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Sample records for nmr structure analysis

  1. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J.; Laue, Ernest D.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  2. NMR-spectroscopic analysis of mixtures: from structure to function

    PubMed Central

    Forseth, Ry R.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy as a particularly information-rich method offers unique opportunities for improving the structural and functional characterization of metabolomes, which will be essential for advancing the understanding of many biological processes. Whereas traditionally NMR spectroscopy was mostly relegated to the characterization of pure compounds, the last few years have seen a surge of interest in using NMR spectroscopic techniques for characterizing complex metabolite mixtures. Development of new methods was motivated partly by the realization that using NMR for the analysis of metabolite mixtures can help identify otherwise inaccessible small molecules, for example compounds that are prone to chemical decomposition and thus cannot be isolated. Furthermore, comparative metabolomics and statistical analyses of NMR-spectra have proven highly effective at identifying novel and known metabolites that correlate with changes in genotype or phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of the range of NMR spectroscopic techniques recently developed for characterizing metabolite mixtures, including methods used in discovery-oriented natural product chemistry, in the study of metabolite biosynthesis and function, or for comparative analyses of entire metabolomes. PMID:21071261

  3. NMR structural analysis of Sleeping Beauty transposase binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    E Carpentier, Claire; Schreifels, Jeffrey M; Aronovich, Elena L; Carlson, Daniel F; Hackett, Perry B; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2014-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is the most widely used DNA transposon in genetic applications and is the only DNA transposon thus far in clinical trials for human gene therapy. In the absence of atomic level structural information, the development of SB transposon relied primarily on the biochemical and genetic homology data. While these studies were successful and have yielded hyperactive transposases, structural information is needed to gain a mechanistic understanding of transposase activity and guides to further improvement. We have initiated a structural study of SB transposase using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the DNA-binding domain of SB transposase in solution. We show that at physiologic salt concentrations, the SB DNA-binding domain remains mostly unstructured but its N-terminal PAI subdomain forms a compact, three-helical structure with a helix-turn-helix motif at higher concentrations of NaCl. Furthermore, we show that the full-length SB DNA-binding domain associates differently with inner and outer binding sites of the transposon DNA. We also show that the PAI subdomain of SB DNA-binding domain has a dominant role in transposase's attachment to the inverted terminal repeats of the transposon DNA. Overall, our data validate several earlier predictions and provide new insights on how SB transposase recognizes transposon DNA. PMID:24243759

  4. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html. PMID:26968364

  5. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; York, Darrin M.; Case, David A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson–Crick stem and the “canonical” UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9–G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. PMID:25805858

  6. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of conventional'' pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO[sub 2] and CH[sub 4] adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  7. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:26068746

  8. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  9. Essential Parameters for Structural Analysis and Dereplication by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the importance of adequate precision when reporting the δ and J parameters of frequency domain 1H NMR (HNMR) data. Using a variety of structural classes (terpenoids, phenolics, alkaloids) from different taxa (plants, cyanobacteria), this study develops rationales that explain the importance of enhanced precision in NMR spectroscopic analysis and rationalizes the need for reporting Δδ and ΔJ values at the 0.1–1 ppb and 10 mHz level, respectively. Spectral simulations paired with iteration are shown to be essential tools for complete spectral interpretation, adequate precision, and unambiguous HNMR-driven dereplication and metabolomic analysis. The broader applicability of the recommendation relates to the physicochemical properties of hydrogen (1H) and its ubiquity in organic molecules, making HNMR spectra an integral component of structure elucidation and verification. Regardless of origin or molecular weight, the HNMR spectrum of a compound can be very complex and encode a wealth of structural information that is often obscured by limited spectral dispersion and the occurrence of higher order effects. This altogether limits spectral interpretation, confines decoding of the underlying spin parameters, and explains the major challenge associated with the translation of HNMR spectra into tabulated information. On the other hand, the reproducibility of the spectral data set of any (new) chemical entity is essential for its structure elucidation and subsequent dereplication. Handling and documenting HNMR data with adequate precision is critical for establishing unequivocal links between chemical structure, analytical data, metabolomes, and biological activity. Using the full potential of HNMR spectra will facilitate the general reproducibility for future studies of bioactive chemicals, especially of compounds obtained from the diversity of terrestrial and marine organisms. PMID:24895010

  10. Essential parameters for structural analysis and dereplication by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C; Bisson, Jonathan; Case, Ryan J; Chadwick, Lucas R; Gödecke, Tanja; Inui, Taichi; Krunic, Aleksej; Jaki, Birgit U; McAlpine, James B; Mo, Shunyan; Napolitano, José G; Orjala, Jimmy; Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Niemitz, Matthias

    2014-06-27

    The present study demonstrates the importance of adequate precision when reporting the δ and J parameters of frequency domain (1)H NMR (HNMR) data. Using a variety of structural classes (terpenoids, phenolics, alkaloids) from different taxa (plants, cyanobacteria), this study develops rationales that explain the importance of enhanced precision in NMR spectroscopic analysis and rationalizes the need for reporting Δδ and ΔJ values at the 0.1-1 ppb and 10 mHz level, respectively. Spectral simulations paired with iteration are shown to be essential tools for complete spectral interpretation, adequate precision, and unambiguous HNMR-driven dereplication and metabolomic analysis. The broader applicability of the recommendation relates to the physicochemical properties of hydrogen ((1)H) and its ubiquity in organic molecules, making HNMR spectra an integral component of structure elucidation and verification. Regardless of origin or molecular weight, the HNMR spectrum of a compound can be very complex and encode a wealth of structural information that is often obscured by limited spectral dispersion and the occurrence of higher order effects. This altogether limits spectral interpretation, confines decoding of the underlying spin parameters, and explains the major challenge associated with the translation of HNMR spectra into tabulated information. On the other hand, the reproducibility of the spectral data set of any (new) chemical entity is essential for its structure elucidation and subsequent dereplication. Handling and documenting HNMR data with adequate precision is critical for establishing unequivocal links between chemical structure, analytical data, metabolomes, and biological activity. Using the full potential of HNMR spectra will facilitate the general reproducibility for future studies of bioactive chemicals, especially of compounds obtained from the diversity of terrestrial and marine organisms. PMID:24895010

  11. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  12. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  13. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. PMID:9761684

  14. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  15. NMR investigation of phenanthridine dyes self-association in aqueous solution. Structural and thermodynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, A. N.; Lantushenko, A. O.

    2002-12-01

    Phenanthridine dyes have pronounced mutagenic activity due to their intercalative binding with double-helical DNA. Although the structural significance in the interacalation process of the phenanthridinium chromophore is well established, the role ofits side chains is still under discussion. The comparative analysis of complexation with DNA of phenanthridinium dyes - ethidium bormide (EB) and its two photosensitive analogues: 3-amino-8-azido-5-ethyl-6-phenyl phenanthridinium bormide (EMB) and 3,80diazido-5-ethyl-6-phenyl phenanthridinium chloride (EDC) has shown that they have different affinities of binding with nucleotide sequences in aqueous salt solution. In order to test the role of azido-groups in side chains of EB chromophore on the drug-DNA affinity, the self-association of EB and its two azido-analogues have been studied in this work by one- and two-dimensional 1H-NMR spectrosocpy. Self-association of the aromatic drug molecuels has been studied using concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts. The equilibrium reaction constants, cooperativity parameters, the limiting values of proton chemical shifts and thermodynamical parameters-enthalpy and entropy of drug self-association have been determined for all the molecular system studied.

  16. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  17. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We now have two suites of well-characterized microporous materials including oxides (zeolites and silica gel) and activated carbons from our industrial partner, Air Products in Allentown, PA. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  18. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  19. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  20. Local structural plasticity of the prion protein. Analysis of NMR relaxation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Viles, J H; Donne, D; Kroon, G; Prusiner, S B; Cohen, F E; Dyson, H J; Wright, P E

    2001-03-01

    A template-assisted conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) from a predominantly helical structure to an amyloid-type structure with a higher proportion of beta-sheet is thought to be the causative factor in prion diseases. Since flexibility of the polypeptide is likely to contribute to the ability of PrP(C) to undergo the conformational change that leads to the infective state, we have undertaken a comprehensive examination of the dynamics of two recombinant Syrian hamster PrP fragments, PrP(29-231) and PrP(90-231), using (15)N NMR relaxation measurements. The molecular motions of these PrP fragments have been studied in solution using (15)N longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse relaxation (T(2)) measurements as well as [(1)H]-(15)N nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE). These data have been analyzed using both reduced spectral density mapping and the Lipari-Szabo model free formalism. The relaxation properties of the common regions of PrP(29-231) and PrP(90-231) are very similar; both have a relatively inflexible globular domain (residues 128-227) with a highly flexible and largely unstructured N-terminal domain. Residues 29-89 of PrP(29-231), which include the copper-binding octarepeat sequences, are also highly flexible. Analysis of the spectral densities at each residue indicates that even within the structured core of PrP(C), a markedly diverse range of motions is observed, consistent with the inherent plasticity of the protein. The central portions of helices B and C form a relatively rigid core, which is stabilized by the presence of an interhelix disulfide bond. Of the remainder of the globular domain, the parts that are not in direct contact with the rigid region, including helix A, are more flexible. Most significantly, slow conformational fluctuations on a millisecond to microsecond time scale are observed for the small beta-sheet. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious, scrapie form of the protein Pr

  1. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  2. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  3. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  4. Structural analysis of CXCR4 - Antagonist interactions using saturation-transfer double-difference NMR.

    PubMed

    Cox, Bryan D; Mehta, Anil K; DiRaddo, John O; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J; Snyder, James P

    2015-10-01

    CXCR4 is a GPCR involved in leukocyte trafficking. Small molecule antagonists of the receptor may treat inflammatory disease, cancer and HIV. Here we probe the binding of a tetrahydroisoquinoline-based antagonist (TIQ-10) to CXCR4 using saturation transfer double-difference (STDD) NMR. STDD spectra were acquired using extracts from Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing membrane-embedded CXCR4. The experiments demonstrate competitive binding between TIQ-10 and established antagonists and provide the TIQ-10 - CXCR4 binding epitope. Molecular modeling of TIQ-10 into the binding pocket provides a pose consistent with STDD-derived interactions. This study paves the way for future investigations of GPCR-ligand interactions in a biological milieu for use in chemical biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and rational drug design. PMID:26301631

  5. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  6. Structural Biology by NMR: Structure, Dynamics, and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Malliavin, Thérèse; Nilges, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both protein structure and dynamics in solution. Typically, NMR experiments are sensitive both to structural features and to dynamics, and hence the measured data contain information on both. Despite major progress in both experimental approaches and computational methods, obtaining a consistent view of structure and dynamics from experimental NMR data remains a challenge. Molecular dynamics simulations have emerged as an indispensable tool in the analysis of NMR data. PMID:18818721

  7. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Franks, W Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-21

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies. PMID:26709853

  8. NMR-based Structural Analysis of the Complete Rough-type Lipopolysaccharide Isolated from Capnocytophaga canimorsus*

    PubMed Central

    Zähringer, Ulrich; Ittig, Simon; Lindner, Buko; Moll, Hermann; Schombel, Ursula; Gisch, Nicolas; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2014-01-01

    We here describe the NMR analysis of an intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in water with 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as detergent. When HPLC-purified rough-type LPS of Capnocytophaga canimorsus was prepared, 13C,15N labeling could be avoided. The intact LPS was analyzed by homonuclear (1H) and heteronuclear (1H,13C, and 1H,31P) correlated one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques as well as by mass spectrometry. It consists of a penta-acylated lipid A with an α-linked phosphoethanolamine attached to C-1 of GlcN (I) in the hybrid backbone, lacking the 4′-phosphate. The hydrophilic core oligosaccharide was found to be a complex hexasaccharide with two mannose (Man) and one each of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo), Gal, GalN, and l-rhamnose residues. Position 4 of Kdo is substituted by phosphoethanolamine, also present in position 6 of the branched ManI residue. This rough-type LPS is exceptional in that all three negative phosphate residues are “masked” by positively charged ethanolamine substituents, leading to an overall zero net charge, which has so far not been observed for any other LPS. In biological assays, the corresponding isolated lipid A was found to be endotoxically almost inactive. By contrast, the intact rough-type LPS described here expressed a 20,000-fold increased endotoxicity, indicating that the core oligosaccharide significantly contributes to the endotoxic potency of the whole rough-type C. canimorsus LPS molecule. Based on these findings, the strict view that lipid A alone represents the toxic center of LPS needs to be reassessed. PMID:24993825

  9. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  10. Dipeptide Structural Analysis Using Two-Dimensional NMR for the Undergraduate Advanced Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Dolino, Drew; Schwartzenburg, Danielle; Steiger, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to introduce students in either an organic chemistry or biochemistry lab course to two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy using simple biomolecules. The goal of this experiment is for students to understand and interpret the information provided by a 2D NMR spectrum. Students are…

  11. Quantitative analysis of NMR spectra with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winning, H.; Larsen, F. H.; Bro, R.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The number of applications of chemometrics to series of NMR spectra is rapidly increasing due to an emerging interest for quantitative NMR spectroscopy e.g. in the pharmaceutical and food industries. This paper gives an analysis of advantages and limitations of applying the two most common chemometric procedures, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR), to a designed set of 231 simple alcohol mixture (propanol, butanol and pentanol) 1H 400 MHz spectra. The study clearly demonstrates that the major advantage of chemometrics is the visualisation of larger data structures which adds a new exploratory dimension to NMR research. While robustness and powerful data visualisation and exploration are the main qualities of the PCA method, the study demonstrates that the bilinear MCR method is an even more powerful method for resolving pure component NMR spectra from mixtures when certain conditions are met.

  12. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  13. NMR structure improvement: A structural bioinformatics & visualization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Jeremy N.

    The overall goal of this project is to enhance the physical accuracy of individual models in macromolecular NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) structures and the realism of variation within NMR ensembles of models, while improving agreement with the experimental data. A secondary overall goal is to combine synergistically the best aspects of NMR and crystallographic methodologies to better illuminate the underlying joint molecular reality. This is accomplished by using the powerful method of all-atom contact analysis (describing detailed sterics between atoms, including hydrogens); new graphical representations and interactive tools in 3D and virtual reality; and structural bioinformatics approaches to the expanded and enhanced data now available. The resulting better descriptions of macromolecular structure and its dynamic variation enhances the effectiveness of the many biomedical applications that depend on detailed molecular structure, such as mutational analysis, homology modeling, molecular simulations, protein design, and drug design.

  14. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  15. The inclusion complex of rosmarinic acid into beta-cyclodextrin: A thermodynamic and structural analysis by NMR and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aksamija, Amra; Polidori, Ange; Plasson, Raphaël; Dangles, Olivier; Tomao, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    This work focuses on the characterization of the rosmarinic acid (RA)-β-cyclodextrin (CD) complex in aqueous solution by (1)H NMR (1D- and 2D-ROESY), completed with studies by capillary electrophoresis (CE). From the (1)H NMR data, the stoichiometry of the complex was determined by a Job's plot and the binding constant was estimated from a linear regression (Scott's method). At pH 2.9, the results showed that RA binds CD with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a binding constant Kb of 445 (±53) M(-1) or 465 (±81) M(-1) depending on the CD protons (H-5 or H-3) selected for the evaluation. The Kb value was also calculated from the CD-induced chemical shifts of each RA proton in order to collect information on the structure of the complex. The pH dependence of Kb revealed that the RA carboxylic form displays the highest affinity for CD. An investigation by capillary electrophoresis fully confirmed these results. 2D ROESY analysis provided detailed structural information on the complex and showed a strong correlation between H-3 and H-5 of CD and most RA protons. In conclusion, RA, an efficient phenolic antioxidant from rosemary with a marketing authorization, spontaneously forms a relatively stable inclusion complex with CD in water. PMID:27132848

  16. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  17. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  18. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  19. Structural analysis of photo-degradation in thiazole-containing compounds by LC-MS/MS and NMR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lianming; Hong, Tricia Y; Vogt, Frederick G

    2007-07-27

    The photo-degradation behavior of a pharmaceutical compound previously under development for treatment of overactive bladder was studied. Samples of {4-(4-chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-2-[4-(methyloxy)phenyl]-1,3-thiazol-5-yl} acetic acid were stressed with visible light and were observed to degrade into a single primary photo-degradation product. This unknown product was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with accurate mass measurement and hydrogen/deuterium exchange to determine its molecular weight and formula, isotope distribution patterns and exchangeable protons, and product ion structures. By comparison of the fragmentation pathways of the protonated and sodiated species, the charge was found to locate in the electron-rich part of the molecule after fragmentation. MS-derived structural information combined with stopped-flow 1H LC-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis suggested that the degradation product was 4-chloro-N-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-3-fluorobenzamide. This unique photo-degradation product was subsequently isolated using preparative-scale chromatography, and its structure was confirmed using 1D and 2D NMR techniques involving the 1H, 13C, 15N and 19F nuclei. The structure of this product suggests that {4-(4-chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-2-[4-(methyloxy)phenyl]-1,3-thiazol-5-yl} acetic acid has reacted with singlet oxygen (1Deltag) via a [4+2] Diels-Alder cycloaddition upon photo-irradiation to cause photo-oxygenation in the solid-state (as is common in solution phase), resulting in an unstable endoperoxide that rearranges to the final degradation product structure. Photo-degradation of a structurally related thiazole, 4-(4-Chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-amine, proceeded via a similar process but in a less reactive manner. However, when exposed to the same conditions, sulfathiazole did not degrade, indicating that this photo-degradation process may only occur for thiazole-containing compounds with specific substituents, such as aryl

