changes (dentin and pulp) of human teeth in vitro. The technique involves spin-spin relaxation measurement and inversion spin-spin spectral analysis methods. The spin-spin relaxation decay curve is converted into a T2 distribution spectrum by a sum of single exponential decays. The NMR spectra from the extracted dentin-portion-only and dental pulp-cells-only were compared with the whole extracted teeth spectra, for the dentin and pulp peak assignments. While dentin and pulp are highly significant parameters in determining tooth quality, variations in these parameters with age can be used as an effective tool for estimating tooth quality. Here we propose an NMR calibration method—the ratio of the amount of dentin to the amount of pulp obtained from NMR T2 distribution spectra can be used for measuring the age-related structural changes in teeth while eliminating any variations in size of teeth. Eight teeth (third molars) extracted from humans, aged among 17-67 years old, were tested in this study. It is found that the intensity ratio of dentin to pulp sensitively changes from 0.48 to 3.2 approaching a linear growth with age. This indicates that age-related structural changes in human teeth can be detected using the low-field NMR technique.

  8. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  9. Sensitivity-enhanced NMR reveals alterations in protein structure by cellular milieus.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Ong, Ta-Chung; Jacavone, Angela C; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-10-22

    Biological processes occur in complex environments containing a myriad of potential interactors. Unfortunately, limitations on the sensitivity of biophysical techniques normally restrict structural investigations to purified systems, at concentrations that are orders of magnitude above endogenous levels. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enable structural studies in biologically complex environments. Here, we applied DNP NMR to investigate the structure of a protein containing both an environmentally sensitive folding pathway and an intrinsically disordered region, the yeast prion protein Sup35. We added an exogenously prepared isotopically labeled protein to deuterated lysates, rendering the biological environment "invisible" and enabling highly efficient polarization transfer for DNP. In this environment, structural changes occurred in a region known to influence biological activity but intrinsically disordered in purified samples. Thus, DNP makes structural studies of proteins at endogenous levels in biological contexts possible, and such contexts can influence protein structure. PMID:26456111

  10. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p < 0.01). Freezing did not significantly change the NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the μCT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  11. Synthetic, structural, NMR and catalytic studies of phosphinic amide-phosphoryl chalcogenides (chalcogen = O, S, Se) as mixed-donor bidentate ligands in zinc chemistry.

    PubMed

    del Águila-Sánchez, Miguel A; Santos-Bastos, Neidemar M; Ramalho-Freitas, Maria C; García López, Jesús; Costa de Souza, Marcos; Camargos-Resende, Jackson A L; Casimiro, María; Alves-Romeiro, Gilberto; Iglesias, María José; López Ortiz, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    ortho Substituted (diphenylphosphoryl)-, (diphenylphosphorothioyl)- and (diphenylphosphoroselenoyl)-phosphinic amides o-C6H4(P(X)Ph2)(P(O)N(i)Pr2) (X = O (20a), S (20b), Se (20c)) were synthesized by ortho directed lithiation of N,N-diisopropyl-P,P-diphenylphosphinic amide (Ph2P(O)N(i)Pr2) followed by trapping with Ph2PCl and subsequent oxidation of the o-(diphenylphosphine)phosphinic amide (19) with H2O2, S8 and Se. The reaction of the new mixed-donor bidentate ligands with zinc dichloride afforded the corresponding complexes [ZnCl2(P(X)Ph2)o-C6H4(P(O)N(i)Pr2)] (21a-c). The new compounds were structurally characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and in the solid-state by X-ray diffraction analysis of the ligand (20b) and the three complexes (21a-c). The X-ray crystal structure of 20b suggests the existence of a P[double bond, length as m-dash]O→P(S)-C intramolecular nonbonded interaction. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis using DFT methods showed that the stabilization effect provided by a nO→σ*P-C orbital interaction was negligible. The molecular structure of the complexes consisted of seven-membered chelates formed by O,X-coordination of the ligands to the zinc cation. The metal is four-coordinated by binding to the two chlorine atoms showing a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Applications in catalysis revealed that hemilabile ligands 20a-c act as significant promoters of the addition of diethylzinc to aldehydes, with 20a showing the highest activity. Chelation of Et2Zn with 20a was evidenced by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:25121963

  12. A Study of the Solvation Structure of L-Leucine in Alcohol-Water Binary Solvents through Molecular Dynamics Simulations and FTIR and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Hatomoto, Yohei; Tonegawa, Junko; Tsutsumi, Youichi; Umecky, Tatsuya

    2015-10-26

    The solvation structures of l-leucine (Leu) in aliphatic-alcohol-water and fluorinated-alcohol-water solvents are elucidated for various alcohol contents by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and IR, and (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy. The aliphatic alcohols included methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol, whereas the fluorinated alcohols were 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. The MD results show that the hydrophobic alkyl moiety of Leu is surrounded by the alkyl or fluoroalkyl groups of the alcohol molecules. In particular, TFE and HFIP significantly solvate the alkyl group of Leu. IR spectra reveal that the Leu C-H stretching vibration blueshifts in fluorinated alcohol solutions with increasing alcohol content, whereas the vibration redshifts in aliphatic alcohol solutions. When the C-H stretching vibration blueshifts in the fluorinated alcohol solutions, the hydrogen and carbon atoms of the Leu alkyl group are magnetically shielded. Consequently, TFE and HFIP molecules may solvate the Leu alkyl group through the blue-shifting hydrogen bonds. PMID:26289908

  13. Correlations between lithium local structure and electrochemistry of layered LiCo(1-2x)Ni(x)Mn(x)O2 oxides: 7Li MAS NMR and EPR studies.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Radostina; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhecheva, Ekaterina; Samoson, Ago; Simova, Svetlana; Tzvetkova, Pavleta; Barra, Anne-Laure

    2014-02-14

    Advanced (7)Li MAS NMR technologies and high frequency EPR are combined to identify structural motifs and their relation to electrochemical properties of layered lithium-cobalt-nickel-manganese oxides LiCo1-2xNixMnxO2 (0 < x ≤ 0.5) used as cathode materials in lithium ion batteries. Structural-chemical shift regularities were established by systematic variation of the ratio of diamagnetic Co(3+) to paramagnetic Ni/Mn ions with variable valences. While EPR allows identifying the oxidation state of transition metal ions inside the layers, (7)Li NMR probes the local structure of Li with respect to transition metal ions located in two adjacent layers. For assignment of the lithium chemical shifts, we examine first magnetically diluted LiCo1-2xNixMnxO2 with x = 0.02, where paramagnetic ions are stabilized only in Mn(4+) and Ni(3+) form. Then the studies are extended towards the intermediate compositions with x = 0.10 and 0.33, containing simultaneously paramagnetic Mn(4+), Ni(3+) and Ni(2+) ions and diamagnetic Co(3+) ions. The benefit of using NMR with ultrafast spinning rates is demonstrated for the end composition LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2 having only paramagnetic Ni(2+) and Mn(2+) ions. The local structure of Li is quantified in respect of the number of Ni(2+) and Mn(4+) neighbors. It has been demonstrated that Ni(2+) and Mn(4+) are non-randomly distributed around Li and their distribution depends on the method of synthesis. The extent of local cationic order and its effect on the electrochemical properties of LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2 are discussed. PMID:24356075

  14. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the effect of composition on network connectivity and structural disorder in multi-component glasses in the diopside and jadeite join: Implications for structure of andesitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of andesitic melts with varying compositions remains one of the unsolved questions in high-temperature geochemistry and petrology. In this article, we report the structural details of model andesitic glasses [CaO-MgO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMNAS)] in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) join using high-resolution, multi-nuclear, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 27Al NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses confirm that [4]Al is dominant. While a minor fraction of [5]Al is observed, its presence is only prevalent in the glasses with higher Ca-Mg content. Topological disorder in the glass network also tends to increase with Ca-Mg content as evidenced by the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (Cq) of [4]Al for glasses with increasing diopside contents (XDiopside). Despite the complex nature of the glasses studied here (with five oxide components), the 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra resolve diverse bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), from which the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity among non-network cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) and each oxygen site can be estimated: presence of Al-O-Al in jadeite glass implies a violation of the Al-avoidance rule in the glasses and the decrease in the fraction of NBOs with increasing XDiopside is consistent with a decrease in their viscosity. Analysis of the peak position of {Ca, Mg}-mixed NBOs, along with the absence of Na-NBO peak, and the peak shape of Si-O-Al reveals preferential partitioning of Ca2+ and Mg2 into NBOs and the proximity of Na+ to BOs. The fraction of highly coordinated Al has been linked to thermodynamic and transport properties of the melts. Considering all the experimental Al coordination environments available in the literature, together with the current experimental studies, we attempt to establish the relationship between the fractions of highly coordinated Al and composition, particularly average

  15. Electronic structure and solvatochromism of merocyanines NMR spectroscopic point of view.

    PubMed

    Kulinich, Andrii V; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Groth, Ulrich M

    2007-09-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of two series of malononitrile-based merocyanines, which possess positive and negative solvatochromism have been in detail investigated in low polar chloroform and polar dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Careful attribution of signals in spectra has been made with the help of two-dimensional NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HMBC, and HMQC). Hence, the dependence of merocyanines electronic structure on their chemical structure and solvent nature has been studied by this powerful method. It has been shown that there exists a good correlation between the calculated charges on carbon atoms of a polymethine chain and their chemical shifts in (13)C NMR spectra. The influence of solvent polarity on bond orders for dyes with positive and negative solvatochromism is also observed. The comparison of (13)C NMR spectra of merocyanines and corresponding parent ionic dyes allows to determine their sign of solvatochromism irrespectively of electronic spectra, and also to find the key atoms of chromophore whose signals in (13)C NMR spectra are most informative. PMID:17188560

  16. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  17. Solution- and solid-state NMR studies of GPCRs and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Tapaneeyakorn, Satita; Goddard, Alan D; Oates, Joanne; Willis, Christine L; Watts, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the major targets of new drugs on the market given their roles as key membrane receptors in many cellular signalling pathways. Structure-based drug design has potential to be the most reliable method for novel drug discovery. Unfortunately, GPCR-ligand crystallisation for X-ray diffraction studies is very difficult to achieve. However, solution- and solid-state NMR approaches have been developed and have provided new insights, particularly focussing on the study of protein-ligand interactions which are vital for drug discovery. This review provides an introduction for new investigators of GPCRs/ligand interactions using NMR spectroscopy. The guidelines for choosing a system for efficient isotope labelling of GPCRs and their ligands for NMR studies will be presented, along with an overview of the different sample environments suitable for generation of high resolution structural information from NMR spectra. PMID:20951674

  18. NMR studies in chemistry. I. Organometallic tin and geramanium compounds. II. The sorbitol pathway in intact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized in the study of two very different chemical problems. The bonding and structure of various cyclopropyl derivatives of tin and germanium has been investigated by means of Sn-119, Ge-73, C-13, and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. Intact rabbit lenses have also been studied using NMR spectroscopy with regard to diabetic cataract formation. C-13 and P-31 NMR spectroscopies have been utilized in the study of the sorbitol pathway and aldose reductase inhibition.

  19. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  20. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  1. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure–activity relationship, protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement’s (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10–13, pp. 176–187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277–298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111–138). Our approach uses NVR’s scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR’s data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR’s assignment accuracy on NVR’s test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs. PMID:25580019

  2. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs. PMID:25194346

  4. NMR study of a 17O enriched LaMnO3 stoichiometric crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsard-Gaudart, L.; Trokiner, A.; Verkhovskii, S.; Gerashenko, A.; Dragoe, N.

    2011-12-01

    We present the synthesis and the NMR characterization of a 17O enriched LaMnO 3 crystalline sample. We checked that it is single phase and, more important, stoichiometric in oxygen. Its 17O enrichment estimated by NMR is about 5.5%. These first 17O NMR results obtained at T=415 K in an undoped parent LaMnO 3 manganite demonstrate that the two oxygen sites of the structure probe very different Mn spin correlations in the paramagnetic orbital ordered phase. This work opens the way to study experimentally the interactions responsible for the orbital order.

  5. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  6. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of

  7. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  8. Use of proline mutants to help solve the NMR solution structure of type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Davies, P. L.; Sykes, B. D.; Sönnichsen, F. D.

    1993-01-01

    To help understand the structure/function relationships in antifreeze proteins (AFP), and to define the motifs required for ice binding, a Type III AFP suitable for two-dimensional (2D) NMR studies was produced in Escherichia coli. A synthetic gene for one of the Type III AFP isoforms was assembled in a T7 polymerase-directed expression vector. The 67-amino acid-long gene product differed from the natural AFP by inclusion of an N-terminal methionine but was indistinguishable in activity. The NMR spectra of this AFP were complicated by cis-trans proline isomerization from the C-terminal sequence YPPA. Substitution of this sequence by YAA eliminated isomer signals without altering the activity or structure of the mutant AFP. This variant (rQAE m1.1) was selected for sequential assignment and the secondary structure determination using 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy. Nine beta-strands are paired to form two triple-stranded antiparallel sheets and one double-stranded antiparallel sheet. Two further proline replacements, P29A and P33A, were made to delineate the role of conserved prolines in Type III AFP. These mutants were valuable in clarifying ambiguous NMR spectral assignments amongst the remaining six prolines of rQAE m1.1. In contrast to the replacement of the C-terminal prolyl residues, the exchange of P29 and P33 caused some structural changes and significantly decreased protein solubility and antifreeze activity. PMID:8401227

  9. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  10. The interaction between ketamine and some crown ethers in common organic solvents studied by NMR: The effect of donating atoms and ligand structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekin, Fereshteh; Bordbar, Maryam; Fathollahi, Yaghoub; Alizadeh, Naader

    2006-02-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the stoichiometry and stability of the drug ketamine cation complexes with some crown ethers, such as 15-crown-5 (15C5), aza-15-crown-5 (A15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), aza-18-crown-6 (A18C6), diaza-18-crown-6 (DA18C6), dibenzyl-diaza-18-crown-6 (DBzDA18C6) and cryptant [2,2,2] (C222) in acetonitrile (AN), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH) at 27 °C. In order to evaluate the formation constants of the ketamine cation complexes, the CH 3 protons chemical shift (on the nitrogen atom of ketamine) was measured as function of ligand/ketamine mole ratio. The formation constant of resulting complexes were calculated by the computer fitting of chemical shift versus mole ratio data to appropriate equations. A significant chemical shift variation was not observed for 15C5 and 18C6. The stoichiometry of the mono aza and diaza ligands are 1:1 and 1:2 (ligand/ketamine), respectively. In all of the solvents studied, DA18C6 formed more stable complexes than other ligands. The solvent effect on the stability of these complexes is discussed.

  11. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  12. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  13. NMR studies of p7 protein from hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gabriel A; Opella, Stanley J

    2010-06-01

    The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) plays an important role in the viral lifecycle. Like other members of the viroporin family of small membrane proteins, the amino acid sequence of p7 is largely conserved over the entire range of genotypes, and it forms ion channels that can be blocked by a number of established channel-blocking compounds. Its characteristics as a membrane protein make it difficult to study by most structural techniques, since it requires the presence of lipids to fold and function properly. Purified p7 can be incorporated into phospholipid bilayers and micelles. Initial solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of p7 in 14-O-PC/6-O-PC bicelles indicate that the protein contains helical segments that are tilted approximately 10 degrees and 25 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. A truncated construct corresponding to the second transmembrane domain of p7 is shown to have properties similar to those of the full-length protein, and was used to determine that the helix segment tilted at 10 degrees is in the C-terminal portion of the protein. The addition of the channel blocker amantadine to the full-length protein resulted in selective chemical shift changes, demonstrating that NMR has a potential role in the development of drugs targeted to p7. PMID:19727701

  14. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  15. Study of molecular interactions with 13C DNP-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Mathilde H.; Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Baumann, Herbert; Petersen, Bent O.; Karlsson, Magnus; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2010-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an established, versatile technique for the detection of molecular interactions, even when these interactions are weak. Signal enhancement by several orders of magnitude through dynamic nuclear polarization alleviates several practical limitations of NMR-based interaction studies. This enhanced non-equilibrium polarization contributes sensitivity for the detection of molecular interactions in a single NMR transient. We show that direct 13C NMR ligand binding studies at natural isotopic abundance of 13C gets feasible in this way. Resultant screens are easy to interpret and can be performed at 13C concentrations below μM. In addition to such ligand-detected studies of molecular interaction, ligand binding can be assessed and quantified with enzymatic assays that employ hyperpolarized substrates at varying enzyme inhibitor concentrations. The physical labeling of nuclear spins by hyperpolarization thus provides the opportunity to devise fast novel in vitro experiments with low material requirement and without the need for synthetic modifications of target or ligands.

  16. Dynamic NMR of low-sensitivity fast-relaxing nuclei: (17)O NMR and DFT study of acetoxysilanes.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Mameli, Giulia; Mocci, Francesca; Luhmer, Michel; Cerioni, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    (17)O NMR is not routinely used for structure characterization, and kinetic studies of fluxional organic compounds are seldom undertaken because poor sensitivity and fast quadrupole relaxation are frequently regarded as intractable issues. This work shows how, nowadays, quantitative (17)O dynamic NMR studies on small organic molecules are feasible without enrichment being needed. It reports on acetoxysilanes, a class of fluxional compounds whose structure and dynamics were to be clarified. Natural abundance (17)O NMR spectra were recorded over a wide range of temperatures using standard instrumentation. The analysis relies on simple linewidth measurements and directly provides the activation parameters. The activation enthalpy is found to decrease with increasing number of acetoxy groups bound to silicon. Density functional theory calculations properly predict this trend and show that a single oxygen atom of the acetoxy group is bound to silicon, excluding chelation as binding mode, and that the dynamic process involves the shift of the silicon atom between the two oxygen atoms of the acetoxy group. PMID:22374872

  17. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; York, Darrin M.; Case, David A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson–Crick stem and the “canonical” UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9–G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. PMID:25805858

  18. A 19F NMR Study of Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Keith E.; Lentz, Kevin; Duncan, Jeffery

    1998-10-01

    This basic enzyme activity laboratory experiment demonstrates how 19F NMR can be used in biochemical studies and presents the advantages of 19F NMR over 1H NMR for studies of this nature. N-Trifluoroacetylglycine was selected as a commercially available model fluorine-tagged substrate that readily undergoes acylase I-catalyzed hydrolysis to produce trifluoroacetic acid and glycine. Progress of the reaction was monitored by following conversion of the trifluoroacetyl moiety peak of N-trifluoroacetylglycine to trifluoroacetic acid. The extent of hydrolysis was determined by comparing integrated ratios of the two 19F NMR peaks. A plot of percent hydrolysis versus enzyme concentration was used to calculate unit activity of the enzyme. This is a viable laboratory experiment for junior/senior-level courses in instrumental analytical chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, or spectroscopy.

  19. Towards Automated Structure-Based NMR Resonance Assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    We propose a general framework for solving the structure-based NMR backbone resonance assignment problem. The core is a novel 0-1 integer programming model that can start from a complete or partial assignment, generate multiple assignments, and model not only the assignment of spins to residues, but also pairwise dependencies consisting of pairs of spins to pairs of residues. It is still a challenge for automated resonance assignment systems to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention. To test the feasibility of this for structure-based assignment, we integrated our system with our automated peak picking and sequence-based resonance assignment system to obtain an assignment for the protein TM1112 with 91% recall and 99% precision without manual intervention. Since using a known structure has the potential to allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data, we work towards the goal of automated structure-based assignment using only such labeled data. Our system reduced the assignment error of Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey-Kellogg's contact replacement (CR) method, which to our knowledge is the most error-tolerant method for this problem, by 5 folds on average. By using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for Ubiquitin, where the type prediction accuracy is 83%, we achieved 91% assignment accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy that was obtained without correcting for typing errors.

  20. Correlations between 11B NMR parameters and structural characters in borate and borosilicate minerals investigated by high-resolution MAS NMR and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing; Sun, Zhaohua; Yao, Yefeng; Pan, Yuanming

    2012-05-01

    Borates consisting of diverse fundamental building blocks (FBB) formed from complex polymerization of planar triangular [Bϕ3] groups and tetrahedral [Bϕ4] groups, where ϕ = O and OH, provide an excellent opportunity for investigation of correlations between the NMR parameters and local structures. However, previous studies suggested that the 11B NMR parameters in borates are insensitive to local structural environments other than the B coordination number, in contrast to those documented for 29Si, 23Na and 27Al in silicates, and no correlation between 11B chemical shifts and the sum of bond valences has been established for borate minerals with hydroxyl groups or molecular water in the structures. In this study, high-resolution NMR spectra have been acquired at the ultra high field of 21 T as well as at 14 T for selected borate and borosilicate minerals, and have been used to extract high-precision NMR parameters by using combined ab initio theoretical calculations and spectral simulations. These new NMR parameters reveal subtle correlations with various structural characters, especially the effects of the 11B chemical shifts from the bridging oxygen atom(s), site symmetry, symmetry of FBB, the sum of bond valences, as well as the next-nearest-neighbor cations and hydrogen bonding. Also, these results provide new insights into the shielding mechanism for 11B in borate and borosilicate minerals. In particular, this study demonstrates that the small variation in 11B chemical shifts can still be used to probe the local structural environments and that the established correlations can be used to investigate the structural details in borates and amorphous materials.

  1. Protein structure determination by combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary couplings

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Hopf, Thomas A.; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate protein structure determination by NMR is challenging for larger proteins, for which experimental data is often incomplete and ambiguous. Fortunately, the upsurge in evolutionary sequence information and advances in maximum entropy statistical methods now provide a rich complementary source of structural constraints. We have developed a hybrid approach (EC-NMR) combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary residue-residue couplings, and demonstrate accurate structure determination for several 6 to 41 kDa proteins. PMID:26121406

  2. Structural studies on Mannich bases of 2-Hydroxy-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorobenzene. An UV, IR, NMR and DFT study. A mini-review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Mannich bases of 2-Hydroxy-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorobenzene are chosen as an exemplary case for tautomeric Mannich bases. Molecular structures are calculated. OH stretching frequencies are rationalized based on DFT calculations. Intrinsic deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in the M-form are estimated based on OH bond lengths. The observed deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are demonstrated to be largely of equilibrium type except at ambient temperatures.

  3. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  4. NMR, UV, FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra and molecular structure (monomeric and dimeric structures) investigation of nicotinic acid N-oxide: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet; Karaca, Caglar; Kose, Etem

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the experimental and theoretical UV, NMR, and vibrational features of nicotinic acid N-oxide (abbreviated as NANO, C 6H 5NO 3) were studied. The ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum of studied compound that dissolved in water was examined in the range of 200-800 nm. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra in solid state were observed in the region 4000-400 cm -1 and 3500-50 cm -1, respectively. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO were recorded. The geometrical parameters, energies and the spectroscopic properties of NANO were obtained for all four conformers from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. There are four conformers, C n, n = 1-4 for this molecule. The computational results identified the most stable conformer of title molecule as the C1 form. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by CIS approach. Finally the calculation results were applied to simulate infrared, Raman, and UV spectra of the title compound which show good agreement with observed spectra.

