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Sample records for nocardia

  1. Nocardia infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... eyes, and bones. Nocardia bacteria are found in soil around the world. You can get the disease ... bacteria. You can also get the diseaseor if soil containing nocardia bacteria gets into an open wound. ...

  2. Nocardia asteroides keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, L W; Harrison, G K; Merz, W G; Stark, W J

    1979-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides has been reported as the cause of keratitis in only 7 cases and of other ocular disease in another 12 cases. We report a case of N. asteroides keratitis that presented 3 weeks after rural trauma and progressed despite trials of appropriate antibiotics. Seven weeks after the origianl injury a successful conjunctival flap was placed over the cornea. The morphology and the sensitivity testing of N. asteroides to antibiotics appears necessary before reliable information can be obtained for clinical use. Moreover, our case did not show the relatively benign course of other reported cases of nocardia keratitis. Images PMID:380634

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Mycobacteria spp., they have the potential for use as reagents in the purification of Nocardia antigens. Images PMID:2405017

  4. Nocardia, nocardiosis and mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Boiron, P; Locci, R; Goodfellow, M; Gumaa, S A; Isik, K; Kim, B; McNeil, M M; Salinas-Carmona, M C; Shojaei, H

    1998-01-01

    The recent emergence of invasive infections due to Nocardia spp., including nosocomial outbreak, is now evident. Newer molecular diagnostic and typing methods are developed. Although sulfonamide-based therapy is generally effective, optimal treatment may be guided by antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates. The improved classification of nocardiae and other related genera such as actinomadurae, using the 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, provide a sound basis for improved diagnostic methods for the identification of members of clinically significant species. The commonest cause of eumycetoma in Sudan is Madurella mycetomatis, and Streptomyces somaliensis and Actinomadura madurae for actinomycetoma. The humoral immunity response in actinomycetoma patients and in experimental mice was measured and significant titre of anti-P24 antibody was demonstrated. PMID:9988489

  5. Disseminated Nocardia farcinica in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Boamah, H; Puranam, P; Sandre, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a gram-positive, partially acid-fast, methenamine silver-positive aerobic actinomycete that is infrequently associated with nocardiosis. The relative frequency of Nocardia farcinica isolates in nocardiosis is unknown but thought to be under diagnosis. It is increasingly been recognized in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated Nocardia farcinica causing brain abscess in 55 year old immunocompetent man who was successfully treated with long term antibiotics. The present report illustrates that early detection and treatment of disseminated Nocardia farcinica can lead to a good outcome. PMID:27617207

  6. Genetic Manipulation of Nocardia Species.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Dipesh; Kumar Jha, Amit; Pokhrel, Anaya; Shrestha, Anil; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are aerobic, Gram-positive, catalase positive, and non-motile actinomycetes. They are associated with human infections. However, some species produce important natural products, degrade toxic chemicals, and are involved in biotransformation of valuable products. The lack of robust genetic tools has hindered detailed studies and advanced research. This unit describes the major genetic engineering approaches using Nocardia sp. CS682 as a prototype. These methods will certainly help in understanding the basis of their pathogenicity as well as biosynthetic and biotransforming abilities. It can be expected that knowledge of the biochemistry behind their pathogenicity will be crucial in developing effective treatment strategies. These genetic tools can be utilized to develop rational metabolic engineering approaches for crafting host strains with higher production or biotransformation ability. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26855280

  7. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  8. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  9. Molecular identification and thermoresistance to boiling of Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica from bovine bulk tank milk

    PubMed Central

    Condas, L.A.Z.; Ribeiro, M.G.; Gonoi, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Yazawa, K.; Motta, R.G.; Franco, M.M.J.; Listoni, F.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Two strains of Nocardia spp. were isolated from bovine milk of two individual bulk tank. Molecular identification classified the strains as Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica. The thermorresistance to boiling of the isolates was carried out and was observed bacterial growth after boiling. Our findings indicate the potential risk of pathogen transmission to humans through contaminated milk with Nocardia spp. PMID:24031926

  10. Bioconversion of steroid glycosides by Nocardia restricta.

    PubMed

    Belic, I; Kastelic-Suhadolc, T; Kralj, B

    1985-09-01

    The bioconversion of steroid alkaloid tomatine by Nocardia restricta yields the conjugate with lactic acid. We studied the bioconversion of some steroid glycosides without a nitrogen atom in the molecule to determine the effect of the nitrogen atom. The glycosides were of three different types: sterol glycosides, bufadienolide rhamnoside and steroid saponine. The results of bioconversions showed that Nocardia restricta converts steroid glycosides differently according to the sugar bound to the steroid aglycone. It can be concluded that in the absence of a nitrogen atom in the steroid molecule no conjugation with lactic acid by Nocardia restricta occurs. PMID:4046605

  11. Brain abscess caused by Nocardia asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Uneda, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Kenta; Okubo, Shuichi; Hirashita, Koji; Yunoki, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nocardia infection of the central nervous system leading to brain abscess is a rare condition but has a high mortality rate. Among the species of Nocardia, only three cases of brain abscess due to Nocardia asiatica infection have been reported. Case Description: A 65-year-old man with a history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prednisolone presented to our hospital because of occipital headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral occipital lesions. The patient underwent craniotomy and resection of the left occipital lobe lesion. N. asiatica was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing of the resected specimen. Treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole led to a complete resolution of the brain lesion. Conclusion: Because of the different antimicrobial sensitivity patterns among Nocardia species, both appropriate subtyping and susceptibility testing of uncommon species such as N. asiatica are required for the successful treatment of nocardial infections. PMID:27563485

  12. Nocardia zapadnayensis sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir-Kocak, Fadime; Saygin, Hayrettin; Saricaoglu, Salih; Cetin, Demet; Pötter, Gabriele; Spröer, Cathrin; Guven, Kiymet; Isik, Kamil; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sahin, Nevzat

    2016-01-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and mycolic acid containing strain, FMN18(T), isolated from soil, was characterised using a polyphasic approach. The organism showed a combination of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic properties that were consistent with its classification in the genus Nocardia and it formed a phyletic line in the Nocardia 16S rRNA gene tree. The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid (type IV) and whole cell sugars were galactose, glucose, arabinose and ribose. The predominant menaquinone was MK-8(H4ω-cyclo). The major phospholipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. Major fatty acids are C16:0, 10-methyl C18:0 (TBSA), C18:1 cis9 and C16:1 trans9. These chemotaxonomic traits are in good agreement with those known for representatives of the genus Nocardia. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain FMN18(T) showed it to be closely related to Nocardia grenadensis GW5-5797(T) (99.2 %), Nocardia speluncae N2-11(T) (99.1 %), Nocardia jinanensis 04-5195(T) (99.0 %) and Nocardia rhamnosiphila 202GMO(T) (98.3 %). The phylogenetic analysis based on the gyrB gene sequence of strain FMN18(T) showed it to be closely related to N. rhamnosiphila 202GMO(T) (99.0 %), N. grenadensis DSM 45869(T) (96.6 %), N. jinanensis DSM 45048(T) (93.1 %), N. carnea IFM 0237(T) (89.7 %) and N. speluncae DSM 45078(T) (89.1 %). A combination of DNA-DNA hybridization results and phenotypic properties demonstrated that strain FMN18(T) was clearly distinguished from all closely related Nocardia species. It is proposed that the organism be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia zapadnayensis (type strain FMN18(T) = DSM 45872(T) = KCTC 29234(T)) is proposed. PMID:26547854

  13. The Spectrum of Nocardia Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mei-Zahav, Meir; Livnat, Galit; Bentur, Lea; Mussaffi, Huda; Prais, Dario; Stafler, Patrick; Bar-On, Ophir; Steuer, Guy; Blau, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    We reviewed all cases of Nocardia infection in cystic fibrosis patients at 2 centers. Eight of 200 patients had Nocardia in sputum. Four developed severe lung disease, including 3 with associated allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis; 4 remained clinically stable. Nocardia is often associated with significant lung disease in cystic fibrosis, possibly associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or steroids. PMID:25973994

  14. Nocardia species: host-parasite relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, B L; Beaman, L

    1994-01-01

    The nocardiae are bacteria belonging to the aerobic actinomycetes. They are an important part of the normal soil microflora worldwide. The type species, Nocardia asteroides, and N. brasiliensis, N. farcinica, N. otitidiscaviarum, N. nova, and N. transvalensis cause a variety of diseases in both normal and immunocompromised humans and animals. The mechanisms of pathogenesis are complex, not fully understood, and include the capacity to evade or neutralize the myriad microbicidal activities of the host. The relative virulence of N. asteroides correlates with the ability to inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion in phagocytes; to neutralize phagosomal acidification; to detoxify the microbicidal products of oxidative metabolism; to modify phagocyte function; to grow within phagocytic cells; and to attach to, penetrate, and grow within host cells. Both activated macrophages and immunologically specific T lymphocytes constitute the major mechanisms for host resistance to nocardial infection, whereas B lymphocytes and humoral immunity do not appear to be as important in protecting the host. Thus, the nocardiae are facultative intracellular pathogens that can persist within the host, probably in a cryptic form (L-form), for life. Silent invasion of brain cells by some Nocardia strains can induce neurodegeneration in experimental animals; however, the role of nocardiae in neurodegenerative diseases in humans needs to be investigated. Images PMID:8055469

  15. Bilateral Nocardia Keratitis after Photorefractive Keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Amir; Feizi, Sepehr; Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Yazdizadeh, Forouzan; Moein, Hamid-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical, confocal scan, and histopathologic features of nocardia keratitis in a patient who developed bilateral infection following photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Case Report A 23-year-old woman underwent bilateral PRK for low myopia. On postoperative day 3, dense central stromal infiltrates were noticed in both eyes. Empirical antibiotic therapy was initiated which was converted into specific therapy after a definite diagnosis was made based on clinical features and confirmed by confocal scan and histopathologic findings. Clinical and confocal scan features were consistent with the diagnosis of Nocardia keratitis, and topical 2% amikacin eye drops were started. Because of poor response to medical therapy, lamellar keratectomy was performed in both eyes which shortened the treatment course. Histopathologic examination reconfirmed the initial diagnosis. Conclusion Familiarity with clinical and confocal scan features facilitates early diagnosis of Nocardia keratitis leading to proper management and hence a rapid therapeutic response. PMID:23275825

  16. Nocardia farcinica bacteraemia presenting as a prostate abscess.

    PubMed

    Scorey, Hana; Daniel, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is characterised as a Gram positive filamentous rod and is found worldwide in soil, decaying vegetable matter and aquatic environments. Localised pulmonary infection is the most common clinical presentation. However, Nocardia can present in a wide variety of clinical manifestations, especially in the immunocompromised individual. We present the first case of a prostate abscess caused by Nocardia farcinica in a man with a history of severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. He had been on long term immunosuppression for this with prednisolone and etanercept. His Nocardia was likely contracted through direct skin inoculation while gardening with haematological dissemination to the prostate. He responded well to long term sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. PMID:27419070

  17. Nocardia brasiliensis: mycetoma induction and growth cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Conde, C; Melendro, E I; Fresán, M; Ortiz-Ortiz, L

    1982-01-01

    The capacity of Nocardia brasiliensis to induce mycetoma in BALB/c mice in the absence of adjuvants was studied. Whether the virulence of N. brasiliensis varied in the different phases of its growth cycle was also determined. The results showed that N. brasiliensis suspended in 0.15 M NaCl and injected into the footpads of mice were able to induce mycetoma after only 14 days of infection, as evidenced by histological studies. Data are also presented indicating that the virulence of N. brasiliensis did not vary during the different phases of its growth curve. The differences in virulence reported between N. brasiliensis and other nocardiae are discussed and explained in terms of several variables in the experimental designs used: among these variables are mouse genotype, route of inoculation, and model for determining virulence. Images PMID:7152671

  18. Nocardia Arthritis: 3 Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, Hélène; Lebeaux, David; Gras, Guillaume; Catherinot, Emilie; Rammaert, Blandine; Poiree, Sylvain; Lecuyer, Hervé; Zeller, Valérie; Bernard, Louis; Lortholary, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nocardia are Gram-positive filamentous bacteria responsible for infections ranging from opportunistic life-threatening disseminated diseases to chronic skin and soft-tissue infections. Even if virtually all organs can be infected, articular involvement is rare. Therefore, we report 3 recent cases and performed a literature review of cases of Nocardia arthritis in order to describe clinical features, therapeutic challenges, and outcome of these patients. Among 34 patients (31 in the literature plus our 3 cases), 21 (62%) were due to hematogenous dissemination, 9 (26%) were due to direct bacterial inoculation through the skin, and in 4 cases, the mechanism of infection was unknown. Four out of these 34 cases occurred on prosthetic joints. Whereas hematogenous infections mostly occurred in immunocompromised hosts (17 of 21, 81%), direct inoculation was mostly seen in immunocompetent patients. Eighty-two percent of patients (28 out of 34) received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-containing regimens and median antibiotic treatment duration was 24 weeks (range, 12–120) for hematogenous infections and 12 weeks (range, 6–24) for direct inoculations. Outcome was favorable in 27 cases despite unsystematic surgical management (17 cases) without sequelae in 70% of the cases. Nocardia arthritis is rare but its management is complex and should rely on a combined approach with rheumatologist, infectious diseases expert, and surgeon. PMID:26496274

  19. [Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves].

    PubMed

    Chain, Sergio; Luciardi, Hector; Feldman, Gabriela; Berman, Sofia; Estrella, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Nocardia endocarditis in native valve is an uncommon infection that usually arises in immunodepressed patients. We report a 51-year-old man diagnosed as having Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves, which received antimicrobial therapy and required aortic valve replacement. In 6 month follow up the patient remained asymptomatic with good clinical evolution. PMID:17628917

  20. First Spanish case of nocardiosis caused by Nocardia takedensis.

    PubMed

    Betrán, A; Rezusta, A; Lezcano, M A; Villuendas, M C; Revillo, M J; Boiron, P; Rodríguez-Nava, V

    2009-06-01

    Nocardia takedensis is a recently described species isolated from soil. The first clinical isolate in Japan has recently been reported. This report describes the first clinical isolate of N. takedensis in Spain from a respiratory specimen. PMID:19386840

  1. First Spanish Case of Nocardiosis Caused by Nocardia takedensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, A.; Rezusta, A.; Lezcano, M. A.; Villuendas, M. C.; Revillo, M. J.; Boiron, P.; Rodríguez-Nava, V.

    2009-01-01

    Nocardia takedensis is a recently described species isolated from soil. The first clinical isolate in Japan has recently been reported. This report describes the first clinical isolate of N. takedensis in Spain from a respiratory specimen. PMID:19386840

  2. A French multicentric study and review of pulmonary Nocardia spp. in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nava, Verónica; Durupt, Stéphane; Chyderiotis, Sandra; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Karsenty, Judith; de Montclos, Michèle; Reix, Philippe; Durieu, Isabelle; Nove-Josserand, Raphaele; Chiron, Raphael; Bremont, François; Têtu, Laurent; Murris, Marlène; Terru, Dominique; Godreuil, Sylvain; Bergeron, Emmanuelle; Freney, Jean; Boiron, Patrick; Vandenesch, François; Marchandin, Hélène; Segonds, Christine; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Some bacterial species recovered from the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are indisputably associated with lung infections, whereas the clinical relevance of others, such as Nocardia spp., remains unclear. Sixteen French CF cases of colonization/infection with Nocardia spp. were reviewed in order to evaluate the epidemiology, the clinical impact and the potential treatment of these bacteria, and results were compared to those of the literature. Five Nocardia species were identified, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica being the major species (50 % of cases). At first isolation, Nocardia was the sole pathogen recovered in six patients. Seven patients presented pulmonary exacerbation. For 12 patients, antimicrobial treatment against Nocardia was started immediately, mainly based on cotrimoxazole (6 of the 12 cases). In this study, we highlight the heterogeneity of the clinical management of Nocardia spp. in CF. Guidelines for the clinical management of Nocardia infections in CF patients are proposed. PMID:25344657

  3. Nocardia altamirensis sp. nov., isolated from Altamira cave, Cantabria, Spain.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Valme; Boiron, Patrick; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Laurent, Frédéric; Couble, Andrée; Laiz, Leonila; Klenk, Hans-Peter; González, Juan M; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Mouniée, Delphine; Bergeron, Emanuelle; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2008-09-01

    A novel actinomycete strain, OFN S17(T), was isolated from a sample collected from Altamira Cave, Cantabria, Spain. This strain was identified by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The 16S rRNA, hsp65 and sod gene sequences of the strain were determined and compared with those of representative Nocardia species. The results showed that strain OFN S17(T) should be assigned to the genus Nocardia. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain OFN S17(T) was most closely related to the type strain of Nocardia tenerifensis (98.6, 96.2 and 96% similarity, respectively, for the 16S rRNA, hsp65 and sod gene sequences). The DNA G+C content was 64.4 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analyses revealed 29% relative reassociation between the DNA of strain OFN S17(T) and N. tenerifensis DSM 44704(T). The phenotypic and genotypic data show that strain OFN S17(T) merits recognition as a representative of a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia altamirensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OFN S17(T) (=CIP 109606(T) =DSM 44997(T)). PMID:18768631

  4. Molecular Identification of Nocardia Isolates from Clinical Samples and an Overview of Human Nocardiosis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; Soriano, Morgana Fonseca; Ladeira, Elisa Martins; Souza, Mônica Cristina; Camello, Thereza Cristina Ferreira; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Hirata Junior, Raphael; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2013-01-01

    Background Nocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and/or either neglected or misidentified in laboratory specimens. Accurate identification of Nocardia species has become increasingly important for clinical and epidemiological investigations. In this study, seven clinical Nocardia isolates were identified by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and their antimicrobial susceptibility was also determined. Most Nocardia isolates were associated to pulmonary disease. Methodology/Principal Findings The majority of Brazilian human isolates in cases reported in literature were identified as Nocardia sp. Molecular characterization was used for species identification of Nocardia nova, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, Nocardia asiatica and Nocardia exalbida/gamkensis. Data indicated that molecular analysis provided a different Nocardia speciation than the initial biochemical identification for most Brazilian isolates. All Nocardia isolates showed susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the antimicrobial of choice in the treatment nocardiosis. N. nova isolated from different clinical specimens from one patient showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and two distinct clones. Conclusions/Significance Although Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of land mass and population, pulmonary, extrapulmonary and systemic forms of nocardiosis were reported in only 6 of the 26 Brazilian states from 1970 to 2013. A least 33.8% of these 46 cases of nocardiosis proved fatal. Interestingly, coinfection by two clones may

  5. Role of Nocardia in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Yousefi, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge process is a biological process that is widely used in the domestic and industrial wastewater treatment in over the world. The foam formation is often reported in wastewater treatment plants which are related to this process. Some operational problems can be created by foaming, such as effluent quality deteriorates, the creation of malodorous, increased time requirements in order to plant maintenance, and in extreme cases, hazardous working conditions resulting from foam spilling out of the aeration basin and as well as increased in operational costs. There are different ways to overcome this problem, such as reduce air flows into the aeration basin, reduction in the grease and oil content of the wastewater, surface and return activated sludge (RAS) chlorination, anoxic and anaerobic selectors, solid retention time (SRT) control and antifoams and organic polymer addition. On the other hand, rapid and accurate identification of the foam causes is in the first step to control bulking and foaming. Foam problem is often created by filamentous bacteria, such as Nocardia and Gordonia species. This bacterium has a role important in activated sludge. PMID:27418874

  6. Role of Nocardia in Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Yousefi, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Activated sludge process is a biological process that is widely used in the domestic and industrial wastewater treatment in over the world. The foam formation is often reported in wastewater treatment plants which are related to this process. Some operational problems can be created by foaming, such as effluent quality deteriorates, the creation of malodorous, increased time requirements in order to plant maintenance, and in extreme cases, hazardous working conditions resulting from foam spilling out of the aeration basin and as well as increased in operational costs. There are different ways to overcome this problem, such as reduce air flows into the aeration basin, reduction in the grease and oil content of the wastewater, surface and return activated sludge (RAS) chlorination, anoxic and anaerobic selectors, solid retention time (SRT) control and antifoams and organic polymer addition. On the other hand, rapid and accurate identification of the foam causes is in the first step to control bulking and foaming. Foam problem is often created by filamentous bacteria, such as Nocardia and Gordonia species. This bacterium has a role important in activated sludge. PMID:27418874

  7. Nocardia donostiensis sp. nov., isolated from human respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Ercibengoa, Maria; Bell, Melissa; Marimón, José Maria; Humrighouse, Benjamin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Pötter, Gabrielle; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Three human clinical isolates (X1654, X1655, and W9944) were recovered from the sputum and bronchial washings of two patients with pulmonary infections. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the isolates showed that they share 100 % sequence similarity with each other and belong to the genus Nocardia. Close phylogenetic neighbours are Nocardia brevicatena ATCC 15333(T) (98.6 %) and Nocardia paucivorans ATCC BAA-278T (98.4 %). The in silico DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolates ranges from 96.8 to 100 % suggesting that they belong to the same genomic species. The DNA-DNA relatedness between X1654 and N. brevicatena ATCC 15333(T) is 13.3 ± 2.3 % and N. paucivorans ATCC BAA-278T is 18.95 ± 1.1 % suggesting that they do not belong to the same genomic species. Believed to represent a novel species, these isolates were further characterised to establish their taxonomic standing within the genus. Chemotaxonomic data for isolate X1654 are consistent with those described for the genus Nocardia: this isolate produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, tuberculostearic acid (15.9 %), the major menaquinone was MK-8 (H4cyclic), mycolic acid chain lengths ranged from 38 to 58 carbons, produced meso-diaminopimelic acid with arabinose, glucose, and galactose as the whole cell sugars. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The DNA G+C content is 66.7 mol  %. Based on the combination of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic data for X1654, X1655, and W9944, we conclude that these isolates represent a novel species within the genus Nocardia for which we propose the name Nocardia donostiensis sp. nov. with X1654(T) (=DSM 46814(T) = CECT 8839(T)) as the type strain. PMID:26914251

  8. Pleurésie purulente à Nocardia asteroids

    PubMed Central

    Bopaka, Régis Gothard; Janah, Hind; El Khattabi, Wiam; Aichane, Abdelaziz; Afif, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    La pleurésie purulente à Nocardia asteroides est rare. Elle survient le plus souvent sur un terrain d'immunodépression. Nous rapportons une observation d'une pleurésie à Nocardia asteroides chez une patiente âgée de 60 ans, chez qui nous avons découvert un diabète. A travers ce travail les auteurs soulignent l'intérêt de la multiplication de prélèvements, de rechercher ce germe sur terrain d'immunodépression et en cas d'isolement, de rechercher la comorbidité. PMID:25574322

  9. First report of Nocardia fusca isolated in humans.

    PubMed

    Ercibengoa Arana, María; Marimón Ortiz de Zarate, José María

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia fusca was first described in 1983; however, to date, no report of human infection has been done. In this work, we report the first case of N. fusca isolation during an episode of acute exacerbation in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The extent of the role of N. fusca as human pathogen still has to be determined. PMID:26038381

  10. Autochthonous Nocardia cerradoensis Infection in Humans, Spain, 2011 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Ercibengoa, Maria; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia cerradoensis was first isolated in 2003 in the El Cerrado region of Brazil; since then, only 2 human infections, in France and Spain, have been reported. We describe 3 autochthonous cases in residents of Spain during 2011 and 2014. Together these cases support the idea of an emerging global pathogenic microorganism. PMID:26691545

  11. Autochthonous Nocardia cerradoensis Infection in Humans, Spain, 2011 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Ercibengoa, Maria; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Marimón, José Maria

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia cerradoensis was first isolated in 2003 in the El Cerrado region of Brazil; since then, only 2 human infections, in France and Spain, have been reported. We describe 3 autochthonous cases in residents of Spain during 2011 and 2014. Together these cases support the idea of an emerging global pathogenic microorganism. PMID:26691545

  12. Nocardia wallacei sp. nov. and Nocardia blacklockiae sp. nov., Human Pathogens and Members of the “Nocardia transvalensis Complex”▿

    PubMed Central

    Conville, Patricia S.; Brown, June M.; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Witebsky, Frank G.

    2008-01-01

    Nocardia isolates that share the property of in vitro amikacin resistance are grouped together by some authors in the Nocardia transvalensis complex. Our examination of 13 isolates that are amikacin resistant has revealed the existence of three distinct species. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, 65-kDa heat shock protein, and secA1 genes, coupled with DNA-DNA hybridization, indicated that “N. asteroides drug pattern IV,” “N. transvalensis new taxon 1,” and N. transvalensis sensu stricto should each be considered a distinct species. The phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the proposed new species Nocardia wallacei (N. asteroides drug pattern IV) and N. blacklockiae (N. transvalensis new taxon 1) are presented and compared with those of N. transvalensis sensu stricto. The relative genetic diversity of isolates best placed with the species N. blacklockiae is also discussed. Case studies demonstrating the pathogenicity of N. wallacei and N. blacklockiae are presented. The type strain of N. wallacei is ATCC 49873 (DSM 45136), and that of N. blacklockiae is ATCC 700035 (DSM 45135). PMID:18256227

  13. Nocardia pigrifrangens sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from a contaminated agar plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Zhang, Yamei; Huang, Ying; Maldonado, Luis A; Liu, Zhiheng; Goodfellow, Michael

    2004-09-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to establish the taxonomic position of an actinomycete strain isolated from a contaminated agar plate. The strain, designated 7031T, had morphological and chemotaxonomic properties typical of the genus Nocardia. An almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence determined for the strain was aligned with available sequences for nocardiae, and phylogenetic trees were inferred using three tree-generating algorithms. Strain 7031T clustered with the type strains of Nocardia carnea and Nocardia flavorosea, showing low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to these species (97.2 and 97.5 %, respectively). The strain was also distinguished from the closest species by a range of phenotypic properties. It is proposed that the strain be recognized as a novel species of Nocardia, Nocardia pigrifrangens sp. nov., the type strain of which is 7031T (= AS 4.1808T = JCM 11884T). PMID:15388728

  14. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M.; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis. PMID:27313917

  15. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis. PMID:27313917

  16. Clinical significance, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular identification of Nocardia species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Betrán, Ana; Villuendas, M Cruz; Rezusta, Antonio; Pereira, Javier; Revillo, M José; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen that causes respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology, clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species isolated from eight children with cystic fibrosis. The isolated species were identified as Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, Nocardia pneumoniae, Nocardia veterana and Nocardia wallacei. N. farcinica was isolated in three patients and all of them presented lung affectation with a chronic colonization and pneumonia. N. farcinica showed resistance against gentamicin, tobramycin, cefotaxime, but was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amikacin. N. transvalensis, which was isolated from two patients, showed an association with chronic colonization. N. transvalensis was resistant to tobramycin and amikacin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cefotaxime. N. veterana, N. pneumoniae and N. wallacei were isolated from three different patients and appeared in transitory lung colonization. N. veterana and N. pneumoniae were susceptible to imipenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, tobramycin, and cefotaxime. N. wallacei was resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and susceptible to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime. All the isolates were identified up to species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of Nocardia in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis is not always an indication of an active infection; therefore, the need for a treatment should be evaluated on an individual basis. The detection of multidrug-resistant species needs molecular identification and susceptibility testing, and should be performed for all Nocardia infections. PMID:27155949

  17. Nocardia nova mycetoma over forehead in a lepromatous leprosy patient.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, M; Kaistha, N; Bansal, N; Solanki, L S; Chander, J; Thami, G P; van de Sande, W W

    2012-07-01

    We present a case of a 31-year-old male, a known patient with lepromatous leprosy with a type 2 lepra reaction, who presented with a slowly growing asymptomatic swelling with multiple discharging sinuses over the forehead that developed over 6 months. Smears of the serosanguinous discharge on Gram staining showed Gram-positive branching filamentous bacilli, which on culture on blood agar showed chalky-white colonies. Histology of the lesion showed suppurative granulomas with polymorphs surrounding characteristic grains. The isolate was identified as Nocardia nova by gene sequencing and the patient was started on combined antibiotic therapy that resulted in complete resolution of the infection in six months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mycetoma related to Nocardia nova in association with leprosy. PMID:22863625

  18. Microbial Transformation of Ibuprofen by a Nocardia Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yijun; Rosazza, John P. N.

    1994-01-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group of ibuprofen [α-methyl-4-(2-methylpropyl) benzene acetic acid] is reduced to the corresponding alcohol and subsequently esterified to the acetate derivative by cultures of Nocardia species strain NRRL 5646. The alcohol and ester microbial transformation products were isolated, and their structures were determined by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. By derivatization of synthetic and microbiologically produced ibuprofen alcohols with S(+)-O-acetylmandelic acid, nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated that the carboxylic acid reductase of Nocardia sp. is R enantioselective, giving alcohol products with an enantiomeric excess of 61.2%. The R enantioselectivity of the carboxylic acid reductase enzyme system was confirmed by using cell extracts together with ATP and NADPH in the reduction of isomeric ibuprofens. PMID:16349237

  19. Nocardia veterana: disseminated infection with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Poisnel, Elodie; Roseau, Jean-Baptiste; Landais, Cécile; Rodriguez-Nava, Veronica; Bussy, Emmanuel; Gaillard, Tiphaine

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are a group of aerobic actinomycetes widely distributed in soil, and associated with severe opportunistic infections, essentially pulmonary infections. We report the first case of disseminated infection associated with urinary tract infection caused by Nocardia veterana. The diagnosis was difficult; despite the presence of pulmonary nodules, the lung biopsies remained negative while only one aerobic blood culture and the urine culture were positive for N. veterana, identified after a 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Few cases of clinical importance due to N. veterana have been published since its characterization. The bacteriological diagnosis of nocardiosis can be difficult to establish because of the delayed growth and the specific techniques that are required. This case illustrates the necessity of performing specific investigations in immunocompromised patients who present with infectious disease because the severity of this infection requires early diagnosis and quick initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:25636185

  20. Cell-mediated immunity in experimental Nocardia asteroides infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, T; Agarwal, S C

    1977-01-01

    Experimental mycetoma-like lesions developed in guinea pigs after subcutaneous injection of Nocardia asteroides. Although delayed hypersensitivity appeared earlier, increased macrophage migration inhibition and microbicidal activity appeared after 7 weeks. When the lesions healed, high cell-mediated immunity was present. Cell-mediated immunity was transferred to normal recipient guinea pigs from healed donor guinea pigs by spleen cell transfer. Recipient guinea pigs showed marked protection against challenge with N. asteroides. PMID:321348

  1. [Potential nosocomial disseminated infection due to Nocardia asteroides after a prosthesis insertion in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Mrozek, N; Hamizi, S; Gourdon, F; Laurichesse, H; Beytout, J; Lesens, O

    2008-12-01

    Nocardia infections are rare and usually occurred in immunocompromised patients with systemic dissemination from a lung infection. We report a case of an immunocompetent patient in whom Nocardia asteroides had cause psoas and cerebral abcess without pulmonary infection, a short period after a hip prosthesis insertion. The clinical history is highly suggestive of a hospital-acquired infection. PMID:18395304

  2. Nocardia thailandica Pulmonary Nocardiosis in a Post-Solid Organ Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Canterino, Joseph; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vientos, Wilson; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wallace, Richard J.; Campbell, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia thailandica is a rare pathogen related to Nocardia asteroides, Nocardia neocaledoniensis, and Nocardia caishijiensis that, since its original description in 2004, has only been reported to cause wound and ocular infections in humans. We report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia thailandica in a 66-year-old solid organ transplant patient from Connecticut, which was identified at the molecular taxonomic level by secA1 analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of N. thailandica in the United States and the first report of pulmonary infection by this pathogen in the literature. PMID:26292312

  3. Nocardia thailandica Pulmonary Nocardiosis in a Post-Solid Organ Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Canterino, Joseph; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vientos, Wilson; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wallace, Richard J; Campbell, Sheldon

    2015-11-01

    Nocardia thailandica is a rare pathogen related to Nocardia asteroides, Nocardia neocaledoniensis, and Nocardia caishijiensis that, since its original description in 2004, has only been reported to cause wound and ocular infections in humans. We report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia thailandica in a 66-year-old solid organ transplant patient from Connecticut, which was identified at the molecular taxonomic level by secA1 analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of N. thailandica in the United States and the first report of pulmonary infection by this pathogen in the literature. PMID:26292312

  4. Long-term treatment of persistent disseminated Nocardia cyriacigeorgica infection.

    PubMed

    Ozgenç, Onur; Avcı, Meltem; Arı, Alpay; Celebi, Ismail Yunus; Coşkuner, Seher Ayten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a disseminated persistent Nocardia cyriacigeorgica infection in an immunocompetent patient is described. The patient's long-term treatment, as well as its implications for managing similar cases in the future, is emphasized. Presenting with high fever, multiple nodules, and ulcerative cutaneous lesions of body sites, the patient was treated with various antimicrobials. Under combined therapy, empyema and arthritis, leading to disseminated nocardiosis, were seen. The overall treatment course was 28 months. It can be concluded that the choice of the antibiotics and optimal duration of treatment are uncertain; therefore the treatment of nocardiosis requires expertise. PMID:24833199

  5. Nocardia cerebral abscess: New concepts in diagnosis, management, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, E; Brophy, B P; Perrett, L V

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of multiple cerebral nocardial abscess are presented. All were cured by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery, a unique experience. Early detection, appropriate chemotherapy, absence of underlying immune malfunction, and surgically remediable disease are good prognostic indices in cerebral nocardiosis. If other adverse prognostic factors are absent, however, multiple abscess formation does not preclude the possibility of cure. Accurate localisation of nocardia cerebral abscesses by computerised axial tomography is a great help in management if multiple lesions are present. Images PMID:501368

  6. Genotyping of Nocardia farcinica with multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Du, P; Hou, X; Xie, Y; Xu, S; Li, L; Zhang, J; Wan, K; Lou, Y; Li, Z

    2016-05-01

    Nocardia are aerobic Gram-positive saprophytes that are widely distributed in nature, but some species cause nocardiosis, especially opportunistic infections that affect immunocompromised patients mostly. In this study, we developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme using seven housekeeping genes (gyrB, hsp65, secA1, rpoB, rpoA, recA, and trpB) for genotyping the most common clinical species, Nocardia farcinica (37 clinical isolates from the patients with nocardiosis and seven from animals in China and 15 reference strains). The results showed that using these loci could perform accurate identification among different species, and high discriminative power within the N. farcinica species. Of the 59 N. farcinica isolates, 44 sequence types have been identified; 32 STs covering 46 isolates could be assigned to six clonal complexes that encompassed most of the collected strains. The results showed that these strains displayed a sufficiently informative population structure using this method. Our study also provided a suitable approach for epidemiological studies of N. farcinica. A large clonal complex comprising 16 strains was identified, and was notable for its wide distribution and host adaptation. This complex should be monitored closely and merits further study. PMID:26972429

  7. Fatal nocardiosis in a dog caused by multiresistant Nocardia veterana.

    PubMed

    Uhde, Ann-Kathrin; Kilwinski, Jochen; Peters, Martin; Verspohl, Jutta; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Wohlsein, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Among pathogenic Nocardia species in humans and animals, infections caused by Nocardia (N.) veterana have rarely been described and so far, all non-human cases are linked to bovine mastitis in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify the causative microorganism involved in the death of a three-month-old dog suffering from dyspnea and neurological deficits ante mortem. Pathomorphological investigation revealed (pyo-)granulomatous lesions in various organs. Bacteriological examination was performed and the respective bacteria were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rDNA sequencing, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth microdilution. Gram-staining and colony morphology suggested the presence of an actinomycete which was identified as N. veterana by MALDI-TOF MS. This identification was confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Distemper-associated immunosuppression may have played a role in the pathogenesis of systemic nocardiosis in this dog. Retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility status showed that the N. veterana isolate was multiresistant and displayed high minimal inhibitory concentrations to all antimicrobial agents used for the dog's therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a systemic nocardiosis caused by N. veterana in a dog with a concurrent canine distemper virus infection. PMID:26790938

  8. A novel aryl acylamidase from Nocardia farcinica hydrolyses polyamide.

    PubMed

    Heumann, Sonja; Eberl, Anita; Fischer-Colbrie, Gudrun; Pobeheim, Herbert; Kaufmann, Franz; Ribitsch, Doris; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Guebitz, Georg M

    2009-03-01

    An alkali stable polyamidase was isolated from a new strain of Nocardia farcinica. The enzyme consists of four subunits with a total molecular weight of 190 kDa. The polyamidase cleaved amide and ester bonds of water insoluble model substrates like adipic acid bishexylamide and bis(benzoyloxyethyl)terephthalate and hydrolyzed different soluble amides to the corresponding acid. Treatment of polyamide 6 with this amidase led to an increased hydrophilicity based on rising height and tensiometry measurements and evidence of surface hydrolysis of polyamide 6 is shown. In addition to amidase activity, the enzyme showed activity on p-nitrophenylbutyrate. On hexanoamide the amidase exhibited a K(m) value of 5.5 mM compared to 0.07 mM for p-nitroacetanilide. The polyamidase belongs to the amidase signature family and is closely related to aryl acylamidases from different strains/species of Nocardia and to the 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic dimer hydrolase (EI) from Arthrobacter sp. KI72. PMID:18942140

  9. Nocardia asteroides peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis: First case in pediatrics, treated with protracted linezolid.

    PubMed

    El-Naggari, Mohamed; El Nour, Ibtisam; Al-Nabhani, Dana; Al Muharrmi, Zakaria; Gaafar, Heba; Abdelmogheth, Anas A W

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides is a rare pathogen in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. We report on a 13-year-old female with Nocardia asteroides peritonitis complicated by an intra-abdominal abscess. Linezolid was administered intravenously for 3 months and followed by oral therapy for an additional 5 months with close monitoring for adverse effects. The patient was discharged after 3 months of hospitalization on hemodialysis. The diagnosis and management of such cases can be problematic due to the slow growth and difficulty of identifying Nocardia species. The optimal duration of treatment for Nocardia peritonitis is not known. Linezolid can be used for prolonged periods in cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant cases with close monitoring for adverse effects. PMID:26768669

  10. The role of oral co-trimoxazole in treating Nocardia farcinica keratitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neharika; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Nocardia farcinica is one of the more recently identified species of the Nocardia genus. Nocardia farcinica keratitis is a rare occurrence, with only eight previously reported cases. Semi-permeable rigid contact lens use was associated with one of these reported cases. We report the first case of an extended wear soft contact lens-related Nocardia farcinica keratitis and recommend a new treatment regime. A 47-year-old lady presented with a right eye keratitis after wearing her extended wear soft contact lenses for five continuous weeks. There was no history of trauma or swimming with contact lenses in. Empirical ciprofloxacin and tobramycin eye drops were not tolerated due to ocular surface irritation on application, and instead, empirical treatment was with chloramphenicol and fortified gentamicin 1.5 % eye drops. Corneal scrapings grew Nocardia farcinica after 3 weeks-sensitive to amikacin and co-trimoxazole. Treatment was changed to amikacin 2.5 % eye drops, resulting in partial resolution of the corneal infiltrates. Oral co-trimoxazole 160 mg/800 mg BD was added, due to cultured drug sensitivity and its high ocular penetration, with good results and a final right eye best-corrected visual acuity of 6/5. Nocardia farcinica keratitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of contact lens-related keratitis. We report the first case occurring in association with extended wear soft contact lenses. Nocardia species can mimic fungal and acanthamoeba keratitis. Treatment with oral co-trimoxazole has not been previously reported. This case demonstrates the role of co-trimoxazole in treating Nocardia farcinica keratitis based on cultured drug sensitivities. PMID:27294730

  11. Nocardia Colonization: A Risk Factor for Lung Deterioration in Cystic Fibrosis Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Adi; Keller, Nathan; Vilozni, Daphna; Ramon-Saraf, Reut; Bar, Bat-El; Sarouk, Ifat; Ashkenazi, Moshe; Lavie, Moran; Efrati, Ori

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are predisposed to infection and colonization with different microbes. Some cause deterioration of lung functions, while others are colonizers without clear pathogenic effects. Our aim was to understand the effects of Nocardia species in sputum cultures on the course of lung disease in CF patients. Material/Methods A retrospective study analyzing the impact of positive Nocardia spp. in sputum of 19 CF patients over a period of 10 years, comparing them with similar status patients without Nocardia growth. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are used as indicators of lung disease severity and decline rate in functions per year is calculated. Results No significant difference in PFTs of CF patients with positive Nocardia in sputum was found in different sub-groups according to number of episodes of growth, background variables, or treatment plans. The yearly decline in PFTs was similar to that recognized in CF patients. The control group patients showed similar background data. However, a small difference was found in the rate of decline of their PFTs, which implies a possibly slower rate of progression of lung disease. Conclusions The prognosis of lung disease in CF patients colonized with Nocardia does not seem to differ based on the persistence of growth on cultures, different treatment plans or risk factors. Apparently, Nocardia does not cause a deterioration of lung functions with time. However, it may show a trend to faster decline in PFTs compared to similar status CF patients without isolation of this microorganism in their sputum. PMID:26125407

  12. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERN OF SEVEN CLINICAL ISOLATES OF Nocardia spp. IN BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Condas, Larissa Anuska Zeni; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Muro, Marisol Domingues; de Vargas, Agueda Palmira Castagna; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Yazawa, Katsukiyo; Siqueira, Amanda Keller; Salerno, Tatiana; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Risseti, Rafaela Mastrangelo; Ferreira, Karen Spadari; Gonoi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia is a ubiquitous microorganism related to pyogranulomatous infection, which is difficult to treat in humans and animals. The occurrence of the disease is on the rise in many countries due to an increase in immunosuppressive diseases and treatments. This report of cases from Brazil presents the genotypic characterization and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern using the disk-diffusion method and inhibitory minimal concentration with E-test® strips. In summary, this report focuses on infections in young adult men, of which three cases were cutaneous, two pulmonary, one neurological and one systemic. The pulmonary, neurological and systemic cases were attributed to immunosuppressive diseases or treatments. Sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA segments (1491 bp) identified four isolates of Nocardia farcinica, two isolates of Nocardia nova and one isolate of Nocardia asiatica. N. farcinica was involved in two cutaneous, one systemic and other pulmonary cases; N. nova was involved in one neurological and one pulmonary case; and Nocardia asiatica in one cutaneous case. The disk-diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility test showed that the most effective antimicrobials were amikacin (100%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (100%), cephalexin (100%) and ceftiofur (100%), while isolates had presented most resistance to gentamicin (43%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (43%) and ampicillin (29%). However, on the inhibitory minimal concentration test (MIC test), only one of the four isolates of Nocardia farcinica was resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. PMID:26200967

  13. [GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN SURFACTANTS PRODUCER NOCARDIA VACCINII IMV B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Shevchuk, T A; Beregova, K A

    2015-01-01

    Key enzymes of glucose metabolism were detected in the cells of surfactants producer Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 grown on this substrate. It has been established that glucose catabolism is performed through gluconate (FAD(+)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase activity 698 ± 35 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) of protein). Oxidation of gluconate to 6-phosphogluconate is catalised by gluconokinase (178 ± 9 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) of protein). 6-Phosphogluconate was involved into pentose phosphate cycle by constitutive NADP(+)-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (activity 357 ± 17 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) of protein). The data obtained serve as the basis for theoretical calculations of optimal molar ratio of concentrations of energetically nonequivalent substrates for intensifying the surfactants synthesis on their mixture. PMID:26638479

  14. Disseminated Nocardia paucivorans infection in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, M; Kraft, C; Pulst-Korenberg, J; Chenoweth, C; Gregg, K S

    2014-10-01

    Nocardia paucivorans is a recently discovered species that has been shown to have a predilection for CNS involvement in cases of disseminated infection. We present a 50-year-old man with one year of weight loss admitted to the hospital with cough and confusion. Imaging revealed pulmonary and iliopsoas masses as well as innumerable ring-enhancing brain lesions. N. paucivorans was eventually identified in a subcarinal lymph node biopsy. The diagnosis was expedited by utilizing 16s rRNA gene sequencing on the biopsy tissue, resulting in species-level identification several weeks prior to culture positivity. He was treated with 12 months of parenteral and oral antibiotics, with resolution of pulmonary and brain lesions on repeat imaging. PMID:24634088

  15. Pulmonary Nocardiosis Caused by Nocardia concava with a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Tatsuro; Takazono, Takahiro; Horai, Yoshiro; Tashiro, Masato; Saijo, Tomomi; Kosai, Kosuke; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kurihara, Shintaro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Tsukamoto, Misuzu; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kawakami, Atsushi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with anorexia and leg pain. He was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis through a renal biopsy. Immunosuppression with two courses of steroid pulse therapies and intravenous cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone at 40 mg/day were administered. About one month after starting the immunosuppression therapy, he complained of hemosputum. Chest computed tomography showed a cavitary lesion in the lung. Cultures from his sputum showed Nocardia species, and we were able to identify the species as N. concava using a 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Only three detailed reports of N. concava infection have so far been published worldwide. PMID:27150883

  16. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  17. Nocardia vulneris sp. nov., isolated from wounds of human patients in North America.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Brent A; Bell, Melissa; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Schumann, Cathrin; Schumann, Peter; Brown, June M

    2014-09-01

    Nocardia species are ubiquitous in the environment with an increasing number of species isolated from clinical sources. From 2005 to 2009, eight isolates (W9042, W9247, W9290, W9319, W9846, W9851T, W9865, and W9908) were obtained from eight patients from three states in the United States and Canada; all were from males ranging in age from 47 to 81 years old; and all were obtained from finger (n = 5) or leg (n = 3) wounds. Isolates were characterized by polyphasic analysis using molecular, phenotypic, morphologic and chemotaxonomic methods. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the eight isolates are 100 % identical to each other and belong in the genus Nocardia. The nearest phylogenetically related neighbours were found to be the type strains for Nocardia altamirensis (99.33 % sequence similarity), Nocardia brasiliensis (99.37 %), Nocardia iowensis (98.95 %) and Nocardia tenerifensis (98.44 %). The G+C content of isolate W9851T was determined to be 68.4 mol %. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain W9851T and the N. brasiliensis type strain was 72.8 % and 65.8 % when measured in the laboratory and in silico from genome sequences, respectively, and 95.6 % ANI. Whole-cell peptidoglycan was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid; MK-8-(H4)ω-cyc was identified as the major menaquinone; the major fatty acids were identified as C16:0, 10 Me C18:0, and C18:1 w9c, the predominant phospholipids were found to include diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides; whole-cell sugars detected were arabinose and galactose; and mycolic acids ranging from 38 to 60 carbon atoms were found to be present. These chemotaxonomic analyses are consistent with assignment of the isolates to the genus Nocardia. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra of the clinical isolates showed genus and species level profiles that were different from other Nocardia species. All

  18. Permanent Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia sp. BMG111209, an Actinobacterium Isolated from Nodules of Casuarina glauca.

    PubMed

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Gueddou, Abdellatif; Hezbri, Karima; Ktari, Amir; Louati, Moussa; Nouioui, Imen; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Pagani, Ioanna; Sen, Arnab; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Gtari, Maher; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia sp. strain BMG111209 is a non-Frankia actinobacterium isolated from root nodules of Casuarina glauca in Tunisia. Here, we report the 9.1-Mbp draft genome sequence of Nocardia sp. strain BMG111209 with a G + C content of 69.19% and 8,122 candidate protein-encoding genes. PMID:27491997

  19. Permanent Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia sp. BMG111209, an Actinobacterium Isolated from Nodules of Casuarina glauca

    PubMed Central

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Gueddou, Abdellatif; Hezbri, Karima; Ktari, Amir; Louati, Moussa; Nouioui, Imen; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Pagani, Ioanna; Sen, Arnab; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia sp. strain BMG111209 is a non-Frankia actinobacterium isolated from root nodules of Casuarina glauca in Tunisia. Here, we report the 9.1-Mbp draft genome sequence of Nocardia sp. strain BMG111209 with a G + C content of 69.19% and 8,122 candidate protein-encoding genes. PMID:27491997

  20. Clinical and Laboratory Features of the Nocardia spp. Based on Current Molecular Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Brown, June M.; Conville, Patricia S.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent explosion of newly described species of Nocardia results from the impact in the last decade of newer molecular technology, including PCR restriction enzyme analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing. These molecular techniques have revolutionized the identification of the nocardiae by providing rapid and accurate identification of recognized nocardiae and, at the same time, revealing new species and a number of yet-to-be-described species. There are currently more than 30 species of nocardiae of human clinical significance, with the majority of isolates being N. nova complex, N. abscessus, N. transvalensis complex, N. farcinica, N. asteroides type VI (N. cyriacigeorgica), and N. brasiliensis. These species cause a wide variety of diseases and have variable drug susceptibilities. Accurate identification often requires referral to a reference laboratory with molecular capabilities, as many newer species are genetically distinct from established species yet have few or no distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. Correct identification is important in deciding the clinical relevance of a species and in the clinical management and treatment of patients with nocardial disease. This review characterizes the currently known pathogenic species of Nocardia, including clinical disease, drug susceptibility, and methods of identification. PMID:16614249

  1. Hetero-oligomeric cell wall channels (porins) of Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Kläckta, Christian; Knörzer, Philipp; Riess, Franziska; Benz, Roland

    2011-06-01

    The cell wall of Nocardia farcinica contains a cation-selective cell wall channel, which may be responsible for the limited permeability of the cell wall of N. farcinica for negatively charged antibiotics. Based on partial sequencing of the protein responsible for channel formation derived from N. farcinica ATTC 3318 we were able to identify the corresponding genes (nfa15890 and nfa15900) within the known genome of N. farcinica IFM 10152. The corresponding genes of N. farcinica ATTC 3318 were separately expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21DE3Omp8 strain and the N-terminal His10-tagged proteins were purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The pure proteins were designated NfpANHis and NfpBNHis, for N. farcinica porin A and N. farcinica porin B. The two proteins were checked separately for channel formation in lipid bilayers. Our results clearly indicate that the proteins NfpANHis and NfpBNHis expressed in E. coli could only together form a channel in lipid bilayer membranes. This means that the cell wall channel of N. farcinica is formed by a heterooligomer. NfpA and NfpB form together a channel that may structurally be related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis based on amino acid comparison and renaturation procedure. PMID:21092733

  2. Nocardia and Lungs in COPD: Beyond Immuno-deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Maggiorelli, Claudia; Di Pierro, Irene; Manta, Carmen; Maccari, Uberto; Galanti, Irene; Scala, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen and Pulmonary Nocardiosis (PN) occurred in more than half of the cases in subjects with immuno-suppressed status. COPD is one of the most common comorbidity observed in immuno-competent patients with PN. In this perspective study, we report the clinical patterns, the outcomes and the comorbidities of all cases of PN admitted in our Unit in the years 1999-2012. Among 6545 patients admitted in our Unit during the study time, we identified PN in 4 patients. COPD was coexistent in 3 out of 4 cases. A delayed time for the diagnosis was observed. Clinical-radiological improvement was detected in all cases after one month of specific anti-PN therapy. According to our experience, PN is a rare disease that should be suspected also in immuno-competent patients. COPD is confirmed to be a risk factor for the development of PN, probably due to reduced respiratory defenses and prolonged steroid therapy. PMID:25093624

  3. Oxidation of Alkyl-substituted Cyclic Hydrocarbons by a Nocardia during Growth on n-Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. B.; Raymond, R. L.