  20. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, NBO, UV, NMR, first order hyperpolarizability, analysis of 4-Methoxy-4'-Nitrobiphenyl by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindarasu, K; Kavitha, E

    2014-03-25

    In this study, geometrical optimization, spectroscopic analysis, electronic structure and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 4-Methoxy-4'-Nitrobiphenyl (abbreviated as 4M4'NBPL) were investigated by utilizing HF and DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The equilibrium geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the 4M4'NBPL have been calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1) respectively. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is also used to explain the molecular stability. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the title compound dissolved in chloroform were recorded in the range of 200-800 cm(-1). The HOMO-LUMO energy gap explains the charge interaction taking place within the molecule. Good correlation between the experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts in chloroform solution and calculated GIAO shielding tensors were found. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability of the studied molecule indicate that the compound is a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials. The chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of 4M4'NBPL at different temperature are calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations. PMID:24299985

  1. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, NBO, UV, NMR, first order hyperpolarizability, analysis of 4-Methoxy-4";-Nitrobiphenyl by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarasu, K.; Kavitha, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, geometrical optimization, spectroscopic analysis, electronic structure and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 4-Methoxy-4";-Nitrobiphenyl (abbreviated as 4M4";NBPL) were investigated by utilizing HF and DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The equilibrium geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the 4M4";NBPL have been calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-50 cm-1 respectively. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is also used to explain the molecular stability. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the title compound dissolved in chloroform were recorded in the range of 200-800 cm-1. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap explains the charge interaction taking place within the molecule. Good correlation between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in chloroform solution and calculated GIAO shielding tensors were found. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability of the studied molecule indicate that the compound is a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials. The chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of 4M4";NBPL at different temperature are calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  2. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  3. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarter report No. 4, 1 October 1992--30 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of ``conventional`` pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  4. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA-adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  5. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W. Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A.; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA–adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  6. Molecular structure and spectroscopic analysis of homovanillic acid and its sodium salt - NMR, FT-IR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Kowczyk-Sadowy, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of the electronic charge distribution in metal complex or salt allows to predict what kind of deformation of the electronic system of ligand would undergo during complexation. It also permits to make more precise interpretation of mechanism by which metals affect the biochemical properties of ligands. The influence of sodium cation on the electronic system of homovanillic acid was studied in this paper. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G** method. Mulliken, MK and ChelpG atomic charges were analyzed. The theoretical NMR and IR spectra were obtained. 1H and 13C NMR as well as FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of studied compounds were also recorded and analyzed. The calculated parameters are compared with experimental characteristics of these molecules.

  7. Resonance Assignments and Secondary Structure Analysis of Dynein Light Chain 8 by Magic-angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shangjin; Butterworth, Andrew H.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Lightcap, Christine M.; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2011-08-04

    Dynein light chain LC8 is the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex and has been shown to play important roles in both dynein-dependent and dynein-independent physiological functions via its interaction with a number of its binding partners. It has also been linked to pathogenesis including roles in viral infections and tumorigenesis. Structural information for LC8-target proteins is critical to understanding the underlying function of LC8 in these complexes. However, some LC8-target interactions are not amenable to structural characterization by conventional structural biology techniques owing to their large size, low solubility, and crystallization difficulties. Here, we report magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of the homodimeric apo-LC8 protein as a first effort in addressing more complex, multi-partner, LC8-based protein assemblies. We have established site-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignments for the majority of the residues of LC8, and show TALOS+-predicted torsion angles ø and ψ in close agreement with most residues in the published LC8 crystal structure. Data obtained through these studies will provide the first step toward using MAS NMR to examine the LC8 structure, which will eventually be used to investigate protein–protein interactions in larger systems that cannot be determined by conventional structural studies.

  8. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the application of low-field NMR to both surface area and pore structure analysis of catalyst supports will be presented. Low-field (20 MHz) spin-lattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) experiments are performed on fluids contained in alumina and silica catalyst supports. Pore size distributions (PSD) calculated from these NMR experiments are compared to those obtained from mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ribo; Du Qishi Wang Chenghua; Chou, K.-C.

    2008-12-26

    The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

  10. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint. PMID:20513646

  11. Structural studies of an arabinan from the stems of Ephedra sinica by methylation analysis and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-You; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-05-01

    Plant arabinan has important biological activity. In this study, a water-soluble arabinan (Mw∼6.15kDa) isolated from the stems of Ephedra sinica was found to consist of (1→5)-Araƒ, (1→3,5)-Araƒ, T-Araƒ, (1→3)-Araƒ and (1→2,5)-Araƒ residues at proportions of 10:2:3:2:1. A tentative structure was proposed by methylation analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY) and literature. The structure proposed includes a branched (1→5)-α-Araf backbone where branching occurs at the O-2 and O-3 positions of the residues with 7.7% and 15.4% of the 1,5-linked α-Araf substituted at the O-2 and O-3 positions. The presence of a branched structure was further observed by atomic force microscopy. This polymer was characterized as having a much longer linear (1→5)-α-Araf backbone as a repeating unit. In particular, the presence of α-Araf→3)-α-Araf-(1→3)-α-Araf-(1→ attached at the O-2 is a new finding. This study may facilitate a deeper understanding of structure-activity relationships of biological polysaccharides from the stems of E. sinica. PMID:25659720

  12. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  13. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Christopher A; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John

    2016-01-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions. PMID:27109776

  14. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-01-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions. PMID:27109776

  15. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  16. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  17. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  18. Structural Analysis of Multi-Helical RNAs by NMR-SAXS/WAXS: Application to the U4/U6 di-snRNA.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Didychuk, Allison L; Rodgers, Margaret L; Michael, Lauren A; Burke, Jordan E; Montemayor, Eric J; Hoskins, Aaron A; Butcher, Samuel E

    2016-02-27

    NMR and SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering)/WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) are highly complementary approaches for the analysis of RNA structure in solution. Here we describe an efficient NMR-SAXS/WAXS approach for structural investigation of multi-helical RNAs. We illustrate this approach by determining the overall fold of a 92-nt 3-helix junction from the U4/U6 di-snRNA. The U4/U6 di-snRNA is conserved in eukaryotes and is part of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that comprises a major subunit of the assembled spliceosome. Helical orientations can be determined by X-ray scattering data alone, but the addition of NMR RDC (residual dipolar coupling) restraints improves the structure models. RDCs were measured in two different external alignment media and also by magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. The resulting alignment tensors are collinear, which is a previously noted problem for nucleic acids. Including WAXS data in the calculations produces models with significantly better fits to the scattering data. In solution, the U4/U6 di-snRNA forms a 3-helix junction with a planar Y-shaped structure and has no detectable tertiary interactions. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer data support the observed topology. A comparison with the recently determined cryo-electron microscopy structure of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP illustrates how proteins scaffold the RNA and dramatically alter the geometry of the U4/U6 3-helix junction. PMID:26655855

  19. 1H NMR sequential assignments and secondary structure analysis of human fibrinogen gamma-chain C-terminal residues 385-411

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, K.H.; Burke, C.; Lindon, J.N.; Kloczewiak, M. )

    1990-04-03

    The human fibrinogen gamma-chain, C-terminal fragment, residues 385-411, i.e., KIIPFNRLTIGEGQQHHLGGAKQAGDV, contains two biologically important functional domains: (1) fibrinogen gamma-chain polymerization center and (2) platelet receptor recognition domain. This peptide was isolated from cyanogen bromide degraded human fibrinogen and was investigated by 1H NMR (500 MHz) spectroscopy. Sequence-specific assignments of NMR resonances were obtained for backbone and side-chain protons via analysis of 2D NMR COSY, double quantum filtered COSY, HOHAHA, and NOESY spectra. The N-terminal segment from residues 385-403 seems to adopt a relatively fixed solution conformation. Strong sequential alpha CH-NH NOESY connectivities and a continuous run of NH-NH NOESY connectivities and several long-lived backbone NH protons strongly suggest the presence of multiple-turn or helix-like structure for residues 390 to about 402. The conformation of residues 403-411 seems to be much less constrained as evidenced by the presence of weaker and sequential alpha CH-NH NOEs, the absence of sequential NH-NH NOEs, and the lack of longer lived amides. Chemical shifts of resonances from backbone and side-chain protons of the C-terminal dodecapeptide, residues 400-411, differ significantly from those of the parent chain, suggesting that some preferred C-terminal conformation does exist.

  20. Revisiting Protocols for the NMR Analysis of Bacterial Metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Zhang, Bo; Gaupp, Rosmarie; Lei, Shulei; Snell, Emily; Fenton, Robert J.; Barletta, Raul G.; Somerville, Greg A.; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, metabolomics has emerged as an important technique for systems biology. Measuring all the metabolites in a biological system provides an invaluable source of information to explore various cellular processes, and to investigate the impact of environmental factors and genetic modifications. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important method routinely employed in metabolomics. NMR provides comprehensive structural and quantitative information useful for metabolomics fingerprinting, chemometric analysis, metabolite identification and metabolic pathway construction. A successful metabolomics study relies on proper experimental protocols for the collection, handling, processing and analysis of metabolomics data. Critically, these protocols should eliminate or avoid biologically-irrelevant changes to the metabolome. We provide a comprehensive description of our NMR-based metabolomics procedures optimized for the analysis of bacterial metabolomes. The technical details described within this manuscript should provide a useful guide to reliably apply our NMR-based metabolomics methodology to systems biology studies. PMID:26078915

  1. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  2. NMR studies of structure and dynamics in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Stark, R E; Yan, B; Ray, A K; Chen, Z; Fang, X; Garbow, J R

    2000-05-01

    Cutin and suberin are support polymers involved in waterproofing the leaves and fruits of higher plants, regulating the flow of nutrients among various plant organs, and minimizing the deleterious impact of microbial pathogens. Despite the complexity and intractable nature of these plant biopolyesters, their molecular structure and development are amenable to study by suitable solid-state and solution-state NMR techniques. Interactions of tomato cutin with water were examined by solid-state 2H and 13C NMR, showing that water films enhance rapid segmental motions of the acyl chains and are associated with a fivefold increase in surface elasticity upon cutin hydration. The suberization of wounded potato tissues was studied by solid-state 13C NMR, revealing the likely phenylpropanoid structures that permit dense cross-linking of the suberin structure and their proximity to the cell-wall polysaccharides. Finally, two new approaches were developed to elucidate the molecular structures of these biopolymers: partial depolymerization followed by spectroscopic analysis of the soluble oligomers; and swelling of the intact materials followed by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR analysis. PMID:10811427

  3. 1H NMR structural and thermodynamical analysis of the hetero-association of daunomycin and novatrone in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, A. N.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Rozvadovskaya, A. O.; Hernandez Santiago, A.; Zubchenok, O. V.; Djimant, L. N.; Davies, D. B.

    2004-09-01

    The complexation of antitumour antibiotics novatrone (NOV) and daunomycin (DAU) in aqueous solution has been studied by one- and two-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy (500 MHz) in order to elucidate the probable molecular mechanism of the action of aromatic antitumour drugs in combination chemotherapy. The equilibrium reaction constants, thermodynamical parameters (Δ H, Δ S) of hetero-association of NOV with DAU and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules in the hetero-complexes have been determined from the experimental concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts of the aromatic molecules. The most favourable structure of the 1:1 NOV-DAU hetero-association complex has been determined using both the molecular mechanics methods (X-PLOR software) and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules. The obtained results have shown that intermolecular complexes between NOV and DAU molecules are mainly stabilized by stacking interactions of the aromatic chromophores. It is likely that there is an additional stabilization of the NOV-DAU hetero-complexes by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. It is concluded that aromatic molecules of antibiotics may form energetically stable hetero-association complexes in aqueous solution and hence effect their medical-biological (and probably toxic) activity.

  4. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  5. Molecular structure, vibrational, UV, NMR, hyperpolarizability, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis of Pteridine2,4-dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabavathi, N.; Nilufer, A.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2012-12-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of Pteridine2,4-dione has been recorded in the region 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The tautomeric stability, optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of Pteridine2,4-dione were obtained by the density functional theory (DFT) using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The 1H and13C NMR spectra chemical shifts of the molecule were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound using CIS method and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) of these novel molecular system and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of Pteridine2,4-dione are calculated using DFT/6-311++G (d,p) method on the finite-field approach. The Mulliken charges, the values of electric dipole moment (μ) of the molecule were computed using DFT calculations. The change in electron density (ED) in the σ* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by natural bond (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyper conjugation of hydrogen-bonded interactions.

  6. Molecular structure, vibrational, UV, NMR, hyperpolarizability, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis of Pteridine2,4-dione.

    PubMed

    Prabavathi, N; Nilufer, A; Krishnakumar, V

    2012-12-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of Pteridine2,4-dione has been recorded in the region 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The tautomeric stability, optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of Pteridine2,4-dione were obtained by the density functional theory (DFT) using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The (1)H and(13)C NMR spectra chemical shifts of the molecule were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound using CIS method and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (β(0)) of these novel molecular system and related properties (β, α(0) and Δα) of Pteridine2,4-dione are calculated using DFT/6-311++G (d,p) method on the finite-field approach. The Mulliken charges, the values of electric dipole moment (μ) of the molecule were computed using DFT calculations. The change in electron density (ED) in the σ(*) antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by natural bond (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyper conjugation of hydrogen-bonded interactions. PMID:23085999

  7. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  8. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  9. Structural analysis of high-silica ferrierite with different structure-directing agents by solid-state NMR and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hideyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The host-guest interaction in high-silica ferrierite (FER) with different structure-directing agents (SDA), pyridine and piperidine, was analyzed by solid-state (29)Si NMR relaxation experiments and molecular-orbital calculations. Qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the SDA structure obtained by these methods provides significant insight for understanding the functions in a template, and the stabilizing role of the SDA. Relaxation experiments show a larger magnetic dipolar interaction between the silicon and hydrogen atoms in piperidine as compared to that in pyridine, and the results correlate with the bonding property in terms of the distance between the zeolite framework and the SDA. The (1)H MAS NMR spectrum shows that the pyridine molecules mainly act as pore fillers in the pyridine-FER. In contrast, it was presumed that piperidine, adjacent to the aluminosilicate framework and framework defects, acted as a counter cation to balance the charge in the piperidine-FER. H(+)-FER synthesized with piperidine shows a lower hydrothermal stability as compared to that synthesized with pyridine. The hydrothermal stability of H(+)-FER is discussed by considering the contributions of framework defects and the different properties pertaining to the bonding between the zeolite framework and the SDA. PMID:20410561

  10. A statistical analysis of NMR spectrometer noise.

    PubMed

    Grage, Halfdan; Akke, Mikael

    2003-05-01

    Estimation of NMR spectral parameters, using e.g. maximum likelihood methods, is commonly based on the assumption of white complex Gaussian noise in the signal obtained by quadrature detection. Here we present a statistical analysis with the purpose of discussing and testing the validity of this fundamental assumption. Theoretical expressions are derived for the correlation structure of the noise under various conditions, showing that in general the noise in the sampled signal is not strictly white, even if the thermal noise in the receiver steps prior to digitisation can be characterised as white Gaussian noise. It is shown that the noise correlation properties depend on the ratio between the sampling frequency and the filter cut-off frequency, as well as the filter characteristics. The theoretical analysis identifies conditions that are expected to yield non-white noise in the sampled signal. Extensive statistical characterisation of experimental noise confirms the theoretical predictions. The statistical methods outlined here are also useful for residual analysis in connection with validation of the model and the parameter estimates. PMID:12762994

  11. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing results obtained on the Argonne coals. We have extended our fitting procedure to include carbons of all types in the analysis.

  12. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  13. Using NMR to Determine Protein Structure in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnero, Silvia

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a marvelous spectroscopic technique that chemists, physicists, and biochemists routinely employ for their research around the world. This year half of the Nobel Prize for chemistry went to Kurt Wüthrich, who was recognized for the development of NMR-based techniques that lead to the structure determination of biomolecules in solution. In addition to implementing novel pulse sequences and software packages, Wüthrich also applied his methods to several biological systems of key importance to human health. These include the prion protein, which is heavily involved in the spongiform encephalopathy (best known as 'mad cow disease'), which recently caused numerous human deaths, particularly in the UK, due to ingestion of contaminated meat. Transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) is the most intriguing new NMR method recently developed by Wüthrich and coworkers. This and other closely related pulse sequences promise to play a pivotal role in the extension of NMR to the conformational analysis of very large (up to the megadalton range) macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. More exciting new developments are expected in the near future.