  5. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of conventional'' pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO[sub 2] and CH[sub 4] adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  6. NMR study of compressed supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, W. J.; Jonas, J.

    1981-01-01

    The proton spin-lattice relaxation time T1 in water has been measured as a function of pressure in the temperature range 150 to 700°C. This study focuses on the supercritical region (tc=374°C) where the spin-rotation interaction mechanism dominates the observed proton relaxation rate. Since water is an asymmetric top molecule, the analysis of the experimental data involves a number of simplifying assumptions discussed in detail. The experimental finding that in supercritical water the spin-rotation relaxation time T 1SR is a linear function of density ρ, up to relatively high densities (ρ≃ 1.5 ρc) provides rationale for analysis of the NMR experimental data in terms of a model used for dilute gases. The T 1SR data are analyzed on the basis of the assumption that the collision modulated spin-rotation interactions can be described by a single correlation function which is an exponential function of time. Using this procedure, we find that T 1SR/ρ αT-2, i.e.T 1SR/ρ exhibits a stronger temperature dependence than that found (T 1SR/ρ αT-3/2) for many polar and nonpolar gases. The calculated effective cross sections for the transfer of angular momentum σeff which show strong temperature dependence (σeff αT-1.5) are several times larger than the kinetic cross sections. By assuming applicability of expressions derived for isotropic reorientation of spherical-top molecules and using the effective spin-rotation interaction constant as obtained from microwave measurements, we are able to calculate the angular momentum correlation time τJ, over the range of temperatures and densities studied. In the supercritical region τJ⩾τΘ, where τΘ is the reorientational correlation time, and the estimated mean angle of reorientation ΔΘ¯ is in the range 50° to 800°. The T 1SR data are also interpreted in terms of the modified rough hard sphere (RHS) model which for ρ<2ρc takes into account the effect of attractive forces. We find that 1/T 1SR is a linear

  7. Molecular structure from a single NMR sequence (fast-PANACEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2010-09-01

    The PANACEA experiment combines three standard NMR pulse sequences (INADEQUATE, HSQC and HMBC) into a single entity, and is designed for spectrometers with two or more receivers operating in parallel. For small molecules it offers a direct route to molecular structure. Often the INADEQUATE feature is the rate-determining step, being limited by the low natural abundance of directly coupled 13C sbnd 13C pairs. This new version, fast-PANACEA, speeds up this measurement by two alternative schemes. In the first, the individual 13C sites are excited by selective radiofrequency pulses acting on double-quantum coherence, and encoded according to the rows of a Hadamard matrix. The columns of this matrix are used to decode the experimental data into separate F 2 spectra. This reduction in the number of required scans secures a faster result than the conventional stepwise exploration of the evolution dimension where the Nyquist condition and the resolution requirements must both be satisfied. The second scheme makes use of multiple aliasing in the evolution dimension. Significant speed improvements are achieved by either technique, illustrated by measurements made on samples of menthol and cholesterol. A new stabilization scheme (i-lock) is introduced. This is a software program that corrects the final NMR frequencies based on the observed frequency of a strong X-spin signal. It replaces the conventional deuterium lock, permitting measurements on neat liquids such as peanut oil and silicone oil, and offering advantages where deuterated solvents are undesirable.

  8. First Principles NMR Study of Fluorapatite under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Barbara; Ceresoli, Davide; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.; Fornari, Marco

    2012-01-01

    NMR is the technique of election to probe the local properties of materials. Herein we present the results of density functional theory (DFT) ab initio calculations of the NMR parameters for fluorapatite (FAp), a calcium orthophosphate mineral belonging to the apatite family, by using the GIPAW method [Pickard and Mauri, 2001]. Understanding the local effects of pressure on apatites is particularly relevant because of their important role in many solid state and biomedical applications. Apatites are open structures, which can undergo complex anisotropic deformations, and the response of NMR can elucidate the microscopic changes induced by an applied pressure. The computed NMR parameters proved to be in good agreement with the available experimental data. The structural evaluation of the material behavior under hydrostatic pressure (from −5 to +100 kbar) indicated a shrinkage of the diameter of the apatitic channel, and a strong correlation between NMR shielding and pressure, proving the sensitivity of this technique to even small changes in the chemical environment around the nuclei. This theoretical approach allows the exploration of all the different nuclei composing the material, thus providing a very useful guidance in the interpretation of experimental results, particularly valuable for the more challenging nuclei such as 43Ca and 17O. PMID:22770669

  9. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  10. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2016-01-15

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs. PMID:26312739

  11. Multiple Quantum NMR Investigations of Structure- Property Relationships in Synthetic and Aged Silicone Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Gjersing, E; Chinn, S; Herberg, J; Eastwood, E; Bowen, D; Stephens, T

    2006-09-27

    Complex engineering elastomeric materials are often characterized by a complex network structure obtained by crosslinking network chains with multiple chain lengths. Further, these networks are commonly filled with thixotropic reinforcing agents such as SiO{sub 2} or carbon black. Degradation of such materials often occurs via mechanisms that alter the fundamental network structure. In order to understand the effects of modifications of network structure and filler-polymer interaction on component performance, a series of model compounds have been studied by {sup 1}H multiple quantum NMR analysis and traditional mechanical property assessments. The {sup 1}H NMR data provides insight into the distribution of segmental dynamics that reveals insight into the changes in mechanical properties.

  12. Drug screening strategy for human membrane proteins: from NMR protein backbone structure to in silica- and NMR-screened hits.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Chiu, Ellis J C; Pierce, Levi C; McCammon, J Andrew; Choe, Senyon

    2014-03-21

    About 8000 genes encode membrane proteins in the human genome. The information about their druggability will be very useful to facilitate drug discovery and development. The main problem, however, consists of limited structural and functional information about these proteins because they are difficult to produce biochemically and to study. In this paper we describe the strategy that combines Cell-free protein expression, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular DYnamics simulation (CNDY) techniques. Results of a pilot CNDY experiment provide us with a guiding light towards expedited identification of the hit compounds against a new uncharacterized membrane protein as a potentially druggable target. These hits can then be further characterized and optimized to develop the initial lead compound quicker. We illustrate such "omics" approach for drug discovery with the CNDY strategy applied to two example proteins: hypoxia-induced genes HIGD1A and HIGD1B. PMID:24525125

  13. {sup 19}F NMR spectra and structures of halogenated porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Hodge, J.A.; Grinstaff, M.W.

    1995-07-05

    Fluorine-19 NMR spectra of a series of halogenated porphyrins have been used to create a spectral library of different types of fluorine splitting patterns for tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrins (TFPP) complexed with diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions. The paramagnetic shift, line broadening, and fine structure of the resonances form the peripheral pentafluorophenyl rings are dependent on the symmetry and core environment of the porphyrin macrocycles. In combination with crystal structure data, {sup 19}F NMR helps define the behavior of halogenated porphyrins in solution. Six new crystal structures for TFPP and octahalo-TFPP derivatives are reported: H{sub 2}TFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.327(4) {Angstrom}, c = 15.261(2) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 103.87(2){degrees}, V = 2227.6(13) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; CuTFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.358(5), c = 14.678(2) {Angstrom}, {alpha} = 88.97(1), {beta}=76.05(1){degrees}, {gamma} = 71.29(1){degrees}, V = 2181.4(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; ZnTFPPCl{sub 8} in tetragonal space group P42, c, a = 19.502(20), c = 10.916(8) {Angstrom}, V = 4152(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; H{sub 2}TFPPBr{sub 8} in monoclinic space group C2, a = 27.634(6) {Angstrom}, b = 6.926(2) {Angstrom}, c = 14.844(3) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 109.64(2){degrees}, V = 2675.8(11) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2.

  14. On reasons of 29Si NMR chemical shift/structure relations for silicon oxides, nitrides, and carbides: an individual-gauge-for-localized-orbitals study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Jancke, H; Radeglia, R

    1997-12-01

    For alpha-quartz, monoclinic ZSM-5, alpha- and beta-Si3N4 and SiC-6H polytype, the silicon chemical shifts have been calculated using the IGLO (individual gauge for localized orbitals) method and models of different size in real crystal geometry. The result is a theoretical chemical shift scale, which is very similar to the corresponding experimental scale from 29Si MAS NMR experiments. It is shown that the assignment of isotropic silicon chemical shifts of crystallized solids based on theory is a method of practical applicability, also in cases where experimental methods or empirical relations fail. The two NMR spectral lines of alpha-Si3N4 are for the first time assigned to the crystallographic positions. The partition of the silicon chemical shifts into localized contributions from different parts of the model allows insight into the interactions around the resonance nucleus due to substituent and geometry variations leading to silicon chemical shifts. PMID:9477448

  15. 1H NMR studies of maltose, maltoheptaose, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, and complexes in aqueous solutions with hydroxy protons as structural probes.

    PubMed

    Bekiroglu, Somer; Kenne, Lennart; Sandström, Corine

    2003-03-01

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts, coupling constants, temperature coefficients, and exchange rates have been measured for the hydroxy protons of aqueous solutions of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, maltose, and maltoheptaose. In cyclodextrins (CDs), the high chemical shift of the O(3)H signal and its small (3)J(OH,CH) value suggest that O(3)H is involved in a hydrogen bond. The small temperature coefficients and rate of exchange values of O(2)H and O(3)H confirm the involvement of O(3)H in hydrogen bonding and indicate that O(2)H is the hydrogen bond partner. In maltose, two distinct NMR signals with two different vicinal coupling constants are found for O(2')H. A cross-peak in the ROESY spectrum indicates chemical exchange between the O(2')H and O(3)H protons. The existence of two distinct NMR signals with different J values for O(2')H shows the influence of anomeric configuration on the O(2')H-O(3)H interaction. The effect of complexation with methyl benzoate, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid, adamantane-1-ol, and l- and d-tryptophane on the NMR spectra of the hydroxy protons of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins and of maltose has been investigated. No significant spectral changes were observed upon addition of methyl benzoate and adamantane-1-carboxylic acid. The addition of adamantane-1-ol resulted in an upfield shift and a strong broadening of the O(2)H signal from alpha-CD, and a small temperature coefficient was measured upon complexation. The O(2)H and O(3)H signals in beta-CD were broadened and shifted downfield upon addition of l- and d-tryptophane. PMID:12608778

  16. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:26068746

  17. One pot synthesis, molecular structure and spectroscopic studies (X-ray, IR, NMR, UV-Vis) of novel 2-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) amino acid ester derivatives.

    PubMed

    El-Faham, Ayman; Soliman, Saied M; Osman, Sameh M; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Siddiqui, Mohammed R H; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-04-15

    Novel series of 2-(4,6-dimethoxy,1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) amino acid ester derivatives were synthesized using simple one pot method in methanol. The products were obtained in high yields and purities as observed from their spectral data, elemental analyses, GC-MS and X-ray crystallographic analysis. The B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculated molecular structures are well correlated with the geometrical parameters obtained from the X-ray analyses. The spectroscopic properties such as IR vibrational modes, NMR chemical shifts and UV-Vis electronic transitions were discussed both experimentally and theoretically. The IR vibrational frequencies showed good correlations with the experimental data (R(2)=0.9961-0.9995). The electronic spectra were assigned based on the TD-DFT results. Intense electronic transition band is calculated at 198.1 nm (f=0.1389), 204.2 nm (f=0.2053), 205.0 (f=0.1704) and 205.7 (0.2971) for compounds 6a-i, respectively. The molecular orbital energy levels contributed in the longest wavelength transition band were explained. For all compounds, the experimental wavelengths showed red shifts compared to the calculations due to the solvent effect. The NMR chemical shifts were calculated using GIAO method. The NBO analyses were performed to predict the stabilization energies due to the electron delocalization processes occur in the studied systems. PMID:26845586

  18. One pot synthesis, molecular structure and spectroscopic studies (X-ray, IR, NMR, UV-Vis) of novel 2-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) amino acid ester derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faham, Ayman; Soliman, Saied M.; Osman, Sameh M.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Siddiqui, Mohammed R. H.; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Novel series of 2-(4,6-dimethoxy,1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) amino acid ester derivatives were synthesized using simple one pot method in methanol. The products were obtained in high yields and purities as observed from their spectral data, elemental analyses, GC-MS and X-ray crystallographic analysis. The B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculated molecular structures are well correlated with the geometrical parameters obtained from the X-ray analyses. The spectroscopic properties such as IR vibrational modes, NMR chemical shifts and UV-Vis electronic transitions were discussed both experimentally and theoretically. The IR vibrational frequencies showed good correlations with the experimental data (R2 = 0.9961-0.9995). The electronic spectra were assigned based on the TD-DFT results. Intense electronic transition band is calculated at 198.1 nm (f = 0.1389), 204.2 nm (f = 0.2053), 205.0 (f = 0.1704) and 205.7 (0.2971) for compounds 6a-i, respectively. The molecular orbital energy levels contributed in the longest wavelength transition band were explained. For all compounds, the experimental wavelengths showed red shifts compared to the calculations due to the solvent effect. The NMR chemical shifts were calculated using GIAO method. The NBO analyses were performed to predict the stabilization energies due to the electron delocalization processes occur in the studied systems.

  19. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR spectra and molecular structure investigation of (E)-2-(3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)-1-(3-ethyl-2, 6-diphenyl piperidin-4-ylidene) hydrazine: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therasa Alphonsa, A.; Loganathan, C.; Athavan Alias Anand, S.; Kabilan, S.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents the characterization of (E)-2-(3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)-1-(3-ethyl-2, 6-diphenyl piperidin-4-ylidene) hydrazine (HDE) by quantum chemical calculations and spectral techniques. The structure was investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-vis and NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from Density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP (6-31G (d, p)) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge-independent atomic orbital method (GIAO). The electronic properties such as excitation energies, wavelength, HOMO, LUMO energies performed by Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. NBO analysis has been performed for analyzing charge delocalization throughout the molecule. The calculation results were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. To provide information about the interactions between human cytochrome protein and the novel compound theoretically, docking studies were carried out using Schrödinger software.

  20. Solution NMR Structure of Membrane-Integral Diacylglycerol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Kim, Hak-Jun; Ellis, Charles D.; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Karra, Murthy D.; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) represents a family of integral membrane enzymes that is unrelated to all other phosphotransferases. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the DAGK homotrimer using solution NMR. The third transmembrane helix from each subunit is domain-swapped with the first and second transmembrane segments from an adjacent subunit. Each of DAGK’s three active sites resembles a portico. The cornice of the portico appears to be the determinant of DAGK’s lipid substrate specificity and overhangs the site of phosphoryl transfer near the water-membrane interface. Mutations to cysteine that caused severe misfolding were located in or near the active site, indicating a high degree of overlap between sites responsible for folding and for catalysis. PMID:19556511

  1. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  2. Sol-gel synthesis, phase composition, morphological and structural characterization of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2: XRD, FTIR, SEM, 3D SEM and solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareiva, Simonas; Klimavicius, Vytautas; Momot, Aleksandr; Kausteklis, Jonas; Prichodko, Aleksandra; Dagys, Laurynas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas; Sakirzanovas, Simas; Balevicius, Vytautas; Kareiva, Aivaras

    2016-09-01

    Aqueous sol-gel chemistry route based on ammonium-hydrogen phosphate as the phosphorus precursor, calcium acetate monohydrate as source of calcium ions, and 1,2-ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetracetic acid (DCTA), or tartaric acid (TA), or ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol (GL) as complexing agents have been used to prepare calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, CHAp). The phase transformations, composition, and structural changes in the polycrystalline samples were studied by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The local short-range (nano- and mezo-) scale effects in CHAp were studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The spatial 3D data from the SEM images of CHAp samples obtained by TA, EG and GL sol-gel routes were recovered for the first time to our knowledge.

  3. Simple NMR methods for evaluating higher order structures of monoclonal antibody therapeutics with quinary structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Long, Dianna S; Lute, Scott C; Levy, Michaella J; Brorson, Kurt A; Keire, David A

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs constitute the largest class of protein therapeutics currently on the market. Correctly folded protein higher order structure (HOS), including quinary structure, is crucial for mAb drug quality. The quinary structure is defined as the association of quaternary structures (e.g., oligomerized mAb). Here, several commonly available analytical methods, i.e., size-exclusion-chromatography (SEC) FPLC, multi-angle light scattering (MALS), circular dichroism (CD), NMR and multivariate analysis, were combined and modified to yield a complete profile of HOS and comparable metrics. Rituximab and infliximab were chosen for method evaluation because both IgG1 molecules are known to be homologous in sequence, superimposable in Fab crystal structure and identical in Fc structure. However, herein the two are identified to be significantly different in quinary structure in addition to minor secondary structure differences. All data collectively showed rituximab was mostly monomeric while infliximab was in mono-oligomer equilibrium driven by its Fab fragment. The quinary structure differences were qualitatively inferred from the less used but more reproducible dilution-injection-SEC-FPLC curve method. Quantitative principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on NMR spectra of either the intact or the in-situ enzymatic-digested mAb samples. The cleavage reactions happened directly in NMR tubes without further separation, which greatly enhanced NMR spectra quality and resulted in larger inter- and intra-lot variations based on PCA. The new in-situ enzymatic digestion method holds potential in identifying structural differences on larger therapeutic molecules using NMR. PMID:27344629

  4. Diamond deposition and defect chemistry studied via solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Karen K.

    1994-06-01

    Diamond defects were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While maintaining the macroscopic integrity of the films, concentrations between 0.001 and 1.0 at.% H were measured, among the lowest ever reported by solid-state 1H NMR. These concentrations were correlated to infrared absorption in the 8 to 10 micron region and to thermal conductivity. Despite the low concentrations, Multiple Quantum NMR reveals a high degree of hydrogen clustering consistent with grain boundary passivation. Most hydrogen is rigidly held, but some, probably in -OCH3 and -NCH3 defects, undergoes rotation at room temperature. Similar results were obtained for hot-filament, microwave-plasma and DC arc-jet films, suggesting a common surface chemistry, but no hydrogen was detected in an as-deposited combustion film. 13C NMR provided the first quantitative determination of non-diamond bonded carbon defects, providing a benchmark for Raman spectroscopy, the primary characterization method for diamond. Selective 13C labeling demonstrated heterogeneous reactions involving carbon occur at the hot-filament. With high-speed magic-angle-spinning 19F NMR, CFx (x=1-3) functionalities were resolved on the surface of plasma-treated diamond powder. Understanding these defects impacts the understanding of film growth mechanisms and structure-property relationships for CVD diamond.

  5. The NMR study of biologically active metallated alkanol ammoinium ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, I. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Adamovich, S. N.; Mirskov, R. G.; Mirskova, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The 1H, 13C, 15N, and 111Cd NMR spectra of a series of metallated alkanol ammonium ionic liquids (MAIL) series [n N(CH2CH2OH;)3M]+ · mX-, where M = Cd, Mg, Zn, Fe, Rh; X = Cl, OOCCH3, obtained in a wide range of temperatures of the studied samples, have been analyzed. It is found that, under biomimetic conditions (H2O, 25 °C), the compounds studied exist as mono- bi- and the tricyclic structures, which are in equilibrium. Shift of the equilibrium depends upon nature of a metal and effects all the parameters of the NMR spectra. Peculiarities of ligand exchange, typical for the studied compounds, have been studied in a wide range of temperatures. It is found that the NMR data can be used to control structure of the compounds formed in the course of synthesis.

  6. Molecular and electron-spin structures of a ring-shaped mixed-valence polyoxovanadate (IV, V) studied by (11)B and (23)Na solid-state NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takahiro; Yamase, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    (11)B and (23)Na solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ring-shaped paramagnetic crystals of H15[V7(IV)V5(V)B32O84Na4]·13H2O containing seven d(1) electrons from V(IV) were studied. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum MAS NMR experiments were performed at moderate (9.4T) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (21.6T). The NMR parameters for quadrupole and isotropic chemical shift interactions were estimated by simulation of the NMR spectra and from relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Four Na ions incorporated into the framework were found to occupy four distinct sites with different populations. The DFT calculation showed that d(1) electrons with effectively one up-spin caused by strong antiferromagnetic interactions were delocalized over the 12V ions. PMID:27018827

  7. A computational NMR study on zigzag aluminum nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, Ali; Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Seif, Ahmad; Giahi, Masoud

    2008-12-01

    A computational nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study is performed to investigate the electronic structure properties of the single-walled zigzag aluminum nitride nanotubes (AlNNTs). The chemical-shielding (CS) tensors are calculated at the sites of Al-27 and N-15 nuclei in three structural forms of AlNNT including H-saturated, Al-terminated, and N-terminated ones. The structural forms are firstly optimized and then the calculated CS tensors in the optimized structures are converted to chemical-shielding isotropic (CSI) and chemical-shielding anisotropic (CSA) parameters. The calculated parameters reveal that various Al-27 and N-15 nuclei are divided into some layers with equivalent electrostatic properties; furthermore, Al and N can act as Lewis base and acid, respectively. In the Al-terminated and N-terminated forms of AlNNT, in which one mouth of the nanotube is terminated by aluminum and nitrogen nuclei, respectively, just the CS tensors of the nearest nuclei to the mouth of the nanotube are significantly changed due to removal of saturating hydrogen atoms. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed using GAUSSIAN 98 package of program.

  8. NMR spectral and structural studies on some xanthenones and their thiosemicarbazone derivatives: Crystal and molecular structure of 12-(2-chlorophenyl)-8,9,10,12-tetrahydrobenzo[a]xanthen-11-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethukumar, A.; Vithya, V.; Udhaya Kumar, C.; Arul Prakasam, B.

    2012-01-01

    A series of 12-aryl-8,9,10,12-tetrahydrobenzo[a]xanthen-11-ones [ 1a- 9a] were prepared employing a three component one-pot reaction of aryl aldehyde, 2-naphthol and 1,3-cyclohexanedione using BF 3·OEt 2 as catalyst. Thiosemicarbazone derivatives [ 1b- 5b] were also prepared in the presence of acid catalyst. All the synthesized compounds have been characterized by IR and NMR. The structure of 5b was confirmed by HSQC spectral analysis. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis of 12-(2-chlorophenyl)-8,9,10,12-tetrahydrobenzo[a]xanthen-11-one evidences the envelope and flattened-boat conformations of cyclohexenone and pyran rings respectively.