    1961-01-01

    Nocardia 107-332, a soil isolate, oxidizes short-chain alkyl-substituted cyclic hydrocarbons to cyclic acids while growing on n-alkanes. Cyclic acids are produced also from relatively long-chain alkyl-substituted cyclics such as n-nonylbenzene or n-dodecylbenzene which alone support growth in a mineral-salts medium. ω-Oxidation of the alkyl substituents is followed by β-oxidation. It is of particular interest that cyclic acids such as cyclohexaneacetic and phenylacetic with C2 residual carboxylic acid substituents are resistant to further oxidation by the nocardia but cyclic acids with C1 or C3 substituents are readily oxidized and utilized for growth. The specificity of microbial oxidations is demonstrated by the conversion of p-isopropyltoluene (p-cymene) to p-isopropylbenzoic acid in n-alkane, growth-supported nocardia cultures. PMID:13720182

  4. Isolation of both Pseudozyma aphidis and Nocardia otitidiscaviarum from a mycetoma on the leg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Zhu, Lin-yu; Xuan, Xuan; Wu, Ling-jian; Zhou, Tie-li; Zhang, Xue-qi; Li, Bing-xu

    2011-06-01

    We describe a case of mycetoma which typified the classic presentation of the disease: a male farmer with affection of the lower limbs and a history of trauma. The patient presented with a swollen right lower limb showing multiple discharging sinuses for 25 years. Histopathologically, grains were found by HE stain, and clustered yeast-like cells were observed by PAS stain. The distinctive 'dot-in-circle' sign was found through MRI. Besides Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Pseudozyma aphidis was isolated from deep tissue culture, and the identification of the etiologic species was ascertained by DNA sequencing. Generally speaking, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum is an infrequent cause of mycetoma, and Pseudozyma species are usually isolated from plant material rather than clinical specimens. This is the first case of mycetoma from which both Nocardia otitidiscaviarum and Pseudozyma aphidis were isolated. PMID:21595667

  5. Postoperative Nocardia Endophthalmitis and the Challenge of Managing with Intravitreal Amikacin

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, G. Ashok Kumar; Sunder, C. Aruna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is a rare cause of delayed onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery and it usually carries a guarded visual prognosis. Purpose. To highlight the clinical presentation, microbiological profile, and treatment outcome in a case of nocardial endophthalmitis after manual small incision cataract surgery. Methods. This case report highlights the typical features of Nocardia endophthalmitis, which presented six weeks after undergoing small incision cataract surgery. The case was managed by pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotics. Intravitreal amikacin was used based on microbiologic work-up. Results. The endophthalmitis part was controlled but the case developed amikacin induced macular infarction which jeopardized a good visual outcome. Conclusion. Nocardia endophthalmitis manifests late after cataract surgery in an aggressive manner and carries a poor visual prognosis. An early diagnosis and the use of correct antibiotic regimen may salvage the vision. But the present case shows that one should always be wary of potential retinal toxicity with intravitreal amikacin. PMID:27034869

  6. Postoperative Nocardia Endophthalmitis and the Challenge of Managing with Intravitreal Amikacin.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, Sikander A K; Reddy, G Ashok Kumar; Sunder, C Aruna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is a rare cause of delayed onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery and it usually carries a guarded visual prognosis. Purpose. To highlight the clinical presentation, microbiological profile, and treatment outcome in a case of nocardial endophthalmitis after manual small incision cataract surgery. Methods. This case report highlights the typical features of Nocardia endophthalmitis, which presented six weeks after undergoing small incision cataract surgery. The case was managed by pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotics. Intravitreal amikacin was used based on microbiologic work-up. Results. The endophthalmitis part was controlled but the case developed amikacin induced macular infarction which jeopardized a good visual outcome. Conclusion. Nocardia endophthalmitis manifests late after cataract surgery in an aggressive manner and carries a poor visual prognosis. An early diagnosis and the use of correct antibiotic regimen may salvage the vision. But the present case shows that one should always be wary of potential retinal toxicity with intravitreal amikacin. PMID:27034869

  7. Susceptibility of rapidly growing mycobacteria and Nocardia isolates from cats and dogs to pradofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Govendir, M; Norris, J M; Hansen, T; Wigney, D I; Muscatello, G; Trott, D J; Malik, R

    2011-12-15

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and Nocardiae can cause severe or refractory infections in cats and dogs. Prolonged antibacterial therapy is required to cure these infections. As fluoroquinolones have been used in combination therapy for treating RGM infections, isolates from the Mycobacterium smegmatis cluster (n=64), Mycobacterium fortuitum cluster (n=17), and M. mageritense cluster (n=2), collected from feline and canine patients, underwent susceptibility testing to pradofloxacin. The MIC(50), MIC(90) and tentative epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) values as determined by microbroth dilution susceptibility testing that inhibited growth of the M. smegmatis and M. fortuitum clusters were 0.063, 0.125 and ≤ 0.25; and 0.125, 0.250 and ≤ 1.0 μg/mL, respectively. E-Test results showed similar trends but MICs were lower than those for microbroth dilution. In summary, pradofloxacin demonstrated effective in vitro activity against RGM isolates. Additionally, veterinary isolates of Nocardia nova (n=18), Nocardia farcinica (n=3) and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n=1) underwent microbroth dilution testing to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and pradofloxacin. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) of pradofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin that inhibited growth of Nocardia nova isolates were 2 (4), 8 (16), 16 (32) μg/mL, respectively. The tentative ECOFF values for pradofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were 32 μg/mL and for enrofloxacin 64 μg/mL. The MIC or MIC range for the three N. farcinica isolates of pradofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin were 0.25-0.5, 2 and 2 μg/mL and for the single N. cyriacigeorgica isolate were 1, 4 and 4 μg/mL, respectively. On the basis on these results, fluoroquinolones appear to have limited therapeutic potential for most Nocardia infections. PMID:21726965

  8. Nocardia rayongensis sp. nov., isolated from Thai peat swamp forest soil.

    PubMed

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    An actinomycete strain, RY45-3T, isolated from a peat swamp forest soil in Rayong Province, Thailand, was characterized using a polyphasic approach. The strain belonged to the genus Nocardia on the basis of morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties. Cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The N-acyl group of muramic acid in the cell wall was glycolyl type. The diagnostic sugars in whole-cell hydrolysates were galactose and arabinose. MK-8 (H4ω-cycl) was the major menaquinone. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9c. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The genomic DNA G+C content was 71 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis, strain RY45-3T was closely related to Nocardia jiangxiensis JCM 12861T (98.9 %), Nocardia nova JCM 6044T (98.8 %) and Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis JCM 9894T (98.6 %). The strain showed low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness with N. jiangxiensis JCM 12861T, N. nova JCM 6044T and N. pseudobrasiliensis JCM 9894T (range from 3.6 to 55.3 %). On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and the results mentioned, this strain could be differentiated from closely related type strains and represents a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia rayongensis sp. nov. (type strain RY45-3T = JCM 19832T = TISTR 2213T = PCU 334T) is proposed. PMID:26873179

  9. Nocardia halotolerans sp. nov., a halotolerant actinomycete isolated from saline soil.

    PubMed

    Moshtaghi Nikou, Mahdi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Ali Amoozegar, Mohammad; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Harirchi, Sharareh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhasan; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    A novel halotolerant actinomycete, strain Chem15(T), was isolated from soil around Inche-Broun hypersaline wetland; its taxonomic position was determined based on a polyphasic approach. Strain Chem15(T) was strictly aerobic and tolerated NaCl up to 12.5%. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 28-30 °C and pH 7.0-7.5, respectively. The cell wall of strain Chem15(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diamino acid and galactose, arabinose and ribose as whole-cell sugars. The major phospholipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The cellular fatty acids profile consisted of C16 : 0, iso-C18 : 0, C18 : 0 10-methyl and C18 : 1ω9c, and the major respiratory quinone was MK-8(H4cycl). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.0 mol%. The novel strain constituted a distinct phyletic line within the genus Nocardia, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and was closely associated with Nocardia sungurluensis DSM 45714(T) and Nocardia alba DSM 44684(T) (98.2 and 98.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). However DNA-DNA relatedness and phenotypic data demonstrated that strain Chem15(T) was clearly different from closely related species of the genus Nocardia. It is concluded that the organism should be classified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia halotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Chem15(T) ( = IBRC-M 10490(T) = LMG 28544(T)). PMID:26297293

  10. Nocardia mikamii a Novel Species Causing Disseminated Nocardiosis: A Literature Review of Disseminated Nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Mohammed Muqeet; Mujeeb, Sufyan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia is an uncommon Gram-positive organism. It typically appears as delicate filamentous Gram-positive branching rods. In the United States it was estimated to be approximately 500 to 1000 new cases per year. The organism causes disease in immunocompromised individuals with pulmonary infection representing the most common site of infection. Nocardia mikamii has been a recently isolated pathogen and not many cases of disseminated infection with this organism has been reported in the literature; we present a case of disseminated nocardiosis (mikamii sp.) in an immunocompromised patient. We also present a literature review on nocardiosis. PMID:27437492

  11. Nocardia nova causing empyema necessitatis afterlung re-transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Severo, Cecília Bittencourt; Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Vargas, Agueda Palmira Castagna; Schio, Sadi Marcelo; Camargo, José de Jesus Peixoto; Hochhegger, Bruno; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We report herein a case of thoracic infection due to Nocardia nova following lung re-transplantation performed for emphysema related to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. The infection extended from the lung into the pleural space, thoracic wall, and mediastinum, presenting as pericarditis and empyema necessitatis. Nocardia nova was identified by 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. According to a literature search of PubMed, LILACS and MEDLINE databases, we describe herein the first case of empyema necessitatis caused by N. nova species in a transplanted patient. PMID:27598645

  12. [Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical Nocardia isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Uner, Mahmut Celalettin; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Müştak, Hamit Kaan

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are ubiquitous in the environment and responsible for various human infections such as pulmonary, cutaneous, central nervous system and disseminated nocardiosis. Since the clinical pictures and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Nocardia species exhibit variability, susceptibility testing is recommended for every Nocardia isolates. The aims of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Nocardia clinical isolates and to compare the results of broth microdilution and disc diffusion susceptibility tests. A total of 45 clinical Nocardia isolates (isolated from 17 respiratory tract, 8 brain abscess, 7 pus, 3 skin, 3 conjunctiva, 2 blood, 2 tissue, 2 pleural fluid and 1 cerebrospinal fluid samples) were identified by using conventional methods and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing was performed for amikacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, linezolid and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) by broth microdilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria recommended in 2011 approved standard (M24-A2) and disk diffusion method used as an alternative comparative susceptibility testing method. Among the 45 Nocardia strains, N.cyriacigeorgica (n: 26, 57.8%) was the most common species, followed by N.farcinica (n: 12, 26.7%), N.otitiscaviarum (n: 4, 8.9%), N.asteroides (n: 1, 2.2%), N.neocaledoniensis (n: 1, 2.2%) and N.abscessus (n: 1, 2.2%). Amikacin and linezolid were the only two antimicrobials to which all isolates were susceptible for both broth microdilution and disk diffusion tests. In broth microdilution test, resistance rates to TMP-SMX, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin were found as 15.6%, 37.8% and 84.4% respectively, whereas in the disk diffusion test, the highest resistance rate was observed against ciprofloxacin (n: 33, 73.3%), followed by TMP-SMX (n: 22, 48.9%) and ceftriaxone (n: 15, 33.3%). In both of these tests, N.cyriacigeorgica was the species with the

  13. Nocardia asteroides sinusitis in a pediatric patient: Case report with 20 year follow-up and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sorichetti, Brendan; Westerberg, Brian D; Tan, Rusung; Kozak, Frederick K

    2015-07-01

    Nocardia Asteroides infection in a non-immunocompromised pediatric patient is extremely rare. We present a case of ethmoid sinusitis and orbital subperiosteal abscess caused by N. asteroides with a 20 year follow up and a review of the literature. N. asteroides was grown from intraoperative cultures for mycobacteria following surgical incision and drainage of the abscess. Postoperatively, the patient received a seven month course of trimethoprim-sulfamethozaxole and had no subsequent sequelae. Nocardia infections are common in immunocompromised patients. We present what we believe to be the first case of pediatric Nocardia sinusitis with 20-year follow up. PMID:25943955

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Erythromycin- and Oxytetracycline-Sensitive Nocardia seriolae Strain U-1 (NBRC 110359)

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Masaki; Shimizu, Masato; Yamane, Jin; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Oshima, Syun-ichirou

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the emergence of macrolide- and oxytetracycline-resistant strains of Nocardia seriolae has previously been reported. Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of N. seriolae strain U-1, isolated in 2011 from a diseased yellowtail in Kagoshima Prefecture. The draft genome does not have any genes responsible for macrolide and tetracycline resistance. PMID:26798107

  15. Mediastinal mass and pericardial tamponade in a renal transplant recipient: A rare case of nocardia infection

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Maria Nieva; Wray, Dannah; Denlinger, Chadrick; Srinivas, Titte; Thomas, Beje; Posadas, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 30 Final Diagnosis: Nocardiosis Symptoms: Cardiac tamponade • cough • dyspnea • hoarseness • mediastinal mass • pericardial effusion • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare disease Background: Nocardia infections can complicate solid organ transplantation. The usual clinical presentations include pulmonary infiltrates with or without cavitation and subcutaneous and brain abscesses. We report an unusual case of nocardia infection in a kidney transplant recipient that presented as mediastinal mass and was associated with pericardial tamponade. Case Report: A 30 year old African American renal transplant recipient presented with cough, hoarseness and shortness of breath nine months after kidney transplantation. She received basiliximab perioperatively and her maintenance immunosuppression included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Computed tomography (CT) showed a large mediastinal mass with a large pericardial effusion. An echocardiogram revealed collapse of the right ventricle consistent with tamponade. We performed emergent pericardiocentesis to treat the tamponade. A mediastinoscopic biopsy of the mediastinal mass was done to establish a diagnosis. The mediastinal biopsy confirmed the growth of Nocardia. After 2 weeks of imipenem and 6 weeks of linezolid, there was marked radiographic improvement in the size of the mediastinal mass. Conclusions: We report a rare case of a large mediastinal mass associated with pericardial tamponade from nocardia infection in a renal transplant recipient. An invasive approach may be necessary to obtain tissue diagnosis to direct treatment in these cases. Prompt and appropriate medical therapy leads to marked radiographic improvement. PMID:23940824

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia jinanensis, an Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogen That Causes Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Nocardia jinanensis, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause skin infections, reveals genes that may contribute to the lifestyle and pathogenicity of N. jinanensis. The genome also reveals the biosynthetic capacity of N. jinanensis in producing mycolic acids, siderophores, and other polyketide and nonribosomal peptide-derived secondary metabolites. PMID:27445366

  17. Novel method for rapid identification of Nocardia species by detection of preformed enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Biehle, J R; Cavalieri, S J; Felland, T; Zimmer, B L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to devise a method for the identification of Nocardia species that is more technically simple, accurate, and rapid than current standard methods of identification. We focused on a commercial bacteria identification system that contained chromogenic test substrates. Two MicroScan products were selected for use in the study on the basis of their content of chromogenic and conventional substrates. They were the Rapid Anaerobe Identification and the HNID panels. A total of 85 strains of Nocardia representing five species were used in the study. All isolates were identified as Nocardia species by the use of standard methods. The beta-naphthylamide-labeled substrate L-pyrrolidonyl-beta-naphthylamide (PYR), the nitrophenyl-labeled substrate p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (MNP), and indoxyl phosphate were found to be useful for identification purposes. N. farcinica and N. nova were the only species positive for PYR, whereas N. brasiliensis was the only species that hydrolyzed MNP. All strains of N. brasiliensis, N. otitidiscavarium, and N. farcinica were positive for indoxyl phosphate, whereas strains of N. nova and N. asteroides sensu stricto were always negative. Agreement between the standard and enzymatic identification methods was 100%. In summary, detection of preformed enzymes appears to be a simple and reproducible method for the identification of Nocardia spp. PMID:8748283

  18. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species among patients with nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Shahraki, Abodolrazagh; Heidarieh, Parvin; Bostanabad, Saeed Zaker; Hashemzadeh, Mohamad; Feizabadi, Mohamad Mehdi; Schraufnagel, Dean; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter study was to determine the genetic diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of clinically isolated Nocardia species. One hundred twenty-seven patients with nocardiosis were randomly selected from 5 provinces of Iran. Molecular diagnosis of Nocardia species was performed using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrase B of the β subunit of DNA topoisomerase (gyrB), and 16S rRNA and subunit A of SecA preproteintranslocase (secA1). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Thirty-five N. cyriacigeorgica, 30 N. asteroides, 26 N. farcinica, 12 N. otitidiscaviarum, and 10 N. abscessus cultures were studied. All isolates were susceptible to linezolid. All isolates of N. cyriacigeorgica, N. asteroides, N. abscessus, and N. otitidiscaviarum were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, while 8% of N. farcinica isolates were resistant to this drug. All N. otitidiscaviarum isolates were highly resistant to imipenem, but N. cyriacigeorgica, N. asteroides, N. farcinica, and N. abscessus were only moderate resistant. The susceptibility patterns vary with different species of Nocardia. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in Iran is low and this drug should be first line therapy, unless drug susceptibility testing shows resistance. Linezolid also covers Nocardia well and could be a second line agent. PMID:26638771

  19. Actinomycetoma of the chest wall attributed to Nocardia nova after reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Joana; Pacheco, David; Travassos, Rita; Sequeira, Hortênsia; Filipe, Paulo; Marques, Manuel Sacramento

    2012-01-01

    A 29-year-old man, presented with multiple ulcers, nodules, abscesses, fistulae, and atrophic scars, over the right chest wall. Six years prior, the patient had a car accident, which resulted in skin loss of the right arm, shoulder, thoracic wall. In addition, he suffered a supracondylar fracture; orthopedic surgery and skin grafts were required. Material discharging from sinus tracts was obtained for mycological and bacteriological studies. Direct microscopic examination revealed small white grains. Cultures on Sabouraud and Lowenstein-Jensen media isolated orange-white colonies suggestive of Nocardia. PCR assay identified Nocardia nova. Thoracic and right upper limb CT showed signs of chronic osteomyelitis. Treatment with imipenem/cilastatin for 8 weeks, followed by amoxicillin clavulanate for 6 months, resulted in healing of lesions and improvement in the patient's general health. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis remains a diagnostic challenge. Nocardia are soil-borne filamentous gram-positive bacteria. Identification of characteristic granules on examination of discharge smears from discharge or tissue biopsy is essential for diagnosing mycetoma. Because grain discharge is discontinuous, multiple clinical specimens should be submitted for microscopic examination and culture. Sulfonamides have been the mainstay of Nocardia actinomycetoma treatment. However, our patient's strain was resistant to Co-trimoxazole. Therefore, treatment with imipenem followed by amoxicillin clavulanate was favored, with good clinical and analytical response. PMID:22301041

  20. First Case of Disseminated Infection with Nocardia cerradoensis in a Human

    PubMed Central

    Kerjouan, Mallorie; Le Mouel, Marc; Patrat-Delon, Solene; Henaux, Pierre-Louis; Brun, Vanessa; Morin, Marie-Pascale; Gautier, Philippe; Rodriguez-Nava, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Here we report in a human, a renal transplant patient, the first disseminated infection with Nocardia cerradoensis, isolated after a brain biopsy. Species identification was based on 16S rRNA, gyrB, and hsp65 gene analyses. Antibiotic treatment was successful by combining carbapenems and aminoglycosides and then switching to oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:25568436

  1. Fatal pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-susceptible, but imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient. The isolate was confirmed to the species level by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The patient did not respond to antibiotic therapy, including ceftriaxone and imipenem, and died of progressing pneumonia and multiple organ failure. PMID:23523047

  2. Genetic relatedness analysis of nocardia strains by random amplification polymorphic Dna: validation and applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, F; Provost, F; Couble, A; Casoli, E; Boiron, P

    2000-05-01

    Until now, no simple and rapid technique existed for epidemiological study of strains belonging to the Nocardia genus. The application of the arbitrarily primed PCR procedure to generate randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprints for such analysis of Nocardia isolates was investigated. Fifty-one unrelated clinical isolates of N. asteroides were tested. Two conditions of RAPD using two different primers generated RAPD fingerprints that allowed the differentiation of all strains. The patterns were reproducible and discriminating. The results highlight the diversity of N. asteroides species and confirm that RAPD analysis is a highly valuable tool for studying the epidemiology of the Nocardia genus. Several examples describe the advantage of RAPD analysis for establishing the relationship between isolates from a given patient (long-term infections, coinfections) and from different patients (i.e. during an outbreak). In the future, this technique will help us to investigate the source of infection in cases of nosocomial transmission, to understand the outcome of nocardiosis, and to follow the evolution and acquisition of resistance to Nocardia strains. PMID:10875283

  3. Outbreak of Nocardia farcinica infection with the same pattern in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Kachi, S; Okazaki, M; Takeda, H; Igarashi, H; Kobayashi, O; Watanabe, H; Nakata, K; Kawai, S; Aoshima, M; Watanabe, T; Goto, H

    2006-04-01

    We experienced three cases of nocardiosis by Nocardia farcinica in the same ward within a six-month period. The result of gene analysis by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA gave the same pattern. Thus, these three cases were considered to be caused by the same strain of N. farcinica, implying the presence of nosocomial infection. PMID:16483691

  4. A rapid and gentle method for isolation of genomic DNA from pathogenic Nocardia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, R D; Oletta, C A; Zlotnik, H

    1996-01-01

    The lack of simple and efficient methods for extraction of DNA from Nocardia spp. has hampered molecular manipulation of the DNA for diagnostic purposes. In the present study, a method for the rapid extraction of undegraded genomic nocardial DNA was established. Briefly, 14 pathogenic Nocardia strains were grown at 37 degrees C for 3 to 5 days in Sauton broth containing 0.05% Tween 80. Subsequently, the cultures were treated for 48 h with 1.2 mg of cycloserine per ml (final concentration). Cells were then harvested by centrifugation and treated with a lysis solution containing 3 mg of lysozyme per ml. This was followed by the addition of proteinase K and sodium dodecyl sulfate to final concentrations of 0.2 mg/ml and 0.5%, respectively, and incubation for 1 h at 50 degrees C. DNA was precipitated with isopropanol after phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol extractions and RNase treated before being quantitated and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The average undegraded DNA yields obtained were 101 micrograms for Nocardia brasiliensis and 121 micrograms for N. asteroides. This DNA was suitable for restriction endonuclease digestion and PCR amplification, which are methods being applied to the characterization and diagnosis of slowly growing organisms such as Nocardia spp. PMID:8877144

  5. Direct Detection of Nocardia spp. in Clinical Samples by a Rapid Molecular Method

    PubMed Central

    Couble, Andrée; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica; de Montclos, Michèle Pérouse; Boiron, Patrick; Laurent, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    We developed a 16S PCR-based assay for the rapid detection of Nocardia spp. directly from human clinical samples. The applicability of the assay was confirmed by using 18 samples from patients with nocardiosis as diagnosed by conventional cultures and 20 clinical samples from patients with confirmed tuberculosis used as negative controls. PMID:15815019

  6. Transmission of nocardiosis and molecular typing of Nocardia species: a short review.

    PubMed

    Provost, F; Laurent, F; Blanc, M V; Boiron, P

    1997-02-01

    Nocardia species are ubiquitous in the environment and may be found in the soil. They are generally responsible for sporadic pulmonary diseases acquired by inhalation of spores, with secondary localizations in the central nervous system and subcutaneous tissues. There is no absolute evidence for person to person transmission. Presumptive outbreaks of nocardiosis were observed in immunocompromised patients, more frequently in kidney transplant patients than in cardiac transplant patients. Nocardia spp., being present in dust particles, closure and disinfection of the transplantation unit with formaldehyde arrested the sequence of cases of nocardiosis. The original sources of the Nocardia sp. remain doubtful. Other possible sources of contamination are other patients, medical staff and the hospital environment. The first studies of Nocardia spp. typing were based on the detection of extracellular antigens, on the susceptibility of actinomycete strains to killer yeasts, and on the biochemical profiles with fluorogenic substrate. The use of molecular typing techniques have given very promising results. Analysis of plasmid profiles is an interesting way to compare the identity of isolates, although the reliability of this method depends of the presence of plasmids in the isolates. Other typing methods, including analysis of restriction length fragment polymorphism of total DNA, ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, require further investigations to evaluate their discriminating power or to be easily interpretable, whereas a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay was successful for epidemiological purposes. Progress in epidemiological analysis of cases of nocardiosis will be consistent when an improved diagnosis of this infection (molecular and serological diagnosis) will be available, when the genetic diversity of Nocardia spp. isolates will be better known, and when molecular typing, that hold promise in complementing investigations of outbreak of these infections, will

  7. Resistance gene pool to co-trimoxazole in non-susceptible Nocardia strains

    PubMed Central

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Garrido, Noelia; Carrasco, Gema; Villalón, Pilar; Medina-Pascual, María J.; Saéz-Nieto, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Nocardia sp. causes severe cutaneous, pulmonary, and central nervous system infections. Against them, co-trimoxazole (SXT) constitutes the mainstay of antimicrobial therapy. However, some Nocardia strains show resistance to SXT, but the underlying genetic basis is unknown. We investigated the presence of genetic resistance determinants and class 1–3 integrons in 76 SXT-resistant Nocardia strains by PCR and sequencing. By E test, these clinical strains showed SXT minimum inhibitory concentrations of ≥32:608 mg/L (ratio of 1:19 for trimethoprim: sulfamethoxazole). They belonged to 12 species, being the main representatives Nocardia farcinica (32%), followed by N. flavorosea (6.5%), N. nova (11.8%), N. carnea (10.5%), N. transvalensis (10.5%), and Nocardia sp. (6.5%). The prevalence of resistance genes in the SXT-resistant strains was as follows: sul1 and sul2 93.4 and 78.9%, respectively, dfrA(S1) 14.7%, blaTEM-1 and blaZ 2.6 and 2.6%, respectively, VIM-2 1.3%, aph(3′)-IIIa 40.8%, ermA, ermB, mefA, and msrD 2.6, 77.6, 14.4, and 5.2%, respectively, and tet(O), tet(M), and tet(L) 48.6, 25.0, and 3.9%, respectively. Detected amino acid changes in GyrA were not related to fluoroquinolone resistance, but probably linked to species polymorphism. Class 1 and 3 integrons were found in 93.42 and 56.57% strains, respectively. Class 2 integrons and sul3 genes were not detected. Other mechanisms, different than dfrA(S1), dfrD, dfrF, dfrG, and dfrK, could explain the strong trimethoprim resistance shown by the other 64 strains. For first time, resistance determinants commonly found in clinically important bacteria were detected in Nocardia sp. sul1, sul2, erm(B), and tet(O) were the most prevalent in the SXT-resistant strains. The similarity in their resistome could be due to a common genetic platform, in which these determinants are co-transferred. PMID:25972856

  8. Use of PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis and sequencing database for hsp65 gene-based identification of Nocardia species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica; Couble, Andrée; Devulder, Gregory; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Boiron, Patrick; Laurent, Frédéric

    2006-02-01

    Nocardia identification required laborious and time-consuming phenotypic and chemotaxonomic methods until molecular methods were developed in the mid-1990s. Here we reassessed the capacity of PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene to differentiate Nocardia species, including 36 new species. Our results confirm that hsp65 PRA must no longer be used for Nocardia species identification, as many species have the same restriction pattern. We then compared sequencing-based strategies using an hsp65 database and a 16S rRNA database and found that the hsp65 region contained sufficient polymorphisms for comprehensive Nocardia species identification. PMID:16455910

  9. Infection caused by Nocardia farcinica mimicking pulmonary metastasis in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Babayigit, Arzu; Olmez, Duygu; Sozmen, Sule C; Makay, Balahan; Uzuner, Nevin; Karaman, Ozkan; Anal, Ozden; Gulay, Zeynep

    2010-03-01

    Nocardia farcinica infections are rare and potentially life threatening. Herein, we describe a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by N. farcinica. This 13-year-old girl admitted with 1-year history of cough, intermittent fever, and recurrent hemoptysis. She was examined for multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary metastasis that were detected with chest radiography and computed tomography of the thorax. Eventually, N. farcinica was yielded in culture of sputum and aspiration material of pulmonary nodules. No predisposing factor could be shown for Nocardia infection. Although infections caused by N. farcinica have tendency to disseminate, and are mostly resistant to antibiotics, the patient was successfully treated with prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy followed with oral amoxicillin-clavulanate. PMID:20216281

  10. In Vitro Activities of the New Antitubercular Agents PA-824 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rivera, Mayra Paola; Gonzalez-Martinez, Norma Alejandra; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Cole, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro activity of PA-824 and BTZ043 against 30 Nocardia brasiliensis isolates was tested. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for PA-824 were both >64 μg/ml. The same values for BTZ043 were 0.125 and 0.250 μg/ml. Given the MIC values for benzothiazinone (BTZ) compounds, we consider them good candidates to be tested in vivo against N. brasiliensis. PMID:22526312

  11. In vitro activities of the new antitubercular agents PA-824 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Campos-Rivera, Mayra Paola; Gonzalez-Martinez, Norma Alejandra; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Cole, Stewart T

    2012-07-01

    The in vitro activity of PA-824 and BTZ043 against 30 Nocardia brasiliensis isolates was tested. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) values for PA-824 were both >64 μg/ml. The same values for BTZ043 were 0.125 and 0.250 μg/ml. Given the MIC values for benzothiazinone (BTZ) compounds, we consider them good candidates to be tested in vivo against N. brasiliensis. PMID:22526312

  12. Nocardia farcinica Meningitis Masquerading as Central Nervous System Metastasis in a Child With Cerebellar Pilocytic Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Kreppel, Andrew J; Brady, Rebecca C; Jones, Blaise; Stevenson, Charles B; Fouladi, Maryam; Hummel, Trent R

    2015-08-01

    Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, the most common pediatric central nervous system (CNS) neoplasm, characteristically displays an indolent growth pattern and rarely demonstrates metastatic dissemination. Reports of infections mimicking CNS metastatic disease are also rare and can impact treatment. We report the youngest known case of a child with a CNS Nocardia farcinica infection who had a known cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, review other infections that may masquerade as CNS neoplasms, and discuss N. farcinica CNS infections. PMID:26181420

  13. [Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant].

    PubMed

    Chacón, C F; Vicente, R; Ramos, F; Porta, J; Lopez Maldonado, A; Ansotegui, E

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have a higher risk of developing chronic respiratory infectious diseases. The Nocardia farcinica lung infection is rare in this group of patients, and there are limited publications about this topic. Its diagnosis is complex, due to the clinical and the radiology signs being non-specific. Identification of the agent responsible in the sputum culture is occasionally negative. It is a slow growing organism and for this reason treatment is delayed, which can lead to an increase in complications, hospitable stays, and mortality. A case is reported on a 26 year-old woman with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung colonization by Nocardia farcinica and Aspergillus fumigatus, on long-term treatment with ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and posaconazole, who was admitted to ICU after bilateral lung transplantation. The initial post-operative progress was satisfactory. After discharge, the patient showed a gradual respiratory insufficiency with new chest X-ray showing diffuse infiltrates. Initially, the agent was not seen in the sputum culture. Prompt and aggressive measures were taken, due to the high clinical suspicion of a Nocardia farcinica lung infection. Treatment with a combination of amikacin and meropenem, and later combined with linezolid, led to the disappearance of the lung infiltrates and a clinical improvement. In our case, we confirm the rapid introduction of Nocardia farcinica in the new lungs. The complex identification and the delay in treatment increased the morbimortality. There is a special need for its eradication in patients with lung transplant, due to the strong immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:25443661

  14. Nocardia casuarinae sp. nov., an actinobacterial endophyte isolated from root nodules of Casuarina glauca.

    PubMed

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Nouioui, Imen; Salem, Karima; Ktari, Amir; Montero-Calasanz, Maria del Carmen; Tisa, Louis S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Gtari, Maher

    2014-06-01

    An actinobacterium strain BMG51109a was isolated from surface sterilized root nodules of Casuarina glauca collected in Tunisia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain BMG51109a showed most similarity (96.53-96.55 %) to the type strains of Nocardia transvalensis, N. aobensis and N. elegans. Chemotaxonomic analysis supported the assignment of the strain to Nocardia genus. The major menaquinone was MK-8(H4c) while the polar lipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, glycophospholipid, phosphatidylinositol, one uncharacterized phospholipid and three glycolipids. Whole-cell sugar analysis revealed the presence of meso-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose and galactose as diagnostic sugars, complemented by glucose, mannose and ribose. The major cellular fatty acids were tuberculostearic, oleic, palmitoleic and stearic acids. Physiological and biochemical tests showed that strain BMG51109a could be clearly distinguished from its closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of these results, strain BMG51109a(T) (= DSM 45978(T) = CECT 8469(T)) is proposed as the type strain of the novel species Nocardia casuarinae sp. nov. PMID:24715251

  15. [Pulmonary Nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in a Patient with ANCA-associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Suemori, Koichiro; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Shinobu; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Jun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Murakami, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    Nocardia asiatica is a rare causative organism responsible for opportunistic infection, and was first reported by Kageyama et al. in 2004. We report herein on a very rare case of N. asiatica infection in a 76-year old male patient with ANCA-associated vasculitis and a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient developed pulmonary nocardiosis due to N. asiatica while receiving glucocorticoid therapy. Chest computed tomography demonstrated multiple granules and cavity formation mainly in the left lower lobe. From the images, we suspected opportunistic infection, possibly pulmonary tuberculosis or pulmonary damage due to ANCA-associated vasculitis. Nocardia sp. was detected from a bronchoalveolar lavage culture and N. asiatica was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed no abnormality. Administration of Doripenem (1.5g/day) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4g/day) was started, and the patient's clinical and imaging findings promptly improved. Thereafter, he received sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (2g/day) and prednisolone (10 mg/day) as maintenance therapy for ANCA-associated vasculitis for more than one year, and there has since been no recurrence of the Nocardia infection. PMID:26554223

  16. A Case of Nocardia farcinica Pneumonia and Mediastinitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyoung; Kang, Minkyu; Kim, Juri; Jung, Sohee; Park, Junhung; Lee, Dongkyu

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are aerobic, gram-positive pathogens found worldwide in soil. Nocardia is considered an opportunistic pathogen, and its infection mostly occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of Nocardia farcinica induced mediastinitis and pneumonia that occurred in a 64-year-old male patient who had no significant medical history except for hypertension. He visited another hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and left chest wall pain. The symptoms arose 7 days ago without any trauma and they worsened. A mediastinal mass was found on computed tomography scan. After being transferred to our hospital for further evaluation, he was diagnosed with mediastinitis and pneumonia. As N. farcinica was found to be the causative organism by 16S rRNA sequencing, proper antibiotic therapy including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was initiated immediately. After this, the patient improved and he was discharged. If an infection has a disseminating course, nocardiosis cannot be excluded even in immunocompetent patients. Once the diagnosis is established, prompt antibiotic therapy should be performed based on the severity. PMID:27066088

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility among clinical Nocardia species identified by multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Lisa R; Doucet, Jennifer; Witkowska, Maria; Richardson, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 112 clinical isolates, 28 type strains, and 9 reference strains of Nocardia were determined using the Sensititre Rapmyco microdilution panel (Thermo Fisher, Inc.). Isolates were identified by highly discriminatory multilocus sequence analysis and were chosen to represent the diversity of species recovered from clinical specimens in Ontario, Canada. Susceptibility to the most commonly used drug, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was observed in 97% of isolates. Linezolid and amikacin were also highly effective; 100% and 99% of all isolates demonstrated a susceptible phenotype. For the remaining antimicrobials, resistance was species specific with isolates of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, N. brasiliensis, N. abscessus complex, N. nova complex, N. transvalensis complex, N. farcinica, and N. cyriacigeorgica displaying the traditional characteristic drug pattern types. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a variety of rarely encountered species isolated from clinical specimens are reported for the first time and were categorized into four additional drug pattern types. Finally, MICs for the control strains N. nova ATCC BAA-2227, N. asteroides ATCC 19247(T), and N. farcinica ATCC 23826 were robustly determined to demonstrate method reproducibility and suitability of the commercial Sensititre Rapmyco panel for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Nocardia spp. isolated from clinical specimens. The reported values will facilitate quality control and standardization among laboratories. PMID:25348540

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Clinical Nocardia Species Identified by Multilocus Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Jennifer; Witkowska, Maria; Richardson, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 112 clinical isolates, 28 type strains, and 9 reference strains of Nocardia were determined using the Sensititre Rapmyco microdilution panel (Thermo Fisher, Inc.). Isolates were identified by highly discriminatory multilocus sequence analysis and were chosen to represent the diversity of species recovered from clinical specimens in Ontario, Canada. Susceptibility to the most commonly used drug, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was observed in 97% of isolates. Linezolid and amikacin were also highly effective; 100% and 99% of all isolates demonstrated a susceptible phenotype. For the remaining antimicrobials, resistance was species specific with isolates of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, N. brasiliensis, N. abscessus complex, N. nova complex, N. transvalensis complex, N. farcinica, and N. cyriacigeorgica displaying the traditional characteristic drug pattern types. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a variety of rarely encountered species isolated from clinical specimens are reported for the first time and were categorized into four additional drug pattern types. Finally, MICs for the control strains N. nova ATCC BAA-2227, N. asteroides ATCC 19247T, and N. farcinica ATCC 23826 were robustly determined to demonstrate method reproducibility and suitability of the commercial Sensititre Rapmyco panel for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Nocardia spp. isolated from clinical specimens. The reported values will facilitate quality control and standardization among laboratories. PMID:25348540

  19. Diagnosis of Nocardia paucivorans central nervous system infection by DNA sequencing from paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Pasticci, Maria Bruna; De Carolis, Elena; Mello, Enrica; Pallotto, Carlo; Leli, Christian; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Baldelli, Franco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Mencacci, Antonella

    2016-06-01

    Infections by Nocardia spp. are generally regarded as opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients, but can also affect immunocompetent subjects. Such infections represent an important diagnostic challenge for clinicians and microbiologists, and diagnosis is frequently delayed or even conducted post mortem. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of ventriculitis and relapsing brain abscess. Five months prior, this patient had undergone external ventricular drain and surgery for a cerebellar abscess. Histopathology demonstrated pyogenic inflammatory reaction, microbiologic investigations proved negative and empiric antimicrobial therapy was administered for a total of eight weeks. Six weeks later, the patient developed relapsing neurologic manifestations. On reviewing the patient's clinical history it emerged that the patient had suffered pneumonia two months prior to neurosurgery, treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate 3g a day and levofloxacin 500mg a day for three weeks. On the CNS relapsing manifestations, nocardiosis was suspected and DNA sequencing from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebellar tissue collected during neurosurgery allowed diagnosis of Nocardia paucivorans infection. The patient received medical therapy for 11 months. At follow-up, eight months after treatment was discontinued, the patient was aymptomatic. Nocardia spp. infections need to be suspected not only in immunocompromised, but also in immunocompetent patients. Proper samples need to be collected for proper microbiologic investigations. Paraffin-embedded tissue genomic sequencing can be a useful tool for diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:27367327

  20. A Case of Nocardia farcinica Pneumonia and Mediastinitis in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyoung; Kang, Minkyu; Kim, Juri; Jung, Sohee; Park, Junhung; Lee, Dongkyu; Yoon, Heejung

    2016-04-01

    Nocardia species are aerobic, gram-positive pathogens found worldwide in soil. Nocardia is considered an opportunistic pathogen, and its infection mostly occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of Nocardia farcinica induced mediastinitis and pneumonia that occurred in a 64-year-old male patient who had no significant medical history except for hypertension. He visited another hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and left chest wall pain. The symptoms arose 7 days ago without any trauma and they worsened. A mediastinal mass was found on computed tomography scan. After being transferred to our hospital for further evaluation, he was diagnosed with mediastinitis and pneumonia. As N. farcinica was found to be the causative organism by 16S rRNA sequencing, proper antibiotic therapy including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was initiated immediately. After this, the patient improved and he was discharged. If an infection has a disseminating course, nocardiosis cannot be excluded even in immunocompetent patients. Once the diagnosis is established, prompt antibiotic therapy should be performed based on the severity. PMID:27066088

  1. Temperature effects on biomass, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol production and cellular activity by Nocardia spp. and Streptomyces spp. isolated from rainbow trout recirculating aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolates of Nocardia cummidelens, Nocardia fluminea, Streptomyces albidoflavus, and Streptomyces luridiscabiei attributing to geosmin-related off-flavor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) raised in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) were evaluated for the effect of temperature (10-30 degree...

  2. Report of an immunocompetent case with disseminated infection due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum: Identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Eren, Esma; Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Atalay, Altay; Demiraslan, Hayati; Parkan, Omur; Koc, Nedret

    2016-03-01

    Nocardia otitidiscaviarum belongs to the agents of opportunistic infections seen in immunocompromised patients, but may occur rarely in immunocompetent patients. In this report we described a case of a previously healthy 69-year-old woman with cerebral and retroperitoneal abscess due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum. The patient was admitted to hospital because of loss of strength in her right arm and leg. Nocardia spp. was isolated from the abscess material. The intracranial lesions were drained by stereotactic craniotomy. The large abscess located around the left kidney was drained and microscopic examination of aspirated material showed Nocardia spp. For species identification, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was carried out and was 100% concordant with Nocardia otitidiscaviarum. Use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for identification permits detection of rare aetiologic agents that cause brain abscesses. PMID:27031902

  3. In Vivo Activity of the Benzothiazinones PBTZ169 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Norma Alejandra; Lozano-Garza, Hector Gerardo; Castro-Garza, Jorge; De Osio-Cortez, Alexandra; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Cavazos-Rocha, Norma; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Makarov, Vadim; Cole, Stewart T.; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycetoma is a neglected, chronic, and deforming infectious disease caused by fungi and actinomycetes. In Mexico, N. brasiliensis is the predominant etiologic agent. Therapeutic alternatives are necessary because the current drug regimens have several disadvantages. Benzothiazinones (BTZ) are a new class of candidate drugs that inhibit decaprenyl-phosphoribose-epimerase (DprE1), an essential enzyme involved in the cell wall biosynthesis of Corynebacterineae. Methodology/Principal findings In this study, the in vitro activity of the next generation BTZ, PBTZ169, was tested against thirty Nocardia brasiliensis isolates. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for PBTZ169 were 0.0075 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively. Because Nocardia is a potential intracellular bacterium, a THP-1 macrophage monolayer was infected with N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and then treated with PBTZ169, resulting in a decrease in the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) at a concentration of 0.25X the in vitro value. The in vivo activity was evaluated after infecting female BALB/c mice in the right hind food-pad. After 6 weeks, treatment was initiated with PBTZ169 and its activity was compared with the first generation compound, BTZ043. Both BTZ compounds were administered at 100 mg/kg twice daily by gavage, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT), at 100 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole, was used as a positive control. After 22 weeks of therapy, only PBTZ169 and SXT displayed statistically significant activity. Conclusion These results indicate that DprE1 inhibitors may be useful for treating infections of Nocardia and may therefore be active against other actinomycetoma agents. We must test combinations of these compounds with other antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, tedizolid or SXT, that have good to excellent in vivo activity, as well as new DprE1 inhibitors that can achieve higher plasma levels. PMID:26474057

  4. Peptidolipins B-F, Antibacterial Lipopeptides from an Ascidian-derived Nocardia sp

    PubMed Central

    Wyche, Thomas P.; Hou, Yanpeng; Vazquez-Rivera, Emmanuel; Braun, Doug; Bugni, Tim S.

    2012-01-01

    A marine Nocardia sp. isolated from the ascidian Trididemnum orbiculatum was found to produce five new lipopeptides, peptidolipins B-F (1–5), which show distinct similarities to the previously reported L-Val(6) analog of peptidolipin NA. Synthetic modification of peptidolipin E (4) was used to determine the location of an olefin within the lipid chain. Advanced Marfey’s method was used to determine the absolute configurations of the amino acids. Peptidolipins B (1) and E (4) demonstrated moderate antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). PMID:22482367

  5. Suppurative granulomatous sinorhinitis associated with Nocardia spp. infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    NAKANISHI, Ataru; MASHITA, Tadahisa; AKIYAMA, Kyoko; NAKANISHI, Wakana; MORI, Takashi; YANO, Masaki; ASAI, Tetsuo; KANO, Rui; SHIMAMURA, Syunsuke; YASUDA, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female cat was examined for cheek skin drainage. The skin lesion did not respond to medical therapy; thereafter, facial deformity developed. A computed tomography revealed an intranasal mass and maxillary osteolysis. The mass was histopathologically diagnosed as suppurative granulomatous inflammation caused by filamentous bacteria. The lesion responded well to radiation therapy. Although actinomycosis was suspected histopathologically, no actinomycetes were detected in the nasal lesion by a bacterial culture conducted at a commercial laboratory. The submandibular lymph node and subcutaneous tissue exhibited swelling. Microbiological examination and genetic analysis based on 16S rDNA gene sequence revealed that Nocardia spp. were isolated from both lesions. PMID:25648934

  6. Mycetoma due to Pseudallescheria boydii and co-isolation of Nocardia abscessus in a patient injured in road accident.

    PubMed

    Horré, R; Schumacher, G; Marklein, G; Stratmann, H; Wardelmann, E; Gilges, S; De Hoog, G S; Schaal, K P

    2002-10-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed a mycetoma after experiencing a road accident. From surgical biopsies Pseudallescheria boydii was isolated. Subsequently, after the infection had been treated with itraconazole, a Gram-positive bacterium, identified as the newly described species Nocardia abscessus, was cultured from wound fluids. PMID:12462533

  7. Systemic increased immune response to Nocardia brasiliensis co-exists with local immunosuppressive microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian Geovanni; Welsh, Oliverio

    2012-10-01

    Human diseases produced by pathogenic actinomycetes are increasing because they may be present as opportunistic infections. Some of these microbes cause systemic infections associated with immunosuppressive conditions, such as chemotherapy for cancer, immunosuppressive therapy for transplant, autoimmune conditions, and AIDS; while others usually cause localized infection in immunocompetent individuals. Other factors related to this increase in incidence are: antibiotic resistance, not well defined taxonomy, and a delay in isolation and identification of the offending microbe. Examples of these infections are systemic disease and brain abscesses produced by Nocardia asteroides or the located disease by Nocardia brasiliensis, named actinomycetoma. During the Pathogenic Actinomycetes Symposium of the 16th International Symposium on Biology of Actinomycetes (ISBA), held in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, several authors presented recent research on the mechanisms by which N. brasiliensis modulates the immune system to survive in the host and advances in medical treatment of human actinomycetoma. Antibiotics and antimicrobials that are effective against severe actinomycetoma infections with an excellent therapeutic outcome and experimental studies of drugs that show promising bacterial inhibition in vivo and in vitro were presented. Here we demonstrate a systemic strong acquired immune response in humans and experimental mice at the same time of a local dominance of anti inflammatory cytokines environment. The pathogenic mechanisms of some actinomycetes include generation of an immunosuppressive micro environment to evade the protective immune response. This information will be helpful in understanding pathogenesis and to design new drugs for treatment of actinomycetoma. PMID:22825801

  8. Oxidation of gaseous and volatile hydrocarbons by selected alkene-utilizing bacteria. [Mycobacterium; Nocardia

    SciTech Connect

    van Ginkel, C.G.; Welten, H.G.J.; de Bont, J.A.M.

    1987-12-01

    Eleven strains of alkene-utilizing bacteria belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Nocardia, and Xanthobacter were tested for their ability to grow with C/sub 1/ to C/sub 6/ alkanes, C/sub 2/ to C/sub 6/ alkenes, alkadienes, and monoterpenes furnished individually as sole sources of carbon and energy in a mineral salts medium. A limited number of alkenes and alkanes supported growth of the bacteria; some bacteria were unable to grow on any of the saturated hydrocarbons tested. Monoterpenes were frequently used as carbon and energy sources by alkene-utilizing bacteria belonging to the genera Mycobacterium and Nocardia. Washed cell suspensions of alkene-grown bacteria attack the whole range of alkenes tested, whereas only three strains were able to oxidize alkanes as well. The alkenes tested were oxidized either to water and carbon dioxide or to epoxyalkanes. Few epoxides accumulated in stoichiometric amounts from the corresponding alkenes, because most epoxides formed were further converted to other compounds like alkanediols.

  9. Naphthalene metabolism in Nocardia otitidiscaviarum strain TSH1, a moderately thermophilic microorganism.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Majid; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Ardestani, Sussan K

    2008-06-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Nocardia otitidiscaviarum strain TSH1, originally isolated in our laboratory from a petroindustrial wastewater contaminated soil in Iran, grows at 50 degrees C on a broad range of hydrocarbons. Transformation of naphthalene by strain TSH1 which is able to use this two ring-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) as a sole source of carbon and energy was investigated. The metabolic pathway was elucidated by identifying metabolites, biotransformation studies and monitoring enzyme activities in cell-free extracts. The identification of metabolites suggests that strain TSH1 initiates its attack on naphthalene by dioxygenation at its C-1 and C-2 positions to give 1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene. The intermediate 2-hydroxycinnamic acid, characteristic of the meta-cleavage of the resulting diol was identified in the acidic extract. Apart from typical metabolites of naphthalene degradation known from mesophiles, benzoic acid was identified as an intermediate for the naphthalene pathway of this Nocardia strain. Neither phthalic acid nor salicylic acid metabolites were detected in culture extracts. Enzymatic experiments with cell extract showed the catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity while transformation of phthalic acid and protocatechuic acid was not observed. The results of enzyme activity assays and identification of benzoic acid in culture extract provide strong indications that further degradation goes through benzoate and beta-ketoadipate pathway. Our results indicate that naphthalene degradation by thermophilic N. otitidiscaviarum strain TSH1 differs from the known pathways found for the thermophilic Bacillus thermoleovorans Hamburg 2 and mesophilic bacteria. PMID:18471862

  10. Novel bioactive metabolites from a marine derived bacterium Nocardia sp. ALAA 2000.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Mervat M A; Hawas, Usama W; Jaspars, Marcel

    2008-06-01

    Extracts of the Egyptian marine actinomycete, Nocardia sp. ALAA 2000, were found to be highly bioactive. It was isolated from the marine red alga Laurenica spectabilis collected off the Ras-Gharib coast of the Red Sea, Egypt. According to detailed identification studies, the strain was classified as a member of the genus Nocardia. The cultivation and chemical analysis of this species yielded four structurally related compounds namely, chrysophanol 8-methyl ether (1), asphodelin; 4,7'-bichrysophanol (2) and justicidin B (3), in addition to a novel bioactive compound ayamycin; 1,1-dichloro-4-ethyl-5-(4-nitro-phenyl)-hexan-2-one (4) which is unique in contain both chlorination and a rarely observed nitro group. The compounds were isolated by a series of chromatographic steps and their structures of 1approximately 3 secured by detailed spectroscopic analysis of the MS and NMR data whereas that of 4 was elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These compounds displayed different potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi with MIC ranging from 0.1 to 10 microg/ml. PMID:18667786

  11. Brain Abscesses Caused by Nocardia paucivorans in a Multiple Myeloma Patient Treated with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone: a Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Jacopo; Luzzati, Roberto; Maurel, Cristina; Rosin, Chiara; Valentinotti, Romina; Farina, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of multiple brain abscesses caused by Nocardia paucivorans in a patient suffering from multiple myeloma on treatment with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. N. paucivorans is a recently described species of the genus Nocardia, which is supposed to have a heightened neurotropism in cases of disseminated infection. Although nocardiosis itself is an uncommon infectious complication in multiple myeloma so far, nocardial brain abscess should be added to the spectrum of adverse effects due to this novel chemotherapy regimen. PMID:25574370

  12. Nocardia abscessus-related intracranial aneurysm of the internal carotid artery with associated brain abscess: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Farran, Yvette; Antony, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia infections primarily begin in the lungs and spread hematogenously to other sites in the body. Thus, a Nocardia brain abscess is not a completely uncommon occurrence. However, a Nocardia brain abscess complicated by a middle cerebral artery and infectious intracranial aneurysm is a very rare clinical entity. We present a case of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with an associated Nocardia brain abscess that required surgical intervention and resection. The patient was an immunocompetent 60-year-old male who presented with a chief complaint of headache and was found to have an infected intracranial aneurysm and cerebral abscess. He underwent drainage of the abscess with subsequent resection of the infected aneurysm. Cultures from both the blood vessel and brain tissue grew Nocardia abscessus. He was successfully treated with 6 weeks of ceftriaxone and high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Infectious intracranial aneurysms of the brain caused by Nocardia are rare occurrences, and only a single previous case has been described in the literature. The outcomes of this condition can be catastrophic if it is not treated with a combination of surgery and intravenous antibiotics. The guidelines for the management of this infection are not well defined at this time. PMID:26724261

  13. Pulmonary nocardiosis due to Nocardia farcinica in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Gowrinath, K; Baig, Waqas Wahid; Prabhu, Attur Ravindra; Chawla, Kiran; Bairy, Indira

    2009-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is an infrequent cause of nocardiosis among the renal transplant recipients and it has not been reported so far from India. We report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis due to N. farcinica in a 32-year-old woman with hypothyroidism and post-renal transplant status, currently on immunosuppressive therapy (prednisolone, azathioprine and tacrolimus). The N. farcinica isolate was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ), linezolid, imipenem, gentamicin but resistant to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, erythromycin, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and tetracycline. Treatment with TMP-SMZ and linezolid resulted in marked clinico-radiological improvement but after two weeks both of the drugs had to be stopped due to severe pancytopenia as adverse effect of their use. Currently, the patient is on imipenem and remains stable after four weeks of treatment. In N. farcinica infections, multi antibiotic resistance and toxicity of some specific drugs enhances the risk of therapeutic failure in renal transplant recipients. PMID:20073376

  14. Pyothorax caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in a patient with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Bandoh, Shuji; Fujita, Jiro; Tokuda, Michiaki; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2004-07-01

    We report a case of pyothorax caused by Nocardia (N.) otitidiscaviarum infection in a 69-year-old man with rheumatoid vasculitis, who was regularly treated with prednisolone in our hospital. Initially, the patient responded poorly to intravenous imipenem/cilastatin (IPM/CS), minocyclin (MINO), and oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), but later improved after treatment with levofloxacin (LVFX) and gentamicin sulfate (GM) according to in vitro susceptibility tests. To our knowledge, this is the first description of pyothorax caused by N. otitidiscaviarum infection. It is a rare disease, but recognition of the disease in immunocompromised patients and the prompt initiation of appropriate treatments based on isolation of the pathogen and susceptibility testing can lead to a successful outcome. PMID:15335193

  15. A study on L-asparaginase of Nocardia levis MK-VL_113.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva

    2012-01-01

    An enzyme-based drug, L-asparaginase, was produced by Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 isolated from laterite soils of Guntur region. Cultural parameters affecting the production of L-asparaginase by the strain were optimized. Maximal yields of L-asparaginase were recorded from 3-day-old culture grown in modified asparagine-glycerol salts broth with initial pH 7.0 at temperature 30°C. Glycerol (2%) and yeast extract (1.5%) served as good carbon and nitrogen sources for L-asparaginase production, respectively. Cell-disrupting agents like EDTA slightly enhanced the productivity of L-asparaginase. Ours is the first paper on the production of L-asparaginase by N. levis. PMID:22619604

  16. A Study on L-Asparaginase of Nocardia levis MK-VL_113

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Alapati; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva

    2012-01-01

    An enzyme-based drug, L-asparaginase, was produced by Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 isolated from laterite soils of Guntur region. Cultural parameters affecting the production of L-asparaginase by the strain were optimized. Maximal yields of L-asparaginase were recorded from 3-day-old culture grown in modified asparagine-glycerol salts broth with initial pH 7.0 at temperature 30°C. Glycerol (2%) and yeast extract (1.5%) served as good carbon and nitrogen sources for L-asparaginase production, respectively. Cell-disrupting agents like EDTA slightly enhanced the productivity of L-asparaginase. Ours is the first paper on the production of L-asparaginase by N. levis. PMID:22619604

  17. Microbial transformations of warfarin: stereoselective reduction by Nocardia corallina and Arthrobacter species.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, P J; Rizzo, J D

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological metabolism of warfarin was examined as a model of metabolism in higher organisms, including humans, and to determine the chirality of microbial reductases for application in organic synthesis. Nineteen cultures were examined based on their reported abilities to reduce ketonic substrates, and several were shown to catalyze the desired reaction. Nocardia corallina (ATCC 19070) exhibited complete substrate and product stereoselectivity as it reduced S-warfarin to the corresponding S-alcohol. Arthrobacter species (ATCC 19140) exhibited marked substrate and complete product stereoselectivity since S-warfarin, and to a lesser extent R-warfarin, were reduced to the corresponding S-alcohols. These reductions parallel those reported to occur in mammalian species. PMID:7081986

  18. Diesel and kerosene degradation by Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112 and Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans NCIM 2386.