  14. A new Schiff base, (E)-4-((4-chlorophenylimino) methyl)-2-methoxyphenol: Crystal structure, thermal behavior, solid-state fluorescence, DFT calculations and FT NMR spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagapandiselvi, P.; Baby, C.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Schiff base, (E)-4-((4-chlorophenylimino) methyl)-2-methoxyphenol (4CMP), was synthesized and grown as single crystal by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The crystal structure of the compound, elucidated from single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, was in good agreement with the calculated structure using Density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) basis set of Gaussian 03 program. The physicochemical characterization of the title compound was further performed by modern spectroscopic techniques like FT-IR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR (both 1D and 2D), UV-Vis-NIR, and fluorescence analysis. UV-Vis-NIR spectrum showed the transparent nature of 4CMP crystal in the region 500-1200 nm. Solid state fluorescence of the crystal indicate that the title compound can serve as a photoactive material. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the grown crystal is thermally stable up to a temperature of 225 °C. From DSC, the phase transition of the compound was found to be at 131 °C. The dependence of both dielectric constant and dielectric loss with frequency was measured. Microscopic nonlinear optical properties like dipole moment (μ) and first order hyperpolarizability (β) were also measured using DFT.

  15. Structural investigation of a uronic acid-containing polysaccharide from abalone by graded acid hydrolysis followed by PMP-HPLC-MSn and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-xu; Zhao, Jun; Li, Dong-mei; Song, Shuang; Song, Liang; Fu, Ying-huan; Zhang, Li-peng

    2015-01-30

    A new strategy was applied to elucidate the structure of a polysaccharide from abalone gonad (AGSP). It was hydrolyzed by 0.05 M, 0.2 M, 0.5 M, and 2.0 M TFA at 100 °C for 1 h, sequentially. Every hydrolysate was ultrafiltrated (3000 Da) to collect oligo- and monosaccharides, and the final retentate was further hydrolyzed with 2.0 M TFA at 110 °C and 121 °C for 2 h, respectively. 1-Phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) derivatization followed by HPLC-MSn analysis was applied to detect the sugar residues in these hydrolysates, which allowed proposing their location in the polysaccharide structure. The retentate after 0.5 M TFA hydrolysis was confirmed as the polysaccharide backbone, and it was further analyzed by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. Thus, the structural elucidation of AGSP was accomplished, and it has a backbone of →4)-β-GlcA(1→2)-α-Man(1→ repeating unit with Fuc, Xyl and Gal in the branch. The analytical strategy demonstrated was useful to characterize the structure of polysaccharides. PMID:25497339

  16. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  17. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  18. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. NMR solution structure of the neurotrypsin Kringle domain.

    PubMed

    Ozhogina, Olga A; Grishaev, Alexander; Bominaar, Emile L; Patthy, László; Trexler, Maria; Llinás, Miguel

    2008-11-25

    Neurotrypsin is a multidomain protein that serves as a brain-specific serine protease. Here we report the NMR structure of its kringle domain, NT/K. The data analysis was performed with the BACUS (Bayesian analysis of coupled unassigned spins) algorithm. This study presents the first application of BACUS to the structure determination of a 13C unenriched protein for which no prior experimental 3D structure was available. NT/K adopts the kringle fold, consisting of an antiparallel beta-sheet bridged by an overlapping pair of disulfides. The structure reveals the presence of a surface-exposed left-handed polyproline II helix that is closely packed to the core beta-structure. This feature distinguishes NT/K from other members of the kringle fold and points toward a novel functional role for a kringle domain. Functional divergence among kringle domains is discussed on the basis of their surface and electrostatic characteristics. PMID:18956887

  20. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1, 1993--December 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and dosed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  1. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  2. Molecular structure, vibrational, UV, NMR, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, NLO, NBO analysis of 3,5 di tert butyl 4 hydroxy benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathammal, R.; Sangeetha, K.; Sangeetha, M.; Mekala, R.; Gadheeja, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 3,5 di tert butyl 4 hydroxy benzoic acid. The properties of title compound have been evaluated by quantum chemical calculation (DFT) using B3LYP functional and 6-31 + G (d, p) as basis set. IR Spectra has been recorded using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the region 4000-400 cm-1. The vibrational assignment of the calculated normal modes has been made on the basis set. The isotropic chemical shifts computed by 13C and 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) analyses also show good agreement with experimental observations. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound are used to study the visible absorption maxima (λ max). The structure activity relationship have been interpreted by mapping electrostatic potential surface (MEP), which is valuable information for the quality control of medicines and drug receptor interactions. The Mullikan charges, HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital) - LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital) energy are analyzed. HOMO-LUMO energy gap and other related molecular properties are also calculated. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is carried out to investigate the various intra and inter molecular interactions of molecular system. The Non-linear optical properties such as dipole moment (μ), polarizability (αtot) and molecular first order hyperpolarizability (β) of the title compound are computed with B3LYP/6-31 + G (d,p) level of theory.

  3. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  4. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  5. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  6. Structural plasticity and Mg2+ binding properties of RNase P P4 from combined analysis of NMR residual dipolar couplings and motionally decoupled spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Getz, Melissa M; Andrews, Andy J; Fierke, Carol A; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2007-02-01

    The P4 helix is an essential element of ribonuclease P (RNase P) that is believed to bind catalytically important metals. Here, we applied a combination of NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and a recently introduced domain-elongation strategy for measuring "motionally decoupled" relaxation data to characterize the structural dynamics of the P4 helix from Bacillus subtilis RNase P. In the absence of divalent ions, the two P4 helical domains undergo small amplitude (approximately 13 degrees) collective motions about an average interhelical angle of 10 degrees. The highly conserved U7 bulge and helical residue C8, which are proposed to be important for substrate recognition and metal binding, are locally mobile at pico- to nanosecond timescales and together form the pivot point for the collective domain motions. Chemical shift mapping reveals significant association of Mg2+ ions at the P4 major groove near the flexible pivot point at residues (A5, G22, G23) previously identified to bind catalytically important metals. The Mg2+ ions do not, however, significantly alter the structure or dynamics of P4. Analysis of results in the context of available X-ray structures of the RNA component of RNase P and structural models that include the pre-tRNA substrate suggest that the internal motions observed in P4 likely facilitate adaptive changes in conformation that take place during folding and substrate recognition, possibly aided by interactions with Mg2+ ions. Our results add to a growing view supporting the existence of functionally important internal motions in RNA occurring at nanosecond timescales. PMID:17194721

  7. Simple NMR methods for evaluating higher order structures of monoclonal antibody therapeutics with quinary structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Long, Dianna S; Lute, Scott C; Levy, Michaella J; Brorson, Kurt A; Keire, David A

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs constitute the largest class of protein therapeutics currently on the market. Correctly folded protein higher order structure (HOS), including quinary structure, is crucial for mAb drug quality. The quinary structure is defined as the association of quaternary structures (e.g., oligomerized mAb). Here, several commonly available analytical methods, i.e., size-exclusion-chromatography (SEC) FPLC, multi-angle light scattering (MALS), circular dichroism (CD), NMR and multivariate analysis, were combined and modified to yield a complete profile of HOS and comparable metrics. Rituximab and infliximab were chosen for method evaluation because both IgG1 molecules are known to be homologous in sequence, superimposable in Fab crystal structure and identical in Fc structure. However, herein the two are identified to be significantly different in quinary structure in addition to minor secondary structure differences. All data collectively showed rituximab was mostly monomeric while infliximab was in mono-oligomer equilibrium driven by its Fab fragment. The quinary structure differences were qualitatively inferred from the less used but more reproducible dilution-injection-SEC-FPLC curve method. Quantitative principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on NMR spectra of either the intact or the in-situ enzymatic-digested mAb samples. The cleavage reactions happened directly in NMR tubes without further separation, which greatly enhanced NMR spectra quality and resulted in larger inter- and intra-lot variations based on PCA. The new in-situ enzymatic digestion method holds potential in identifying structural differences on larger therapeutic molecules using NMR. PMID:27344629

  8. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, NBO, NMR, UV, first order hyperpolarizability, analysis of (S)-(-)-N-(5-Nitro-2-pyridyl) alaninol by Density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindarasu, K; Kavitha, E

    2014-06-01

    In this study, geometrical optimization, spectroscopic analysis, electronic structure and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of (S)-(-)-N-(5-Nitro-2-pyridyl) alaninol (abbreviated as SN5N2PLA) were investigated by utilizing HF and DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of SN5N2PLA were recorded in the region 4000-400cm(-1) and 3500-50cm(-1), respectively. Complete vibrational assignments, analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. UV-Visible spectrum of the compound that dissolved in methanol were recorded in the region 200-800nm and the electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured by TD-DFT approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The molecular stability and bond strength have been investigated by applying the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of SN5N2PLA were calculated using the GIAO method in methanol solution and compared with the measured experimental data. The dipole moment, polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The polarizability and first hyperpolarizability of the studied molecule indicate that the compound is a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials. The Chemical reactivity and Thermodynamic properties of SN5N2PLA at different temperature are calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations. PMID:24657932

  9. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2},{sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  10. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarter report {number_sign}8, 7/1/93--9/30/93

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. The dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals is investigated. In particular, the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3},{sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13} CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface is studied.

  11. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sup 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  12. Multinuclear NMR analysis of the antitubercular drug ethionamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale, Nuno; Correia, Alexandra; Figueiredo, Patrícia; Santos, Hélder A.

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis remains as the deadliest bacterial infection in developing countries, a situation that is particularly aggravated by the increasing spread of multidrug resistant mycobacteria (MDR-TB). In this view, not only new anti-tubercular drugs are urgently needed, but also a better understanding of the existing ones may aid in the future design of more efficient derivatives or surrogates. Ethionamide (ETA) is an anti-tubercular pro-drug used as second-line therapy against MDR-TB, being bio-activated by the mycobacterial monooxygenase EtA. ETA has been the focus of several research works, devoted either to the identification of ETA's metabolites or to the development of novel derivatives potentially useful to fight against tuberculosis. In either case, structural analysis of ETA and related structures is of undeniable relevance, while the presence of sulfur in ETA's structure brings about the possibility of including 33S-NMR in the toolbox of structural analysis techniques. In this work, we have engaged into a multinuclear NMR characterization of ETA, through the study of the drug's solubility in seven deuterated solvents, and of the chemical shifts for different nuclei in ETA. Results showed which are the best conditions to study ETA by NMR and provided some important evidence on the low reactivity of the drug's thioamide group, which may be of relevance for future drug derivatization approaches.

  13. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  14. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  15. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 3, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We now have two suites of well-characterized microporous materials including oxides (zeolites and silica gel) and activated carbons from our industrial partner, Air Products in Allentown, PA. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  16. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  17. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. PMID:27095695

  18. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  19. Solid State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid state NMR methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid state NMR techniques and technology. PMID:21219138

  20. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  1. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant. PMID:27060701

  2. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. PMID:25178811

  3. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  4. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  5. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  6. Correlation between local structural dynamics of proteins inferred from NMR ensembles and evolutionary dynamics of homologues of known structure.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Offmann, Bernard; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Conformational changes in proteins are extremely important for their biochemical functions. Correlation between inherent conformational variations in a protein and conformational differences in its homologues of known structure is still unclear. In this study, we have used a structural alphabet called Protein Blocks (PBs). PBs are used to perform abstraction of protein 3-D structures into a 1-D strings of 16 alphabets (a-p) based on dihedral angles of overlapping pentapeptides. We have analyzed the variations in local conformations in terms of PBs represented in the ensembles of 801 protein structures determined using NMR spectroscopy. In the analysis of concatenated data over all the residues in all the NMR ensembles, we observe that the overall nature of inherent local structural variations in NMR ensembles is similar to the nature of local structural differences in homologous proteins with a high correlation coefficient of .94. High correlation at the alignment positions corresponding to helical and β-sheet regions is only expected. However, the correlation coefficient by considering only the loop regions is also quite high (.91). Surprisingly, segregated position-wise analysis shows that this high correlation does not hold true to loop regions at the structurally equivalent positions in NMR ensembles and their homologues of known structure. This suggests that the general nature of local structural changes is unique; however most of the local structural variations in loop regions of NMR ensembles do not correlate to their local structural differences at structurally equivalent positions in homologues. PMID:23730714

  7. sup 1 H NMR studies of plastocyanin from Scenedesmus obliquus: Complete sequence-specific assignment, secondary structure analysis, and global fold

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Chazin, W.J.; Wright, P.E. ); Powls, R. )

    1988-10-04

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods have been used to make sequence-specific resonance assignments for the 97 amino acid residues of the plastocyanin from the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Assignments were obtained for all backbone protons and the majority of the side-chain protons. Spin system identification relied heavily on the observation of relayed connectivities to the backbone amide proton. Sequence-specific assignments were made by using the sequential assignment procedure. During this process, an extra valine residue was identified that had not been detected in the original amino acid sequence. Elements of regular secondary structure were identified from characteristic NOE connectivities between backbone protons, coupling constant values, and the observation of slowly exchanging amide protons. The protein in solution contains eight {beta}-strands, one short segment of helix, five reverse turns, and five loops. The {beta}-strands may be arranged into two {beta}sheets on the basis of extensive cross-strand NOE connectivities. The chain-folding topology determined from the NMR experiments is that of a Greek key {beta}-barrel and is similar to that observed for French bean plastocyanin in solution and poplar plastocyanin in the crystalline state. While the overall structures are similar, several differences in local structure between the S. obliquus and higher plant plastocyanins have been identified.

  8. Proton Fingerprints Portray Molecular Structures: Enhanced Description of the 1H NMR Spectra of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Niemitz, Matthias; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic signals observed in NMR spectra encode essential information on the structure of small molecules. However, extracting all of this information from complex signal patterns is not trivial. This report demonstrates how computer-aided spectral analysis enables the complete interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated with a set of organic molecules, for which replicas of their 1H NMR spectra were generated. The potential impact of this methodology on organic chemistry research is discussed. PMID:24007197

  9. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  10. Overview on the use of NMR to examine protein structure.

    PubMed

    Breukels, Vincent; Konijnenberg, Albert; Nabuurs, Sanne M; Doreleijers, Jurgen F; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Vuister, Geerten W

    2011-04-01

    Any protein structure determination process contains several steps, starting from obtaining a suitable sample, then moving on to acquiring data and spectral assignment, and lastly to the final steps of structure determination and validation. This unit describes all of these steps, starting with the basic physical principles behind NMR and some of the most commonly measured and observed phenomena such as chemical shift, scalar and residual coupling, and the nuclear Overhauser effect. Then, in somewhat more detail, the process of spectral assignment and structure elucidation is explained. Furthermore, the use of NMR to study protein-ligand interaction, protein dynamics, or protein folding is described. PMID:21488042

  11. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  12. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  13. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 1, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  14. Deuterium NMR Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Gramicidin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, Andrew William

    1990-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the membrane peptide gramicidin are investigated by deuterium NMR. A specific structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the alpha carbon of the third alanine residue. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on this analog in oriented lipid bilayers indicate that the c_alpha- ^2H bond makes an angle relative to the helical axis that is in agreement with the bond angle predicted by the beta^{6.3} helical model. A second structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the formyl group of two different analogs. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on these analogs show that the spectra of the two analogs are very similar. However, the analog possessing D-leucine as the second residue also appears to exist in a second, minor conformation which does not seem to exist for the analog possessing glycine as the second residue.

  15. Elemental and structural analysis of silicon forms in herbal drugs using silicon-29 MAS NMR and WD-XRF spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Pajchel, L; Nykiel, P; Kolodziejski, W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study concentration of silicon and its structural forms present in herbal drugs. Equisetum arvense and Urtica dioica L. from teapot bags, dietary supplements (tablets and capsules) containing those herbs, dry extract obtained from a teapot bag of E. arvense, and samples of the latter herb harvested in wild habitat over four months were studied using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WD-XRF) and high-resolution solid-state (29)Si NMR. The highest concentration of Si, ca. 27mg/g, was found in the herbal material from the teapot bags containing E. arvense. The Si content in natural E. arvense (whole plants) increased from May to August by ca. 7mg/g, reaching value 26mg/g. Three different silicon forms were detected in the studied herbal samples: Si(OSi)4 (Q(4)), Si(OH)(OSi)3 (Q(3)) and Si(OH)2(OSi)2 (Q(2)). Those sites were populated in E. arvense in the following order: Q(4)≫Q(3)>Q(2). A dramatic, ca. 50-fold decrease of the Si concentration during the infusion process was observed. The infusion process and the subsequent drying procedure augmented population of the Q(4) sites at the cost of the Q(2) sites. The WD-XRF and (29)Si NMR methods occurred useful and complementary in the study of herbal materials. PMID:21813258

  16. FT-IR and FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopic investigation and hybrid computational (HF and DFT) analysis on the molecular structure of mesitylene.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Atac, A; Karabacak, M; Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Asiri, A M; Periandy, S

    2013-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of mesitylene were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, (1)H and (13)C NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method and Hartree-Fock (HF) method with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Reduced density gradient (RDG) of the mesitylene was also given to investigate interactions of the molecule. PMID:23978748

  17. FT-IR and FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopic investigation and hybrid computational (HF and DFT) analysis on the molecular structure of mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, E.; Atac, A.; Karabacak, M.; Nagabalasubramanian, P. B.; Asiri, A. M.; Periandy, S.

    2013-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of mesitylene were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method and Hartree-Fock (HF) method with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Reduced density gradient (RDG) of the mesitylene was also given to investigate interactions of the molecule.