  9. Crystal versus solution structures of enzymes: NMR spectroscopy of a crystalline serine protease.

    PubMed

    Smith, S O; Farr-Jones, S; Griffin, R G; Bachovchin, W W

    1989-05-26

    The hydrogen-bonding status of His57 in the catalytic triad (Asp-His-Ser) of serine protease has important mechanistic implications for this class of enzymes. Recent nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of alpha-lytic protease find His57 and Ser195 to be strongly hydrogen-bonded, a result that conflicts with the corresponding crystallographic studies, thereby suggesting that the crystal and solution structures may differ. This discrepancy is addressed and resolved in a nitrogen-15 NMR study of the enzyme in the crystalline state. The results show that the His-Ser and Asp-His interactions are identical in crystals and solutions, but that in crystals His57 titrates with a pKa of 7.9, nearly one pKa unit higher than in solution. This elevated pKa accounts for the absence of the His-Ser hydrogen bond in previous x-ray studies. PMID:2499045

  10. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  11. TC and H NMR studies of PQQ and selected derivatives. [Pyrroloquinoline quinone

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ortho-quinone structure of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is famous for its reactivity with nucleophilic species of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen(Duine et. al. 1987). In fact, the crystal structure of PQQ was solved in the form of the C-5 acetone adduct(Salisbury et. al 1979). The propensity of the ortho-quinone to accept nucleophiles is the chemical basis of the function of PQQ at enzyme active sites. The present study focuses on the NMR of PQQ and various derivatives formed with oxygen and nitrogen nucleophiles. Our goals are to assign the H, TC, and VN NMR spectra and to rigorously confirm the structures of the adducts. Once the NMR data of the relevant adducts are well defined, we will use TC and VN labeled substrates to probe the active sites of PQQ containing enzymes. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jennifer; Huang, Yulin; Natella, Michael; Cai, Yang; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2009-01-04

    A detailed study of the chemical structure of mesoporous silica catalysts containing rhodium ligands and nanoparticles (RhP-MSN) was carried out by multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques. The degree of functionalization of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex to the surface of the RhP-MSN channels was determined by {sup 29}Si NMR experiments. The structural assignments of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex were unambiguously determined by employing the novel, indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation ({sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H idHETCOR) techniques, which indicated that oxidation of the attached phosphinosilyl groups and detachment of Rh was enhanced upon syngas conversion.

  13. NMR and EPR spectroscopic and structural studies of low-spin, (d(xz),d(y)(z))(4)(d(x)(y))(1) ground state Fe(III) bis-tert-butylisocyanide complexes of dodecasubstituted porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Walker, F Ann

    2004-07-12

    The bis-(1,1-dimethylethylisocyanide) (tert-butylisocyanide) complexes of three iron porphyrinates (2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, OETPP; 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octamethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, OMTPP; and 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-tetra-beta,beta'-tetramethylene-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, TC(6)TPP) have been prepared and studied by EPR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. From EPR and NMR spectroscopic results it has been found that the ground states of the bis-(t-BuNC) complexes of OETPP, OMTPP, and TC(6)TPP are represented mainly (99.1-99.4%) as (d(xz,)d(yz))(4)(d(xy))(1) electron configurations, with an excited state lying 700 cm(-)(1) to higher energy for the OMTPP complex, and probably at lower and higher energies, respectively, for the OETPP and TC(6)TPP complexes. In the (1)H NMR spectra the (d(xz,)d(yz))(4)(d(xy))(1) electron configurations of all three complexes are indicated by the large and positive meso-phenyl-H shift differences, delta(m)-delta(o) and delta(m)-delta(p), and close to the diamagnetic shifts of groups (CH(3) or CH(2)) directly attached to the beta-carbons. However, in comparison to meso-only substituted porphyrinates such as [FeTPP(t-BuNC)(2)]ClO(4), the meso-phenyl shift differences are much smaller, especially for the OETPP complex. 2D NOESY spectra show that the flexibility of the porphyrin core decreases with increasing nonplanar distortion in the order TC(6)TPP > OMTPP > OETPP and in the same order the stability of the binding to t-BuNC ligands decreases. In addition, the structures of two crystalline forms of [FeOMTPP(t-BuNC)(2)]ClO(4) have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both structures showed purely saddled porphyrin cores and somewhat off-axis binding of the isocyanide ligands. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a porphyrin complex with a purely saddled conformation that adopts the (d(xz,)d(yz))(4)(d(xy))(1) ground state. All structurally-characterized complexes of this electron

  14. Magnetic structure of low-dimensional LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} multiferroic according to {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 7}Li NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sadykov, A. F. Gerashchenko, A. P.; Piskunov, Yu. V.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Smol'nikov, A. G.; Verkhovskii, S. V.; Yakubovskii, A. Yu.; Tishchenko, E. A.; Bush, A. A.

    2012-10-15

    The complex NMR study of the magnetic structure of LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} multiferroic has been performed. It has been shown that the spin spirals in LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} are beyond the ab, bc, and ac crystallographic planes. The external magnetic field applied along the c axis of the crystal does not change the spatial orientation of spirals in Cu{sup 2+} chains. A magnetic field of H{sub 0} = 94 kOe applied along the a and b axes rotates the planes of spin spirals in chains, tending to orient the normal n of spirals along the external magnetic field. The rotation angle of the planes of the magnetic moments are maximal at H{sub 0} Double-Vertical-Line b.

  15. High-Resolution NMR Determination of the Dynamic Structure of Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Villinger, Saskia; Schmidt, Christian D; Griesinger, Christian; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-08-22

    (15) N spin-relaxation rates are demonstrated to provide critical information about the long-range structure and internal motions of membrane proteins. Combined with an improved calculation method, the relaxation-rate-derived structure of the 283-residue human voltage-dependent anion channel revealed an anisotropically shaped barrel with a rigidly attached N-terminal helix. Our study thus establishes an NMR spectroscopic approach to determine the structure and dynamics of mammalian membrane proteins at high accuracy and resolution. PMID:27461260

  16. Sequence specific molecular recognition by a monocationic lexitropsin of the decadeoxyribonucleotide d-[CATGGCCATG]2: structural and dynamic aspects deduced from high field 1H-NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M; Hartley, J A; Pon, R T; Krowicki, K; Lown, J W

    1988-01-01

    All 1H-NMR resonances of d-[CATGGCCATG]2 and the 1:1 complex of lexitropsin 1 and the DNA were assigned by the NOE difference, COSY and NOESY methods. Addition of 1 causes the base and imino protons for the sequence 5'-CCAT to undergo the most marked drug-induced chemical shift changes, thereby indicating that 1 is located in this base pair sequence. NOEs confirmed the location and orientation of the drug in the 1:1 complex, with the amino terminus oriented to C(6). The van der Waals interaction between H12a,b of 1 and AH2(8) may be responsible for reading of the 3' A.T base pair in the 5'-CCAT sequence. Exchange NMR effects allow an estimate of approximately equal to 62 s-1 for the intramolecular "slide-swing" exchange of the lexitropsin between two equivalent binding sites with delta G = 58 +/- 5 kJ mol-1 at 301 degrees K. PMID:2829134

  17. Some specific features of the NMR study of fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Some specific features of studying fluid flows with a NMR spectrometer are considered. The consideration of these features in the NMR spectrometer design makes it possible to determine the relative concentrations of paramagnetic ions and measure the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times ( T 1 and T 2, respectively) in fluid flows with an error no larger than 0.5%. This approach allows one to completely avoid errors in determining the state of a fluid from measured relaxation constants T 1 and T 2, which is especially urgent when working with medical suspensions and biological solutions. The results of an experimental study of fluid flows are presented.

  18. NMR study of the potential composition of Titan's lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    A large number of hydrocarbon lakes have been discovered in Titan's surface. However, the chemical composition and physical properties of these lakes are not fully understood. We investigate the potential composition of Titan's lakes by NMR. Based upon NMR data, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the hydrocarbons in Titan's lakes are simulated on a 1 T spectrometer [being developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for future in situ characterization of Titan's lakes]. The study indicates that the dominant composition (all components>1% of the lake composition by mole fraction) in Titan's lakes can be determined and the major soluble organics quantitatively identified from either quantitative 1H or 13C spectra on a 1 T NMR spectrometer. The proton T1 relaxation times are determined for a number of candidate organics in hydrocarbon solution, a necessary determinant for quantitative NMR. The gas solubility of these organics is also investigated to understand the equilibrium of composition between Titan's lakes and atmosphere and the precipitation rates of the molecules at Titan's ground level. Our results are significant for the ongoing discussion regarding the development of in situ, low bias analysis methods and instruments for Titan missions and other outer planet exploration.

  19. Structural studies by proton-NMR spectroscopy of plant horseradish peroxidase C, the wild-type recombinant protein from Escherichia coli and two protein variants, Phe41----Val and Arg38----Lys.

    PubMed

    Veitch, N C; Williams, R J; Bray, R C; Burke, J F; Sanders, S A; Thorneley, R N; Smith, A T

    1992-07-15

    Wild-type recombinant horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C and two protein variants, Phe41----Val and Arg38----Lys, have been characterised using both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Proton NMR spectra recorded in both resting and cyanide-ligated states of the proteins were compared with those of the corresponding plant peroxidase. The latter contains 18% carbohydrate in eight N-linked oligosaccharide side chains whereas the recombinant proteins are expressed in nonglycosylated form. The spectra of the plant enzyme and refolded recombinant protein are essentially identical with the exception of carbohydrate-linked resonances in the former, indicating that their solution structures are highly similar. This comparison also identifies classes of carbohydrate resonances in the plant enzyme which provides new information on the local environment and mobility of the oligosaccharide side chains. Comparison of the spectra of the cyanide-ligated states of the two variants and those of plant horseradish peroxidase C indicated that there were significant differences with respect to haem and haem-linked resonances. These could not be rationalised simply on the basis of the local perturbation expected from a single-site substitution. The two substitutions made to residues on the distal side of the haem apparently influenced the degree of imidazolate character of the proximal His170 imidazole ring thus perturbing the magnetic environment of the haem group. Inspection of the spectra of the Phe41----Val variant also showed that the resonances of a phenylalanine residue in the haem pocket had been incorrectly assigned to Phe41 in a previous study. A new assignment, based on additional information from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy, was made to Phe152. The assignments made for the Phe41----Val variant were also used as a basis to investigate the structure of the complex formed with the aromatic donor molecule, benzhydroxamic acid. PMID:1633807

  20. NMR study in sodium-hydrogen-C{sub 60} superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, H.; Miyajima, S.; Imaeda, K.; Inokuchi, H.

    1998-12-31

    {sup 23}Na and {sup 1}H NMR studies have been carried out for a Na{sub x}H{sub y}C{sub 60} superconductor. The peak position of the {sup 23}Na NMR spectrum exhibits discontinuous upfield shift of 30 ppm at about 250 K, indicates a first order phase transition. From the line shape of the {sup 23}Na spectrum obtained at 7 K, the quadrupole coupling constant tensor is evaluated to be {vert_bar}e{sup 2}Qq/h{vert_bar} = 3.7 MHz with the asymmetry parameter {eta} = 0.95. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum suggests an anionic hydrogen state with weakly delocalized nature.

  1. Indole-containing new types of dyes and their UV-vis and NMR spectra and electronic structures: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzu, Burak; Menges, Nurettin

    2016-06-01

    Indole containing dyes were synthesized via a simple method with high yield. These molecules have different colors and UV-vis spectra of them were recorded. Impact of solvents on absorbances was investigated and it was observed that basic solvent such as DMF and pyridine have blue shift. TD-DFT calculations were done and results were compared with experimental data. NMR data of molecules were analyzed and tautomeric forms of colorants and their ratio were determined. It was find out that two tautomers might be formed in solution, called indole and indolenine form. HOMO-LUMO and energy gaps were calculated and plotted. Furthermore, molecular electrostatic potentials were simulated to find out electrophilic and nucleophilic regions.

  2. A study of structure and dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    Solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR measurements have been carried out on poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends over a wide range of temperatures. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformations of PAANa in PAANa/PVA blends take the α-helix form over a wide range of blend ratios, and, in contrast, the conformation and dynamics of the side chains of PAANa are strongly influenced by the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the side chains and the hydroxyl group of PVA. The behavior of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame ( T1 ρ(H)) and the laboratory frame ( T1(H)) indicates that when the blend ratio of PAANa and PVA is 1:1, they are miscible.

  3. Indole-containing new types of dyes and their UV-vis and NMR spectra and electronic structures: Experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Burak; Menges, Nurettin

    2016-06-01

    Indole containing dyes were synthesized via a simple method with high yield. These molecules have different colors and UV-vis spectra of them were recorded. Impact of solvents on absorbances was investigated and it was observed that basic solvent such as DMF and pyridine have blue shift. TD-DFT calculations were done and results were compared with experimental data. NMR data of molecules were analyzed and tautomeric forms of colorants and their ratio were determined. It was find out that two tautomers might be formed in solution, called indole and indolenine form. HOMO-LUMO and energy gaps were calculated and plotted. Furthermore, molecular electrostatic potentials were simulated to find out electrophilic and nucleophilic regions. PMID:26985875

  4. The NMR solution structure of recombinant RGD-hirudin

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xia; Mo, Wei; Liu, Xingang; Zhu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomin; Song, Houyan . E-mail: hysong@shmu.edu.cn; Dai, Linsen . E-mail: lsdai@fudan.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    The solution structure of a new recombinant RGD-hirudin, which has the activities of anti-thrombin and anti-platelet aggregation, was determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared with the conformations of recombinant wild-type hirudin and hirudin (variant 2, Lys47) of the hirudin thrombin complex. On the basis of total 1284 distance and dihedral angle constraints derived from a series of NMR spectra, 20 conformers were computed with ARIA/CNS programs. The structure of residues 3-30 and 37-48 form a molecular core with two antiparallel {beta}-sheets as the other two hirudins. However, significant differences were found in the surface electrostatic charge distributions among the three hirudins, especially in the RGD segment of recombinant RGD-hirudin. This difference may be greatly beneficial to its additional function of anti-platelet aggregation. The difference in extended C-terminal makes its both ionic and hydrophobic interactions with the fibrinogen recognition exosite of thrombin more effective.

  5. MAS PFG NMR Studies of Mixtures in Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, Marcel; Hertel, Stefan; Wehring, Markus; Schlayer, Stefan; Stallmach, Frank; Galvosas, Petrik

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques have been successfully combined for the study of mixture diffusion in porous materials. Using a modular setup of commercially available components, gradient pulses of up to ±2.6 T/m can be applied coinciding with fast sample rotation at the magic angle. Methods for the proper alignment of all components are presented along with protocols for MAS PFG NMR experiments. Finally, first diffusion measurements of n-hexane and benzene being adsorbed together in the metal-organic framework MOF-5 are presented.

  6. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  7. Advances in Protein NMR Impacting Drug Discovery Provided by the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational drug design relies on three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, especially proteins. Structural genomics high-throughput (HTP) structure determination platforms established by the NIH Protein Structure Initiative are uniquely suited to provide these structures. NMR plays a critical role since (i) many important protein targets do not form single crystals required for X-ray diffraction and (ii) NMR can provide valuable structural and dynamic information on proteins and their drug complexes that cannot be obtained with X-ray crystallography. In this article, recent advances of NMR driven by structural genomics projects are reviewed. These advances promise that future pharmaceutical discovery and design of drugs can increasingly rely on protocols for rapid and accurate NMR structure determination. PMID:20443167

  8. Deuterium and lithium-6 MAS NMR studies of manganese oxide electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Younkee

    Electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) is used world wide as the cathode materials in both lithium and alkaline primary (non-rechargeable) batteries. We have developed deuterium and lithium MAS NMR techniques to study EMD and related manganese oxides and hydroxides, where diffraction techniques are of limited value due to a highly defective nature of the structures. Deuterons in EMD, manganite, groutite, and deuterium-intercalated pyrolusite and ramsdellite were detected by NMR, for the first time, and their locations and motions in the structures were analyzed by applying variable temperature NMR techniques. Discharge mechanisms of EMD in alkaline (aqueous) electrolytes were studied, in conjunction with step potential electrochemical spectroscopic (SPECS) method, and five distinctive discharge processes were proposed. EMD is usually heat-treated at about 300--400°C to remove water to be used in lithium batteries. Details of the effects of heat-treatment, such as structural and compositional changes as a function of heat-treatment temperature, were studied by a combination of MAS NMR, XRD, and thermogravimetric analysis. Lithium local environments in heat-treated EMD (HEMD) that were discharged in lithium cells, were described in terms of related environments found in model compounds pyrolusite and ramsdellite where specific Li + sites were detected by MAS NMR and the hyperfine shift scale method of Grey et al. Acid-leaching of Li2MnO3 represents an approach for synthesizing new or modified manganese oxide electrode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries. Progressive removal of lithium from specific crystallographic sites, followed by a gradual change of the crystal structure, was monitored by a combination of NMR and XRD techniques.

  9. A Solid-State NMR Study of Selenium Substitution into Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Kuras, Marzena; Oledzka, Ewa; Sobczak, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The substitution of selenium oxyanions in the hydroxyapatite structure was examined using multinuclear solid-state resonance spectroscopy (ssNMR). The study was supported by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF). Samples of pure hydroxyapatite (HA300) and selenate (HA300-1.2SeO4) or selenite (HA300-1.2SeO3) substituted hydroxyapatites were synthesized using the standard wet method and heated at 300 °C to remove loosely bonded water. PXRD data showed that all samples are single-phase, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. The incorporation of selenite and selenate ions affected the lattice constants. In selenium-containing samples the concentration of Se was very similar and amounted to 9.55% and 9.64%, for HA300-1.2SeO4 and HA300-1.2SeO3, respectively. PXRD and ssNMR data showed that the selenite doping significantly decreases the crystallite size and crystallinity degree. 31P and 1H NMR experiments demonstrated the developed surface hydrated layer in all samples, especially in HA300-1.2SeO3. 1H NMR studies showed the dehydroxylation of HA during the selenium oxyanions substitution and the existence of hydrogen bonding in structural hydroxyl group channels. 1H→77Se cross polarization NMR experiments indicated that selenites and selenates are located in the crystal lattice and on the crystal surface. PMID:25997001

  10. NMR Studies of the Li-Mg-N-H Phases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Robert; Reiter, J. W.; Kulleck, J. G.; Hwang, S.-J.; Luo, Weifang

    2007-03-01

    Solid state NMR including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and cross-polarization (CP) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various amide and imide phases containing Li and/or Mg. MAS-NMR spectra for the ^1H, ^6Li, ^7Li, and ^15N nuclei have been obtained to improve understanding on formation, processing, and degradation behavior. Only limited information could be obtained from the proton and ^7Li MAS-NMR spectra to due large dipolar interactions and small chemical shifts. However, more success was obtained from the ^6Li and ^15N nuclei although their very long spin-lattice relaxation times did impact signal acquisition times. For example, three distinct ^6Li peaks were resolved from LiNH2 phases that were clearly separated from the LiH secondary phase in these samples. While the ^15N spectra for LiNH2 phase in isotopically enriched samples exhibited only a single peak at least three distinct ^15N peaks were observed from the similarly enriched Mg amide samples. These differences will be related to crystal structures. The NMR spectra also revealed very little motion in these hydrides upon to nearly 500 K.

  11. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  12. Novel Dodecaarylporphyrins: Synthesis and Variable Temperature NMR Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, Mark; Lebrilla, Carlito; Ma, Jian-Guo; Medforth, Craig J.; Muzzi, Cinzia M.; Shelnutt, John A.; Smith, Kevin M.; Voss, Lisa

    1999-05-05

    An investigation of the synthesis of novel dodecaarylporphyrins using the Suzuki coupling reaction of arylboronic acids with octabromotetraarylporphyrins is reported. Studies of the dynamic properties of these new porphyrins using variable temperature (VT) 1H NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics provide interesting insights into their dynamic properties, including the first determination of {beta} aryl rotation in a porphyrin system.

  13. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  14. Local electronic structure in MgB2 from B12 β -NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indris, Sylvio; Heitjans, Paul; Hattendorf, Jens; Zeitz, Wolf-Dietrich; Bredow, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We performed β -NMR spectroscopic studies on B12 which was implanted into MgB2 to get insight into the local electronic structure of this high-temperature superconducting material. By measuring electric field gradients we probed the electronic charge distribution anisotropy around boron in this solid and thus obtained experimental information about the bonding by p electrons. Besides the absolute value, the sign of the electric field gradient was also experimentally determined. By comparison with quantum chemical calculations, some of which were performed in the present work, and with results from conventional NMR spectroscopy on B11 we were able to identify regular boron lattice sites as well as interstitial sites.

  15. Macromolecular NMR spectroscopy for the non-spectroscopist: beyond macromolecular solution structure determination.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Michael; Kwan, Ann H; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Mackay, Joel P; Gooley, Paul R

    2011-03-01

    A strength of NMR spectroscopy is its ability to monitor, on an atomic level, molecular changes and interactions. In this review, which is intended for non-spectroscopist, we describe major uses of NMR in protein science beyond solution structure determination. After first touching on how NMR can be used to quickly determine whether a mutation induces structural perturbations in a protein, we describe the unparalleled ability of NMR to monitor binding interactions over a wide range of affinities, molecular masses and solution conditions. We discuss the use of NMR to measure the dynamics of proteins at the atomic level and over a wide range of timescales. Finally, we outline new and expanding areas such as macromolecular structure determination in multicomponent systems, as well as in the solid state and in vivo. PMID:21214861

  16. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Rosen, M S; Wang, R; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-12-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. PMID:12807139

  17. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed – neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  19. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  20. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  1. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  2. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  3. Structure and stability of variants of the sarcin-ricin loop of 28S rRNA: NMR studies of the prokaryotic SRL and a functional mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Seggerson, K; Moore, P B

    1998-01-01

    NMR has been used to examine the conformational properties of two variants of the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) from eukaryotic 28S rRNA, which is essential for elongation factor interactions with the ribosome: (1) its bacterial homologue, which lacks two of the bases that flank the conserved 12-nt sequence in the middle of the SRL, but which is functionally equivalent, and (2) a functionally active variant of the eukaryotic SRL in which the bulged G within the conserved sequence is replaced by an A. The data indicate that, although the bacterial SRL is less stable than the eukaryotic SRL, its conformation is closely similar. Furthermore, even though replacement of the bulged G in the SRL with an A seriously destabilizes the center of the loop, its effect on the overall conformation of the SRL appears to be modest. In the course of this work, it was serendipitously discovered that at neutral pH, the C8 proton of the bulged G, in both PRO-SRL and E73, exchanges about 10 times faster than it does in GMP. PMID:9769095

  4. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and NMR-Based Structural Studies of Deltorphin I Analogs Modified in Message Domain with a New α,α-Disubstituted Glycines.