    PubMed

    Kalme, Satish; Parshetti, Ganesh; Gomare, Sushma; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112 (Pd 2112) and Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans NCIM 2386 (Nh 2386) demonstrated an ability to degrade diesel and kerosene. Triton X-100 had enhanced the diesel degradation process by reducing the time required for the maximum utilization of total petroleum hydrocarbon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum of degraded diesel indicates the presence of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes, C=C aromatic nuclei, and substituted benzenes. Surface tension reduction and stable emulsification was increased using consortium when compared to individual strains. Triton X-100 showed increase in microbial attachment to hydrocarbon among the various chemical surfactants tested. For generating a rapid assay to screen microorganisms capable of degrading kerosene, the acetaldehyde produced in the degradation process could be used as an indicator of degradation. These results indicate diesel and kerosene degradation ability of both of the strains. PMID:18330635

  19. Unusual presentation of disseminated Nocardia abscessus infection in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Sherbuk, Jacqueline; Saly, Danielle; Barakat, Lydia; Ogbuagu, Onyema

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with AIDS presented with symptoms of a chronic cough, subacute headache, generalised weakness with falls, urinary and faecal incontinence, and acute onset subcutaneous nodules. A chest CT scan showed multiple cavitary and nodular pulmonary infiltrates. MRI of his brain and spinal cord revealed innumerable ring-enhancing lesions. Pathological examination of the purulent material obtained from his subcutaneous lesions, as well as transbronchial tissue specimens obtained by biopsy, revealed beaded and branching Gram-positive rods, subsequently identified by 16S RNA sequencing to be Nocardia abscessus species. We observed an excellent therapeutic response to a combination antimicrobial therapy with resolution of the subcutaneous, pulmonary and central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Infections caused by N. abscessus are rare and typically occur in immunocompromised patients. In this article, we will review the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of N. abscessus infection. PMID:27440848

  20. Identification and Functional Analysis of the Nocardithiocin Gene Cluster in Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kanae; Komaki, Hisayuki; Gonoi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Nocardithiocin is a thiopeptide compound isolated from the opportunistic pathogen Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis. It shows a strong activity against acid-fast bacteria and is also active against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we report the identification of the nocardithiocin gene cluster in N. pseudobrasiliensis IFM 0761 based on conserved thiopeptide biosynthesis gene sequence and the whole genome sequence. The predicted gene cluster was confirmed by gene disruption and complementation. As expected, strains containing the disrupted gene did not produce nocardithiocin while gene complementation restored nocardithiocin production in these strains. The predicted cluster was further analyzed using RNA-seq which showed that the nocardithiocin gene cluster contains 12 genes within a 15.2-kb region. This finding will promote the improvement of nocardithiocin productivity and its derivatives production. PMID:26588225

  1. Non-inducible, mainly cell-associated beta-lactamase from Nocardia asteroides strain 108.

    PubMed

    Scopetti, F; Fattorini, L; Franceschini, N; Amicosante, G; Orefici, G

    1997-07-01

    The beta-lactamase of the soil-borne strain 108 (parental strain) of Nocardia asteroides is a non-inducible enzyme mainly associated with the cells; it can be efficiently extracted by ultrasonication and SDS treatment. Crude enzyme preparations showed penicillinase and cephalosporinase activity. The kinetics of beta-lactamase production and in-vitro susceptibility to combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics plus beta-lactamase inhibitors have been studied in two stable overproducer mutants (A14 and B1) obtained by mutagenization of the parental strain with nitrosoguanidine. The cell-associated enzyme increased with bacterial growth in parental and mutant strains and was particularly abundant in stationary phase cells. The beta-lactamase inhibitors sulbactam and clavulanic acid decreased MIC values of penicillins more efficiently in the parental strain than in mutants, thus indicating some involvement of the enzyme in the resistance of N. asteroides strain 108 to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:9249198

  2. Isolation and genetic characterization of Nocardia seriolae from snubnose pompano Trachinotus blochii in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Vu-Khac, Hung; Duong, Van Quy; Chen, Shih-Chu; Pham, Trung Hieu; Nguyen, Thi Thu; Trinh, Thi Thu

    2016-07-01

    A total of 480 cage-cultured fish were collected from 4 coastal provinces in central Vietnam to investigate the causative agent of nocardiosis. Fish displayed unique characteristics such as paleness and lethargy and exhibited haemorrhages and ulcers on the skin. Prominent white nodules varying in size were observed in the spleen, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, histopathological sections showed typical granulomatous lesions in these organs. Using the Ziehl-Neelsen staining method, isolated bacteria exhibited acid-fast, bead-like filament morphology when cultured in brain-heart infusion medium or Ogawa medium. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA confirmed that the isolated bacterium was Nocardia seriolae. This study demonstrates for the first time an outbreak of N. seriolae in snubnose pompano in central Vietnam. PMID:27409241

  3. Nocardia prosthetic knee infection successfully treated by one-stage exchange: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Laurent, F; Rodriguez-Villalobos, H; Cornu, O; Vandercam, B; Yombi, J C

    2015-08-01

    A 64-year-old man with a history of sarcoidosis on corticosteroids and azathioprine was admitted to our hospital with complaints of worsening left knee pain and swelling for the past 3 weeks. His past medical history is also significant for severe osteoarthritis requiring a cemented total left knee arthroplasty 1 year ago. Diagnostic investigation during his hospital admission eventually led to the diagnosis of Nocardia nova knee prosthetic joint infection in the setting of a disseminated nocardiosis. He was successful treated by one-stage complete hardware exchange in conjunction with an adapted antibiotic therapy regimen (meropenem and doxycycline followed by ceftriaxone and doxycycline). Two years later, his recovery was deemed excellent. PMID:25560058

  4. Antagonistic Activity of Nocardia brasiliensis PTCC 1422 Against Isolated Enterobacteriaceae from Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Hossnieh Kafshdar; Salamatzadeh, Abdolreza; Jalali, Arezou Kafshdar; Kashani, Hamed Haddad; Asbchin, Salman Ahmadi; Issazadeh, Khosro

    2016-03-01

    The main drawback of current antibiotic therapies is the emergence and rapid increase in antibiotic resistance. Nocardiae are aerobic, Gram-positive, catalase-positive, non-motile actinomycetes. Nocardia brasiliensis was reported as antibiotic producer. The purpose of the study was to determine antibacterial activity of N. brasiliensis PTCC 1422 against isolated Enterobacteriaceae from urinary tract infections (UTIs). The common bacteria from UTIs were isolated from hospital samples. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for the isolated pathogens using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guideline. Antagonistic activity of N. brasiliensis PTCC 1422 was examined with well diffusion methods. Supernatant of N. brasiliensis PTCC 1422 by submerged culture was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Isolated strains included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens and Proteus mirabilis. The most common pathogen isolated was E. coli (72.5%). Bacterial isolates revealed the presence of high levels of antimicrobial resistances to ceftriaxone and low levels of resistance to cephalexin. Supernatant of N. brasiliensis PTCC 1422 showed antibacterial activity against all of the isolated microorganisms in well diffusion method. The antibiotic resistance among the uropathogens is an evolving process, so a routine surveillance to monitor the etiologic agents of UTI and the resistance pattern should be carried out timely to choose the most effective empirical treatment by the physicians. Our present investigation indicates that the substances present in the N. brasiliensis PTCC 1422 could be used to inhibit the growth of human pathogen. Antibacterial resistance among bacterial uropathogen is an evolving process. Therefore, in the field on the need of re-evaluation of empirical treatment of UTIs, our present. The study has demonstrated that N. brasiliensis PTCC 1422 has a high potential

  5. Nocardia farcinica Activates Human Dendritic Cells and Induces Secretion of Interleukin-23 (IL-23) Rather than IL-12p70

    PubMed Central

    Eisenblätter, Martin; Buchal, Ariane; Gayum, Hermine; Jasny, Edith; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Ulrichs, Timo; Schneider, Thomas; Schumann, Ralf R.; Zweigner, Janine

    2012-01-01

    Studying the interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with bacteria controlled by T-cell-mediated immune responses may reveal novel adjuvants for the induction of cellular immunity. Murine studies and the observation that nocardias infect predominantly immunosuppressed patients have suggested that these bacteria may possess an adjuvant potential. Moreover, adjuvants on the basis of the nocardial cell wall have been applied in clinical studies. Since the handling of adjuvants by DCs may determine the type of immune responses induced by a vaccine, the present study aimed at investigating the interaction of immature human monocyte-derived DCs with live or inactivated Nocardia farcinica in vitro and determining the cellular phenotypic changes as well as alterations in characteristic functions, such as phagocytosis, induction of T-cell proliferation, and cytokine secretion. Human DCs ingested N. farcinica and eradicated the bacterium intracellularly. DCs exposed to inactivated N. farcinica were activated, i.e., they developed a mature phenotype, downregulated their phagocytic capacity, and stimulated allogeneic T cells in mixed leukocyte reactions. Soluble factors were not involved in this process. To elucidate the potential adjuvant effect of N. farcinica on the induction of T-cell-mediated immune responses, we characterized the cytokines produced by nocardia-exposed DCs and detected substantial amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-12 p40 (IL-12p40). However, nocardia-treated DCs secreted only small amounts of IL-12p70, which were significantly smaller than the amounts of IL-23. Thus, N. farcinica activates DCs, but adjuvants based on this bacterium may have only a limited capacity to induce Th1 immune responses. PMID:22988018

  6. Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity of Forest-Derived Soil Actinomycete, Nocardia sp. PB-52

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyanka; Kalita, Mohan C.; Thakur, Debajit

    2016-01-01

    A mesophilic actinomycete strain designated as PB-52 was isolated from soil samples of Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary of Assam, India. Based on phenotypic and molecular characteristics, the strain was identified as Nocardia sp. which shares 99.7% sequence similarity with Nocardia niigatensis IFM 0330 (NR_112195). The strain is a Gram-positive filamentous bacterium with rugose spore surface which exhibited a wide range of antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Gram-negative bacteria, and yeasts. Optimization for the growth and antimicrobial activity of the strain PB-52 was carried out in batch culture under shaking condition. The optimum growth and antimicrobial potential of the strain were recorded in GLM medium at 28°C, initial pH 7.4 of the medium and incubation period of 8 days. Based on polyketide synthases (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) gene-targeted PCR amplification, the occurrence of both of these biosynthetic pathways was detected which might be involved in the production of antimicrobial compounds in PB-52. Extract of the fermented broth culture of PB-52 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method using ethyl acetate. The ethyl acetate extract of PB-52 (EA-PB-52) showed lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against S. aureus MTCC 96 (0.975 μg/mL) whereas highest was recorded against Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (62.5 μg/mL). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that treatment of the test microorganisms with EA-PB-52 destroyed the targeted cells with prominent loss of cell shape and integrity. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its antimicrobial activity, EA-PB-52 was subjected to chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). GC-MS analysis showed the presence of twelve different chemical constituents in the extract, some of which are reported to possess diverse biological activity. These

  7. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  8. Lymphocutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection acquired from a cat scratch: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Sachs, M K

    1992-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a bacterium that is most commonly found in the soil. Traumatic inoculation of N. brasiliensis into the skin is the most typical mode of acquisition of infection due to this organism. To the best of my knowledge, I report the first case of lymphocutaneous N. brasiliensis disease from a penetrating cat scratch of the skin, thereby establishing cats as vehicles for the transmission of this infection. Treatment with penicillin produced a rapid resolution of all signs and symptoms of infection. The efficacy of penicillin against the N. brasiliensis isolate recovered from this patient was highly unusual. In general, penicillin has limited therapeutic value since these organisms elaborate beta-lactamase. Sulfonamides remain the drugs of choice for the treatment of these infections. These soil-borne organisms are most likely carried on the claws of cats and may establish infection after percutaneous inoculation. A high index of suspicion for N. brasiliensis soft-tissue infection is required since a delayed or missed diagnosis may be associated with progressive local disease and/or widespread disseminated infection. PMID:1420688

  9. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  10. Nocardia asteroides recovery from a dog with steroid- and antibiotic-unresponsive idiopathic polyarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, A M; Beaman, B L; Pedersen, N C; Anderson, M; Scott, J L

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a fatal case of idiopathic polyarthritis in a dog that was partially responsive to vigorous immunosuppressive treatment. Synovial fluids were cultured for L-forms at the following stages of disease: (i) acute arthritic relapse, (ii) incomplete remission, and (iii) death. Nocardia asteroides UCD 1-581 was recovered from the L-form broth culture of the specimen taken during acute relapse, 5 weeks after inoculation, but not at any other stage of disease. Numerous conventional microbiological cultures were unproductive during all phases. Changes occurring in L-form plates included the formation of large irregular mineral deposits and many transferable bodies resembling pseudocolonies. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of many intracellular golden-brown granules and acid-fast bodies in macrophages of the lung and bronchial lymph node tissues. The granules are believed to be the variants embedded in calcium deposits similar to those which developed in the L-form cultures in vitro. Fluorescence of these acid-fast bodies with antibody specific for superoxide dismutase of N. asteroides GUH-2 and labeled anti-immunoglobulin G established their relationship to the isolate. The unrelenting course of disease and the persistence of N. asteroides as an L-form in this animal despite vigorous immunosuppression suggest that this organism plays a direct role in the etiology of this disease. Images PMID:6355155

  11. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Nader; Izhakain, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G; Fruchter, Oren; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual. PMID:26819795

  12. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Nader; Izhakain, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G.; Fruchter, Oren; Kramer, Mordechai R.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual. PMID:26819795

  13. Nocardia farcinica sternotomy site infections in patients following open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Wenger, P N; Brown, J M; McNeil, M M; Jarvis, W R

    1998-11-01

    Although Nocardia farcinica surgical site infection outbreaks have been reported (though rarely), no source for these has been identified. From May 1992 through June 1993, 5 patients contracted N. farcinica sternotomy site infections following open heart surgery at hospital A. A case-control study comparing case-patients (n=5) with open heart surgery patients without subsequent sternotomy site infections (n=50) identified as risk factors diabetes (4/5 vs. 11/50, P<.02) and exposure to a particular anesthesiologist (anesthesiologist A; 4/5 vs. 9/50, P<.01). Four case-patients' isolates and a hand isolate of anesthesiologist A had an identical ribotype pattern (strain 1); the remaining case-patient's isolate and multiple isolates from anesthesiologist A's hands and home had a different ribotype pattern (strain 2). An intensified hand-washing regimen, barriers (gloves, gowns), and cleaning of anesthesiologist A's house were associated with termination of the outbreak. This is the first reported nosocomial N. farcinica outbreak to document the source and person-to-person transmission epidemiologically and molecularly. PMID:9780283

  14. In vitro germicidal activity of teat dips against Nocardia asteroides and other udder pathogens.

    PubMed

    Larocque, L; Malik, S S; Landry, D A; Presseault, S; Sved, S; Matula, T

    1992-05-01

    Nine commercial teat dip formulations containing 1.94% linear dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid, or 1% available iodine from nonylphenoxypoly (ethyleneoxy) ethanol-iodine complex, or .5% chlorhexidine acetate were tested for contamination with aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and their in vitro germicidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, and Nocardia asteroides. All products were free of bacteria when neutralized samples were tested on blood agar or liquid thioglycollate media. To test for in vitro efficacy, each teat dip preparation was mixed with a suspension of one of the pathogenic test organisms containing 10(8) bacteria/ml (final concentration) for .5 to 15 min. Viable bacteria were evaluated by direct plating of neutralized aliquots and by filtration techniques. All products were effective against E. coli, Staph. aureus, and Strep. agalactiae. With N. asteroides, the direct plating method gave equivocal results. The filtration experiments indicated that all teat dips containing dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid and nonylphenoxypoly (ethyleneoxy) ethanol-iodine complex were effective against all four pathogens. Three of the teat dips containing chlorhexidine acetate were ineffective against N. asteroides. The fourth teat dip, containing chlorhexidine acetate and an emollient, was partially effective. PMID:1597578

  15. Isolation and structure of nocobactin NA, a lipid-soluble iron-binding compound from Nocardia asteroides

    PubMed Central

    Ratledge, Colin; Snow, G. Alan

    1974-01-01

    Nocobactin NA, a lipid-soluble iron-chelating product with an unusual and characteristic u.v.-absorption spectrum, was isolated from Nocardia asteroides grown under conditions of iron deficiency. Its structure was determined by physical methods and by synthesis of one of its degradation products. Nocobactin NA was obtained as a homologous mixture of compounds with side chains of differing length, and resembles mycobactin M in structure except that it has an oxazole ring in place of an oxazoline ring, and the side chains in the cobactin fragment are considerably shorter. PMID:4614794

  16. Isolation, characterization and biological evaluation of bioactive metabolites from Nocardia levis MK-VL_113.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Narasimhulu, Manchala; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Rao, Karanam Venkateswara; Raju, Venkata Balaraju Subba

    2010-03-31

    An Actinomycete isolate found to be prominent in the laterite soils of Acharya Nagarjuna University (ANU) Campus, Guntur was identified as Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 by 16S rRNA analysis. Cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics of the strain were recorded. Screening of secondary metabolites obtained from 4-day old culture broth of the strain led to the isolation of two fractions active against a wide variety of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The structure of the first active fraction was elucidated using FT-IR, EI-MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra and identified as 1-phenylbut-3-ene-2-ol which is first time reported as a natural product. The compound exhibited good antimicrobial potential against the opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The antifungal activity of the strain and its metabolite were further confirmed with in vitro and in vivo studies. Evidence for the antagonism of the strain against Fusarium oxysporum, causing wilt disease in sorghum was demonstrated by the formation of inhibition zone in in vitro plate assay and reduction in the incidence of wilt of sorghum plants by using a green house trial. Analysis of the rhizosphere soil extracts by high performance liquid chromatography also demonstrated the production of the compound by the strain under in vivo conditions. As compared to the commercial fungicide mancozeb, the bioactive compound, 1-phenylbut-3-ene-2-ol was highly effective in controlling wilt of sorghum. Besides, the partially purified second fraction (PPF) subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of phenylethyl alcohol, dibutyl phthalate and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 3-nitro. PMID:19577444

  17. Nocardia globerula NHB-2 nitrilase catalysed biotransformation of 4-cyanopyridine to isonicotinic acid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Isonicotinic acid (INA) is an important pyridine derivative used in the manufacture of isoniazid (antituberculosatic drug) and other pharmaceutically important drugs. Nitrilase catalysed processes for the synthesis of pharmaceutically important acids from their corresponding nitriles are promising alternative over the cumbersome, hazardous, and energy demanding chemical processes. Nitrilase of Nocardia globerula NHB-2 (NitNHB2) is expressed in presence of isobutyronitrile in the growth medium (1.0% glucose, 0.5% peptone, 0.3% beef extract, and 0.1 % yeast extract, pH 7.5). NitNHB2 hydrolyses 4-cyanopyridine (4-CP) to INA without accumulation of isonicotinamide, which is common in the reaction catalysed via fungal nitrilases. The NitNHB2 suffers from substrate inhibition effect and hydrolysing activity up to 250 mM 4-CP was recorded. Complete conversion of 200 mM 4-CP to INA was achieved in 40 min using resting cell concentration corresponding to 10 U mL-1 nitrilase activity in the reaction. Substrate inhibition effect in the fed batch reaction (200 mM substrate feed/40min) led to formation of only 729 mM INA. In a fed batch reaction (100 mM 4-CP/20min), substrate inhibition effect was encountered after 7th feed and a total of 958 mM INA was produced in 400 min. The fed batch reaction scaled up to 1 L and 100% hydrolysis of 700 mM of 4-CP to INA at 35°C achieved in 140 min. The rate of INA production was 21.1 g h-1 mgDCW-1. This is the fastest biotransformation process ever reported for INA production with time and space productivity of 36 g L-1 h-1 using a bacterial nitrilase. PMID:22537922

  18. Rare actinomycetes Nocardia caishijiensis and Pseudonocardia carboxydivorans as endophytes, their bioactivity and metabolites evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Rabia; Sajid, Imran; Hasnain, Shahida; Kulik, Andreas; Grond, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Two strains identified as Nocardia caishijiensis (SORS 64b) and Pseudonocardia carboxydivorans (AGLS 2) were isolated as endophytes from Sonchus oleraceus and Ageratum conyzoides respectively. The analysis of their extracts revealed them to be strongly bioactive. The N. caishijiensis extract gave an LC50 of 570 μg/ml(-1) in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay and an EC50 of 0.552 μg/ml(-1) in the DPPH antioxidant assay. Antimicrobial activity was observed against Methicillin resistant Staphlococcus aureus (MRSA) and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (14 mm), Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 706003 (13 mm), S. aureus ATCC 25923 (11 mm) and Candida tropicalis (20 mm). For the extract of P. carboxydivorans the EC50 was 0.670 μg/ml(-1) and it was observed to be more bioactive against Bacillus subtilis DSM 10 ATCC 6051 (21 mm), C. tropicalis (20 mm), S. aureus ATCC 25923 (17 mm), MRSA (17 mm), E. coli K12 (W1130) (16 mm) and Chlorella vulgaris (10 mm). The genotoxicity testing revealed a 20 mm zone of inhibition against the polA mutant strain E. coli K-12 AB 3027 suggesting damage to the DNA and polA genes. The TLC and bioautography screening revealed a diversity of active bands of medium polar and nonpolar compounds. Metabolite analysis by HPLC-DAD via UV/vis spectral screening suggested the possibility of stenothricin and bagremycin A in the mycelium extract of N. caishijiensis respectively. In the broth and mycelium extract of P. carboxydivorans borrelidin was suggested along with α-pyrone. The HPLC-MS revealed bioactive long chained amide derivatives such as 7-Octadecenamide, 9, 12 octadecandienamide. This study reports the rare actinomycetes N. caishijiensis and P. carboxydivorans as endophytes and evaluates their bioactive metabolites. PMID:26946375

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia seriolae Strain N-2927 (NBRC 110360), Isolated as the Causal Agent of Nocardiosis of Yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) in Kochi Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Fukumoto, Yoichi; Yamane, Jin; Sukeda, Masaki; Shimizu, Masato; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Oshima, Syun-Ichirou

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Nocardia seriolae strain N-2927 (NBRC 110360), isolated from cultured yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. RAST annotation of the genome revealed 117 genes involved in the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem. Eleven of these genes were predicted as antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:25767227

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia seriolae Strain N-2927 (NBRC 110360), Isolated as the Causal Agent of Nocardiosis of Yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) in Kochi Prefecture, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yoichi; Yamane, Jin; Sukeda, Masaki; Shimizu, Masato; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Oshima, Syun-ichirou

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Nocardia seriolae strain N-2927 (NBRC 110360), isolated from cultured yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. RAST annotation of the genome revealed 117 genes involved in the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem. Eleven of these genes were predicted as antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:25767227

  1. Permanent Improved High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia casuarinae Strain BMG51109, an Endophyte of Actinorhizal Root Nodules of Casuarina glauca

    PubMed Central

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Louati, Moussa; Nouioui, Imen; Ktari, Amir; Hezbri, Karima; Gueddou, Abdellatif; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Pagani, Ioanna; Sen, Arnab; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Gtari, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first genome sequence of a Nocardia plant endophyte, N. casuarinae strain BMG51109, isolated from Casuarina glauca root nodules. The improved high-quality draft genome sequence contains 8,787,999 bp with a 68.90% GC content and 7,307 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:27491980

  2. Permanent Improved High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia casuarinae Strain BMG51109, an Endophyte of Actinorhizal Root Nodules of Casuarina glauca.

    PubMed

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Louati, Moussa; Nouioui, Imen; Ktari, Amir; Hezbri, Karima; Gueddou, Abdellatif; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Pagani, Ioanna; Sen, Arnab; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Gtari, Maher; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first genome sequence of a Nocardia plant endophyte, N. casuarinae strain BMG51109, isolated from Casuarina glauca root nodules. The improved high-quality draft genome sequence contains 8,787,999 bp with a 68.90% GC content and 7,307 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:27491980

  3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serological diagnosis of Nocardia brasiliensis and clinical correlation with mycetoma infections.

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Carmona, M C; Welsh, O; Casillas, S M

    1993-01-01

    We previously identified three immunodominant antigens obtained from a Nocardia brasiliensis cell extract and recognized by sera from mycetoma patients (M. C. Salinas-Carmona, L. Vera, O. Welsh, and M. Rodríguez, Zentralbl. Bakteriol. 276:390-397, 1992). In the present work, we obtained a crude extract from a mass culture of N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and purified two immunodominant antigens, the 26- and 24-kDa proteins, by using simple physiochemical techniques. With these antigens, we developed a conventional solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and tested 30 serum samples from mycetoma patients, 29 from tuberculosis patients, 24 from a leprosy group, and 31 from healthy individuals. Our results show for the first time statistically significant differences in serology among these groups. All mycetoma patients with a positive culture for N. brasiliensis had absorbance values higher than 0.3. On the other hand, the mycobacterium-infected patients as well as the healthy individuals all had absorbance values below that level. Moreover, we found a close correlation between the clinical condition of the mycetoma patients and the anti-26- and anti-24-kDa protein antibody concentrations. We therefore propose the use of this assay in routine clinical laboratories to confirm the diagnosis of N. brasiliensis infection in human mycetoma cases. In addition, the possible application of this assay in the serodiagnosis of Nocardia asteroides infection is also discussed. Images PMID:8263174

  4. Thyrotoxicosis followed by Hypothyroidism due to Suppurative Thyroiditis Caused by Nocardia brasiliensis in a Patient with Advanced Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teckie, G2; Bhana, S A; Tsitsi, J M L; Shires, R

    2014-03-01

    Acute thyroiditis is an extremely rare complication of nocardiosis. We report a patient with hyperthyroidism due to suppurative thyroiditis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis. A 38-year-old Black male presented with features of thyrotoxicosis, sepsis and airway obstruction. He had no evidence of underlying thyroid disease, but was severely immunocompromised as a result of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. He had previously been diagnosed with pulmonary nocardiosis and also had nocardial abscesses on his anterior chest wall. Investigations revealed thyrotoxicosis, with a FT4 of 43.2 pmol/l and a suppressed TSH <0.01 mIU/l. Serum anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies were absent. Computed tomography scan showed a large abscess in the anterior neck involving the left lobe and isthmus, as well as inhomogeneous changes in the right lobe of the thyroid. The radioisotopic scan showed absent uptake of tracer in keeping with thyroiditis. Although the initial presentation was that of hyperthyroidism, destruction of the gland later resulted in sustained hypothyroidism, necessitating thyroid hormone supplementation. The hyperthyroidism can be explained by the release of presynthesized and stored thyroid hormone into the circulation as a result of inflammation and disruption of the thyroid follicles, and the subsequent hypothyroidism by the fact that much of the gland was destroyed by the abscess and the extensive inflammatory process. This is the first documented case of hyperthyroidism in a patient with acute suppurative thyroiditis caused by Nocardia. PMID:24847469

  5. Shortcomings of the Commercial MALDI-TOF MS Database and Use of MLSA as an Arbiter in the Identification of Nocardia Species

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Gema; de Dios Caballero, Juan; Garrido, Noelia; Valdezate, Sylvia; Cantón, Rafael; Sáez-Nieto, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are difficult to identify, a consequence of the ever increasing number of species known and their homogeneous genetic characteristics. 16S rRNA analysis has been the gold standard for identifying these organisms, but proteomic techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) and housekeeping gene analysis, have also been explored. One hundred high (n = 25), intermediate (n = 20), and low (n = 55) prevalence (for Spain) Nocardia strains belonging to 30 species were identified via 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The manufacturer-provided database MALDI Biotyper library v4.0 (5.627 entries, Bruker Daltonik) was employed. In the high prevalence group (Nocardia farcinica, N. abscessus, N. cyriacigeorgica and N. nova), the 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS methods provided the same identification for 76% of the strains examined. For the intermediate prevalence group (N. brasiliensis, N. carnea, N. otitidiscaviarum and N. transvalensis complex), this figure fell to 45%. In the low-prevalence group (22 species), these two methods were concordant only in six strains at the species level. Tetra-gene multi-locus sequencing analysis (MLSA) involving the concatemer gyrB-16S rRNA-hsp65-secA1 was used to arbitrate between discrepant identifications (n = 67). Overall, the MLSA confirmed the results provided at species level by 16S rRNA analysis in 34.3% of discrepancies, and those provided by MALDI-TOF MS in 13.4%. MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate for the identification of Nocardia species, but only if its reference spectrum database improves, especially with respect to unusual, recently described species and species included in the described Nocardia complexes. PMID:27148228

  6. Shortcomings of the Commercial MALDI-TOF MS Database and Use of MLSA as an Arbiter in the Identification of Nocardia Species.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Gema; de Dios Caballero, Juan; Garrido, Noelia; Valdezate, Sylvia; Cantón, Rafael; Sáez-Nieto, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are difficult to identify, a consequence of the ever increasing number of species known and their homogeneous genetic characteristics. 16S rRNA analysis has been the gold standard for identifying these organisms, but proteomic techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) and housekeeping gene analysis, have also been explored. One hundred high (n = 25), intermediate (n = 20), and low (n = 55) prevalence (for Spain) Nocardia strains belonging to 30 species were identified via 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The manufacturer-provided database MALDI Biotyper library v4.0 (5.627 entries, Bruker Daltonik) was employed. In the high prevalence group (Nocardia farcinica, N. abscessus, N. cyriacigeorgica and N. nova), the 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS methods provided the same identification for 76% of the strains examined. For the intermediate prevalence group (N. brasiliensis, N. carnea, N. otitidiscaviarum and N. transvalensis complex), this figure fell to 45%. In the low-prevalence group (22 species), these two methods were concordant only in six strains at the species level. Tetra-gene multi-locus sequencing analysis (MLSA) involving the concatemer gyrB-16S rRNA-hsp65-secA1 was used to arbitrate between discrepant identifications (n = 67). Overall, the MLSA confirmed the results provided at species level by 16S rRNA analysis in 34.3% of discrepancies, and those provided by MALDI-TOF MS in 13.4%. MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate for the identification of Nocardia species, but only if its reference spectrum database improves, especially with respect to unusual, recently described species and species included in the described Nocardia complexes. PMID:27148228

  7. Multicenter Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Study for Identification of Clinically Relevant Nocardia spp.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Sara J; Drake, Steven K; Andrasko, Jennifer L; Henderson, Christina M; Kamboj, Kamal; Antonara, Stella; Mijares, Lilia; Conville, Patricia; Frank, Karen M; Harrington, Susan M; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2016-05-01

    This multicenter study analyzed Nocardia spp., including extraction, spectral acquisition, Bruker matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification, and score interpretation, using three Nocardia libraries, the Bruker, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and The Ohio State University (OSU) libraries, and compared the results obtained by each center. A standardized study protocol, 150 Nocardia isolates, and NIH and OSU Nocardia MALDI-TOF MS libraries were distributed to three centers. Following standardized culture, extraction, and MALDI-TOF MS analysis, isolates were identified using score cutoffs of ≥2.0 for species/species complex-level identification and ≥1.8 for genus-level identification. Isolates yielding a score of <2.0 underwent a single repeat extraction and analysis. The overall score range for all centers was 1.3 to 2.7 (average, 2.2 ± 0.3), with common species generally producing higher average scores than less common ones. Score categorization and isolate identification demonstrated 86% agreement between centers; 118 of 150 isolates were correctly identified to the species/species complex level by all centers. Nine strains (6.0%) were not identified by any center, and six (4.0%) of these were uncommon species with limited library representation. A categorical score discrepancy among centers occurred for 21 isolates (14.0%). There was an overall benefit of 21.2% from repeat extraction of low-scoring isolates and a center-dependent benefit for duplicate spotting (range, 2 to 8.7%). Finally, supplementation of the Bruker Nocardia MALDI-TOF MS library with both the OSU and NIH libraries increased the genus-level and species-level identification by 18.2% and 36.9%, respectively. Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of diverse clinical microbiology laboratories to utilize MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid identification of clinically relevant Nocardia spp. and to implement MALDI-TOF MS libraries

  8. Purification and properties of alpha-pinene oxide lyase from Nocardia sp. strain P18.3.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, E T; Harries, P C; Jeffcoat, R; Trudgill, P W

    1987-01-01

    alpha-Pinene oxide is an intermediate in the degradation of alpha-pinene by Nocardia sp. strain P18.3 and some Pseudomonas strains. The epoxide is cleaved by a lyase which catalyzes a concerted reaction in which both rings of the bicyclic structure are cleaved with the formation of cis-2-methyl-5-isopropylhexa-2,5-dienal. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from Nocardia sp. strain P18.3. It was induced by growth with alpha-pinene and constituted 6 to 7% of the soluble protein of cell extracts. The apparent molecular weight of the native enzyme was 50,000 by ultracentrifugal analysis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gave two dissimilar subunits with apparent molecular weights of 17,000 and 22,000. The enzyme was devoid of prosthetic groups, had no cofactor requirement, and had a broad pH activity range, a Km for alpha-pinene oxide of 9 microM, and a turnover number of 15,000. Inhibitors included sulfhydryl reactive compounds, terpene epoxides, and pinane derivatives with substituent groups at carbon 3. A mechanism for the concerted reaction has been proposed in which decyclization is initiated by donation of a proton from the catalytic center to the oxygen of the epoxide with consequent destabilization. In vitro the enzyme was inactivated during catalysis, and a reactive cationic intermediate may be responsible for this phenomenon. The enzyme should be classified as a lyase EC 4.99.-.-. Images PMID:3667522

  9. Predicted highly expressed genes in Nocardia farcinica and the implication to its primary metabolism and nocardial virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Nie, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-02-23

    Nocardia farcinica is a gram positive, filamentous bacterium, and is considered an opportunistic pathogen. In this study, the highly expressed genes in N. farcinica were predicted using the codon adaptation index (CAI) as a numerical estimator of gene expressivity. Using ribosomal protein (RP) genes as references, the top {approx}10% of the genes were predicted to be the predicted highly expressed (PHX) genes in N. farcinica using a CAI cutoff of greater than 0.73. Consistent with early analysis in Streptomyces genomes, most of the PHX genes in N. farcinica were involved in various ''house-keeping'' functions important for cell growth. However, fifteen genes putatively involved in no cardial virulence were predicted as PHX in N. farcinica, which included genes encoding four Mce virulence proteins, cyclopropane fatty acid synthase which is involved in the modification of cell wall important for nocardia virulence, polyketide synthase PKS13 for mycolic acid synthesis and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in biosynthesis of a mycobactin-related siderophore. In addition, multiple genes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the phagocyte were predicted with high expressivity, which included alkylhydroperoxide reductase (ahpC), catalase (katG), superoxide dismutase (sodF), thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that combating against ROS was essential for survival of N. farcinica in host cells. The study also showed that the distribution of PHX genes in the N. farcinica circular chromosome was uneven, with more PHX genes located in the regions close to replication initiation site. The results provided the first approximates of global gene expression patterns in N. farcinica, which will be useful in guiding experimental design for further investigation.

  10. Accurate Identification of Common Pathogenic Nocardia Species: Evaluation of a Multilocus Sequence Analysis Platform and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Pang, Lu; Chen, Sharon C-A; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Xia; Hou, Xin; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Species identification of Nocardia is not straightforward due to rapidly evolving taxonomy, insufficient discriminatory power of conventional phenotypic methods and also of single gene locus analysis including 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here we evaluated the ability of a 5-locus (16S rRNA, gyrB, secA1, hsp65 and rpoB) multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach as well as that of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison with sequencing of the 5'-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene to provide identification of 25 clinical isolates of Nocardia. The 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing successfully assigned 24 of 25 (96%) clinical isolates to species level, namely Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n = 12, 48%), N. farcinica (n = 9, 36%), N. abscessus (n = 2, 8%) and N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 1, 4%). MLSA showed concordance with 16S rRNA gene sequencing results for the same 24 isolates. However, MLSA was able to identify the remaining isolate as N. wallacei, and clustered N. cyriacigeorgica into three subgroups. None of the clinical isolates were correctly identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS analysis using the manufacturer-provided database. A small "in-house" spectral database was established incorporating spectra of five clinical isolates representing the five species identified in this study. After complementation with the "in-house" database, of the remaining 20 isolates, 19 (95%) were correctly identified to species level (score ≥ 2.00) and one (an N. abscessus strain) to genus level (score ≥ 1.70 and < 2.00). In summary, MLSA showed superior discriminatory power compared with the 5'-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identification of Nocardia. MALDI-TOF MS can provide rapid and accurate identification but is reliant on a robust mass spectra database. PMID:26808813

  11. Brasiliquinones A, B and C, new benz[alpha]anthraquinone antibiotics from Nocardia brasiliensis. I. Producing strain, isolation and biological activities of the antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, A; Tanaka, Y; Karasaki, Y; Komaki, H; Yazawa, K; Mikami, Y; Tojo, T; Kadowaki, K; Tsuda, M; Kobayashi, J

    1997-01-01

    New benz[alpha]anthraquinone antibiotics (brasiliquinones A, B and C) with an ethyl group at C-3 were isolated. The producer was identified as Nocardia brasiliensis. The antibiotics were active against Gram-positive bacteria including Mycobacterium sp., but not active against Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. They were also active against multiple drug-resistant P388/ADR tumor cells. PMID:9066761

  12. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization−Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Mycobacterium species, Nocardia species, and Other Aerobic Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, S. P.; Olson, S. L.; Connelly, B. J.; Lucas, B. C.; Rodning, A. A.; Walchak, R. C.; Deml, S. M.; Wohlfiel, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    The value of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization−time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of bacteria and yeasts is well documented in the literature. Its utility for the identification of mycobacteria and Nocardia spp. has also been reported in a limited scope. In this work, we report the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of 162 Mycobacterium species and subspecies, 53 Nocardia species, and 13 genera (totaling 43 species) of other aerobic actinomycetes using both the MALDI-TOF MS manufacturer's supplied database(s) and a custom database generated in our laboratory. The performance of a simplified processing and extraction procedure was also evaluated, and, similar to the results in an earlier literature report, our viability studies confirmed the ability of this process to inactivate Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to analysis. Following library construction and the specificity study, the performance of MALDI-TOF MS was directly compared with that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the evaluation of 297 mycobacteria isolates, 148 Nocardia species isolates, and 61 other aerobic actinomycetes isolates under routine clinical laboratory working conditions over a 6-month period. MALDI-TOF MS is a valuable tool for the identification of these groups of organisms. Limitations in the databases and in the ability of MALDI-TOF MS to rapidly identify slowly growing mycobacteria are discussed. PMID:26637381

  13. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Mycobacterium species, Nocardia species, and Other Aerobic Actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, S P; Olson, S L; Connelly, B J; Lucas, B C; Rodning, A A; Walchak, R C; Deml, S M; Wohlfiel, S L; Wengenack, N L

    2016-02-01

    The value of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of bacteria and yeasts is well documented in the literature. Its utility for the identification of mycobacteria and Nocardia spp. has also been reported in a limited scope. In this work, we report the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of 162 Mycobacterium species and subspecies, 53 Nocardia species, and 13 genera (totaling 43 species) of other aerobic actinomycetes using both the MALDI-TOF MS manufacturer's supplied database(s) and a custom database generated in our laboratory. The performance of a simplified processing and extraction procedure was also evaluated, and, similar to the results in an earlier literature report, our viability studies confirmed the ability of this process to inactivate Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to analysis. Following library construction and the specificity study, the performance of MALDI-TOF MS was directly compared with that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the evaluation of 297 mycobacteria isolates, 148 Nocardia species isolates, and 61 other aerobic actinomycetes isolates under routine clinical laboratory working conditions over a 6-month period. MALDI-TOF MS is a valuable tool for the identification of these groups of organisms. Limitations in the databases and in the ability of MALDI-TOF MS to rapidly identify slowly growing mycobacteria are discussed. PMID:26637381

  14. Purification and characterization of a cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase from Nocardia tartaricans CAS-52, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziqiang; Wang, Yunshan; Su, Zhiguo

    2013-03-01

    A highly enantioselective cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase from Nocardia tartaricans was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme was purified 184-fold with a yield of 18.8 %. The purified cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase had a monomeric molecular weight of 28 kDa, and its optimum conditions were 37 °C and pH 7-9. With sodium cis-epoxysuccinate as the substrate, Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics analysis gave a Km value of 35.71 mM and a Vmax of 2.65 mM min(-1). The enzyme was activated by Ni(2+) and Al(3+), while strongly inhibited by Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Ag(+). The cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase gene was cloned, and its open reading frame sequence predicted a protein composed of 253 amino acids. A pET11a expression plasmid carrying the gene under the control of the T7 promoter was introduced into Escherichia coli, and the cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase gene was successfully expressed in the recombinant strains. PMID:22552902

  15. Two different primary oxidation mechanisms during biotransformation of thymol by gram-positive bacteria of the genera Nocardia and Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Veronika; Sünwoldt, Katharina; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-02-01

    Thymol has antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal, and antioxidative properties which are the basis for the wide use of this compound in the cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Although thymol is a ubiquitously occurring substance in the environment, data about its degradation and detoxification by bacteria are sparse. Here, we show the existence of two different pathways for the biotransformation of thymol by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica and Mycobacterium neoaurum which were described for the first time for gram-positive bacteria. The first pathway starts with hydroxylation of thymol to thymohydroquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzene-1,4-diol) with subsequent oxidation to thymobenzoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone). The second pathway involves hydroxylation of the methyl group followed by oxidation to 3-hydroxy-4-isopropylbenzoic acid, possibly via the aldehyde 3-hydroxy-4-isopropylbenzaldehyde. It is noteworthy that the branched side chain of thymol was not oxidized. Similarities and differences of these oxidation processes with those of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida, fungi, and plants are discussed and, in addition, the toxicity of thymol towards N. cyriacigeorgica and M. neoaurum was tested. The experiments showed a temporary growth inhibition with 0.025 % thymol. This was explained by degradation of thymol and the formation of products which are less toxic than thymol itself. PMID:22828982

  16. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Nocardia brasiliensis HUJEG-1 Reveals a Saprobic Lifestyle and the Genes Needed for Human Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Elizondo-Gonzalez, Ramiro; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is an important etiologic agent of mycetoma. These bacteria live as a saprobe in soil or organic material and enter the tissue via minor trauma. Mycetoma is characterized by tumefaction and the production of fistula and abscesses, with no spontaneous cure. By using mass sequencing, we determined the complete genomic nucleotide sequence of the bacteria. According to our data, the genome is a circular chromosome 9,436,348-bp long with 68% G+C content that encodes 8,414 proteins. We observed orthologs for virulence factors, a higher number of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and catabolism, and gene clusters for the synthesis of bioactive compounds, such as antibiotics, terpenes, and polyketides. An in silico analysis of the sequence supports the conclusion that the bacteria acquired diverse genes by horizontal transfer from other soil bacteria, even from eukaryotic organisms. The genome composition reflects the evolution of bacteria via the acquisition of a large amount of DNA, which allows it to survive in new ecological niches, including humans. PMID:23755230

  17. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  18. Improved Rifamycin B Production by Nocardia mediterranei MTCC 14 under Solid-State Fermentation through Process Optimization.

    PubMed

    Vastrad, Basavaraj M; Neelagund, Shivayogeshwar E; Iiger, Sudhir R; Godbole, Ajeet M; Kulkarni, Venkatrao

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of various production parameters using response surface methodology (RSM) was performed to assess maximum yield of rifamycin B from Nocardia mediterranei MTCC 14. Plackett-Burman design test was applied to determine the significant effects of various production parameters such as glucose, maltose, ribose, galactose, beef extract, peanut meal, ammonium chloride, ammonium sulphate, barbital, pH, and moisture content on production of rifamycin B. Among the eleven variables tested, galactose, ribose, glucose, and pH were found to have significant effect on rifamycin B production. Optimum levels of the significant variables were decided by using a central composite design. The most appropriate condition for production of rifamycin B was found to be a single step production at galactose (8% w/w), ribose (3% w/w), glucose (9% w/w), and pH (7.0). At these optimum production parameters, the maximum yield of rifamycin B obtained experimentally (9.87 g/kgds dry sunflower oil cake) was found to be very close to its predicted value of 10.35 g/kgds dry sunflower oil cake. The mathematical model developed was found to fit greatly with the experimental data of rifamycin B production. PMID:25371823

  19. Rapid detection of Nocardia amarae in the activated sludge process using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Iwahori, K; Miyata, N; Morisada, S; Suzuki, N

    2000-01-01

    Nocardia amarae, a mycolic acid-containing bacterium, has often been reported to cause foaming of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the number of N. amarae cells in the activated sludge process was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with anti-N. amarae polyclonal antibody. Use of the antibody enabled N. amarae to be detected at levels of 10(4) to 10(7) colony forming units. On the other hand, the antibody reacted with only a small portion of activated sludge, in which no N. amarae cells were detected by the plate count method. Competitive ELISA was employed to estimate the N. amarae cells in samples taken from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, including raw wastewater and activated sludge foam. The cell numbers estimated by competitive ELISA corresponded well with those obtained by plate counts. Hence, the antibody produced in this study was shown to be effective for the rapid monitoring of N. amarae in the activated sludge process. PMID:16232779

  20. Improved Rifamycin B Production by Nocardia mediterranei MTCC 14 under Solid-State Fermentation through Process Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Vastrad, Basavaraj M.; Neelagund, Shivayogeshwar E.; Iiger, Sudhir R.; Godbole, Ajeet M.; Kulkarni, Venkatrao

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of various production parameters using response surface methodology (RSM) was performed to assess maximum yield of rifamycin B from Nocardia mediterranei MTCC 14. Plackett-Burman design test was applied to determine the significant effects of various production parameters such as glucose, maltose, ribose, galactose, beef extract, peanut meal, ammonium chloride, ammonium sulphate, barbital, pH, and moisture content on production of rifamycin B. Among the eleven variables tested, galactose, ribose, glucose, and pH were found to have significant effect on rifamycin B production. Optimum levels of the significant variables were decided by using a central composite design. The most appropriate condition for production of rifamycin B was found to be a single step production at galactose (8% w/w), ribose (3% w/w), glucose (9% w/w), and pH (7.0). At these optimum production parameters, the maximum yield of rifamycin B obtained experimentally (9.87 g/kgds dry sunflower oil cake) was found to be very close to its predicted value of 10.35 g/kgds dry sunflower oil cake. The mathematical model developed was found to fit greatly with the experimental data of rifamycin B production. PMID:25371823

  1. Accurate Identification of Common Pathogenic Nocardia Species: Evaluation of a Multilocus Sequence Analysis Platform and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C-A.; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Xia; Hou, Xin; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Species identification of Nocardia is not straightforward due to rapidly evolving taxonomy, insufficient discriminatory power of conventional phenotypic methods and also of single gene locus analysis including 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here we evaluated the ability of a 5-locus (16S rRNA, gyrB, secA1, hsp65 and rpoB) multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach as well as that of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison with sequencing of the 5’-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene to provide identification of 25 clinical isolates of Nocardia. The 5’-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing successfully assigned 24 of 25 (96%) clinical isolates to species level, namely Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n = 12, 48%), N. farcinica (n = 9, 36%), N. abscessus (n = 2, 8%) and N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 1, 4%). MLSA showed concordance with 16S rRNA gene sequencing results for the same 24 isolates. However, MLSA was able to identify the remaining isolate as N. wallacei, and clustered N. cyriacigeorgica into three subgroups. None of the clinical isolates were correctly identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS analysis using the manufacturer-provided database. A small “in-house” spectral database was established incorporating spectra of five clinical isolates representing the five species identified in this study. After complementation with the “in-house” database, of the remaining 20 isolates, 19 (95%) were correctly identified to species level (score ≥ 2.00) and one (an N. abscessus strain) to genus level (score ≥ 1.70 and < 2.00). In summary, MLSA showed superior discriminatory power compared with the 5’-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identification of Nocardia. MALDI-TOF MS can provide rapid and accurate identification but is reliant on a robust mass spectra database. PMID:26808813

  2. Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Gordonia, Tsukamurella, and Listeria Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Du, Shin-Hei; Teng, Shih-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether the Bruker Biotyper matrix-associated laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system provides accurate species-level identifications of 147 isolates of aerobically growing Gram-positive rods (GPRs). The bacterial isolates included Nocardia (n = 74), Listeria (n = 39), Kocuria (n = 15), Rhodococcus (n = 10), Gordonia (n = 7), and Tsukamurella (n = 2) species, which had all been identified by conventional methods, molecular methods, or both. In total, 89.7% of Listeria monocytogenes, 80% of Rhodococcus species, 26.7% of Kocuria species, and 14.9% of Nocardia species (n = 11, all N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum) were correctly identified to the species level (score values, ≥2.0). A clustering analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper identified six clusters of Nocardia species, i.e., cluster 1 (N. cyriacigeorgica), cluster 2 (N. brasiliensis), cluster 3 (N. farcinica), cluster 4 (N. puris), cluster 5 (N. asiatica), and cluster 6 (N. beijingensis), based on the six peaks generated by ClinProTools with the genetic algorithm, i.e., m/z 2,774.477 (cluster 1), m/z 5,389.792 (cluster 2), m/z 6,505.720 (cluster 3), m/z 5,428.795 (cluster 4), m/z 6,525.326 (cluster 5), and m/z 16,085.216 (cluster 6). Two clusters of L. monocytogenes spectra were also found according to the five peaks, i.e., m/z 5,594.85, m/z 6,184.39, and m/z 11,187.31, for cluster 1 (serotype 1/2a) and m/z 5,601.21 and m/z 11,199.33 for cluster 2 (serotypes 1/2b and 4b). The Bruker Biotyper system was unable to accurately identify Nocardia (except for N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum), Tsukamurella, or Gordonia species. Continuous expansion of the MALDI-TOF MS databases to include more GPRs is necessary. PMID:24759706

  3. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Differential Functional Gene Expression in Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) after Challenge with Nocardia seriolae

    PubMed Central

    Byadgi, Omkar; Chen, Chi-Wen; Wang, Pei-Chyi; Tsai, Ming-An; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) are common hosts of an epizootic bacterial infection by Nocardia seriolae. We conducted transcriptome profiling of M. salmoides to understand the host immune response to N. seriolae infection, using the Illumina sequencing platform. De novo assembly of paired-end reads yielded 47,881 unigenes, the total length, average length, N50, and GC content of which were 49,734,288, 1038, 1983 bp, and 45.94%, respectively. Annotation was performed by comparison against non-redundant protein sequence (NR), non-redundant nucleotide (NT), Swiss-Prot, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Gene Ontology (GO), and Interpro databases, yielding 28,964 (NR: 60.49%), 36,686 (NT: 76.62%), 24,830 (Swissprot: 51.86%), 8913 (COG: 18.61%), 20,329 (KEGG: 42.46%), 835 (GO: 1.74%), and 22,194 (Interpro: 46.35%) unigenes. Additionally, 8913 unigenes were classified into 25 Clusters of Orthologous Groups (KOGs) categories, and 20,329 unigenes were assigned to 244 specific signalling pathways. RNA-Seq by Expectation Maximization (RSEM) and PossionDis were used to determine significantly differentially expressed genes (False Discovery Rate (FDR) < 0.05) and we found that 1384 were upregulated genes and 1542 were downregulated genes, and further confirmed their regulations using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Altogether, these results provide information on immune mechanisms induced during bacterial infection in largemouth bass, which may facilitate the prevention of nocardiosis. PMID:27529219

  4. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Differential Functional Gene Expression in Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) after Challenge with Nocardia seriolae.

    PubMed

    Byadgi, Omkar; Chen, Chi-Wen; Wang, Pei-Chyi; Tsai, Ming-An; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) are common hosts of an epizootic bacterial infection by Nocardia seriolae. We conducted transcriptome profiling of M. salmoides to understand the host immune response to N. seriolae infection, using the Illumina sequencing platform. De novo assembly of paired-end reads yielded 47,881 unigenes, the total length, average length, N50, and GC content of which were 49,734,288, 1038, 1983 bp, and 45.94%, respectively. Annotation was performed by comparison against non-redundant protein sequence (NR), non-redundant nucleotide (NT), Swiss-Prot, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Gene Ontology (GO), and Interpro databases, yielding 28,964 (NR: 60.49%), 36,686 (NT: 76.62%), 24,830 (Swissprot: 51.86%), 8913 (COG: 18.61%), 20,329 (KEGG: 42.46%), 835 (GO: 1.74%), and 22,194 (Interpro: 46.35%) unigenes. Additionally, 8913 unigenes were classified into 25 Clusters of Orthologous Groups (KOGs) categories, and 20,329 unigenes were assigned to 244 specific signalling pathways. RNA-Seq by Expectation Maximization (RSEM) and PossionDis were used to determine significantly differentially expressed genes (False Discovery Rate (FDR) < 0.05) and we found that 1384 were upregulated genes and 1542 were downregulated genes, and further confirmed their regulations using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Altogether, these results provide information on immune mechanisms induced during bacterial infection in largemouth bass, which may facilitate the prevention of nocardiosis. PMID:27529219

  5. Microbial Gutta-Percha Degradation Shares Common Steps with Rubber Degradation by Nocardia nova SH22a

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Quan; Hiessl, Sebastian; Poehlein, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia nova SH22a, a bacterium capable of degrading gutta-percha (GP) and natural rubber (NR), was used to investigate the GP degradation mechanism and the relations between the GP and NR degradation pathways. For this strain, a protocol of electroporation was systematically optimized, and an efficiency of up to 4.3 × 107 CFU per μg of plasmid DNA was achieved. By applying this optimized protocol to N. nova SH22a, a Tn5096-based transposon mutagenesis library of this bacterium was constructed. Among about 12,000 apramycin-resistant transformants, we identified 76 stable mutants defective in GP or NR utilization. Whereas 10 mutants were specifically defective in GP utilization, the growth of the other 66 mutants was affected on both GP and NR. This indicated that the two degradation pathways are quite similar and share many common steps. The larger number of GP-degrading defective mutants could be explained in one of two ways: either (i) the GP pathway is more complex and harbors more specific steps or (ii) the steps for both pathways are almost identical, but in the case of GP degradation there are fewer enzymes involved in each step. The analysis of transposition loci and genetic studies on interesting genes confirmed the crucial role of an α-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase in the degradation of both GP and NR. We also demonstrated the probable involvement of enzymes participating in oxidoreduction reactions, β-oxidation, and the synthesis of complex cell envelope lipids in the degradation of GP. PMID:23220954

  6. Degradation of trichloroethene by a linear-plasmid-encoded alkene monooxygenase in Rhodococcus corallinus (Nocardia corallina) B-276.