  18. Solid state NMR strategy for characterizing native membrane protein structures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Das, Nabanita; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-09-17

    Unlike water soluble proteins, the structures of helical transmembrane proteins depend on a very complex environment. These proteins sit in the midst of dramatic electrical and chemical gradients and are often subject to variations in the lateral pressure profile, order parameters, dielectric constant, and other properties. Solid state NMR is a collection of tools that can characterize high resolution membrane protein structure in this environment. Indeed, prior work has shown that this complex environment significantly influences transmembrane protein structure. Therefore, it is important to characterize such structures under conditions that closely resemble its native environment. Researchers have used two approaches to gain protein structural restraints via solid state NMR spectroscopy. The more traditional approach uses magic angle sample spinning to generate isotropic chemical shifts, much like solution NMR. As with solution NMR, researchers can analyze the backbone chemical shifts to obtain torsional restraints. They can also examine nuclear spin interactions between nearby atoms to obtain distances between atomic sites. Unfortunately, for membrane proteins in lipid preparations, the spectral resolution is not adequate to obtain complete resonance assignments. Researchers have developed another approach for gaining structural restraints from membrane proteins: the use of uniformly oriented lipid bilayers, which provides a method for obtaining high resolution orientational restraints. When the bilayers are aligned with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer, researchers can obtain orientational restraints in which atomic sites in the protein are restrained relative to the alignment axis. However, this approach does not allow researchers to determine the relative packing between helices. By combining the two approaches, we can take advantage of the information acquired from each technique to minimize the challenges and maximize the quality of the

  19. MOTOR: model assisted software for NMR structure determination.

    PubMed

    Schieborr, Ulrich; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Elshorst, Bettina; Maurer, Marcus; Saxena, Krishna; Stehle, Tanja; Kudlinzki, Denis; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Schwalbe, Harald

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic proteins with important biological function can be partially unstructured, conformational flexible, or heterogenic. Crystallization trials often fail for such proteins. In NMR spectroscopy, parts of the polypeptide chain undergoing dynamics in unfavorable time regimes cannot be observed. De novo NMR structure determination is seriously hampered when missing signals lead to an incomplete chemical shift assignment resulting in an information content of the NOE data insufficient to determine the structure ab initio. We developed a new protein structure determination strategy for such cases based on a novel NOE assignment strategy utilizing a number of model structures but no explicit reference structure as it is used for bootstrapping like algorithms. The software distinguishes in detail between consistent and mutually exclusive pairs of possible NOE assignments on the basis of different precision levels of measured chemical shifts searching for a set of maximum number of consistent NOE assignments in agreement with 3D space. Validation of the method using the structure of the low molecular-weight-protein tyrosine phosphatase A (MptpA) showed robust results utilizing protein structures with 30-45% sequence identity and 70% of the chemical shift assignments. About 60% of the resonance assignments are sufficient to identify those structural models with highest conformational similarity to the real structure. The software was benchmarked by de novo solution structures of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and the extracellular fibroblast growth factor receptor domain FGFR4 D2, which both failed in crystallization trials and in classical NMR structure determination. PMID:23852655

  20. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  1. NMR Studies of Enzyme Structure and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildvan, Albert

    2006-03-01

    At least three NMR methodologies pioneered by Al Redfield, have greatly benefited enzymology: (1) the suppression of strong water signals without pre-saturation; (2) sequence specific NH/ND exchange; and (3) dynamic studies of mobile loops of proteins. Water suppression has enabled us to identify unusually short, strong H-bonds at the active sites of five enzymes (three isomerases and two esterases), and to measure their lengths from both the chemical shifts and D/H fractionation factors of the deshielded protons involved (J. Mol. Struct. 615, 163 (2002)). Backbone NH exchange studies were used to detect regions of an NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in which NH groups became selectively protected against exchange on Mg(2+) binding, and further protected on product (NMP) binding, thus locating binding sites as well as conformationally linked remote sites (Biochemistry 42, 10140 (2003)). Dynamic studies were used to elucidate the frequency of motion of a flexible loop of GDP-mannose hydrolase (66,000/sec) containing the catalytic base His-124, from exchange broadening of the side chain NH signals of His-124 in the free enzyme. The binding of Mg(2+) and GDP-mannose lock His-124 in position to deprotonate the entering water and complete the reaction.

  2. An NMR structural study of nickel-substituted rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Brian J; Duarte, Iven C N; Macedo, Anjos L; Volkman, Brian F; Nunes, Sofia G; Moura, I; Markley, John L; Moura, José J G

    2010-03-01

    The Ni(II) and Zn(II) derivatives of Desulfovibrio vulgaris rubredoxin (DvRd) have been studied by NMR spectroscopy to probe the structure at the metal centre. The beta CH(2) proton pairs from the cysteines that bind the Ni(II) atom have been identified using 1D nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) difference spectra and sequence specifically assigned via NOE correlations to neighbouring protons and by comparison with the published X-ray crystal structure of a Ni(II) derivative of Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin. The solution structures of DvRd(Zn) and DvRd(Ni) have been determined and the paramagnetic form refined using pseudocontact shifts. The determination of the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy tensor allowed the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed chemical shifts to be obtained. Analysis of the pseudocontact and contact chemical shifts of the cysteine H beta protons and backbone protons close to the metal centre allowed conclusions to be drawn as to the geometry and hydrogen-bonding pattern at the metal binding site. The importance of NH-S hydrogen bonds at the metal centre for the delocalization of electron spin density is confirmed for rubredoxins and can be extrapolated to metal centres in Cu proteins: amicyanin, plastocyanin, stellacyanin, azurin and pseudoazurin. PMID:19997764

  3. Structural NMR of Protein Oligomers using Hybrid Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Solving structures of native oligomeric protein complexes using traditional high resolution NMR techniques remains challenging. However, increased utilization of computational platforms, and integration of information from less traditional NMR techniques with data from other complementary biophysical methods, promises to extend the boundary of NMR-applicable targets. This article reviews several of the techniques capable of providing less traditional and complementary structural information. In particular, the use of orientational constraints coming from residual dipolar couplings and residual chemical shift anisotropy offsets are shown to simplify the construction of models for oligomeric complexes, especially in cases of weak homo-dimers. Combining this orientational information with interaction site information supplied by computation, chemical shift perturbation, paramagnetic surface perturbation, cross-saturation and mass spectrometry allows high resolution models of the complexes to be constructed with relative ease. Non-NMR techniques, such as mass spectrometry, EPR and small angle X-ray scattering, are also expected to play increasingly important roles by offering alternative methods of probing the overall shape of the complex. Computational platforms capable of integrating information from multiple sources in the modeling process are also discussed in the article. And finally a new, detailed example on the determination of a chemokine tetramer structure will be used to illustrate how a non-traditional approach to oligomeric structure determination works in practice. PMID:21074622

  4. NMR analysis of the transient complex between membrane photosystem I and soluble cytochrome c6.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Molina-Heredia, Fernando P; Nieto, Pedro M; Hansson, Orjan; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Karlsson, B Göran

    2005-03-01

    A structural analysis of the surface areas of cytochrome c(6), responsible for the transient interaction with photosystem I, was performed by NMR transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy. The hemeprotein was titrated by adding increasing amounts of the chlorophyllic photosystem, and the NMR spectra of the free and bound protein were analyzed in a comparative way. The NMR signals of cytochrome c(6) residues located at the hydrophobic and electrostatic patches, which both surround the heme cleft, were specifically modified by binding. The backbones of internal residues close to the hydrophobic patch of cytochrome c(6) were also affected, a fact that is ascribed to the conformational changes taking place inside the hemeprotein when interacting with photosystem I. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy of a transient complex between soluble and membrane proteins. PMID:15611120

  5. Analysis of experimentally shocked minerals by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Boslough, M.B.

    1994-10-01

    The shock-loading of natural materials by an impact or explosion can result in the formation of modified and altered phases. In order to characterize the resulting material and to evaluate the extent of shock modification, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to examine several experimentally shocked minerals. In three related NMR studies, they have (1) examined shocked clinoptilolite, (2) performed a preliminary analysis of shocked quartz, and (3) reproduced shocked quartz results with detailed spectral deconvolutions, and extended it with NMR analysis of shocked feldspar powders.

  6. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  7. Membrane protein structural validation by oriented sample solid-state NMR: diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Li, Conggang; Gao, F Philip; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-04-15

    The validation of protein structures through functional assays has been the norm for many years. Functional assays perform this validation for water-soluble proteins very well, but they need to be performed in the same environment as that used for the structural analysis. This is difficult for membrane proteins that are often structurally characterized in detergent environments, although functional assays for these proteins are most frequently performed in lipid bilayers. Because the structure of membrane proteins is known to be sensitive to the membrane mimetic environment, such functional assays are appropriate for validating the protein construct, but not the membrane protein structure. Here, we compare oriented sample solid-state NMR spectral data of diacylglycerol kinase previously published with predictions of such data from recent structures of this protein. A solution NMR structure of diacylglycerol kinase has been obtained in detergent micelles and three crystal structures have been obtained in a monoolein cubic phase. All of the structures are trimeric with each monomer having three transmembrane and one amphipathic helices. However, the solution NMR structure shows typical perturbations induced by a micelle environment that is reflected in the predicted solid-state NMR resonances from the structural coordinates. The crystal structures show few such perturbations, especially for the wild-type structure and especially for the monomers that do not have significant crystal contacts. For these monomers the predicted and observed data are nearly identical. The thermostabilized constructs do show more perturbations, especially the A41C mutation that introduces a hydrophilic residue into what would be the middle of the lipid bilayer inducing additional hydrogen bonding between trimers. These results demonstrate a general technique for validating membrane protein structures with minimal data obtained from membrane proteins in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers by

  8. Synthesis, structural, spectral (FTIR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR), NBO and first order hyperpolarizability analysis of N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindarasu, K; Kavitha, E; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-12-10

    In this study sulfonamide compound, N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide (NPBS) has been synthesized and grown as a high quality single crystal by the slow evaporation solution growth technique. The grown crystals were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared (4000-400cm(-1)), Fourier transform Raman (3500-500cm(-1)), UV-Vis (200-800nm) and NMR spectroscopy. Density functional (DFT) calculations have been carried out for the compound NPBS by utilizing DFT level of theory using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated by using quantum chemical methods. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The chemical reactivity and ionization potential of NPBS were also calculated. In addition, Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP), Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) analysis was investigated using theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic properties of the compound were calculated at different temperatures and corresponding relations between the properties and temperature were also studied. Finally, geometric parameters, vibrational bands were compared with available experimental data of the molecules. PMID:24973782

  9. (19) F NMR and DFT Analysis Reveal Structural and Electronic Transition State Features for RhoA-Catalyzed GTP Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Molt, Robert W; Waltho, Jonathan P; Richards, Nigel G J; Blackburn, G Michael

    2016-03-01

    Molecular details for RhoA/GAP catalysis of the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP are poorly understood. We use (19) F NMR chemical shifts in the MgF3 (-) transition state analogue (TSA) complex as a spectroscopic reporter to indicate electron distribution for the γ-PO3 (-) oxygens in the corresponding TS, implying that oxygen coordinated to Mg has the greatest electron density. This was validated by QM calculations giving a picture of the electronic properties of the transition state (TS) for nucleophilic attack of water on the γ-PO3 (-) group based on the structure of a RhoA/GAP-GDP-MgF3 (-) TSA complex. The TS model displays a network of 20 hydrogen bonds, including the GAP Arg85' side chain, but neither phosphate torsional strain nor general base catalysis is evident. The nucleophilic water occupies a reactive location different from that in multiple ground state complexes, arising from reorientation of the Gln-63 carboxamide by Arg85' to preclude direct hydrogen bonding from water to the target γ-PO3 (-) group. PMID:26822702

  10. Broadband homonuclear correlation spectroscopy driven by combined R2(n)(v) sequences under fast magic angle spinning for NMR structural analysis of organic and biological solids.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangjin; Yan, Si; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-07-01

    We recently described a family of experiments for R2n(v) Driven Spin Diffusion (RDSD) spectroscopy suitable for homonuclear correlation experiments under fast MAS conditions [G. Hou, S. Yan, S.J. Sun, Y. Han, I.J. Byeon, J. Ahn, J. Concel, A. Samoson, A.M. Gronenborn, T. Polenova, Spin diffusion drive by R-symmetry sequencs: applications to homonuclear correlation spectroscopy in MAS NMR of biological and organic solids, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133 (2011) 3943-3953]. In these RDSD experiments, since the broadened second-order rotational resonance conditions are dominated by the radio frequency field strength and the phase shifts, as well as the size of reintroduced dipolar couplings, the different R2n(v) sequences display unique polarization transfer behaviors and different recoupling frequency bandwidths. Herein, we present a series of modified R2n(v) sequences, dubbed COmbined R2n(v)-Driven (CORD), that yield broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling and give rise to uniform distribution of cross peak intensities across the entire correlation spectrum. We report NMR experiments and numerical simulations demonstrating that these CORD spin diffusion sequences are suitable for broadband recoupling at a wide range of magnetic fields and MAS frequencies, including fast-MAS conditions (νr=40 kHz and above). Since these CORD sequences are largely insensitive to dipolar truncation, they are well suited for the determination of long-range distance constraints, which are indispensable for the structural characterization of a broad range of systems. Using U-(13)C,(15)N-alanine and U-(13)C,(15)N-histidine, we show that under fast-MAS conditions, the CORD sequences display polarization transfer efficiencies within broadband frequency regions that are generally higher than those offered by other existing spin diffusion pulse schemes. A 89-residue U-(13)C,(15)N-dynein light chain (LC8) protein has also been used to demonstrate that the CORD sequences exhibit uniformly high cross peak

  11. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules. PMID:26479462

  12. Assessment of structural changes of human teeth by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    A technique of low-field pulsed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is described for assessment of age-related structural changes (dentin and pulp) of human teeth in vitro. The technique involves spin-spin relaxation measurement and inversion spin-spin spectral analysis methods. The spin-spin relaxation decay curve is converted into a T2 distribution spectrum by a sum of single exponential decays. The NMR spectra from the extracted dentin-portion-only and dental pulp-cells-only were compared with the whole extracted teeth spectra, for the dentin and pulp peak assignments. While dentin and pulp are highly significant parameters in determining tooth quality, variations in these parameters with age can be used as an effective tool for estimating tooth quality. Here we propose an NMR calibration method—the ratio of the amount of dentin to the amount of pulp obtained from NMR T2 distribution spectra can be used for measuring the age-related structural changes in teeth while eliminating any variations in size of teeth. Eight teeth (third molars) extracted from humans, aged among 17-67 years old, were tested in this study. It is found that the intensity ratio of dentin to pulp sensitively changes from 0.48 to 3.2 approaching a linear growth with age. This indicates that age-related structural changes in human teeth can be detected using the low-field NMR technique.

  13. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  14. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  15. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR. PMID:25924947

  16. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  17. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James M.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining , 13C, and 15N backbone and 13Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2–1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9–1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments. PMID:22665781

  18. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  19. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  20. Structural Aspects of Several Oxide Glasses as Elucidated by Multinuclear NMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianhui

    1988-03-01

    NMR is sensitive to many interactions that the nucleus experiences with its environment. Included among these interactions are two that were heavily exploited in this thesis. They are the electric quadrupole interaction and the chemical shift interaction. These interactions yield structural information on short-range order and atom coordinations, which are very valuable and important to the understanding of properties and microstructures of glasses. Both the static or MASS NMR at high field and low field CW NMR were utilized to obtain information concerning the coordinations and local environments of several oxide glasses. For some systems, other spectroscopic methods (thermal analysis, X-ray and IR spectroscopies) were also used to assist NMR studies. In Chapter I relevant NMR theory and detection techniques used for this work are introduced. In Chapters 2-4, some structural aspects of alkali borate, borosilicate or alkali boroaluminate glasses are studied. In particular, boron coordinations in these glasses are carefully reinvestigated. The relationship between the change in boron coordinations and the changes in macroscopic characteristics of the glasses (such as electric conductivity and the mixed alkali effects) are studied. In mixed alkali glasses, the postulated alkali -pairing model provides a reasonable explanation for the structural changes. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the ^{71}Ga and ^{69 }Ga NMR studies of alkali gallate glasses. The glassforming range is explored and the gallium atom coordinations are studied. A structural model for the glass systems is suggested based on the distribution of galliums of different coordinations and structural parameters (quadrupole coupling constants, asymmetry parameters, and isotropic chemical shifts, etc.). A study of ^{31} P spectra in lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glasses is presented in Chapter 6. By subjecting the samples to various magnetic field strengths and different temperatures, information on the local

  1. Analysis of bacterial biofilms using NMR-based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Powers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases can be difficult to cure, especially if the pathogen forms a biofilm. After decades of extensive research into the morphology, physiology and genomics of biofilm formation, attention has recently been directed toward the analysis of the cellular metabolome in order to understand the transformation of a planktonic cell to a biofilm. Metabolomics can play an invaluable role in enhancing our understanding of the underlying biological processes related to the structure, formation and antibiotic resistance of biofilms. A systematic view of metabolic pathways or processes responsible for regulating this ‘social structure’ of microorganisms may provide critical insights into biofilm-related drug resistance and lead to novel treatments. This review will discuss the development of NMR-based metabolomics as a technology to study medically relevant biofilms. Recent advancements from case studies reviewed in this manuscript have shown the potential of metabolomics to shed light on numerous biological problems related to biofilms. PMID:22800371

  2. New methods of structure refinement for macromolecular structure determination by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Clore, G. Marius; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in multidimensional NMR methodology have permitted solution structures of proteins in excess of 250 residues to be solved. In this paper, we discuss several methods of structure refinement that promise to increase the accuracy of macromolecular structures determined by NMR. These methods include the use of a conformational database potential and direct refinement against three-bond coupling constants, secondary 13C shifts, 1H shifts, T1/T2 ratios, and residual dipolar couplings. The latter two measurements provide long range restraints that are not accessible by other solution NMR parameters. PMID:9600889

  3. ImatraNMR: Novel software for batch integration and analysis of quantitative NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, A. V.; Heikkilä, O.; Kilpeläinen, I.; Heikkinen, S.