    PubMed

    Lasota, Anika; Frączak, Oliwia; Muchowska, Adriana; Nowakowski, Michał; Maciejczyk, Maciej; Ejchart, Andrzej; Olma, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This article describes new deltorphin I analogs in which phenylalanine residues were replaced by the corresponding (R) or (S)-α-benzyl-β-azidoalanine, α-benzyl-β-(1-pyrrolidinyl)alanine, α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)alanine, and α-benzyl-β-(4-morpholinyl)-alanine residues. The potency and selectivity of the new analogs were evaluated by a competitive receptor binding assay in the rat brain using [(3) H]DAMGO (a μ ligand) and [(3) H]DELT (a δ ligand). The affinity of analogs containing (R) or (S)-α-benzyl-β-azidoalanine in position 3 to δ-receptors strongly depended on the chirality of the α,α-disubstituted residue. The conformational behavior of peptides modified with (R) or (S)-α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)Ala, which displays the opposite selectivity, was analyzed by (1) H and (13) C NMR. The μ-selective Tyr-d-Ala-(R)-α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)Ala-Asp-Val-Val-Gly-NH2 lacks the helical conformation observed in the δ-selective Tyr-d-Ala-(S)-α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)Ala-Asp-Val-Val-Gly-NH2 . Our results support the proposal that differences between δ- and μ-selective opioid peptides are attributable to the presence or absence of a spatial overlap between the N-terminal message domain and the C-terminal address domain. PMID:26808639

  5. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  6. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH/sub 3/ and CD/sub 3/) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed.

  7. Expression and Purification of Src-family Kinases for Solution NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Piserchio, Andrea; Cowburn, David; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2012-01-01

    Summary NMR analyses of the structure, dynamics and interactions of the Src family kinases (SFKs) have been hindered by the limited ability to obtain sufficient amounts of properly folded, soluble protein from bacterial expression systems, to allow these studies to be performed in an economically viable manner. In this chapter we detail our attempts to overcome these difficulties using the catalytic domain (SrcCD) of c-Src, the prototypical SFK, as an illustrative example. We describe in detail two general methods to express and purify SrcCD from E. coli expression systems in both fully active wild-type and kinase-deficient mutant forms, allowing the efficient and cost-effective labeling by NMR-active isotopes for solution NMR studies. PMID:22167671

  8. NMR Investigations of Structure and Dynamics in Polymers for Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Steven

    Materials innovation is needed to realize major progress in energy storage capacity for lithium batteries and capacitors. Polymers hold considerable promise as ion conducting media in batteries and electrochemical capacitors and as dielectrics in thin film capacitors. Structural studies of materials utilized in lithium battery technology are hampered by the lack of long-range order found in well-defined crystalline phases. Powder x-ray diffraction yields structural parameters that have been averaged over hundreds of lattice sites, and is unable to provide structural information about amorphous phases. Our laboratory uses solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to investigate structural and chemical aspects of lithium ion cathodes, anodes, electrolytes, interfaces and interphases. NMR is element- (nuclear-) specific and sensitive to small variations in the immediate environment of the ions being probed, for example Li+, and in most cases is a reliably quantitative spectroscopy in that the integrated intensity of a particular spectral component is directly proportional to the number of nuclei in the corresponding material phase. NMR is also a powerful tool for probing ionic and molecular motion in lithium battery electrolytes with a dynamic range spanning some ten orders of magnitude through spin-lattice relaxation and self-diffusion measurements. Broadband relaxometry based on Fast Field Cycling NMR (FFCNMR) methods can span three to four of these orders of magnitude in a single set of measurements. Results of several recent NMR investigations performed on our lab will be presented. We explore the ion transport mechanism in polyether-based and lithium polymer electrolytes and those based on other base polymers, in particular, the extent to which ionic motion is coupled to polymer segmental motion. Polycarbonates are being considered as a possible replacement for polypropylene in high power thin film capacitors due to their favorable dielectric

  9. Vibrational, XRD and (13)C NMR studies of DL-phenylglycinium methanesulfonate crystal.

    PubMed

    Wołoszyn, Łukasz; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Ilczyszyn, Maria M; Haupa, Karolina

    2016-11-01

    A new crystal formed by DL-phenylglycine and methanesulfonic acid (PGLYMS) was obtained and studied by X-ray diffraction, IR and Raman spectroscopy, solid state NMR and DSC methods. Additionally, theoretical computations for the phenylglycine cation were carried out (DFT/B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ). Our results show that PGLYMS does not exhibit any phase transitions and crystallizes in the P21/c space group of monoclinic system (Z=4). Detailed analysis of its structure and its IR, Raman and NMR spectra is presented. PMID:27289350

  10. Effects of the introduction of L-nucleotides into DNA. Solution structure of the heterochiral duplex d(G-C-G-(L)T-G-C-G).d(C-G-C-A-C-G-C) studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blommers, M J; Tondelli, L; Garbesi, A

    1994-06-28

    The effect of the substitution of a L-nucleoside for a D-nucleoside in the duplex d(G-C-G-T-G-C-G).d(C-G-C-A-C-G-C) was studied by UV and NMR spectroscopy. These unnatural oligonucleotides have potential for antisense DNA technology [Damha, M. J., Giannaris, P. A., & Marfey, P. (1994) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. The thermal stability of such duplexes is lower than that of the natural one and is dependent on the nucleotide type and/or sequence. Interestingly, inversion of the chirality of thymidine but not adenosine coincides with a large stabilizing enthalpy change. The structure of the heterochiral duplex d(G1-C2-G3-(L)T4-G5-C6-G7).d(C8-G9-C10-A11-C12-G13- C14), where (L)T denotes the mirror image of the natural thymidine, has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. The sugar conformation was determined using the sum of coupling constants and the distances using a model free relaxation matrix approach. The torsion angles of the backbone follow from 3JHH, 3JHP, and 4JHP coupling constants. The structure of the duplex was calculated by metric matrix distance geometry followed by simulated annealing. The structure is close to that of B-DNA. The base pair formed by (L)T and A is of the Watson-Crick type. All sugars adopt an S-type pucker. The incorporation of the L-sugar in the duplex is accomplished by changes in the backbone torsion angles around the phosphates and the glycosidic torsion angle of (L)T. The modification induces changes in the natural strand as well. The structure exhibits an unusual interaction between the aromatic rings of the (L)T4.A11 and G3.C12 base pairs, which provides a plausible explanation of the unusual thermodynamic properties of the duplex. PMID:8011651

  11. Structural Dynamics and Conformational Equilibria of SERCA Regulatory Proteins in Membranes by Solid-State NMR Restrained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Alfonso; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is emerging as a powerful approach to determine structure, topology, and conformational dynamics of membrane proteins at the atomic level. Conformational dynamics are often inferred and quantified from the motional averaging of the NMR parameters. However, the nature of these motions is difficult to envision based only on spectroscopic data. Here, we utilized restrained molecular dynamics simulations to probe the structural dynamics, topology and conformational transitions of regulatory membrane proteins of the calcium ATPase SERCA, namely sarcolipin and phospholamban, in explicit lipid bilayers. Specifically, we employed oriented solid-state NMR data, such as dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy measured in lipid bicelles, to refine the conformational ensemble of these proteins in lipid membranes. The samplings accurately reproduced the orientations of transmembrane helices and showed a significant degree of convergence with all of the NMR parameters. Unlike the unrestrained simulations, the resulting sarcolipin structures are in agreement with distances and angles for hydrogen bonds in ideal helices. In the case of phospholamban, the restrained ensemble sampled the conformational interconversion between T (helical) and R (unfolded) states for the cytoplasmic region that could not be observed using standard structural refinements with the same experimental data set. This study underscores the importance of implementing NMR data in molecular dynamics protocols to better describe the conformational landscapes of membrane proteins embedded in realistic lipid membranes. PMID:24940774

  12. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  13. Influence of glass composition and alteration solution on leached silicate glass structure: A solid-state NMR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Frédéric; Gaillard, Marina; Jollivet, Patrick; Charpentier, Thibault

    2006-05-01

    A multinuclear solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of the amorphous alteration products (so called gels) that form during the aqueous alteration of silicate glasses is reported. The studied glass compositions are of increasing complexity, with addition of aluminum, calcium, and zirconium to a sodium borosilicate glass. Two series of gels were obtained, in acidic and in basic solutions, and were analyzed using 1H, 29Si, and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques have been employed such as 1H- 29Si and 1H- 27Al cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, 1H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and 27Al multiple quantum (MQ) MAS NMR. Under acidic conditions, 29Si CP MAS NMR data show that the repolymerized silicate networks have similar configuration. Zirconium as a second nearest neighbor increases the 29Si isotropic chemical shift. The gel porosity is influenced by the pristine glass composition, modifying the silicon-proton interactions. From 1H DQ and 1H- 29Si CP MAS NMR experiments, it was possible to discriminate between silanol groups (isolated or not) and physisorbed molecular water near Si (Q 2), Si (Q 3), and Si (Q 4) sites, as well as to gain insight into the hydrogen-bonding interaction and the mobility of the proton species. These experiments were also carried out on heated samples (180 °C) to evidence hydrogen bonds between hydroxyl groups on molecular water. Alteration in basic media resulted in a gel structure that is more dependent on the initial glass composition. 27Al MQMAS NMR data revealed an exchange of charge compensating cations of the [AlO 4] - groups during glass alteration. 1H- 27Al CP MAS NMR data provide information about the proximities of these two nuclei and two aluminum environments have been distinguished. The availability of these new structural data should provide a better understanding of the impact of glass composition on the gel structure depending on the nature of the alteration solution.

  14. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  15. High pressure NMR study of a small protein, gurmarin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Yamada, H; Imoto, T; Akasaka, K

    1998-11-01

    The effect of pressure on the structure of gurmarin, a globular, 35-residue protein from Gymnema sylvestre, was studied in aqueous environment (95% 1H2O/5% 2H2O, pH 2.0) with an on-line variable pressure NMR system operating at 750 MHz. Two-dimensional TOCSY and NOESY spectra were measured as functions of pressure between 1 and 2000 bar at 40 degrees C. Practically all the proton signals of gurmarin underwent some shifts with pressure, showing that the entire protein structure responds to, and is altered by, pressure. Most amide protons showed different degrees of low field shifts with pressure, namely 0-0.2 ppm with an average of 0.051 ppm at 2000 bar, showing that they are involved in hydrogen bonding and that these hydrogen bonds are shortened by pressure by different degrees. The tendency was also confirmed that the chemical shifts of the amide protons exposed to the solvent (water) are more sensitive to pressure than those internally hydrogen bonded with carbonyls. The pressure-induced shifts of the H alpha signals of the residues in the beta-sheet showed a negative correlation with the 'folding' shifts (difference between the shift at 1 bar and that of a random coil), suggesting that the main-chain torsion angles of the beta-sheet are slightly altered by pressure. Significant pressure-induced shifts were also observed for the side-chain protons (but no larger than 10% of the 'folding' shifts), demonstrating that the tertiary structure of gurmarin is also affected by pressure. Finally, the linearity of the pressure-induced shifts suggest that the compressibility of gurmarin is invariant in the pressure range between 1 and 2000 bar. PMID:9862129

  16. NMR and Infrared Study of Thermal Oxidation of cis-1, 4-Polybutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gemmer, Robert V.; Golub, Morton A.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the microstructural changes occuring in CB during thermal, uncatalyzed oxidation was carried out. Although the oxidation of CB is accompanied by extensive crosslinking with attendant insolubilization, it was found possible to follow the oxidation of solid CB directly with C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The predominant products appearing in the C-13 NMR spectra of oxidized CB are epoxides. The presence of lesser amounts of alcohols, peroxides, and carbonyl structures was adduced from complementary infrared and NMR spectra of soluble extracts obtained from the oxidized, crosslinked CB. This distribution of functional groups contrasts with that previously reported for the autooxidation of 1,4-polyisoprene. The difference was rationalized in terms of the relative stabilities of intermediate radical species involved in the autoxidation of CB and 1,4-polyisoprene.

  17. Multinuclear solid film state NMR studies of metal oxide catalysts and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.S.; Stec, D.F.; Ellis, P.D.

    1996-10-01

    Several of our investigations of heterogeneous process by novel NMR experiments and analyses are reviewed and the utility and limitations of NMR spectroscopy for these areas discussed. Out studies have included the following: dynamics and arrangements of proton-containing adsorbates, primarily Bronsted acid sites and water, on the surface of zirconia and alumina catalysts; hydrogen dynamics and coordinates in synthetic aluminum oxyhydroxides; phase separation and crystallinity of synthetic minerals. In combination with the complementary results obtained in our laboratory via infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis (primarily TGA and DSC), and catalytic activity measurements, these NMR data provide unique and valuable information on atomic and molecular dynamics, identities, and structures without requiring pristine, single crystal specimens.

  18. Multivalent ligand mimetics of LecA from P. aeruginosa: synthesis and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bini, Davide; Marchetti, Roberta; Russo, Laura; Molinaro, Antonio; Silipo, Alba; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-06-24

    Molecular recognition of glycans plays an important role in glycomic and glycobiology studies. For example, pathogens have a number of different types of lectin for targeting host sugars. In bacteria, lectins exist sometimes as domains of bacterial toxins and exploit adhesion to glycoconjugates as a means of entering host cells. Herein, we describe the synthesis of three glycodendrons with the aim to dissect the fine structural details involved in the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions. LecA, from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been used to characterize galactose dendrons interaction using one of the most widespread NMR technique for the elucidation of receptor-ligand binding in solution, the saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR. Furthermore, the effective hydrodynamic radius of each dendrimer recognized by LecA was estimated from the diffusion coefficients determined by pulsed-field-gradient stimulated echo (PFG-STE) NMR experiments. PMID:27185108

  19. NMR structure of a fungal virulence factor reveals structural homology with mammalian saposin B

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Moriah R.; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Goldman, William E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The fungal protein CBP (calcium binding protein) is a known virulence factor with an unknown virulence mechanism. The protein was identified based on its ability to bind calcium and its prevalence as Histoplasma capsulatum’s most abundant secreted protein. However, CBP has no sequence homology with other calcium binding proteins and contains no known calcium-binding motifs. Here, the NMR structure of CBP reveals a highly intertwined homodimer and represents the first atomic level NMR model of any fungal virulence factor. Each CBP monomer is comprised of four α-helices that adopt the saposin fold, characteristic of a protein family that binds to membranes and lipids. This structural homology suggests that CBP functions as a lipid-binding protein, potentially interacting with host glycolipids in the phagolysosome of host cells. PMID:19298372

  20. Understanding the directed ortho lithiation of (R)-Ph₂P(=NCO₂Me)NHCH(Me)Ph. NMR spectroscopic and computational study of the structure of the N-lithiated species.

    PubMed

    Casimiro, M; García-López, J; Iglesias, M J; López-Ortiz, F

    2014-10-14

    A multinuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H, (7)Li, (13)C, (15)N, (31)P) and DFT computational study at the M06-2X(SMD,THF)/6-311+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of the structure of a N-lithiated phosphinimidic amide (R)-Ph2P(=NCO2Me)NHCH(Me)Ph 13 has been performed. In THF solution it exists as an equilibrium mixture of monomers and dimers. The monomers consist of a six-membered ring formed by coordination of the lithium atom with the deprotonated nitrogen and the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group. This coordination mode is in contrast to the standard N,N-chelation observed in N-lithiated N,N'-bis(trimethylsilyl)phosphinimidic amides. The calculations showed that the metallacycle adopts a twist-boat conformation and that the lithium atom is in a tetrahedral environment involving O,N-chelation by the ligand and coordination to two/one THF molecules in the monomer/dimer. Dimerization takes place through O-Li bridges. For all species two series of isomers have been identified, which originated by restricted rotation of the methoxy group and ring inversion. The twist-boat conformational interconversion seems to be operating for explaining the pattern of signals observed in the (7)Li and (31)P NMR spectra. The structure found for the most stable dimer is analogous to the molecular structure reported for a related C(α)-lithiated phosphazene 20. The structural study revealed that the chiral side-arm of the N-lithiated species is oriented to the outer face of the pro-S P-phenyl ring, which shows one ortho-proton very close to the nitrogen atom of the carbamate moiety. In this conformation, proton abstraction by a base is highly favoured, in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:24849316

  1. Local structure and lithium mobility in intercalated Li3Al(x)Ti(2-x)(PO4)3 NASICON type materials: a combined neutron diffraction and NMR study.

    PubMed

    Arbi, K; Hoelzel, M; Kuhn, A; García-Alvarado, F; Sanz, J

    2014-09-14

    The structural features of intercalated Li3AlxTi2-x(PO4)3 compounds, with x = 0 and 0.2, have been deduced by Rietveld analysis of neutron diffraction (ND) patterns recorded between 100 and 500 K. The Li insertion decreases the symmetry from R3̄c to R3̄ in analyzed compounds. In pristine Li1+xAlxTi2-x(PO4)3 samples, Li occupies mainly six-fold M1 sites at ternary axes; but in lithiated Li3AlxTi2-x(PO4)3 samples, Li is located near M2 positions at M3/M3' four-fold coordinated sites. In both cases, Li arrangement minimizes electrostatic Li-Li repulsions. The insertion of lithium resulted in the reduction of Ti(4+) to Ti(3+) that shifts (7)Li, (27)Al and (31)P MAS-NMR resonances towards more positive chemical shifts, improving the resolution of different sites. The detection of twelve components in (7)Li MAS-NMR spectra recorded at room temperature suggests the location of Li(+) ions at three-oxygen faces that define M2 cavities. From (7)Li MAS-NMR spectra, the occupancy of sites and mobility of lithium were investigated in the temperature range 100-500 K. The correlation between structural information, deduced by neutron diffraction, and lithium mobility, deduced by NMR spectroscopy, provides new insights into structural factors that affect lithium mobility in materials with NASICON structure. PMID:25070935

  2. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N.; Schug, Alexander

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  3. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, José N.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein's functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  4. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K; Haglund, Ellinor; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, José N

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein's functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism. PMID:26723626

  5. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations. PMID:25502373

  6. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  7. Correction: Substituent interference on supramolecular assembly in urea gelators: synthesis, structure prediction and NMR.

    PubMed

    Piana, Francesca; Case, David H; Ramalhete, Susana M; Pileio, Giuseppe; Facciotti, Marco; Day, Graeme M; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Angulo, Jesús; Brown, Richard C D; Gale, Philip A

    2016-06-28

    Correction for 'Substituent interference on supramolecular assembly in urea gelators: synthesis, structure prediction and NMR' by Francesca Piana et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 4034-4043. PMID:27254024

  8. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  9. NMR investigations of protein-carbohydrate interactions binding studies and refined three-dimensional solution structure of the complex between the B domain of wheat germ agglutinin and N,N', N"-triacetylchitotriose.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J F; Asensio, J L; García, J L; Laynez, J; Bruix, M; Wright, C; Siebert, H C; Gabius, H J; Cañada, F J; Jiménez-Barbero, J

    2000-07-01

    The specific interaction of the isolated B domain of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-B) with N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose has been analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The association constants for the binding of WGA-B to this trisaccharide have been determined from both 1H-NMR titration experiments and microcalorimetry methods. Entropy and enthalpy of binding have been obtained. The driving force for the binding process is provided by a negative DeltaH which is partially compensated by negative DeltaS. These negative signs indicate that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces are the major interactions stabilizing the complex. NOESY NMR experiments in water solution provided 327 protein proton-proton distance constraints. All the experimental constraints were used in a refinement protocol including restrained molecular dynamics in order to determine the refined solution conformation of this protein/carbohydrate complex. With regard to the NMR structure of the free protein, no important changes in the protein NOEs were observed, indicating that carbohydrate-induced conformational changes are small. The average backbone rmsd of the 35 refined structures was 1.05 A, while the heavy atom rmsd was 2.10 A. Focusing on the bound ligand, two different orientations of the trisaccharide within WGA-B binding site are possible. It can be deduced that both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts confer stability to both complexes. A comparison of the three-dimensional structure of WGA-B in solution to that reported in the solid state and to those deduced for hevein and pseudohevein in solution has also been performed. PMID:10866795

  10. A Combinatorial NMR and EPR Approach for Evaluating the Structural Ensemble of Partially Folded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jampani Nageswara; Jao, Christine C.; Hegde, Balachandra G.; Langen, Ralf; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2010-01-01

    Partially folded proteins, characterized as exhibiting secondary structure elements with loose or absent tertiary contacts, represent important intermediates in both physiological protein folding and pathological protein misfolding. To aid in the characterization of the structural state(s) of such proteins, a novel structure calculation scheme is presented that combines structural restraints derived from pulsed EPR and NMR spectroscopy. The methodology is established for the protein α-synuclein (αS), which exhibits characteristics of a partially folded protein when bound to a micelle of the detergent sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (SLAS). By combining 18 EPR-derived interelectron spin label distance distributions with NMR-based secondary structure definitions and bond vector restraints, interelectron distances were correlated and a set of theoretical ensemble basis populations was calculated. A minimal set of basis structures, representing the partially folded state of SLAS-bound αS, was subsequently derived by back-calculating correlated distance distributions. A surprising variety of well-defined protein-micelle interactions was thus revealed in which the micelle is engulfed by two differently arranged anti-parallel αS helices. The methodology further provided the population ratios between dominant ensemble structural states, whereas limitation in obtainable structural resolution arose from spin label flexibility and residual uncertainties in secondary structure definitions. To advance the understanding of protein-micelle interactions, the present study concludes by showing that, in marked contrast to secondary structure stability, helix dynamics of SLAS-bound αS correlate with the degree of protein-induced departures from free micelle dimensions. PMID:20524659

  11. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html. PMID:26968364

  12. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43- groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  13. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite – Gelatine Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43− groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals. PMID:26515127

  14. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  16. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  17. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  18. Molecular Motions in (CH3)3XCl, X = Sn and Pb. NMR Investigations and Crystal Structure Study of (CH3)3PbCl and CH3SnBr3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Dou, Shi-Qi; Weiss, Alarich

    1991-04-01

    The molecular motion in (CH3)3XCl, X = Sn and Pb has been investigated by measurement of the second moment M2(1H) as function of temperature in the range 95 < T,/K<345. The methyl groups in both compounds rotate freely over the whole temperature range studied. In (CH3)3SnCl the C'3-rotation of (CH3)3Sn-group about the Sn CI axis sets in above 273 K. To explain the NMR and INS results, the crystal structures of (CH3)3PbCl and CH3SnBr3 were determined by single X-ray diffraction. (CH3)3PbCl crystallizes in a monoclinic space group C32-C2, a = 1276.7(3) pm, b = 982.3(3) pm, c = 547.0(2) pm, ß = 91.12(1)°; Z = 4, R = 0.035. CH3SnBr3 crystallizes in an orthorhombic space group D162h-Pnma, a = 643.0(3) pm, b= 1005.3(4) pm, c= 1148.0(4) pm; Z = 4, R =0.057

  19. Elucidating Structural Characteristics of Biomass using Solution-State 2 D NMR with a Mixture of Deuterated Dimethylsulfoxide and Hexamethylphosphoramide.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Pu, Yunqiao; Li, Mi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2016-05-23

    Recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6 ) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18 ). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. The structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6 /HMPA-d18 ; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. It also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities. PMID:27116696

  20. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James M.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining , 13C, and 15N backbone and 13Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2–1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9–1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments. PMID:22665781

  1. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  2. Mechanochemical and solution synthesis, X-ray structure and IR and 31P solid state NMR spectroscopic studies of copper(I) thiocyanate adducts with bulky monodentate tertiary phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, Graham A; Hanna, John V; Hart, Robert D; Healy, Peter C; King, Scott P; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Skelton, Brian W; Tabacaru, Aurel; White, Allan H

    2012-07-01

    A number of adducts of copper(I) thiocyanate with bulky tertiary phosphine ligands, and some nitrogen-base solvates, were synthesized and structurally and spectroscopically characterised. CuSCN:PCy3 (1:2), as crystallized from pyridine, is shown by a single crystal X-ray study to be a one-dimensional polymer ...(Cy3P)2CuSCN(Cy3P)2CuSCN... (1) with the four-coordinate copper atoms linked end-on by S-SCN-N bridging thiocyanate groups. A second form (2), obtained from acetonitrile, was also identified and shown by IR and 31P CPMAS NMR spectroscopy to be mononuclear, with the magnitude of the dν(Cu) parameter measured from the 31P CPMAS and the ν(CN) value from the IR clearly establishing this compound as three-coordinate [(Cy3P)2CuNCS]. Two further CuSCN/PCy3 compounds CuSCN:PCy3 (1:1) (3), and CuSCN:PCy3:py (1:1:1) (4) were also characterized spectroscopically, with the dν(Cu) parameters indicating three- and four-coordinate copper sites, respectively. Attempts to obtain a 1:2 adduct with tri-t-butylphosphine have yielded, from pyridine, the 1:1 adduct as a dimer [(Bu(t)3P)((SCN)(NCS))Cu(PBu(t)3)] (5), while similar attempts with tri-o-tolylphosphine (from acetonitrile and pyridine (= L)) resulted in solvated 1:1:1 CuSCN:P(o-tol)3:L forms as dimeric [{(o-tol)3P}LCu((SCN)(NCS))CuL{P(o-tol)3}] (6 and 8). The solvent-free 1:1 CuSCN:P(o-tol)3 adduct (7), obtained by desolvation of 6, was characterized spectroscopically and dν(Cu) measurements from the 31P CPMAS NMR data are consistent with the decrease in coordination number of the copper atom from four (for 6) (P,N(MeCN)Cu,S,N) to three (for 7) (PCuS,N) upon loss of the acetonitrile of solvation. These results are compared with those previously reported for mononuclear and binuclear PPh3 adducts which demonstrate a clear tendency for the copper centre to remain four-coordinate. The IR spectroscopic measurements on these compounds show that bands in the far-IR spectra provide a much more definitive criterion for

  3. Proton Fingerprints Portray Molecular Structures: Enhanced Description of the 1H NMR Spectra of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Niemitz, Matthias; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic signals observed in NMR spectra encode essential information on the structure of small molecules. However, extracting all of this information from complex signal patterns is not trivial. This report demonstrates how computer-aided spectral analysis enables the complete interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated with a set of organic molecules, for which replicas of their 1H NMR spectra were generated. The potential impact of this methodology on organic chemistry research is discussed. PMID:24007197

  4. Structural dynamics and folding of beta-lactoglobulin probed by heteronuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazumasa; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yagi, Masanori; Goto, Yuji

    2009-06-01

    Bovine beta-lactoglobulin (beta LG) has been one of the most extensively studied proteins in the history of protein science mainly because its abundance in cow's milk makes it readily available to researchers. However, compared to other textbook proteins, progress in the study of beta LG has been slow because of obstacles such as a low reversibility from denaturation linked with thiol-disulfide exchange or monomer-dimer equilibrium preventing a detailed NMR analysis. Recently, the expression of various types of recombinant beta LGs combined with heteronuclear NMR analysis has significantly improved understanding of the physico-chemical properties of beta LG. In this review, we address several topics including pH-dependent structural dynamics, ligand binding, and the complex folding mechanism with non-native intermediates. These unique properties might be brought about by conformational frustration of the beta LG structure, partly attributed to the relatively large molecular size of beta LG. We expect studies with beta LG to continue to reveal various important findings, difficult to obtain with small globular proteins, leading to a more comprehensive understanding of the conformation, dynamics and folding of proteins. PMID:19362581

  5. Ammonia fixation by humic substances: A nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 NMR study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of ammonia fixation has been studied in three well characterized and structurally diverse fulvic and humic acid samples. The Suwannee River fulvic acid, and the IHSS peat and leonardite humic acids, were reacted with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N NMR spectrometry. Elemental analyses and liquid phase 13C NMR spectra also were recorded on the samples before and after reaction with ammonium hydroxide. The largest increase in percent nitrogen occurred with the Suwannee River fulvic acid, which had a nitrogen content of 0.88% before fixation and 3.17% after fixation. The 15N NMR spectra revealed that ammonia reacted similarly with all three samples, indicating that the functional groups which react with ammonia exist in structural configurations common to all three samples. The majority of nitrogcn incorporated into the samples appears to be in the form of indole and pyrrole nitrogen, followed by pyridine, pyrazine, amide and aminohydroquinone nitrogen. Chemical changes in the individual samples upon fixation could not be discerned from the 13C NMR spectra.

  6. Methyl-specific isotopic labeling: a molecular tool box for solution NMR studies of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Plevin, Michael J; Sounier, Remy; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a uniquely powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules at atomic resolution. In the past 15 years, the development of new isotopic labeling strategies has opened the possibility of exploiting NMR spectroscopy in the study of supra-molecular complexes with molecular weights of up to 1MDa. At the core of these isotopic labeling developments is the specific introduction of [(1)H,(13)C]-labeled methyl probes into perdeuterated proteins. Here, we describe the evolution of these approaches and discuss their impact on structural and biological studies. The relevant protocols are succinctly reviewed for single and combinatorial isotopic-labeling of methyl-containing residues, and examples of applications on challenging biological systems, including high molecular weight and membrane proteins, are presented. PMID:25881211

  7. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR–derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra. PMID:26665178

  8. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    PubMed Central

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  9. Furosemide's one little hydrogen atom: NMR crystallography structure verification of powdered molecular organics.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Robson, Harry; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-05-10

    The potential of NMR crystallography to verify molecular crystal structures deposited in structural databases is evaluated, with two structures of the pharmaceutical furosemide serving as examples. While the structures differ in the placement of one H atom, using this approach, we verify one of the structures in the Cambridge Structural Database using quantitative tools, while establishing that the other structure does not meet the verification criteria. PMID:27115483

  10. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  11. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  12. MRI and unilateral NMR study of reindeer skin tanning processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizheng; Del Federico, Eleonora; Ilott, Andrew J; Klokkernes, Torunn; Kehlet, Cindie; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-04-01

    The study of arctic or subarctic indigenous skin clothing material, known for its design and ability to keep the body warm, provides information about the tanning materials and techniques. The study also provides clues about the culture that created it, since tanning processes are often specific to certain indigenous groups. Untreated skin samples and samples treated with willow (Salix sp) bark extract and cod liver oil are compared in this study using both MRI and unilateral NMR techniques. The two types of samples show different proton spatial distributions and different relaxation times, which may also provide information about the tanning technique and aging behavior. PMID:25719858

  13. Solution NMR of MPS-1 reveals a random coil cytosolic domain structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Shi, Pan; Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134-256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  14. Solution NMR of MPS-1 Reveals a Random Coil Cytosolic Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134–256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  15. NMR Studies of Biodegradation Reactions in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitreiter, I.; Oswald, S. E.; Stallmach, F.

    2007-12-01

    Subsurface contamination caused by organic compounds is a widespread environmental problem. Biodegradation is the main process to reduce the mass of organic contaminants in soils and groundwater. Often the biodegradation is limited by the supply of electron acceptors at the location of the contaminants, and mixing and diffusion are therefore coupled to the degradation process. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) allows non- invasive and non-destructive insight into diffusion processes and effects of microbial biomass on the pore scale, where the mixing and degradation processes actually are taking place. Studying key processes non-invasively with high temporal resolution will contribute to a better understanding of the effective biodegradation rates of organic contaminants in saturated porous systems. The application of 1H NMR relaxometry and PFG NMR diffusometry provide the possibilities to study diffusive transport at the mixing zones in porous media, where contaminants and electron acceptors show strong concentration gradients due to degradation reactions. Nuclear spin relaxation times of water reflect its interaction with the porous media as well as the biomass. To localize microbial biomass the mobility of the water molecules (relaxation times) can be classified corresponding to bound water in the biomass and bulk water. Oxygen is the most important electron acceptor that stimulate the activity and growth of aerobic microbes, and iron(III) a major one for anaerobes. In our work we applied low field (0.2 T) and high field (3 T) NMR measurements to analyze the diffusion in water and biomass and to monitor the concentration changes of electron acceptors. The experimental setup consists of small columns containing saturated porous media applying inversion recovery (IR) and pulsed field gradient (PFG) sequences. We show that both, oxygen as well as iron(III) affect the relaxation times by their paramagnetic properties, and can be determined by NMR relaxometry in

  16. Protein structure determination by conformational space annealing using NMR geometric restraints.

    PubMed

    Joo, Keehyoung; Joung, InSuk; Lee, Jinhyuk; Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Weontae; Brooks, Bernard; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out numerical experiments to investigate the applicability of the global optimization method of conformational space annealing (CSA) to the enhanced NMR protein structure determination over existing PDB structures. The NMR protein structure determination is driven by the optimization of collective multiple restraints arising from experimental data and the basic stereochemical properties of a protein-like molecule. By rigorous and straightforward application of CSA to the identical NMR experimental data used to generate existing PDB structures, we redetermined 56 recent PDB protein structures starting from fully randomized structures. The quality of CSA-generated structures and existing PDB structures were assessed by multiobjective functions in terms of their consistencies with experimental data and the requirements of protein-like stereochemistry. In 54 out of 56 cases, CSA-generated structures were better than existing PDB structures in the Pareto-dominant manner, while in the remaining two cases, it was a tie with mixed results. As a whole, all structural features tested improved in a statistically meaningful manner. The most improved feature was the Ramachandran favored portion of backbone torsion angles with about 8.6% improvement from 88.9% to 97.5% (P-value <10(-17)). We show that by straightforward application of CSA to the efficient global optimization of an energy function, NMR structures will be of better quality than existing PDB structures. PMID:26454251

  17. Simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics using CONGEN: energy refinement of the NMR solution structures of epidermal and type-alpha transforming growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, R.; Bassolino-Klimas, D.; Bruccoleri, R. E.; Montelione, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    The new functionality of the program CONGEN (Bruccoleri RE, Karplus M, 1987, Biopolymers 26:137-168; Bassolino-Klimas D et al., 1996, Protein Sci 5:593-603) has been applied for energy refinement of two previously determined solution NMR structures, murine epidermal growth factor (mEGF) and human type-alpha transforming growth factor (hTGF alpha). A summary of considerations used in converting experimental NMR data into distance constraints for CONGEN is presented. A general protocol for simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics is applied to generate NMR solution structures using CONGEN together with real experimental NMR data. A total of 730 NMR-derived constraints for mEGF and 424 NMR-derived constraints for hTGF alpha were used in these energy-refinement calculations. Different weighting schemes and starting conformations were studied to check and/or improve the sampling of the low-energy conformational space that is consistent with all constraints. The results demonstrate that loosened (i.e., "relaxed") sets of the EGF and hTGF alpha internuclear distance constraints allow molecules to overcome local minima in the search for a global minimum with respect to both distance restraints and conformational energy. The resulting energy-refined structures of mEGF and hTGF alpha are compared with structures determined previously and with structures of homologous proteins determined by NMR and X-ray crystallography. PMID:8845748

  18. Calcium binding of transglutaminases: a 43Ca NMR study combined with surface polarity analysis.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, A; Bányai, I; Weiss, M S; Hilgenfeld, R; Keresztessy, Z; Muszbek, L; Fésüs, L

    2001-08-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) form cross-links between glutamine and lysine side-chains of polypeptides in a Ca2+-dependent reaction. The structural basis of the Ca2+-effect is poorly defined. 43Ca NMR, surface polarity analysis combined with multiple sequence alignment and the construction of a new homology model of human tissue transglutaminase (tTGase) were used to obtain structural information about Ca2+ binding properties of factor XIII-A2, tTGase and TGase 3 (each of human origin). 43Ca NMR provided higher average dissociation constants titrating on a wide Ca2+-concentration scale than previous studies with equilibrium dialysis performed in shorter ranges. These results suggest the existence of low affinity Ca2+ binding sites on both FXIII-A and tTGase in addition to high affinity ones in accordance with our surface polarity analysis identifying high numbers of negatively charged clusters. Upon increasing the salt concentration or activating with thrombin, FXIII-A2 partially lost its original Ca2+ affinity; the NMR data suggested different mechanisms for the two activation processes. The NMR provided structural evidence of GTP-induced conformational changes on the tTGase molecule diminishing all of its Ca2+ binding sites. NMR data on the Ca2+ binding properties of the TGase 3 are presented here; it binds Ca2+ the most tightly, which is weakened after its proteolytic activation. The investigated TGases seem to have very symmetric Ca2+ binding sites and no EF-hand motifs. PMID:11565852

  19. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    PubMed

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods. PMID:18470882

  20. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    PubMed

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html. PMID:23221084

  1. The NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Wilder, G.; von Freyberg, B.; Braun, W.; Wuethrich, K. ); Traber, R.; Widmer, H. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A bound to the presumed receptor protein cyclophilin was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using uniform {sup 15}N- or {sup 13}C-labeling of cyclosporin A and heteronuclear spectral editing techniques. With an input of 108 intramolecular NOEs and four vicinal {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants, the three-dimensional structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin was calculated with the distance geometry program DISMAN, and the structures resulting from 181 converged calculations were energy refined with the program FANTOM. A group of 120 conformers was selected on the basis of the residual constraint violations and energy criteria to represent the solution structure. The average of the pairwise root-mean-square distances calculated for the backbone atoms of the 120 structures was 0.58 {angstrom}. The structure represents a novel conformation of cyclosporin A, for which the backbone conformation is significantly different from the previously reported structures in single crystals and in chloroform solution. The structure has all peptide bonds in the trans form, contains no elements of regular secondary structure and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exposes nearly all polar groups to its environment. The root-mean-square distance between the backbone atoms of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the mean of the 120 conformers representing the NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin is 2.5 {angstrom}.

  2. NMR Structure and Ion Channel Activity of the p7 Protein from Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Montserret, Roland; Saint, Nathalie; Vanbelle, Christophe; Salvay, Andrés Gerardo; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Ebel, Christine; Sapay, Nicolas; Renisio, Jean-Guillaume; Böckmann, Anja; Steinmann, Eike; Pietschmann, Thomas; Dubuisson, Jean; Chipot, Christophe; Penin, François

    2010-01-01

    The small membrane protein p7 of hepatitis C virus forms oligomers and exhibits ion channel activity essential for virus infectivity. These viroporin features render p7 an attractive target for antiviral drug development. In this study, p7 from strain HCV-J (genotype 1b) was chemically synthesized and purified for ion channel activity measurements and structure analyses. p7 forms cation-selective ion channels in planar lipid bilayers and at the single-channel level by the patch clamp technique. Ion channel activity was shown to be inhibited by hexamethylene amiloride but not by amantadine. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the structure of p7 is mainly α-helical, irrespective of the membrane mimetic medium (e.g. lysolipids, detergents, or organic solvent/water mixtures). The secondary structure elements of the monomeric form of p7 were determined by 1H and 13C NMR in trifluoroethanol/water mixtures. Molecular dynamics simulations in a model membrane were combined synergistically with structural data obtained from NMR experiments. This approach allowed us to determine the secondary structure elements of p7, which significantly differ from predictions, and to propose a three-dimensional model of the monomeric form of p7 associated with the phospholipid bilayer. These studies revealed the presence of a turn connecting an unexpected N-terminal α-helix to the first transmembrane helix, TM1, and a long cytosolic loop bearing the dibasic motif and connecting TM1 to TM2. These results provide the first detailed experimental structural framework for a better understanding of p7 processing, oligomerization, and ion channel gating mechanism. PMID:20667830

  3. Dynamic and structural aspects of PEGylated liposomes monitored by NMR.

    PubMed

    Leal, Cecília; Rögnvaldsson, Sibylla; Fossheim, Sigrid; Nilssen, Esben A; Topgaard, Daniel

    2008-09-15

    Proton-detected NMR diffusion and (31)P NMR chemical shifts/bandwidths measurements were used to investigate a series of liposomal formulations where size and PEGylation extent need to be controlled for ultrasound mediated drug release. The width of the (31)P line is sensitive to aggregate size and shape and self-diffusion (1)H NMR conveys information about diffusional motion, size, and PEGylation extent. Measurements were performed on the formulations at their original pH, osmolality, and lipid concentration. These contained variable amounts of PEGylated phospholipid (herein referred to as PEG-lipid) and cholesterol. At high levels of PEG-lipid (11.5 and 15 mol%) the self-diffusion (1)H NMR revealed the coexistence of two entities with distinct diffusion coefficients: micelles (1.3 to 3x10(-11) m(2)/s) and liposomes (approximately 5x10(-12) m(2)/s). The (31)P spectra showed a broad liposome signal and two distinct narrow lines that were unaffected by temperature. The narrow lines arise from mixed micelles comprising both PEG-lipids and phospholipids. The echo decay in the diffusion experiments could be described as a sum of exponentials revealing that the exchange of PEG-lipid between liposomes and micellar aggregates is slower than the experimental observation time. For low amounts of PEG-lipid (1 and 4.5 mol%) the (31)P spectra consisted of a broad signal typically obtained for liposomes and the diffusion data were best described by a single exponential decay attributed solely to liposomes. For intermediate amounts of PEG-lipid (8 mol%), micellization started to occur and the diffusion data could no longer be fitted to a single or bi-exponential decay. Instead, the data were best described by a log-normal distribution of diffusion coefficients. The most efficient PEG-lipid incorporation in liposomes (about 8 mol%) was achieved for lower molecular weight PEG (2000 Da vs 5000 Da) and when the PEG-lipid acyl chain length matched the acyl chain length of the

  4. What function for human lithostathine?: structural investigations by three-dimensional structure modeling and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patard, L; Stoven, V; Gharib, B; Bontems, F; Lallemand, J Y; De Reggi, M

    1996-11-01

    Human lithostathine is a 144-residue protein, expressed in various organs and pathologies. Several biological functions have been proposed for this protein. Among others, inhibition of nucleation and growth of CaCO3 crystals in the pancreas and bacterial aggregation has retained attention, because lithostathine presents high sequence similarities with calcium-dependent (or C-type) lectins. To study its structure-function relationship and compare it with that of C-type lectins, we have built a model for lithostathine. This model is derived from the only two C-type lectins of known structures: rat mannose binding protein and human E-selectin. An original strategy, inspired by that proposed by Havel and Snow, was designed for model building. We have undertaken NMR studies on the natural protein. Although complete structure determination has not yet been achieved, the NMR studies did confirm the main characteristics of the model. From analysis of the proposed model, we concluded that lithostathine is not expected to present sugar- or calcium-binding properties. Therefore, the mechanisms of bacterial aggregation and inhibition of CaCO3 nucleation and growth have not yet been elucidated. PMID:8961348

  5. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  6. Feasibility studies. The use of NMR spectrometry as a possible substitute of or complement to several analytical tests in pharmacopoeia monographs.

    PubMed

    McEwen, I; Arvidsson, T

    2012-04-01

    NMR spectrometry has many analytical applications; for instance, the identification of known substances; the structure elucidation of unknown ones; the quantification of APIs, impurities, solvent and water; kinetic studies, stereochemistry determinations, and the analyses of complex mixtures as in metabonomics. NMR spectrometry has the potential to substitute or complement existing analyses that are performed on APIs. In this work, 4 different NMR analyses were done on 2 APIs: fluvastatin sodium and benzalkonium chloride with good results. PMID:23327894

  7. Essential Parameters for Structural Analysis and Dereplication by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the importance of adequate precision when reporting the δ and J parameters of frequency domain 1H NMR (HNMR) data. Using a variety of structural classes (terpenoids, phenolics, alkaloids) from different taxa (plants, cyanobacteria), this study develops rationales that explain the importance of enhanced precision in NMR spectroscopic analysis and rationalizes the need for reporting Δδ and ΔJ values at the 0.1–1 ppb and 10 mHz level, respectively. Spectral simulations paired with iteration are shown to be essential tools for complete spectral interpretation, adequate precision, and unambiguous HNMR-driven dereplication and metabolomic analysis. The broader applicability of the recommendation relates to the physicochemical properties of hydrogen (1H) and its ubiquity in organic molecules, making HNMR spectra an integral component of structure elucidation and verification. Regardless of origin or molecular weight, the HNMR spectrum of a compound can be very complex and encode a wealth of structural information that is often obscured by limited spectral dispersion and the occurrence of higher order effects. This altogether limits spectral interpretation, confines decoding of the underlying spin parameters, and explains the major challenge associated with the translation of HNMR spectra into tabulated information. On the other hand, the reproducibility of the spectral data set of any (new) chemical entity is essential for its structure elucidation and subsequent dereplication. Handling and documenting HNMR data with adequate precision is critical for establishing unequivocal links between chemical structure, analytical data, metabolomes, and biological activity. Using the full potential of HNMR spectra will facilitate the general reproducibility for future studies of bioactive chemicals, especially of compounds obtained from the diversity of terrestrial and marine organisms. PMID:24895010

  8. Essential parameters for structural analysis and dereplication by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C; Bisson, Jonathan; Case, Ryan J; Chadwick, Lucas R; Gödecke, Tanja; Inui, Taichi; Krunic, Aleksej; Jaki, Birgit U; McAlpine, James B; Mo, Shunyan; Napolitano, José G; Orjala, Jimmy; Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Niemitz, Matthias

    2014-06-27

    The present study demonstrates the importance of adequate precision when reporting the δ and J parameters of frequency domain (1)H NMR (HNMR) data. Using a variety of structural classes (terpenoids, phenolics, alkaloids) from different taxa (plants, cyanobacteria), this study develops rationales that explain the importance of enhanced precision in NMR spectroscopic analysis and rationalizes the need for reporting Δδ and ΔJ values at the 0.1-1 ppb and 10 mHz level, respectively. Spectral simulations paired with iteration are shown to be essential tools for complete spectral interpretation, adequate precision, and unambiguous HNMR-driven dereplication and metabolomic analysis. The broader applicability of the recommendation relates to the physicochemical properties of hydrogen ((1)H) and its ubiquity in organic molecules, making HNMR spectra an integral component of structure elucidation and verification. Regardless of origin or molecular weight, the HNMR spectrum of a compound can be very complex and encode a wealth of structural information that is often obscured by limited spectral dispersion and the occurrence of higher order effects. This altogether limits spectral interpretation, confines decoding of the underlying spin parameters, and explains the major challenge associated with the translation of HNMR spectra into tabulated information. On the other hand, the reproducibility of the spectral data set of any (new) chemical entity is essential for its structure elucidation and subsequent dereplication. Handling and documenting HNMR data with adequate precision is critical for establishing unequivocal links between chemical structure, analytical data, metabolomes, and biological activity. Using the full potential of HNMR spectra will facilitate the general reproducibility for future studies of bioactive chemicals, especially of compounds obtained from the diversity of terrestrial and marine organisms. PMID:24895010

  9. NMR Studies of 3He Films on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of NMR studies of the dynamics of 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. These studies can identify the phase transitions of the 2D films as a function of temperature. A thermally activated temperature dependence is observed for 2.6 < T < 8 K compared to a linear temperature dependence for 0.7 < T < 2.6 K. This linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in a fluid for coverages of 0.4 - 0.6 of a monolayer.