    PubMed

    Saeki, H; Akira, M; Furuhashi, K; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1999-07-01

    Rhodococcus corallinus (formerly Nocardia corallina) B-276, isolated with propene as sole carbon and energy source, is able to oxidize trichloroethene (TCE). Glucose- or propene-grown R. corallinus B-276 cells exhibited no difference in TCE degradation efficiency. TCE degradation was found to be growth-phase-dependent and maximum rates were monitored with stationary-phase cells. K(m) and Vmax values for TCE degradation of R. corallinus B-276 grown in nutrient broth medium in the presence of glucose were 187 microM and 2.4 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1, respectively. Escherichia coli recombinants harbouring and expressing the alkene monooxygenase genes of R. corallinus B-276 exhibited the ability to degrade TCE. This result provides clear evidence that the alkene monooxygenase of R. corallinus B-276 catalyses TCE oxidation. R. corallinus B-276 was shown to contain four linear plasmids, pNC10 (70 kb), pNC20 (85 kb), pNC30 (185 kb) and pNC40 (235 kb). The observation that pNC30-deficient strains had lost the ability to grow on propene suggested that the genes of the propene degradation pathway are encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Southern blot analysis with cloned alkene monooxygenase genes from R. corallinus B-276 revealed a positive hybridization signal with the linear plasmid pNC30. This result clearly shows that the alkene monooxygenase is encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Eleven short-chain-alkene-oxidizing strains were screened for the presence of linear plasmids. Among these, four propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus strains and one ethene-oxidizing Mycobacterium strain were found to contain linear megaplasmids. Southern blot analysis with the alkene monooxygenase revealed positive signals with linear plasmids of two propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus ruber strains. These results indicate that homologous alkene monooxygenases are encoded by linear plasmids in R. ruber strains. PMID:10439411

  7. The Nocardia cyriacigeorgica GUH-2 genome shows ongoing adaptation of an environmental Actinobacteria to a pathogen’s lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nocardia cyriacigeorgica is recognized as one of the most prevalent etiological agents of human nocardiosis. Human exposure to these Actinobacteria stems from direct contact with contaminated environmental matrices. The full genome sequence of N. cyriacigeorgica strain GUH-2 was studied to infer major trends in its evolution, including the acquisition of novel genetic elements that could explain its ability to thrive in multiple habitats. Results N. cyriacigeorgica strain GUH-2 genome size is 6.19 Mb-long, 82.7% of its CDS have homologs in at least another actinobacterial genome, and 74.5% of these are found in N. farcinica. Among N. cyriacigeorgica specific CDS, some are likely implicated in niche specialization such as those involved in denitrification and RuBisCO production, and are found in regions of genomic plasticity (RGP). Overall, 22 RGP were identified in this genome, representing 11.4% of its content. Some of these RGP encode a recombinase and IS elements which are indicative of genomic instability. CDS playing part in virulence were identified in this genome such as those involved in mammalian cell entry or encoding a superoxide dismutase. CDS encoding non ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and polyketide synthases (PKS) were identified, with some being likely involved in the synthesis of siderophores and toxins. COG analyses showed this genome to have an organization similar to environmental Actinobacteria. Conclusion N. cyriacigeorgica GUH-2 genome shows features suggesting a diversification from an ancestral saprophytic state. GUH-2 ability at acquiring foreign DNA was found significant and to have led to functional changes likely beneficial for its environmental cycle and opportunistic colonization of a human host. PMID:23622346

  8. Evaluation and enhancement of heavy metals bioremediation in aqueous solutions by Nocardiopsis sp. MORSY1948, and Nocardia sp. MORSY2014.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Mervat Morsy Abbas Ahmed; El-Bondkly, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of wastewater samples collected from different industrial regions of Egypt demonstrated dangerously high levels of nickel (0.27-31.50mgL(-1)), chromium (1.50-7.41mgL(-1)) and zinc (1.91-9.74mgL(-1)) in the effluents. Alarmingly, these heavy metals are among the most toxic knownones to humans and wildlife. Sixty-nine Actinomycete isolates derived from contaminated sites were evaluated under single, binary, and ternary systems for their biosorption capacity for Ni(2+), Cr(6+) and Zn(2+) from aqueous solutions. The results of the study identified isolates MORSY1948 and MORSY2014 as the most active biosorbents. Phenotypic and chemotypic characterization along with molecular phylogenetic evidence confirmed that the two strains are members of the Nocardiopsis and Nocardia genera, respectively. The results also proved that for both the strains, heavy metal reduction was more efficient with dead rather than live biomass. The affinity of the dead biomass of MORSY1948 strain for Ni(2+), Cr(6+) and Zn(2+) under the optimized pH conditions of 7, 8 and 7, respectively at 40°C temperature with 0.3% biosorbent dosage was found to be as follows: Ni(2+) (87.90%)>Zn(2+) (84.15%)>Cr(6+) (63.75%). However, the dead biomass of MORSY2014 strain under conditions of pH 8 and 50°C temperature with 0.3% biosorbent dose exhibited the highest affinity which was as follows: Cr(6+) (95.22%)>Ni(2+) (93.53%)>Zn(2+) (90.37%). All heavy metals under study were found to be removed from aqueous solutions in entirety when the sorbent dosage was increased to 0.4%. PMID:27245130

  9. Creation of an In-House Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Corynebacterineae Database Overcomes Difficulties in Identification of Nocardia farcinica Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dacko, Władysław; Sikora, Joanna; Gurlaga, Danuta; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Miękisiak, Grzegorz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare disease that is caused by Gram-positive actinobacteria of the Nocardia genus and affects predominantly immunocompromised patients. In its disseminated form, it has a predilection for the central nervous system and is associated with high mortality rates. Therefore, prompt identification of the pathogen is critical. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a relatively novel technique used for identification of microorganisms. In this work, an upgraded MALDI-TOF Biotyper database containing Corynebacterineae representatives of strains deposited in the Polish Collection of Microorganisms was created and used for identification of the strain isolated from a nocardial brain abscess, mimicking a brain tumor, in an immunocompetent patient. Testing with the API Coryne system initially incorrectly identified Rhodococcus sp., while chemotaxonomic tests, especially mycolic acid analysis, enabled correct Nocardia identification only at the genus level. Subsequent sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and secA1 genes confirmed the identification. To improve the accuracy of the results, an in-house database was constructed using optimized parameters; with the use of the database, the strain was eventually identified as Nocardia farcinica. Clinical laboratories processing various clinical strains can upgrade a commercial database to improve and to accelerate the results obtained. This is especially important in the case of Nocardia, for which valid microbial diagnosis remains challenging; reference laboratories are often required to identify and to survey these rare actinobacteria. PMID:26041903

  10. Creation of an In-House Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Corynebacterineae Database Overcomes Difficulties in Identification of Nocardia farcinica Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Paściak, Mariola; Dacko, Władysław; Sikora, Joanna; Gurlaga, Danuta; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Miękisiak, Grzegorz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare disease that is caused by Gram-positive actinobacteria of the Nocardia genus and affects predominantly immunocompromised patients. In its disseminated form, it has a predilection for the central nervous system and is associated with high mortality rates. Therefore, prompt identification of the pathogen is critical. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a relatively novel technique used for identification of microorganisms. In this work, an upgraded MALDI-TOF Biotyper database containing Corynebacterineae representatives of strains deposited in the Polish Collection of Microorganisms was created and used for identification of the strain isolated from a nocardial brain abscess, mimicking a brain tumor, in an immunocompetent patient. Testing with the API Coryne system initially incorrectly identified Rhodococcus sp., while chemotaxonomic tests, especially mycolic acid analysis, enabled correct Nocardia identification only at the genus level. Subsequent sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and secA1 genes confirmed the identification. To improve the accuracy of the results, an in-house database was constructed using optimized parameters; with the use of the database, the strain was eventually identified as Nocardia farcinica. Clinical laboratories processing various clinical strains can upgrade a commercial database to improve and to accelerate the results obtained. This is especially important in the case of Nocardia, for which valid microbial diagnosis remains challenging; reference laboratories are often required to identify and to survey these rare actinobacteria. PMID:26041903

  11. Insights into the Microbial Degradation of Rubber and Gutta-Percha by Analysis of the Complete Genome of Nocardia nova SH22a

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Quan; Hiessl, Sebastian; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Nocardia nova SH22a was determined in light of the remarkable ability of rubber and gutta-percha (GP) degradation of this strain. The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 8,348,532 bp with a G+C content of 67.77% and 7,583 predicted protein-encoding genes. Functions were assigned to 72.45% of the coding sequences. Among them, a large number of genes probably involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics and hardly degradable compounds, as well as genes that participate in the synthesis of polyketide- and/or nonribosomal peptide-type secondary metabolites, were detected. Based on in silico analyses and experimental studies, such as transposon mutagenesis and directed gene deletion studies, the pathways of rubber and GP degradation were proposed and the relationship between both pathways was unraveled. The genes involved include, inter alia, genes participating in cell envelope synthesis (long-chain-fatty-acid–AMP ligase and arabinofuranosyltransferase), β-oxidation (α-methylacyl-coenzyme A [α-methylacyl-CoA] racemase), propionate catabolism (acyl-CoA carboxylase), gluconeogenesis (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and transmembrane substrate uptake (Mce [mammalian cell entry] transporter). This study not only improves our insights into the mechanism of microbial degradation of rubber and GP but also expands our knowledge of the genus Nocardia regarding metabolic diversity. PMID:24747905

  12. Degradation of Methoxylated Benzoic Acids by a Nocardia from a Lignin-Rich Environment: Significance to Lignin Degradation and Effect of Chloro Substituents

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R. L.; McCoy, Elizabeth; Harkin, J. M.; Kirk, T. K.; Obst, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Strain A81 of Nocardia corallina hydroxylates or demethylates p-anisic acid to p-hydroxybenzoic acid and isovanillic acid. It demethylates veratric acid to a mixture of vanillic and isovanillic acids. These are both demethylated to protocatechuic acid, which undergoes ring cleavage to afford β-carboxy-cis-cis-muconic acid. The intermediacy of protocatechuic acid in the catabolic pathway of veratric acid was confirmed by blocking ring cleavage with an additional substituent in the ring: 5-chlorovanillic acid was demethylated to 5-chloro-protocatechuic acid, which accumulated. Chloro substituents in the ring of other methoxylated benzoic acids also arrested their normal metabolism by the Nocardia: an ortho-chloro substituent thwarted both demethylation and ring-opening. ortho-Hydroxylation of p-methoxybenzoic acid to isovanillic acid was unaffected by a chlorine ortho to the methoxyl group. Washed whole cells of veratric acid-grown N. corallina A81 produced no detected structural changes in an isolated lignin. The implications of this observation are discussed. PMID:4743871

  13. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Amedeo; Guercini, Francesco; Cardaccia, Angela; Furbetta, Leone; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bistoni, Francesco; Mencacci, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troublesome, and the isolation and identification of the etiologic agent are difficult and time-consuming processes. We describe a case of fatal disseminated infection in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, treated with corticosteroids, in which N. farcinica has been isolated from blood culture and identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. The patient died after 18 days of hospitalization in spite of triple antimicrobial therapy. Nocardia farcinica infection should be suspected in patients with history of malignancy, under corticosteroid therapy, suffering from subacute pulmonary infection,and who do not respond to conventional antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry can be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:23690786

  14. NOCARDIA BEIJINGENSIS PSOAS ABSCESS AND SUBCUTANEOUS PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS CAUSED BY PHAEOACREMONIUM PARASITICUM IN A RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT: THE FIRST CASE REPORT IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Palavutitotai, Nattawan; Chongtrakoo, Piriyaporn; Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2015-11-01

    We describe the first case of a psoas muscle abscess caused by Nocardia beijingensis and subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Phaeoacremonium parasiticum in a renal transplant recipient. The patient was treated for nocardiosis with percutaneous drainage and intravenous trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) combined with imipenem for 2 weeks, followed by a 4-week course of intravenous TMP/SMX and then oral TMP/SMX. During hospitalization for the psoas muscle abscess the patient developed cellulitis with subcutaneous nodules of his right leg. Skin biopsy and cultures revealed a dematiaceous mold, subsequently identified as P. parasiticum by DNA sequencing. The subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis was treated with surgical drainage and liposomal amphotericin B for 4 weeks followed by a combination of itraconazole and terbinafine. The patient gradually improved and was discharged home after 18 weeks of hospitalization. PMID:26867363

  15. [Steroid-transforming enzymes from microorganisms. XII. Induction characteristics of the 4-en-3-oxosteroid: (acceptor)-1-en-oxidoreductase in Nocardia opaca].

    PubMed

    Hörhold, C; Hüller, E; Rose, G

    1979-01-01

    17 alpha-Methyltestosterone and the corresponding 1(2)-dehydrocompound (Dianabol) are efficient inducers of the 4-en-3-oxosteroid: (acceptor)-1-en-oxidoreductase from Nocardia opaca. After a lag period of 4 hours the enzyme activity increases rapidly. During the induction the steroids are completely metabolized causing a drastical drop of specific enzyme activity. Using a fixed induction time the optimal steroid concentration and the temperature characteristic were found out. The influence of the concentration of the steroid water suspension on the induction effect is discussed to be dependent on the velocity of the dissolving of the steroid particles. Chloramphenicol and streptomycin are powerful inhibitors of the induction process. PMID:547499

  16. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of Nocardia salmonicida, the causative agent of nocardiosis in fish.

    PubMed

    Xia, Liqun; Zhang, Honglian; Lu, Yishan; Cai, Jia; Wang, Bei; Jian, Jichang

    2015-03-01

    Nocardia salmonicida is one of the main pathogens of fish nocardiosis. The purpose of this study was to build a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid and sensitive detection of N. salmonicida. A set of four primers were designed from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region of N. salmonicida, and conditions for LAMP were optimized as incubating all the reagents for 60 min at 64°C. LAMP products were judged with agar gel electrophoresis as well as with the naked eye after the addition of SYBR Green I. Results showed the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 1.68 × 10(3) CFU/ml (16.8 CFU per reaction) and 10-fold higher than that of PCR. The LAMP method was also effectively applied to detect N. salmonicida in diseased fish samples, and it may potentially facilitate the surveillance and early diagnosis of fish nocardiosis. PMID:25262681

  17. [Synthesis of surfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 on industrial waste].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Sofilkanich, A P; Pokora, K A; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of surfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 on industrial waste (food and oil-processing industry, production of biodiesel) was investigated. The possibility of replacing the expensive substrates (n-hexadecane and ethanol) by industrial waste (oil and fat industry, fried sunflower oil, glycerol, liquid paraffin) for the surfactant biosynthesis was established. The conditional concentration of surfactants was maximal on oil containing substrates and exceeded those on n-hexadecane and ethanol 2-3 times. The highest rates of surfactants synthesis were observed on fried sunflower oil with the use of inoculum grown on carbohydrate substrates (glucose, molasses). It was established that the addition of glucose (0.1%) was accompanied by 2-4-fold intensification of surfactants synthesis by R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 on fried sunflower oil (2%). PMID:25000725

  18. [Destruction of oil in the presence of Cu2+ and surfactants of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinska, G O

    2015-01-01

    The effect of copper cations (0.01-1.0 mM) and surface-active agents (surfactants) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Alc-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 in the form of culture liquid on the destruction of oil in water (3.0-6.0 g/L) and soil (20 g/kg), including in the presence of Cd2+ and Pb2+ (0.01-0.5 mM), was investigated. It was shown that the degree of oil degradation in water and soil after 20 days in the presence of low concentrations of Cu2+ (0.01-0.05 mM) and culture liquid of strains IMV B-7241, IMV Ac-5017, and IMV B-7405 was 15 - 25% higher than without copper cations. The activating effect of Cu2+ on the decomposition of complex oil and Cd2+ and Pb2+ pollution was established: after treatment with surfactant of A. calcoacelicus IMV B-7241 and R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 destruction of oil in water and soil was 85-95%, and after removal of the copper cations decreased to 45-70%. Intensification of oil destruction in the presence of copper cations may be due to their stimulating effect on the activity of alkane hydroxylases as in surfactant-producing strains, and natural (autochthonous) oxidizing microbiota. PMID:26036026

  19. Bacterial metabolism of alpha-pinene: pathway from alpha-pinene oxide to acyclic metabolites in Nocardia sp. strain P18.3.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, E T; Bociek, S M; Harries, P C; Jeffcoat, R; Sissons, D J; Trudgill, P W

    1987-01-01

    Over 20 gram-positive bacteria were isolated by elective culture with (+/-)-alpha-pinene as the sole carbon source. One of these strains, Nocardia sp. strain P18.3, was selected for detailed study. alpha-Pinene-grown cells oxidized, without lag, alpha-pinene, alpha-pinene oxide (epoxide), and the cis and trans isomers of 2-methyl-5-isopropylhexa-2,5-dienal. No other tested terpene was oxidized at a significant rate. alpha-Pinene was not metabolized by cell extracts in the presence or absence of NADH or NADPH. Cell extracts catalyzed a rapid decyclization of alpha-pinene oxide, in the absence of added cofactors, with the formation of cis-2-methyl-5-isopropylhexa-2,5-dienal. Further oxidation of the aldehyde to the corresponding acid occurred in the presence of NAD. Both activities were induced by growth with alpha-pinene. A rapid, nonenzymic transformation of the cis aldehyde into the trans isomer occurred in glycine buffer. The trans isomer was also a substrate for the NAD-linked aldehyde dehydrogenase. The distribution of the alpha-pinene oxide lyase in alpha-pinene-utilizing Pseudomonas spp. was also investigated and was compatible with the two alternative ring-cleavage sequences that have been proposed on the basis of accumulated metabolites. PMID:3667521

  20. Characterization of a SAM-dependent fluorinase from a latent biosynthetic pathway for fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine formation in Nocardia brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    Fluorination has been widely used in chemical synthesis, but is rare in nature. The only known biological fluorination scope is represented by the fl pathway from Streptomyces cattleya that produces fluoroacetate (FAc) and 4-fluorothreonine (4-FT). Here we report the identification of a novel pathway for FAc and 4-FT biosynthesis from the actinomycetoma-causing pathogen Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC 700358. The new pathway shares overall conservation with the fl pathway in S. cattleya. Biochemical characterization of the conserved domains revealed a novel fluorinase NobA that can biosynthesize 5’-fluoro-5’-deoxyadenosine (5’-FDA) from inorganic fluoride and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). The NobA shows similar halide specificity and characteristics to the fluorination enzyme FlA of the fl pathway. Kinetic parameters for fluoride ( K m 4153 μM, k cat 0.073 min -1) and SAM ( K m 416 μM, k cat 0.139 min -1) have been determined, revealing that NobA is slightly (2.3 fold) slower than FlA. Upon sequence comparison, we finally identified a distinct loop region in the fluorinases that probably accounts for the disparity of fluorination activity. PMID:24795808

  1. Temperature effects on biomass, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol production and cellular activity by Nocardia spp. and Streptomyces spp. isolated from rainbow trout recirculating aquaculture systems.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Kevin K; Harries, Marcuslene D; Page, Phaedra N

    2015-05-01

    Isolates of Nocardia cummidelens, Nocard ia fluminea, Streptomyces albidoflavus, and Streptomyces luridiscabiei attributed as the cause of "earthy-musty" off-flavor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) raised in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) were evaluated for the effect of temperature (10-30 °C) on biomass, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) production and cellular activity. Cultures of these isolates were monitored over 7 days by measuring culture dry weight, geosmin, and MIB production using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), and ATP production via a luminometer. Compared to the other isolates, S. luridiscabiei had significantly (P < 0.05) higher biomass (8.17 ± 0.35 mg/mL) at 15 °C (water temperature in the RAS) after 7 days incubation. In addition, S. luridiscabiei produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher geosmin (69,976 ± 15,733 ng/L) at 15 °C. At 25 °C and 30 °C, S. albidoflavus produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher geosmin (182,074 ± 60,272 ng/L and 399,991 ± 102,262 ng/L, respectively). All isolates produced MIB at 15 °C, but S. luridiscabiei produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher MIB (97,143 ± 28,972 ng/L) and ATP after 7 days. Therefore, S. luridiscabiei appears to be a likely contributor of geosmin and MIB in the RAS. PMID:25724337

  2. Nocardia brasiliensis cell wall lipids modulate macrophage and dendritic responses that favor development of experimental actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Trevino-Villarreal, J Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis. PMID:22851755

  3. Nocardia brasiliensis Cell Wall Lipids Modulate Macrophage and Dendritic Responses That Favor Development of Experimental Actinomycetoma in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trevino-Villarreal, J. Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis. PMID:22851755

  4. Characterization of the Genome of the Polyvalent Lytic Bacteriophage GTE2, Which Has Potential for Biocontrol of Gordonia-, Rhodococcus-, and Nocardia-Stabilized Foams in Activated Sludge Plants ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Petrovski, Steve; Seviour, Robert J.; Tillett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic Actinobacteria are commonly associated with the stabilization of foams in activated sludge systems. One possible attractive approach to control these foam-stabilizing organisms is the use of specific bacteriophages. We describe the genome characterization of a novel polyvalent DNA phage, GTE2, isolated from activated sludge. This phage is lytic for Gordonia terrae, Rhodococcus globerulus, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, and Nocardia brasiliensis. Phage GTE2 belongs to the family Siphoviridae, possessing a characteristic icosahedral head encapsulating a double-stranded DNA linear genome (45,530 bp) having 10-bp 3′-protruding cohesive ends. The genome sequence is 98% unique at the DNA level and contains 57 putative genes. The genome can be divided into two components, where the first is modular and encodes phage structural proteins and lysis genes. The second is not modular, and the genes harbored there are involved in DNA replication, repair, and metabolism. Some have no known function. GTE2 shows promising results in controlling stable foam production by its host bacteria under laboratory conditions, suggesting that it may prove useful in the field as a biocontrol agent. PMID:21498753

  5. CELLULAR LIPIDS OF A NOCARDIA GROWN ON PROPANE AND N-BUTANE.

    PubMed

    DAVIS, J B

    1964-07-01

    Lipid fractions of propane- and n-butane-grown nocardial cells each contain a chloroform-soluble, ether-insoluble polymer not observed previously in liquid n-alkane-grown cells. The polymer in propane-grown cells is poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. The polymer in n-butane-grown cells apparently contains unsaturation in the molecule, and is identified tentatively as a co-polymer of beta-hydroxybutyric and beta-hydroxybutenoic (specifically 3-hydroxy 2-butenoic) acids. The other major component of the lipid fraction consists of triglycerides containing principally palmitic and stearic acids. There seems to be little qualitative distinction in the glycerides of propane- or n-butane-grown cells. Oxidative assimilation of n-butane is described. PMID:14199017

  6. Predominant Catalase-negative Soil Bacteria. III. Agromyces, gen. n., Microorganisms Intermediary to Actinomyces and Nocardia1

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, William E.; Casida, L. E.

    1969-01-01

    The occurrence of filamentous, branching, catalase-negative bacteria as a numerically predominant microflora of various soils was demonstrated by using a dilution frequency isolation procedure. The major characteristics of these organisms were those of the order Actinomycetales. However, they could not be placed in any of the present genera of this order and, therefore, a new genus, Agromyces, was proposed for these organisms. This genus includes catalase-negative, nutritionally-fastidious microorganisms whose cells produce a true branching mycelium that fragments into coccoid and diphtheroid forms. Also, they have an oxidative metabolism, are microaerophilic to aerobic, and contain neither diaminopimelic acid nor lysine as major constituents of the cell wall glycopeptide. The type species would be Agromyces ramosus, gen. n., sp. n. The possible importance of these organisms in clarifying certain phylogenetic relationships of the Actinomycetales is discussed. Images PMID:16349860

  7. Nocardiosis in Heart Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Michael M; El-Banayosy, Aly; Schulz, Uwe; Zeriouh, Mohamad; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero; Ghodsizad, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, especially in organ transplant recipients. Heart transplant (HT) recipients initially had an especially high rate of Nocardia infection, but this could be reduced by the routine use of cyclosporine. Our objective was to clarify the prevalence and presentation of Nocardiosis in HT recipients in a retrospective cross-sectional analysis. PMID:26726715

  8. A man with unilateral endophthalmitis: a case of disseminated nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Navarrete, N; Escobar Sevilla, J; Toribio García, M; Urbano, F; Sabio, J M; Jiménez-Alonso, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with an infection by Nocardia which manifested itself with monocular endophthalmitis. Nocardia infection is not common and ocular involvement is one of the most uncommon presentations. In these cases it is very important to make an early diagnosis and intensive treatment to prevent the visual prognosis. PMID:25878910

  9. Nocardiosis: Updates and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia, a gram-positive bacillus with the microscopic appearance of branching hyphae, can produce considerable disease in the appropriate host. The taxonomy of Nocardia continues to evolve; more than 50 species have been described. Early recognition and effective therapy are imperative to achieve successful outcomes. Although nocardiosis typically occurs in patients with cell-mediated immunosuppressive conditions, infection may occasionally develop in immunocompetent patients as well. This review addresses the microbiology of Nocardia, risk factors for infection, clinical presentations, and management strategies. PMID:22469352

  10. Pulmonary nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Lucy; Santoro, Jonathan D; Milla, Carlos; Bhargava, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are bacteria of low virulence that cause infection classically in immunocompromised hosts with the lungs as the primary site of infection in the majority of cases. Patients with cystic fibrosis have pulmonary disease characterized by frequent and progressive bacterial infections. Reports of Nocardia spp. isolation in CF are rare in the literature and may represent colonization or active infection, the significance and optimal treatment of which are unknown. We report the second case to date of Nocardia transvalensis pulmonary infection in an immunocompetent patient with CF and the first in a child under the age of eighteen. PMID:25960909

  11. Disseminated nocardiosis masquerading as metastatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Rajalakshmi; Padmanabhan, Arjun; Reddy Attunuru, Bhanu Prakash; Gupta, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon gram-positive bacterial infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia. It can be localized or systemic and is regarded as an opportunistic infection that is commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a patient with underlying malignancy in whom the clinical presentation was highly suggestive of a metastatic disease. PMID:27578940

  12. A fatal case of pulmonary nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mahantesh; C, Shivaprasad; Varghese, Jaicob; Rajagopalan, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a serious, most often considered an opportunistic infection affecting the respiratory tract. Even though it is more common in immunocompromised hosts, it is not infrequently seen in immunocompetent patients as well. The aerosol route is the main portal of entry in to the body. Molecular techniques have revolutionised the identification of Nocardia species. However such tests are limited to referral laboratories. The radiographic appearances of Nocardia infection vary from a small nodule to bilateral infiltrates with cavitation. Traditionally sulphonamides have been considered the treatment of choice. However, resistance to sulphonamides is increasingly recognised. Carbapenems and linezolid have been found to be uniformly active against all the pathogenic species of Nocardia that affect human beings. The authors report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient, in whom the infection relentlessly progressed to florid sepsis despite prompt institution of right antibiotics. Florid sepsis relating to pulmonary nocardiosis is rare. PMID:22665550

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Infecting Nocardioforms in Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Preeti; Chandekar, Rajshree H.; Paunikar, Waman N.

    2014-01-01

    Activated sludge plants (ASP) are associated with the stable foaming problem worldwide. Apart from the physical and chemical treatment methods, biological treatment method has been least explored and may prove to be a novel and ecofriendly approach to tackle the problem of stable foam formation. In ASP Nocardia species are commonly found and are one of the major causes for forming sticky and stable foam. This study describes the isolation and characterization of three Nocardia bacteriophages NOC1, NOC2, and NOC3 for the control of Nocardia species. The bacteriophages isolated in this study have shown promising results in controlling foam producing bacterial growth under laboratory conditions, suggesting that it may prove useful in the field as an alternative biocontrol agent to reduce the foaming problem. To the best of our knowledge to date no work has been published from India related to biological approach for the control of foaming. PMID:25140256

  14. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages infecting nocardioforms in wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Pal, Preeti; Chandekar, Rajshree H; Paunikar, Waman N

    2014-01-01

    Activated sludge plants (ASP) are associated with the stable foaming problem worldwide. Apart from the physical and chemical treatment methods, biological treatment method has been least explored and may prove to be a novel and ecofriendly approach to tackle the problem of stable foam formation. In ASP Nocardia species are commonly found and are one of the major causes for forming sticky and stable foam. This study describes the isolation and characterization of three Nocardia bacteriophages NOC1, NOC2, and NOC3 for the control of Nocardia species. The bacteriophages isolated in this study have shown promising results in controlling foam producing bacterial growth under laboratory conditions, suggesting that it may prove useful in the field as an alternative biocontrol agent to reduce the foaming problem. To the best of our knowledge to date no work has been published from India related to biological approach for the control of foaming. PMID:25140256

  15. Primary Cutaneous Nocardiosis in a Patient With Nephrotic Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Tang, Jin; Lu, Zeyuan; Wang, Niansong; Gao, Xuping; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia infection is not common in clinical practice and most cases occur as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients.We report a case of primary cutaneous nocardiosis characterized by multiple subcutaneous abscesses due to Nocardia brasiliensis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome undergoing long-term corticosteroid therapy. The patient was diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome 9 months ago, and mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. Subsequently, his renal disease was stable under low-dose methylprednisolone (8 mg/d). All of the pus cultures, which were aspirated from 5 different complete abscesses, presented Nocardia. Gene sequencing confirmed that they were all N. brasiliensis. The patient was cured by surgical drainage and a combination of linezolid and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole.The case highlights that even during the period of maintenance therapy with low-dose corticosteroid agents, an opportunistic infection still could occur in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26817885

  16. Pulmonary Nocardiosis: Review of Cases and an Update

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Malini; Gunasekaran, Jayanthi

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia, a branching, filamentous bacteria, is widely distributed in the environment and can cause human infection in immune-compromised hosts. Inhalation of Nocardia leads to pulmonary disease. Microbiology laboratory processed the clinical samples from patients with respiratory infections. Smears were prepared from the samples and were stained and cultured. Five cases were positive for Nocardia. They were treated with the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination. The disease was cured in three patients, and two died due to other comorbid conditions leading to complications. Nocardiosis is encountered in parts of the world even where it is not endemic due to increased world travel. So physicians and laboratory staff should be aware of this and try to diagnose it. Early detection can lead to the prompt initiation of treatment and reduced mortality in these patients. Patients with disseminated or severe nocardiosis should be treated with combination therapy with two or more active agents.

  17. Degradation and induction specificity in actinomycetes that degrade p-nitrophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Hanne, L.F.; Kirk, L.L.; Appel, S.M.; Narayan, A.D.; Bains, K.K. )

    1993-10-01

    We have isolated two soil bacteria (identified as Arthrobacter aurescens TW17 and Nocardia sp. strain TW2) capable of degrading p-nitrophenol (PNP) and numerous other phenolic compounds. A. aurescens TW17 contains a large plasmid which correlated with the PNP degradation phenotype. Degradation of PNP by A. aurescens TW 17 was induced by preexposure to PNP, 4-nitrocatechol, 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol, or m-nitrophenol, whereas PNP degradation by Nocardia sp. strain TW2 was induced by PNP, 4-nitrocatechol, phenol, p-cresol, or m-nitrophenol. A. aurescens TW17 initially degraded PNP to hydroquinone and nitrite. Nocardia sp. strain TW2 initially converted PNP to hydroquinone or 4-nitrocatechol, depending upon the inducing compound.

  18. Pulmonary Nocardiosis: Review of Cases and an Update.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Malini; Gunasekaran, Jayanthi

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia, a branching, filamentous bacteria, is widely distributed in the environment and can cause human infection in immune-compromised hosts. Inhalation of Nocardia leads to pulmonary disease. Microbiology laboratory processed the clinical samples from patients with respiratory infections. Smears were prepared from the samples and were stained and cultured. Five cases were positive for Nocardia. They were treated with the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination. The disease was cured in three patients, and two died due to other comorbid conditions leading to complications. Nocardiosis is encountered in parts of the world even where it is not endemic due to increased world travel. So physicians and laboratory staff should be aware of this and try to diagnose it. Early detection can lead to the prompt initiation of treatment and reduced mortality in these patients. Patients with disseminated or severe nocardiosis should be treated with combination therapy with two or more active agents. PMID:27445562

  19. Disseminated nocardiosis in a patient on infliximab and methylprednisolone for treatment-resistant Sweet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drone, Elizabeth R; McCrory, Allison L; Lane, Natalie; Fiala, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    A 62-year-old white man with a 10-year history of treatment-refractory Sweet's syndrome was admitted to the hospital with the onset of purpuric lesions. Methylprednisolone and infliximab were administered. Our patient developed disseminated Nocardia infection and eventually succumbed. Opportunistic infections such as Nocardia have been associated with infliximab and other tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. The astute clinician should be aware of the risk of rare opportunistic infections, particularly in patients on TNF-α inhibitors and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:25165648

  20. Disseminated nocardiosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome following HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Letian; Liu, Hong; Yuan, Fang; Yuan, Shuguang

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, a case of disseminated abscesses caused by Nocardia in a patient undergoing immunosuppressive therapy for nephrotic syndrome and infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported. The patient had membranous nephropathy and received systemic corticosteroid therapy for one year. During this time, the patient was diagnosed with HIV and developed disseminated abscesses in the lungs, brain and hip. Pathogens isolated from sputum and pus were identified as Nocardia asteroides. The patient was successfully treated following surgical drainage of the abscesses and by oral administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:25187812

  1. New bioactive lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  2. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  3. Value-added products from vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new comp...

  4. New bioactive fatty acids from vegetable oils and new uses of bioglycerin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  5. Pulmonary nocardiosis in a patient receiving immunosuppressive agent.

    PubMed

    Aswapokee, P; Aswapokee, N; Chirawong, P; Leelarasamee, A

    1977-09-01

    A 20-year-old woman receiving corticosteroid treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus developed pulmonary nocardiosis with hydrophneumothorax. The organism identified as Nocardia asteroides resisted to sulfonamide and cotrimoxazole but sensitive to chloramphenicaol and streptomycin in vitro. She seemed to respond to chloramphenicol but subsequently had peritonitis and succumbed later. PMID:607422

  6. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  7. Spontaneous Nocardial Brain Abscess in a Juvenile Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Ferrecchia, Christie E.; Ducore, Rebecca M.; Colgin, Lois M.A.; Lewis, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Background A juvenile rhesus macaque presented with blindness, ataxia, and head tilt. Methods Postmortem gross and microscopic examination, histochemical staining and bacterial culture were performed. Results Nocardia sp. was identified as the etiologic agent of a primary pneumonia with secondary cerebral abscessation. Conclusions Nocardiosis should be a differential diagnosis for patients with neurologic disease. PMID:25470211

  8. ACTINOMYCETES OF SEWAGE-TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In some activated sludge sewage treatment plants a thick foam rich in Nocardia may be formed at the surface of the secondary aeration and settling tanks. It had previously been observed that the supernatant from anaerobic digesters contained suspended solids which were toxic for ...

  9. Cooperative catabolic pathways within an atrazine-degrading enrichment culture isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E

    2005-07-01

    Atrazine degradation previously has been shown to be carried out by individual bacterial species or by relatively simple consortia that have been isolated using enrichment cultures. Here, the degradative pathway for atrazine was examined for a complex 8-membered enrichment culture. The species composition of the culture was determined by PCR-DGGE. The bacterial species included Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Caulobacter crescentus, Pseudomonas putida, Sphingomonas yaniokuyae, Nocardia sp., Rhizobium sp., Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, and Variovorax paradoxus. All of the isolates were screened for the presence of known genes that function for atrazine degradation including atzA,-B,-C,-D,-E,-F and trzD,-N. Dechlorination of atrazine, which was obligatory for complete mineralization, was carried out exclusively by Nocardia sp., which contained the trzN gene. Following dechlorination, the resulting product, hydroxyatrazine was further degraded via two separate pathways. In one pathway Nocardia converted hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide via an unidentified gene product. In the second pathway, hydroxyatrazine generated by Nocardia sp. was hydrolyzed to N-isopropylammelide by Rhizobium sp., which contained the atzB gene. Each member of the enrichment culture contained atzC, which is responsible for ring cleavage, but none of the isolates carried the atzD,-E, or -F genes. Each member further contained either trzD or exhibited urease activity. The enrichment culture was destabilized by loss of Nocardia sp. when grown on ethylamine, ethylammelide, and cyanuric acid, after which the consortium was no longer able to degrade atrazine. The analysis of this enrichment culture highlights the broad level bacterial community interactions that may be involved in atrazine degradation in nature. PMID:16329946

  10. Distribution and Substrate Specificity of Benzylpenicillin Acylase1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H. T.; Seto, T. A.; Shull, G. M.

    1963-01-01

    Benzylpenicillin acylase, which hydrolyzes benzylpenicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid, was found to be widely distributed among members of the Schizomycetes, particularly in gram-negative bacteria, and in the genus Nocardia. The hydrolysis of a series of biosynthetic and semisynthetic penicillins by freeze-dried cells of a strain of Nocardia and of Proteus was studied. Benzylpenicillin was the preferred substrate; all departures from the benzylpenicillin side-chain structure led to reduction of substrate activity (the greater the departure, the greater the reduction in activity). Penicillin amides and methyl esters were also hydrolyzed, as were suitable N-acyl derivatives of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. Occurrence of an enzyme activity which hydrolyzes benzylpenicillinamide to benzylpenicillin was detected in certain strains of yeasts. PMID:13955341

  11. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme. PMID:25596394

  12. Immunosuppression and a serious opportunistic infection: an unfortunate price to pay.

    PubMed

    Narula, Nupoor; Bourne, Michael; Bhagra, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus type 1, status postcadaveric pancreas transplant alone 11 years ago, on chronic immunosuppression, and dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease, presented with 2 months of progressive generalised weakness, lumbar back pain with right lower extremity radiculopathy and episodic symptomatic hypotension. Preliminary infectious disease work up was unremarkable. She was discharged following symptomatic improvement. She represented 3 days later with continued functional decline and leucocytosis. Chest X-ray demonstrated diffuse pulmonary nodules, confirmed on chest CT scan. CT-guided biopsy of a right upper lobe nodule was performed; studies confirmed Nocardia farcinica. Further imaging revealed bilateral white matter intracranial lesions, and extensive Nocardia-positive fluid collections in the right gluteal and vastus musculature, requiring periodic surgical debridement. She was treated with multiple antimicrobials, including trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amoxicillin/clavulanate and moxifloxacin. She was discharged after a 6-month hospitalisation. PMID:26153281

  13. Chemical Composition of Cell-Wall Preparations from Strains of Various Form-Genera of Aerobic Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, B.; Lechevalier, M. P.; Lechevalier, H. A.

    1965-01-01

    Cell-wall preparations were made from more than 140 strains of aerobic actinomycetes representing most of the form-genera that have been proposed. All cell-wall preparations contained as major constituents glucosamine, muramic acid, alanine, and glutamic acid. In addition, cell-wall preparations from various types of streptomycetes and strains of Microëllobosporia contained glycine and ll-α,ε-diaminopimelic acid; those from strains of most Actinoplanaceae and micromonosporae contained glycine and meso-α-ε-diaminopimelic acid; those from strains of Thermoactinomyces, Microbispora, Dermatophilus, and nocardiae of the madurae-pelletieri group contained meso-α,ε-diaminopimelic acid; and those from strains of Thermomonospora, Micropolyspora, and most nocardiae contained meso-α,ε-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose, and galactose. All the strains used were also studied morphologically. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14325886

  14. Studies on the biodegradation of nonionic surfactants applied in the polyester fiber industry. I. Activated sludge bacteria degrading the surfactants.

    PubMed

    Rzechowska, E

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents characteristics of 76 strains of bacteria capable of utilizing nonionic surfactants Cirrasol FP, Cirrasol SF 200 and Cirrasol TCS as the source of carbon. The strains were isolated from two activated sludges adapted to the purification of wastes containing the above compounds at concentration 150--200 mg/l. The isolated strains belonged to the genera: Achromobacter, Alcaligenes, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. With load 0.11 mg surfactant/mg d.w./day bacteria belonging to Alcaligenes were dominating. With load 0.18--0.31 mg surfactant/mg d.w./day microorganisms were dominated by Pseudomonas. The highest intensity of degradation of the studied surfactant was shown by species: Alcaligenes viscolactis, Nocardia blackwellii and Pseudomonas rathonis. PMID:62497

  15. A Case of Disseminated Nocardiosis Secondary to the Skin Nodules in an Elderly Woman

    PubMed Central

    In, Seung Gyun; Han, Sung Hyup; Shin, Jeong Hyun; Chung, Moon Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Nocardiosis refers to a locally invasive or disseminated infection associated with the Nocardia species. Most infections enter through the respiratory tract and then disseminate systemically. Rarely can a primary nocardial infection of the skin spread to contiguous structures or disseminate to other internal organs in immunocompromised hosts. We describe a 70-year-old woman who suffered from recurrent nodular skin lesions on her right hand, forearm and elbow following inoculation of a traumatic injury. Analysis of the purulent exudates obtained from the nodule revealed Nocardia species. After 20 days, a chest X-ray showed newly developed multiple nodules in both lungs. The diagnosis of systemic nocardiosis was established, and we treated this case with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:27303166

  16. Endophthalmitis caused by exogenous nocardial infection in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, J G; McCartney, A C; Rice, N S; Peacock, J; Seal, D V

    1990-02-01

    A 60-year-old woman receiving prednisolone therapy for Sjögren's syndrome presented with corneal perforation. Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed, but no causative organism was identified. Focal inflammatory infiltrates in both donor and host cornea and anterior uveitis developed postoperatively. Five months later the inflammation rapidly became much worse, with fulminating abscesses, and the eye was eviscerated because of severe endophthalmitis. Nocardia organisms were identified in the cornea, conjunctiva and vitreous by means of acridine orange and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The infection produced both suppurative and granulomatous inflammation. Reexamination of the penetrating keratoplasty specimen with a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain revealed a few Nocardia organisms, which suggested that infection had occurred at the time of corneal perforation. PMID:2328434

  17. Potential nosocomial acquisition of epidemic Listeria monocytogenes presenting as multiple brain abscesses resembling nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Aleksandra; Reid, James; Nadon, A Celine; Grant, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Listerial brain abscesses are rare, and are found mostly in patients with underlying hematological malignancies or solid-organ transplants. A case of a patient with Crohn's disease and multiple brain abscesses involving the left cerebellum and right sylvian fissure is described. The Gram stain and histopathology of the cerebellar abscess revealed Gram-positive, beaded rods suggestive of Nocardia. However, on culture, Listeria monocytogenes was identified. Listeria may appear Gram-variable and has been misidentified as streptococci, enterococci and diphtheroids. The present case is the first reported case of L monocytogenes resembling Nocardia on both microbiological and histopathological assessment. Reported cases of listerial brain abscesses are sporadic, while the current case was part of a nationwide listerial outbreak linked to consumption of contaminated deli meats. Broad antimicrobial therapy (including antilisterial coverage) in immunosuppressed patients presenting with brain abscess is crucial, until cultures confirm the identification of the organism. PMID:21358887

  18. Microbial Aromatization of Steroids into Equilin

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, S. N.; Vézina, Claude

    1970-01-01

    This report describes the bioconversion of 19-hydroxy-androsta-4, 7-diene-3, 17-dione into equilin with Nocardia rubra. Through mutation and improvement of medium and of conditions, the bioconversion could be improved to yield 40% equilin for a substrate concentration of 1 g/liter. Aromatization of several other 19-hydroxy and 19-nor substrates of the androstene series is reported, and the influence of various substitutions of the substrate molecule on aromatization is discussed. PMID:5492438

  19. Pleural Nocardiosis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mantur, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare infection that has attracted attention with its increased rate of occurrence in the recent years. In India there is a rare documentation of the pleural involvement in nocardiosis. We report here a case of pleural nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis in patients with pleural lesions. PMID:26894067

  20. Sequence-Based Identification of Aerobic Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Wallace, Richard J.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Taylor, Tony; Imperatrice, Carol; Leonard, Deborah G. B.; Wilson, Rebecca W.; Mann, Linda; Jost, Kenneth C.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the utility of 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing for identifying clinically significant species of aerobic actinomycetes. A total of 28 reference strains and 71 clinical isolates that included members of the genera Streptomyces, Gordonia, and Tsukamurella and 10 taxa of Nocardia were studied. Methods of nonsequencing analyses included growth and biochemical analysis, PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the 439-bp Telenti fragment of the 65 hsp gene, susceptibility testing, and, for selected isolates, high-performance liquid chromatography. Many of the isolates were included in prior taxonomic studies. Sequencing of Nocardia species revealed that members of the group were generally most closely related to the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strains. However, the sequences of Nocardia transvalensis, N. otitidiscaviarum, and N. nova isolates were highly variable; and it is likely that each of these species contains multiple species. We propose that these three species be designated complexes until they are more taxonomically defined. The sequences of several taxa did not match any recognized species. Among other aerobic actinomycetes, each group most closely resembled the associated reference strain, but with some divergence. The study demonstrates the ability of partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify members of the aerobic actinomycetes, but the study also shows that a high degree of sequence divergence exists within many species and that many taxa within the Nocardia spp. are unnamed at present. A major unresolved issue is the type strain of N. asteroides, as the present one (ATCC 19247), chosen before the availability of molecular analysis, does not represent any of the common taxa associated with clinical nocardiosis. PMID:15184431

  1. Sporotrichoid pattern of nerve abscesses in borderline tuberculoid leprosy: A Case Report (sporotrichoid like abscesses in leprosy).

    PubMed

    Garg, G; Thami, G P; Mohan, H

    2014-01-01

    Linear distribution of multiple subcutaneous nodules or ulcers along the course of lymphatics, classically seen in lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis, has been observed in a number of other infections like localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, cutaneous tuberculous and non tuberculous mycobacterial infections, Pasteurella tularensis, Scopulariopsis blochi, Nocardia brasiliensis, yaws and syphilis. A case of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with multiple cutaneous nodules corresponding to resolving nerve abscesses in a sporotrichoid pattern is being reported. PMID:26411249

  2. Clostridium chauvoei-associated meningoencephalitis in a calf.

    PubMed

    2016-01-16

    ·Meningoencephalitis in a calf associated with Clostridium chauvoei infection. ·Bovine papular stomatitis in calves. ·Otitis media due to Mycoplasma bovis in calves. ·Sporadic porcine abortion due to Nocardia species. ·Spotty liver disease in hens. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for September 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26769810

  3. Molecular, chemical and biological screening of soil actinomycete isolates in seeking bioactive peptide metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Imanparast, Somaye; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Due to the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains, screening of natural resources, especially actinomycetes, for new therapeutic agents discovery has become the interests of researchers. In this study, molecular, chemical and biological screening of soil actinomycetes was carried out in order to search for peptide-producing actinomycetes. Materials and Methods: 60 actinomycetes were isolated from soils of Iran. The isolates were subjected to molecular screening for detection NRPS (non-ribosomal peptide synthetases) gene. Phylogenic identification of NRPS containing isolates was performed. Chemical screening of the crude extracts was performed using chlorine o-dianisidine as peptide detector reagent and bioactivity of peptide producing strains was determined by antimicrobial bioassay. High pressure liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) with UV-visible spectroscopy was performed for detection of the metabolite diversity in selected strain. Results: Amplified NRPS adenylation gene (700 bp) was detected among 30 strains. Phylogenic identification of these isolates showed presence of rare actinomycetes genera among the isolates and 10 out of 30 strains were subjected to chemical screening. Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 showed antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal test pathogens. HPLC-MS and UV-visible spectroscopy results from the crude extract showed that this strain has probably the ability to produce new metabolites. Conclusion: By application of a combined approach, including molecular, chemical and bioactivity analysis, a promising strain of Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 was obtained. This strain had significant activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Strain Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 produce five unknown and most probably new metabolites with molecular weights of 274.2, 390.3, 415.3, 598.4 and 772.5. This strain had showed 99% similarity to Nocardia ignorata DSM 44496 T. PMID:26644870

  4. INFLAMMATORY INDEX AND TREATMENT OF BRAIN ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    OYAMA, HIROFUMI; KITO, AKIRA; MAKI, HIDEKI; HATTORI, KENICHI; NODA, TOMOYUKI; WADA, KENTARO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study retrospectively analyzed 12 patients with brain abscesses. Half of the patients were diagnosed inaccurately in the initial stage, and 7.2 days were required to achieve the final diagnosis of brain abscess. The patients presented only with a moderately elevated leukocyte count, serum CRP levels, or body temperatures during the initial stage. These markers changed, first with an increase in the leukocyte count, followed by the CRP and body temperature. The degree of elevation tended to be less prominent, and the time for each inflammatory index to reach its maximum value tended to be longer in the patients without ventriculitis than in those with it. The causative organisms of a brain abscess were detected in 10 cases. The primary causative organisms from dental caries were Streptococcus viridians or milleri, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Nocardia sp. or farcinica were common when the abscess was found in other regions. The primary causative organisms of unrecognized sources of infection were Streptococcus milleri and Prolionibacterium sp. Nocardia is resistant to many antibiotics. However, carbapenem, tetracycline and quinolone were effective for Nocardia as well as many other kinds of bacteria. In summary, the brain abscesses presented with only mildly elevated inflammatory markers of body temperature, leukocyte and CRP. These inflammatory markers were less obvious in the patients without ventriculitis and/or meningitis. The source of infection tended to suggest some specific primary causative organism. It was reasonable to initiate therapy with carbapenem. PMID:23092104

  5. NOCARDIOSIS REVEALED BY THYROID ABSCESS AND PNEUMONIA IN A LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Reechaipichitkul, Wipa; Thanasatirakul, Pachara

    2015-11-01

    Nocardia thyroid abscess with pneumonia is a rare clinical presentation. We reported a liver transplant recipient with Nocardia thyroiditis and pneumonia after receiving high dose immunosuppressants to preserve his graft. The patient is a 50-year-old male who developed hepatitis C virus-related liver cirrhosis and received a liver transplant. Seven months post-transplantation the patient developed graft rejection, which was treated with 3 days pulse dose methyl-prednisolone followed by an increased dose of his tracolimus, mycophenolate and prednisolone. He presented to the hospital with a 2 week history of fever, tenderness in his anterior neck and dry cough. On admission his temperature was 39.5°C. The right wing of his thyroid gland was swollen to 3 cm in size, fluctuant and tender. On auscultation of his lungs there were fine crepitations and increased vocal resonance in the right middle lung field. On laboratory testing, a complete blood count (CBC) revealed leukocytosis (19,900/mm3) with neutrophils (97%). A chest X-ray showed an patchy infiltrates and round circumscribed densities in the superior segment of the right lower lobe of his lung. A CT scan of his neck revealed a diffusely enlarged right wing of the thyroid gland, 3.8 cm in diameter that had an abnormal hyposignal area. A CT of his chest revealed consolidation of the superior segment of the right lower lobe and necrotic right paratracheal lymph nodes with inflamed strap muscles. Fine needle aspiration of the right lobe of thyroid gland was performed. Modified acid-fast bacilli (MAFB) staining showed partially acid-fast beaded branching filamentous organisms and a culture grew out Nocardia asteroides. He was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for 6 months. He improved clinically and his chest X-ray also cleared. PMID:26867364

  6. Hydrocarbon extraction agents and microbiological processes for their production

    SciTech Connect

    Zajic, J.E.; Gerson, D.F.

    1987-02-03

    A process is described for producing extraction agents useful in the separation of hydrocarbon values from mineral deposits. It comprises cultivating by an aerobic fermentation, in a growth promoting medium and under growth promoting conditions, and on a liquid hydrocarbon substrate, a selected microbial strain of a species of microorganism selected from the group consisting of Arthrobacter terregens, Arthrobacter xerosis, Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium lepus, Corynebacterium xerosis, Nocardia petroleophila, and Vibrio ficheri. This is done to produce an extraction agent of microbiological origin in the fermentation medium, subsequently recovering the extraction agent from the fermentation medium and drying the agent to powdered form.

  7. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator infection due to Mycobacterium mageritense.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masato; Goya, Masahiko; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are usually detected in blood cultures after 4-5 days of incubation, so it is important to differentiate RGM from contamination of commensal organisms on human skin. We report an unusual case of Mycobacterium mageritense bacteremia and infection of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator originally misidentified as Corynebacterium spp. or Nocardia spp. in gram-stained smears. 16S rRNA gene sequencing had utility in the definitive identification of isolates. We should be aware that RGM infection may exist in repeated implantable device infections. PMID:26719132

  8. Pulmonary nocardiosis in a 3-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Holdaway, M. D.; Kennedy, J.; Ashcroft, T.; Kay-Butler, J. J.