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative NMR spectroscopy is a useful and important tool for analysis of various mixtures. Recently, in addition of traditional quantitative 1D 1H and 13C NMR methods, a variety of pulse sequences aimed for quantitative or semiquantitative analysis have been developed. To obtain actual usable results from quantitative spectra, they must be processed and analyzed with suitable software. Currently, there are many processing packages available from spectrometer manufacturers and third party developers, and most of them are capable of analyzing and integration of quantitative spectra. However, they are mainly aimed for processing single or few spectra, and are slow and difficult to use when large numbers of spectra and signals are being analyzed, even when using pre-saved integration areas or custom scripting features. In this article, we present a novel software, ImatraNMR, designed for batch analysis of quantitative spectra. In addition to capability of analyzing large number of spectra, it provides results in text and CSV formats, allowing further data-analysis using spreadsheet programs or general analysis programs, such as Matlab. The software is written with Java, and thus it should run in any platform capable of providing Java Runtime Environment version 1.6 or newer, however, currently it has only been tested with Windows and Linux (Ubuntu 10.04). The software is free for non-commercial use, and is provided with source code upon request.

  4. ImatraNMR: novel software for batch integration and analysis of quantitative NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, A V; Heikkilä, O; Kilpeläinen, I; Heikkinen, S

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative NMR spectroscopy is a useful and important tool for analysis of various mixtures. Recently, in addition of traditional quantitative 1D (1)H and (13)C NMR methods, a variety of pulse sequences aimed for quantitative or semiquantitative analysis have been developed. To obtain actual usable results from quantitative spectra, they must be processed and analyzed with suitable software. Currently, there are many processing packages available from spectrometer manufacturers and third party developers, and most of them are capable of analyzing and integration of quantitative spectra. However, they are mainly aimed for processing single or few spectra, and are slow and difficult to use when large numbers of spectra and signals are being analyzed, even when using pre-saved integration areas or custom scripting features. In this article, we present a novel software, ImatraNMR, designed for batch analysis of quantitative spectra. In addition to capability of analyzing large number of spectra, it provides results in text and CSV formats, allowing further data-analysis using spreadsheet programs or general analysis programs, such as Matlab. The software is written with Java, and thus it should run in any platform capable of providing Java Runtime Environment version 1.6 or newer, however, currently it has only been tested with Windows and Linux (Ubuntu 10.04). The software is free for non-commercial use, and is provided with source code upon request. PMID:21705250

  5. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  6. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  7. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Elleman, D. D.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The general problems associated with the removal of the effects of dipolar broadening from solid-state NMR spectra are analyzed. The effects of finite pulse width and H sub 1 inhomogeneity are shown to have limited the resolution of previous pulse cycles, and a new eight-pulse cycle designed to minimize these problems is discussed. Spectra for F-19 in CaF2 taken with this cycle are presented which show residual linewidth near 10 Hz. The feasibility of measuring proton chemical shift tensors is discussed.

  8. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole. PMID:27454747

  9. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, Erin E.; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce,Kimberly; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal, and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  10. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  11. Fully automated high-quality NMR structure determination of small 2H-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Schneider, William M.; Shen, Yang; Raman, Srivatsan; Inouye, Masayori; Baker, David; Roth, Monica J.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of high-quality small protein structures by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods generally requires acquisition and analysis of an extensive set of structural constraints. The process generally demands extensive backbone and sidechain resonance assignments, and weeks or even months of data collection and interpretation. Here we demonstrate rapid and high-quality protein NMR structure generation using CS-Rosetta with a perdeuterated protein sample made at a significantly reduced cost using new bacterial culture condensation methods. Our strategy provides the basis for a high-throughput approach for routine, rapid, high-quality structure determination of small proteins. As an example, we demonstrate the determination of a high-quality 3D structure of a small 8 kDa protein, E. coli cold shock protein A (CspA), using <4 days of data collection and fully automated data analysis methods together with CS-Rosetta. The resulting CspA structure is highly converged and in excellent agreement with the published crystal structure, with a backbone RMSD value of 0.5 Å, an all atom RMSD value of 1.2 Å to the crystal structure for well-defined regions, and RMSD value of 1.1 Å to crystal structure for core, non-solvent exposed sidechain atoms. Cross validation of the structure with 15N- and 13C-edited NOESY data obtained with a perdeuterated 15N, 13C-enriched 13CH3 methyl protonated CspA sample confirms that essentially all of these independently-interpreted NOE-based constraints are already satisfied in each of the 10 CS-Rosetta structures. By these criteria, the CS-Rosetta structure generated by fully automated analysis of data for a perdeuterated sample provides an accurate structure of CspA. This represents a general approach for rapid, automated structure determination of small proteins by NMR. PMID:20734145

  12. Investigation of the spatial structure of des-Gly/sup 9/-(Arg/sup 8/)vasopressin by the methods of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and theoretical conformational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shenderovich, M.D.; Sekatsis, I.P.; Liepin'sh, E.E.; Nikiforovich, G.V.; Papsuevich, O.S.

    1986-07-01

    An assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR signals of des-Gly/sup 9/-(Arg/sup 8/)vasopressin in dimethyl sulfoxide has been made by 2D spectroscopy. The SSCCs and temperature coefficients ..delta..delta/..delta.. T have been obtained for the amide protons and the system of NOE cross-peaks in the two-dimensional NOESY spectrum has been analyzed. The most important information on the spatial structure of des-Gly/sup 9/-(Arg/sup 8/)vasopressin is given by the low value of the temperature coefficient ..delta..delta/..delta.. T of the Asn/sup 5/ amide proton and the NOE between the ..cap alpha..-protons of Cys/sup 1/ and Cys/sup 6/. It is assumed that the screening of the NH proton of the Asn/sup 5/ residue from the solvent is connected with a ..beta..-bend of the backbone in the 2-5 sequence, and the distance between the C/sup ..cap alpha../H atoms of the Cys/sup 1/ and Cys/sup 6/ residues does not exceed 4 A. Bearing these limitations in mind, a theoretical conformational analysis of the molecule has been made. The group of low-energy conformations of the backbone obtained has been compared with the complete set of NMR characteristics.

  13. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  14. Quantum chemical 13Cα chemical shift calculations for protein NMR structure determination, refinement, and validation

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Aramini, James M.; Rossi, Paolo; Kuzin, Alexandre; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A recently determined set of 20 NMR-derived conformations of a 48-residue all-α-helical protein, (PDB ID code 2JVD), is validated here by comparing the observed 13Cα chemical shifts with those computed at the density functional level of theory. In addition, a recently introduced physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distance constraints together with observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, was applied to determine a new set of 10 conformations, (Set-bt), as a blind test for the same protein. A cross-validation of these two sets of conformations in terms of the agreement between computed and observed 13Cα chemical shifts, several stereochemical quality factors, and some NMR quality assessment scores reveals the good quality of both sets of structures. We also carried out an analysis of the agreement between the observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts for a slightly longer construct of the protein solved by x-ray crystallography at 2.0-Å resolution (PDB ID code 3BHP) with an identical amino acid residue sequence to the 2JVD structure for the first 46 residues. Our results reveal that both of the NMR-derived sets, namely 2JVD and Set-bt, are somewhat better representations of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution than the 3BHP crystal structure. In addition, the 13Cα-based validation analysis appears to be more sensitive to subtle structural differences across the three sets of structures than any other NMR quality-assessment scores used here, and, although it is computationally intensive, this analysis has potential value as a standard procedure to determine, refine, and validate protein structures. PMID:18787110

  15. NMR Structure of a Viral Peptide Inserted in Artificial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Galloux, Marie; Libersou, Sonia; Alves, Isabel D.; Marquant, Rodrigue; Salgado, Gilmar F.; Rezaei, Human; Lepault, Jean; Delmas, Bernard; Bouaziz, Serge; Morellet, Nelly

    2010-01-01

    Nonenveloped virus must penetrate the cellular membrane to access the cytoplasm without the benefit of membrane fusion. For birnavirus, one of the peptides present in the virus capsid, pep46 for infectious bursal disease virus, is able to induce pores into membranes as an intermediate step of the birnavirus-penetration pathway. Using osmotic protection experiments, we demonstrate here that pep46 and its pore-forming N-terminal moiety (pep22) form pores of different diameters, 5–8 and 2–4 nm, respectively, showing that both pep46 moieties participate to pore formation. The solution structures of pep46, pep22, and pep24 (the pep46 C-terminal moiety) in different hydrophobic environments and micelles determined by 1H NMR studies provide structural insights of the pep46 domain interaction. In CDCl3/CD3OH mixture and in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, the N-terminal domain of pep46 is structured in a long kinked helix, although the C terminus is structured in one or two helices depending upon the solvents used. We also show that the folding and the proline isomerization status of pep46 depend on the type of hydrophobic environment. NMR spectroscopy with labeled phospholipid micelles, differential scanning calorimetry, and plasmon waveguide resonance studies show the peptides lie parallel to the lipid-water interface, perturbing the fatty acid chain packing. All these data lead to a model in which the two domains of pep46 interact with the membrane to form pores. PMID:20385550

  16. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of

  17. Understanding the NMR properties and conformational behavior of indole vs. azaindole group in protoberberines: NICS and NCS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Shivaji S.; Toušek, Jaromír; Maier, Lukáš; Pipíška, Matej; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2012-11-01

    We report here the preparation and the structural investigation into a series of 8-(indol-1-yl)-7,8-dihydroprotoberberine derivatives derived from berberine, palmatine, and coptisine. Structures of these new compounds were characterized mainly by 2D NMR spectroscopy and the conformational behavior was investigated by using methods of density-functional theory (DFT). PBE0/6-311+G** calculated NMR chemical shifts for selected derivatives correlate excellently with the experimental NMR data and support the structural conclusions drawn from the NMR experiments. An interesting role of the nitrogen atom in position N7' of the indole moiety in 8-(7-azaindol-1-yl)-7,8-dihydroprotoberberines as compared to other 8-indolyl derivatives is investigated in detail. The experimentally observed trends in NMR chemical shifts are rationalized by DFT calculations and analysis based on the nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs).

  18. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  19. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Raman, Srivatsan; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Xiao, Rong; Ma, Li-Chung; Acton, Thomas B.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta.1 Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints, have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the RPF scores. Upon further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared to the X-ray structure MR performance were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures, demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of non-bivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results in NMR structures with improved MR performance PMID:18816799

  20. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  1. Multiple Quantum NMR Investigations of Structure- Property Relationships in Synthetic and Aged Silicone Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Gjersing, E; Chinn, S; Herberg, J; Eastwood, E; Bowen, D; Stephens, T

    2006-09-27

    Complex engineering elastomeric materials are often characterized by a complex network structure obtained by crosslinking network chains with multiple chain lengths. Further, these networks are commonly filled with thixotropic reinforcing agents such as SiO{sub 2} or carbon black. Degradation of such materials often occurs via mechanisms that alter the fundamental network structure. In order to understand the effects of modifications of network structure and filler-polymer interaction on component performance, a series of model compounds have been studied by {sup 1}H multiple quantum NMR analysis and traditional mechanical property assessments. The {sup 1}H NMR data provides insight into the distribution of segmental dynamics that reveals insight into the changes in mechanical properties.

  2. Synthesis and NMR Spectral Analysis of Amine Heterocycles: The Effect of Asymmetry on the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra of N,O-Acetals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Shahrokh; Ciaccio, James A.; Espinal, Jennifer; Aman, Courtney E.

    2007-01-01

    The stereochemical investigation is conducted to give students the combined experience of chemical synthesis of amines and N-heterocycles and structural stereochemical analysis using NMR spectroscopy. Students are introduced to the concept of topicity-stereochemical relationships between ligands within a molecule by synthesizing N,O-acetals.

  3. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P. )

    1988-09-01

    The pore structures of two types of catalyst support material were studied: {gamma}-alumina and silica aerogel. The alumina samples were commercial catalyst supports made in 1/8 inch diameter pellet form by Harshaw Chemical. Aerogels were prepared by forming a gel in a two-step, base-catalyzed process using TEOS, followed by supercritical drying to form the aerogel. Two different aerogels were made, one undergoing the drying process immediately after gel formation (non-aged), and the other being aged in the gel state for two weeks in a basic solution of 0.1 molar NH{sub 4}OH at 323 K before being supercritically dried (aged). The aging process is believed to alter the aerogel pore structure. The pore size distribution of the alumina material was determined via NMR and compared to results obtained by mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption/condensation techniques. The pore size distributions of the two aerogel samples were measured via NMR and nitrogen adsorption/condensation; the material was too compressible for porosimetry.

  4. Application of quantitative artificial neural network analysis to 2D NMR spectra of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Väänänen, Taito; Koskela, Harri; Hiltunen, Yrjö; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2002-01-01

    Understanding relationships between the structure and composition of molecular mixtures and their chemical properties is a main industrial aim. One central field of research is oil chemistry where the key question is how the molecular characteristics of composite hydrocarbon mixtures can be associated with the macroscopic properties of the oil products. Apparently these relationships are complex and often nonlinear and therefore call for advanced spectroscopic techniques. An informative and an increasingly used approach is two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. In the case of composite hydrocarbons the application of 2D NMR methodologies in a quantitative manner pose many technical difficulties, and, in any case, the resulting spectra contain many overlapping resonances that challenge the analytical work. Here, we present a general methodology, based on quantitative artificial neural network (ANN) analysis, to resolve overlapping information in 2D NMR spectra and to simultaneously assess the relative importance of multiple spectral variables on the sample properties. The results in a set of 2D NMR spectra of oil samples illustrate, first, that use of ANN analysis for quantitative purposes is feasible also in 2D and, second, that this methodology offers an intrinsic opportunity to assess the complex and nonlinear relationships between the molecular composition and sample properties. The presented ANN methodology is not limited to the analysis of NMR spectra but can also be applied in a manner similar to other (multidimensional) spectroscopic data. PMID:12444730

  5. Towards Automated Structure-Based NMR Resonance Assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    We propose a general framework for solving the structure-based NMR backbone resonance assignment problem. The core is a novel 0-1 integer programming model that can start from a complete or partial assignment, generate multiple assignments, and model not only the assignment of spins to residues, but also pairwise dependencies consisting of pairs of spins to pairs of residues. It is still a challenge for automated resonance assignment systems to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention. To test the feasibility of this for structure-based assignment, we integrated our system with our automated peak picking and sequence-based resonance assignment system to obtain an assignment for the protein TM1112 with 91% recall and 99% precision without manual intervention. Since using a known structure has the potential to allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data, we work towards the goal of automated structure-based assignment using only such labeled data. Our system reduced the assignment error of Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey-Kellogg's contact replacement (CR) method, which to our knowledge is the most error-tolerant method for this problem, by 5 folds on average. By using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for Ubiquitin, where the type prediction accuracy is 83%, we achieved 91% assignment accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy that was obtained without correcting for typing errors.

  6. Protein structure determination by combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary couplings

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Hopf, Thomas A.; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate protein structure determination by NMR is challenging for larger proteins, for which experimental data is often incomplete and ambiguous. Fortunately, the upsurge in evolutionary sequence information and advances in maximum entropy statistical methods now provide a rich complementary source of structural constraints. We have developed a hybrid approach (EC-NMR) combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary residue-residue couplings, and demonstrate accurate structure determination for several 6 to 41 kDa proteins. PMID:26121406

  7. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available. PMID:26431312

  8. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed. PMID:27573182

  9. Molecular structure from a single NMR sequence (fast-PANACEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2010-09-01

    The PANACEA experiment combines three standard NMR pulse sequences (INADEQUATE, HSQC and HMBC) into a single entity, and is designed for spectrometers with two or more receivers operating in parallel. For small molecules it offers a direct route to molecular structure. Often the INADEQUATE feature is the rate-determining step, being limited by the low natural abundance of directly coupled 13C sbnd 13C pairs. This new version, fast-PANACEA, speeds up this measurement by two alternative schemes. In the first, the individual 13C sites are excited by selective radiofrequency pulses acting on double-quantum coherence, and encoded according to the rows of a Hadamard matrix. The columns of this matrix are used to decode the experimental data into separate F 2 spectra. This reduction in the number of required scans secures a faster result than the conventional stepwise exploration of the evolution dimension where the Nyquist condition and the resolution requirements must both be satisfied. The second scheme makes use of multiple aliasing in the evolution dimension. Significant speed improvements are achieved by either technique, illustrated by measurements made on samples of menthol and cholesterol. A new stabilization scheme (i-lock) is introduced. This is a software program that corrects the final NMR frequencies based on the observed frequency of a strong X-spin signal. It replaces the conventional deuterium lock, permitting measurements on neat liquids such as peanut oil and silicone oil, and offering advantages where deuterated solvents are undesirable.