  10. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  11. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated. PMID:25429955

  12. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R.

    2014-11-01

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca2+. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 ( {10bar 14} )). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for 43Ca, 13C, and 17O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  13. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: NMR potentials for studying physical processes in fossil coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Anatolii D.; Ul'yanova, Ekaterina V.; Vasilenko, Tat'yana A.

    2005-11-01

    High-resolution, pulsed, and wide-line NMR studies of fossil coals are reviewed. Coal substance conversion due to outbursts is discussed. Results on water and methane interactions with coal substance, which provide insight into the dynamic characteristics of boundary water, the location of methane in coal structure, and water and methane's hazard implications for coal beds (gas- or geodynamic phenomena) are presented; these are shown to have potential for predicting and preventing life threatening situations.

  14. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    the SEI with temperature. In Chapter 5 we report on the use of NMR to study the effect of electrolyte/solvent and electrode structure on SEI formation. The intensity of the SEI in a cell containing LiBOB electrolyte with EC and DEC is greater than that in a cell with LiPF6 electrolyte with EC and DMC. This implies that the cell containing LiBOB electrolyte with EC and DEC is more stable. From the analysis of NMR of the cathode, it was found that it is easier to form SEI in layered structure cathode than in a spinel structure, suggesting that spinel structure materials may be better choices as cathode in lithium ion batteries. Evidently, then, the choice of electrolyte/solvent materials and electrode materials are key factors in determining the performance of lithium ion batteries.

  15. Applications of carbon-13 and sodium-23 NMR in the study of plants, animal, and human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sillerud, L.O.; Heyser, J.W.; Han, C.H.; Bitensky, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon-13 and sodium-23 NMR have been applied to the study of a variety of plant, animal and human cell types. Sodium NMR, in combination with dysprosium shift reagents, has been used to monitor sodium transport kinetics in salt-adapted, and non-adapted cells of P. milliaceum and whole D. spicata plants. The sodium content of human erythrocytes and leukemic macrophages was measured. Carbon-13 NMR was used to determine the structure and metabolism of rat epididymal fat pad adipocytes in real time. Insulin and isoproterenol-stimulated triacylglycerol turnover could be monitored in fat cell suspensions. (1-/sup 13/C) glucose was used as a substrate to demonstrate futile metabolic cycling from glucose to glycerol during lypolysis. Cell wall polysaccharide synthesis was followed in suspensions of P. milliaceum cells using (1-/sup 13/C) glucose as a precursor. These results illustrate the wide range of living systems which are amenable to study with NMR. 14 refs., 21 figs.

  16. An FTIR Calibration for Structural Hydrogen in Feldspars Using 1H MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. A.; Rossman, G. R.

    2002-05-01

    It is important to know how to determine the speciation and concentration of H in feldspars because this information could be used to determine primary magmatic water activity or to estimate the degree of hydrothermal alteration in igneous rocks. FTIR spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in speciation of hydrogen, and can be calibrated for quantitative determination of H concentration using 1H MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy. Three pegmatitic albites, one metamorphic albite, three volcanic plagioclases (albite, andesine, and anorthite) and one pegmatite oligoclase were used in this study to provide a range of plagioclase compositions. Two pegmatitic microclines and one sanidine were also studied. Polarized infrared spectra were obtained in the three principal optical directions for each specimen. Samples were prepared for 1H MAS NMR experiments at 12 kHz spinning speed in a dry box, without the use of a liquid grinding aid. A spectrum from anhydrous synthetic corundum was used as a baseline for feldspar NMR spectra. The pegmatitic and metamorphic albites are transparent, but contain submicroscopic fluid inclusions as evidenced by a broad band at 3400 cm-1 and an asymmetric band at 5200 cm-1 in the IR spectra that shift to bands characteristic of ice upon cooling to 77 K. These albites have a very sharp band at 4.7 ppm (relative to TMS) in their NMR spectra consistent with fluid inclusion water. In addition to the broad fluid inclusion band, the pegmatitic albites have sharp bands in the mid-IR similar the OH bands found in quartz. All other plagioclases have broad, anisotropic bands around 3200 cm-1 in the mid-IR and MOH combination stretch-bend bands near 4500 cm-1 in the near-IR, indicative of structural OH. The NMR spectra of these plagioclases have a broad band at 4.7 to 4.9 ppm TMS. The OH vector in plagioclases is preferentially aligned parallel to the a crystallographic axis. The concentration of structural OH in the plagioclases ranges from 50

  17. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  18. Real-Time NMR Investigations of Structural Changes in Silicon Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Baris; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet; Morcrette, Mathieu; Seznec, Vincent; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Grey, Clare P.

    2009-12-10

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) containing silicon negative electrodes have been the subject of much recent investigation because of the extremely large gravimetric and volumetric capacity of silicon. The crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition that occurs on electrochemical Li insertion into crystalline Si, during the first discharge, hinders attempts to link structure in these systems with electrochemical performance. We apply a combination of static, in situ and magic angle sample spinning, ex situ {sup 7}Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies to investigate the changes in local structure that occur in an actual working LIB. The first discharge occurs via the formation of isolated Si atoms and smaller Si-Si clusters embedded in a Li matrix; the latter are broken apart at the end of the discharge, forming isolated Si atoms. A spontaneous reaction of the lithium silicide with the electrolyte is directly observed in the in situ NMR experiments; this mechanism results in self-discharge and potential capacity loss. The rate of this self-discharge process is much slower when CMC (carboxymethylcellulose) is used as the binder.

  19. Real-time NMR investigations of structural changes in silicon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Key, Baris; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet; Morcrette, Mathieu; Seznéc, Vincent; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Grey, Clare P

    2009-07-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) containing silicon negative electrodes have been the subject of much recent investigation because of the extremely large gravimetric and volumetric capacity of silicon. The crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition that occurs on electrochemical Li insertion into crystalline Si, during the first discharge, hinders attempts to link structure in these systems with electrochemical performance. We apply a combination of static, in situ and magic angle sample spinning, ex situ (7)Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies to investigate the changes in local structure that occur in an actual working LIB. The first discharge occurs via the formation of isolated Si atoms and smaller Si-Si clusters embedded in a Li matrix; the latter are broken apart at the end of the discharge, forming isolated Si atoms. A spontaneous reaction of the lithium silicide with the electrolyte is directly observed in the in situ NMR experiments; this mechanism results in self-discharge and potential capacity loss. The rate of this self-discharge process is much slower when CMC (carboxymethylcellulose) is used as the binder. PMID:19298062

  20. Water speciation in sodium silicate glasses (quenched melts): A comprehensive NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.; Eguchi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of water is an important factor governing how the dissolved water affects the physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and glasses. Our previous studies have demonstrated that 1H MAS NMR in combination with 29Si-1H and 27Al-1H double-resonance NMR experiments is an effective approach for unambiguously differentiating and quantifying different water species in quenched silicate melts (glasses). Several contrasting dissolution mechanisms have been revealed depending on the melt composition: for relatively polymerized melts, the formation of SiOH/AlOH species (plus molecular H2O) and depolymerization of the network structure dominate; whereas for depolymerized Ca-Mg silicate melts, free OH (e.g. MgOH) become increasingly important (cf. [1]). The proportion of free OH species has been shown to decrease with both increasing melt polymerization (silica content) and decreasing field strength of the network modifying cations (from Mg to Ca). Our previous 1H and 29Si MAS NMR results for hydrous Na silicate glasses of limited compositions (Na2Si4O9 and Na2Si2O5) were consistent with negligible free OH (NaOH) species and depolymerizing effect of water dissolution [2]. On the other hand, there were also other studies that proposed the presence of significant NaOH species in hydrous glasses near the Na2Si2O5 composition. The purpose of this study is apply the approach of combined 1H MAS NMR and double-resonance (29Si-1H and 23Na-1H) NMR to gain unambiguous evidence for the OH speciation in Na silicate glasses (melts) as a function of composition. Hydrous Na silicate glasses containing mostly ≤ 1 wt% H2O for a range of Na/Si ratios from 0.33 to 1.33 have been synthesized by rapidly quenching melts either at 0.2 GPa using an internally heated gas pressure vessel or at 1 GPa using a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. NMR spectra have been acquired using a 9.4 T Varian Unity-Inova spectrometer. The 29Si and 1H chemical shifts are

  1. The NMR and X-ray study of L-arginine derived Schiff bases and its cadmium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Grech, E.; Schilf, W.; Kamieński, B.; Pazio, A.; Woźniak, K.

    2014-04-01

    The structure study of five Schiff bases derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) and 2-hydroxy carbonyl compounds were performed in both solution and solid state using NMR and X-ray methods. Both analytical methods applied to the solid state sample of two Schiff bases showed a significant difference in molecular structures of unsubstituted and 7-CH3 substituted compounds. This effect was explained as a steric interaction of methyl group. Additionally the structure of two Cd2+ complexes with some Schiff bases were determined by NMR methods in DMSO solution and in the solid state. On the base of heteronuclear NMR measurement (13C, 15N and 113Cd) it was possible to define the complexation site on nitrogen atom. The large set of spectral parameters: chemical shifts, homo- and heteronuclear coupling constants, were used in structure study.

  2. A novel one-pot synthesis of heterocyclic compound (4-benzoyl-5-phenyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-3,3a-dihydropyrazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-7(6H)-one): Structural (X-ray and DFT) and spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis and Mass) characterization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Mecit; Sönmez, Mehmet; Şen, Fatih; Dinçer, Muharrem; Özdemir, Namık

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the title compound named as 4-benzoyl-5-phenyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-3,3a-dihydropyrazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-7(6H)-one (C24H18N4O2) was both experimentally and theoretically investigated. The compound was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, NMR (1H NMR, 13C NMR and HETCOR-NMR), Mass spectroscopies and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n with a = 6.1402 (3) Å, b = 21.4470 (15) Å, c = 15.0049 (8) Å and β = 97.407 (4)°. The molecular geometry was obtained from the X-ray structure determination optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-31+G(d, p) basis set in ground state. From the optimized structure, geometric parameters, vibrational wavenumbers and chemical shifts of molecule were obtained. Experimental measurements were compared with its corresponding the calculated data. An excellent harmony between the two data was ascertained. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and non-linear optical (NLO) properties of the title molecule were investigated by theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d, p) level.

  3. Structural models for covalent non-oxidic glasses: Atomic distribution and local order in CdGeAs2-xPx glasses studied by use of 31P and 113Cd spin-echo and 31-113Cd spin-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Deanna; Maxwell, Robert; Lathrop, David; Banks, Kesha; Eckert, Hellmut

    1992-10-01

    The structure of glasses in the system CdGeAs2-xPx is discussed on the basis of complementary solid-state NMR experiments, including 31P and 113Cd magic-angle spinning (MAS) and spin-echo techniques, as well as 31-113Cd spin-echo double resonance (SEDOR) NMR. Computer simulations of atomic distribution models and experimental studies on crystalline model systems are used to quantify the results. The analysis reveals striking differences in the short-range order between the glassy and the stoichiometrically analogous crystalline materials. The structure of glasses in the system CdGeAs2-xPx is characterized by the presence of a substantial fraction of homopolar pnictogen-pnictogen bonds and by a distribution of cadmium relative to phosphorus that is close to random. These results lend credence to the bond-switching model invoked for the structural description of amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors.

  4. Dynamic 1H NMR Studies of Schiff Base Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köylü, M. Z.; Ekinci, A.; Böyükata, M.; Temel, H.

    2016-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 and the spin-spin relaxation time T 2 of two Schiff base derivatives, N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane (H2L1) and N,N'-ethylenebis (salicylidene)-1,3-diaminopropane (H2L2), in DMSO-d6 solvent were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 20-50°C using a Bruker Avance 400.132 MHz 1H NMR spectrometer. Based on the activation energy ( E a) and correlation time (τc), we believe that the Schiff base derivatives perform a molecular tumbling motion.

  5. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies establish that heparanase is a retaining glycosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer C.; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Singh, Sanjesh; Ferro, Vito

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of fondaparinux were fully assigned by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. •Hydrolysis of fondaparinux by heparanase was monitored by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. •Heparanase is established to be a retaining glycosidase. -- Abstract: Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans in basement membranes and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Heparanase is implicated in several diverse pathological processes associated with ECM degradation such as metastasis, inflammation and angiogenesis and is thus an important target for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug discovery. Heparanase has been classed as belonging to the clan A glycoside hydrolase family 79 based on sequence analysis, secondary structure predictions and mutagenic analysis, and thus it has been inferred that it is a retaining glycosidase. However, there has been no direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion. Herein we describe {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies of the hydrolysis of the pentasaccharide substrate fondaparinux by heparanase, and provide conclusive evidence that heparanase hydrolyses its substrate with retention of configuration and is thus established as a retaining glycosidase. Knowledge of the mechanism of hydrolysis may have implications for future design of inhibitors for this important drug target.

  6. High field and 2D-nmr studies with the aporphine alkaloid glaucine.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; Kook, A M; Davis, P J

    1986-01-01

    The aporphine alkaloid glaucine (1) was examined by comparison of the high field (600 MHz) 1H-nmr spectra of 1 vs. racemic 6a,7,7-trideutereoglaucine (4,5), by computer-simulated 1H-nmr spectra at 600 MHz, by using decoupled proton spectra, and two-dimensional COSY and HETCOR experiments with 1 at 500 and 360 MHz, respectively, and using high field (90 MHZ) 13C-nmr of S-(+)-glaucine (1). Emphasis was placed on the resolution of the chemical shifts and coupling constants for the H-4 alpha, H-4 beta, H-5 alpha, H-5 beta, H-6 alpha, H-7 alpha, and H-7 beta alicyclic protons of the molecule, which were previously unassigned. The complete assignment of the alicyclic protons of 1 by 1H-nmr was required for the structural elucidation of deuterated analogs of glaucine, which will be used in microbial transformation studies to determine the stereochemical course of aporphine dehydrogenation by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030). PMID:3783155

  7. Li NMR study of heavy-fermion LiV2O4 containing magnetic defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, X.; Das, S.; Borsa, F.; Vannette, M.; Prozorov, R.; Schmalian, J.; Johnston, D.

    2008-04-21

    We present a systematic study of the variations of the {sup 7}Li NMR properties versus magnetic defect concentration up to 0.83 mol% within the spinel structure of polycrystalline powder samples and a collection of small single crystals of LiV2O4 in the temperature range from 0.5 to 4.2 K. We also report static magnetization measurements and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements at 14 MHz on the samples at low temperatures. Both the NMR spectrum and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate are inhomogeneous in the presence of the magnetic defects. The NMR data for the powders are well explained by assuming that (i) there is a random distribution of magnetic point defects, (ii) the same heavy Fermi liquid is present in the samples containing the magnetic defects as in magnetically pure LiV2O4, and (iii) the influences of the magnetic defects and of the Fermi liquid on the magnetization and NMR properties are separable. In the single crystals, somewhat different behaviors are observed. Remarkably, the magnetic defects in the powder samples show evidence of spin freezing below T {approx} 1.0 K, whereas in the single crystals with similar magnetic defect concentration no spin freezing was found down to 0.5 K. Thus different types of magnetic defects and/or interactions between them appear to arise in the powders versus the crystals, possibly due to the substantially different synthesis conditions of the powders and crystals.

  8. 75 As and 59Co NMR studies of SrCo2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yuji; Ogloblichev, Vasily; Pandey, Abhisek; Johnston, David C.

    2015-03-01

    After the discovery of unconventional superconductivity in Fe pnictides with the ThCr2Si2-type structure, much attention has been paid to the related materials AM2As2(A = Ca, Sr, and Ba, and M = Co, Ni, Mn, and Cu). We have been studying the electronic and magnetic properties of these related materials systematically. Among them, metallic SrCo2As2 is an interesting system because inelastic neutron scattering measurements indicate strong stripe-type antiferromagnetic correlations, similar to the Fe pnictide superconductors. In order to investigate the magnetic and electronic properties of SrCo2As2 from a microscopic point of view, we carried out 59Co and 75As NMR in the temperature range T = 1.3 - 300 K. In this talk, based on 59Co NMR data including 75As NMR results published previously, we discuss the characteristic magnetic fluctuations in the system and compare them with those measured from NMR data for another cobalt arsenide BaCo2As2. Supported by USDOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  9. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  10. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  11. Membrane protein structural validation by oriented sample solid-state NMR: diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Li, Conggang; Gao, F Philip; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-04-15

    The validation of protein structures through functional assays has been the norm for many years. Functional assays perform this validation for water-soluble proteins very well, but they need to be performed in the same environment as that used for the structural analysis. This is difficult for membrane proteins that are often structurally characterized in detergent environments, although functional assays for these proteins are most frequently performed in lipid bilayers. Because the structure of membrane proteins is known to be sensitive to the membrane mimetic environment, such functional assays are appropriate for validating the protein construct, but not the membrane protein structure. Here, we compare oriented sample solid-state NMR spectral data of diacylglycerol kinase previously published with predictions of such data from recent structures of this protein. A solution NMR structure of diacylglycerol kinase has been obtained in detergent micelles and three crystal structures have been obtained in a monoolein cubic phase. All of the structures are trimeric with each monomer having three transmembrane and one amphipathic helices. However, the solution NMR structure shows typical perturbations induced by a micelle environment that is reflected in the predicted solid-state NMR resonances from the structural coordinates. The crystal structures show few such perturbations, especially for the wild-type structure and especially for the monomers that do not have significant crystal contacts. For these monomers the predicted and observed data are nearly identical. The thermostabilized constructs do show more perturbations, especially the A41C mutation that introduces a hydrophilic residue into what would be the middle of the lipid bilayer inducing additional hydrogen bonding between trimers. These results demonstrate a general technique for validating membrane protein structures with minimal data obtained from membrane proteins in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers by

  12. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  13. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  14. Structural Model of the Bilitranslocase Transmembrane Domain Supported by NMR and FRET Data

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Amrita Roy; Sikorska, Emilia; van den Boom, Johannes; Bayer, Peter; Popenda, Łukasz; Szutkowski, Kosma; Jurga, Stefan; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Sali, Andrej; Zhukov, Igor; Passamonti, Sabina; Novič, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D model of the four transmembrane (TM) helical regions of bilitranslocase (BTL), a structurally uncharacterized protein that transports organic anions across the cell membrane. The model was computed by considering helix-helix interactions as primary constraints, using Monte Carlo simulations. The interactions between the TM2 and TM3 segments have been confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, increasing our confidence in the model. Several insights into the BTL transport mechanism were obtained by analyzing the model. For example, the observed cis-trans Leu-Pro peptide bond isomerization in the TM3 fragment may indicate a key conformational change during anion transport by BTL. Our structural model of BTL may facilitate further studies, including drug discovery. PMID:26291722

  15. Studies on 2H NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction of thermochromic bis ( N, N-diethyl-1,2-ethanediamine) nickel(II) complexes with and without structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kotani, Kyoko; Ohki, Hiroshi; Ishimaru, Shin'ichi; Okamoto, Ken-Ichi; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    1995-02-01

    The thermochromic complex bis( N, N-diethyl-1,2-ethanediamine) ((C 2H 5) 2NC 2H 4NH 2) nickel(II) perchlorate([Ni(dieten) 2](ClO 4) 2) was studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction and found to form a triclinic lattice with space group P 1¯, a = 8.108(1) Å, b = 8.835(1) Å, c = 9.736(1) Å, α = 94.24(1)°, β = 114.28(1)°, γ = 116.49(1)°, and Z = 1 being isomorphous with that of [Cu(dieten) 2](ClO 4) 2 which has been reported to have a thermochromic phase transition. The temperature dependences of 2H NMR spectra in [Ni(dieten- d2) 2]X 2 (dieten- d2: (C 2H 5) 2NC 2H 4ND 2; X: ClO 4, BF 4, Br, NO 3, I) were observed and quadrupole coupling constants e2Qq and asymmetry parameters η were evaluated. Below room temperature, an almost rigid structure of the ND 2 group was derived by analyzing the spectra. For perchlorate and tetrafluoroborate with colour changes at respective phase transition temperatures ( Tc), quadrupole parameters were also changed discontinuously at Tc. The analysis of spectra observed above Tc afforded two-site jumps of the N-D bond by angles of 52-55° supporting the ring-puckering model of the five-membered chelate ring. However, iodide having no phase transition showed continuous changes of both e2Qq and η values with increasing temperature up to 450 K. These results which cannot be attributed to the puckering motion were explained by whole complex reorientation. These molecular motions are discussed in connection with the colour change observed in these complexes.

  16. Screening protein – Single stranded RNA complexes by NMR spectroscopy for structure determination☆

    PubMed Central

    Foot, Jaelle N.; Feracci, Mikael; Dominguez, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, RNA molecules have been revealed to be at the center of numerous biological processes. Long considered as passive molecules transferring genetic information from DNA to proteins, it is now well established that RNA molecules play important regulatory roles. Associated with that, the number of identified RNA binding proteins (RBPs) has increased considerably and mutations in RNA molecules or RBP have been shown to cause various diseases, such as cancers. It is therefore crucial to understand at the molecular level how these proteins specifically recognise their RNA targets in order to design new generation drug therapies targeting protein–RNA complexes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a particularly well-suited technique to study such protein–RNA complexes at the atomic level and can provide valuable information for new drug discovery programs. In this article, we describe the NMR strategy that we and other laboratories use for screening optimal conditions necessary for structural studies of protein-single stranded RNA complexes, using two proteins, Sam68 and T-STAR, as examples. PMID:24096002

  17. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral IR, NMR UV-Vis investigations, NBO and NLO of 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide with use of X-ray diffractions studies along with DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Sibel; Sarioğlu, Ahmet Oral; Güler, Semih; Dege, Necmi; Sönmez, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    The title compound, 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide compound (C22H16NO3Cl) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, 1H and 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectra. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts were computed using hybrid-DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods and 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The calculated optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and 1H NMR chemical shift values are in strong agreement with experimentally measured values. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound, was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as calculated energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, dipole moments and frontier orbital energies and band gap energies were computed with TDDFT-B3LYP methodolgy and using 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non linear optical (NLO) properties were performed by using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level for the title compound.