    1967-01-01

    Until 1960, 179 cases of infection with Nocardia asteroides had been described in the world literature. Seventeen cases in children were reported by 1963. The organism is a common saprophyte in nature with probably a world-wide distribution. Infection can be primary but is more common in patients with underlying malignancy, auto-immune disease or preceding tuberculosis. Sulphonamides, particularly sulphadiazine, are the drugs of choice in treatment; the value of antibiotics is less clearly established. The indications for surgical treatment have not yet been defined. We record a further case of primary pulmonary nocardiosis in a 3-year-old child. Images PMID:6035802

  9. Thoracic actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Slade, P. R.; Slesser, B. V.; Southgate, J.

    1973-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary infection with Actinomyces Israeli and one case of infection with Nocardia asteroides are described. The incidence of thoracic actinomycosis has declined recently and the classical presentation with chronic discharging sinuses is now uncommon. The cases described illustrate some of the forms which the disease may take. Actinomycotic infection has been noted, not infrequently, to co-exist with bronchial carcinoma and a case illustrating this association is described. Sputum cytology as practised for the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma has helped to identify the fungi in the sputum. Treatment is discussed, particularly the possible use of oral antibiotics rather than penicillin by injection. Images PMID:4568119

  10. Testicular nocardiosis accompanied by cutaneous lesions in an immunocompetent man.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Sekimoto, Etsuko; Shirakami, Atsuhisa; Shibata, Hironobu; Ozaki, Shuji; Shigekiyo, Toshio; Noda, Toshinori; Shikiji, Takanori; Kanda, Kazuya; Hirose, Takanori; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Gonoi, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 77-year-old man admitted for an acute cutaneous infection and persistent fever. A physical examination revealed systemic small blisters and scrotal swelling. He was suspected of having complications from chickenpox or bullous impetigo as the initial diagnosis. Nocardia was detected on an aspiration biopsy of the small blisters and the surgically removed testis at a later date. Testicular nocardiosis is a rare condition; however, we should consider nocardiosis in the differential diagnosis because delay in providing treatment may worsen a patient's general condition. PMID:23291688

  11. Thiolactomycin-Based Inhibitors of Bacterial β-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthases with in Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Bommineni, Gopal R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Cummings, Jason E; Lu, Yang; Knudson, Susan E; Gu, Chendi; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Tonge, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthases (KAS) are key enzymes involved in the type II bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) pathway and are putative targets for antibacterial discovery. Several natural product KAS inhibitors have previously been reported, including thiolactomycin (TLM), which is produced by Nocardia spp. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of optically pure 5R-thiolactomycin (TLM) analogues that show improved whole cell activity against bacterial strains including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and priority pathogens such as Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. In addition, we identify TLM analogues with in vivo efficacy against MRSA and Klebsiella pneumoniae in animal models of infection. PMID:27187871

  12. A case of endophthalmitis associated with limbal relaxing incision

    PubMed Central

    Haripriya, Aravind; Syeda, Taranum S

    2012-01-01

    Limbal relaxing incisions (LRIs) are considered a relatively safe procedure with rapid stabilization and absence of infectious complications. Do we need to readdress this last impression? We report a case of nocardia endophthalmitis associated with an exudate at the site of an LRI in a patient who underwent routine cataract surgery. This case, to the best of our knowledge, is the first report of its kind, stressing the need for a cautious approach to the adoption of this method of astigmatic correction. PMID:22569388

  13. Isolation of Microorganisms Able To Metabolize Purified Natural Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Heisey, R. M.; Papadatos, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria able to grow on purified natural rubber in the absence of other organic carbon sources were isolated from soil. Ten isolates reduced the weight of vulcanized rubber from latex gloves by >10% in 6 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed the ability of the microorganisms to colonize, penetrate, and dramatically alter the physical structure of the rubber. The rubber-metabolizing bacteria were identified on the basis of fatty acid profiles and cell wall characteristics. Seven isolates were strains of Streptomyces, two were strains of Amycolatopsis, and one was a strain of Nocardia. PMID:16535106

  14. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain abscesses and a history of chronic exposure to silica dust, PAP and opportunistic nocardial infection should always be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:26605224

  15. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain abscesses and a history of chronic exposure to silica dust, PAP and opportunistic nocardial infection should always be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:26605224

  16. Rice-Field Drowning-Associated Pneumonia in which Pseudomonas spp., Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cunninghamella sp. Are Isolated.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, Satoshi; Nakashima, Kei; Suzuki, Fumi; Otsuki, Ayumu; Watanabe, Junko; Takai, Motohisa; Katsurada, Masahiro; Katsurada, Naoko; Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Misawa, Masafumi; Kaneko, Norihiro; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Aoshima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 84-year-old who developed pneumonia after drowning in a rice field. Besides Aspergillus fumigatus, many pathogens previously not reported in drowning-associated pneumonia (such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Nocardia niigatensis, and Cunninghamella sp.) were isolated from his sputum. He received sulbactam/ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, voriconazole, levofloxacin and liposomal amphotericin B, but died due to respiratory failure. Because the patient had drowned in a contaminated stagnant rice field and had multiple lung cavities, zygomycosis was suspected. This report provides invaluable information for the consideration of zygomycosis after an individual drowning in a rice field, even in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:27041173

  17. Actinomycetes in Karstic caves of northern Spain (Altamira and Tito Bustillo).

    PubMed

    Groth, I; Vettermann, R; Schuetze, B; Schumann, P; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    1999-05-01

    A variety of isolation procedures were carried out to study the involvement of bacteria in the colonisation and biodeterioration of Spanish caves with paleolithic rock art (Altamira and Tito Bustillo). The applied techniques mainly aimed to isolate heterotrophic bacteria such as streptomycetes, nocardioform and coryneform actinomycetes, and other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results demonstrated that actinomycetes were the most abundant gram-positive bacteria in the caves. Actinomycetes revealed a great taxonomic diversity with the predominant isolates belonging to the genus Streptomyces. Members of the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Nocardioides, Amycolatopsis, Saccharothrix, Brevibacterium, Microbacterium, and coccoid actinomycetes (family Micrococcaceae) were also found. PMID:10353805

  18. AH7, a non-polyenic antifungal antibiotic produced by a new strain of Streptosporangium roseum.

    PubMed

    Hacène, H; Boudjellal, F; Lefebvre, G

    1998-01-01

    An antibiotic (AH7) produced by Streptosporangium roseum strain 214 was investigated. This compound was extracted with chloroform from the filtrate culture and purified using thin-layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. The antibiotic strongly inhibited the growth of several strains of fungi and bacteria known to be plant and human pathogens. This compound differed from all other antibiotics known to be synthesized by Streptosporangium spp. Some of its chemical and physical properties resembled those of maytansines produced by Nocardia but the antibiotic AH7 has only antibacterial and antitumoral activities. PMID:10093231

  19. Ability of Cricetomys rats to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and discriminate it from other microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Machang'u, Robert S; Lazar, Doris; Weiner, January; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-03-01

    Trained African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) have potential for diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). These rats target volatile compounds of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that cause TB. Mtb and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species are related to Nocardia and Rhodococcus spp., which are also acid-fast bacilli and can be misdiagnosed as Mtb in smear microscopy. Diagnostic performance of C. gambianus on in vitro-cultured mycobacterial and related pulmonary microbes is unknown. This study reports on the response of TB detection rats to cultures of reference Mtb, clinical Mtb, NTM, Nocardia; Rhodococcus; Streptomyces; Bacillus; and yeasts. Trained rats significantly discriminated Mtb from other microbes (p < 0.008, Fisher's exact test). Detection of Mtb cultures was age-related, with exponential and early stationary phase detected more frequently than early log phase and late stationary phase (p < 0.001, Fisher's test) (sensitivity = 83.33%, specificity = 94.4%, accuracy = 94%). The detection of naturally TB-infected sputum exceeded that of negative sputum mixed with Mtb, indicating that C. gambianus are conditioned to detect odours of TB-positive sputum better than spiked sputum. Although further studies on volatiles from detectable growth phases of Mtb are vital for identification of Mtb-specific volatiles detected by rats, our study underline the potential of C. gambianus for TB diagnosis. PMID:22197664

  20. Recovery of microorganisms from synovial and pleural fluids of animals using hyperosmolar media.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, A M; Davis, D C; Pedersen, N C; Beaman, B L

    1982-03-01

    L-phase (CWD) broth and plate media were used in parallel with conventional microbiological media during a 3-year period for culturing synovial and pleural fluids of animals. Two kinds of recoveries were obtained where parallel conventional methods were negative: (1) parent or normal bacteria, in very low numbers; and (2) Type B CWD variants in equally low numbers. Organisms in group 1 were: Streptococcus zooepidemicus from horses (2x); beta-hemolytic streptococci, Lancefield Gp. G (2x); Staphylococcus aureus; Actinobacillus, and Actinomyces viscosus. Group 2 consisted of Bacteroides sp., Propionibacterium acnes, and three "Nocardia-like" sp. Catalase + Actinomyces was not recovered equally well on CWD plates as on conventional media with fluids obtained during ampicillin treatment. This occurred in spite of the fact that the CWD media was shown to support growth and reversion of laboratory induced L-phase variants of Nocardia caviae and N. asteroides, and had facilitated recovery of a Bacteroides L-phase variant from a pleural fluid. The nature of this fault in the media is under investigation in this laboratory. PMID:7101719

  1. Global Burden of Human Mycetoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, Wendy W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic infectious disease of the subcutaneous tissue with a high morbidity. This disease has been reported from countries between 30°N and 15°S since 1840 but the exact burden of disease is not known. It is currently unknown what the incidence, prevalence and the number of reported cases per year per country is. In order to estimate what the global burden of mycetoma is, a meta-analysis was performed. In total 50 studies were included, which resulted in a total of 8763 mycetoma cases. Most cases were found in men between 11 and 40 years of age. The foot was most commonly affected. Most cases were reported from Mexico, Sudan and India. Madurella mycetomatis was the most prevalent causative agent world-wide, followed by Actinomadura madurae, Streptomyces somaliensis, Actinomadura pelletieri, Nocardia brasiliensis and Nocardia asteroides. Although this study represents a first indication of the global burden on mycetoma, the actual burden is probably much higher. In this study only cases reported to literature could be used and most of these cases were found by searching archives from a single hospital in a single city of that country. By erecting (inter)national surveillance programs a more accurate estimation of the global burden on mycetoma can be obtained. PMID:24244780

  2. Pulmonary nocardiosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A new clinical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Giorgio; Grimaldi, Anna; Castellana, Marco; Farina, Claudio; Castellana, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis (PN) is a rare but severe disease caused by Nocardia spp. Despite the traditional description as opportunistic infection, case reports and case series of pulmonary nocardiosis have recently been reported in immunocompetent patients too, in particular among people with chronic pulmonary diseases such as advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). PN is characterized by non-specific symptoms and radiological findings; bacteriological culture can be difficult. For the reasons above, diagnosis of PN is challenging, sometimes resulting in a misdiagnosis of tuberculosis. We report an interesting case of PN in a 75-year-old male with COPD. He complained a 3-months history of fatigue, evening rise in body temperature, night sweats, unexplained weight loss of 5 kg, worsening dyspnea, cough and mucopurulent sputum. The chest X-ray showed multiple nodules with cavitations bilaterally in the apical and subclavian regions. Nocardia cyriacigeorgica with 100% identity was identified in three sputum samples. Since the patient has never undergone a systemic and/or inhaled steroid therapy, and has no respiratory failure and comorbidities entailing immunodepression, it is conceivable that, in this immunocompetent patient, the COPD could represent an isolated risk factor for PN. Risk factors, clinical presentations, radiographic findings, differential diagnosis and review of the literature of PN cases in COPD, pointing out the similarities and differences, are also described. PMID:27144111

  3. Diverse UV-B resistance of culturable bacterial community from high-altitude wetland water.

    PubMed

    Zenoff, Veronica Fernández; Heredia, Judith; Ferrero, Marcela; Siñeriz, Faustino; Farías, María Eugenia

    2006-05-01

    Isolation of most ultraviolet B (UV-B)-resistant culturable bacteria that occur in the habitat of Laguna Azul, a high-altitude wetland [4554 m above sea level (asl)] from the Northwestern Argentinean Andes, was carried out by culture-based methods. Water from this environment was exposed to UV-B radiation under laboratory conditions during 36 h, at an irradiance of 4.94 W/m2. It was found that the total number of bacteria in water samples decreased; however, most of the community survived long-term irradiation (312 nm) (53.3 kJ/m2). The percentage of bacteria belonging to dominant species did not vary significantly, depending on the number of UV irradiation doses. The most resistant microbes in the culturable community were Gram-positive pigmented species (Bacillus megaterium [endospores and/or vegetative cells], Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Nocardia sp.). Only one Gram-negative bacterium could be cultivated (Acinetobacter johnsonii). Nocardia sp. that survived doses of 3201 kJ/m2 were the most resistant bacteria to UV-B treatment. This study is the first report on UV-B resistance of a microbial community isolated from high-altitude extreme environments, and proposes a method for direct isolation of UV-B-resistant bacteria from extreme irradiated environments. PMID:16604419

  4. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Huda M.; Kalendar, Aisha A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola, and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though Brevibacterium and Kocuria were the most dominant actinobacterial isolates, they failed to show any antimicrobial activity, whereas less dominant genera, such as Streptomyces, did show antimicrobial activity. Focusing on the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria may help to understand how corals thrive under harsh environmental conditions and may lead to the discovery of novel antimicrobial metabolites with potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26973601

  5. Target-specific identification and characterization of the putative gene cluster for brasilinolide biosynthesis revealing the mechanistic insights and combinatorial synthetic utility of 2-deoxy-l-fucose biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsien-Tai; Weng, Chien-Pao; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Hung

    2016-02-14

    Brasilinolides exhibiting potent immunosuppressive and antifungal activities with remarkably low toxicity are structurally characterized by an unusual modified 2-deoxy-l-fucose (2dF) attached to a type I polyketide (PK-I) macrolactone. From the pathogenic producer Nocardia terpenica (Nocardia brasiliensis IFM-0406), a 210 kb genomic fragment was identified by target-specific degenerate primers and subsequently sequenced, revealing a giant nbr gene cluster harboring genes (nbrCDEF) required for TDP-2dF biosynthesis and those for PK-I biosynthesis, modification and regulation. The results showed that the genetic and domain arrangements of nbr PK-I synthases agreed colinearly with the PK-I structures of brasilinolides. Subsequent heterologous expression of nbrCDEF in Escherichia coli accomplished in vitro reconstitution of TDP-2dF biosynthesis. The catalytic functions and mechanisms of NbrCDEF enzymes were further characterized by systematic mix-and-match experiments. The enzymes were revealed to display remarkable substrate and partner promiscuity, leading to the establishment of in vitro hybrid deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways throughout an in situ one-pot (iSOP) method. This study represents the first demonstration of TDP-2dF biosynthesis at the enzyme and molecular levels, and provides new hope for expanding the structural diversity of brasilinolides by combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:26754528

  6. A mimic's imitator: a cavitary pneumonia in a myasthenic patient with history of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raquel Ramos; Bhanot, Nitin; Min, Zaw

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with myasthenia gravis receiving prednisone and plasmapheresis was found to have right upper lobe cavitary pneumonia on radiological imaging studies after thymectomy. He had a remote history of treated pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) at the age of 19. On the basis of history of TB and current prednisone therapy, reactivation of pulmonary TB was highly suspected. Branching Gram-positive bacilli were identified on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). BAL Ziehl-Neelsen Acid-fast bacilli stain was negative, but a modified Kinyoun stain revealed branching, beaded, filamentous bacilli, suggestive of Nocardia spp. Nocardia cyriacigeorgica grew from the BAL culture. Cerebral MRI demonstrated a right frontal lobe lesion, clinically correlated to be nocardial brain abscess. The patient was treated with three-drug antimicrobial therapy (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, meropenem, linezolid) for 2 months, followed by an additional 10 months of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Amikacin would have been included in the initial three-drug regimen, but its use was contraindicated in our myasthenic patient because aminoglycoside would trigger fatal myasthenic crisis by neuromuscular blockage. Follow-up imaging studies revealed resolution of the lung and brain lesions. PMID:26150643

  7. Pulmonary Nocardiosis in a Multiple Myeloma Patient Treated with Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Nikolai P.; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Forde, Inga C.; Rudkovaskaia, Anastasiia; Saul, Zane K.; Lobo, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 71 Final Diagnosis: Pulmonary nocardiosis Symptoms: Cough • dyspnea • fever Medication: Carfillzomib Clinical Procedure: Bronchoscopy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: The use of proteasome inhibitors like Bortezomib to treat multiple myeloma has been associated with increased rates of opportunistic infections, including Nocardia, especially when lymphopenia is present. The prevalence or association of such infections with newer agents like Carfilzomib is not known. Case Report: A 71-year-old man with multiple myeloma presented with a 6-week history of respiratory symptoms and cyclic fevers. He was undergoing chemotherapy with Carfilzomib. Work-up revealed severe lymphopenia and a CT chest showed multiple lung nodules and a mass-like consolidation. He underwent a bronchoscopy, and respiratory cultures grew Nocardia species. He responded well to intravenous antibiotics with resolution of symptoms and CT findings. Conclusions: With the introduction of newer agents like Carfilzomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma, clinicians must maintain a high degree of suspicion for opportunistic infections to achieve early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26861506

  8. Actinomycete infections in humans--a review.

    PubMed

    Schaal, K P; Lee, H J

    1992-06-15

    Diseases caused by pathogenic aerobic and facultatively anaerobic actinomycetes differ considerably with respect to their etiology, pathogenesis, clinical appearance and epidemiology. Facultatively anaerobic (fermentative) actinomycetes may not only be involved etiologically in the three classical forms of cervicofacial, thoracic and abdominal actinomycoses, but also in infections of the female genital organs, the eye, the tissue adjacent to dental implantation elements and tooth extraction wounds. The species distribution of the fermentative actinomycetes isolated from these conditions varied to a certain, but characteristic, extent, as did the concomitant actinomycotic flora. The sex ratio reported for human Actinomyces infections (male:female = 3:1) appeared to be restricted to actinomycotic abscesses and empyemas. The prevailing pathogenic, obligately aerobic actinomycete species in Germany was found to be Nocardia farcinica followed by Nocardia asteroides. The comparatively high incidence of N. farcinica infections was chiefly due to the occurrence of nosocomial postoperative wound infections by this pathogen observed in two German hospitals. Besides surgical treatment, immunosuppressive treatment appeared to be the most common factor predisposing for nocardiosis. Recent observations strongly suggested that the spectrum of human nocardial infections in Germany has been changing, as regards the overall incidence, the prevalence of N. farcinica, the sex ratio, the mean age of patients, as well as the role of N. farcinica as a possibly important nosocomial pathogen. PMID:1612438

  9. Comparative pathology of nocardiosis in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    St Leger, J A; Begeman, L; Fleetwood, M; Frasca, S; Garner, M M; Lair, S; Trembley, S; Linn, M J; Terio, K A

    2009-03-01

    Nocardia spp. infections in mammals cause pyogranulomatous lesions in a variety of organs, most typically the lung. Members of the Nocardia asteroides complex are the most frequently recognized pathogens. Nine cases of nocardiosis in free-ranging pinnipeds and 10 cases of nocardiosis in cetaceans were evaluated. Host species included the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata, n = 8), leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx, n = 1), Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, n = 4), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas, n = 4), and killer whale (Orcinus orca, n = 2). The most common presentation of nocardiosis in both pinnipeds and cetaceans was the systemic form, involving 2 or more organs. Organs most frequently affected were lung and thoracic lymph nodes in 7 of 9 cases in pinnipeds and 8 of 10 cases in cetaceans. Molecular identification and bacterial isolation demonstrated a variety of pathogenic species. N. asteroides, N. farcinica, N. brasiliensis, and N. otitisdiscaviarum are pathogenic for pinnipeds. In cetaceans N. asteroides, N. farcinica, N. brasiliensis, N. cyriacigeorgica, and N. levis are pathogenic. Hematoxylin and eosin and acid fast staining failed to reveal bacteria in every case, whereas modified acid fast and Grocott's methenamine silver consistently demonstrated the characteristic organisms. In both pinnipeds and cetaceans, juvenile animals were affected more often than adults. Hooded seals demonstrated more cases of nocardiosis than other pinnipeds. PMID:19261643

  10. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Huda M; Kalendar, Aisha A

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola, and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though Brevibacterium and Kocuria were the most dominant actinobacterial isolates, they failed to show any antimicrobial activity, whereas less dominant genera, such as Streptomyces, did show antimicrobial activity. Focusing on the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria may help to understand how corals thrive under harsh environmental conditions and may lead to the discovery of novel antimicrobial metabolites with potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26973601

  11. Corticosteroids as a therapy for bacterial keratitis: an evidence-based review of 'who, when and why'.

    PubMed

    Tallab, Raghad T; Stone, Donald U

    2016-06-01

    Corticosteroids have been proposed as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial keratitis, with significant controversy regarding the appropriate use of this therapy. Recent prospective randomised controlled trials have provided additional evidence to guide clinical decision-making. A review of the epidemiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis, preliminary animal studies, retrospective human studies and prospective randomised clinical trials that address the potential risks and benefits of corticosteroids in patients with bacterial keratitis was performed. Four prospective randomised controlled trials were identified. Three small studies found no benefit of topical corticosteroids, but were underpowered to evaluate adverse events. The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) study and subgroup analyses provide evidence for a relative gain of one line of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in patients with non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, especially when corticosteroids were initiated within 3 days of presentation; no increase in adverse events was noted. No evidence was found to support the concern for corneal thinning attributable to corticosteroids in the absence of an inadequately treated infectious process. In patients with culture-proven non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, corticosteroids provide one line of vision improvement over antimicrobials alone, with no increase in adverse events. This benefit should not be extrapolated to patients with other aetiologies of keratitis, such as fungus, herpes viruses, acanthamoeba or atypical mycobacteria, and these entities should be excluded before considering adjunctive steroid therapy. PMID:26743622

  12. Role of steroids in the treatment of bacterial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Palioura, Sotiria; Henry, Christopher R; Amescua, Guillermo; Alfonso, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis can lead to severe visual impairment from corneal ulceration, subsequent scarring, and possible perforation. The mainstay of treatment is topical antibiotics, whereas the use of adjunctive topical corticosteroid drops remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review the rationale for and against the use of topical corticosteroids and we assess their effectiveness and safety in the published randomized controlled trials that have evaluated their role as adjunctive therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. In the largest study to date, the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial, topical corticosteroid drops were neither helpful nor harmful for the 500 participants as a whole. However, subgroup analyses suggested that topical corticosteroids may be beneficial upon early administration (within 2–3 days after starting antibiotics) for more central corneal ulcers with poorer vision at presentation, for invasive Pseudomonas strains, and for non-Nocardia ulcers. These results are discussed within the limitations of the study. PMID:26869751

  13. Aladapcin, a new microbial metabolite that enhances host resistance against bacterial infection. Production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, A; Nakajima, M; Katayama, T; Matsuda, T; Niwa, T; Okazaki, T; Takamatsu, Y; Nagaki, H; Kinoshita, T; Takatsu, T

    1990-06-01

    We have constructed a new screening system for detecting microbial products that enhance host resistance against bacterial infection. It was found that a new compound with such activity is produced by a soil isolate classified as Nocardia sp. SANK 60484. The compound was isolated from the culture filtrate of the organism and named aladapcin after its amino acid composition. Aladapcin was obtained as an amphoteric white amorphous powder with the molecular formula, C13H25N5O5. It consists of 2 mol of D-alanine and 1 mol of meso-diaminopimelic acid. From the analysis of IR, 1H NMR and FAB-MS spectra, the structure was assigned to be a tripeptide. Aladapcin enhanced host resistance against an experimental Escherichia coli infection in mice at doses ranging between 1 and 100 micrograms/kg. PMID:2199420

  14. Actinomycetes in the rhizosphere of semidesert soils of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norovsuren, Zh.; Zenova, G. M.; Mosina, L. V.

    2007-04-01

    The population density of actinomycetes in the desert-steppe soil, rhizosphere, and the above-ground parts of plants varies from tens to hundreds of thousands of colony-forming units (CFU) per gram of substrate. The actinomycetal complexes of the brown desert-steppe soil without plant roots are more diverse in their taxonomic composition than the actinomycetal complexes in the rhizosphere and the aboveground parts of plants. Additionally to representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, actinomycetes from the Nocardia, Saccharopolyspora, Thermomonospora, and Actinomadura genera were identified in the soil. The population density of actinomycetes in the rhizosphere and in the soil reached hundreds of thousand CFU/g; it considerably exceeded the population density of actinomycetes in the aboveground parts of plants. The maximum population density of actinomycetes was determined in the rhizosphere of Asparagus gobicus, Salsola pestifera, and Cleistogenes songorica.

  15. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a report of seven patients from King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kawkitinarong, Kamon; Sittipunt, Chanchai; Wongtim, Somkiat; Udompanich, Visit

    2005-09-01

    From 1983 to 2001, 7 patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis were admitted to the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Presenting symptoms varied from asymptomatic (1 patient), progressive dyspnea on exertion (4 patients) to respiratory failure (2 patients). Other symptoms included dry cough and weight loss. Gradual onset of dyspnea could be observed by average time to hospital (7 months). Early worsening of dyspnea and high-grade fever suggested a possibility of superimposed infection. Chest radiographs revealed symmetrical infiltration without lobar predominance. 4 of 7 patients were misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis before diagnosis of PAP was made. Diagnosis was made by bronchoscopic examination with typical lavage fluid or pathological results; only one case need open lung biopsy. 6 of 7 patients required lung lavage to relieve dyspneic symptoms. Coinfection with Nocardia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was found in one patient. Prognosis was good but recurrence was common. PMID:16623047

  16. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution. PMID:26527268

  17. Impact of immune status on the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Sung, Heungsup; Jung, Jiwon; Yu, Shi Nae; Lee, Ju Young; Kim, Sung-Han; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang-Oh; Chong, Yong Pil

    2016-08-01

    Nocardiosis occurs in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. We aimed to assess how its characteristics differ depending on patients' immune status. Of a total of 54 patients with culture-proven nocardiosis diagnosed over 13 years, 18 (33%) were immunocompetent. Half of immunocompetent patients had chronic lung disease and were not receiving systemic corticosteroid. There were no significant differences in clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic characteristics, and treatment outcomes according to immune status, except that pulmonary cavitation (47% vs. 8%) and coexisting infections (17% vs. 0%) were more frequent in immunocompromised hosts. Nocardia farcinica, the most commonly identified isolates at the species level (51%), was highly susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (100%) and highly resistant to ceftriaxone (94%). Nocardiosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of pneumonia, brain abscess, or soft tissue infection that does not respond to conventional antibiotic therapy such as ceftriaxone, regardless of whether the patient is immunocompromised or not. PMID:27241370

  18. Spectrum of disease caused by Rhodococcus equi in human immunodeficiency virus infection: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Willsie-Ediger, Sandra K; Stanford, James F; Salzman, Gary A; Bamberger, David M

    1990-01-01

    Since the first report of Rhodococcus equi infection in an acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient in 1986, seven additional cases have been described. A patient is described in whom the diagnosis was delayed due to misidentification of the organism as an atypical mycobacterial species. The literature regarding R equi infection in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus is reviewed. The most common presentation is one of a chronic, indolent pulmonary infiltrative disease (78%). Fever (78%), cough (67%), and hemoptysis (44%) are frequently present. Coexistent opportunistic illnesses are common (67%). In the laboratory identification of this organism, it is important to communicate the clinical setting to the microbiologist and to recognize the potential for the organism to be overlooked as normal flora or a contaminant, or misidentified as an organism with similar phenotypic characteristics (Nocardia species or a rapidly growing mycobacterium). Based on experience in foals, therapy with erythromycin and rifampin is suggested. PMID:22553450

  19. Locating and Activating Molecular ‘Time Bombs’: Induction of Mycolata Prophages

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Brown, Teagan L.; Farrar, Ben; Doyle, Stephen R.; Tucci, Joseph; Seviour, Robert J.; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence, functionality and ecological roles of temperate phages for members of the mycolic acid producing bacteria, the Mycolata. While many lytic phages infective for these organisms have been isolated, and assessed for their suitability for use as biological control agents of activated sludge foaming, no studies have investigated how temperate phages might be induced for this purpose. Bioinformatic analysis using the PHAge Search Tool (PHAST) on Mycolata whole genome sequence data in GenBank for members of the genera Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella revealed 83% contained putative prophage DNA sequences. Subsequent prophage inductions using mitomycin C were conducted on 17 Mycolata strains. This led to the isolation and genome characterization of three novel Caudovirales temperate phages, namely GAL1, GMA1, and TPA4, induced from Gordonia alkanivorans, Gordonia malaquae, and Tsukamurella paurometabola, respectively. All possessed highly distinctive dsDNA genome sequences. PMID:27487243

  20. Pulmonary Nocardiosis in an Adolescent Patient with Crohn’s Disease Treated with Infliximab: a Serious Complication of TNF-Alpha Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rishi; Walia, Ritu; Sondike, Stephen B.; Khan, Raheel

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a serious complication of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blockers. With the increasing use of biologics for inflammatory bowel disease, it is to be anticipated that opportunistic infections such as nocardia will be more frequently encountered in children. We present the case of a 16 year old male with Crohn’s disease who developed pulmonary nocardiosis during the course of his treatment with infliximab. This case illustrates the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges faced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease infected with opportunistic organisms. Pediatric health care providers need to be aware so that early diagnosis and treatment can be provided thereby preventing disseminated disease and having favorable outcomes. Although TNF blocker therapy must be discontinued in the presence of such infections, biologic therapy may be reintroduced after successful treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to control underlying symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26050296

  1. Microbiologic spectrum and susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Animesh; Pathengay, Avinash; Jalali, Subhadra; Mathai, Annie; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay; Sharma, Savitri; Das, Taraprasad; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. A retrospective review of 33 consecutive patients with culture proven delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis was done from January 2006 to March 2013. There were 22 bacterial and eleven fungal cases. Common isolates were Streptococci (seven cases), coagulase-negative staphylococci (five), Gram-negative bacilli (seven), Nocardia (two), Aspergillus (five), Candida (five). Gram-positive cocci were most susceptible to vancomycin and gatifloxacin (91.7%). Gram-negative isolates were most susceptible to ofloxacin (85.7%). Fungi being slow growing organisms are an important cause of delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. PMID:26124631

  2. A comparison of three bacterial strains for the remediation of town gas soils

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.E.; Akkineni, D.K.; Cutright, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    The contamination of soils from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is widespread. Although PAH contamination still occurs from current industrial processes, accidental spills, and leaking underground storage tanks, the main source of contamination is from abandoned town gas sites. To date there is a conservative estimate of 2500 town gas sites that require remediation. The most cost effective in-situ treatment for these sites is that of bioremediation. Experiments were conducted to compare the efficiencies of three bacterial strains for the remediation of an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the efficiencies of Achromobacter sp., Mycobacterium sp., and Nocardia paraffinae were investigated. This paper will address the chemical specificity of each bacterial strains for the PAHs present.

  3. Synthesis, Spectral, and In Vitro Antibacterial Studies of Organosilicon(IV) Complexes with Schiff Bases Derived from Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Har Lal; Singh, Jangbhadur; Mukherjee, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present work stems from our interest in the synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial evaluation of organosilicon(IV) complexes of a class of amino-acid-based Schiff base which have been prepared by the interaction of ethoxytrimethylsilane with the Schiff bases (N OH) in 1 : 1 molar ratio. These complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, and spectroscopic studies including electronic IR and NMR (1H, 13C, and 29Si) spectroscopy. The analytical and spectral data suggest trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the silicon atom in the resulting complexes. The ligands and their organosilicon complexes have also been evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Nocardia spp., E. aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Staphylococcus spp.). The complexes were found to be more potent as compared to the ligands. PMID:23983671

  4. Infectious eccrine hidradenitis: a report of 3 cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bassas-Vila, J; Fernández-Figueras, M T; Romaní, J; Ferrándiz, C

    2014-03-01

    Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH) is a nonspecific clinicopathological reaction pattern, classified as a neutrophilic dermatosis, that usually develops in patients receiving chemotherapy for a hematologic malignancy. More rarely, it has been reported in association with infectious agents such as Serratia and Enterobacter species, Staphylococcus aureus, and human immunodeficiency virus. We describe 3 cases of infectious eccrine hidradenitis secondary to infection with Nocardia species, Mycobacterium chelonae, and S aureus. Histological findings revealed a dense infiltrate with perivascular and periductal neutrophils in the dermis. In the eccrine glands, there was vacuolar degeneration and necrosis of the epithelial cells. Our cases support the assertion that NEH is a characteristic cutaneous response to nonspecific stimuli. Clinical and histopathological findings of infectious and noninfectious NEH are generally indistinguishable and when NEH is suspected, the possibility of an infectious association must be investigated by skin tissue culture. In this article we also discuss differential diagnoses and review the literature. PMID:24011437

  5. Natural toxins implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Experimental models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are of great importance for improving the design of future clinical trials. Various neurotoxic models are available, including 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), paraquat and rotenone. However, no model is considered perfect; each has its own limitations. Based on epidemiological data, a new trend of using environmental toxins in PD modeling seems attractive and has dominated public discussions of the disease etiology. A search for new environmental toxin-based models would improve our knowledge of the pathology of the condition. Here, we discuss some toxins of natural origin (e.g. cycad-derived toxins, epoxomicin, Nocardia asteroides bacteria, Streptomyces venezuelae bacteria, annonacin and DOPAL) that possibly represent a contributory environmental component to PD. PMID:22164190

  6. Diversity of actinomycetes isolated from subseafloor sediments after prolonged low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Dana; Goo, Kian-Sim

    2015-05-01

    Subseafloor sediments present an untapped source of novel bacterial species with industrially important bioactivities. Subseafloor core samples collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 315, 316, and 331 and stored in Kochi Core Center at -80 °C for 1 to 4 years were used for cultivation-based study of viable actinomycetes. In total, more than 100 actinomycete-like colonies were isolated from two deep-frozen subseafloor sediment samples. Isolated actinomycetes showed close similarity to known Actinotalea, Dietzia, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Microbacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella species and were halotolerant. Bioactivity assays revealed that two of the isolates were producing potent antibacterial compound(s) and one isolate was having antifungal activity. Our study demonstrated that deep-frozen subseafloor core samples could be a potential source of viable actinomycetes, which may be used in drug discovery. PMID:25381631

  7. Microbiologic spectrum and susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Animesh; Pathengay, Avinash; Jalali, Subhadra; Mathai, Annie; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay; Sharma, Savitri; Das, Taraprasad; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. A retrospective review of 33 consecutive patients with culture proven delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis was done from January 2006 to March 2013. There were 22 bacterial and eleven fungal cases. Common isolates were Streptococci (seven cases), coagulase-negative staphylococci (five), Gram-negative bacilli (seven), Nocardia (two), Aspergillus (five), Candida (five). Gram-positive cocci were most susceptible to vancomycin and gatifloxacin (91.7%). Gram-negative isolates were most susceptible to ofloxacin (85.7%). Fungi being slow growing organisms are an important cause of delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. PMID:26124631

  8. The isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from dominant benthic macroinvertebrates endemic to Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-03-01

    The high demand for new antibacterials fosters the isolation of new biologically active compounds producing actinobacteria. Here, we report the isolation and initial characterization of cultured actinobacteria from dominant benthic organisms' communities of Lake Baikal. Twenty-five distinct strains were obtained from 5 species of Baikal endemic macroinvertebrates of amphipods, freshwater sponges, turbellaria worms, and insects (caddisfly larvae). The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-based phylogenic analysis of obtained strains showed their affiliation to Streptomyces, Nocardia, Pseudonocardia, Micromonospora, Aeromicrobium, and Agromyces genera, revealing the diversity of actinobacteria associated with the benthic organisms of Lake Baikal. The biological activity assays showed that 24 out of 25 strains are producing compounds active against at least one of the test cultures used, including Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. Complete dereplication of secondary metabolite profiles of two isolated strains led to identification of only few known compounds, while the majority of detected metabolites are not listed in existing antibiotic databases. PMID:26347255

  9. De novo biosynthesis of Gastrodin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanfen; Yin, Hua; Bi, Huiping; Zhuang, Yibin; Liu, Tao; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-05-01

    Gastrodin, a phenolic glycoside, is the key ingredient of Gastrodia elata, a notable herbal plant that has been used to treat various conditions in oriental countries for centuries. Gastrodin is extensively used clinically for its sedative, hypnotic, anticonvulsive and neuroprotective properties in China. Gastrodin is usually produced by plant extraction or chemical synthesis, which has many disadvantages. Herein, we report unprecedented microbial synthesis of gastrodin via an artificial pathway. A Nocardia carboxylic acid reductase, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and a Rhodiola glycosyltransferase UGT73B6 transformed 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, an intermediate of ubiquinone biosynthesis, into gastrodin in Escherichia coli. Pathway genes were overexpressed to enhance metabolic flux toward precursor 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of the UGT73B6 toward phenolic alcohols were improved through directed evolution. The finally engineered strain produced 545mgl(-1) gastrodin in 48h. This work creates a new route to produce gastrodin, instead of plant extractions and chemical synthesis. PMID:26804288

  10. Chronic granulomatous disease: a review of the infectious and inflammatory complications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease is the most commonly encountered immunodeficiency involving the phagocyte, and is characterized by repeated infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens, as well as the formation of granulomas in tissue. The disease is the result of a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, culminating in an inability of the phagocyte to generate superoxide, leading to the defective killing of pathogenic organisms. This can lead to infections with Staphylococcus aureus, Psedomonas species, Nocardia species, and fungi (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans). Involvement of vital or large organs can contribute to morbidity and/or mortality in the affected patients. Major advances have occurred in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, with the potential for gene therapy or stem cell transplantation looming on the horizon. PMID:21624140

  11. Genome Sequences and Characterization of the Related Gordonia Phages GTE5 and GRU1 and Their Use as Potential Biocontrol Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tillett, Daniel; Seviour, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Activated sludge plants suffer frequently from the operational problem of stable foam formation on aerobic reactor surfaces, which can be difficult to prevent. Many foams are stabilized by mycolic acid-containing Actinobacteria, the mycolata. The in situ biocontrol of foaming using phages is an attractive strategy. We describe two polyvalent phages, GTE5 and GRU1, targeting Gordonia terrae and Gordonia rubrupertincta, respectively, isolated from activated sludge. Phage GRU1 also propagates on Nocardia nova. Both phages belong to the family Siphoviridae and have similar-size icosahedral heads that encapsulate double-stranded DNA genomes (∼65 kb). Their genome sequences are similar to each other but markedly different from those of other sequenced phages. Both are arranged in a modular fashion. These phages can reduce or eliminate foam formation by their host cells under laboratory conditions. PMID:22038604

  12. Screening for Genes Coding for Putative Antitumor Compounds, Antimicrobial and Enzymatic Activities from Haloalkalitolerant and Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria Strains of Algerian Sahara Soils

    PubMed Central

    Selama, Okba; Amos, Gregory C. A.; Djenane, Zahia; Borsetto, Chiara; Laidi, Rabah Forar; Porter, David; Nateche, Farida; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Hacène, Hocine

    2014-01-01

    Extreme environments may often contain unusual bacterial groups whose physiology is distinct from those of normal environments. To satisfy the need for new bioactive pharmaceuticals compounds and enzymes, we report here the isolation of novel bacteria from an extreme environment. Thirteen selected haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria were isolated from Algerian Sahara Desert soils. These isolates were screened for the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds using PCR based methods. Enzymatic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined by using cultural dependant methods. Several of these isolates are typical of desert and alkaline saline soils, but, in addition, we report for the first time the presence of a potential new member of the genus Nocardia with particular activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to their haloalkali character, the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, combined with the antimicrobial activity against a broad range of indicator strains and their enzymatic potential, makes them suitable for biotechnology applications. PMID:24977147

  13. Laboratory survey of fluoroquinolone activity.

    PubMed

    Bellido, F; Pechère, J C

    1989-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are active against a wide variety of bacteria. The antibacterial spectra of fluoroquinolones encompass staphylococci, Bacillus species, and Corynebacterium species implicated in infections of the immunocompromised host; Enterobacteriaceae; most intestinal pathogens; and many gram-negative organisms commonly causing nosocomial infections. Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus ducreyi, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Branhamella catarrhalis are highly susceptible to this class of drugs. Because of their ability to penetrate into phagocytes, fluoroquinolones have been tested against intracellular pathogens: Legionella species, Rickettsia conorii, Rickettsia rickettsii, and Brucella melitensis are very sensitive; Chlamydia trachomatis and the mycoplasmas are borderline; and some antimycobacterial activities deserve further investigation. Species that are generally resistant include Pseudomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas cepacia, Pseudomonas pseudomallei, Alcaligenes species, Nocardia species, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and most anaerobes. PMID:2672262

  14. Production of anti-Gordonia amarae mycolic acid polyclonal antibody for detection of mycolic acid-containing bacteria in activated sludge foam.

    PubMed

    Iwahori, K; Miyata, N; Takata, N; Morisada, S; Mochizuki, T

    2001-01-01

    Mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes (mycolata) are considered the causative agents of foaming of activated sludge and scum formation in activated sludge treatment plants. In this study, the production of anti-Gordonia amarae mycolic acid polyclonal antibodies was investigated. Rabbits were immunized with a conjugate of keyhole limpet hemocyanin and mycolic acids of G. amarae, which contained 48 to 56 carbon atoms (average, 52.0). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that the polyclonal antibodies could recognize cells of G. amarae ranging from 0.1 to 10 microg. The antibodies also reacted with other tested mycolata strains belonging to the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Dietzia, Mycobacterium and Tsukamurella. However, reactivities against other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria not containing mycolic acid were negligible or much lower. The results indicate that the anti-G. amarae mycolic acid antibodies show a reactivity selective for a group of mycolata involved in the foaming of activated sludge. PMID:16233121

  15. Identification and antimicrobial activity of actinobacteria from soils in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sripreechasak, P; Tanasupawat, S; Matsumoto, A; Inahashi, Y; Suwanborirux, K; Takahashi, Y

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this research was to study on the identification and antimicrobial activity of actinobacteria from six soil samples collected around Krung Ching waterfall, Nakhon Si Thammarat province, the southern part of Thailand. Thirty-one isolates of actinobacteria were isolated using the dilution plating method on modified starch casein nitrate agar plates and potato starch-glycerol agar plates. On the primary screening, 9 isolates exhibited the antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, 8 isolates against Kocuria rhizophila, 6 isolates against Mucor racemosus, 2 isolates against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans and 5 isolates against Xanthomonas campestris pv. oryzae. All the isolates were identified based on their morphological and cultural characteristics including the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Eighteen isolates were identified as Streptomyces, 8 isolates as Nocardia, 2 isolates as Kitasatospora, one of each isolate as Amycolatopsis, Rhodococcus and Gordonia. PMID:23665707

  16. Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Trained African Giant Pouched Rats and Confounding Impact of Pathogens and Microflora of the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mgode, Georgies F.; Weetjens, Bart J.; Nawrath, Thorben; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Machang'u, Robert S.; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Drancourt, Michel; Schulz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Trained African giant-pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) can detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and show potential for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). However, rats' ability to discriminate between clinical sputum containing other Mycobacterium spp. and nonmycobacterial species of the respiratory tract is unknown. It is also unknown whether nonmycobacterial species produce odor similar to M. tuberculosis and thereby cause the detection of smear-negative sputum. Sputum samples from 289 subjects were analyzed by smear microscopy, culture, and rats. Mycobacterium spp. were isolated on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and nonmycobacterial species were isolated on four different media. The odor from nonmycobacterial species from smear- and M. tuberculosis culture-negative sputa detected by ≥2 rats (“rat positive”) was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to the M. tuberculosis odor. Rats detected 45 of 56 confirmed cases of TB, 4 of 5 suspected cases of TB, and 63 of 228 TB-negative subjects (sensitivity, 80.4%; specificity, 72.4%; accuracy, 73.9%; positive predictive value, 41.7%; negative predictive value, 93.8%). A total of 37 (78.7%) of 47 mycobacterial isolates were M. tuberculosis complex, with 75.7% from rat-positive sputa. Ten isolates were nontuberculous mycobacteria, one was M. intracellulare, one was M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and eight were unidentified. Rat-positive sputa with Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. were associated with TB. Rhodococcus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, and Candida spp. from rat-positive sputa did not produce M. tuberculosis-specific volatiles (methyl nicotinate, methyl para-anisate, and ortho-phenylanisole). Prevalence of Mycobacterium-related Nocardia and Rhodococcus in smear-negative sputa did not equal that of smear-negative mycobacteria (44.7%), of which 28.6% were rat positive. These findings and the absence of M. tuberculosis

  17. Diagnosis of tuberculosis by trained African giant pouched rats and confounding impact of pathogens and microflora of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Weetjens, Bart J; Nawrath, Thorben; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Machang'u, Robert S; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Drancourt, Michel; Schulz, Stefan; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-02-01

    Trained African giant-pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) can detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and show potential for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). However, rats' ability to discriminate between clinical sputum containing other Mycobacterium spp. and nonmycobacterial species of the respiratory tract is unknown. It is also unknown whether nonmycobacterial species produce odor similar to M. tuberculosis and thereby cause the detection of smear-negative sputum. Sputum samples from 289 subjects were analyzed by smear microscopy, culture, and rats. Mycobacterium spp. were isolated on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and nonmycobacterial species were isolated on four different media. The odor from nonmycobacterial species from smear- and M. tuberculosis culture-negative sputa detected by ≥2 rats ("rat positive") was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to the M. tuberculosis odor. Rats detected 45 of 56 confirmed cases of TB, 4 of 5 suspected cases of TB, and 63 of 228 TB-negative subjects (sensitivity, 80.4%; specificity, 72.4%; accuracy, 73.9%; positive predictive value, 41.7%; negative predictive value, 93.8%). A total of 37 (78.7%) of 47 mycobacterial isolates were M. tuberculosis complex, with 75.7% from rat-positive sputa. Ten isolates were nontuberculous mycobacteria, one was M. intracellulare, one was M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and eight were unidentified. Rat-positive sputa with Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. were associated with TB. Rhodococcus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, and Candida spp. from rat-positive sputa did not produce M. tuberculosis-specific volatiles (methyl nicotinate, methyl para-anisate, and ortho-phenylanisole). Prevalence of Mycobacterium-related Nocardia and Rhodococcus in smear-negative sputa did not equal that of smear-negative mycobacteria (44.7%), of which 28.6% were rat positive. These findings and the absence of M. tuberculosis

  18. Experimental Granulomatous Pulmonary Nocardiosis in BALB/C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mifuji Lira, Roque M.; Limón Flores, Alberto Yairh; Salinas Carmona, Mario César

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a granulomatous disease with high mortality that affects both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and progression of the infection are currently unknown. An animal model to study these mechanisms is sorely needed. We report the first in vivo model of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis that closely resembles human pathology. BALB/c mice infected intranasally with two different doses of GFP-expressing Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC700358 (NbGFP), develop weight loss and pulmonary granulomas. Mice infected with 109 CFUs progressed towards death within a week while mice infected with 108 CFUs died after five to six months. Histological examination of the lungs revealed that both the higher and lower doses of NbGFP induced granulomas with NbGFP clearly identifiable at the center of the lesions. Mice exposed to 108 CFUs and subsequently to 109 CFUs were not protected against disease severity but had less granulomas suggesting some degree of protection. Attempts to identify a cellular target for the infection were unsuccessful but we found that bacterial microcolonies in the suspension used to infect mice were responsible for the establishment of the disease. Small microcolonies of NbGFP, incompatible with nocardial doubling times starting from unicellular organisms, were identified in the lung as early as six hours after infection. Mice infected with highly purified unicellular preparations of NbGFP did not develop granulomas despite showing weight loss. Finally, intranasal delivery of nocardial microcolonies was enough for mice to develop granulomas with minimal weight loss. Taken together these results show that Nocardia brasiliensis microcolonies are both necessary and sufficient for the development of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis in mice. PMID:27303806

  19. Microbial metabolism of the pyridine ring. Metabolic pathways of pyridine biodegradation by soil bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, G K; Cain, R B

    1975-01-01

    1. Two bacteria, a Bacillus sp. and a Nocardia sp. (strain Z1) were isolated from soil by enrichment with 0.1 percent (v/v) pyridine and grew rapidly on this compound as sole C, N and energy source. The monohydroxypyridines, tetrahydropyridine, piperidine and some other analogues were not utilized for growth or oxidized by washed suspensions of either bacterium. 2. Cell-free extracts were unable to metabolize pyridine even after supplementation with a variety of cofactors or protecting agents. Treatment of cells with toluene led to rapid loss of the ability to oxidize pyridine. 3. In the presence of 10mM-semicarbazide at pH 6.0, Nocardia Z1 accumulated a semialdehyde idenditied as its 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone by chromatography, mixed melting point, mass spectrometry and isotope trapping from [2,6(-14)C]pyridine as glutarate semialdehyde. 4. Extracts of this bacterium prepared from cells grown with pyridine or exposed to the gratuitous inducer 2-picoline, contained high activities of a specific glutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase. 5. Cells grown with pyridine or glutarate also contained a glutaric dialdehyde dehydrogenase, an acyl-CoA synthetase and elevated amounts of isocitrate lyase but no glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase. 6. Bacillus 4 accumulated in the presence of 10mM-semicarbazide several acidic carbonyl compounds from pyridine among which was succinate semialdehyde. Extracts of this bacillus after growth of the cells with pyridine contained an inducible succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase in amounts at least 50-fold over those found in succinate-grown cells. 7. Two mutants of this bacillus, selected for their inability to grow on pyridine were deficient in succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase. 8. In the presence of 0.2mM-KCN, washed suspensions of Bacillus 4 accumulated formate and possibly formamide from pyridine. The use of [14C]pyridine showed that formate was derived from C-2 of the pyridine ring. 9. The organism had a specific formamide amidohydrolase

  20. Comparison of Chemical, Biological and Physical Quality Assessment of Indoor Swimming Pools in Shahrekord City, Iran in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Fadaei, Abdolmajid; Amiri, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mismanaged swimming pools could transmit water-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was the quality assessment of chemical, biological and physical characteristics of swimming pools in Shahrekord city, southwest of Iran. The two main indoor swimming pools of Shahrekord city were considered during the summer and winter of 2013. The number of 459 samples were analysed from swimming pools, showers and dressing rooms for chemical, biological and physical quality assessment. The most prevalent fungi were Aspergillus (48.91%), Penicillium (22.9%), Nocardia (11.31%), Cladosporium (8.41%). Rhizopus (6.18%), Scopulariopsis (6.21%), Fusarium (5.31%), and Mucor (1.38%). The most fungal contamination sites for both swimming pools were showers. Results showed that the values of total faecal coliform, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionalla, Escherichia coli and Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) for both swimming pools exceeded the guidelines, except for Staphylococcus aureus. The correlation coefficient between bathers load and total faecal coliform, heterotrophic bacteria was 0.949. The turbidity, free residual chlorine, and hardness of both swimming pools were not compliance with standard guidelines. Therefore, the improvement of disinfection and cleaning procedures is necessary, due to the different users and daily bather loads of each pool, as well as monitoring the water quality and increasing of the knowledge of swimming pool users on the risks of these potential diseases. PMID:25948424

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of Crossiella equi and Amycolatopsis species causing nocardioform placentitis in horses.

    PubMed

    Erol, Erdal; Williams, Neil M; Sells, Stephen F; Kennedy, Laura; Locke, Stephen J; Donahue, James M; Carter, Craig N

    2012-11-01

    Nocardioform actinomycetes are significant causes of placentitis and abortions in horses. In the current study, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 38 Amycolatopsis spp. and 22 Crossiella equi isolates, the most common nocardioform actinomycetes causing placentitis in horses, were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of these isolates were tested by broth microdilution method in a commercial system, which was designed for Nocardia spp., fast-growing Mycobacterium spp., and other aerobic actinomycetes. The minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 90% of organisms (MIC(90)) of the following antibiotics tested for Amycolatopsis spp. were: 4 µg/ml for linezolid, trimethophrim-sulfametaxazole (TMP-SMX), and ciprofloxacin; 8 µg/ml for ceftriaxone, doxycycline, and minocycline; 16 µg/ml for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clarithromycin, and imipenem; >16 µg/ml for tobramycin; 32 µg/ml for amikacin and cefepime; and 128 µg/ml for cefoxitin. The MIC(90) levels for C. equi were 0.25 µg/ml for doxycycline; ≤1 µg/ml for minocycline; 2 µg/ml for linezolid and TMP-SMX; 4 µg/ml for ciprofloxacin; 8 µg/ml for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, and imipenem; 16 µg/ml for clarithromycin; >16 µg/ml for tobramycin; 32 µg/ml for cefepime; >64 µg/ml for amikacin; and 128 µg/ml for cefoxitin. PMID:23051830

  2. Rhodococcus equi--an emerging human pathogen in immunocompromized hosts: a report of four cases from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Puthucheary, S D; Sangkar, V; Hafeez, Asma; Karunakaran, R; Raja, Nadeem S; Hassan, H H

    2006-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, a recognized pathogen in horses, is emerging as a human opportunistic pathogen, especially in immunocompromized hosts. We describe four immunocompromized patients who had serious R. equi infections with an overall mortality of 75%. The natural habitat of R. equi is soil, particularly soil contaminated with animal manure. Necrotizing pneumonia is the commonest form of infection but extrapulmonary infections, such as wound infections and subcutaneous abscess, have also been described in humans. R. equi is cultured easily in ordinary non-selective media. Large, smooth, irregular colonies appear within 48 hours. It is a facultative, intracellular, nonmotile, non-spore forming, gram-positive coccobacillus, which is weakly acid-fast staining and bears a similarity to diphtheroids. It forms a salmon-colored pigment usually after 48 hours incubation. A particular characteristic of this organism is that it undergoes synergistic hemolysis with some bacteria on sheep blood agar. R. equi may be misidentified as diphtheroids, Mycobacterium species, or Nocardia. In vitro R. equi is usually susceptible to erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, aminoglycosides, rifampin, imipenem and meropenem. The organism can be difficult to eradicate, making treatment challenging. Increased awareness of the infection may help with early diagnosis and timely treatment. PMID:16771229

  3. Isolation, identification, and characterization of gut microflora of Perionyx excavatus collected from Midnapore, West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Tanushree Tulsian; Das, Ankita

    2016-03-01

    Agriculture is an important part of the economy of the undivided Midnapore district. Agricultural land is its asset and most importantly its means of sustenance as well as survival. Earthworms are invertebrates that play a key role in recycling organic matters in soils. Since the intestines of earthworms harbor wide ranges of microorganisms, enzymes, hormones etc., these half digested materials decompose rapidly and are transformed into a stabilized material called vermicompost which is very useful for increasing the soil fertility. One has to look for these characters before recommending any species for vermiculture. In the present study, Perionyx excavatus specimens were collected from the undivided Midnapore district and from the Earthworms gut, bacteria, fungus, actinobacteria, and yeast were isolated and identified using various morphological and biochemical tests. All the bacterial isolates were identified using morphological study, staining techniques, and different biochemical tests such as catalase test, KOH test, H2 SO4 test, Starch hydrolysis test, oxidase test, and sucrose hydrolysis test. All the fungal, actinobacteria, and yeast isolates were subjected to staining and morphological characterization (color and texture of fungal colony). Bacterial isolates of genus Bacillus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Enterococci, Micrococcus sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were identified. Among the fungal isolates Aspergilus sp., and P. boydii were identified. Streptomyces sp., Nocardia sp. among the actinobacteria and Candida sp. among yeast were also found to be present in earthworm gut and these might play an important role along with the earthworm to increase the quality and fertility of soil. PMID:26821782

  4. Effect of streptomycin on lipid composition with particular reference to cyclic depsipeptide biosynthesis in Serratia marcescens and other micro-organisms

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Margaret A. C.; Deol, B. S.; Still, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    The addition of low concentrations of streptomycin (5–10μg/ml of medium) to Serratia marcescens caused significant alterations in the lipid composition of this organism, but neither growth nor pigmentation was affected. The acetone-soluble cyclic depsipeptides, which comprise on average 15% of the total lipid, were decreased almost to zero and the total lipid phosphorus was more than doubled in the presence of streptomycin. Most of the phospholipid increase was due to an increase in phosphatidylethanolamine. Cyclic depsipeptides were not leached from the cell in the presence of streptomycin, indicating a definite inhibition of the biosynthetic pathway. The effect of streptomycin on the reported peptidolipids of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides, Halobacterium halobium, Nocardia asteroides and Pseudomonas tabaci was investigated. In the case of the only strictly comparable cellular cyclic depsipeptide (that of N. asteroides) the biosynthesis was strongly inhibited by streptomycin, but cell weight was maintained or even slightly increased. A possible mode and site of action of low concentrations of streptomycin on bacterial lipids is discussed. PMID:4923921

  5. Actinomycetes from Red Sea Sponges: Sources for Chemical and Phylogenetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Yang, Chen; Horn, Hannes; Hajjar, Dina; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges collected off Fsar Reef (Saudi Arabia) was investigated in the present study. Forty-seven actinomycetes were cultivated and phylogenetically identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were assigned to 10 different actinomycete genera. Eight putatively novel species belonging to genera Kocuria, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, and Rhodococcus were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other 16S rRNA gene sequences available in the NCBI database. PCR-based screening for biosynthetic genes including type I and type II polyketide synthases (PKS-I, PKS-II) as well as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) showed that 20 actinomycete isolates encoded each at least one type of biosynthetic gene. The organic extracts of nine isolates displayed bioactivity against at least one of the test pathogens, which were Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, human parasites, as well as in a West Nile Virus protease enzymatic assay. These results emphasize that marine sponges are a prolific resource for novel bioactive actinomycetes with potential for drug discovery. PMID:24824024

  6. Siderophore production by actinomycetes isolates from two soil sites in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanna; Postmaster, Armin; Soon, Hooi Peng; Keast, David; Carson, Kerry C

    2012-04-01

    The actinomycetes are metabolically flexible soil micro-organisms capable of producing a range of compounds of interest, including siderophores. Siderophore production by actinomycetes sampled from two distinct and separate geographical sites in Western Australia were investigated and found to be generally similar in the total percentage of siderophore producers found. The only notable difference was the proportion of isolates producing catechol siderophores with only 3% found in site 1 (from the north-west of Western Australia and reportedly containing 40% magnetite) and 17% in site 2 (a commercial stone fruit orchard in the hills east of Perth with a soil base ranging from sandy loam to laterite). Further detailed characterization of isolates of interest identified a Streptomyces that produced extracellularly excreted enterobactin, the characteristic Enterobacteriaceae siderophore, and also revealed some of the conditions required for enterobactin production. Carriage of the entF gene, which codes for the synthetase responsible for the final assembly of the tri-cyclic structure of enterobactin, was confirmed by PCR in this isolate. Another separate Streptomyces produced a compound that matched the UV/VIS spectra of heterobactin, a siderophore previously only described in Rhodococcus and Nocardia. PMID:22038645

  7. Microbial life at extremely low nutrient levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, P.

    Many microorganisms (``oligotrophs'') grow in distilled water: Pseudomonas spp., Caulobacter spp., Hyphomicrobium spp., Arthrobacter spp., Seliberia spp., Bactoderma alba, Corynebacterium spp., Amycolata (Nocardia) autotrophica, Mycobacterium spp., yeasts, and Chlorella spp. Also, certain lower fungi can be found here. In the laboratory, these organisms thrive on contaminations of the air (CO, hydrocarbons, H2, alcohols etc.). All are euryosmotic and often grow also in higher concentrations of salts and nutrients. Natural locations with extremely low nutrient levels (snow, rain water pools, springs, free ocean water, Antarctic rocks and soils) do not contain more than 1-5 mg/1 of organic carbon. Oligotrophs found here are especially adapted to constant famine: they frequently live attached to surfaces, form polymers and storage products even while starving, and often aggregate. Many of these oligotrophs alter their morphology (surface to volume ratio) with changing nutrient concentrations. Extreme oligotrophs also occur in generally nutrient-rich environments such as sewage aeration tanks or compost soil. Here they are thought to survive in nutrient-depauperate microhabitats.

  8. Diversity and Antimicrobial Activities of Actinobacteria Isolated from Tropical Mangrove Sediments in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Learn-Han; Zainal, Nurullhudda; Azman, Adzzie-Shazleen; Eng, Shu-Kee; Goh, Bey-Hing; Yin, Wai-Fong; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify Actinobacteria from Malaysia mangrove forest and screen them for production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Eighty-seven isolates were isolated from soil samples collected at 4 different sites. This is the first report to describe the isolation of Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Leifsonia, Microbacterium, Sinomonas, Nocardia, Terrabacter, Streptacidiphilus, Micromonospora, Gordonia, and Nocardioides from mangrove in east coast of Malaysia. Of 87 isolates, at least 5 isolates are considered as putative novel taxa. Nine Streptomyces sp. isolates were producing potent antimicrobial secondary metabolites, indicating that Streptomyces isolates are providing high quality metabolites for drug discovery purposes. The discovery of a novel species, Streptomyces pluripotens sp. nov. MUSC 135T that produced potent secondary metabolites inhibiting the growth of MRSA, had provided promising metabolites for drug discovery research. The biosynthetic potential of 87 isolates was investigated by the detection of polyketide synthetase (PKS) and nonribosomal polyketide synthetase (NRPS) genes, the hallmarks of secondary metabolites production. Results showed that many isolates were positive for PKS-I (19.5%), PKS-II (42.5%), and NRPS (5.7%) genes, indicating that mangrove Actinobacteria have significant biosynthetic potential. Our results highlighted that mangrove environment represented a rich reservoir for isolation of Actinobacteria, which are potential sources for discovery of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. PMID:25162061

  9. Bacterial degradation of natural and synthetic rubber.

    PubMed

    Bode, H B; Kerkhoff, K; Jendrossek, D

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of natural rubber (NR), synthetic poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) (SR), and cross-linked NR (latex gloves) by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was analyzed by weight loss, gel permeation chromatography, and determination of the protein content. Weight losses of 11-18% and an increase in protein up to 850 microg/mL after incubation of Nocardia sp. DSMZ43191, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces griseus, bacterial isolate 18a, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Xanthomonas sp. with latex gloves as a carbon source indicated degradation of the polymer. An increase of protein up to 1250 microg/mL was obtained upon incubation of the bacteria with SR. No or only little weight losses and no increase in the protein content were found for nondegrading control strains such as Streptomyces lividans and Streptomyces exfoliatus and for mutants of degrading strains of S. coelicolor and S. griseus, which have been identified by their inability to produce clearing zones on opaque latex agar. Measurement of the average molecular weight of synthetic rubber before and after degradation showed a time-dependent shift to lower values for the degrading strains. Diketone derivates of oligo(cis-1,4-isoprene) were identified as metabolites of rubber degradation. An oxidative degradation pathway of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) to acetyl-coenzymeA and propionyl-coenzymeA by beta-oxidation is suggested for bacterial degradation of isoprene rubber. PMID:11749186

  10. Prokaryotic silicon utilizing microorganisms in the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Although a little study has been done to determine the silicon utilizing prokaryotes, our previous experiments indicated that almost all Gram-positive bacteria are silicon utilizing; one of them, Streptococci survived exposure on the lunar surface for a long period in experiment done by others. Our initial experiments with these Gram positive microorganisms showed that there were limited growths of these microorganisms on carbon free silicate medium probably with the help of some carry over carbon and nitrogen during cultivation procedures. However, increase in growth rate after repeated subcultures could not be explained at present. The main groups of prokaryotes which were found silicon utilizing microorganisms were Mycobacterium, Bacillus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium. In a another previous study by us when silicon level was studied in such grown up cells on carbon "free" silicate medium by electron prove microanalyser, it was found that silicon in cells grown on carbon "free" silicate medium was much higher (24.9%) than those grown on conventional carbon based medium (0.84%). However, these initial findings are encouraging for our future application of this group of organisms on extraterrestrial surfaces for artificial micro-ecosystem formation. It was found that when electropositive elements are less in extraterrestrial situation, then polymerization of silicon-oxygen profusion may occur easily, particularly in carbon and nitrogen paucity in the rocky worlds of the Universe.