  10. Determination of Membrane Protein Structure by Rotational Resonance NMR: Bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creuzet, F.; McDermott, A.; Gebhard, R.; van der Hoef, K.; Spijker-Assink, M. B.; Herzfeld, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Levitt, M. H.; Griffin, R. G.

    1991-02-01

    Rotationally resonant magnetization exchange, a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique for measuring internuclear distances between like spins in solids, was used to determine the distance between the C-8 and C-18 carbons of retinal in two model compounds and in the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. Magnetization transfer between inequivalent spins with an isotropic shift separation, δ, is driven by magic angle spinning at a speed ω_r that matches the rotational resonance condition δ = nω_r, where n is a small integer. The distances measured in this way for both the 6-s-cis- and 6-s-trans-retinoic acid model compounds agreed well with crystallographically known distances. In bacteriorhodopsin the exchange trajectory between C-8 and C-18 was in good agreement with the internuclear distance for a 6-s-trans configuration [4.2 angstroms (overset{circ}{mathrm A})] and inconsistent with that for a 6-s-cis configuration (3.1 overset{circ}{mathrm A}). The results illustrate that rotational resonance can be used for structural studies in membrane proteins and in other situations where diffraction and solution NMR techniques yield limited information.

  11. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR), HOMO and LUMO analysis of 3-ethynylthiophene with DFT quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Mavis, Tugba; Eskici, Mustafa; Atac, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra of 3-ethynylthiophene (3-ETP, C6H4S) were carried out by using density functional theory DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 3500-400cm(-1) and 3500-50cm(-1), respectively. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers were obtained and the complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The (1)H, (13)C and HMQC ((1)H-(13)C correlation) NMR spectra in chloroform (CDCl3) were recorded and calculated. The UV spectrum of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400nm in ethanol solution. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT/B3LYP approach and the results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties such zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment of the studied compound were calculated. As a result, the calculated results were compared with the observed data and found to be in good agreement. PMID:23886506

  12. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR), HOMO and LUMO analysis of 3-ethynylthiophene with DFT quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Mavis, Tugba; Eskici, Mustafa; Atac, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra of 3-ethynylthiophene (3-ETP, C6H4S) were carried out by using density functional theory DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 3500-400 cm-1 and 3500-50 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers were obtained and the complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The 1H, 13C and HMQC (1H-13C correlation) NMR spectra in chloroform (CDCl3) were recorded and calculated. The UV spectrum of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400 nm in ethanol solution. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT/B3LYP approach and the results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties such zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment of the studied compound were calculated. As a result, the calculated results were compared with the observed data and found to be in good agreement.

  13. Structure and dynamics of homoleptic beryllocenes: a solid-state 9Be and 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Macdonald, Charles L B; Schurko, Robert W

    2004-11-19

    The correlation between anisotropic 9Be NMR (quadrupolar and chemical shielding) interactions and the structure and dynamics in [Cp2Be], [Cp2*Be], and [(C5Me4H)2Be] is examined by solid-state 9Be NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ab initio and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The 9Be quadrupole coupling constants in the three compounds correspond well to the relative degrees of spherical ground-state electronic symmetry of the environment about beryllium. Theoretical computations of NMR interaction tensors are in excellent agreement with experimental values and aid in understanding the origins of NMR interaction tensors and their correlation to molecular symmetry. Variable-temperature (VT) 9Be and 13C NMR experiments reveal a highly fluxional structure in the condensed phase of [Cp2Be]. In particular, the pathway by which the Cp rings of [Cp2Be] 'invert' coordination modes is examined in detail using hybrid density functional theory in order to inspect variations of the 9Be NMR interaction tensors. The activation energy for the 'inversion' process is found to be 36.9 kJ mol(-1) from chemical exchange analysis of 13C VT CP/MAS NMR spectra. The low-temperature (ca. -100 degrees C) X-ray crystal structures of all three compounds have been collected and refined, and are in agreement with previously reported structures. In addition, the structure of the same Cp2Be crystal was determined at 20 degrees C and displays features consistent with increased intramolecular motion, supporting observations by 9Be VT NMR spectroscopy. PMID:15484199

  14. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  15. {sup 19}F NMR spectra and structures of halogenated porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Hodge, J.A.; Grinstaff, M.W.

    1995-07-05

    Fluorine-19 NMR spectra of a series of halogenated porphyrins have been used to create a spectral library of different types of fluorine splitting patterns for tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrins (TFPP) complexed with diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions. The paramagnetic shift, line broadening, and fine structure of the resonances form the peripheral pentafluorophenyl rings are dependent on the symmetry and core environment of the porphyrin macrocycles. In combination with crystal structure data, {sup 19}F NMR helps define the behavior of halogenated porphyrins in solution. Six new crystal structures for TFPP and octahalo-TFPP derivatives are reported: H{sub 2}TFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.327(4) {Angstrom}, c = 15.261(2) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 103.87(2){degrees}, V = 2227.6(13) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; CuTFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.358(5), c = 14.678(2) {Angstrom}, {alpha} = 88.97(1), {beta}=76.05(1){degrees}, {gamma} = 71.29(1){degrees}, V = 2181.4(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; ZnTFPPCl{sub 8} in tetragonal space group P42, c, a = 19.502(20), c = 10.916(8) {Angstrom}, V = 4152(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; H{sub 2}TFPPBr{sub 8} in monoclinic space group C2, a = 27.634(6) {Angstrom}, b = 6.926(2) {Angstrom}, c = 14.844(3) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 109.64(2){degrees}, V = 2675.8(11) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2.

  16. MQ NMR and SPME analysis of nonlinearity in the degradation of a filled silicone elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Alviso, C T; Berman, E S; Harvey, C A; Maxwell, R S; Wilson, T S; Cohenour, R; Saalwachter, K; Chasse, W

    2008-10-10

    Radiation induced degradation of polymeric materials occurs via numerous, simultaneous, competing chemical reactions. Though degradation is typically found to be linear in adsorbed dose, some silicone materials exhibit non-linear dose dependence due to dose dependent dominant degradation pathways. We have characterized the effects of radiative and thermal degradation on a model filled-PDMS system, Sylgard 184 (commonly used as an electronic encapsulant and in biomedical applications), using traditional mechanical testing, NMR spectroscopy, and sample headspace analysis using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The mechanical data and {sup 1}H spin-echo NMR indicated that radiation exposure leads to predominantly crosslinking over the cumulative dose range studies (0 to 250 kGray) with a rate roughly linear with dose. {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum NMR detected a bimodal distribution in the network structure, as expected by the proposed structure of Sylgard 184. The MQ-NMR further indicated that the radiation induced structural changes were not linear in adsorbed dose and competing chain scission mechanisms contribute more largely to the overall degradation process in the range of 50 -100 kGray (though crosslinking still dominates). The SPME-GC/MS data were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which identified subtle changes in the distributions of degradation products (the cyclic siloxanes and other components of the material) as a function of age that provide insight into the dominant degradation pathways at low and high adsorbed dose.

  17. NMR analysis of sequence of toxin II from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wemmer, D.E.; Kumar, N.V.; Metrione, R.M.; Lazdunski, M.; Drobny, G.; Kallenbach, N.R.

    1986-11-04

    Toxin II from Radianthus paumotensis (Rp/sub II/) has been investigated by high-resolution NMR and chemical sequencing methods. Resonance assignments have been obtained for this protein by the sequential approach. NMR assignments could not be made consistent with the previously reported primary sequence for this protein, and chemical methods have been used to determine a sequence with which the NMR data are consistent. Analysis of the 2D NOE spectra shows that the protein secondary structure is comprised of two sequences of ..beta..-sheet, probably joined into a distorted continuous sheet, connected by turns and extended loops, without any regular ..cap alpha..-helical segments. The residues previously implicated in activity in this class of proteins, D8 and R13, occur in a loop region.

  18. Solution NMR Structure of Membrane-Integral Diacylglycerol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Kim, Hak-Jun; Ellis, Charles D.; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Karra, Murthy D.; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) represents a family of integral membrane enzymes that is unrelated to all other phosphotransferases. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the DAGK homotrimer using solution NMR. The third transmembrane helix from each subunit is domain-swapped with the first and second transmembrane segments from an adjacent subunit. Each of DAGK’s three active sites resembles a portico. The cornice of the portico appears to be the determinant of DAGK’s lipid substrate specificity and overhangs the site of phosphoryl transfer near the water-membrane interface. Mutations to cysteine that caused severe misfolding were located in or near the active site, indicating a high degree of overlap between sites responsible for folding and for catalysis. PMID:19556511

  19. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  20. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  1. Computational Analysis of Solvent Effects in NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2010-01-12

    Solvent modeling became a standard part of first principles computations of molecular properties. However, a universal solvent approach is particularly difficult for the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding and spin-spin coupling constants that in part result from collective delocalized properties of the solute and the environment. In this work, bulk and specific solvent effects are discussed on experimental and theoretical model systems comprising solvated alanine zwitterion and chloroform molecules. Density functional theory computations performed on larger clusters indicate that standard dielectric continuum solvent models may not be sufficiently accurate. In some cases, more reasonable NMR parameters were obtained by approximation of the solvent with partial atomic charges. Combined cluster/continuum models yielded the most reasonable values of the spectroscopic parameters, provided that they are dynamically averaged. The roles of solvent polarizability, solvent shell structure, and bulk permeability were investigated. NMR shielding values caused by the macroscopic solvent magnetizability exhibited the slowest convergence with respect to the cluster size. For practical computations, however, inclusion of the first solvation sphere provided satisfactory corrections of the vacuum values. The simulations of chloroform chemical shifts and CH J-coupling constants were found to be very sensitive to the molecular dynamics model used to generate the cluster geometries. The results show that computationally efficient solvent modeling is possible and can reveal fine details of molecular structure, solvation, and dynamics. PMID:26614339

  2. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  3. NMR Analysis of KChIP4a Reveals Structural Basis for Control of Surface Expression of Kv4 Channel Complexes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Jochen; Zolles, Gerd; Kandias, Nikolaos G.; Neubauer, Isabel; Kalbacher, Hubert; Covarrubias, Manuel; Fakler, Bernd; Bentrop, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    Potassium channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) are EF-hand calcium-binding proteins of the recoverin/neuronal calcium sensor 1 family that co-assemble with the pore-forming Kv4 α-subunits and thus control surface trafficking of the voltage-gated potassium channels mediating the neuronal IA and cardiac Ito currents. Different from the other KChIPs, KChIP4a largely reduces surface expression of the Kv4 channel complexes. Using solution NMR we show that the unique N terminus of KChIP4a forms a 6-turn α-helix that is connected to the highly conserved core of the KChIP protein via a solvent-exposed linker. As identified by chemical shift changes, N-terminal α-helix and core domain of KChIP4a interact with each other through the same hydrophobic surface pocket that is involved in intermolecular interaction between the N-terminal helix of Kv4α and KChIP in Kv4-KChIP complexes. Electrophysiological recordings and biochemical interaction assays of complexes formed by wild-type and mutant Kv4α and KChIP4a proteins suggest that competition of these two helical domains for the surface groove is responsible for the reduced trafficking of Kv4-KChIP4a complexes to the plasma membrane. Surface expression of Kv4 complexes may thus be controlled by an auto-inhibitory domain in the KChIP subunit. PMID:18458082

  4. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  5. NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-11-13

    The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

  6. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either. PMID:24177877

  7. Calcium binding of transglutaminases: a 43Ca NMR study combined with surface polarity analysis.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, A; Bányai, I; Weiss, M S; Hilgenfeld, R; Keresztessy, Z; Muszbek, L; Fésüs, L

    2001-08-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) form cross-links between glutamine and lysine side-chains of polypeptides in a Ca2+-dependent reaction. The structural basis of the Ca2+-effect is poorly defined. 43Ca NMR, surface polarity analysis combined with multiple sequence alignment and the construction of a new homology model of human tissue transglutaminase (tTGase) were used to obtain structural information about Ca2+ binding properties of factor XIII-A2, tTGase and TGase 3 (each of human origin). 43Ca NMR provided higher average dissociation constants titrating on a wide Ca2+-concentration scale than previous studies with equilibrium dialysis performed in shorter ranges. These results suggest the existence of low affinity Ca2+ binding sites on both FXIII-A and tTGase in addition to high affinity ones in accordance with our surface polarity analysis identifying high numbers of negatively charged clusters. Upon increasing the salt concentration or activating with thrombin, FXIII-A2 partially lost its original Ca2+ affinity; the NMR data suggested different mechanisms for the two activation processes. The NMR provided structural evidence of GTP-induced conformational changes on the tTGase molecule diminishing all of its Ca2+ binding sites. NMR data on the Ca2+ binding properties of the TGase 3 are presented here; it binds Ca2+ the most tightly, which is weakened after its proteolytic activation. The investigated TGases seem to have very symmetric Ca2+ binding sites and no EF-hand motifs. PMID:11565852

  8. [sup 31]P NMR study of immobilized artificial membrane surfaces. Structure and dynamics of immobilized phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Pidgeon, C. )

    1993-11-25

    Chromatography surfaces were prepared by immobilizing a single-chain ether phospholipid at approximately a monolayer density on silica particles. The chromatography particles are denoted as [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3], and they are stable to all solvents. The structure and dynamics of the interphase created by immobilizing phospholipids on silica particles were studied by [sup 31]P NMR methods. [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] spontaneously wets when suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents, and [sup 31]P NMR spectra were obtained in water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, and acetone. [sup 31]P NMR spectra were subjected to line-shape analysis. From line-shape analysis, the correlation times for rapid internal motion ([tau]-PLL) and wobbling ([tau]-PRP) of the phospholipid headgroup were calculated for each solvent. Immobilized phospholipid headgroups comprising the IAM interfacial region undergo rapid reorientation similar to the case of the phospholipids forming liposome membranes with [tau]-PLL approximately 1 ns. Phospholipids in liposome membranes exhibit slower wobbling motion ([tau]-PRP approximately 1 ms) in the plane of the membrane. However, the immobilized phospholipids on [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surfaces wobble with correlation times [tau]-PRP that depend on the solvent bathing the [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surface. 41 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  10. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-05-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  11. The NMR solution structure of recombinant RGD-hirudin

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xia; Mo, Wei; Liu, Xingang; Zhu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomin; Song, Houyan . E-mail: hysong@shmu.edu.cn; Dai, Linsen . E-mail: lsdai@fudan.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    The solution structure of a new recombinant RGD-hirudin, which has the activities of anti-thrombin and anti-platelet aggregation, was determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared with the conformations of recombinant wild-type hirudin and hirudin (variant 2, Lys47) of the hirudin thrombin complex. On the basis of total 1284 distance and dihedral angle constraints derived from a series of NMR spectra, 20 conformers were computed with ARIA/CNS programs. The structure of residues 3-30 and 37-48 form a molecular core with two antiparallel {beta}-sheets as the other two hirudins. However, significant differences were found in the surface electrostatic charge distributions among the three hirudins, especially in the RGD segment of recombinant RGD-hirudin. This difference may be greatly beneficial to its additional function of anti-platelet aggregation. The difference in extended C-terminal makes its both ionic and hydrophobic interactions with the fibrinogen recognition exosite of thrombin more effective.

  12. Multivariate analysis relating oil shale geochemical properties to NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Washburn, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry has been used to provide insight into shale composition by separating relaxation responses from the various hydrogen-bearing phases present in shales in a noninvasive way. Previous low-field NMR work using solid-echo methods provided qualitative information on organic constituents associated with raw and pyrolyzed oil shale samples, but uncertainty in the interpretation of longitudinal-transverse (T1–T2) relaxometry correlation results indicated further study was required. Qualitative confirmation of peaks attributed to kerogen in oil shale was achieved by comparing T1–T2 correlation measurements made on oil shale samples to measurements made on kerogen isolated from those shales. Quantitative relationships between T1–T2 correlation data and organic geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales were determined using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). Relaxometry results were also compared to infrared spectra, and the results not only provided further confidence in the organic matter peak interpretations but also confirmed attribution of T1–T2 peaks to clay hydroxyls. In addition, PLSR analysis was applied to correlate relaxometry data to trace element concentrations with good success. The results of this work show that NMR relaxometry measurements using the solid-echo approach produce T1–T2 peak distributions that correlate well with geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales.