  19. Crystal structure, FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H NMR and computational study of ethyl 2-{[(Z)3-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxy-2-propene-1-thione] amino} acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, S.; Varughese, Mary; Joseph, Nirmala; Mathew, Paulson; Manojkumar, T. K.; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure of a thioamide derivative ethyl 2-{[(Z)3-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxy-2-propene-1-thione] amino} acetate was determined by X-ray diffraction. The proton NMR (1H NMR), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) and Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of the compound were recorded and analyzed. The conjugated enol form of the compound was crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with unit cell dimensions a = 12.514(2) Å, b = 5.403(5) Å, c = 21.233(3) Å, β = 94.597(4)°. The structure was solved by direct methods and refined to the R value of 0.0462. The thioamide moiety in the compound adopts the Z-conformation and the Csbnd N bond shows a high rotational barrier. The geometry in the gas phase was optimized by B3LYP and RHF quantum mechanical calculations using Gaussian 09 programme and the vibrational frequencies were calculated. The experimental and theoretical data are in good agreement.

  20. Crystallography & NMR system: A new software suite for macromolecular structure determination.

    PubMed

    Brünger, A T; Adams, P D; Clore, G M; DeLano, W L; Gros, P; Grosse-Kunstleve, R W; Jiang, J S; Kuszewski, J; Nilges, M; Pannu, N S; Read, R J; Rice, L M; Simonson, T; Warren, G L

    1998-09-01

    A new software suite, called Crystallography & NMR System (CNS), has been developed for macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In contrast to existing structure-determination programs, the architecture of CNS is highly flexible, allowing for extension to other structure-determination methods, such as electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. CNS has a hierarchical structure: a high-level hypertext markup language (HTML) user interface, task-oriented user input files, module files, a symbolic structure-determination language (CNS language), and low-level source code. Each layer is accessible to the user. The novice user may just use the HTML interface, while the more advanced user may use any of the other layers. The source code will be distributed, thus source-code modification is possible. The CNS language is sufficiently powerful and flexible that many new algorithms can be easily implemented in the CNS language without changes to the source code. The CNS language allows the user to perform operations on data structures, such as structure factors, electron-density maps, and atomic properties. The power of the CNS language has been demonstrated by the implementation of a comprehensive set of crystallographic procedures for phasing, density modification and refinement. User-friendly task-oriented input files are available for nearly all aspects of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography and solution NMR. PMID:9757107

  1. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid-state NMR and computational structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Masica, David L.; Ash, Jason T.; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P.; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR. Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this new method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized. PMID:21134646

  2. Synthesis and carbon-13 NMR studies of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong

    2000-08-01

    The orientation of different segments of 4'-cyanophenyl 4-heptylbenzoate (7CPB) has been investigated using 13C NMR. The method of proton encoded local field (PELF) spectroscopy was used in combination with off-magic-angle spinning (OMAS) of the sample. High-resolution 2D spectra were obtained and the order parameters were calculated from the spectra. Linear relationships between the obtained order parameters and anisotropic chemical shifts determined by 1D 13C NMR were established and semi-empirical parameters were obtained. A 1:2 mixture of 7CPB and its chain-perfluorinated analog (7PFCPB) shows interesting phase behavior with changing of temperature. The mixture was studied by the use of 13C NMR and polarizing optical microscopy. The order parameters of 7CPB in the smectic A phase of the mixture were calculated using the semi-empirical parameters obtained by the 2D NMR method. Eight series of liquid crystals containing an electron- donating group at one end of a conjugated system and an electron-withdrawing group at the other end have been synthesized. The electron-donating group is 4- n-alkylpiperazinyl group, the electron- withdrawing group is nitro group and the conjugated system is diphenyldiazene with zero, one or two substituents on the phenyl rings. The substituents are -F, -Cl, and -CH3. Two series of compounds with cyano group as electron-withdrawing group were also synthesized. Most of the compounds synthesized are nematogenic and exhibit rather broad liquid crystalline ranges. The effects of the lateral substituents on the optical absorption and phase transition temperatures are correlated with their nature and position of substitution. Birefringence, dielectric anisotropy, elastic constant ratio and rise time of the liquid crystals were carried out using 10 wt% LC mixtures in E7. It has been found that lateral substituents have subtle effects on the properties. The presence of lateral substituents depresses melting points and clearing points of the

  3. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  4. NMR Solution Structure and Condition-Dependent Oligomerization of the Antimicrobial Peptide Human Defensin 5

    PubMed Central

    Wommack, Andrew J.; Robson, Scott A.; Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Wan, Andrea; Turner, Christopher J.; Wagner, Gerhard; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Human defensin 5 (HD5) is a 32-residue host-defense peptide expressed in the gastrointestinal, reproductive, and urinary tracts that has antimicrobial activity. It exhibits six cysteine residues that are regiospecifically oxidized to form three disulfide bonds (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, and Cys10—Cys30) in the oxidized form (HD5ox). To probe the solution structure and oligomerization properties of HD5ox, and select mutant peptides lacking one or more disulfide bonds, NMR solution studies and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments are reported in addition to in vitro peptide stability assays. The NMR solution structure of HD5ox, solved at pH 4 in 90:10 H2O/D2O, is presented (PDB: 2LXZ). Relaxation T1/T2 measurements and the rotational correlation time (Tc) estimated from a [15N,1H]-TRACT experiment demonstrate that HD5ox is dimeric under these experimental conditions. Exchange broadening of the Hα signals in the NMR spectra suggests that residues 19-21 (Val19-Cys20-Glu21) contribute to the dimer interface in solution. Exchange broadening is also observed for residues 7-14 comprising the loop. Sedimentation velocity and equilibrium studies conducted in buffered aqueous solution reveal that the oligomerization state of HD5ox is pH-dependent. Sedimentation coefficients of ca. 1.8 S and a molecular weight of 14,363 Da were determined for HD5ox at pH 7, supporting a tetrameric form ([HD5ox] ≥ 30 μM). At pH 2, a sedimentation coefficient of ca. 1.0 S and a molecular weight of 7,079 Da, corresponding to a HD5ox dimer, were obtained. Millimolar concentrations of NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2 have negligible effect on the HD5ox sedimentation coefficients in buffered aqueous solution at neutral pH. Removal of a single disulfide bond results in a loss of peptide fold and quaternary structure. These biophysical investigations highlight the dynamic and environment-sensitive behavior of HD5ox in solution, and provide important insights into HD5ox structure

  5. sup 31 Phosphorus NMR studies of renal membrane phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    A research program was undertaken in order to study the effects of toxin-induced acute renal failure and streptozotozin-induced diabetes mellitus on the organization and motion of phospholipids in kidney membranes. The method of study included {sup 31}P NMR and computer simulated lineshape analyses and apparent lipid diffusion rate measurements. These were performed with selected tissue samples and disease models, and the results were compared with those of healthy renal tissues in order to identify changes associated with the diseased state. A new selective-excitation NMR pulse sequence was developed in which a portion of the lipid molecules were excited with a series of short equally-spaced RF pulses. As the position of the molecules changed on the membrane by lateral diffusion, the shape of the hole was seen to change. Experimental spectra were compared with calculated lineshapes in order to obtain estimates of useful molecular parameters including relation times and lateral lipid diffusion rates. The lineshape calculations were based on a solution to the Bloch equations for complex magnetization components with exchange terms added for diffusion.

  6. Structure of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton Protein Bactofilin by NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Variation.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Maher M; Wang, Yong; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-06-01

    Bactofilins constitute a recently discovered class of bacterial proteins that form cytoskeletal filaments. They share a highly conserved domain (DUF583) of which the structure remains unknown, in part due to the large size and noncrystalline nature of the filaments. Here, we describe the atomic structure of a bactofilin domain from Caulobacter crescentus. To determine the structure, we developed an approach that combines a biophysical model for proteins with recently obtained solid-state NMR spectroscopy data and amino acid contacts predicted from a detailed analysis of the evolutionary history of bactofilins. Our structure reveals a triangular β-helical (solenoid) conformation with conserved residues forming the tightly packed core and polar residues lining the surface. The repetitive structure explains the presence of internal repeats as well as strongly conserved positions, and is reminiscent of other fibrillar proteins. Our work provides a structural basis for future studies of bactofilin biology and for designing molecules that target them, as well as a starting point for determining the organization of the entire bactofilin filament. Finally, our approach presents new avenues for determining structures that are difficult to obtain by traditional means. PMID:27276252

  7. Studying metal ion binding properties of a three-way junction RNA by heteronuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Bartova, Simona; Pechlaner, Maria; Donghi, Daniela; Sigel, Roland K O

    2016-06-01

    Self-splicing group II introns are highly structured RNA molecules, containing a characteristic secondary and catalytically active tertiary structure, which is formed only in the presence of Mg(II). Mg(II) initiates the first folding step governed by the κζ element within domain 1 (D1κζ). We recently solved the NMR structure of D1κζ derived from the mitochondrial group II intron ribozyme Sc.ai5γ and demonstrated that Mg(II) is essential for its stabilization. Here, we performed a detailed multinuclear NMR study of metal ion interactions with D1κζ, using Cd(II) and cobalt(III)hexammine to probe inner- and outer-sphere coordination of Mg(II) and thus to better characterize its binding sites. Accordingly, we mapped (1)H, (15)N, (13)C, and (31)P spectral changes upon addition of different amounts of the metal ions. Our NMR data reveal a Cd(II)-assisted macrochelate formation at the 5'-end triphosphate, a preferential Cd(II) binding to guanines in a helical context, an electrostatic interaction in the ζ tetraloop receptor and various metal ion interactions in the GAAA tetraloop and κ element. These results together with our recently published data on Mg(II) interaction provide a much better understanding of Mg(II) binding to D1κζ, and reveal how intricate and complex metal ion interactions can be. PMID:26880094

  8. Combined methods for the determination of structure in disordered systems: Application of solid state NMR and diffraction methods to catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupas, Peter Joseph

    The research presented in this dissertation involves the use of a combination of experimental methods in the study of disordered heterogeneous catalysts, with the aim of determining active site structure. This research has used powder diffraction, including both the Rietveld and Pair Distribution Analysis (PDF) methods to probe the local, intermediate and long-range structure from atomic scale correlations to crystalline periodic order. Additionally, NMR spectroscopic methods have been applied to the study of local structure and correlations. Disordered heterogeneous catalyst systems have been investigated with the aim of determining how structure is implicated in reactivity. Our work has focused on aluminum fluorides and fluorinated aluminum oxide as catalysts in halocarbon reactions. These materials are widely used both in halocarbon reforming reactions but also as acid catalysts. Using the methods described above, a detailed model is developed to describe formation of catalytically active sites on fluorinated aluminum oxide. Systems with low levels of fluorine versus fully fluorinated systems have been investigated as well as transition metal doped systems, to explore various aspects of structure that may play a vital role in governing catalytic activity. NMR has allowed us to discriminate surface structure versus bulk structure, while powder diffraction methods have developed a more global model of catalyst structure. Additionally, the use of basic probe molecules combined with NMR is shown to be effective in the study of acid site structure, the active sites in these catalysts. In addition to the application of existing techniques to the study of catalysts, the work presented here also aims at developing new methodologies to study catalytic systems in-situ. Time-resolved PDF has been developed to study materials properties in-situ, as a function of temperature or reaction conditions. In conclusion, the work presented in this dissertation aims to illustrate how

  9. High resolution structural characterization of Aβ42 amyloid fibrils by magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Frohm, Birgitta; Su, Yongchao; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-06-17

    The presence of amyloid plaques composed of amyloid beta (Aβ) fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Aβ peptide is present as several length variants with two common alloforms consisting of 40 and 42 amino acids, denoted Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, respectively. While there have been numerous reports that structurally characterize fibrils of Aβ1-40, very little is known about the structure of amyloid fibrils of Aβ1-42, which are considered the more toxic alloform involved in AD. We have prepared isotopically (13)C/(15)N labeled AβM01-42 fibrils in vitro from recombinant protein and examined their (13)C-(13)C and (13)C-(15)N magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra. In contrast to several other studies of Aβ fibrils, we observe spectra with excellent resolution and a single set of chemical shifts, suggesting the presence of a single fibril morphology. We report the initial structural characterization of AβM01-42 fibrils utilizing (13)C and (15)N shift assignments of 38 of the 43 residues, including the backbone and side chains, obtained through a series of cross-polarization based 2D and 3D (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N MAS NMR experiments for rigid residues along with J-based 2D TOBSY experiments for dynamic residues. We find that the first ∼5 residues are dynamic and most efficiently detected in a J-based TOBSY spectrum. In contrast, residues 16-42 are easily observed in cross-polarization experiments and most likely form the amyloid core. Calculation of ψ and φ dihedral angles from the chemical shift assignments indicate that 4 β-strands are present in the fibril's secondary structure. PMID:26001057

  10. High Resolution Structural Characterization of Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils by Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The presence of amyloid plaques composed of amyloid beta (Aβ) fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The Aβ peptide is present as several length variants with two common alloforms consisting of 40 and 42 amino acids, denoted Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42, respectively. While there have been numerous reports that structurally characterize fibrils of Aβ1–40, very little is known about the structure of amyloid fibrils of Aβ1–42, which are considered the more toxic alloform involved in AD. We have prepared isotopically 13C/15N labeled AβM01–42 fibrils in vitro from recombinant protein and examined their 13C–13C and 13C–15N magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra. In contrast to several other studies of Aβ fibrils, we observe spectra with excellent resolution and a single set of chemical shifts, suggesting the presence of a single fibril morphology. We report the initial structural characterization of AβM01–42 fibrils utilizing 13C and 15N shift assignments of 38 of the 43 residues, including the backbone and side chains, obtained through a series of cross-polarization based 2D and 3D 13C–13C, 13C–15N MAS NMR experiments for rigid residues along with J-based 2D TOBSY experiments for dynamic residues. We find that the first ∼5 residues are dynamic and most efficiently detected in a J-based TOBSY spectrum. In contrast, residues 16–42 are easily observed in cross-polarization experiments and most likely form the amyloid core. Calculation of ψ and φ dihedral angles from the chemical shift assignments indicate that 4 β-strands are present in the fibril’s secondary structure. PMID:26001057

  11. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules. PMID:26479462

  12. A strategy for co-translational folding studies of ribosome-bound nascent chain complexes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M E; Launay, Hélène M M; Karyadi, Maria-Evangelia; Wang, Xiaolin; Waudby, Christopher A; Deckert, Annika; Robertson, Amy L; Christodoulou, John; Cabrita, Lisa D

    2016-08-01

    During biosynthesis on the ribosome, an elongating nascent polypeptide chain can begin to fold, in a process that is central to all living systems. Detailed structural studies of co-translational protein folding are now beginning to emerge; such studies were previously limited, at least in part, by the inherently dynamic nature of emerging nascent chains, which precluded most structural techniques. NMR spectroscopy is able to provide atomic-resolution information for ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs), but it requires large quantities (≥10 mg) of homogeneous, isotopically labeled RNCs. Further challenges include limited sample working concentration and stability of the RNC sample (which contribute to weak NMR signals) and resonance broadening caused by attachment to the large (2.4-MDa) ribosomal complex. Here, we present a strategy to generate isotopically labeled RNCs in Escherichia coli that are suitable for NMR studies. Uniform translational arrest of the nascent chains is achieved using a stalling motif, and isotopically labeled RNCs are produced at high yield using high-cell-density E. coli growth conditions. Homogeneous RNCs are isolated by combining metal affinity chromatography (to isolate ribosome-bound species) with sucrose density centrifugation (to recover intact 70S monosomes). Sensitivity-optimized NMR spectroscopy is then applied to the RNCs, combined with a suite of parallel NMR and biochemical analyses to cross-validate their integrity, including RNC-optimized NMR diffusion measurements to report on ribosome attachment in situ. Comparative NMR studies of RNCs with the analogous isolated proteins permit a high-resolution description of the structure and dynamics of a nascent chain during its progressive biosynthesis on the ribosome. PMID:27466710

  13. The secondary structure of echistatin from 1H-NMR, circular-dichroism and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saudek, V; Atkinson, R A; Lepage, P; Pelton, J T

    1991-12-01

    Detailed biophysical studies have been carried out on echistatin, a member of the disintegrin family of small, cysteine-rich, RGD-containing proteins, isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus. Analysis of circular-dichroism spectra indicates that, at 20 degrees C, echistatin contains no alpha-helix but contains mostly beta-turns and beta-sheet. Two isobestic points are observed as the temperature is raised, the conformational changes associated with that observed between 40 degrees C and 72 degrees C being irreversible. Raman spectra also indicate considerable beta-turn and beta-sheet (20%) structure and an absence of alpha-helical structure. Three of the four disulphide bridges are shown to be in an all-gauche conformation, while the fourth adopts a trans-gauche-gauche conformation. The 1H-NMR spectrum of echistatin has been almost fully assigned. A single conformation was observed at 27 degrees C with the four proline residues adopting only the trans conformation. A large number of backbone amide protons were found to exchange slowly, but no segments of the backbone were found to be in either alpha-helical or beta-sheet conformation. A number of turns could be characterised. An irregular beta-hairpin contains the RGD sequence in a mobile loop at its tip. Two of the four disulphide cross-links have been identified from the NMR spectra. The data presented in this paper will serve to define the structure of echistatin more closely in subsequent studies. PMID:1761037

  14. Effects of Phe-to-Trp mutation and fluorotryptophan incorporation on the solution structure of cardiac troponin C, and analysis of its suitability as a potential probe for in situ NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Mercier, Pascal; Letourneau, Paul-Jean; Sykes, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool for probing protein properties in situ. However, results obtained using this technique are relevant only if the 19F probe offers minimal perturbation to the surrounding environment. In this paper, we examine the effect of 5-fluorotryptophan (5fW) incorporation on the three-dimensional structure of cardiac troponin-C (cTnC), with the intention of developing a 19F-labeled TnC for use in in situ 19FNMR. We find that, in general, 5fW does not perturb the structure of the protein significantly. Replacement of residue Phe 153 with 5fW produces no noticeable change in protein conformation. However, replacement of residue Phe 104 with 5fW produces a folding behavior that is dependent on the Escherichia coli strain used to express the mutant. The orientations of the indole rings in these mutants are such that the Trp residue adopts a χ2 of ~90° in the F104W mutant and ~−100° in the F153W mutant. Using results from 19F-1H heteronuclear NOE experiment, we show the replacement of L-Trp with 5fW at these positions does not change the orientation of the indole ring and the spread of the 5fW side-chain dihedral angles increases moderately for the F104(5fW) mutant and not at all for the F153(5fW) mutant. Based on these structures, we conclude that the substitution of Phe by 5fW at these two positions has minimal effects on the structure of cTnC and that the 5fW indole rings in both mutants have well defined orientation, making the two mutants viable candidates for use in in situ 19F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:16131667

  15. Voltammetric, coulometric, mercury-199 NMR, and other studies characterizing new and unusual mercury complexes produced by electrochemical oxidation of mercury(II) diethyldithiocarbamate. Crystal and molecular structure of octakis(N,N-diethyldithiocarbamato)pentamercury(II) perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, A.M.; Colton, R.; Hollenkamp, A.F.; Hoskins, B.F.; McGregor, K.

    1987-04-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of Hg(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 2/ (dtc = dithiocarbamate) has been studied at both mercury and platinum electrodes in dichloromethane solution. At mercury, polarograms and cyclic voltammograms exhibit two reversible one-electron oxidation processes. Oxidative controlled potential electrolysis at mercury at a potential of 0.6 V (least positive oxidation process) gave a green solution which, on the basis of extensive electrochemical studies, is shown to contain the (Hg/sub 3/(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 4/)/sup 2 +/ cation. The results of mercury-199 NMR studies are consistent with this suggestion. Oxidative cyclic voltammetry of Hg(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 2/ at a platinum electrode showed an irreversible oxidation response at 1.25 V, quite different to the response at mercury. However, oxidative controlled potential electrolysis at a potential corresponding to the foot of the wave at platinum also produced a solution of (Hg/sub 3/(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 4/)/sup 2 +/, which in this case is thought to be formed via a mercury(III) dithiocarbamate intermediate. On evaporation of solutions of (Hg/sub 3/(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 4/)/sup 2 +/ a solid is obtained which X-ray crystallographic studies show to be (Hg/sub 5/(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 8/)(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/. This pentamercury complex redissolves in dichloromethane to behave as a mixture of (Hg/sub 3/(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 4//sup 2 +/ and 2Hg(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 2/. Crystal data for (Hg/sub 5/(Et/sub 2/dtc)/sub 8/)(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/: M/sub r/ = 2388.2, triclinic space group P anti 1, a = 12.766 (2) A, b = 14.050 (2) A, c = 10.820 (2) A, ..cap alpha.. = 101.97 (2)/sup 0/, ..beta.. = 105.86 (2)/sup 0/, ..gamma.. = 84.03 (1)/sup 0/, Z = 1, rho/sub measd/ = 2.16 g cm/sup -3/, Mo K..cap alpha.. radiation, R = 0.033, R/sub W/ = 0.034 for 8371 independent reflections. The molecular structure contains a polymeric chain cation with the repeating unit containing five mercury atoms.