  11. Growth of rhodococcus S1 on anthracene.

    PubMed

    Tongpim, S; Pickard, M A

    1996-03-01

    Three slow-growing bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for growth on anthracene, using creosote-contaminated soil as the inoculum. Organisms were shown to use anthracene by the production of a clear zone around the colony after a mineral salts agar plate was sprayed with anthracene. All three bacteria were nonmotile, nonsporulating, gram-positive rods and stained acid-fast. Physiological and biochemical tests, GC content, and cell wall lipid patterns of whole cell methanolysates indicated that they belonged to the Nocardia-Mycobacterium-Rhodococcus group. On the basis of these characteristics and pyrolysis gas chromatography, they were assigned to the genus Rhodococcus. Growth of the isolates was slow on crystalline anthracene, giving a doubling time of 1.5-3 days, and they grew mainly on the crystal surface. When anthracene was supplied by precipitation from a solvent, doubling time was reduced to 1 day. All three isolates mineralized anthracene but not phenanthrene or naphthalene, nor could they grow on naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene, fluoranthene, acenaphthene, pyrene, chrysene, or naphthacene as sole carbon source. One isolate, Rhodococcus S1, was able to use 2-methylanthracene or 2-chloroanthracene as carbon source but not 1- or 9-substituted analogs. These results suggest that the initial enzyme attacking anthracene in these isolates has a narrow substrate specificity. PMID:8868237

  12. Genetics and Genomics of the Genus Amycolatopsis.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Lal, Rup

    2016-09-01

    Actinobacteria are gram-positive filamentous bacteria which contains some of the most deadly human pathogens (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. leprae, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Nocardia farcinica), plant pathogens (Streptomyces scabies, Leifsonia xyli) along with organisms that produces antibiotic (Streptomycetes, Amycolatopsis, Salinospora). Interestingly, these bacteria are equipped with an extraordinary capability of producing antibiotics and other metabolites which have medicinal properties. With the advent of inexpensive genome sequencing techniques and their clinical importance, many genomes of Actinobacteria have been successfully sequenced. These days, with the constant increasing number of drug-resistant bacteria, the urgent need for discovering new antibiotics has emerged as a major scientific challenge. And, unfortunately the traditional method of screening bacterial strains for the production of antibiotics has decreased leading to a paradigm shift in the planning and execution of discovery of novel biosynthetic gene clusters via genome mining process. The entire focus has shifted to the evaluation of genetic capacity of organisms for metabolite production and activation of cryptic gene clusters. This has been made possible only due to the availability of genome sequencing and has been augmented by genomic studies and new biotechnological approaches. Through this article, we present the analysis of the genomes of species belonging to the genus Amycolatopsis, sequenced till date with a focus on completely sequenced genomes and their application for further studies. PMID:27407288

  13. Causes of death in renal transplant recipients: a study of 102 autopsies from 1968 to 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, M A; Costa, R S; Ferraz, A S

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted on 102 patients submitted to renal transplant who died and were autopsied at the University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, from 1968 to 1991. The cause of death, based on a review of medical records and autopsy reports, was assigned to one of the following categories: infectious (69.6%); cardiovascular (12.7%); gastrointestinal (7.8%); graft rejection (6.9%); tumoral (2.0%); and undetermined (1.0%). Among the 71 cases of death caused by infection, 28 (39.4%) showed disseminated agents involving two or more organs. Isolated pneumonia involved 17 patients (23.9%), followed by acute pyelonephritis in the transplanted kidney in 10 patients (14.1%). The most frequent agents were: bacteria (58.0%), divided into 'non-classified' (83.0%), Nocardia (10.6%) and Mycobacterium (6.4%); fungi (27.5%) represented by Cryptococcus (22.7%), Aspergillus, Candida and Pneumocystis carinii (18.1% each), Histoplasma (13.6%), Mucor and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (4.5% each); viruses (6.2%) represented by Herpes simplex (60.0%); metazoa (5.0%, S. stercoralis), and protozoa (2.5%, T. cruzi). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) was identified in the lungs of 12 patients and was not directly correlated with death but was associated with other agents. In conclusion, immunodepressed patients such as renal transplant recipients should be carefully monitored for infection due to the high mortality rate. PMID:7884765

  14. Analysis and optimization of triacylglycerol synthesis in novel oleaginous Rhodococcus and Streptomyces strains isolated from desert soil.

    PubMed

    Röttig, Annika; Hauschild, Philippa; Madkour, Mohamed H; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Almakishah, Naief H; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-05-10

    As oleaginous microorganisms represent an upcoming novel feedstock for the biotechnological production of lipids or lipid-derived biofuels, we searched for novel, lipid-producing strains in desert soil. This was encouraged by the hypothesis that neutral lipids represent an ideal storage compound, especially under arid conditions, as several animals are known to outlast long periods in absence of drinking water by metabolizing their body fat. Ten lipid-accumulating bacterial strains, affiliated to the genera Bacillus, Cupriavidus, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces, were isolated from arid desert soil due to their ability to synthesize poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), triacylglycerols or wax esters. Particularly two Streptomyces sp. strains and one Rhodococcus sp. strain accumulate significant amounts of TAG under storage conditions under optimized cultivation conditions. Rhodococcus sp. A27 and Streptomyces sp. G49 synthesized approx. 30% (w/w) fatty acids from fructose or cellobiose, respectively, while Streptomyces isolate G25 reached a cellular fatty acid content of nearly 50% (w/w) when cultivated with cellobiose. The stored triacylglycerols were composed of 30-40% branched fatty acids, such as anteiso-pentadecanoic or iso-hexadecanoic acid. To date, this represents by far the highest lipid content described for streptomycetes. A biotechnological production of such lipids using (hemi)cellulose-derived raw material could be used to obtain sustainable biodiesel with a high proportion of branched-chain fatty acids to improve its cold-flow properties and oxidative stability. PMID:27034020

  15. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials. 2. Microbial and plant responses to nutrients in the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Conner, A. J.; Killham, K.; Deamer, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    Meteoritic materials are investigated as potential early planetary nutrients. Aqueous extracts of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous meteorite are utilized as a sole carbon source by microorganisms, as demonstrated by the genetically modified Pseudomonas fluorescence equipped with the lux gene. Nutrient effects are observed also with the soil microorganisms Nocardia asteroides and Arthrobacter pascens that reach populations up to 5 x 10(7) CFU/ml in meteorite extracts, similar to populations in terrestrial soil extracts. Plant tissue cultures of Asparagus officinalis and Solanum tuberosum (potato) exhibit enhanced pigmentation and some enhanced growth when meteorite extracts are added to partial nutrient media, but inhibited growth when added to full nutrient solution. The meteorite extracts lead to large increases in S, Ca, Mg, and Fe plant tissue contents as shown by X-ray fluorescence, while P, K, and Cl contents show mixed effects. In both microbiological and plant tissue experiments, the nutrient and inhibitory effects appear to be best balanced for growth at about 1:20 (extracted solid : H2O) ratios. The results suggest that solutions in cavities in meteorites can provide efficient concentrated biogenic and early nutrient environments, including high phosphate levels, which may be the limiting nutrient. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroid resources can sustain soil microbial activity and provide essential macronutrients for future space-based ecosystems.

  16. Seasonal trends of microbial keratitis in south India

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Charles C.; Prajna, Lalitha; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Prajna, N. Venkatesh; McLeod, Stephen D.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Porco, Travis C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior studies suggest that fungal keratitis is more common in hot, humid climates while bacterial keratitis is independent of seasonal variation. This study analyzes seasonal trends in the incidence of fungal and bacterial keratitis at the Aravind Eye Hospital in southeast India. Methods Using microbiology records from August 2006 to July 2009, retrospective analyses of infectious keratitis were performed. Bacterial and fungal keratitis incidence data were analyzed for seasonal patterns. Results Among the 6,967 infectious keratitis cases, cultures were performed in 5,221 (74.9%) and positive in 3,028 (58%). Of the positive cultures cases, 1,908 (63%) and 1,081 (35.7%) were of fungal and bacterial etiology, respectively. The predominant fungal organism was Fusarium spp (42.3%) and the predominant bacterial organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (35.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24.3%), and Nocardia spp (8.1%). Analyses revealed an uneven distribution of fungal keratitis throughout the year (p<0.001) with peaks in July and January. No significant seasonal trend was observed for the combined bacterial keratitis group. Conclusion A higher incidence of fungal keratitis occurs during the months corresponding to the windy and harvest seasons, during which time infection from vegetative corneal injury may be more likely. Robust screening efforts during these periods may mitigate visually debilitating sequelae from infectious keratitis. PMID:22868629

  17. Microbiological Spectrum of Brain Abscess at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India: 24-Year Data and Review

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, V.; Umabala, P.; Anuradha, K.; Padmaja, K.; Padmasree, C.; Rajesh, A.; Purohit, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial abscesses are life-threatening infections that pose a diagnostic challenge not only to the neurosurgeon but also to the microbiologists. Detailed studies documenting the spectrum of infecting agents involved in brain abscesses are limited from India. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective analysis of 352 samples from 1987 to 2010 analyzed at a tertiary care hospital in South India from 1987 to 2010, to document the changing trends with time. Results. The age of the patients ranged from 2 to 80 years, a larger number of males being affected. Otogenic infections were the most common cause while cryptogenic abscesses were 20%. Gram stain and culture positivity were 78% each. Gram-positive and negative facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes were also on the rise. Unusual organisms, like Burkholderia pseudomallei, Salmonella typhi, Nocardia species, Cladosporium bantiana, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Entamoeba histolytica, and Acanthamoeba were also isolated and/or detected from the brain abscesses aspirate or resected tissue. Summary. New and emerging pathogens associated with brain abscess, especially in immunosuppressed individuals, have renewed the necessity of an early detection, and it will be of great value in appropriate management of patients with brain abscess. PMID:22191080

  18. Molecular Analysis of Surfactant-Driven Microbial Population Shifts in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil†

    PubMed Central

    Colores, Gregory M.; Macur, Richard E.; Ward, David M.; Inskeep, William P.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of surfactant addition on hydrocarbon mineralization kinetics and the associated population shifts of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in soil. A mixture of radiolabeled hexadecane and phenanthrene was added to batch soil vessels. Witconol SN70 (a nonionic, alcohol ethoxylate) was added in concentrations that bracketed the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in soil (CMC′) (determined to be 13 mg g−1). Addition of the surfactant at a concentration below the CMC′ (2 mg g−1) did not affect the mineralization rates of either hydrocarbon. However, when surfactant was added at a concentration approaching the CMC′ (10 mg g−1), hexadecane mineralization was delayed and phenanthrene mineralization was completely inhibited. Addition of surfactant at concentrations above the CMC′ (40 mg g−1) completely inhibited mineralization of both phenanthrene and hexadecane. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene segments showed that hydrocarbon amendment stimulated Rhodococcus and Nocardia populations that were displaced by Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes populations at elevated surfactant levels. Parallel cultivation studies revealed that the Rhodococcus population can utilize hexadecane and that the Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes populations can utilize both Witconol SN70 and hexadecane for growth. The results suggest that surfactant applications necessary to achieve the CMC alter the microbial populations responsible for hydrocarbon mineralization. PMID:10877792

  19. Radiologically guided fine needle lung biopsies in the evaluation of focal pulmonary lesions in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, E; Piilonen, A; Volin, L; Ruutu, P; Parkkali, T; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Ruutu, T

    2002-02-01

    Lung problems are common in allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic yield of radiologically guided fine needle lung biopsy (FNLB) in allogeneic SCT recipients with focal pulmonary lesions, a retrospective analysis was carried out. Between 1989 and 1998, radiologists performed a total of 30 FNLBs in 21 allogeneic SCT recipients, guided either by ultrasound (n = 17) or computed tomography (n = 13). The median time from SCT to the first FNLB was 131 days (20-343 days). Prophylactic platelet transfusions were given in 19 procedures (66%). The complications of FNLB included clinically insignificant pneumothorax in four procedures (13%) and self-limiting haemoptysis in one case (3%). The first FNLB was suggestive of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in five patients (24%). Additional clinically useful findings of FNLB included Pseudomonas (two patients) and Nocardia (one patient). The final diagnosis of pulmonary lesions was IPA in 14 patients, immunological lung problems in four patients and other in three patients. Radiologically guided FNLB is feasible in allogeneic SCT recipients and has a low complication rate. The diagnostic yield is high especially for IPA. PMID:11896433

  20. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Keul, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez, Pedro J.; Robinson, Howard H.; Mattevi, Andrea; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-03-23

    N-hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines, such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on D-Lys although it binds L-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producingmore » more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the FAD domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. We discuss the biological implications of these findings.« less

  1. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Keul, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez, Pedro J.; Robinson, Howard H.; Mattevi, Andrea; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-03-23

    N-hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines, such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on D-Lys although it binds L-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producing more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the FAD domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. We discuss the biological implications of these findings.

  2. Wax D of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in Buffalo rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Semba, I; Hirayama, Y; Koga, T; Nagao, S; Takada, H

    1998-12-01

    A suspension of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in liquid paraffin has been reported to induce foot swelling accompanied by new bone formation in Buffalo (BUF) rats, which are low responders to the induction of adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we found that wax D, a mycobacterial cell wall peptidoglycan fragment-arabinogalactan-mycolic acid complex, was an effective component of this bacterium for the induction of osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in BUF rats. Chronic inflammation was produced in BUF rats by a single subcutaneous injection of wax D suspended in liquid paraffin. Other Mycobacterium species and Gordona bronchialis were also capable of inducing this reaction. Other bacterial cells including the acid-fast bacteria Nocardia and Rhodococcus, purified cell walls and peptidoglycans from Lactobacillus plantarum, wax C, cord factor, arabinogalactan and mycolic acid prepared from M. tuberculosis were inactive in this respect. In addition, when wax D was administered as a water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's type adjuvant), bone formation scarcely occurred in BUF rats. In Fisher (F344) and Wistar rats, both of which are responder strains to adjuvant arthritis, wax D in liquid paraffin did not induce bone formation. PMID:9879920

  3. Action of Microorganisms on Bituminous Materials1

    PubMed Central

    Traxler, R. W.; Proteau, P. R.; Traxler, R. N.

    1965-01-01

    Visual effects of Mycobacterium ranae on a 135-penetration asphalt (asphalt 1A) are described, which show the texture and rheological characteristics of the asphalt to be modified by microbial action. A bentonite-asphalt emulsion system for asphalts 1A, 3A, and 6A was used to subject these materials to the degradative activity of M. ranae and Nocardia coeliaca for 4 months at 30 C. N. coeliaca caused 1.5-, 3.9-, and 6.8-fold increases in relative viscosity of asphalts 1A, 3A, and 6A, respectively. A similar susceptibility pattern for M. ranae was obtained on the same asphalts, but apparently this organism exerted even a greater effect on asphalt 6A since the viscosity of this residue was too hard to be determined satisfactorily. Comparison of these data with analyses of the three asphalts indicates that the organisms probably attack the resin components of the asphalts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:5866034

  4. Humus bacteria of Norway spruce stands: plant growth promoting properties and birch, red fescue and alder colonizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Elo; Maunuksela; Salkinoja-Salonen; Smolander; Haahtela

    2000-02-01

    We studied the potential of the humus layer of the Norway spruce stands to supply beneficial rhizobacteria to birch (Betula pendula), alder (Alnus incana) and fescue grass (Festuca rubra), representatives of pioneer vegetation after clear-cutting of the coniferous forest. Axenically grown seedlings of these species were inoculated with the acid spruce humus, pH 3.7-5.3. Actinorhizal propagules, capable of nodulating alder, were present in high density (10(3) g(-1)) in humus of long-term limed plots, whereas plots with nitrogen fertilization contained almost none (Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas, independently of prior liming or fertilization of the plots. The taxa found in the seedling roots differed from that in humus by the prevalence of the Gram-negative genera Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes and Comamonas. Enrichment cultures of the roots on nitrogen-free media yielded Paenibacillus and Rhodococcus species. Nitrogen-fixing R. erythropolis and a novel Paenibacillus, closest by full sequence of 16S rDNA to P. durus, represented new classes of nitrogen-fixing rhizosphere bacteria. In addition, nitrogen-fixing R. fascians was found in the humus. The rhizoflora and humus contained high proportions of bacteria antagonistic towards plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia sp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium culmorum. The antagonistic isolates also commonly produced siderophores and/or cell wall degrading enzymes. PMID:10640667

  5. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lara-Severino, Reyna Del Carmen; Camacho-López, Miguel Ángel; García-Macedo, Jessica Marlene; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M; Sandoval-Trujillo, Ángel H; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ = 150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes. PMID:26925294

  6. A Systematic Approach for Discovering Novel, Clinically Relevant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Simmon, Keith E.; Fisher, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (16S) is a reference method for bacterial identification. Its expanded use has led to increased recognition of novel bacterial species. In most clinical laboratories, novel species are infrequently encountered, and their pathogenic potential is often difficult to assess. We reviewed partial 16S sequences from >26,000 clinical isolates, analyzed during February 2006–June 2010, and identified 673 that have <99% sequence identity with valid reference sequences and are thus possibly novel species. Of these 673 isolates, 111 may represent novel genera (<95% identity). Isolates from 95 novel taxa were recovered from multiple patients, indicating possible clinical relevance. Most repeatedly encountered novel taxa belonged to the genera Nocardia (14 novel taxa, 42 isolates) and Actinomyces (12 novel taxa, 52 isolates). This systematic approach for recognition of novel species with potential diagnostic or therapeutic relevance provides a basis for epidemiologic surveys and improvement of sequence databases and may lead to identification of new clinical entities. PMID:22377371

  7. Increased NOD2-mediated recognition of N-glycolyl muramyl dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, François; Divangahi, Maziar; Veyrier, Frédéric; de Léséleuc, Louis; Gleason, James L.; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Pandey, Amit K.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Reed, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Peptidoglycan-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates innate immunity via the host sensor NOD2. Although MDP is N-acetylated in most bacteria, mycobacteria and related Actinomycetes convert their MDP to an N-glycolylated form through the action of N-acetyl muramic acid hydroxylase (NamH). We used a combination of bacterial genetics and synthetic chemistry to investigate whether N-glycolylation of MDP alters NOD2-mediated immunity. Upon infecting macrophages with 12 bacteria, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α secretion was NOD2 dependent only with mycobacteria and other Actinomycetes (Nocardia and Rhodococcus). Disruption of namH in Mycobacterium smegmatis obrogated NOD2-mediated TNF secretion, which could be restored upon gene complementation. In mouse macrophages, N-glycolyl MDP was more potent than N-acetyl MDP at activating RIP2, nuclear factor κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice challenged intraperitoneally with live or killed mycobacteria, NOD2-dependent immune responses depended on the presence of bacterial namH. Finally, N-glycolyl MDP was more efficacious than N-acetyl MDP at inducing ovalbumin-specific T cell immunity in a model of adjuvancy. Our findings indicate that N-glycolyl MDP has a greater NOD2-stimulating activity than N-acetyl MDP, consistent with the historical observation attributing exceptional immunogenic activity to the mycobacterial cell wall. PMID:19581406

  8. Increased NOD2-mediated recognition of N-glycolyl muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, François; Divangahi, Maziar; Veyrier, Frédéric; de Léséleuc, Louis; Gleason, James L; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Pandey, Amit K; Sassetti, Christopher M; Reed, Michael B; Behr, Marcel A

    2009-08-01

    Peptidoglycan-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates innate immunity via the host sensor NOD2. Although MDP is N-acetylated in most bacteria, mycobacteria and related Actinomycetes convert their MDP to an N-glycolylated form through the action of N-acetyl muramic acid hydroxylase (NamH). We used a combination of bacterial genetics and synthetic chemistry to investigate whether N-glycolylation of MDP alters NOD2-mediated immunity. Upon infecting macrophages with 12 bacteria, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha secretion was NOD2 dependent only with mycobacteria and other Actinomycetes (Nocardia and Rhodococcus). Disruption of namH in Mycobacterium smegmatis obrogated NOD2-mediated TNF secretion, which could be restored upon gene complementation. In mouse macrophages, N-glycolyl MDP was more potent than N-acetyl MDP at activating RIP2, nuclear factor kappaB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice challenged intraperitoneally with live or killed mycobacteria, NOD2-dependent immune responses depended on the presence of bacterial namH. Finally, N-glycolyl MDP was more efficacious than N-acetyl MDP at inducing ovalbumin-specific T cell immunity in a model of adjuvancy. Our findings indicate that N-glycolyl MDP has a greater NOD2-stimulating activity than N-acetyl MDP, consistent with the historical observation attributing exceptional immunogenic activity to the mycobacterial cell wall. PMID:19581406

  9. Clinico-microbiological profile and treatment outcome of infectious scleritis: experience from a tertiary eye care center of India.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sahu, Srikant; Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri; Sahu, Kalyani

    2012-01-01

    Medical and microbiology records of seventeen patients (17 eyes), diagnosed as scleritis of infectious origin were reviewed; to study clinical features, predisposing risk factors, microbiologic profile and treatment outcome of infectious scleritis. The mean patient age was 52.3 ± 19.75 years. Twelve patients (70.6%) had history of trauma/prior surgery. Isolated organisms included Staphylococcus species (spp) (n = 5), Fungus (n = 4), Nocardia spp (n = 3), two each of atypical Mycobacterium spp and Streptococcus pneumoniae and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Treatment included intensive topical antimicrobial in all eyes and systemic medication in 15 (88.2%) patients; surgical exploration was needed for 13 (76.5%) patients and scleral patch graft was done in four (23.5%) patients. Lesions resolved in all patients and none required evisceration. The presenting log MAR visual acuity of 1.77 ± 1.40 and improved to 0.99 ± 0.91. (P ≤ 0.039) after treatment with a mean follow up of 22.57 ± 19.53 weeks. A microbiological confirmation, appropriate medical and/or surgical intervention has a good tectonic and visual outcome. PMID:22164345

  10. Phenol- and thiocyanate-based wastewater treatment in RBC reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, G.

    1996-10-01

    A laboratory-scale investigation at ambient temperature was performed to examine the applicability of a four-stage across-the-flow rotating biological contactor (RBC) reactor for the treatment of synthetic waste-water containing phenol and thiocyanate. The composition was so maintained that the phenol to thiocyanate ratio approximated that usually found in coal carbonization effluent. In the combined treatment of the toxicants, it was noted that the toxicants were removed in sequence. Phenol was mostly removed in the earlier (first and second) stages, while thiocyanate-fed microbes acted more efficiently in the latter stages (third and fourth). The overall reaction rate coefficient for phenol biodegradation (K{sub PH}) varied in the range of 10.20--3.50 g/m{sup 2}{center_dot}d in presence of 0--240 g/m{sup 3} of influent thiocyanate concentration. The same coefficient for thiocyanate biodegradation (K{sub TH}) was found to be in the range of 8.20--0.30 g/m{sup 2}{center_dot}d in presence of 0--240 g/m{sup 3} of influent phenol concentration. The effects of various operating and process parameters such as disk rotational speed, temperature of the reactor liquid, and substrate load on the removal of phenol and thiocyanate were also examined. The microbes, predominantly found in the earlier stages, were identified as Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Candida tropicalis, whereas in the latter stages, Thiobacillus thioparus and Nocardia sp. populations predominated.

  11. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation*

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Keul, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez, Pedro J.; Robinson, Howard H.; Mattevi, Andrea; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on d-Lys, although it binds l-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA, and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producing more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. Biological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25802330

  12. Current Perspectives on Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense, the Causal Agents of Bovine Farcy

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mohamed E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium farcinogenes and M. senegalense are the causal agents of bovine farcy, a chronic, progressive disease of the skin and lymphatics of zebu cattle. The disease, which is prevalent mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, was in earlier times thought to be caused by Nocardia farcinica and can be described as one of the neglected diseases in cattle. Some aspects of the disease have been investigated during the last five decades but the major development had been in the bacteriological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic aspects. Molecular analyses confirmed that M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense fall in a subclade together with M. houstonense and M. fortuitum. This subclade is closely related to the one accommodating M. peregrinum, M. porcinum, M. septicum, M. neworleansense, and M. alvei. DNA probes were designed from 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer and could be used for the rapid diagnosis of bovine farcy. An ELISA assay has been evaluated for the serodiagnosis of the disease. The zoonotic potentials of M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense are unknown; few studies reported the isolation of M. senegalense and M. farcinogenes from human clinical sources but not from environmental sources or from other domestic or wild animals. PMID:24876989

  13. Biological Potential of Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.; Conner, Anthony J.; Killham, Kenneth; Deamer, David W.

    1997-09-01

    Meteoritic materials are investigated as potential early planetary nutrients. Aqueous extracts of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous meteorite are utilized as a sole carbon source by microorganisms, as demonstrated by the genetically modifiedPseudomonas fluorescenceequipped with theluxgene. Nutrient effects are observed also with the soil microorganismsNocardia asteroidesandArthrobacter pascensthat reach populations up to 5 × 107CFU/ml in meteorite extracts, similar to populations in terrestrial soil extracts. Plant tissue cultures ofAsparagus officinalisandSolanum tuberosum(potato) exhibit enhanced pigmentation and some enhanced growth when meteorite extracts are added to partial nutrient media, but inhibited growth when added to full nutrient solution. The meteorite extracts lead to large increases in S, Ca, Mg, and Fe plant tissue contents as shown by X-ray fluorescence, while P, K, and Cl contents show mixed effects. In both microbiological and plant tissue experiments, the nutrient and inhibitory effects appear to be best balanced for growth at about 1:20 (extracted solid:H2O) ratios. The results suggest that solutions in cavities in meteorites can provide efficient concentrated biogenic and early nutrient environments, including high phosphate levels, which may be the limiting nutrient. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroid resources can sustain soil microbial activity and provide essential macronutrients for future space-based eco- systems.

  14. Synthesis of α,β-unsaturated esters via a chemo-enzymatic chain elongation approach by combining carboxylic acid reduction and Wittig reaction

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yitao; Yao, Peiyuan; Du, Yuncheng; Feng, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Summary α,β-Unsaturated esters are versatile building blocks for organic synthesis and of significant importance for industrial applications. A great variety of synthetic methods have been developed, and quite a number of them use aldehydes as precursors. Herein we report a chemo-enzymatic chain elongation approach to access α,β-unsaturated esters by combining an enzymatic carboxylic acid reduction and Wittig reaction. Recently, we have found that Mycobacterium sp. was able to reduce phenylacetic acid (1a) to 2-phenyl-1-ethanol (1c) and two sequences in the Mycobacterium sp. genome had high identity with the carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) gene from Nocardia iowensis. These two putative CAR genes were cloned, overexpressed in E. coli and one of two proteins could reduce 1a. The recombinant CAR was purified and characterized. The enzyme exhibited high activity toward a variety of aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids, including ibuprofen. The Mycobacterium CAR catalyzed carboxylic acid reduction to give aldehydes, followed by a Wittig reaction to afford the products α,β-unsaturated esters with extension of two carbon atoms, demonstrating a new chemo-enzymatic method for the synthesis of these important compounds. PMID:26664647

  15. Efficacy of amikacin combinations for nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Saga, Tomoo; Harigae, Hideo; Ishikawa, Shiho; Takemura, Hiromu; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2003-11-01

    We isolated five bacterial strains from patients diagnosed as having nocardiosis. Bacterial species were identified based on the similarities in the nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNAs. Three of the five strains were identified as Nocardia asteroids, but unexpectedly other two were Streptomyces hygroscopicus and Rothia dentocariosa. The latter two species are not members of the family Nocardiaceae. We investigated the susceptibilities of these five strains to the following nine antimicrobial agents: trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), minocycline (MINO), erythromycin (EM), amikacin (AMK), cefotaxime (CTX), faropenem (FRPM), imipenem (IPM), ciprofloxacin (CPFX), and sparfloxacin (SPFX). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges (mg/ml) were as follows: TMP-SMX, 4- > 32; MINO, 0.125-8; EM, < or = 0.016- > 32; AMK, 1-2; CTX, 0.063- > 32; FRPM, 0.063-16; IPM, 0.125-2; CPFX, 4-32; and SPFX, 0.5-16. Moreover, the synergistic effects of AMK in combination with each of TMP-SMX, MINO, EM, CTX, IPM, and SPFX were investigated by checkerboard synergy testing. No antagonism was recognized for the three N. asteroides strains. Synergistic and additive effects were observed for the combinations of AMK with CTX, IPM, or SPFX. PMID:14649737

  16. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    SciTech Connect

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-10-23

    Bacterial and fungal type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) are evolutionarily connected, as bacterial FAS I is considered to be the ancestor of fungal FAS I. In this work, the production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of a bacterial FAS I are reported. While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution.

  17. Chemical composition of essential oil from ripe fruit of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi and evaluation of its activity against wild strains of hospital origin

    PubMed Central

    Cole, E.R.; dos Santos, R.B.; Júnior, V. Lacerda; Martins, J.D.L.; Greco, S.J.; Neto, A. Cunha

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil (EO) composition of ripe fruit of S. terebinthifolius Raddi was analyzed by GC-MS. The oil extraction yielded 6.54 ± 1.06% (w/w). Seventeen compounds were identified, accounting for 91.15% of the total oil, where monoterpenes constituted the main chemical class (85.81%), followed by sesquiterpenes (5.34%). The major monoterpene identified was δ-3-carene (30.37%), followed by limonene (17.44%), α-phellandrene (12.60%) and α-pinene (12.59%). Trans-caryophyllene (1.77%) was the major sesquiterpene identified. The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated against wild strains of hospital origin (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Klebsiella oxytoca, Corynebacterium sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter sp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Bacillus sp., Nocardia sp. and Streptococcus group D). The essential oil of the ripe fruit of S. terebinthifolius Raddi has shown to be active against all tested wild strains, with minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 3.55 μg/mL to 56.86 μg/mL. However, it has revealed some differences in susceptibility: the general, Gram-positive species showed greater sensitivity to the action of EO, which is probably due to the lower structural complexity of their cell walls. PMID:25477913

  18. Activating and Attenuating the Amicoumacin Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Bong; Perez, Corey E; Perry, Elena Kim; Crawford, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    The amicoumacins belong to a class of dihydroisocoumarin natural products and display antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. Amicoumacins are the pro-drug activation products of a bacterial nonribosomal peptide-polyketide hybrid biosynthetic pathway and have been isolated from Gram-positive Bacillus and Nocardia species. Here, we report the stimulation of a "cryptic" amicoumacin pathway in the entomopathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Xenorhabdus bovienii, a strain not previously known to produce amicoumacins. X. bovienii participates in a multi-lateral symbiosis where it is pathogenic to insects and mutualistic to its Steinernema nematode host. Waxmoth larvae are common prey of the X. bovienii-Steinernema pair. Employing a medium designed to mimic the amino acid content of the waxmoth circulatory fluid led to the detection and characterization of amicoumacins in X. bovienii. The chemical structures of the amicoumacins were supported by 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-QTOF-MS, tandem MS, and polarimeter spectral data. A comparative gene cluster analysis of the identified X. bovienii amicoumacin pathway to that of the Bacillus subtilis amicoumacin pathway and the structurally-related Xenorhabdus nematophila xenocoumacin pathway is presented. The X. bovienii pathway encodes an acetyltransferase not found in the other reported pathways, which leads to a series of N-acetyl-amicoumacins that lack antibacterial activity. N-acetylation of amicoumacin was validated through in vitro protein biochemical studies, and the impact of N-acylation on amicoumacin's mode of action was examined through ribosomal structural analyses. PMID:27347911

  19. Infections in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R; Paya, C V

    1997-01-01

    Solid-organ transplantation is a therapeutic option for many human diseases. Infections are a major complication of solid-organ transplantation. All candidates should undergo a thorough infectious-disease screening prior to transplantation. There are three time frames, influenced by surgical factors, the level of immunosuppression, and environmental exposures, during which infections of specific types most frequently occur posttransplantation. Most infections during the first month are related to surgical complications. Opportunistic infections typically occur from the second to the sixth month. During the late posttransplant period (beyond 6 months), transplantation recipients suffer from the same infections seen in the general community. Opportunistic bacterial infections seen in transplant recipients include those caused by Legionella spp., Nocardia spp., Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of viral infections. Herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus and others are also significant pathogens. Fungal infections, caused by both yeasts and mycelial fungi, are associated with the highest mortality rates. Mycobacterial, pneumocystis, and parasitic diseases may also occur. PMID:8993860

  20. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis, utilization and pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Golderer, G; Werner, E R

    2002-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H4-biopterin) is an essential cofactor of a set of enzymes that are of central metabolic importance, i.e. the hydroxylases of the three aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, of ether lipid oxidase, and of the three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. As a consequence, H4-biopterin plays a key role in a vast number of biological processes and pathological states associated with neurotransmitter formation, vasorelaxation, and immune response. In mammals, its biosynthesis is controlled by hormones, cytokines and certain immune stimuli. This review aims to summarize recent developments concerning regulation of H4-biopterin biosynthetic and regulatory enzymes and pharmacological effects of H4-biopterin in various conditions, e.g. endothelial dysfunction or apoptosis of neuronal cells. Also, approaches towards gene therapy of diseases like the different forms of phenylketonuria or of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Additional emphasis is given to H4-biopterin biosynthesis and function in non-mammalian species such as fruit fly, zebra fish, fungi, slime molds, the bacterium Nocardia as well as to the parasitic protozoan genus of Leishmania that is not capable of pteridine biosynthesis but has evolved a sophisticated salvage network for scavenging various pteridine compounds, notably folate and biopterin. PMID:12003348

  1. Clinico-Microbiological Profile and Treatment Outcome of Infectious Scleritis: Experience from a Tertiary Eye Care Center of India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Sahu, Srikant; Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri; Sahu, Kalyani

    2012-01-01

    Medical and microbiology records of seventeen patients (17 eyes), diagnosed as scleritis of infectious origin were reviewed; to study clinical features, predisposing risk factors, microbiologic profile and treatment outcome of infectious scleritis. The mean patient age was 52.3 ± 19.75 years. Twelve patients (70.6%) had history of trauma/prior surgery. Isolated organisms included Staphylococcus species (spp) (n = 5), Fungus (n = 4), Nocardia spp (n = 3), two each of atypical Mycobacterium spp and Streptococcus pneumoniae and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Treatment included intensive topical antimicrobial in all eyes and systemic medication in 15 (88.2%) patients; surgical exploration was needed for 13 (76.5%) patients and scleral patch graft was done in four (23.5%) patients. Lesions resolved in all patients and none required evisceration. The presenting log MAR visual acuity of 1.77 ± 1.40 and improved to 0.99 ± 0.91. (P ≤ 0.039) after treatment with a mean follow up of 22.57 ± 19.53 weeks. A microbiological confirmation, appropriate medical and/or surgical intervention has a good tectonic and visual outcome. PMID:22164345

  2. Identification of a Mycoloyl Transferase Selectively Involved in O-Acylation of Polypeptides in Corynebacteriales

    PubMed Central

    Huc, Emilie; de Sousa-D'Auria, Célia; de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès Li; Salmeron, Christophe; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Bayan, Nicolas; Houssin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described the posttranslational modification of pore-forming small proteins of Corynebacterium by mycolic acid, a very-long-chain α-alkyl and β-hydroxy fatty acid. Using a combination of chemical analyses and mass spectrometry, we identified the mycoloyl transferase (Myt) that catalyzes the transfer of the fatty acid residue to yield O-acylated polypeptides. Inactivation of corynomycoloyl transferase C (cg0413 [Corynebacterium glutamicum mytC {CgmytC}]), one of the six Cgmyt genes of C. glutamicum, specifically abolished the O-modification of the pore-forming proteins PorA and PorH, which is critical for their biological activity. Expectedly, complementation of the cg0413 mutant with either the wild-type gene or its orthologues from Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Rhodococcus, but not Nocardia, fully restored the O-acylation of the porins. Consistently, the three-dimensional structure of CgMytC showed the presence of a unique loop that is absent from enzymes that transfer mycoloyl residues onto both trehalose and the cell wall arabinogalactan. These data suggest the implication of this structure in the enzyme specificity for protein instead of carbohydrate. PMID:23852866

  3. Er:YAG and alexandrite laser radiation propagation in the root canal and its effect on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shoji, Shigeru; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal

    1999-05-01

    The goal of the study was to verify differences between the alexandrite and Er:YAG laser energy distribution in the root canal and in the surrounding dentin and bone tissues. For the experiment, two lasers were prepared: the Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm) with a delivery system fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide ended by a special sapphire tip and the alexandrite laser (λ=0.75 μm) with a silicon fiber. The Er:YAG laser was operated in a free-running mode, the length of the generated pulses was 250 μsec and the output energy ranged from 100 to 350 mJ. The pulse length of the free- running alexandrite laser was 70 μsec and the output energy was ranged from 80 up to 200 mJ. For the experiment prepared root canals of molars were used. It was ascertained that the radiation of the alexandrite laser passes through the root canal and hits the surrounding tissue. Nocardia asteroids, Filaments, Micrococcus albus, Lactobacillus sp and Streptococcus sanguis colonies were treated by the Er:YAG or alexandrite laser radiation. The surface was checked by scanning electron microscopy. From the result it follows that the Er:YAG laser destroyed microbial colonies but the differences is in the depth of the affected area.

  4. Microbiology of coke-plant activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The biological treatment of coke-plant wastewater represents the most economical means of detoxification and contaminant removal, but little is known about the microbial ecology of this system. Research was therefore undertaken to determine the kinds of microorganisms that survive and function in this environment and to examine the growth patterns that influence treatment efficiency. The microbial flora of coke-plant activated sludge is predominated by populations of aerobic gram negative rods. The principle genera identified were Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Flavobacterium and Acinetobacter. The genera Bacillus, Nocardia and Micrococcus were also present at low levels. A single type of rotifer was present along with various protozoans. The ability of microorganisms in coke wastewater to grow on various organic compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy is more restrictive when compared with that of isolates obtained from activated sludge processes treating municipal wastes. The phenol degrading bacteria can be maintained in a continuous culture system with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of as long as 14 days. Under conditions of increasing HRT the average cell size decreased and the number of cells per milliter increased. As the HRT increased cell yields decreased. At long HRT's (7 to 14 days) cell yields remained constant.

  5. Identification and catabolic activity of well-derived gasoline-degrading bacteria from a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgway, H.F.; Safarik, J.; Phipps, D.; Carl, P.; Clark, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Approximately 300 gasoline-degrading bacteria were isolated from well water and core material from a shallow coastal aquifer contaminated with unleaded gasoline. Identification of 244 isolates revealed four genera: Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Nocardia, and Micrococcus, with pseudomonads making up 86.9% of bacteria identified. A total of 297 isolates was sorted into 111 catabolic groups on the basis of aerobic growth responses on 15 gasoline hydrocarbons. Each test hydrocarbon was degraded by at least one isolate. Toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were most frequently utilized as growth substrates, whereas cyclic and branched alkanes were least utilized. Most isolates were able to grow on 2 or 3 different hydrocarbons, and nearly 75% utilized toluene as a sole source of carbon and energy. Isolates were remarkably specific for hydrocarbon usage, often catabolizing only one of several closely related compounds. A subset of 220 isolates was sorted into 51 groups by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was partitioned into 16 protein-banding groups (i.e., subspecies) whose catabolic activities were largely restricted to substituted aromatics. Different members of subspecies groups defined by protein-banding pattern analysis often exhibited different growth responses on the same hydrocarbon, implying marked strain diversity. The catabolic activities of well-derived, gasoline-degrading bacteria associated with this contaminated aquifer are consonant with in situ adaptation at the site.

  6. Soil-acquired cutaneous nocardiosis on the forearm of a healthy male contracted in a swamp in rural eastern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, James R; Santo, Arben; Johnson, Shawn E

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old man complained of pain and swelling on his right wrist after receiving a scratch while playing paintball in a swampy area of eastern Virginia. Two weeks later, he noticed a pimple-like lesion developing, which quickly grew in size and then ulcerated. Because of the severity of his condition, the patient was taken to the emergency room where surgical drainage of the abscess was carried out and the pus was sent for culture and sensitivity testing. Enlarged and tender lymph nodes were palpable going up the arm and surrounding the right axillary area. Three days following culture of pus from his lesion, colonies of Nocardia brasiliensis were isolated. He was successfully treated with an extended regimen of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Because of its low incidence, nocardiosis is usually not considered in the initial diagnosis. The rapidity with which his infection developed from a pimple-like lesion into an extensive ulcerated area, the involvement of his lymphatic system, the extended time needed to successfully treat his infection, and the potential for infection to rapidly disseminate, reinforces the necessity for laboratory identification and immediate treatment of severe pyogenic cutaneous lesions. PMID:24634589

  7. Endocarditis Due to Rare and Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brouqui, P.; Raoult, D.

    2001-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of infective endocarditis is easily made in the presence of continuous bacteremia with gram-positive cocci. However, the blood culture may contain a bacterium rarely associated with endocarditis, such as Lactobacillus spp., Klebsiella spp., or nontoxigenic Corynebacterium, Salmonella, Gemella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Yersinia, Nocardia, Pasteurella, Listeria, or Erysipelothrix spp., that requires further investigation to establish the relationship with endocarditis, or the blood culture may be uninformative despite a supportive clinical evaluation. In the latter case, the etiologic agents are either fastidious extracellular or intracellular bacteria. Fastidious extracellular bacteria such as Abiotrophia, HACEK group bacteria, Clostridium, Brucella, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Bartonella spp. need supplemented media, prolonged incubation time, and special culture conditions. Intracellular bacteria such as Coxiella burnetii cannot be isolated routinely. The two most prevalent etiologic agents of culture-negative endocarditis are C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. Their diagnosis is usually carried out serologically. A systemic pathologic examination of excised heart valves including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and molecular methods has allowed the identification of Whipple's bacillus endocarditis. Pathologic examination of the valve using special staining, such as Warthin-Starry, Gimenez, and PAS, and broad-spectrum PCR should be performed systematically when no etiologic diagnosis is evident through routine laboratory evaluation. PMID:11148009

  8. Microbiological transformations of nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, R A; Fukuda, D S; Kossoy, A D; Abbott, B J

    1979-01-01

    A screening program was conducted to find microorganisms that modify the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone. After purification, the products from three cultures were analyzed by spectral methods to determine their chemical structures. An optically active 9S-hydroxy-6aR,10aR-trans cannabinoid was isolated from a culture of an unidentified soil bacterium designated A24007. From Bacillus cereus cultures were isolated a 9S,6'-dihydroxy-6aR,10aR-trans cannabinoid, a 9S-hydroxy-6'-keto-6aR,10aR-trans cannabinoid, a 9-keto-6'-hydroxy-6aS,10aS-trans cannabinoid, and a 6',9-diketo-6aS,10aS-trans cannabinoid. All of these products were optically active, as was a 9S-hydroxy-6aS,10AS-trans cannabinoid also isolated from B. cereus cultures. A series of acidic products were isolated from cultures of Nocardia salmonicolor. All of these products contained a carboxylic acid group at the terminal end of three-position alkyl side chains having varying numbers of carbon atoms. Two of the acidic products contained a 9-keto group, whereas all other carboxylic acid products were 9-hydroxy cannabinoids. The array of products obtained from incubation of nabilone indicates the usefulness of microbial transformations in the preparation of new cannabinoids. PMID:114111

  9. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding. PMID:27503802

  10. [Proposed neotype Streptomyces ruber (Krainsky, 1914) Waksman et Henrici, 1948].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V D; Filippova, S N; Poltorak, V A

    1987-01-01

    Culture 78 was proposed as a neotype of Streptomyces ruber. It was isolated from the soils of the Baikal region and was closest, in its taxonomic properties, to the original description of the species [13] whose representative had been lost. Cultures from different microbial collections designated as S. ruber were shown to be unlike the original description. The neotype had the following taxononic properties: the cell wall of type I; spiral sporophores with extended spirals having 2-3 coils; oval spores with a smooth envelope; greyish pink aerial and dark-red substrate mycelia; a red pigment not passing into the medium; slow gelatin liquefaction and milk peptonization; weak starch hydrolysis; assimilation of glucose, xylose, rammose, fructose, and inositol; weak growth on arabinose, raffinose and mannitol, but not on sucrose; no formation of melanoid pigments; synthesis of riboflavin and prodigiosin pigments; inhibition of Gram-positive bacterial and acid-resistant mycobacterial growth; no inhibition of yeast and fungal growth. The culture was sensitive to streptomycin, neomycin, gentamycin, monomycin, tetracycline,erythromycin, oleandomycin, lincomycin, ristomycin, levomycetin, polymyxin and fusidin, but resistant in penicillin. The population was composed of six variants [3]: main, faded, asporogenic red, asporogenic yellow, asporogenic white and nocardia-like. The latter two were not capable of riboflavin and prodigiosin formation. The asporogenic yellow variant was a monosynthetic organism: it formed riboflavin, but could not synthesize prodigiosin. The neotype of S. ruber 78 is deposited withthe national Collection of Microorganisms (the reference number is VKM A-611). PMID:3613997

  11. Inactivation of Nocardiophages φC and φEC by Extracts of Bacteriophage-Attachable Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, George H.; Crockett, Jennifer K.

    1971-01-01

    Cultures of several species of Nocardia, including N. erythropolis Mat-Ce and Mat-cE mating strains, were extracted with solvents in an attempt to isolate an inactivating complex for nocardiophages φC and φEC. Ethanol was the only solvent found effective in solubilizing an inhibitory substance. Inactivating extracts were obtained from the cells of all species to which the phage were able to attach. After extraction of whole cells or cell wall preparations, the phage could not effectively attach to them. Both phages φC and φEC were inactivated by the same complex. However, phage φEC inactivation was 10-fold greater than φC inactivation. The velocity of inactivation was about 4.1 × 102 plaque-forming units per microgram per minute for φC and 1.1 × 103 plaque-forming units per microgram per minute for phage φEC. The cell extracts required divalent cations for phage inactivation. The inhibitory capacity of the cell extracts was reduced or lost by the activity of proteolytic enzymes, Tween 80, 2-mercaptoethanol, thymol, and sodium lauryl sulfate. Boiling the extract for 10 min did not alter its activity. The inactivating substance was postulated to be a lipoprotein of considerable complexity, unique in the ease with which it is solubilized from host cells by ethanol. PMID:5006039

  12. Evaluation of the Andromas Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Aerobically Growing Gram-Positive Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Farfour, E.; Leto, J.; Barritault, M.; Barberis, C.; Meyer, J.; Dauphin, B.; Le Guern, A.-S.; Leflèche, A.; Badell, E.; Guiso, N.; Leclercq, A.; Le Monnier, A.; Lecuit, M.; Rodriguez-Nava, V.; Bergeron, E.; Raymond, J.; Vimont, S.; Bille, E.; Carbonnelle, E.; Guet-Revillet, H.; Lécuyer, H.; Beretti, J.-L.; Vay, C.; Berche, P.; Ferroni, A.; Nassif, X.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-associated laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and simple microbial identification method. Previous reports using the Biotyper system suggested that this technique requires a preliminary extraction step to identify Gram-positive rods (GPRs), a technical issue that may limit the routine use of this technique to identify pathogenic GPRs in the clinical setting. We tested the accuracy of the MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy to identify a set of 659 GPR isolates representing 16 bacterial genera and 72 species by the direct colony method. This bacterial collection included 40 C. diphtheriae, 13 C. pseudotuberculosis, 19 C. ulcerans, and 270 other Corynebacterium isolates, 32 L. monocytogenes and 24 other Listeria isolates, 46 Nocardia, 75 Actinomyces, 18 Actinobaculum, 11 Propionibacterium acnes, 18 Propionibacterium avidum, 30 Lactobacillus, 21 Bacillus, 2 Rhodococcus equi, 2 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, and 38 other GPR isolates, all identified by reference techniques. Totals of 98.5% and 1.2% of non-Listeria GPR isolates were identified to the species or genus level, respectively. Except for L. grayi isolates that were identified to the species level, all other Listeria isolates were identified to the genus level because of highly similar spectra. These data demonstrate that rapid identification of pathogenic GPRs can be obtained without an extraction step by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. PMID:22692743

  13. Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Vulcanizates

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchii, Akio; Suzuki, Tomoo; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    An actinomycete, Nocardia sp. strain 835A, grows well on unvulcanized natural rubber and synthetic isoprene rubber, but not on other types of synthetic rubber. Not only unvulcanized but also various kinds of vulcanized natural rubber products were more or less utilized by the organism as the sole source of carbon and energy. The thin film from a latex glove was rapidly degraded, and the weight loss reached 75% after a 2-week cultivation period. Oligomers with molecular weights from 104 to 103 were accumulated during microbial growth on the latex glove. The partially purified oligomers were examined by infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the spectra were those expected of cis-1, 4-polyisoprene with the structure, OHC—CH2—[—CH2—C(—CH3)=CH —CH2—]n—CH2—C(=O)— CH3, with average values of n of about 114 and 19 for the two oligomers. PMID:16346923

  14. Development of Vaccines Against Nocardiosis in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sukanta K; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis, one of the most systemic and devastating diseases, is currently emerging as an important disease of cultured marine and freshwater fishes. The causative agent of this disease is Nocardia seriolae, a Gram-positive acid-fast bacterium. An effective vaccine/vaccination strategy against this pathogen is necessary to control the significant loss in aquaculture practices. In this chapter, we present the vaccination/immunization protocol in fish against both live (sublethal) and inactivated form of N. seriolae using ginbuna crucian carp (Carassius auratus langsdorfii) as a model. N. seriolae either in live (sublethal) form or inactivated antigenic form is found to elevate immunity in ginbuna and also can induce protective immunity upon challenge. In order to develop live vaccine, determination of sublethal dose is critical and needs to be established in the host fish species through pathogenicity and persistence studies. Herein for ginbuna, a sublethal dose of 10(6) CFU/mL was determined by pathogenicity study through a series of challenge doses followed by pathogen persistence study by microbiological and molecular techniques. On the other hand, for inactivated antigenic form, the concentration of the N. seriolae was approximately 10(8) CFU/mL. Although this study showed significant potential of both the forms of N. seriolae as candidate for vaccination, factors such as dose, duration and form need to be optimized in individual fish species. PMID:27076299

  15. Comparison of chemical, biological and physical quality assessment of indoor swimming pools in Shahrekord City, Iran in 2013.