  13. Advances in Protein NMR Impacting Drug Discovery Provided by the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational drug design relies on three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, especially proteins. Structural genomics high-throughput (HTP) structure determination platforms established by the NIH Protein Structure Initiative are uniquely suited to provide these structures. NMR plays a critical role since (i) many important protein targets do not form single crystals required for X-ray diffraction and (ii) NMR can provide valuable structural and dynamic information on proteins and their drug complexes that cannot be obtained with X-ray crystallography. In this article, recent advances of NMR driven by structural genomics projects are reviewed. These advances promise that future pharmaceutical discovery and design of drugs can increasingly rely on protocols for rapid and accurate NMR structure determination. PMID:20443167

  14. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  15. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Szulik, Marta W.; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state of the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed. PMID:25501592

  16. The asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on bovine fetuin. Structural analysis of N-glycanase-released oligosaccharides by 500-megahertz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Green, E D; Adelt, G; Baenziger, J U; Wilson, S; Van Halbeek, H

    1988-12-01

    The structures of the entire population of sialylated asparagine-linked oligosaccharides present on bovine fetuin were elucidated. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were released from fetuin with N-glycanase, radiolabeled by reduction with NaB[3H]4, and fractionated by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ion-suppression amine adsorption HPLC, and concanavalin A affinity chromatography. The 3H-labeled oligosaccharide fractions obtained were analyzed by 500-MHz 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, revealing the presence of 23 distinct oligosaccharide structures. These oligosaccharides differed in extent of sialylation (3% mono-, 35% di-, 54% tri-, and 8% tetrasialylated), number of peripheral branches (17% di- and 83% tribranched), linkage (alpha 2,3 versus alpha 2,6) and location of sialic acid moieties, and linkage (beta 1,4 versus beta 1,3) of galactose residues. This represents the first time that the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides of fetuin have been successfully fractionated and characterized as sialylated species. The sialylated oligosaccharides derived from fetuin were also used to further define the specificities of the lectins leukoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin and Ricinus communis agglutinin I. The behavior of these oligosaccharides during lectin affinity HPLC further establishes the structural features which predominate in the interaction of oligosaccharides with leukoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin and R. communis agglutinin I. PMID:2461366

  17. Macromolecular NMR spectroscopy for the non-spectroscopist: beyond macromolecular solution structure determination.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Michael; Kwan, Ann H; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Mackay, Joel P; Gooley, Paul R

    2011-03-01

    A strength of NMR spectroscopy is its ability to monitor, on an atomic level, molecular changes and interactions. In this review, which is intended for non-spectroscopist, we describe major uses of NMR in protein science beyond solution structure determination. After first touching on how NMR can be used to quickly determine whether a mutation induces structural perturbations in a protein, we describe the unparalleled ability of NMR to monitor binding interactions over a wide range of affinities, molecular masses and solution conditions. We discuss the use of NMR to measure the dynamics of proteins at the atomic level and over a wide range of timescales. Finally, we outline new and expanding areas such as macromolecular structure determination in multicomponent systems, as well as in the solid state and in vivo. PMID:21214861

  18. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations. PMID:25502373

  19. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  20. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed – neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  1. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  2. A new laboratory approach to shale analysis using NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    kerogen, thermally degraded kerogen, and char. Integrated peak areas from the LF-NMR results representative of kerogen and bitumen were found to be well correlated with S1 and S2 parameters from Rock-Eval programmed pyrolysis. This study demonstrates that LFNMR relaxometry can provide a wide range of information on shales and other reservoir rocks that goes well beyond porosity and pore-fluid analysis.

  3. Accurate Structure and Dynamics of the Metal-Site of Paramagnetic Metalloproteins from NMR Parameters Using Natural Bond Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal–ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal–ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for 15N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site. PMID:22329704

  4. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  5. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  6. NMR structure of a fungal virulence factor reveals structural homology with mammalian saposin B

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Moriah R.; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Goldman, William E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The fungal protein CBP (calcium binding protein) is a known virulence factor with an unknown virulence mechanism. The protein was identified based on its ability to bind calcium and its prevalence as Histoplasma capsulatum’s most abundant secreted protein. However, CBP has no sequence homology with other calcium binding proteins and contains no known calcium-binding motifs. Here, the NMR structure of CBP reveals a highly intertwined homodimer and represents the first atomic level NMR model of any fungal virulence factor. Each CBP monomer is comprised of four α-helices that adopt the saposin fold, characteristic of a protein family that binds to membranes and lipids. This structural homology suggests that CBP functions as a lipid-binding protein, potentially interacting with host glycolipids in the phagolysosome of host cells. PMID:19298372

  7. Structural dynamics and folding of beta-lactoglobulin probed by heteronuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazumasa; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yagi, Masanori; Goto, Yuji

    2009-06-01

    Bovine beta-lactoglobulin (beta LG) has been one of the most extensively studied proteins in the history of protein science mainly because its abundance in cow's milk makes it readily available to researchers. However, compared to other textbook proteins, progress in the study of beta LG has been slow because of obstacles such as a low reversibility from denaturation linked with thiol-disulfide exchange or monomer-dimer equilibrium preventing a detailed NMR analysis. Recently, the expression of various types of recombinant beta LGs combined with heteronuclear NMR analysis has significantly improved understanding of the physico-chemical properties of beta LG. In this review, we address several topics including pH-dependent structural dynamics, ligand binding, and the complex folding mechanism with non-native intermediates. These unique properties might be brought about by conformational frustration of the beta LG structure, partly attributed to the relatively large molecular size of beta LG. We expect studies with beta LG to continue to reveal various important findings, difficult to obtain with small globular proteins, leading to a more comprehensive understanding of the conformation, dynamics and folding of proteins. PMID:19362581

  8. Correction: Substituent interference on supramolecular assembly in urea gelators: synthesis, structure prediction and NMR.

    PubMed

    Piana, Francesca; Case, David H; Ramalhete, Susana M; Pileio, Giuseppe; Facciotti, Marco; Day, Graeme M; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Angulo, Jesús; Brown, Richard C D; Gale, Philip A

    2016-06-28

    Correction for 'Substituent interference on supramolecular assembly in urea gelators: synthesis, structure prediction and NMR' by Francesca Piana et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 4034-4043. PMID:27254024

  9. Perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy for structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckel, Sina; Hiller, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses future perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy to study structures and functions of integral membrane proteins at atomic resolution, based on a review of recent progress in this area. Several selected examples of structure determinations, as well as functional studies of integral membrane proteins are highlighted. We expect NMR spectroscopy to make future key scientific contributions to understanding membrane protein function, in particular for large membrane protein systems with known three-dimensional structure. Such situations can benefit from the fact that functional NMR studies have substantially less limitations by molecular size than a full de novo structure determination. Therefore, the general potential for NMR spectroscopy to solve biologic key questions associated with integral membrane proteins is very promising.

  10. NMR Spectra Transformed by Electron-Nuclear Coupling as Indicator of Structural Peculiarities of Magnetically Active Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Vladimir K

    2016-09-01

    The peculiarities of nuclear spin relaxation in the paramagnetic systems have been analyzed taking into account the exchange processes. The analysis is based on the modified Solomon-Bloembergen equations. In this line, the conditions of detecting of the NMR signals of samples are discussed depending on resonance frequency of the NMR spectrometer and characteristic relaxation time. On this basis, (1)H NMR spectra of cobalt semiquinolate complex have been analyzed. It has been shown that the satellite signals observed in the spectrum are caused by hyperfine coupling of the tert-butyl group protons with α and β states (localized on pz orbital of the aromatic carbon) of unpaired electron spin. The relaxation process of the resonance protons is controlled by paramagnetic dipole-dipole coupling. The contact hyperfine coupling does not contribute to the paramagnetic broadening. A mechanism involving paramagnetic molecular structures, which are responsible for intramolecular exchange processes in the cobalt semiquinolate complex, is given. PMID:27513208

  11. Analysis of the extracts of Isatis tinctoria by new analytical approaches of HPLC, MS and NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jue; Qu, Fan

    2011-01-01

    The methods of extraction, separation and analysis of alkaloids and indole glucosinolates (GLs) ofIsatis tinctoria were reviewed. Different analytical approaches such as High-pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Liquid Chromatography with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS), Electrospray Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were used to validate and identity of these constituents. These methods provide rapid separation, identification and quantitative measurements of alkaloids and GLs of Isatis tinctoria. By connection with different detectors to HPLC such as PDA, ELSD, ESI- and APCI-MS in positive and negative ion modes, complicated compounds could be detected with at least two independent detection modes. The molecular formula can be derived in a second step of ESI-TOF-MS data. But for some constituents, UV and MS cannot provide sufficient structure identification. After peak purification, NMR by semi-preparative HPLC can be used as a complementary method. PMID:22754056

  12. Structural heterogeneity in microcrystalline ubiquitin studied by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Shi, Chaowei; Giller, Karin; Wolff, Sebastian; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    By applying [1-13C]- and [2-13C]-glucose labeling schemes to the folded globular protein ubiquitin, a strong reduction of spectral crowding and increase in resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectra could be achieved. This allowed spectral resonance assignment in a straightforward manner and the collection of a wealth of long-range distance information. A high precision solid-state NMR structure of microcrystalline ubiquitin was calculated with a backbone rmsd of 1.57 to the X-ray structure and 1.32 Å to the solution NMR structure. Interestingly, we can resolve structural heterogeneity as the presence of three slightly different conformations. Structural heterogeneity is most significant for the loop region β1-β2 but also for β-strands β1, β2, β3, and β5 as well as for the loop connecting α1 and β3. This structural polymorphism observed in the solid-state NMR spectra coincides with regions that showed dynamics in solution NMR experiments on different timescales. PMID:25644665

  13. High-resolution NMR studies of structure and dynamics of human ERp27 indicate extensive interdomain flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nader T.; Wallis, A. Katrine; Wells, Stephen A.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.; Freedman, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    ERp27 (endoplasmic reticulum protein 27.7 kDa) is a homologue of PDI (protein disulfide-isomerase) localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERp27 is predicted to consist of two thioredoxin-fold domains homologous with the non-catalytic b and b′ domains of PDI. The structure in solution of the N-terminal b-like domain of ERp27 was solved using high-resolution NMR data. The structure confirms that it has the thioredoxin fold and that ERp27 is a member of the PDI family. 15N-NMR relaxation data were obtained and ModelFree analysis highlighted limited exchange contributions and slow internal motions, and indicated that the domain has an average order parameter S2 of 0.79. Comparison of the single-domain structure determined in the present study with the equivalent domain within full-length ERp27, determined independently by X-ray diffraction, indicated very close agreement. The domain interface inferred from NMR data in solution was much more extensive than that observed in the X-ray structure, suggesting that the domains flex independently and that crystallization selects one specific interdomain orientation. This led us to apply a new rapid method to simulate the flexibility of the full-length protein, establishing that the domains show considerable freedom to flex (tilt and twist) about the interdomain linker, consistent with the NMR data. PMID:23234573

  14. Solid-state NMR: An emerging technique in structural biology of self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Protein self-assemblies are ubiquitous biological systems involved in many cellular processes, ranging from bacterial and viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Studying the atomic three-dimensional structures of protein self-assemblies is a particularly demanding task, as these systems are usually insoluble, non-crystalline and of large size. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is an emerging method that can provide atomic-level structural data on intact macromolecular assemblies. We here present recent progress in magic-angle spinning ssNMR to study protein assemblies and give an overview on its combination with complementary techniques such as cryo-EM, mass-per-length measurements, SAXS and X-ray diffraction. Applications of ssNMR on its own and in hybrid approaches have revealed precious atomic details and first high-resolution structures of complex biological assemblies, including amyloid fibrils, bacterial filaments, phages or virus capsids. PMID:26234527

  15. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules. PMID:25759048

  16. 1H NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Glioblastoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Ferguson, Dean; Culf, Adrian; Morin, Pier; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma, characterized by unpredictable clinical behaviors that suggest distinct molecular subtypes. With the tumor metabolic phenotype being one of the hallmarks of cancer, we have set upon to investigate whether GBMs show differences in their metabolic profiles. 1H NMR analysis was performed on metabolite extracts from a selection of nine glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis was performed directly on spectral data and on relative concentrations of metabolites obtained from spectra using a multivariate regression method developed in this work. Both qualitative and quantitative sample clustering have shown that cell lines can be divided into four groups for which the most significantly different metabolites have been determined. Analysis shows that some of the major cancer metabolic markers (such as choline, lactate, and glutamine) have significantly dissimilar concentrations in different GBM groups. The obtained lists of metabolic markers for subgroups were correlated with gene expression data for the same cell lines. Metabolic analysis generally agrees with gene expression measurements, and in several cases, we have shown in detail how the metabolic results can be correlated with the analysis of gene expression. Combined gene expression and metabolomics analysis have shown differential expression of transporters of metabolic markers in these cells as well as some of the major metabolic pathways leading to accumulation of metabolites. Obtained lists of marker metabolites can be leveraged for subtype determination in glioblastomas. PMID:22528487

  17. Bacterial spore detection and analysis using hyperpolarized 129Xe chemical exchange saturation transfer (Hyper-CEST) NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yubin; Wang, Yanfei; Goulian, Mark; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported hyperpolarized 129Xe chemical exchange saturation transfer (Hyper-CEST) NMR techniques for the ultrasensitive (i.e., 1 picomolar) detection of xenon host molecules known as cryptophane. Here, we demonstrate a more general role for Hyper-CEST NMR as a spectroscopic method for probing nanoporous structures, without the requirement for cryptophane or engineered xenon-binding sites. Hyper-CEST 129Xe NMR spectroscopy was employed to detect Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores in solution, and interrogate the layers that comprise their structures. 129Xe-spore samples were selectively irradiated with radiofrequency pulses; the depolarized 129Xe returned to aqueous solution and depleted the 129Xe-water signal, providing measurable contrast. Removal of the outermost spore layers in B. anthracis and B. subtilis (the exosporium and coat, respectively) enhanced 129Xe exchange with the spore interior. Notably, the spores were invisible to hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR direct detection methods, highlighting the lack of high-affinity xenon-binding sites, and the potential for extending Hyper-CEST NMR structural analysis to other biological and synthetic nanoporous structures. PMID:25089181

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral IR, NMR UV-Vis investigations, NBO and NLO of 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide with use of X-ray diffractions studies along with DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Sibel; Sarioğlu, Ahmet Oral; Güler, Semih; Dege, Necmi; Sönmez, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    The title compound, 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide compound (C22H16NO3Cl) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, 1H and 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectra. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts were computed using hybrid-DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods and 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The calculated optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and 1H NMR chemical shift values are in strong agreement with experimentally measured values. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound, was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as calculated energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, dipole moments and frontier orbital energies and band gap energies were computed with TDDFT-B3LYP methodolgy and using 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non linear optical (NLO) properties were performed by using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level for the title compound.

  19. Extraction, Purification, and NMR Analysis of Terpenes from Brown Algae.

    PubMed

    Gaysinski, Marc; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Thomas, Olivier P; Culioli, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Algal terpenes constitute a wide and well-documented group of marine natural products with structures differing from their terrestrial plant biosynthetic analogues. Amongst macroalgae, brown seaweeds are considered as one of the richest source of biologically and ecologically relevant terpenoids. These metabolites, mostly encountered in algae of the class Phaeophyceae, are mainly diterpenes and meroditerpenes (metabolites of mixed biogenesis characterized by a toluquinol or a toluquinone nucleus linked to a diterpene moiety).In this chapter, we describe analytical processes commonly employed for the isolation and structural characterization of the main terpenoid constituents obtained from organic extracts of brown algae. The successive steps include (1) extraction of lipidic content from algal samples; (2) purification of terpenes by column chromatography and semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography; and (3) structure elucidation of the isolated terpenes by means of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). More precisely, we propose a representative methodology which allows the isolation and structural determination of the monocyclic meroditerpene methoxybifurcarenone (MBFC) from the Mediterranean brown alga Cystoseira amentacea var. stricta. This methodology has a large field of applications and can then be extended to terpenes isolated from other species of the family Sargassaceae. PMID:26108508

  20. Furosemide's one little hydrogen atom: NMR crystallography structure verification of powdered molecular organics.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Robson, Harry; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-05-10

    The potential of NMR crystallography to verify molecular crystal structures deposited in structural databases is evaluated, with two structures of the pharmaceutical furosemide serving as examples. While the structures differ in the placement of one H atom, using this approach, we verify one of the structures in the Cambridge Structural Database using quantitative tools, while establishing that the other structure does not meet the verification criteria. PMID:27115483

  1. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda; Dybas, Joseph M.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Summary A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences that do not share recognizable sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. This challenge can be addressed by hybrid algorithms that utilize easily obtainable experimental data and carry a limited amount of indirect structural information. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein super-secondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago, and new folds discovered since then are novel combinations of existing Smotifs. This observation suggests that it should be possible to build any structure, of either a known or yet to be discovered fold, from a combination of existing Smotifs derived from already known structures. In the absence of any sequence similarity signal, limited experimental data can be used to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known experimental structures. Here we present a modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on NMR chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins with unique folds, the algorithm delivered 90 homology model quality models, among them 24 high quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. Detailed analysis of the method’s performance suggests that further improvement can be achieved by improving sampling algorithms and developing more precise tools that predict dihedral angle preferences from chemical shift assignments. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available. PMID:23685209

  2. What function for human lithostathine?: structural investigations by three-dimensional structure modeling and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patard, L; Stoven, V; Gharib, B; Bontems, F; Lallemand, J Y; De Reggi, M

    1996-11-01

    Human lithostathine is a 144-residue protein, expressed in various organs and pathologies. Several biological functions have been proposed for this protein. Among others, inhibition of nucleation and growth of CaCO3 crystals in the pancreas and bacterial aggregation has retained attention, because lithostathine presents high sequence similarities with calcium-dependent (or C-type) lectins. To study its structure-function relationship and compare it with that of C-type lectins, we have built a model for lithostathine. This model is derived from the only two C-type lectins of known structures: rat mannose binding protein and human E-selectin. An original strategy, inspired by that proposed by Havel and Snow, was designed for model building. We have undertaken NMR studies on the natural protein. Although complete structure determination has not yet been achieved, the NMR studies did confirm the main characteristics of the model. From analysis of the proposed model, we concluded that lithostathine is not expected to present sugar- or calcium-binding properties. Therefore, the mechanisms of bacterial aggregation and inhibition of CaCO3 nucleation and growth have not yet been elucidated. PMID:8961348