  16. Joint experimental and computational 17O solid state NMR study of Brownmillerite Ba2In2O5.

    PubMed

    Dervişoğlu, Rıza; Middlemiss, Derek S; Blanc, Frédéric; Holmes, Lesley A; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Morgan, Dane; Grey, Clare P

    2014-02-14

    Structural characterization of Brownmillerite Ba2In2O5 was achieved by an approach combining experimental solid-state NMR spectroscopy, density functional theory (DFT) energetics, and GIPAW NMR calculations. While in the previous study of Ba2In2O5 by Adler et al. (S. B. Adler, J. A. Reimer, J. Baltisberger and U. Werner, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1994, 116, 675-681), three oxygen resonances were observed in the (17)O NMR spectra and assigned to the three crystallographically unique O sites, the present high resolution (17)O NMR measurements under magic angle spinning (MAS) find only two resonances. The resonances have been assigned using first principles (17)O GIPAW NMR calculations to the combination of the O ions connecting the InO4 tetrahedra and the O ions in equatorial sites in octahedral InO6 coordination, and to the axial O ions linking the four- and six-fold coordinated In(3+) ions. Possible structural disorder was investigated in two ways: firstly, by inclusion of the high-energy structure also previously studied by Mohn et al. (C. E. Mohn, N. L. Allan, C. L. Freeman, P. Ravindran and S. Stølen, J. Solid State Chem., 2005, 178, 346-355), where the structural O vacancies are stacked rather than staggered as in Brownmillerite and, secondly, by exploring structures derived from the ground-state structure but with randomly perturbed atomic positions. There is no noticeable NMR evidence for any substantial occupancy of the high-energy structure at room temperature. PMID:24382459

  17. A ladder coordination polymer based on Ca(2+) and (4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonic acid): crystal structure and solution-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Venkatramaiah, Nutalapati; Mendes, Ricardo F; Silva, Artur M S; Tomé, João P C; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2016-09-01

    The preparation of coordination polymers (CPs) based on either transition metal centres or rare-earth cations has grown considerably in recent decades. The different coordination chemistry of these metals allied to the use of a large variety of organic linkers has led to an amazing structural diversity. Most of these compounds are based on carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing ligands. More recently, a wide range of molecules containing phosphonic acid groups have been reported. For the particular case of Ca(2+)-based CPs, some interesting functional materials have been reported. A novel one-dimensional Ca(2+)-based coordination polymer with a new organic linker, namely poly[[diaqua[μ4-(4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonato)][μ3-(4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonato)]dicalcium(II)] tetrahydrate], {[Ca2(C8H4N2O6P2)2(H2O)2]·4H2O}n, has been prepared at ambient temperature. The crystal structure features one-dimensional ladder-like ∞(1)[Ca2(H2cpp)2(H2O)2] polymers [H2cpp is (4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonate)], which are created by two distinct coordination modes of the anionic H2cpp(2-) cyanophosphonate organic linkers: while one molecule is only bound to Ca(2+) cations via the phosphonate groups, the other establishes an extra single connection via a cyano group. Ladders close pack with water molecules through an extensive network of strong and highly directional O-H...O and O-H...N hydrogen bonds; the observed donor-acceptor distances range from 2.499 (5) to 3.004 (6) Å and the interaction angles were found in the range 135-178°. One water molecule was found to be disordered over three distinct crystallographic positions. A detailed solution-state NMR study of the organic linker is also provided. PMID:27585932

  18. Synthesis, characterization and spectroscopy studying of some metal complexes of a new Schiff base ligand; X-ray crystal structure, NMR and IR investigation of a new dodecahedron Cd(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Rezaeivala, Majid; Khalili, Maryam; Notash, Behrouz; Karimi, Javad

    2016-12-01

    Some new [Cd(H2L1)(NO3)]ClO4 (1), [Mn(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (2), [Ni(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (3) and [Cu(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (4) complexes were prepared by the reaction of a Schiff base ligand and M (II) metal ions in equimolar ratios (M = Cd, Mn, Ni and Cu). The ligand H2L1 was synthesized by reaction of 2-[2-(3-formyl phenoxy)propoxy]benzaldehyde and ethanol amine and characterized by IR, 1H,13C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The synthesized complexes were characterized with IR and elemental analysis in all cases and 1H, 13C NMR, and X-ray in the case of Cd(II) complex. The X-ray crystal structure of compound 1 showed that all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of Schiff base ligand (N2O4) and a molecule of nitrate with two donor oxygen atom have been coordinated to the metal ion and the Cd(II) ion is in an eight-coordinate environment that is best described as a distorted dodecahedron geometry.

  19. Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes of two new hexadentate Schiff base ligands derived from different aldehydes and ethanol amine; X-ray crystal structure, IR and NMR spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Rezaeivala, Majid; Albeheshti, Leila

    2014-11-01

    Four new [Cd(H2L1)(NO3)]ClO4 (1), [Zn(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (2), [Cd(H2L2)(NO3)]ClO4 (3), and [Zn(H2L2)](ClO4)2 (4), complexes were prepared by the reaction of two new Schiff base ligands and Cd(II) and Zn(II) metal ions in equimolar ratios. The ligands H2L1 and H2L2 were synthesized by reaction of 2-[2-(2-formyl phenoxy)ethoxy]benzaldehyde and/or 2-[2-(3-formyl phenoxy)propoxy]benzaldehyde and ethanol amine and characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. All complexes were characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR, COSY, and elemental analysis. Also, the complex 1 was characterized by X-ray in addition to the above methods. The X-ray crystal structure of compound 1 showed that all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N2O4) and a molecule of nitrate with two donor oxygen atom have been coordinated to the metal ion and the Cd(II) ion is in an eight-coordinate environment that is best described as a distorted dodecahedron geometry.

  20. Optimization and stabilization of Rho small GTPase proteins for solution NMR studies: The case of Rnd1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Buck, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    Rho GTPases of the Ras superfamily have important roles in regulating the organization of the actin filament system, morphogenesis and migration of cells. Structural details for these proteins are still emerging, and information on their dynamics in solution is much needed to understand the mechanisms underlying their signaling functions. This report reviews conditions for solution NMR studies of Rho GTPases and describes our optimization and stabilization of Rnd1 for such experiments. Rnd1 belongs to the Rnd protein subfamily branch of Rho small GTPases and functions in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development and in axon guidance. However, as we report here, solution NMR studies of this protein are challenging. Multiple methods have been employed to enhance the stability of Rnd1, including by cleavage of an N-terminal His expression tag and by addition of non-hydrolysable GMPPNP (β: γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate) nucleotide. Further stabilization of Rnd1 against aggregation was achieved through a structure informed point mutation while maintaining its conformation and binding affinity for a partner protein. The NMR spectrum of the optimized protein reveals significant improvement in NMR signal dispersion and intensity. This work paves the way for structural and protein-protein/protein-ligand interaction studies of Rnd1 by solution NMR and also provides a guide for optimization and stabilization of other Rho GTPases. PMID:22545226

  1. Tetrahedral site ordering in synthetic gallium albite: A 29Si MAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Barbara L.; Fleet, Michael E.; Burns, Peter C.

    1991-09-01

    The ordering of Si in the tetrahedral sites of gallium albite (NaGaSi 3O 8) has been studied by MAS NMR and Rietveld structure refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data. Low structural state (ordered) material was annealed at about 800°C under a load pressure of 1 kbar, and by Rietveld refinement has tetrahedral-site occupancies for Si of T1O = 0.24(3), T1m = 0.89(2), T2O = 0.98(2), and T2m = 0.89(2), respectively. Corresponding Si occupancies for high structural state (disordered) material are 0.71(2), 0.78(1), 0.76(2), and 0.74(2), respectively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite is equivalent to the three-peak spectrum of natural (Amelia) albite, with resonances at -89.6, -96.4, and -104.2 ppm but with relative peak areas of 0.79:1.0:0.77. The tetrahedral-site occupancies derived from the MAS NMR spectrum are in good agreement with those obtained by Rietveld refinement and, in particular, indicate that the -96.4 ppm peak must correspond to Si in T2O. This is the first independent assignment of the 29Si peak at -96 ppm in the spectrum of ordered albite to the T2O site. A peak at -96 ppm is also resolved in the spectrum of high gallium albite. The systematic differences in peak position between the 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite and those of Amelia albite cannot be explained simply by the direct replacement of Al by Ga, without a change in angle at the bridging oxygen atoms.

  2. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in cinnamic acid derivatives: Comparison of GIAO and GIPAW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-06-01

    In this article we report the results of combined theoretical and experimental structural studies on cinnamic acid derivatives (CADs), one of the main groups of secondary metabolites present in various medicinal plant species and food products of plant origin. The effects of structural differences in CADs on their spectroscopic properties were studied in detail by both: solid-state NMR and GIAO/GIPAW calculations. Theoretical computations were used in order to perform signal assignment in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the cinnamic, o-coumaric, m-coumaric, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, sinapic and 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acids, and to evaluate the accuracy of GIPAW and GIAO methodology.

  3. NMR Studies on the Aqueous Phase Photochemical Degradation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2008-04-06

    Aqueous phase photochemical degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an important pathway in several environments, including washout lagoon soils, impact craters from partially detonated munitions that fill with rain or groundwater, and shallow marine environments containing unexploded munitions that have corroded. Knowledge of the degradation products is necessary for compliance issues on military firing ranges and formerly used defense sites. Previous laboratory studies have indicated that UV irradiation of aqueous TNT solutions results in a multicomponent product mixture, including polymerization compounds, that has been only partially resolved by mass spectrometric analyses. This study illustrates how a combination of solid and liquid state 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy, including two dimensional analyses, provides complementary information on the total product mixture from aqueous photolysis of TNT, and the effect of reaction conditions. Among the degradation products detected were amine, amide, azoxy, azo, and carboxylic acid compounds.

  4. NMR relaxation studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. Jugeshwar; Clark, W. G.; Gaidos, G.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Menon, R.; Ramesh, K. P.

    2015-05-01

    NMR relaxation rates (1 /T1 ), magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene are reported in this paper. The magnetic susceptibility data show the contributions from both Pauli and Curie spins, with the size of the Pauli term depending strongly on the doping level. Proton and fluorine NMR relaxation rates have been studied as a function of temperature (3-300 K) and field (for protons at 0.9, 9.0, 16.4, and 23.4 T, and for fluorine at 9.0 T). The temperature dependence of T1 is classified into three regimes: (a) For T <(g μBB /2 kB ) , the relaxation mechanism follows a modified Korringa relation due to electron-electron interactions and disorder. 1H - T1 is due to the electron-nuclear dipolar interaction in addition to the contact term. (b) For the intermediate temperature range (g μBB /2 kB ) study. Fluorine relaxation data have been analyzed and attributed to the P F6 reorientation. The cross relaxation among the 1H and 19F nuclei has been observed in the entire temperature range suggesting the role of magnetic dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric molecular subgroups. The data analysis shows that the enhancement in the Korringa ratio is greater in a less conducting sample. Intra- and interchain hopping of charge carriers is found to be a dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperature. Frequency dependence of T1-1 on temperature shows that at low temperature [T <(g μBB /2 kB ) ] the system shows three dimensions and changes to quasi one dimension at

  5. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  6. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  7. Structural analysis of CXCR4 - Antagonist interactions using saturation-transfer double-difference NMR.

    PubMed

    Cox, Bryan D; Mehta, Anil K; DiRaddo, John O; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J; Snyder, James P

    2015-10-01

    CXCR4 is a GPCR involved in leukocyte trafficking. Small molecule antagonists of the receptor may treat inflammatory disease, cancer and HIV. Here we probe the binding of a tetrahydroisoquinoline-based antagonist (TIQ-10) to CXCR4 using saturation transfer double-difference (STDD) NMR. STDD spectra were acquired using extracts from Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing membrane-embedded CXCR4. The experiments demonstrate competitive binding between TIQ-10 and established antagonists and provide the TIQ-10 - CXCR4 binding epitope. Molecular modeling of TIQ-10 into the binding pocket provides a pose consistent with STDD-derived interactions. This study paves the way for future investigations of GPCR-ligand interactions in a biological milieu for use in chemical biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and rational drug design. PMID:26301631

  8. Chromophore/DNA interactions: femto- to nanosecond spectroscopy, NMR structure, and electron transfer theory.

    PubMed

    von Feilitzsch, Till; Tuma, Jennifer; Neubauer, Heike; Verdier, Laurent; Haselsberger, Reinhard; Feick, Reiner; Gurzadyan, Gagik; Voityuk, Alexander A; Griesinger, Christian; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E

    2008-01-24

    The mechanism of photoinduced hole injection into DNA has been studied using an integrated approach that combines NMR structural analysis, time-resolved spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations. A covalently linked acridinium derivative, the protonated 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine (X+), is replacing a thymine and separated from either guanine (G) or the easier to oxidize 7-deazaguanine (Z) by one adenine.thymine (A.T) base pair. The key features of this donor/acceptor system are the following: (i) In more than 95% of the duplexes, X+ is located in a central, coplanar position between the neighboring A.T base pairs with its long axis in parallel showing minimal twist and tilt angles (<15 degrees). The complementary adenine base is turned out into the extrahelical space. In a minority of less than 5%, X+ is found to be still attached to the duplex. X+ is most probably associated with one of the phosphates, since it is neither intercalated between more remote base pairs nor bound to sugars or grooves. This minority characterized by an excited state lifetime >10 ns gives rise to a small background signal in time-resolved measurements and contributes predominantly to steady-state fluorescence spectra. (ii) Although the intercalation mode of X+ is well defined, the NMR structure reveals that there are two conformations of X+ with respect to the arrangement of its methoxy substituent. In one conformation, the methoxy group is in the plane of the chromophore, while, in the other extraplanar conformation, the methoxy group forms an angle of 70 degrees with the acridinium ring. The fluorescence decay of 5'-ZAX and 5'-GAX tracts can be fitted to a biexponential function with similar amplitudes, reflecting the oxidation dynamics of G and Z, with the slower rate being determined by larger thermal activation energy. The attribution of biexponential electron transfer (ET) dynamics to the bimodal orientation of the methoxy group at the acridinium is supported by

  9. Solid-state NMR studies of biomineralization peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Roehrich, Adrienne; Drobny, Gary

    2013-09-17

    unanswered. This is largely due to a lack of methods capable of providing high-resolution structural information for proteins adsorbed to material surfaces under physiologically relevant conditions. In this Account, we highlight recent work that is providing insight into the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of a salivary protein model system, as well as the structure and interactions of a peptide that catalyzes the formation of biosilica composites. To develop a better understanding of the structure and interactions of proteins in biomaterials, we have used solid-state NMR techniques to determine the molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides adsorbed onto inorganic crystal surfaces and embedded within biomineral composites. This work adds to the understanding of the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of an acidic human salivary phosphoprotein, statherin. PMID:23932180

  10. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of

  11. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  12. 77Se Chemical Shift Tensor of L-selenocystine: Experimental NMR Measurements and Quantum Chemical Investigations of Structural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine’s specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their 77Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state 77Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information of selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on 77Se L-selenocystine’s chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10–20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of −180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. −90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from −120° to −60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. 77Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272±30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3–9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results

  13. Solid-state structure and solution conformation of the nootropic agent N[2-( N,N-Diisopropylamino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate. X-ray and homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandoli, Giuliano; Nicolini, Marino; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno

    1987-04-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the nootropic agent N-[2-( N,N-diisopropyl-amino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate was determined by X-ray analysis. The conformational properties in the solution state were deduced from the 1H-NMR spectrum run in 2H 2O at 500 MHz. Spectral assignments were made with the aid of the COSY 45 shift correlation experiment. Crystals were triclinic with unit cell dimensions a = 13.410(10), b = 11.382(8), c = 6.697(4) », α = 83.80(3), β = 88.61(3)and γ = 72.25(6)° ; space group Poverline1. The structure was determined from 1047 three-dimensional counter data and refined to a value of 7.5% for the conventional discrepancy factor R. One molecule of the solvent acetonitrile is incorporated per two of the (C 14H 28N 3O 2) +-(HSO 4) -. The five-membered heterocyclic ring is in an envelope ( Cs) conformation and the "flap" atom deviates by 0.31 » from the plane of the other four. This plane forms a dihedral angle of 71.4° with the amide group, with the CO fragment directed toward the ring. All bond angles and distances are in good agreement with expected standard values. A strong OH⋯O intermolecular bond (2.61 ») links the cation of the hydrogen-sulphate anion, while the loosely held MeCN molecule is trapped in the polar pockets. The molecular conformation in the solid was compared with results from 1H NMR spectral analysis which showed that in solution wide torsional oscillations can occur about the bonds of the chain bonded to the N(1) atom.

  14. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  15. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-01

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure. PMID:26365800

  16. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  17. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:24581866

  18. The NMR structure of the II-III-VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-09-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III-IV-V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II-III-VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg(2+)-binding sites within this structure using Mn(2+)-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC G•A base pair, two base triples and two Mg(2+) ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge-bulge interaction and Mg(2+) ions are critical for the stable folding of the II-III-VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II-III-VI junction that does not contain the II-VI bulge-bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme. PMID:26124200

  19. The NMR structure of the II–III–VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III–IV–V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II–III–VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg2+-binding sites within this structure using Mn2+-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC G•A base pair, two base triples and two Mg2+ ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge–bulge interaction and Mg2+ ions are critical for the stable folding of the II–III–VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II–III–VI junction that does not contain the II–VI bulge–bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme. PMID:26124200

  20. Hunting for hydrogen: random structure searching and prediction of NMR parameters of hydrous wadsleyite.

    PubMed

    Moran, Robert F; McKay, David; Pickard, Chris J; Berry, Andrew J; Griffin, John M; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2016-04-21

    The structural chemistry of materials containing low levels of nonstoichiometric hydrogen is difficult to determine, and producing structural models is challenging where hydrogen has no fixed crystallographic site. Here we demonstrate a computational approach employing ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to generate a series of candidate structures for hydrous wadsleyite (β-Mg2SiO4 with 1.6 wt% H2O), a high-pressure mineral proposed as a repository for water in the Earth's transition zone. Aligning with previous experimental work, we solely consider models with Mg3 (over Mg1, Mg2 or Si) vacancies. We adapt the AIRSS method by starting with anhydrous wadsleyite, removing a single Mg(2+) and randomly placing two H(+) in a unit cell model, generating 819 candidate structures. 103 geometries were then subjected to more accurate optimisation under periodic DFT. Using this approach, we find the most favourable hydration mechanism involves protonation of two O1 sites around the Mg3 vacancy. The formation of silanol groups on O3 or O4 sites (with loss of stable O1-H hydroxyls) coincides with an increase in total enthalpy. Importantly, the approach we employ allows observables such as NMR parameters to be computed for each structure. We consider hydrous wadsleyite (∼1.6 wt%) to be dominated by protonated O1 sites, with O3/O4-H silanol groups present as defects, a model that maps well onto experimental studies at higher levels of hydration (J. M. Griffin et al., Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1523). The AIRSS approach adopted herein provides the crucial link between atomic-scale structure and experimental studies. PMID:27020937

  1. 2D NMR studies of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Use of relayed coherence transfer for /sub 1/H resonance assignment and in situ structure elucidation of amikacin derivatives in reaction mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, N.H.; Eaton, H.L.; Nguyen, K.T.; Hartzell, C.; Nelson, R.J.; Priest, J.H.

    1988-04-19

    Phase-sensitive 2D /sup 1/H//sup 1/H COSY spectra can be used to identify the structures of individual pure specimens of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin and its N-hemisuccinyl derivatives. However, even at 500 MHz the 2D chemical shift dispersion does not allow for unambiguous assignment of all cross-peaks. By use of 2D relayed coherence transfer experiments (RELAY) optimized to detect two-step /sup 1/H//sup 1/H scalar interactions in which one of the J-values is small, sufficient additional correlations can be obtained from the frequency-isolated resonances to allow facile tracing of all scalar connectivities. Complete assignments of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra of amikacin, its 6'-N-hemisuccinamide, and a novel bis(acylate) (..gamma..-N-(p-vinylbenzoyl)amikacin 6'-N-hemisuccinamide) were obtained for aqueous media. The NMR spectrum of amikacin free base was also assigned in dimethyl sulfoxide solution. The RELAY experiment can be extended to the analysis of reaction mixtures, which allows for the identification and resonance assignment of regioisomeric amikacin haptens in the mixture state. All of the N-monohemisuccinyl isomers of amikacin have been identified in reaction mixtures through the RELAY experiment. The relative reactivities of the amino functions of amikacin toward acylating agents were found to be 6'-N > 3-N greater than or equal to 3''-N greater than or equal to ..gamma..-N. However, this reactivity order is altered after the initial acylation event.

  2. Two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR studies on cyclophilin, a cytosolic cyclosporin A binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, D.C.; Harding, M.W.; Lazarides, A.; Handschumacher, R.E.; Armitage, I.M.

    1986-05-01

    Cyclophilin (CyP) is a specific cytosolic cyclosporin A (CsA) binding protein (163 residues) that has been implicated in the pharmacological action of this potent immunosuppressant. One and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR methods are being employed to elucidate the solution structural properties of CyP particularly as they relate to the binding site of CsA. The focal point for these studies is the single Trp (residue number120) in CyP which, in the 1:1 CyP:CsA complex (K/sub d/approx.2 x 10/sup -7/M), shows a 2 fold enhancement in its intrinsic fluorescence. Using 2D /sup 1/H NMR methods, a low resolution structure has been derived for a very hydrophobic domain containing the Trp residue using interresidue n.O.e. data between assigned spin systems and a distance geometry algorithm. The structure of this hydrophobic domain will be discussed in relation to the predicted ..cap alpha../..beta.. secondary structure of this protein and comparisons made between its structure in the drug free and complexed form of the protein.

  3. Cation-π versus anion-π interactions: A theoretical NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Khorassani, Mostafa Habibi; Masoodi, Hamid Reza

    2011-03-01

    The influences of cation-π and anion-π interactions on NMR data have been investigated in complexes of cations and anions with 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (TFB). Cation-π interaction increases 1JC-F, 1JC-H and the chemical shifts of hydrogen and fluorine while it decreases 1JC-C. The changes are in reverse direction in the presence of anion-π interaction. The role of geometry and electronic effects on the NMR data was considered. The distance dependence of NMR parameters has been studied in these complexes. The NMR data have been investigated in isoelectronic complexes.

  4. NMR structure of hypothetical protein MG354 from Mycoplasmagenitalium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Shi, Jianxia; Yokotoa, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-04-12

    Mycoplasma genitalium (Mg) and M. pneumoniae (Mp) are human pathogens with two of the smallest genomes sequenced to date ({approx} 480 and 680 genes, respectively). The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center is determining representative structures for gene products in these organisms, helping to understand the set of protein folds needed to sustain this minimal organism. The protein coded by gene MG354 (gi3844938) from M. genitalium has a relatively unique sequence, related only to MPN530 from M. pneumoniae (68% identity, coverage 99%) and MGA{_}0870 from the avian pathogen M. gallisepticum (23% identity, coverage 94%), has no homologue with a determined structure, and no functional annotations.

  5. NMR Structure Determination for Larger Proteins Using Backbone-Only Data

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Srivatsan; Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Tyka, Michael; Wang, Xu; Aramini, James; Liu, Gaohua; Ramelot, Theresa; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael; Prestegard, James; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2010-01-01

    Conventional protein structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance data relies heavily on side-chain proton-proton distances. The necessary side-chain resonance assignment, however, is labor intensive and prone to error. Here we show that structures can be accurately determined without NMR information on the sidechains for proteins up to 25 kDa by incorporating backbone chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and amide proton distances into the Rosetta protein structure modelling methodology. These data, which are too sparse for conventional methods, serve only to guide conformational search towards the lowest energy conformations in the folding landscape; the details of the computed models are determined by the physical chemistry implicit in the Rosetta all atom energy function. The new method is not hindered by the deuteration required to suppress nuclear relaxation processes for proteins greater than 15 kDa, and should enable routine NMR structure determination for larger proteins. PMID:20133520

  6. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. PMID:9761684

  7. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

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