    PubMed

    Fadaei, Abdolmajid; Amiri, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mismanaged swimming pools could transmit water-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was the quality assessment of chemical, biological and physical characteristics of swimming pools in Shahrekord city, southwest of Iran. The two main indoor swimming pools of Shahrekord city were considered during the summer and winter of 2013. The number of 459 samples were analysed from swimming pools, showers and dressing rooms for chemical, biological and physical quality assessment. The most prevalent fungi were Aspergillus (48.91%), Penicillium (22.9%), Nocardia (11.31%), Cladosporium (8.41%). Rhizopus (6.18%), Scopulariopsis (6.21%), Fusarium (5.31%), and Mucor (1.38%). The most fungal contamination sites for both swimming pools were showers. Results showed that the values of total faecal coliform, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionalla, Escherichia coli and Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) for both swimming pools exceeded the guidelines, except for Staphylococcus aureus. The correlation coefficient between bathers load and total faecal coliform, heterotrophic bacteria was 0.949. The turbidity, free residual chlorine, and hardness of both swimming pools were not compliance with standard guidelines. Therefore, the improvement of disinfection and cleaning procedures is necessary, due to the different users and daily bather loads of each pool, as well as monitoring the water quality and increasing of the knowledge of swimming pool users on the risks of these potential diseases. PMID:25948424

  16. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Severino, Reyna del Carmen; Camacho-López, Miguel Ángel; García-Macedo, Jessica Marlene; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M.; Sandoval-Trujillo, Ángel H.; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ = 150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes. PMID:26925294

  17. Mycobacterium immunogenum sp. nov., a novel species related to Mycobacterium abscessus and associated with clinical disease, pseudo-outbreaks and contaminated metalworking fluids: an international cooperative study on mycobacterial taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R W; Steingrube, V A; Böttger, E C; Springer, B; Brown-Elliott, B A; Vincent, V; Jost, K C; Zhang, Y; Garcia, M J; Chiu, S H; Onyi, G O; Rossmoore, H; Nash, D R; Wallace, R J

    2001-09-01

    PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis of a 439 bp hsp65 gene segment identified 113 unique isolates among non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) from clinical and environmental sources that failed to match currently recognized species patterns. This group represented 40% of isolates recovered from bronchoscope contamination pseudo-outbreaks, 0% of disease-associated nosocomial outbreaks and 4% of routine clinical isolates of the Mycobacterium abscessus/Mycobacterium chelonae group submitted to the Mycobacteria/Nocardia laboratory for identification. It is grouped within the Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, with growth in less than 7 d, absence of pigmentation, positive 3-d arylsulfatase reaction and growth on MacConkey agar without crystal violet. It exhibited overlapping biochemical, antimicrobial susceptibility and HPLC characteristics of M. abscessus and M. chelonae. By 16S rRNA gene sequencing, these isolates comprised a homogeneous group with a unique hypervariable region A sequence and differed by 8 and 10 bp, respectively, from M. abscessus and M. chelonae. Surprisingly, this taxon contained two copies of the ribosomal operon, compared with single copies in the two related species. By DNA-DNA hybridization, this new group exhibited <30% homology with recognized RGM species. The name Mycobacterium immunogenum sp. nov. is proposed for this new taxon. PMID:11594606

  18. Infection as a complication of heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linder, J

    1988-01-01

    Infection and cardiac rejection are the most significant causes of morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation. At some transplant centers, more than half of the early transplantation-related deaths are the result of infection. The infectious agents may be transmitted to the host by means of the allograft, through blood transfusion, by nosocomial or environmental routes, or they may represent endogenous microbial flora or reactivation of a prior infection. The frequency of infectious complications is generally related to the degree of immunosuppressive therapy required to prevent graft rejection. Both the composition of the immunosuppressive regimen and the dosage of the immunosuppressive drugs affect the infection rate. Recent protocols, employing a combination of cyclosporine, steroids, and azathioprine cause less toxicity and lower infection rates than protocols that rely solely on cyclosporine and steroids or protocols utilized in the 1970s, which did not contain cyclosporine. A literature review of data reported from 12 transplant centers, encompassing 384 patients who received their transplantation in the era of cyclosporine, revealed infections in 221 patients (57.6%), with 20 infection-related deaths (5.2%). All classes of microorganisms infected the heart transplant recipients. The most frequent agents included staphylococci, gram-negative enteric, Nocardia (bacterial); Aspergillus, Candida, Cryptococcus (fungal); cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, herpes zoster (viral); and Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii (protozoal). The respiratory tract, urinary tract, and skin were the most common sites of infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3058911

  19. RND transporters protect Corynebacterium glutamicum from antibiotics by assembling the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Lu, Shuo; Belardinelli, Juan; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Jones, Victoria; Jackson, Mary; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium–Mycobacterium–Nocardia (CMN) group are the causative agents of a broad spectrum of diseases in humans. A distinctive feature of these Gram-positive bacteria is the presence of an outer membrane of unique structure and composition. Recently, resistance–nodulation–division (RND) transporters (nicknamed MmpLs, Mycobacterial membrane protein Large) have emerged as major contributors to the biogenesis of the outer membranes in mycobacteria and as promising drug targets. In this study, we investigated the role of RND transporters in the physiology of Corynebacterium glutamicum and analyzed properties of these proteins. Our results show that in contrast to Gram-negative species, in which RND transporters actively extrude antibiotics from cells, in C. glutamicum and relatives these transporters protect cells from antibiotics by playing essential roles in the biogenesis of the low-permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Conditional C. glutamicum mutants lacking RND proteins and with the controlled expression of either NCgl2769 (CmpL1) or NCgl0228 (CmpL4) are hypersusceptible to multiple antibiotics, have growth deficiencies in minimal medium and accumulate intracellularly trehalose monocorynomycolates, free corynomycolates, and the previously uncharacterized corynomycolate-containing lipid. Our results also suggest that similar to other RND transporters, Corynebacterial membrane proteins Large (CmpLs) functions are dependent on a proton-motive force. PMID:24942069

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of infection in cardiac transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gentry, L O; Zeluff, B J

    1986-06-01

    Despite major advances in the management of rejection and the development of newer and more potent antimicrobials, infection still constitutes a major problem in transplant patients and other immunosuppressed hosts. Infectious complications in transplant patients clearly occur in two phases. The first phase includes the first 30 to 60 days after transplantation. During this period, nosocomial bacterial infections are most commonly encountered. Pulmonary, renal, and wound infections have all been encountered, and prophylactic antibiotics appear to decrease their frequency. Opportunistic infections usually do not occur during this period unless the patient undergoes treatment for acute rejection. The second phase of infectious complications usually follows the first month after transplantation. In this period, the level of immunosuppression is high, and opportunistic infections are common. Opportunistic pulmonary infections caused by P. carinii, L. pneumophila, cytomegalovirus, Aspergillus, and Nocardia spp. all are potentially life-threatening complications to the transplant patient. Aggressive diagnostic tests such as bronchoscopy, percutaneous needle biopsy, or open lung biopsy are frequently needed to make a diagnosis. Empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy is indicated in the ill patient; however, more specific therapy should be instituted once the diagnosis is confirmed. PMID:3520889

  1. Diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, D M

    1988-06-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia occurs in 0.6% of hospitalized patients. The usual causative agents are gram-negative bacilli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and anaerobic bacteria. In immunocompromised hosts, the differential diagnosis also includes fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, Nocardia, and Pneumocystis carinii. Important risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia include prolonged mechanical ventilation, thoracic or upper abdominal surgery, altered mental status, underlying immunosuppression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the use of antacids or histamine type 2 blockers. Colonization of the oropharynx and tracheal secretions with gram-negative aerobic bacteria is common in hospitalized patients with or without pneumonia. The diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia is usually based on the clinical features of dyspnea, cough, fever, purulent sputum production, new pulmonary infiltrates, hypoxemia, and leukocytosis. However, the clinician must recognize that the presence of these features is neither sensitive nor specific in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia. Microbiologic diagnosis is also difficult because blood cultures are usually negative, and cultures of tracheal secretions, although usually sensitive, are not specific. Invasive procedures may prove useful, but most have yet to be studied in large groups of patients with nosocomial pneumonia. PMID:3041515

  2. Recent experiences with nocardial infections.

    PubMed

    Rosett, W; Hodges, G R

    1978-01-01

    A review of Nocardia isolates at two Kansas City hospitals from 1968 to 1976 revealed isolates from 42 different patients. Data were available for analysis from 36 patients. According to strict criteria, only 17(47%) were infected. Infection increased from zero to one yearly from 1968 through 1973 to five and seven in 1974 and 1975, respectively. Commensal isolates varied from zero to five yearly with no recent increase. Analysis of underlying disease and predisposing factors suggests that bronchopulmonary abnormalities predispose to colonization but infection is unusual without immunosuppression. Primary nocardial infection without known underlying disease accounted for only 4 of the 17(24%) infections. Fever and leukocytosis were not helpful in distinguishing nocardial infection from colonization. A history of prior steroid use and a smear showing gram-positive filamentous organisms correlated highly with infection. Mortality correlated with pulmonary and brain involvement, prior use of steroids, and inappropriate therapy. Nosocomial infection was noted in five patients with a mortality of 60%. Overall mortality was only 29%. PMID:742635

  3. Opportunistic infections (non-cytomegalovirus) in live related renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, P. B.; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of review was increasing number of opportunistic infections with use of newer immunosuppression and difficulty in diagnosis and management of such patients. For this review, MEDLINE database was searched from 2000 to 2006 with the keywords of opportunistic infections in renal transplantation. Opportunistic infection is a serious clinical complication in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy after kidney transplantation. The two major factors for successful renal transplantation are better control of rejection and better prevention and treatment of infection. In renal allograft recipient, immunosuppressive drug therapy is the major cause of immunocompromised status and occurrence of infections, which arise most commonly as a result of invasion by endogenous opportunists. The opportunistic infections with varicella zoster viruses, parvovirus B-19, polyomavirus, nocardia and mucormycosis in immunosuppressed patients were present with severe complications that are reviewed in this article. As a result of use of strong immunosuppressive drugs like tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetyl and antirejection therapy with antithymocyte globulins, these infections are now seen frequently, so they should always be included in differential diagnostic consideration. New diagnostic procedures and new treatment strategies are required to allow early detection and successful treatment of opportunistic infections in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:19672339

  4. Opportunistic fungal and bacterial infection in the renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Tolkoff-Rubin, N E; Rubin, R H

    1992-06-01

    The risk of opportunistic infection in the renal transplant recipient is determined by the interaction between two factors: the epidemiologic exposures the individual encounters within the community and the hospital and a complex function termed the net state of immunosuppression. There are two general categories of opportunistic fungal infection in this patient population: (1) disseminated primary or reactivation infection with one of the geographically restricted systemic mycoses (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, and paracoccidioidomycosis) and (2) opportunistic infection with fungal species that rarely cause invasive infection in the normal host (Aspergillus species, Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and the Mucoraceae), with these last usually being acquired within the hospital environment. Newly available azole compounds, fluconazole and itraconazole, are exciting new alternatives to amphotericin in the treatment of at least some of these infections. The three most important forms of opportunistic bacterial infections are those due to Listeria monocytogenes, Nocardia asteroides, and a variety of mycobacterial species. Clinical diseases with these first two are effectively prevented by low-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. There are two cardinal therapeutic rules to be followed by clinicians in dealing with these infections: prevention is better than treatment; when treatment is required, however, the major determinant of the success of therapy is the rapidity with which the diagnosis is made and effective therapy is initiated. PMID:1498286

  5. Actinomycetes from the South China Sea sponges: isolation, diversity, and potential for aromatic polyketides discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; He, Liming; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges often harbor dense and diverse microbial communities including actinobacteria. To date no comprehensive investigation has been performed on the culturable diversity of the actinomycetes associated with South China Sea sponges. Structurally novel aromatic polyketides were recently discovered from marine sponge-derived Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora strains, suggesting that sponge-associated actinomycetes can serve as a new source of aromatic polyketides. In this study, a total of 77 actinomycete strains were isolated from 15 South China Sea sponge species. Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 12 families and 20 genera, among which three rare genera (Marihabitans, Polymorphospora, and Streptomonospora) were isolated from marine sponges for the first time. Subsequently, β-ketoacyl synthase (KSα) gene was used as marker for evaluating the potential of the actinomycete strains to produce aromatic polyketides. As a result, KSα gene was detected in 35 isolates related to seven genera (Kocuria, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinispora, and Streptomyces). Finally, 10 strains were selected for small-scale fermentation, and one angucycline compound was detected from the culture extract of Streptomyces anulatus strain S71. This study advanced our knowledge of the sponge-associated actinomycetes regarding their diversity and potential in producing aromatic polyketides. PMID:26483773

  6. Chemical composition of essential oil from ripe fruit of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi and evaluation of its activity against wild strains of hospital origin.

    PubMed

    Cole, E R; dos Santos, R B; Lacerda Júnior, V; Martins, J D L; Greco, S J; Cunha Neto, A

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil (EO) composition of ripe fruit of S. terebinthifolius Raddi was analyzed by GC-MS. The oil extraction yielded 6.54 ± 1.06% (w/w). Seventeen compounds were identified, accounting for 91.15% of the total oil, where monoterpenes constituted the main chemical class (85.81%), followed by sesquiterpenes (5.34%). The major monoterpene identified was δ-3-carene (30.37%), followed by limonene (17.44%), α-phellandrene (12.60%) and α-pinene (12.59%). Trans-caryophyllene (1.77%) was the major sesquiterpene identified. The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated against wild strains of hospital origin (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Klebsiella oxytoca, Corynebacterium sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter sp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Bacillus sp., Nocardia sp. and Streptococcus group D). The essential oil of the ripe fruit of S. terebinthifolius Raddi has shown to be active against all tested wild strains, with minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 3.55 μg/mL to 56.86 μg/mL. However, it has revealed some differences in susceptibility: the general, Gram-positive species showed greater sensitivity to the action of EO, which is probably due to the lower structural complexity of their cell walls. PMID:25477913

  7. Taxonomy, Physiology, and Natural Products of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Barka, Essaid Ait; Vatsa, Parul; Sanchez, Lisa; Gaveau-Vaillant, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cedric; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Clément, Christophe; Ouhdouch, Yder; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-03-01

    Actinobacteria are Gram-positive bacteria with high G+C DNA content that constitute one of the largest bacterial phyla, and they are ubiquitously distributed in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Many Actinobacteria have a mycelial lifestyle and undergo complex morphological differentiation. They also have an extensive secondary metabolism and produce about two-thirds of all naturally derived antibiotics in current clinical use, as well as many anticancer, anthelmintic, and antifungal compounds. Consequently, these bacteria are of major importance for biotechnology, medicine, and agriculture. Actinobacteria play diverse roles in their associations with various higher organisms, since their members have adopted different lifestyles, and the phylum includes pathogens (notably, species of Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Propionibacterium, and Tropheryma), soil inhabitants (e.g., Micromonospora and Streptomyces species), plant commensals (e.g., Frankia spp.), and gastrointestinal commensals (Bifidobacterium spp.). Actinobacteria also play an important role as symbionts and as pathogens in plant-associated microbial communities. This review presents an update on the biology of this important bacterial phylum. PMID:26609051

  8. Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum†

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Canchaya, Carlos; Tauch, Andreas; Chandra, Govind; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Chater, Keith F.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Actinobacteria constitute one of the largest phyla among Bacteria and represent gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C content in their DNA. This bacterial group includes microorganisms exhibiting a wide spectrum of morphologies, from coccoid to fragmenting hyphal forms, as well as possessing highly variable physiological and metabolic properties. Furthermore, Actinobacteria members have adopted different lifestyles, and can be pathogens (e.g., Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Tropheryma, and Propionibacterium), soil inhabitants (Streptomyces), plant commensals (Leifsonia), or gastrointestinal commensals (Bifidobacterium). The divergence of Actinobacteria from other bacteria is ancient, making it impossible to identify the phylogenetically closest bacterial group to Actinobacteria. Genome sequence analysis has revolutionized every aspect of bacterial biology by enhancing the understanding of the genetics, physiology, and evolutionary development of bacteria. Various actinobacterial genomes have been sequenced, revealing a wide genomic heterogeneity probably as a reflection of their biodiversity. This review provides an account of the recent explosion of actinobacterial genomics data and an attempt to place this in a biological and evolutionary context. PMID:17804669

  9. Paratrechina longicornis ants in a tropical dry forest harbor specific Actinobacteria diversity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ruth D Hernández; Cafaro, Matías J

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Actinobacteria associated with Paratrechina longicornis, an ant species that prefers a high protein diet, in a subtropical dry forest (Guánica, Puerto Rico) was determined by culture methods and by 16S rDNA clone libraries. The results of both methodologies were integrated to obtain a broader view of the diversity. Streptomyces, Actinomadura, Nocardia, Ornithinimicrobium, Tsukamurella, Brevibacterium, Saccharopolyspora, Nocardioides, Microbacterium, Leifsonia, Pseudonocardia, Corynebacterium, Geodermatophilus, Amycolatopsis, and Nonomuraea were found associated with the ants. The genera Streptomyces and Actinomadura were the most abundant. Also, the diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the soil surrounding the nest was determined using 16S rDNA clone libraries. In total, 27 genera of Actinobacteria were associated with the nest soils. A dominant genus was not observed in any of the soil samples. We compared statistically the Actinobacteria communities among P. longicornis nests and each nest with its surrounding soil using the clone libraries data. We established that the communities associated with the ants were consistent and significantly different from those found in the soil in which the ants live. PMID:24771570

  10. Actinobacterial diversity in limestone deposit sites in Hundung, Manipur (India) and their antimicrobial activities

    PubMed Central

    Nimaichand, Salam; Devi, Asem Mipeshwaree; Tamreihao, K.; Ningthoujam, Debananda S.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Studies on actinobacterial diversity in limestone habitats are scarce. This paper reports profiling of actinobacteria isolated from Hundung limestone samples in Manipur, India using ARDRA as the molecular tool for preliminary classification. A total of 137 actinobacteria were clustered into 31 phylotypic groups based on the ARDRA pattern generated and representative of each group was subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Generic diversity of the limestone isolates consisted of Streptomyces (15 phylotypic groups), Micromonospora (4), Amycolatopsis (3), Arthrobacter (3), Kitasatospora (2), Janibacter (1), Nocardia (1), Pseudonocardia (1) and Rhodococcus (1). Considering the antimicrobial potential of these actinobacteria, 19 showed antimicrobial activities against at least one of the bacterial and candidal test pathogens, while 45 exhibit biocontrol activities against at least one of the rice fungal pathogens. Out of the 137 actinobacterial isolates, 118 were found to have at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, NRPS). The results indicate that 86% of the strains isolated from Hundung limestone deposit sites possessed biosynthetic gene clusters of which 40% exhibited antimicrobial activities. It can, therefore, be concluded that limestone habitat is a promising source for search of novel secondary metabolites. PMID:25999937

  11. Hoyosella altamirensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a new member of the order Actinomycetales isolated from a cave biofilm.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Valme; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesáreo; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mouniée, Delphine; Laiz, Leonila; Couble, Andrée; Pötter, Gabriele; Boiron, Patrick; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2009-12-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain OFN S31(T), was isolated from a complex biofilm in the Altamira Cave, Spain. A polyphasic study was carried out to clarify the taxonomic position of this strain. Phylogenetic analysis with 16S rRNA gene sequences of representatives of the genera Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Gordonia, Millisia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Segniliparus, Skermania, Tsukamurella and Williamsia indicated that strain OFN S31(T) formed a distinct taxon in the 16S rRNA gene tree that was more closely associated with the Mycobacterium clade. The type strain of Mycobacterium fallax was the closest relative of strain OFN S31(T) (95.6 % similarity). The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose and galactose, which are characteristic components of cell-wall chemotype IV of actinomycetes. The sugars of the peptidoglycan were acetylated. The polar lipid pattern was composed of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol. Strain OFN S31(T) is characterized by the absence of mycelium and mycolic acids. Strain OFN S31(T) had MK-8 as the major menaquinone. The DNA G+C content was 49.3 mol%, the lowest found among all taxa included in the suborder Corynebacterineae. Based on morphological, chemotaxonomic, phenotypic and genetic characteristics, strain OFN S31(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Hoyosella altamirensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Hoyosella altamirensis is strain OFN S31(T) (=CIP 109864(T) =DSM 45258(T)). PMID:19643882

  12. Pseudoactinomycotic radiate granules of the gynaecological tract: review of a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Pritt, B; Mount, S L; Cooper, K; Blaszyk, H

    2006-01-01

    The filamentous bacterium actinomyces can cause serious gynaecological tract infections, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and tubo-ovarian abscess. Thus, definitive diagnosis of actinomycotic granules (AMGs) in gynaecological specimens is clinically important. Non-infectious pseudoactinomycotic radiate granules (PAMRAGs) can mimic the microscopic appearance of AMGs. PAMRAGs may be more common than actinomycotic infections in specimens from patients using intrauterine devices and may be seen in patients with PID. Although the composition and aetiology of PAMRAGs is unclear and variable, a panel of histochemical stains can aid in diagnosis. On haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections, AMGs show as distinct granules with basophilic peripheral radiating filaments and a dense central eosinophilic core, whereas H&E stained sections of PAMRAGs feature refractile granules with irregular club-like peripheral projections and no central dense core. The filaments of AMGs are Gram positive on Brown and Brenn (B&B) stain and are highlighted with Gomori methenamine silver stain (GMS). They stain negatively with a modified acid fast bacillus (AFB) stain, aiding in the distinction of actinomyces from nocardia. PAMRAGs show negative or non-specific staining with B&B, GMS, and AFB stains. Therefore, knowledge of these staining properties and the distinguishing characteristics of PAMRAGs and AMGs enables recognition of this important diagnostic pitfall. PMID:16394276

  13. Moderately thermophilic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial communities in Kuwaiti desert soil: enhanced activity via Ca(2+) and dipicolinic acid amendment.

    PubMed

    Al-Mailem, D M; Kansour, M K; Radwan, S S

    2015-05-01

    Pristine and oil-contaminated desert soil samples from Kuwait harbored between 10 and 100 cells g(-1) of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria capable of growth at 50 °C. Enrichment by incubation of moistened soils for 6 months at 50 °C raised those numbers to the magnitude of 10(3) cells g(-1). Most of these organisms were moderately thermophilic and belonged to the genus Bacillus; they grew at 40-50 °C better than at 30 °C. Species belonging to the genera Amycolatopsis, Chelativorans, Isoptericola, Nocardia, Aeribacillus, Aneurinibacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Kocuria, Marinobacter and Paenibacillus were also found. This microbial diversity indicates a good potential for hydrocarbon removal in soil at high temperature. Analysis of the same desert soil samples by a culture-independent method (combined, DGGE and 16S rDNA sequencing) revealed dramatically different lists of microorganisms, many of which had been recorded as hydrocarbonoclastic. Many species were more frequent in the oil contaminated than in the pristine soil samples, which may reflect their hydrocarbonoclastic activity in situ. The growth and hydrocarbon consumption potential of all tested isolates were dramatically enhanced by amendment of the cultures with Ca(2+) (up to 2.5 M CaSO4). This enhanced effect was even amplified when in addition 8 % w/v dipicolinic acid was amended. These novel findings are useful in suggesting biotechnologies for waste hydrocarbon remediation at moderately high temperature. PMID:25716145

  14. Quantitative lipid composition of cell envelopes of Corynebacterium glutamicum elucidated through reverse micelle extraction

    PubMed Central

    Bansal-Mutalik, Ritu; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Cells of the Corynebacterium-Nocardia-Mycobacterium group of bacteria are surrounded by an outer membrane (OM) containing mycolic acids that are covalently linked to the underlying arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex. This OM presumably acts as a permeability barrier that imparts high levels of intrinsic drug resistance to some members of this group, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and its component lipids have been studied intensively in a qualitative manner over the years. However, the quantitative lipid composition of this membrane has remained obscure, mainly because of difficulties in isolating it without contamination from the inner cytoplasmic membrane. Here we use the extraction, with reverse surfactant micelles, of intact cells of Corynebacterium glutamicum and show that this method extracts the free OM lipids quantitatively with no contamination from lipids of the cytoplasmic membrane, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Although only small amounts of corynomycolate were esterified to arabinogalactan, a large amount of cardiolipin was present in a nonextractable form, tightly associated, possibly covalently, with the peptidoglycan-arabinogalactan complex. Furthermore, we show that the OM contains just enough lipid hydrocarbons to produce a bilayer covering the cell surface, with its inner leaflet composed mainly of the aforementioned nonextractable cardiolipin and its outer leaflet composed of trehalose dimycolates, phosphatidylinositol mannosides, and highly apolar lipids, similar to the Minnikin model of 1982. The reverse micelle extraction method is also useful for extracting proteins associated with the OM, such as porins. PMID:21876124

  15. A Novel Inhibitor of Gyrase B Is a Potent Drug Candidate for Treatment of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven M.; Hanzelka, Brian L.; Perola, Emanuele; Shoen, Carolyn M.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Ngwane, Andile H.; Wiid, Ian J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Betoudji, Fabrice; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Thomson, John A.

    2014-01-01

    New drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis are urgently needed. Extensively drug-resistant and probably the totally drug-resistant tuberculosis strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones like moxifloxacin, which target gyrase A, and most people infected with these strains die within a year. In this study, we found that a novel aminobenzimidazole, VXc-486, which targets gyrase B, potently inhibits multiple drug-sensitive isolates and drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro (MICs of 0.03 to 0.30 μg/ml and 0.08 to 5.48 μg/ml, respectively) and reduces mycobacterial burdens in lungs of infected mice in vivo. VXc-486 is active against drug-resistant isolates, has bactericidal activity, and kills intracellular and dormant M. tuberculosis bacteria in a low-oxygen environment. Furthermore, we found that VXc-486 inhibits the growth of multiple strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii (MICs of 0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml), as well as that of several strains of Nocardia spp. (MICs of 0.1 to 1.0 μg/ml). We made a direct comparison of the parent compound VXc-486 and a phosphate prodrug of VXc-486 and showed that the prodrug of VXc-486 had more potent killing of M. tuberculosis than did VXc-486 in vivo. In combination with other antimycobacterial drugs, the prodrug of VXc-486 sterilized M. tuberculosis infection when combined with rifapentine-pyrazinamide and bedaquiline-pyrazinamide in a relapse infection study in mice. Furthermore, the prodrug of VXc-486 appeared to perform at least as well as the gyrase A inhibitor moxifloxacin. These findings warrant further development of the prodrug of VXc-486 for the treatment of tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections. PMID:25534737

  16. In-vitro activity of newer quinolones against aerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Auckenthaler, R; Michéa-Hamzehpour, M; Pechère, J C

    1986-04-01

    Nalidixic and five newer 4-quinolones, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin were tested against 576 recent clinical aerobic bacterial isolates. The 4-quinolones were regularly active (MIC90 less than 4 mg/l) against the following bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, S. saprophyticus, different Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus influenzae, Campylobacter jejuni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Agrobacter spp., Aeromonas spp., Plesiomonas spp., Neisseria meningitidis. Other bacteria were usually intermediately susceptible or resistant: different streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, Nocardia asteroides, P. maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxydans and Alcaligenes denitrificans. Ciprofloxacin was the most potent compound, followed by ofloxacin and pefloxacin, norfloxacin and enoxacin being less active. All the 4-quinolones were much more active than nalidixic acid. The MBC/MIC ratios of the 4-quinolones were between 1 and 2 with a majority of strains, and between 2 and 3 with Streptococcus agalactiae, Str. faecalis and L. monocytogenes. A two- to eight-fold increase of MIC was observed by increasing the inoculum 10,000-fold with most of the strains tested. Susceptible bacterial population of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and P. aeruginosa contained more clones resistant to nalidixic acid (10(4) to 10(8) at four times the MIC) than to 4-quinolones (10(5) to 10(9) at four times the MIC). Supplementing the media with MgSO4 produced smaller inhibition zone diameters with a disc diffusion method than those obtained with non-supplemented agar, with all quinolone or strains. Less regular effect, or no effect was obtained after supplementation with ZnSO4 or Ca(NO3)2. PMID:2940214

  17. Tricholoma matsutake Dominates Diverse Microbial Communities in Different Forest Soils▿†

    PubMed Central

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Fritze, Hannu; Spetz, Peter; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hanajík, Peter; Pennanen, Taina

    2011-01-01

    Fungal and actinobacterial communities were analyzed together with soil chemistry and enzyme activities in order to profile the microbial diversity associated with the economically important mushroom Tricholoma matsutake. Samples of mycelium-soil aggregation (shiro) were collected from three experimental sites where sporocarps naturally formed. PCR was used to confirm the presence and absence of matsutake in soil samples. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and direct sequencing were used to identify fungi and actinobacteria in the mineral and organic soil layers separately. Soil enzyme activities and hemicellulotic carbohydrates were analyzed in a productive experimental site. Soil chemistry was investigated in both organic and mineral soil layers at all three experimental sites. Matsutake dominated in the shiro but also coexisted with a high diversity of fungi and actinobacteria. Tomentollopsis sp. in the organic layer above the shiro and Piloderma sp. in the shiro correlated positively with the presence of T. matsutake in all experimental sites. A Thermomonosporaceae bacterium and Nocardia sp. correlated positively with the presence of T. matsutake, and Streptomyces sp. was a common cohabitant in the shiro, although these operational taxonomic units (OTUs) did not occur at all sites. Significantly higher enzyme activity levels were detected in shiro soil. These enzymes are involved in the mobilization of carbon from organic matter decomposition. Matsutake was not associated with a particular soil chemistry compared to that of nearby sites where the fungus does not occur. The presence of a significant hemicellulose pool and the enzymes to degrade it indicates the potential for obtaining carbon from the soil rather than tree roots. PMID:21984247

  18. atpE gene as a new useful specific molecular target to quantify Mycobacterium in environmental samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The environment is the likely source of many pathogenic mycobacterial species but detection of mycobacteria by bacteriological tools is generally difficult and time-consuming. Consequently, several molecular targets based on the sequences of housekeeping genes, non-functional RNA and structural ribosomal RNAs have been proposed for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical or environmental samples. While certain of these targets were proposed as specific for this genus, most are prone to false positive results in complex environmental samples that include related, but distinct, bacterial genera. Nowadays the increased number of sequenced genomes and the availability of software for genomic comparison provide tools to develop novel, mycobacteria-specific targets, and the associated molecular probes and primers. Consequently, we conducted an in silico search for proteins exclusive to Mycobacterium spp. genomes in order to design sensitive and specific molecular targets. Results Among the 3989 predicted proteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, only 11 proteins showed 80% to 100% of similarity with Mycobacterium spp. genomes, and less than 50% of similarity with genomes of closely related Corynebacterium, Nocardia and Rhodococcus genera. Based on DNA sequence alignments, we designed primer pairs and a probe that specifically detect the atpE gene of mycobacteria, as verified by quantitative real-time PCR on a collection of mycobacteria and non-mycobacterial species. The real-time PCR method we developed was successfully used to detect mycobacteria in tap water and lake samples. Conclusions The results indicate that this real-time PCR method targeting the atpE gene can serve for highly specific detection and precise quantification of Mycobacterium spp. in environmental samples. PMID:24299240

  19. Antimicrobial Activities of Some Actinomycetes Isolated from Different Rhizospheric Soils in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Ines; Oves, Daniel; Manteca, Angel; Genilloud, Olga; Altalhi, Abdullah; Nour, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Fifty four isolates of actinomycetes were collected from four different rhizospheric soils: 18 strains from palm tree bark and soil, 12 strains from an olive field soil, 9 strains from a coastal forest, and 15 strains from an agriculture soil situated in the Algerian-Tunisian border (Oum Tboul). Based on morphological and cultural characters, the isolates were classified as Streptomyces (42 strains), Micromonospora (4 strains), Pseudonocardia (1 strain), Actinomadura (1 strain), Nocardia (1 strain), and non-Streptomyces (5 strains). More than half of the isolates inhibited at least one tested pathogenic microorganisms in liquid culture. In addition, antimicrobial activities of some strains were tested on solid culture. Several bioactive compounds were identified by liquid chromatography joined with low-resolution mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) and analysed by MEDINA's database and by the dictionary of natural products Chapman & Hall. An interesting chlorinated compound with the molecular formula C20H37ClN2O4, produced by three different strains (SF1, SF2, and SF5), was subject of an attempted purification. However, it was demonstrated using confocal microscopy and LC/MS high resolution that this compound is produced only on solid culture. These three potential antimicrobial isolates showed high similarity with Streptomyces thinghirensis and Streptomyces lienomycini, in terms of morphological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequences (bootstrap 97 %). All these findings prove the high antimicrobial diversity of the studied soils. The potential of the selected and other relatively unexplored extreme environments constitute a source of interesting actinomycete strains producing several biologically active secondary metabolites. PMID:27139253

  20. Study of human microecology by mass spectrometry of microbial markers.

    PubMed

    Osipov, G A; Verkhovtseva, N V

    2011-03-01

    This review shows that mass spectrometry of microbial markers (MSMM) permits simultaneous in situ determination of more than one hundred microbial fatty acids in clinical, biotechnological or environmental samples, without precultivation and use of biochemical test materials and primers. Unprecedented information about the quantity of anaerobes and uncultivated aerobes, as well as actinobacteria, yeasts, viruses and microscopic fungi in one sample has provided a full understanding of microbial etiology in clinical conditions of patients. The study of intestine dysbiosis has confirmed the hypothesis about the nosological specificity of changes in the intestinal microbiota. It has been proven that infectious processes are polymicrobial. Measurements have shown that anaerobes dominate in number and functional activities in inflammation. The division of microbes into pathogenic and non- pathogenic is artificial. All microbes living in a human body simultaneously stay in both forms. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria appear as agents of septic conditions and endocarditis. МSММ data confirm that anaerobes of Clostridium, Eubacterium, Propionibacterium, as well as actinobacteria of Streptomyces, Nocardia, Rhodococcus are mixed infection dominants. The data testify translocation of these microbes in inflammation loci from the intestine. Quantitative comparison of concentration of markers in the inflamed organ and blood proves reproduction of microorganisms in this locus. The current hypothesis is confirmed that the goal of translocation is not only infection, but also a biofilm formation similar to intestines, which stimulate local immunity, protection from local pathogens and restoration of the damaged tissues. Quantification using GC-MS revealed that the influence of antibiotics on the normal intestine's microbiota are not as dramatic as believed. Growth-promoting effects are the most important benefits of probiotic applications. The probiotic essence is not the

  1. Bacterial Community Analysis of Drinking Water Biofilms in Southern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lührig, Katharina; Canbäck, Björn; Paul, Catherine J.; Johansson, Tomas; Persson, Kenneth M.; Rådström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of the V1–V2 and V3 variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene generated a total of 674,116 reads that described six distinct bacterial biofilm communities from both water meters and pipes. A high degree of reproducibility was demonstrated for the experimental and analytical work-flow by analyzing the communities present in parallel water meters, the rare occurrence of biological replicates within a working drinking water distribution system. The communities observed in water meters from households that did not complain about their drinking water were defined by sequences representing Proteobacteria (82–87%), with 22–40% of all sequences being classified as Sphingomonadaceae. However, a water meter biofilm community from a household with consumer reports of red water and flowing water containing elevated levels of iron and manganese had fewer sequences representing Proteobacteria (44%); only 0.6% of all sequences were classified as Sphingomonadaceae; and, in contrast to the other water meter communities, markedly more sequences represented Nitrospira and Pedomicrobium. The biofilm communities in pipes were distinct from those in water meters, and contained sequences that were identified as Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Desulfovibrio, and Sulfuricurvum. The approach employed in the present study resolved the bacterial diversity present in these biofilm communities as well as the differences that occurred in biofilms within a single distribution system, and suggests that next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons can show changes in bacterial biofilm communities associated with different water qualities. PMID:25739379

  2. Absence of a functional erm gene in isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group, based on in vitro clarithromycin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E Susan; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  3. Differentiation of etiologic agents of bacterial keratitis from presentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Jeena; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Chen, Michael; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Ray, Kathryn J; Glidden, David V; Costanza, Stephanie; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2012-12-01

    Presenting characteristics of bacterial corneal ulcers may suggest particular causative organisms, helping to guide treatment decisions before cultures become available. In this study, we analyze the association between presentation demographic and clinical characteristics, using data collected as part of a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Data for this study were collected as part of the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked trial. All patients had a culture-proven bacterial corneal ulcer. Patient history, clinical examination, and photography were performed in a standardized fashion at enrollment. Analysis of variance or Fisher's exact test was used to compare characteristics by organism. Univariate logistic regression was used to analyze predictors of the most common organisms. Five hundred patients were enrolled in the trial, of whom 488 were included in this analysis. The most common organism was Streptococcus pneumoniae (N = 248, 51 %) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (N = 110, 23 %). Compared to other organisms, P. aeruginosa was significantly associated with a larger baseline infiltrate/scar size [odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-1.8] and deeper infiltrate (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.5-3.8). S. pneumoniae was significantly associated with a smaller baseline infiltrate/scar size (OR 0.8, 95 % CI 0.7-0.9) and dacryocystitis (OR 7.3, 95 % CI 4.1-13.3). Nocardia spp. were significantly associated with longer duration of symptoms prior to presentation (OR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.2-1.6), more shallow infiltrate (OR 0.3, 95 % CI 0.2-0.5), and better baseline visual acuity (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.2-0.65). Staphylococcus spp. were less likely to be central in location (OR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.08-0.3). Baseline characteristics of bacterial ulcers may suggest the likely etiology and guide early management. PMID:22752605

  4. Stereospecific microbial reduction of 4,5-dihydro-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl-1H-1)-benzazepin+ ++-2-o ne.

    PubMed

    Patel, R N; Robison, R S; Szarka, L J; Kloss, J; Thottathil, J K; Mueller, R H

    1991-11-01

    A key intermediate, (3R-cis)-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-(trifluorome thyl)- 2H-1-benzazepin-2-one (compound II or SQ32191), with high optical purity was made by the stereoselective microbial reduction of the parent ketone 1. Several strains of bacterial and yeast cultures were screened for the ability to catalyse the stereoselective reduction of 4,5-dihydro-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-1-benzazepin++ +-2,3-dione [compound I or SQ32425]. Microorganisms from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Alkaligenes, Corynebacterium, Arthrobacter, Hansenula, and Candida reduced compound I to compound II with 60-70% conversion yield. In contrast, microorganisms from the genera Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter reduced compound I stereospecifically to (trans)-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-(trifluoromet hyl-2H- 1-benzazepin-2-one (compound III or SQ32408). Among various cultures evaluated, N. salmonicolor SC6310 effectively catalysed the transformation of compound I to compound II with 96% conversion yield at 1.5-2.0 gl-1 concentration. Compound II was isolated and identified by NMR analysis, mass spectrometry, and comparison to an authentic sample. Preparative scale fermentation process and transformation process were developed using cell suspensions of N. salmonicolor SC6310 to catalyse the transformation of compound I to compound II. The isolated compound II had a melting point of 222 degrees C (reference 221-223 degrees C), optical rotation of +130.4 (reference +128 degrees C), and optical purity of greater than 99.9% as analyzed by NMR and chiral HPLC. PMID:1368001

  5. Interaction of cord factor (alpha, alpha'-trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate) with phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Crowe, L M; Spargo, B J; Ioneda, T; Beaman, B L; Crowe, J H

    1994-08-24

    We previously reported that cord factor (alpha,alpha'-trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate) isolated from Nocardia asteroides strain GUH-2 strongly inhibits fusion between unilamellar vesicles containing acidic phospholipid. We chose to study the effects of this molecule on liposome fusion since the presence of N. asteroides GUH-2 in the phagosomes of mouse macrophages had been shown to prevent phagosomal acidification and inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion. A virtually non-virulent strain, N. asteroides 10905, does not prevent acidification or phagosome-lysosome fusion and, further, contains only trace amounts of cord factor. In the present paper, we have investigated the effects of cord factor on phospholipid bilayers that could be responsible for the inhibition of fusion. We show that cord factor increases molecular area, measured by isothermal compression of a monolayer film, in a mixed monolayer more than would be expected based in its individual contribution to molecular area. Cord factor, as well as other glycolipids investigated, increased the overall hydration of bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine by 50%, as estimated from the unfrozen water fraction measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of calcium on this increased molecular area and headgroup hydration was measured by fluorescence anisotropy and FTIR spectroscopy of phosphatidylserine liposomes. Both techniques showed that cord factor, incorporated at 10 mol%, increased acyl chain disorder over controls in the presence of Ca2+. However, FTIR showed that cord factor did not prevent headgroup dehydration by the Ca2+. The other glycolipids tested did not prevent either the Ca(2+)-induced chain crystallization or headgroup dehydration of phosphatidylserine bilayers. These data point to a possible role of the bulky mycolic acids of cord factor in preventing Ca(2+)-induced fusion of liposomes containing acidic phospholipids. PMID:8075141

  6. Prospect, isolation, and characterization of microorganisms for potential use in cases of oil bioremediation along the coast of Trindade Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Edmo M; Kalks, Karlos H M; Tótola, Marcos R

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, acrylic coupons with a thin layer of oil on the surface were incubated in the coastal water of Trindade Island, Brazil, for 60 days. The microorganisms adhered to the coupons were isolated using enrichment medium with hexadecane and naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. A total of 15 bacterial isolates were obtained, and the ability of these isolates to use different hydrocarbons as the source of carbon and energy was investigated. None of the isolates produced biosurfactants under our experimental conditions. Subsequently, identification methods such as partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and analysis of fatty acids (MIDI) profile were employed. Among the 15 isolates, representatives of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria were detected. The isolates Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7 and Nocardia farcinica TRH1 were able to use all the hydrocarbons added to the culture medium (toluene, octane, xylene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, hexadecane, anthracene, eicosane, tetracosane, triacontane, and pentacontane). Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the DNA isolated by employing primers for catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, alkane dehydrogenase and the alpha subunit of hydroxylating dioxygenases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon rings genes demonstrated that various isolates capable of utilizing hydrocarbons do not exhibit genes of known routes of catabolism, suggesting the existence of unknown catabolic pathways in these microorganisms. Our findings suggest that the microbiota associated to the coast of tropical oceanic islands has the ability to assist in environmental regeneration in cases of accidents involving oil spills in its shore. Thus, it motivates studies to map bioremediation strategies using the autochthonous microbiota from these environments. PMID:25791233

  7. IcmF Is a Fusion between the Radical B12 Enzyme Isobutyryl-CoA Mutase and Its G-protein Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Cracan, Valentin; Padovani, Dominique; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme B12 is used by two highly similar radical enzymes, which catalyze carbon skeleton rearrangements, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM). ICM catalyzes the reversible interconversion of isobutyryl-CoA and n-butyryl-CoA and exists as a heterotetramer. In this study, we have identified >70 bacterial proteins, which represent fusions between the subunits of ICM and a P-loop GTPase and are currently misannotated as methylmalonyl-CoA mutases. We designate this fusion protein as IcmF (isobutyryl-CoA mutase fused). All IcmFs are composed of the following three domains: the N-terminal 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin binding region that is homologous to the small subunit of ICM (IcmB), a middle P-loop GTPase domain, and a C-terminal part that is homologous to the large subunit of ICM (IcmA). The P-loop GTPase domain has very high sequence similarity to the Methylobacterium extorquens MeaB, which is a chaperone for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. We have demonstrated that IcmF is an active ICM by cloning, expressing, and purifying the IcmFs from Geobacillus kaustophilus, Nocardia farcinica, and Burkholderia xenovorans. This finding expands the known distribution of ICM activity well beyond the genus Streptomyces, where it is involved in polyketides biosynthesis, and suggests a role for this enzyme in novel bacterial pathways for amino acid degradation, myxalamid biosynthesis, and acetyl-CoA assimilation. PMID:19864421

  8. Screening of actinomycetes from earthworm castings for their antimicrobial activity and industrial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Bharti, Alpana; Negi, Yogesh Kumar; Gusain, Omprakash; Pandey, Piyush; Bisht, Gajraj Singh

    2012-01-01

    Actinomycetes from earthworm castings were isolated and screened for their antimicrobial activity and industrial enzymes. A total of 48 isolates were obtained from 12 samples of earthworm castings. Highest numbers of isolates were recovered from forest site (58.33 %) as compared to grassland (25%) and agricultural land (16.66%). The growth patterns, mycelial coloration of abundance actinomycetes were documented. The dominant genera Identified by cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics were Streptomyces (60.41%) followed by Streptosporangium (10.41%),Saccharopolyspora (6.25%) and Nocardia (6.25%). Besides these, other genera like Micromonospora, Actinomadura, Microbispora, Planobispora and Nocardiopsis were also recovered but in low frequency. Among the 48 isolates, 52.08% were found active against one or more test organisms. Out of 25 active isolates 16% showed activity against bacterial, human fungal as well as phytopathogens. Among 48 isolates 38, 32, 21, 20, 16 and 14 produced enzyme amylase, caseinase, cellulase, gelatinase, xylanase and lipase respectively while 10 isolates produced all the enzymes. More interestingly 2, 3, and 1 isolates produced amylase, xylanase and lipase at 45°C respectively. In the view of its antimicrobial activity as well as enzyme production capability the genus Streptomyces was dominant. The isolate EWC 7(2) was most promising on the basis of its interesting antimicrobial activity and was identified as Streptomyces rochei. The results of these findings have increased the scope of finding industrially important actinomycetes from earthworm castings and these organisms could be promising sources for industrially important molecules or enzymes. PMID:24031819

  9. Bulk and rhizosphere soil bacterial communities studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis: plant-dependent enrichment and seasonal shifts revealed.

    PubMed

    Smalla, K; Wieland, G; Buchner, A; Zock, A; Parzy, J; Kaiser, S; Roskot, N; Heuer, H; Berg, G

    2001-10-01

    The bacterial rhizosphere communities of three host plants of the pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae, field-grown strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.), oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), were analyzed. We aimed to determine the degree to which the rhizosphere effect is plant dependent and whether this effect would be increased by growing the same crops in two consecutive years. Rhizosphere or soil samples were taken five times over the vegetation periods. To allow a cultivation-independent analysis, total community DNA was extracted from the microbial pellet recovered from root or soil samples. 16S rDNA fragments amplified by PCR from soil or rhizosphere bacterium DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE fingerprints showed plant-dependent shifts in the relative abundance of bacterial populations in the rhizosphere which became more pronounced in the second year. DGGE patterns of oilseed rape and potato rhizosphere communities were more similar to each other than to the strawberry patterns. In both years seasonal shifts in the abundance and composition of the bacterial rhizosphere populations were observed. Independent of the plant species, the patterns of the first sampling times for both years were characterized by the absence of some of the bands which became dominant at the following sampling times. Bacillus megaterium and Arthrobacter sp. were found as predominant populations in bulk soils. Sequencing of dominant bands excised from the rhizosphere patterns revealed that 6 out of 10 bands resembled gram-positive bacteria. Nocardia populations were identified as strawberry-specific bands. PMID:11571180

  10. Bulk and Rhizosphere Soil Bacterial Communities Studied by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Plant-Dependent Enrichment and Seasonal Shifts Revealed

    PubMed Central

    Smalla, K.; Wieland, G.; Buchner, A.; Zock, A.; Parzy, J.; Kaiser, S.; Roskot, N.; Heuer, H.; Berg, G.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial rhizosphere communities of three host plants of the pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae, field-grown strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.), oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), were analyzed. We aimed to determine the degree to which the rhizosphere effect is plant dependent and whether this effect would be increased by growing the same crops in two consecutive years. Rhizosphere or soil samples were taken five times over the vegetation periods. To allow a cultivation-independent analysis, total community DNA was extracted from the microbial pellet recovered from root or soil samples. 16S rDNA fragments amplified by PCR from soil or rhizosphere bacterium DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE fingerprints showed plant-dependent shifts in the relative abundance of bacterial populations in the rhizosphere which became more pronounced in the second year. DGGE patterns of oilseed rape and potato rhizosphere communities were more similar to each other than to the strawberry patterns. In both years seasonal shifts in the abundance and composition of the bacterial rhizosphere populations were observed. Independent of the plant species, the patterns of the first sampling times for both years were characterized by the absence of some of the bands which became dominant at the following sampling times. Bacillus megaterium and Arthrobacter sp. were found as predominant populations in bulk soils. Sequencing of dominant bands excised from the rhizosphere patterns revealed that 6 out of 10 bands resembled gram-positive bacteria. Nocardia populations were identified as strawberry-specific bands. PMID:11571180

  11. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin β-d-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity. PMID:19286778

  12. Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu; Savage, Paul B.; Pollard, Jacob; Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla; Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli; Stafslien, Shane; Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2012-01-01

    Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter

  13. The biocontaminants and complexity of damp indoor spaces: more than what meets the eyes.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Jack D; Crawley, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Nine types of biocontaminants in damp indoor environments from microbial growth are discussed: (1) indicator molds; (2) Gram negative and positive bacteria; (3) microbial particulates; (4) mycotoxins; (5) volatile organic compounds, both microbial (MVOCs) and non-microbial (VOCs); (6) proteins; (7) galactomannans; (8) 1-3-beta-D-glucans (glucans) and (9) lipopolysaccharides (LPS--endotoxins). When mold species exceed those outdoors contamination is deduced. Gram negative bacterial endotoxins, LPS in indoor environments, synergize with mycotoxins. The gram positive Bacillus species, Actinomycetes (Streptomyces, Nocardia and Mycobacterium), produce exotoxins. The Actinomycetes are associated with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, lung and invasive infections. Mycobacterial mycobacterium infections not from M. tuberculosis are increasing in immunocompetent individuals. In animal models, LPS enhance the toxicity of roridin A, satratoxins G and aflatoxin B1 to damage the olfactory epithelium, tract and bulbs (roridin A, satratoxin G) and liver (aflatoxin B1). Aflatoxin B1 and probably trichothecenes are transported along the olfactory tract to the temporal lobe. Co-cultured Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum produce a cytotoxin similar to doxorubicin and actinomycin D (chemotherapeutic agents). Trichothecenes, aflatoxins, gliotoxin and other mycotoxins are found in dust, bulk samples, air and ventilation systems of infested buildings. Macrocyclic trichothecenes are present in airborne particles <2 microm. Trichothecenes and stachylysin are present in the sera of individuals exposed to S. chartarum in contaminated indoor environments. Haemolysins are produced by S. chartarum, Memnoniella echinata and several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. Galactomannans, glucans and LPS are upper and lower respiratory tract irritants. Gliotoxin, an immunosuppressive mycotoxin, was identified in the lung secretions and sera of cancer patients with aspergillosis

  14. Nonribosomal Propeptide Precursor in Nocardicin A Biosynthesis Predicted from Adenylation Domain Specificity Dependent on the MbtH Family Protein NocI

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Jeanne M.; Bartley, David M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Nocardicin A is a monocyclic β-lactam isolated from the actinomycete Nocardia uniformis that shows moderate antibiotic activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-negative bacteria. The monobactams are of renewed interest due to emerging Gram-negative strains resistant to clinically available penicillins and cephalosporins. Like isopenicillin N, nocardicin A has a tripeptide core of nonribosomal origin. Paradoxically, the nocardicin A gene cluster encodes two nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), NocA and NocB, predicted to encode five modules pointing to a pentapeptide precursor in nocardicin A biosynthesis, unless module skipping or other non-linear reactions are occurring. Previous radiochemical incorporation experiments and bioinformatic analyses predict the incorporation of p-hydroxy-L-phenylglycine (L-pHPG) into positions 1, 3, and 5 and L-serine into position 4. No prediction could be made for position 2. Multi-domain constructs of each module were heterologous expressed in Escherichia coli for determination of the adenylation domain (A-domain) substrate specificity using the ATP/PPi exchange assay. Three of the five A-domains, from modules 1, 2, and 4, required the addition of stoichiometric amounts of MbtH family protein NocI to detect exchange activity. Based on these analyses, the predicted product of the NocA+NocB NRPSs is L-pHPG–L-Arg–D-pHPG–L-Ser–L-pHPG, a pentapeptide. Despite being flanked by nonproteinogenic amino acids, proteolysis of this pentapeptide by trypsin yields two fragments from cleavage at the C-terminus of the L-Arg residue. Thus, a proteolytic step is likely involved in the biosynthesis of nocardicin A, a rare but precedented editing event in the formation of nonribosomal natural products which is supported by the identification of trypsin-encoding genes in N. uniformis. PMID:23330869

  15. Comparative analysis of mycobacterium and related actinomycetes yields insight into the evolution of mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The sequence of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Rv has been available for over a decade, but the biology of the pathogen remains poorly understood. Genome sequences from other Mtb strains and closely related bacteria present an opportunity to apply the power of comparative genomics to understand the evolution of Mtb pathogenesis. We conducted a comparative analysis using 31 genomes from the Tuberculosis Database (TBDB.org), including 8 strains of Mtb and M. bovis, 11 additional Mycobacteria, 4 Corynebacteria, 2 Streptomyces, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, Nocardia farcinia, Acidothermus cellulolyticus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bifidobacterium longum. Results Our results highlight the functional importance of lipid metabolism and its regulation, and reveal variation between the evolutionary profiles of genes implicated in saturated and unsaturated fatty acid metabolism. It also suggests that DNA repair and molybdopterin cofactors are important in pathogenic Mycobacteria. By analyzing sequence conservation and gene expression data, we identify nearly 400 conserved noncoding regions. These include 37 predicted promoter regulatory motifs, of which 14 correspond to previously validated motifs, as well as 50 potential noncoding RNAs, of which we experimentally confirm the expression of four. Conclusions Our analysis of protein evolution highlights gene families that are associated with the adaptation of environmental Mycobacteria to obligate pathogenesis. These families include fatty acid metabolism, DNA repair, and molybdopterin biosynthesis. Our analysis reinforces recent findings suggesting that small noncoding RNAs are more common in Mycobacteria than previously expected. Our data provide a foundation for understanding the genome and biology of Mtb in a comparative context, and are available online and through TBDB.org. PMID:22452820

  16. Epidemiology, pathology, immunology and diagnosis of bovine farcy: a review.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Mohamed E

    2012-06-01

    Bovine farcy (which is caused by Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense) is a chronic suppurative granulomatous inflammation of the skin and lymphatics of cattle and is seen mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. It is not yet certain whether Nocardia farcinica causes cutaneous nocardiosis (farcy) in animals that mimics bovine farcy. Epidemiological data have steadily reported finding bovine farcy in adult cattle of the transhumance pastoralist tribes of the Sahel and the Sudanian savannah zones. M. farcinogenes and or M. senegalense do not affect other domestic or non-domestic animals; it is not known whether these bacteria are zoonotic. The disease--once widespread in many regions--has disappeared from some countries historically known to have it. Reports of bovine farcy prevalence seem to be linked to the existence of survey initiatives by governments and diagnostic capabilities in each country. Farcy causes economic loss due to damaged hides and also is a public-health burden (because the lymphadenitis due to farcy resembles the lesions of bovine tuberculosis in carcasses and the meat is considered inappropriate for human consumption). The current literature is deficient in establishing definitely the prevalence, transmission patterns, and risk factors of bovine farcy. Ixodid ticks transmit other skin diseases (such as dermatophilosis) and might play a role in bovine farcy (given the similarity in the bio-physiology and geographic distribution of the disease). In addition, the tick-resistance of cattle breeds such as the N'Dama, Fulani or the Nilotic might explain their resistance to bovine farcy. Apart from the judicious use of conventional smear-and-culture methods, few diagnostic tests have been developed; the molecular and serological tests have not been evaluated for reproducibility and accuracy. This review points out aspects of bovine farcy that need further research and updates available data on the prevalence, distribution, risk factors

  17. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  18. Geomicrobiology of High-Level Nuclear Waste-Contaminated Vadose Sediments at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Balkwill, David L.; Kennedy, David; Li, Shu-mei W.; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Daly, Michael J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2004-01-01

    Sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume were collected as part of investigations to evaluate the potential fate and migration of contaminants in the subsurface. The plume originated from a leak that occurred in 1962 from a waste tank consisting of high concentrations of alkali, nitrate, aluminate, Cr(VI), 137Cs, and 99Tc. Investigations were initiated to determine the distribution of viable microorganisms in the vadose sediment samples, probe the phylogeny of cultivated and uncultivated members, and evaluate the ability of the cultivated organisms to survive acute doses of ionizing radiation. The populations of viable aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were generally low, from below detection to ∼104 CFU g−1, but viable microorganisms were recovered from 11 of 16 samples, including several of the most radioactive ones (e.g., >10 μCi of 137Cs/g). The isolates from the contaminated sediments and clone libraries from sediment DNA extracts were dominated by members related to known gram-positive bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Arthrobacter species were the most common isolates among all samples, but other phyla high in G+C content were also represented, including Rhodococcus and Nocardia. Two isolates from the second-most radioactive sample (>20 μCi of 137Cs g−1) were closely related to Deinococcus radiodurans and were able to survive acute doses of ionizing radiation approaching 20 kGy. Many of the gram-positive isolates were resistant to lower levels of gamma radiation. These results demonstrate that gram-positive bacteria, predominantly from phyla high in G+C content, are indigenous to Hanford vadose sediments and that some are effective at surviving the extreme physical and chemical stress associated with radioactive waste. PMID:15240306

  19. A novel inhibitor of gyrase B is a potent drug candidate for treatment of tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Locher, Christopher P; Jones, Steven M; Hanzelka, Brian L; Perola, Emanuele; Shoen, Carolyn M; Cynamon, Michael H; Ngwane, Andile H; Wiid, Ian J; van Helden, Paul D; Betoudji, Fabrice; Nuermberger, Eric L; Thomson, John A

    2015-03-01

    New drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis are urgently needed. Extensively drug-resistant and probably the totally drug-resistant tuberculosis strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones like moxifloxacin, which target gyrase A, and most people infected with these strains die within a year. In this study, we found that a novel aminobenzimidazole, VXc-486, which targets gyrase B, potently inhibits multiple drug-sensitive isolates and drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro (MICs of 0.03 to 0.30 μg/ml and 0.08 to 5.48 μg/ml, respectively) and reduces mycobacterial burdens in lungs of infected mice in vivo. VXc-486 is active against drug-resistant isolates, has bactericidal activity, and kills intracellular and dormant M. tuberculosis bacteria in a low-oxygen environment. Furthermore, we found that VXc-486 inhibits the growth of multiple strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii (MICs of 0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml), as well as that of several strains of Nocardia spp. (MICs of 0.1 to 1.0 μg/ml). We made a direct comparison of the parent compound VXc-486 and a phosphate prodrug of VXc-486 and showed that the prodrug of VXc-486 had more potent killing of M. tuberculosis than did VXc-486 in vivo. In combination with other antimycobacterial drugs, the prodrug of VXc-486 sterilized M. tuberculosis infection when combined with rifapentine-pyrazinamide and bedaquiline-pyrazinamide in a relapse infection study in mice. Furthermore, the prodrug of VXc-486 appeared to perform at least as well as the gyrase A inhibitor moxifloxacin. These findings warrant further development of the prodrug of VXc-486 for the treatment of tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections. PMID:25534737

  20. Phenotypes of infiltrating cells in trehalose dimycolate-induced interstitial pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Y; Goren, M B; Kirkpatrick, C H

    1989-01-01

    Trehalose dimycolate is a glycolipid component of the cell walls of mycobacteria, nocardia, and corynebacteria. When trehalose dimycolate is injected into certain strains of mice, they develop interstitial pneumonitis that is characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration of the alveolar walls, intra-alveolar hemorrhages, and in some animals, granuloma formation. The disorder is seldom fatal, and in approximately 4 weeks, the lungs are normal. There is strong evidence that T lymphocytes are essential for production of interstitial pneumonitis by trehalose dimycolate, but little is known about the mechanisms of lung injury in this model. The experiments described in this report were conducted to identify the roles of the various cells that accumulate in the lungs of mice with this form of interstitial pneumonitis. We found that Mac3+ macrophages were the first cells to appear in the alveolar walls. Increases in the number of L3T4+ T lymphocytes, Lyt2+ T lymphocytes, and surface-immunoglobulin-positive lymphocytes followed, but significant increases in the number of lymphoid cells were not observed until day 7, when the pulmonary lesions were well developed. Treatment of the mice with cyclophosphamide or anti-T-cell sera significantly reduced the number of lymphoid cells in the alveolar walls but did not affect the number of Mac3+ cells and did not affect development of intra-alveolar hemorrhages. Treatment with poly(I.C) significantly decreased the number of Mac3+ cells in the lungs, and these mice did not develop pulmonary hemorrhages. We conclude that although development of pulmonary lesions in trehalose dimycolate-treated mice is a T-cell-dependent process, macrophages are also essential and are more directly involved in production of the lung injury. We postulate that the lung lesions are the direct effect of macrophage-produced cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor. Images PMID:2731985

  1. Identification of a Novel Self-Sufficient Styrene Monooxygenase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Dirk; Eulberg, Dirk; Lakner, Silvia; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Schlömann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a 9-kb genomic fragment of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP led to identification of an open reading frame encoding a novel fusion protein, StyA2B, with a putative function in styrene metabolism via styrene oxide and phenylacetic acid. Gene cluster analysis indicated that the highly related fusion proteins of Nocardia farcinica IFM10152 and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 are involved in a similar physiological process. Whereas 413 amino acids of the N terminus of StyA2B are highly similar to those of the oxygenases of two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) from pseudomonads, the residual 160 amino acids of the C terminus show significant homology to the flavin reductases of these systems. Cloning and functional expression of His10-StyA2B revealed for the first time that the fusion protein does in fact catalyze two separate reactions. Strictly NADH-dependent reduction of flavins and highly enantioselective oxygenation of styrene to (S)-styrene oxide were shown. Inhibition studies and photometric analysis of recombinant StyA2B indicated the absence of tightly bound heme and flavin cofactors in this self-sufficient monooxygenase. StyA2B oxygenates a spectrum of aromatic compounds similar to those of two-component SMOs. However, the specific activities of the flavin-reducing and styrene-oxidizing functions of StyA2B are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of StyA/StyB from Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120. PMID:19482928

  2. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials - 1. Nutrients in carbonaceous meteorites, and effects on biological growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    1997-06-01

    Soil nutrient analysis of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous chondrite shows biologically available S, P, Ca, Mg, Na, K and Fe and cation exchange capacity (CEC) at levels comparable with terrestrial agricultural soils. Weathering, and aqueous, hydrothermal (121°C, 15 min) and high-temperature (550°C, 3 h) processing increase the extractable nutrients. Extractable phosphorus (by 0.3 M NH 4F + 0.1 M HCl) content, which may be growth-limiting, is 6.3 μg g -1 in the unprocessed meteorite, but increases to 81 μg g -1 by hydrothermal processing and weathering, and to 130 μg g -1 by high temperature processing. The cation exchange capacity (CEC), attributed mainly to the organic fraction, corresponds responds to 345 meq per 100 g of the polymer, suggesting one ionizable COOH or OH group per 3-4 aromatic rings. The Allende C3(V) meteorite has low extractable Ca, Mg and K, in parallel to its low organic content and CEC, but high extractable P levels (160 μg g -1). Biological effects are observed on growth of the soil microorganisms Flavobacterium oryzihabitans and Nocardia asteroides in meteorite extracts, and the population levels suggest that P is the limiting nutrient. Effects on plant growth are examined on Solanum tuberosum (potato), where extracts of the Murchison meteorite lead to enhanced growth and pigmentation. The biologically available organic and inorganic nutrients in carbonaceous chondrites can provide concentrated solutions for prebiotic and early life processes, and serve as soils and fertilizers for future space-based biological expansion.