  3. Protein structure determination by conformational space annealing using NMR geometric restraints.

    PubMed

    Joo, Keehyoung; Joung, InSuk; Lee, Jinhyuk; Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Weontae; Brooks, Bernard; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out numerical experiments to investigate the applicability of the global optimization method of conformational space annealing (CSA) to the enhanced NMR protein structure determination over existing PDB structures. The NMR protein structure determination is driven by the optimization of collective multiple restraints arising from experimental data and the basic stereochemical properties of a protein-like molecule. By rigorous and straightforward application of CSA to the identical NMR experimental data used to generate existing PDB structures, we redetermined 56 recent PDB protein structures starting from fully randomized structures. The quality of CSA-generated structures and existing PDB structures were assessed by multiobjective functions in terms of their consistencies with experimental data and the requirements of protein-like stereochemistry. In 54 out of 56 cases, CSA-generated structures were better than existing PDB structures in the Pareto-dominant manner, while in the remaining two cases, it was a tie with mixed results. As a whole, all structural features tested improved in a statistically meaningful manner. The most improved feature was the Ramachandran favored portion of backbone torsion angles with about 8.6% improvement from 88.9% to 97.5% (P-value <10(-17)). We show that by straightforward application of CSA to the efficient global optimization of an energy function, NMR structures will be of better quality than existing PDB structures. PMID:26454251

  4. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    PubMed

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods. PMID:18470882

  5. Effects of Phe-to-Trp mutation and fluorotryptophan incorporation on the solution structure of cardiac troponin C, and analysis of its suitability as a potential probe for in situ NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Mercier, Pascal; Letourneau, Paul-Jean; Sykes, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool for probing protein properties in situ. However, results obtained using this technique are relevant only if the 19F probe offers minimal perturbation to the surrounding environment. In this paper, we examine the effect of 5-fluorotryptophan (5fW) incorporation on the three-dimensional structure of cardiac troponin-C (cTnC), with the intention of developing a 19F-labeled TnC for use in in situ 19FNMR. We find that, in general, 5fW does not perturb the structure of the protein significantly. Replacement of residue Phe 153 with 5fW produces no noticeable change in protein conformation. However, replacement of residue Phe 104 with 5fW produces a folding behavior that is dependent on the Escherichia coli strain used to express the mutant. The orientations of the indole rings in these mutants are such that the Trp residue adopts a χ2 of ~90° in the F104W mutant and ~−100° in the F153W mutant. Using results from 19F-1H heteronuclear NOE experiment, we show the replacement of L-Trp with 5fW at these positions does not change the orientation of the indole ring and the spread of the 5fW side-chain dihedral angles increases moderately for the F104(5fW) mutant and not at all for the F153(5fW) mutant. Based on these structures, we conclude that the substitution of Phe by 5fW at these two positions has minimal effects on the structure of cTnC and that the 5fW indole rings in both mutants have well defined orientation, making the two mutants viable candidates for use in in situ 19F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:16131667

  6. Dynamic and structural aspects of PEGylated liposomes monitored by NMR.

    PubMed

    Leal, Cecília; Rögnvaldsson, Sibylla; Fossheim, Sigrid; Nilssen, Esben A; Topgaard, Daniel

    2008-09-15

    Proton-detected NMR diffusion and (31)P NMR chemical shifts/bandwidths measurements were used to investigate a series of liposomal formulations where size and PEGylation extent need to be controlled for ultrasound mediated drug release. The width of the (31)P line is sensitive to aggregate size and shape and self-diffusion (1)H NMR conveys information about diffusional motion, size, and PEGylation extent. Measurements were performed on the formulations at their original pH, osmolality, and lipid concentration. These contained variable amounts of PEGylated phospholipid (herein referred to as PEG-lipid) and cholesterol. At high levels of PEG-lipid (11.5 and 15 mol%) the self-diffusion (1)H NMR revealed the coexistence of two entities with distinct diffusion coefficients: micelles (1.3 to 3x10(-11) m(2)/s) and liposomes (approximately 5x10(-12) m(2)/s). The (31)P spectra showed a broad liposome signal and two distinct narrow lines that were unaffected by temperature. The narrow lines arise from mixed micelles comprising both PEG-lipids and phospholipids. The echo decay in the diffusion experiments could be described as a sum of exponentials revealing that the exchange of PEG-lipid between liposomes and micellar aggregates is slower than the experimental observation time. For low amounts of PEG-lipid (1 and 4.5 mol%) the (31)P spectra consisted of a broad signal typically obtained for liposomes and the diffusion data were best described by a single exponential decay attributed solely to liposomes. For intermediate amounts of PEG-lipid (8 mol%), micellization started to occur and the diffusion data could no longer be fitted to a single or bi-exponential decay. Instead, the data were best described by a log-normal distribution of diffusion coefficients. The most efficient PEG-lipid incorporation in liposomes (about 8 mol%) was achieved for lower molecular weight PEG (2000 Da vs 5000 Da) and when the PEG-lipid acyl chain length matched the acyl chain length of the

  7. GUARDD: user-friendly MATLAB software for rigorous analysis of CPMG RD NMR data.

    PubMed

    Kleckner, Ian R; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics are essential for life, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used extensively to characterize these phenomena since the 1950s. For the past 15 years, the Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion (CPMG RD) NMR experiment has afforded advanced NMR labs access to kinetic, thermodynamic, and structural details of protein and RNA dynamics in the crucial μs-ms time window. However, analysis of RD data is challenging because datasets are often large and require many non-linear fitting parameters, thereby confounding assessment of accuracy. Moreover, novice CPMG experimentalists face an additional barrier because current software options lack an intuitive user interface and extensive documentation. Hence, we present the open-source software package GUARDD (Graphical User-friendly Analysis of Relaxation Dispersion Data), which is designed to organize, automate, and enhance the analytical procedures which operate on CPMG RD data ( http://code.google.com/p/guardd/). This MATLAB-based program includes a graphical user interface, permits global fitting to multi-field, multi-temperature, multi-coherence data, and implements χ (2)-mapping procedures, via grid-search and Monte Carlo methods, to enhance and assess fitting accuracy. The presentation features allow users to seamlessly traverse the large amount of results, and the RD Simulator feature can help design future experiments as well as serve as a teaching tool for those unfamiliar with RD phenomena. Based on these innovative features, we expect that GUARDD will fill a well-defined gap in service of the RD NMR community. PMID:22160811

  8. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  9. Structure of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton Protein Bactofilin by NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Variation.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Maher M; Wang, Yong; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-06-01

    Bactofilins constitute a recently discovered class of bacterial proteins that form cytoskeletal filaments. They share a highly conserved domain (DUF583) of which the structure remains unknown, in part due to the large size and noncrystalline nature of the filaments. Here, we describe the atomic structure of a bactofilin domain from Caulobacter crescentus. To determine the structure, we developed an approach that combines a biophysical model for proteins with recently obtained solid-state NMR spectroscopy data and amino acid contacts predicted from a detailed analysis of the evolutionary history of bactofilins. Our structure reveals a triangular β-helical (solenoid) conformation with conserved residues forming the tightly packed core and polar residues lining the surface. The repetitive structure explains the presence of internal repeats as well as strongly conserved positions, and is reminiscent of other fibrillar proteins. Our work provides a structural basis for future studies of bactofilin biology and for designing molecules that target them, as well as a starting point for determining the organization of the entire bactofilin filament. Finally, our approach presents new avenues for determining structures that are difficult to obtain by traditional means. PMID:27276252

  10. DFT molecular modeling and NMR conformational analysis of a new longipinenetriolone diester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M.; Guerra-Ramírez, Diana; Román-Marín, Luisa U.; Hernández-Hernández, Juan D.; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2006-05-01

    The structure and conformational behavior of the new natural compound (4 R,5 S,7 S,8 R,9 S,10 R,11 R)-longipin-2-en-7,8,9-triol-1-one 7-angelate-9-isovalerate (1) isolated from Stevia eupatoria, were studied by molecular modeling and NMR spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo search followed by DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level provided the theoretical conformations of the sesquiterpene framework, which were in full agreement with results derived from the 1H- 1H coupling constant analysis.

  11. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  12. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  13. 2D NMR Barcoding and Differential Analysis of Complex Mixtures for Chemical Identification: The Actaea Triterpenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ−δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  14. 2D NMR barcoding and differential analysis of complex mixtures for chemical identification: the Actaea triterpenes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Burton, Ian; Karakach, Tobias; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2014-04-15

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ-δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  15. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Nohaile, M J

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five {alpha}-helices and a five-stranded {beta}-sheet in a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 5} topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  16. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  17. An Analysis of a Commercial Furniture Refinisher: A Comprehensive Introductory NMR Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.; Cramer, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment designed to introduce undergraduate organic chemistry students to measurement/interpretation of NMR parameters. Students investigate chemical shift analysis, spin-spin coupling, peak integrations, effect of deuterium oxide extraction, and comparisons with literature spectra;…

  18. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  19. Structure of the novel steroidal antibiotic squalamine determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wehrli, S L; Moore, K S; Roder, H; Durell, S; Zasloff, M

    1993-08-01

    Squalamine is a novel aminosterol recently isolated from the dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble steroid exhibits potent antibacterial activity against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. In addition, squalamine is fungicidal and induces osmotic lysis of protozoa. We report here the structural determination of squalamine, 3 beta-N-1-[N(3-[4-aminobutyl])-1,3 diaminopropane]-7 alpha,24 zeta-dihydroxy-5 alpha-cholestane 24-sulfate, which was deduced from the analysis of fast atom bombardment spectra and a series of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Squalamine is a cationic steroid characterized by a condensation of an anionic bile salt intermediate with the polyamine, spermidine. This molecule is a potential host-defense agent in the shark, and provides insight into a new class of vertebrate antimicrobial molecules. PMID:8212087

  20. Analysis of Radiation Induced Degradation in FPC-461 Fluoropolymers by Variable Temperature Multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Wilson, T S; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-27

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been used to investigate aging mechanisms in a vinyl chloride:chlorotrifluoroethylene copolymer, FPC-461, due to exposure to {gamma}-radiation. Solid state {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra revealed structural changes of the polymer upon irradiation under both air and nitrogen atmospheres. Considerable degradation is seen with {sup 1}H NMR in the vinyl chloride region of the polymer, particularly in the samples irradiated in air. {sup 19}F MAS NMR was used to investigate speciation in the chlorotrifluoroethylene blocks, though negligible changes were seen. {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR at elevated temperature revealed increased segmental mobility and decreased structural heterogeneity within the polymer, yielding significant resolution enhancement over room temperature solid state detection. The effects of multi-site exchange are manifest in both the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR spectra as a line broadening and change in peak position as a function of temperature.

  1. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  2. The secondary structure of echistatin from 1H-NMR, circular-dichroism and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saudek, V; Atkinson, R A; Lepage, P; Pelton, J T

    1991-12-01

    Detailed biophysical studies have been carried out on echistatin, a member of the disintegrin family of small, cysteine-rich, RGD-containing proteins, isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus. Analysis of circular-dichroism spectra indicates that, at 20 degrees C, echistatin contains no alpha-helix but contains mostly beta-turns and beta-sheet. Two isobestic points are observed as the temperature is raised, the conformational changes associated with that observed between 40 degrees C and 72 degrees C being irreversible. Raman spectra also indicate considerable beta-turn and beta-sheet (20%) structure and an absence of alpha-helical structure. Three of the four disulphide bridges are shown to be in an all-gauche conformation, while the fourth adopts a trans-gauche-gauche conformation. The 1H-NMR spectrum of echistatin has been almost fully assigned. A single conformation was observed at 27 degrees C with the four proline residues adopting only the trans conformation. A large number of backbone amide protons were found to exchange slowly, but no segments of the backbone were found to be in either alpha-helical or beta-sheet conformation. A number of turns could be characterised. An irregular beta-hairpin contains the RGD sequence in a mobile loop at its tip. Two of the four disulphide cross-links have been identified from the NMR spectra. The data presented in this paper will serve to define the structure of echistatin more closely in subsequent studies. PMID:1761037

  3. Crystallography & NMR system: A new software suite for macromolecular structure determination.

    PubMed

    Brünger, A T; Adams, P D; Clore, G M; DeLano, W L; Gros, P; Grosse-Kunstleve, R W; Jiang, J S; Kuszewski, J; Nilges, M; Pannu, N S; Read, R J; Rice, L M; Simonson, T; Warren, G L

    1998-09-01

    A new software suite, called Crystallography & NMR System (CNS), has been developed for macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In contrast to existing structure-determination programs, the architecture of CNS is highly flexible, allowing for extension to other structure-determination methods, such as electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. CNS has a hierarchical structure: a high-level hypertext markup language (HTML) user interface, task-oriented user input files, module files, a symbolic structure-determination language (CNS language), and low-level source code. Each layer is accessible to the user. The novice user may just use the HTML interface, while the more advanced user may use any of the other layers. The source code will be distributed, thus source-code modification is possible. The CNS language is sufficiently powerful and flexible that many new algorithms can be easily implemented in the CNS language without changes to the source code. The CNS language allows the user to perform operations on data structures, such as structure factors, electron-density maps, and atomic properties. The power of the CNS language has been demonstrated by the implementation of a comprehensive set of crystallographic procedures for phasing, density modification and refinement. User-friendly task-oriented input files are available for nearly all aspects of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography and solution NMR. PMID:9757107

  4. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid-state NMR and computational structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Masica, David L.; Ash, Jason T.; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P.; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR. Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this new method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized. PMID:21134646

  5. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  6. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  7. Drug screening strategy for human membrane proteins: from NMR protein backbone structure to in silica- and NMR-screened hits.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Chiu, Ellis J C; Pierce, Levi C; McCammon, J Andrew; Choe, Senyon

    2014-03-21

    About 8000 genes encode membrane proteins in the human genome. The information about their druggability will be very useful to facilitate drug discovery and development. The main problem, however, consists of limited structural and functional information about these proteins because they are difficult to produce biochemically and to study. In this paper we describe the strategy that combines Cell-free protein expression, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular DYnamics simulation (CNDY) techniques. Results of a pilot CNDY experiment provide us with a guiding light towards expedited identification of the hit compounds against a new uncharacterized membrane protein as a potentially druggable target. These hits can then be further characterized and optimized to develop the initial lead compound quicker. We illustrate such "omics" approach for drug discovery with the CNDY strategy applied to two example proteins: hypoxia-induced genes HIGD1A and HIGD1B. PMID:24525125

  8. Solid-state NMR strategies for the structural characterization of paramagnetic NO adducts of Frustrated Lewis Pairs (FLPs).

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Thomas; Sajid, Muhammad; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Eckert, Hellmut

    2014-01-01

    By N,N addition of NO to the norbonane annulated borane-phosphane Frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) 1 a five-membered heterocyclic persistent aminoxyl radical 2 and its diamagnetic hydroxylamine reduction product 3 are prepared, and the comprehensive multinuclear solid state NMR characterization ((1)H, (11)B, (19)F, (31)P) of these FLP adducts is reported. Signal quantification experiments using a standard addition method reveal that the (11)B and (31)P NMR signals observed in 2 actually arise from molecular impurities of 3 embedded in the paramagnetic crystal. In contrast analogous quantification experiments reveal that the (1)H and (19)F MAS-NMR spectra originate from spin-carrying molecules. Peak assignments are based on DFT-calculated Mulliken spin densities, which lead to the surprising result that the largest paramagnetic shift affecting a proton NMR resonance in 2 originates from intermolecular interactions. For the (19)F nuclei, experiments and calculations indicate that paramagnetic shift effects are very small. In this case, assignments are based on DFT chemical shift calculations carried out on diamagnetic 3 and (19)F((11)B) Rotational Echo Adiabatic Passage DOuble Resonance (REAPDOR) experiments. The set of experiments described here defines an efficient strategy for the structural analysis of paramagnetic FLP adducts. PMID:24815176

  9. Solid phase synthesis, NMR structure determination of α-KTx3.8, its in silico docking to Kv1.x potassium channels, and electrophysiological analysis provide insights into toxin-channel selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Bastian; Rothenberg, Ina; Ali, Syed Abid; Alam, Mehtab; Seebohm, Guiscard; Kalbacher, Hubert; Voelter, Wolfgang; Stoll, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    Animal venoms, such as those from scorpions, are a potent source for new pharmacological substances. In this study we have determined the structure of the α-KTx3.8 (named as Bs6) scorpion toxin by multidimensional (1)H homonuclear NMR spectroscopy and investigated its function by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electrophysiological measurements. Bs6 is a potent inhibitor of the Kv1.3 channel which plays an important role during the activation and proliferation of memory T-cells (TEM), which play an important role in autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it could be an interesting target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this study, Bs6 was synthesised by solid phase synthesis and its three-dimensional (3D) structure has been determined. To gain a deeper insight into the interaction of Bs6 with different potassium channels like hKv1.1 and hKv1.3, the protein-protein complex was modelled based on known toxin-channel structures and tested for stability in MD simulations using GROMACS. The toxin-channel interaction was further analysed by electrophysiological measurements of different potassium channels like hKv1.3 and hKv7.1. As potassium channel inhibitors could play an important role to overcome autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes mellitus, our data contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of action and will ultimately help to develop new potent inhibitors in future. PMID:25953725

  10. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.