  3. Actinomycetes from Eucalyptus and their biological activities for controlling Eucalyptus leaf and shoot blight.

    PubMed

    Himaman, Winanda; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Pathom-Aree, Wasu; Duangmal, Kannika

    2016-01-01

    In Thailand, Eucalyptus plantations rapidly expand across the country. Leaf and shoot blight caused by Cryptosporiopsis eucalypti, Cylindrocladium sp. and Teratosphaeria destructans is a serious disease in Eucalyptus plantations. In this study, a total of 477 actinomycete strains were successfully isolated from roots and rhizosphere soil of Eucalyptus. Four hundred and thirty nine isolates were classified as streptomycetes and 38 isolates were non-streptomycetes. Among these isolates, 272 (57.0%), 118 (24.7%) and 241 (50.5%) isolates were antagonistic to Cryptosporiopsis eucalypti, Cylindrocladium sp. and Teratosphaeria destructans, respectively. All isolates were tested for their abilities to produce siderophores, indole acetic acid (IAA) and solubilise phosphate. Most isolates (464, 97.3%) produced siderophores. The majority of isolates (345, 72.3%) solubilised phosphate. In addition, almost half of these isolates (237, 49.7%) produced indole acetic acid. Strain EUSKR2S82 which showed the strongest inhibitory effect against all tested fungi with plant growth promoting ability was selected to test with Eucalyptus. This strain could colonize plant roots and increase Eucalyptus roots length. In a detached leaves bioassay, the disease severity of EUSKR2S82-inoculated Eucalyptus leaves was only 30% compared to 95% in the control treatment. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the strain EUSKR2S82 was related to Streptomyces ramulosus NRRL-B 2714(T) (99.44% similarity). Identification of non-streptomycete isolates using 16S rRNA gene sequences classified them into 9 genera: Actinoallomurus, Actinomadura, Amycolatopsis, Cryptosporangium, Microbispora, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nonomuraea and Pseudonocardia. It is evident that Eucalyptus tree harbored several genera of actinomycetes. The selected isolate, EUSKR2S82 showed potential as a candidate for biocontrol agent of leaf and shoot blight of Eucalyptus and to promote growth. PMID:27296961

  4. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in an Acid Vapor-Formed Spring in Tengchong Geothermal Area, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic biogeochemistry has been studied extensively in acid sulfate-chloride hot springs, but not in acid sulfate hot springs with low chloride. In this study, Zhenzhuquan in Tengchong geothermal area, a representative acid sulfate hot spring with low chloride, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.3 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 6-paired parallel water and sediment samples along its outflow channel. Arsenic oxidation occurred in the Zhenxhuquan pool, with distinctly high ratios of arsenate to total dissolved arsenic (0.73-0.86). Coupled with iron and sulfur oxidation along the outflow channel, arsenic accumulated in downstream sediments with concentrations up to 16.44 g/kg and appeared to significantly constrain their microbial community diversity. These oxidations might be correlated with the appearance of some putative functional microbial populations, such as Aquificae and Pseudomonas (arsenic oxidation), Sulfolobus (sulfur and iron oxidation), Metallosphaera and Acidicaldus (iron oxidation). Temperature, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial community structure of upstream and downstream samples. In the upstream outflow channel region, most microbial populations were microaerophilic/anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, such as Sulfolobus, Nocardia, Fervidicoccus, Delftia, and Ralstonia. In the downstream region, aerobic heterotrophic mesophiles and thermophiles were identified, including Ktedonobacteria, Acidicaldus, Chthonomonas and Sphingobacteria. A total of 72.41-95.91% unassigned-genus sequences were derived from the downstream high arsenic sediments 16S rRNA clone libraries. This study could enable us to achieve an integrated understanding on arsenic biogeochemistry in acid hot springs. PMID:26761709

  5. Testing soil-like substrate for growing plants in bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, J. B.; Lasseur, Ch.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Ushakova, S. A.; Zolotukhin, I. G.; Tirranen, L. S.; Karnachuk, R. A.; Dorofeev, V. Yu.

    We studied soil-like substrate (SLS) as a potential candidate for plant cultivation in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). The SLS was obtained by successive conversion of wheat straw by oyster mushrooms and worms. Mature SLS contained 9.5% humic acids and 4.9% fulvic acids. First, it was shown that wheat, bean and cucumber yields as well as radish yields when cultivated on mature SLS were comparable to yields obtained on a neutral substrate (expanded clay aggregate) under hydroponics. Second, the possibility of increasing wheat and radish yields on the SLS was assessed at three levels of light intensity: 690, 920 and 1150 μmol m -2 s -1 of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The highest wheat yield was obtained at 920 μmol m -2 s -1, while radish yield increased steadily with increasing light intensity. Third, long-term SLS fertility was tested in a BLSS model with mineral and organic matter recycling. Eight cycles of wheat and 13 cycles of radish cultivation were carried out on the SLS in the experimental system. Correlation coefficients between SLS nitrogen content and total wheat biomass and grain yield were 0.92 and 0.97, respectively, and correlation coefficients between nitrogen content and total radish biomass and edible root yield were 0.88 and 0.87, respectively. Changes in hormone content (auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins and abscisic acid) in the SLS during matter recycling did not reduce plant productivity. Quantitative and species compositions of the SLS and irrigation water microflora were also investigated. Microbial community analysis of the SLS showed bacteria from Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Proteus, Nocardia, Mycobacterium, Arthrobacter and Enterobacter genera, and fungi from Trichoderma, Penicillium, Fusarium, Aspergillus, Mucor, Botrytis, and Cladosporium genera.

  6. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton. PMID:20018879

  7. Mycetoma: experience of 482 cases in a single center in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Calderón, Luz; Saúl, Amado; Araiza, Javier; Hernández, Marco; González, Gloria M; Ponce, Rosa María

    2014-08-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease. It is classified into eumycetoma caused by fungi and actinomycetoma due to filamentous actinomycetes. Mycetoma can be found in geographic areas in close proximity to the Tropic of Cancer. Mexico is one of the countries in which this disease is highly endemic. In this retrospective study we report epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic data of mycetoma observed in the General Hospital of Mexico in a 33 year-period (1980 to 2013). A total of 482 cases were included which were clinical and microbiology confirmed. Four hundred and forty four cases (92.11%) were actinomycetomas and 38 cases (7.88%) were eumycetomas. Most patients were agricultural workers; there was a male predominance with a sex ratio of 3:1. The mean age was 34.5 years old (most ranged from 21 to 40 years). The main affected localization was lower and upper limbs (70.74% and 14.52% respectively). Most of the patients came from humid tropical areas (Morelos, Guerrero and Hidalgo were the regions commonly reported). The main clinical presentation was as tumor-like soft tissue swelling with draining sinuses (97.1%). Grains were observed in all the cases. The principal causative agents for actinomycetoma were: Nocardia brasiliensis (78.21%) and Actinomadura madurae (8.7%); meanwhile, for eumycetomas: Madurella mycetomatis and Scedosporium boydii (synonym: Pseudallescheria boydii) were identified. This is a single-center, with long-follow up, cross-sectional study that allows determining the prevalence and characteristics of mycetoma in different regions of Mexico. PMID:25144462

  8. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in an Acid Vapor-Formed Spring in Tengchong Geothermal Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic biogeochemistry has been studied extensively in acid sulfate-chloride hot springs, but not in acid sulfate hot springs with low chloride. In this study, Zhenzhuquan in Tengchong geothermal area, a representative acid sulfate hot spring with low chloride, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.3 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 6-paired parallel water and sediment samples along its outflow channel. Arsenic oxidation occurred in the Zhenxhuquan pool, with distinctly high ratios of arsenate to total dissolved arsenic (0.73–0.86). Coupled with iron and sulfur oxidation along the outflow channel, arsenic accumulated in downstream sediments with concentrations up to 16.44 g/kg and appeared to significantly constrain their microbial community diversity. These oxidations might be correlated with the appearance of some putative functional microbial populations, such as Aquificae and Pseudomonas (arsenic oxidation), Sulfolobus (sulfur and iron oxidation), Metallosphaera and Acidicaldus (iron oxidation). Temperature, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial community structure of upstream and downstream samples. In the upstream outflow channel region, most microbial populations were microaerophilic/anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, such as Sulfolobus, Nocardia, Fervidicoccus, Delftia, and Ralstonia. In the downstream region, aerobic heterotrophic mesophiles and thermophiles were identified, including Ktedonobacteria, Acidicaldus, Chthonomonas and Sphingobacteria. A total of 72.41–95.91% unassigned-genus sequences were derived from the downstream high arsenic sediments 16S rRNA clone libraries. This study could enable us to achieve an integrated understanding on arsenic biogeochemistry in acid hot springs. PMID:26761709

  9. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Amit; Bhattad, Sagar; Singh, Surjit

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is the most common symptomatic phagocytic defect. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding protein subunits of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex. CGD is characterized by a defective intracellular killing of phagocytosed organisms due to a defective oxidative burst in the neutrophils and macrophages. It is inherited in either X-linked recessive or autosomal recessive pattern. Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus species are the most common organisms reported. Infections with Burkholderia, Serratia, and Nocardia warrant a screen for CGD. Suppurative lymphadenitis, cutaneous abscesses, pneumonia and diarrhea constitute the most common problems in children with CGD. A small percentage of children develop autoimmune manifestations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, colitis, autoimmune hepatitis) and warrant immunosuppression. X-linked carriers of CGD are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Nitroblue-tetrazolium dye reduction test and dihydro-rhodamine assay by flow cytometry are the screening tests for this disorder. While most children do well on long term antibiotic and antifungal prophylaxis, those with severe forms warrant hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The role of regular interferon-γ injections is debatable. Evidence for white cell transfusions is sparse, and gene therapy is under trial.This current review highlights various aspects and studies in CGD. X-linked form of CGD has been noted to carry a poorer prognosis compared to autosomal recessive variants. However, recent evidence suggests that outcome in CGD is determined by the amount of residual NADPH oxidase activity irrespective of mode of inheritance. PMID:26865172

  10. Mycetoma: Experience of 482 Cases in a Single Center in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Calderón, Luz; Saúl, Amado; Araiza, Javier; Hernández, Marco; González, Gloria M.; Ponce, Rosa María

    2014-01-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease. It is classified into eumycetoma caused by fungi and actinomycetoma due to filamentous actinomycetes. Mycetoma can be found in geographic areas in close proximity to the Tropic of Cancer. Mexico is one of the countries in which this disease is highly endemic. In this retrospective study we report epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic data of mycetoma observed in the General Hospital of Mexico in a 33 year-period (1980 to 2013). A total of 482 cases were included which were clinical and microbiology confirmed. Four hundred and forty four cases (92.11%) were actinomycetomas and 38 cases (7.88%) were eumycetomas. Most patients were agricultural workers; there was a male predominance with a sex ratio of 3∶1. The mean age was 34.5 years old (most ranged from 21 to 40 years). The main affected localization was lower and upper limbs (70.74% and 14.52% respectively). Most of the patients came from humid tropical areas (Morelos, Guerrero and Hidalgo were the regions commonly reported). The main clinical presentation was as tumor-like soft tissue swelling with draining sinuses (97.1%). Grains were observed in all the cases. The principal causative agents for actinomycetoma were: Nocardia brasiliensis (78.21%) and Actinomadura madurae (8.7%); meanwhile, for eumycetomas: Madurella mycetomatis and Scedosporium boydii (synonym: Pseudallescheria boydii) were identified. This is a single-center, with long-follow up, cross-sectional study that allows determining the prevalence and characteristics of mycetoma in different regions of Mexico. PMID:25144462

  11. Microbial degradation of sulfentrazone in a Brazilian rhodic hapludox soil

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Camila O.; Silva, Celia Maria M. S.; Fay, Elisabeth F.; Abakerli, Rosangela B.; Maia, Aline H. N.; Durrant, Lucia R.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfentrazone is amongst the most widely used herbicides for treating the main crops in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, but few studies are available on the biotransformation of this compound in Brazilian soils. Soil samples of Rhodic Hapludox soil were supplemented with sulfentrazone (0.7 µg active ingredient (a.i.) g-1 soil) and maintained at 27°C. The soil moisture content was corrected to 30, 70 or 100 % water holding capacity (WHC) and maintained constant until the end of the experimental period. Herbicide-free soil samples were used as controls. Another experiment was carried out using soil samples maintained at a constant moisture content of 70% WHC, supplemented or otherwise with the herbicide, and submitted to different temperatures of 15, 30 and 40° C. In both experiments, aliquots were removed after various incubation periods for the quantitative analysis of sulfentrazone residues by gas chromatography. Herbicide-degrading microorganisms were isolated and identified. After 120 days a significant effect on herbicide degradation was observed for the factor of temperature, degradation being higher at 30 and 40° C. A half-life of 91.6 days was estimated at 27° C and 70 % WHC. The soil moisture content did not significantly affect sulfentrazone degradation and the microorganisms identified as potential sulfentrazone degraders were Nocardia brasiliensis and Penicillium sp. The present study enhanced the prospects for future studies on the bio-prospecting for microbial populations related to the degradation of sulfentrazone, and may also contribute to the development of strategies for the bioremediation of sulfentrazone-polluted soils. PMID:24031483

  12. Microbial degradation of sulfentrazone in a Brazilian rhodic hapludox soil.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Camila O; Silva, Celia Maria M S; Fay, Elisabeth F; Abakerli, Rosangela B; Maia, Aline H N; Durrant, Lucia R

    2010-01-01

    Sulfentrazone is amongst the most widely used herbicides for treating the main crops in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, but few studies are available on the biotransformation of this compound in Brazilian soils. Soil samples of Rhodic Hapludox soil were supplemented with sulfentrazone (0.7 µg active ingredient (a.i.) g(-1) soil) and maintained at 27°C. The soil moisture content was corrected to 30, 70 or 100 % water holding capacity (WHC) and maintained constant until the end of the experimental period. Herbicide-free soil samples were used as controls. Another experiment was carried out using soil samples maintained at a constant moisture content of 70% WHC, supplemented or otherwise with the herbicide, and submitted to different temperatures of 15, 30 and 40° C. In both experiments, aliquots were removed after various incubation periods for the quantitative analysis of sulfentrazone residues by gas chromatography. Herbicide-degrading microorganisms were isolated and identified. After 120 days a significant effect on herbicide degradation was observed for the factor of temperature, degradation being higher at 30 and 40° C. A half-life of 91.6 days was estimated at 27° C and 70 % WHC. The soil moisture content did not significantly affect sulfentrazone degradation and the microorganisms identified as potential sulfentrazone degraders were Nocardia brasiliensis and Penicillium sp. The present study enhanced the prospects for future studies on the bio-prospecting for microbial populations related to the degradation of sulfentrazone, and may also contribute to the development of strategies for the bioremediation of sulfentrazone-polluted soils. PMID:24031483

  13. Autochthonous Cases of Mycetoma in Europe: Report of Two Cases and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Buonfrate, Dora; Gobbi, Federico; Angheben, Andrea; Marocco, Stefania; Farina, Claudio; Van Den Ende, Jef; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous infection involving cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues. It is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas, but sporadic cases have been reported also in countries of temperate climate. The purpose of this paper is to review the cases of mycetoma in European subjects (and presumably acquired in Europe), to give an insight in the main factors associated with this condition, and to describe two previously unpublished cases observed at our Centre. Methods and Findings PubMed was systematically searched for case reports and case series of mycetoma in Europeans reported between 1980 and 2014, using specific search strategies. Two further cases diagnosed by the authors are described. Forty-two cases were collected. Eleven cases were caused by Scedosporium apiospermium, mainly in immunosuppressed patients from Bulgaria, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain and the United Kingdom. Excluding all patients with immunosuppression, 29 cases remain. Most of them were reported from Bulgaria and in Albanian patients (all diagnosed outside Albania). In the Bulgarian case series many different micro-organisms, both bacteria and fungi, were isolated, while all the 5 cases from Albania were caused by Actinomadura spp. Other countries reporting cases were Greece, Italy and Turkey. In general, Actinomadura spp is the most frequent causative agent isolated, followed by Nocardia spp and Madurella mycetomatis. The foot was the most reported site involved. Most patients were medically treated, but unfortunately a long-term follow up (at least one year) was available only in a few cases. Conclusions Our review and our own cases suggest that Europeans without travel history can be affected by Madura foot. The lack of a surveillance system is likely to cause an underreporting of cases. Moreover, the unfamiliarity of Western doctors with this peculiar infection may cause a mismanagement, including unnecessary amputations. PMID:24963778

  14. Associated bacterial flora, growth, and toxicity of cultured benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, T R; Ballantine, D L; Tosteson, C G; Hensley, V; Bardales, A T

    1989-01-01

    The growth, toxicity, and associated bacterial flora of 10 clonal cultures of the toxic benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus isolated from the coastal waters of southwest Puerto Rico have been examined. Clonal cultures of O. lenticularis grew more rapidly and at broader temperature ranges than those of G. toxicus. All five Ostreopsis clones were toxic, while only one of the five Gambierdiscus clones was poisonous. The degree of toxicity among poisonous clones was highly variable. The number of associated bacterial genera and their frequency of occurrence were quite variable among clones of both dinoflagellate genera. Bacterial isolates represented six genera (Nocardia, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Flavobacterium, and Moraxella) in addition to coryneform bacteria. Extracts of dinoflagellate-associated bacteria grown in pure culture were not toxic. Gambierdiscus clones were characterized by the frequent presence of Pseudomonas spp. (four of five clones) and the absence of coryneforms. In O. lenticularis, only one of five clones showed the presence of Pseudomonas spp., and Moraxella sp. was absent altogether. Detailed analyses of toxicity and associated microflora in a selected Ostreopsis clone, repeatedly cultivated (four times) over a period of 160 days, showed that peak cell toxicities developed in the late static and early negative culture growth phases. Peak Ostreopsis cell toxicities in the stationary phase of culture growth were correlated with significant increases in the percent total bacteria directly associated with these cells. Changes in the quantity of bacteria directly associated with microalgal cell surfaces and extracellular matrices during culture growth may be related to variability and degree of toxicity in these laboratory-cultured benthic dinoflagellates. PMID:2705766

  15. Functional divergence of HBHA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its evolutionary relationship with TadA from Rhodococcus opacus.

    PubMed

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 are oleaginous bacteria able to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG) in lipid bodies (LB). Highly relevant to the structure of LB is a protein homologous to heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) (called TadA in rhodococci), which is a virulence factor found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HBHA is an adhesin involved in binding to non-phagocytic cells and extrapulmonary dissemination. We observed a conserved synteny of three genes encoding a transcriptional regulator (TR), the HBHA protein and a membrane protein (MP) between TAG-accumulating actinobacteria belonging to Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Nocardia and Dietzia genera, among others. A 354 bp-intergenic spacing containing a SigF-binding site was found between hbha and the TR genes in M. tuberculosis, which was absent in genomes of other investigated actinobacteria. Analyses of available "omic" information revealed that TadA and TR were co-induced in rhodococci under TAG-accumulating conditions; whereas in M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, HBHA and TR were regulated independently under stress conditions occurring during infection. We also found differences in protein lengths, domain content and distribution between HBHA and TadA proteins from mycobacteria and rhodococci, which may explain their different roles in cells. Based on the combination of results obtained in model actinobacteria, we hypothesize that HBHA and TadA proteins originated from a common ancestor, but later suffered a process of functional divergence during evolution. Thus, rhodococcal TadA probably has maintained its original role; whereas HBHA may have evolved as a virulence factor in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:27287527

  16. Abundance and diversity of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in a forest soil co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and metals: a molecular study on alkB homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Unraveling functional genes related to biodegradation of organic compounds has profoundly improved our understanding of biological remediation processes, yet the ecology of such genes is only poorly understood. We used a culture-independent approach to assess the abundance and diversity of bacteria catalyzing the degradation of n-alkanes with a chain length between C(5) and C(16) at a forest site co-contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons and metals for nearly 60 years. The alkB gene coding for a rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase enzyme involved in the initial activation step of aerobic aliphatic hydrocarbon metabolism was used as biomarker. Within the area of study, four different zones were evaluated: one highly contaminated, two intermediately contaminated, and a noncontaminated zone. Contaminant concentrations, hydrocarbon profiles, and soil microbial respiration and biomass were studied. Abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria was quantified via real-time PCR of alkB, whereas genetic diversity was examined using molecular fingerprints (T-RFLP) and clone libraries. Along the contamination plume, hydrocarbon profiles and increased respiration rates suggested on-going natural attenuation at the site. Gene copy numbers of alkB were similar in contaminated and control areas. However, T-RFLP-based fingerprints suggested lower diversity and evenness of the n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the highly contaminated zone compared to the other areas; both diversity and evenness were negatively correlated with metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of alkB denoted a shift of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria in the control zone (most similar to Mycobacterium and Nocardia types) to Gram-negative genotypes in the contaminated zones (Acinetobacter and alkB sequences with little similarity to those of known bacteria). Our results underscore a qualitative rather than a quantitative response of

  17. Synthesis of chiral 2-alkanols from n-alkanes by a P. putida whole-cell biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tieves, Florian; Erenburg, Isabelle N; Mahmoud, Osama; Urlacher, Vlada B

    2016-09-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP154A8 from Nocardia farcinica was previously found to catalyze hydroxylation of linear alkanes (C7 -C9 ) with a high regio- and stereoselectivity. The objective of this study was to integrate CYP154A8 along with suitable redox partners into a whole-cell system for the production of chiral 2-alkanols starting from alkanes. Both recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida whole-cell biocatalysts tested for this purpose showed the ability to produce chiral alkanols, but a solvent tolerant P. putida strain demonstrated several advantages in the applied biphasic reaction system. The optimized P. putida whole-cell system produced ∼16 mM (S)-2-octanol with 87% ee from octane, which is more than sevenfold higher than the previously described system with isolated enzymes. The achieved enantiopurity of the product could further be increased up to 99% ee by adding an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) to the alkane-oxidizing P. putida whole-cell systems. By using this setup for the individual conversions of heptane, octane or nonane, 2.6 mM (S)-2-heptanol with 91% ee, 5.4 mM (S)-2-octanol with 97% ee, or 5.5 mM (S)-2-nonanol with 97% ee were produced, respectively. The achieved concentrations of chiral 2-alkanols are the highest reported for a P450-based whole-cell system so far. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1845-1852. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887569

  18. Performance Assessment of New Multiplex Probe Assay for Identification of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Nanetti, Anna; Piersimoni, Claudio; Cichero, Paola; Farina, Claudio; Mucignat, Giorgio; Scarparo, Claudio; Bartolini, Laura; Valentini, Roberta; Nista, Domenico; Gesu, Giampietro; Tosi, Cristiana Passerini; Crovatto, Marina; Brusarosco, Giuliana

    2001-01-01

    A new DNA probe assay (INNO LiPA Mycobacteria; Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium) for the simultaneous identification, by means of reverse hybridization and line-probe technology, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium kansasii, Mycobacterium xenopi, Mycobacterium gordonae, the species of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium chelonae was evaluated on a panel of 238 strains including, besides representatives of all the taxa identifiable by the system, a number of other mycobacteria, some of which are known to be problematic with the only other commercial DNA probe system (AccuProbe; Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.), and two nocardiae. The new kit, which includes a control probe reacting with the whole genus Mycobacterium, correctly identified 99.6% of the strains tested; the one discrepancy, which remained unresolved, concerned an isolate identified as MAC intermediate by INNO LiPA Mycobacteria and as Mycobacterium intracellulare by AccuProbe. In five cases, because of an imperfect checking of hybridization temperature, a very slight, nonspecific, line was visible which was no longer evident when the test was repeated. Two strains whose DNA failed amplification at the first attempt were regularly identified when the test was repeated. Interestingly, the novel kit dodged all the pitfalls presented by the strains giving anomalous reactions with AccuProbe. A unique feature of INNO LiPA Mycobacteria is its ability to recognize different subgroups within the species M. kansasii and M. chelonae, while the declared overlapping reactivity of probe 4 with some M. kansasii and Mycobacterium gastri organisms and of probe 9 with MAC, Mycobacterium haemophilum, and Mycobacterium malmoense, may furnish a useful aid for their identification. The turnaround time of the method is approximately 6 h, including a preliminary PCR amplification. PMID:11230430

  19. Rational approaches to improving the isolation of endophytic actinobacteria from Australian native trees.

    PubMed

    Kaewkla, Onuma; Franco, Christopher M M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, new actinobacterial species have been isolated as endophytes of plants and shrubs and are sought after both for their role as potential producers of new drug candidates for the pharmaceutical industry and as biocontrol inoculants for sustainable agriculture. Molecular-based approaches to the study of microbial ecology generally reveal a broader microbial diversity than can be obtained by cultivation methods. This study aimed to improve the success of isolating individual members of the actinobacterial population as pure cultures as well as improving the ability to characterise the large numbers obtained in pure culture. To achieve this objective, our study successfully employed rational and holistic approaches including the use of isolation media with low concentrations of nutrients normally available to the microorganism in the plant, plating larger quantities of plant sample, incubating isolation plates for up to 16 weeks, excising colonies when they are visible and choosing Australian endemic trees as the source of the actinobacteria. A hierarchy of polyphasic methods based on culture morphology, amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis and limited sequencing was used to classify all 576 actinobacterial isolates from leaf, stem and root samples of two eucalypts: a Grey Box and Red Gum, a native apricot tree and a native pine tree. The classification revealed that, in addition to 413 Streptomyces spp., isolates belonged to 16 other actinobacterial genera: Actinomadura (two strains), Actinomycetospora (six), Actinopolymorpha (two), Amycolatopsis (six), Gordonia (one), Kribbella (25), Micromonospora (six), Nocardia (ten), Nocardioides (11), Nocardiopsis (one), Nonomuraea (one), Polymorphospora (two), Promicromonospora (51), Pseudonocardia (36), Williamsia (two) and a novel genus Flindersiella (one). In order to prove novelty, 12 strains were characterised fully to the species level based on polyphasic taxonomy. One strain represented a novel

  20. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-01-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  1. Screening of actinomycetes from earthworm castings for their antimicrobial activity and industrial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Bharti, Alpana; Negi, Yogesh Kumar; Gusain, Omprakash; Pandey, Piyush; Bisht, Gajraj Singh

    2012-01-01

    Actinomycetes from earthworm castings were isolated and screened for their antimicrobial activity and industrial enzymes. A total of 48 isolates were obtained from 12 samples of earthworm castings. Highest numbers of isolates were recovered from forest site (58.33 %) as compared to grassland (25%) and agricultural land (16.66%). The growth patterns, mycelial coloration of abundance actinomycetes were documented. The dominant genera Identified by cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics were Streptomyces (60.41%) followed by Streptosporangium (10.41%),Saccharopolyspora (6.25%) and Nocardia (6.25%). Besides these, other genera like Micromonospora, Actinomadura, Microbispora, Planobispora and Nocardiopsis were also recovered but in low frequency. Among the 48 isolates, 52.08% were found active against one or more test organisms. Out of 25 active isolates 16% showed activity against bacterial, human fungal as well as phytopathogens. Among 48 isolates 38, 32, 21, 20, 16 and 14 produced enzyme amylase, caseinase, cellulase, gelatinase, xylanase and lipase respectively while 10 isolates produced all the enzymes. More interestingly 2, 3, and 1 isolates produced amylase, xylanase and lipase at 45°C respectively. In the view of its antimicrobial activity as well as enzyme production capability the genus Streptomyces was dominant. The isolate EWC 7(2) was most promising on the basis of its interesting antimicrobial activity and was identified as Streptomyces rochei. The results of these findings have increased the scope of finding industrially important actinomycetes from earthworm castings and these organisms could be promising sources for industrially important molecules or enzymes. PMID:24031819

  2. [Primary pyomyositis. Review of 32 cases diagnosed by ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Nora; Gancedo, Elisa; Sawicki, Mirna; Costa, Nora; Di Rocco, Rosalinda

    2016-01-01

    Primary pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of striated muscle which is acquired by hematogenous route. It is related to risk factors such as HIV/aids and other immuno suppressing diseases, and can be associated with local muscle stress factors. The most frequent etiology is Staphylococcus aureus. Its diagnostic delay may cause a fatal evolution. In this series 32 patients with primary pyomyositis diagnosed by ultrasound were evaluated. The most frequent risk factor was HIV/aids (61%). Local factors were detected in 21 (66%) cases: first, the practice of football. The monofocal form was observed in 19 (59%), the most commonly affected muscles were quadriceps, calves and psoas. Samples for bacteriological study were obtained in 30 cases, 22 blood culture and 27 abscess materials. In 30 cases the etiologic agent was isolated. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 83.3% (25 cases) and Escherichia coli, Nocardia spp., Streptococcus agalactiae, nontuberculous mycobacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated in one case each. Seventeen patients received surgical treatment, aspirative punctures, 9; antibiotics alone, 4. Twenty eight (93.3%) patients had a good evolution; deaths, 2 (6.6%); unknown, 2. Main conclusions of this study were: due to the diverse and changing etiology of the primary pyomyositis it is important to recognize the etiological agent involved and their antibiotic susceptibility. The ultrasound performed the study in real time so it can be used to guide the puncture and to facilitate the immediate diagnosis. This makes the difference with other techniques and transforms it into a first-line method for the study of this disease. PMID:26826987

  3. Actinobacteria from Arid and Desert Habitats: Diversity and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Wink, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The lack of new antibiotics in the pharmaceutical pipeline guides more and more researchers to leave the classical isolation procedures and to look in special niches and ecosystems. Bioprospecting of extremophilic Actinobacteria through mining untapped strains and avoiding resiolation of known biomolecules is among the most promising strategies for this purpose. With this approach, members of acidtolerant, alkalitolerant, psychrotolerant, thermotolerant, halotolerant and xerotolerant Actinobacteria have been obtained from respective habitats. Among these, little survey exists on the diversity of Actinobacteria in arid areas, which are often adapted to relatively high temperatures, salt concentrations, and radiation. Therefore, arid and desert habitats are special ecosystems which can be recruited for the isolation of uncommon Actinobacteria with new metabolic capability. At the time of this writing, members of Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, Cellulomonas, Amycolatopsis, Geodermatophilus, Lechevalieria, Nocardia, and Actinomadura are reported from arid habitats. However, metagenomic data present dominant members of the communities in desiccating condition of areas with limited water availability that are not yet isolated. Furthermore, significant diverse types of polyketide synthase (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes are detected in xerophilic and xerotolerant Actinobacteria and some bioactive compounds are reported from them. Rather than pharmaceutically active metabolites, molecules with protection activity against drying such as Ectoin and Hydroxyectoin with potential application in industry and agriculture have also been identified from xerophilic Actinobacteria. In addition, numerous biologically active small molecules are expected to be discovered from arid adapted Actinobacteria in the future. In the current survey, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria obtained from arid ecosystems

  4. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  5. Quantification of Gordona amarae strains in foaming activated sludge and anaerobic digester systems with oligonucleotide hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, M F; de los Reyes, F L; Hernandez, M; Raskin, L

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  6. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-03-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  7. Influence of Environmental Factors on Antagonism of Fungi by Bacteria in Soil: Clay Minerals and pH

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, William D.; Stotzky, G.

    1979-01-01

    The soil replica plating technique was used to evaluate the influence of clay minerals and pH on antagonistic interactions between fungi and bacteria in soil. In general, the antagonistic activity of bacteria towards filamentous fungi was greater in soil than on agar. The spread of Aspergillus niger through soil was inhibited by Serratia marcescens when the organisms were inoculated into separate sites in soil, and this antagonistic effect was maintained when the soil was amended with 3, 6, 9, or 12% (vol/vol) montmorillonite, whereas the addition of kaolinite at a concentration of 3% reduced the antagonism and at 6, 9, or 12% totally eliminated it. Similar results were obtained with the inhibition of A. niger by Agrobacterium radiobacter and of Penicillium vermiculatum by either S. marcescens or Nocardia paraffinae. When A. niger and S. marcescens were inoculated into the same soil site, A. niger was inhibited in all soils, regardless of clay content, although the extent of inhibition was greater as the concentration of montmorillonite, but not of kaolinite, increased. A. niger was inhibited more when inoculated as spores than as mycelial fragments and when inoculated 96 h after S. marcescens, but a 1% glucose solution reduced the amount of inhibition when the fungus was inoculated 96 h after the bacterium. When the pH of the soil-clay mixtures was altered, the amount of antagonism usually increased as the pH increased. Antagonism appeared to be related to the cation-exchange capacity and the pH of the soil-clay mixtures. Bacillus cereus and another species of Bacillus showed no activity in soil towards A. niger under any of the environmental conditions tested, even though the Bacillus sp. significantly inhibited A. niger and seven other fungi on agar. PMID:16345477

  8. A general classification of silicon utilizing organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.; Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon utilizing organisms may be defined as organisms with high silicon content (≥ 1% dry weight) and they can metabolize silicon with or without demonstrable silicon transporter genes (SIT) in them(Das,2010). Silicon is the second most abundant element in the lithosphere (27.70%) and it is as important as phosphorus and magnesium (0.03%) in the biota. Hydrated silica represents the second most abundant biogenic mineral after carbonate minerals. Silicon is accumulated and metabolized by some prokaryotes, and Si compounds can stimulate the growth of a range of fungi. It is well known that Si is essential for diatoms. In mammals, Si is considered an essential trace element, required in bone, cartilage and connective tissue formation, enzymatic activities and other metabolic processes. Silicon was suggested to act as a phosphoprotein effector in bone. In mammals, Si is also reported to positively influence the immune system and to be required for lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous chemistry of Si is dominated by silicic acid at biological pH ranges. Monosilicic acid can form stable complexes with organic hydroxy-containing molecules . Biosilica also has been identified associated with various biomolecules including proteins and carbohydrates. There are main seven groups of silicon utilizing organisms belonging to Gram positive bacteria, algae, protozoa, sponges, fungi, lichens, and monocotyledon plants. In each group again all the members are not silicon utilizing organisms, thus selective members in each group are further classified depending their degree of silicon utilization. Important silicon utilizing bacteria are Mycobacteria, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus spp. etc., Important silicon utilizing algae are Centrobacillariophyceae, Pennatibacillariophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Many protozoa belonging to Heterokonta, Choanoflagellida, Actinopoda are well known silicon utilizing microorganisms. Hexactinellida ( glass sponges

  9. Identification and functional characterization of multiple interleukin 12 in amberjack (Seriola dumerili).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Hayashi, Kazuma; Suetake, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Araki, Kyosuke

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL) -12 is a heterodimeric cytokine mainly produced by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells in mammals. IL-12p70 composed of IL-12p35 and IL-12p40, is known to play a crucial role in promoting cell-mediated immunity (CMI) through Th1 differentiation and IFN-γ production. Although two types of IL-12p35 (p35a, p35b) and three types of IL-12p40 (p40a, p40b and p40c) have been identified in several fish species, the knowledge on functional characteristics of teleost IL-12 is still limited. In the present study, we cloned two types of IL-12p35 and three types of IL-12p40 genes in amberjack and yellowtail, and analyzed their expressions in response to stimulation with Nocardia seriolae in amberjack. As a result, four types of IL-12 (IL-12p35a, p35b, p40a and p40b) and IFN-γ mRNA were increased by live-N. seriolae stimulation but not by formalin-killed N. seriolae, suggesting that four types of IL-12 (p35, p35b, p40a and p40c) participate in promoting CMI. Subsequently, we produced six types of recombinant IL-12p70 (rIL12p70) protein in insect cells. Head kidney leukocytes were cultured with formalin-killed N. seriolae and six types of rIL-12p70 to elucidate the role of amberjack IL-12p70 in induction of CMI. After stimulation, IFN-γ expression was elevated whereas IL-10 expression was suppressed in Head kidney leukocytes stimulated with four types of rIL-12 (p40a/p35a, p40c/p35a, p40a/p35b, p40a/p35b). On the other hand, two types of rIL-12 (p40b/p35a, p40b/p35b) only elicited down regulation of IL-10 expression. These results indicate that all amberjack IL-12p70 isoforms are involved in Th1 -differentiation and promotion of CMI with different manners. Fish IL-12 has a potential for the promising vaccine adjuvant. PMID:27238429

  10. Clinical spectrum and outcome of pulmonary nocardiosis: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akashdeep; Chhina, Deepinder; Soni, RK; Kakkar, Chandan; Sidhu, US

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary nocardiosis is a rare but a life-threatening infection caused by Nocardia spp. The diagnosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus higher mortality. Aim: In this study, we aim to evaluate the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis. Methods: A retrospective, 5-year (2009–2014) review of demographic profile, risk factors, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Results: The median age of the study subjects was 54 years (range, 16–76) and majority of them (75%) were males. The risk factors for pulmonary nocardiosis identified in our study were long-term steroid use (55.6%), chronic lung disease (52.8%), diabetes (27.8%), and solid-organ transplantation (22.2%). All the patients were symptomatic, and the most common symptoms were cough (91.7%), fever (78%), and expectoration (72%). Almost two-third of the patients were initially misdiagnosed and the alternative diagnosis included pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 7), community-acquired pneumonia (n = 5), lung abscess (n = 4), invasive fungal infection (n = 3), lung cancer (n = 2), and Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 2). The most common radiographic features were consolidation (77.8%) and nodules (56%). The mortality rate for indoor patients was 33% despite treatment. Higher mortality rate was observed among those who had brain abscess (100.0%), HIV positivity (100%), need for mechanical ventilation (87.5%), solid-organ transplantation (50%), and elderly (age > 60 years) patients (43%). Conclusion: The diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus high mortality. A lower threshold for diagnosing pulmonary nocardiosis needs to be exercised, in chest symptomatic patients with underlying chronic lung diseases or systemic immunosuppression, for the early diagnosis

  11. Organic Synthesis and Potential Microbiology in the Solar Nebula: Are Early Solar Systems Nurseries for Microorganisms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Ibrahim, Y.; El-Shall, M. S.

    2004-11-01

    We observed a new synthetic mechanism that can contribute organics toward the origins of life in the solar nebula. We also observed that microorganisms can grow on carbonaceous asteroid/meteorite materials, suggesting that micoorganisms can multiply in aqueous asteroids in the early Solar System. The new synthetic mechanism is provided by ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cold nebular and interstellar cloud environments, through associative charge transfer (ACT) and associative proton transfer (APT) reactions. For example, ionized benzene (C6H6+) reacts with two CH3CH=CH2 molecules to form C6H12+ that initiates ionic polymerization. Other unsaturated molecules (HCCH, H2CO, HCN, CH3CN) can yield complex organics by this mechanism. The C6H6+ ion also reacts with water molecules to form (H2O)nH+ nucleation centers for ices, in which UV-induced organic synthesis can occur. The organics in the nebula can contribute to the origins of life and support microorganisms. For example, we observed that microorganisms such as Nocardia asteroides, algae, fungi, and even plant cultures (Asparagus officinalis) grow in planetary microcosms based on carbonaceous chondrite, as well as Martian, meteorites. We found high microbial populations (10exp7 CFU/ml) and complex microbial communities in these planetary microcosms. Thermophilic archaebacteria also grew on these materials. The results suggest that early aqueous asteroids can support microorganisms, distribute them through the solar nebula by collisions, deliver them to planets, and possibly eject them to interstellar space. Such natural panspermia processes, or directed panspermia payloads, may seed other young solar systems where microbial life can multiply by similar mechanisms. We thank NASA Grant NNG04GH45G for funding support. References: 1. M. N. Mautner, Planetary Bioresources and Astroecology...., Icarus 2002, 158, 72-86; see www.astroecology.com. 2. M. Mautner and G. L. Matloff, Directed Panspermia...., Bull

  12. Microbial Succession during a Field Evaluation of Phenol and Toluene as the Primary Substrates for Trichloroethene Cometabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fries, M. R.; Hopkins, G. D.; Mccarty, P. L.; Forney, L. J.; Tiedje, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Microbial community composition and succession were studied in an aquifer that was amended with phenol, toluene, and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons to evaluate the effectiveness of these aromatic substrates for stimulating trichloroethene (TCE) bioremediation. Samples were taken after the previous year's field studies, which used phenol as the primary substrate, and after three successive monthly treatments of phenol plus 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) plus TCE, phenol plus TCE, and toluene plus TCE. Dominant eubacteria in the community were assessed after each of the four treatments by characterizing isolates from the most dilute most-probable-number tubes and by extracting DNA from aquifer samples. The succession of dominant phenol- and toluene-degrading strains was evaluated by genomic fingerprinting, cellular fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). 1,1-DCE was found to drastically reduce microbial growth and species richness, which corresponded to the reduction in bioremediation effectiveness noted previously for this treatment (G. D. Hopkins and P. L. McCarty, Environ. Sci. Technol. 29:1628-1637, 1995). Only a few gram-positive isolates could be obtained after treatment with 1,1-DCE, and these were not seen after any other treatments. Microbial densities returned to their original levels following the subsequent phenol-TCE treatment, but the original species richness was not restored until after the subsequent toluene-TCE treatment. Genomic fingerprinting and FAME analysis indicated that six of the seven originally dominant microbial groups were still dominant after the last treatment, indicating that the community is quite resilient to toxic disturbance by 1,1-DCE. FAME analysis indicated that six microbial taxa were dominant: three members of the (beta) subclass of the class Proteobacteria (Comamonas-Variovorax, Azoarcus, and Burkholderia) and three gram-positive groups (Bacillus, Nocardia, and an

  13. Identification of Polybacterial Communities in Patients with Postoperative, Posttraumatic, and Endogenous Endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA Gene Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Jayasudha, Rajagopalaboopathi; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Manikandan, Palanisamy

    2014-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is a potential vision-threatening complication following surgical procedures (postoperative endophthalmitis [POE]), trauma (posttraumatic endophthalmitis [PTE]), and bacteremic seeding of the eye from a distant infection site (endogenous endophthalmitis [EE]). Several studies have revealed the polybacterial characteristics of endophthalmitis, which make the administration of antibiotics to treat the disease challenging. However, until now, the polybacterial communities of POE, PTE, and EE have not been precisely studied. Hence, the present study was designed to identify the bacterial community of endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries. Of the 40 intraocular samples tested, 30 libraries were constructed with bacterial nested-PCR-positive samples. The obtained recombinant clones were screened through amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) to identify unique clones. The multiple types of ARDRA patterns (P = 0.345) and diverse bacterial sequences (P = 0.277) within the libraries revealed the polybacterial nature of infection in POE, PTE, and EE. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on polybacterial infection in EE. Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus spp. (n = 19), Streptococcus spp. (n = 18), Staphylococcus spp. (n = 6), Exiguobacterium spp. (n = 3), Gemella spp. (n = 2), Enterococcus spp. (n = 2), a Lysinibacillus sp. (n = 1), a Clostridium sp. (n = 1), and a Nocardia sp. (n = 1), and Gram-negative bacteria, including Serratia spp. (n = 18), Pseudomonas spp. (n = 10), Enterobacter spp. (n = 8), Acinetobacter spp. (n = 3), Pantoea spp. (n = 3), a Haemophilus sp. (n = 1), and a Massilia sp. (n = 1), were identified. Interestingly, among them, 10 bacterial species were not previously reported to be associated with endophthalmitis or other ocular infections. Besides, the presence of 4 unidentifiable clones suggests the possibility of novel organisms that might cause eye infections. Therefore, it is

  14. 005. History of the recently established bronchoscopy unit of the pulmonology clinic of lamia’s general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Emmanouil; Gkika, Dimitrs; Kolovos, Dimitrios; Giannakou, Georgia; Pathiaki, Eirini; Mavromati, Evagelia; Divani, Smaroula; Vardouli, Anna; Tsiligrou, Vaina; Karkanis, Konstantinos; Angel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    two samples with Pseudomonas A., two with Klebsiella sp., one with Acinetobacter Β., two with Αspergillus F., two with Nocardia A., and one with Haemophilus Infl. Conclusions The Broncoscopy Unit of General Hospital of Lamia attempts to help (in the basis of science and documented literature) patients of central Greece at the increasing need for endoscopic intervention and diagnosis of diseases of respiratory system, in paths of modern, interventional pulmonology.

  15. Evaluation of neurologic complications by brain MRI in kidney and liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Agildere, A M; Başaran, C; Cakir, B; Ozgül, E; Kural, F; Haberal, M

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients who developed neurologic complications after liver and kidney transplantation. The results in 216 organ transplant recipients, who had brain MRI were evaluated retrospectively. We performed 187 brain MRI on kidney recipients and 29 liver recipients. Neuroradiologic findings were classified in three groups: group 1 findings were related to transplantation; group 2 findings, to chronic parenchymal disease; and group 3 to neither transplantation nor chronic parenchymal disease. In group 1, six patients (20.6%) after liver and three (1.6%) after kidney transplantation had posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome; two patients (1.1%) after renal and one (3.4%) after liver transplantation had tuberculosis granulomas; one patient (0.5%) after renal transplantation had osmotic demyelination syndrome; one patient (0.5%) had a Nocardia abcess and one (0.5%) focal cerebritis after renal transplantation. Among group 2, 38 patients (20.3%) had brain atrophy; 37 (20%), white matter changes; 3 (1.6%), sinus thrombosis; 8 (4.3%), lacunar infarct; 1 (0.5%), had renal osteodystrophy in the cranial bones; and 4 (2.2%), had intracranial hemorrhage secondary to end-stage renal disease. Brain atrophy in nine patients (31%), hyperintensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR images owing to manganese deposits in nine patients (31%), hyperintensity in basal ganglia on T2-weighted MR images owing to copper depositions in one patient (3.4%) were seen secondary to chronic liver disease. In group 3, three patients (1.6%) had intracranial lipomas; one (0.5%), mesial temporal sclerosis; and one (0.5%), an anterior cerebral artery aneurysm in renal transplant patients. Periventricular and subcortical white matter hyperintensities were observed on T2-weighted MR images in six liver transplant patients (20.7%). Neurologic complications after organ transplantation may be

  16. Identification of actinomycetes from plant rhizospheric soils with inhibitory activity against Colletotrichum spp., the causative agent of anthracnose disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colletotrichum is one of the most widespread and important genus of plant pathogenic fungi worldwide. Various species of Colletotrichum are the causative agents of anthracnose disease in plants, which is a severe problem to agricultural crops particularly in Thailand. These phytopathogens are usually controlled using chemicals; however, the use of these agents can lead to environmental pollution. Potential non-chemical control strategies for anthracnose disease include the use of bacteria capable of producing anti-fungal compounds such as actinomycetes spp., that comprise a large group of filamentous, Gram positive bacteria from soil. The aim of this study was to isolate actinomycetes capable of inhibiting the growth of Colletotrichum spp, and to analyze the diversity of actinomycetes from plant rhizospheric soil. Results A total of 304 actinomycetes were isolated and tested for their inhibitory activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides strains DoA d0762 and DoA c1060 and Colletotrichum capsici strain DoA c1511 which cause anthracnose disease as well as the non-pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain IFO 10217. Most isolates (222 out of 304, 73.0%) were active against at least one indicator fungus or yeast. Fifty four (17.8%) were active against three anthracnose fungi and 17 (5.6%) could inhibit the growth of all three fungi and S. cerevisiae used in the test. Detailed analysis on 30 selected isolates from an orchard at Chanthaburi using the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that most of the isolates (87%) belong to the genus Streptomyces sp., while one each belongs to Saccharopolyspora (strain SB-2) and Nocardiopsis (strain CM-2) and two to Nocardia (strains BP-3 and LK-1). Strains LC-1, LC-4, JF-1, SC-1 and MG-1 exerted high inhibitory activity against all three anthracnose fungi and yeast. In addition, the organic solvent extracts prepared from these five strains inhibited conidial growth of the three indicator fungi

  17. A novel type of N-acetylglutamate synthase is involved in the first step of arginine biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    amongst others the genera Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, and Nocardia. Therefore, the name C-NAGS (Corynebacterineae-type NAGS) is proposed for this new family. PMID:24138314

  18. Mycobacterial infection in Northern snakehead (Channa argus) from the Potomac River catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Henderson, A.P.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Odenkirk, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    The Northern snakehead, Channa argus (Cantor), is a non-native predatory fish that has become established regionally in some temperate freshwater habitats within the United States. Over the past decade, Northern snakehead populations have developed within aquatic ecosystems throughout the eastern USA, including the Potomac River system within Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. Since this species was initially observed in this region in 2002, the population has expanded considerably (Odenkirk & Owens 2007). In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, populations of Northern snakehead exist in the lower Potomac River and Rappahannock Rivers on the Western shore of the Bay, and these fish have also been found in middle or upper reaches of river systems on the Eastern shore of the Bay, including the Nanticoke and Wicomico Rivers among others. Over the past several years, many aspects of Northern snakehead life history in the Potomac River have been described, including range and dispersal patterns, microhabitat selection and diet (Lapointe, Thorson & Angermeier 2010; Saylor, Lapointe & Angermeier 2012; Lapointe, Odenkirk & Angermeier 2013). However, comparatively little is known about their health status including susceptibility to parasitism and disease and their capacity to serve as reservoirs of disease for native wildlife. Although considered hardy by fisheries biologists, snakehead fish have demonstrated susceptibility to a number of described piscine diseases within their native range and habitat in Asia. Reported pathogens of significance in snakehead species in Asia include snakehead rhabdovirus (Lio-Po et al. 2000), aeromonad bacteria (Zheng, Cao & Yang 2012), Nocardia (Wang et al. 2007) andMycobacterium spp. (Chinabut, Limsuwan & Chantatchakool 1990; ). Mycobacterial isolates recovered from another snakehead species (Channa striata) in the previous studies have included M. marinum and M. fortuitum, as identified through molecular

  19. Assessment of the Microbial Constituents of the Home Environment of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and Their Association with Lower Airways Infections

    PubMed Central

    Heirali, Alya; McKeon, Suzanne; Purighalla, Swathi; Storey, Douglas G.; Rossi, Laura; Costilhes, Geoffrey; Drews, Steven J.; Rabin, Harvey R.; Surette, Michael G.; Parkins, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways are colonized by a polymicrobial community of organisms, termed the CF microbiota. We sought to define the microbial constituents of the home environment of individuals with CF and determine if it may serve as a latent reservoir for infection. Methods Six patients with newly identified CF pathogens were included. An investigator collected repeat sputum and multiple environmental samples from their homes. Bacteria were cultured under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Morphologically distinct colonies were selected, purified and identified to the genus and species level through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. When concordant organisms were identified in sputum and environment, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine relatedness. Culture-independent bacterial profiling of each sample was carried out by Illumina sequencing of the V3 region of the 16s RNA gene. Results New respiratory pathogens prompting investigation included: Mycobacterium abscessus(2), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(3), Pseudomonas fluorescens(1), Nocardia spp.(1), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans(1). A median 25 organisms/patient were cultured from sputum. A median 125 organisms/home were cultured from environmental sites. Several organisms commonly found in the CF lung microbiome were identified within the home environments of these patients. Concordant species included members of the following genera: Brevibacterium(1), Microbacterium(1), Staphylococcus(3), Stenotrophomonas(2), Streptococcus(2), Sphingomonas(1), and Pseudomonas(4). PFGE confirmed related strains (one episode each of Sphinogomonas and P. aeruginosa) from the environment and airways were identified in two patients. Culture-independent assessment confirmed that many organisms were not identified using culture-dependent techniques. Conclusions Members of the CF microbiota can be found as constituents of the home environment in individuals with

  20. Terrestrial research in Mars analogue environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, G.

    Fatty acids (FA) content was measured by GC-MS SIM technique in Sulfide ores of present day (Mid-Atlantic Ridge and others) and ancient (Ural Paleocene, Russia) black smokers; Early Proterozoic kerites of Volyn; Siberian, Canadian and Antarctic permafrosts and also in rocks of East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement. Analysis was shown presence those and only those fatty acids which are specific to microorganisms. FA with 12 up 19 of carbon atoms are thought to be a bacterial biomass sign. 3-Hydroxy fatty acids also found in samples and are strong specific markers of gram-negative bacteria. Cultivation yield living bacteria in some cases. The East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement rocks opened by Vorotilov Deep Well (VDW) drilled through Puchezh-Katunski impact structure were studied within depths 2575 - 2805 m. 34 microbial lipid markers were detected by GC-MS and 22 species were identified. Bacteria of g. Bacillus reached 6,8 % in subsurface communities. However, members of gg. Clostridium (37,1 - 33,2 %) and Rhodococcus (27,6 - 33,7 %) were absolute dominants within studied depth interval. Some lipid patterns of kerite samples could be assessed to definite genera or, in special cases, to species of contemporary microorganisms. For instance, 2-hydroxylauric acid is specific to Pseudomonas putida group or Acinetobacter spp., and hydroxymyristic together with hydroxypalmitic are specific to P.cepacea and cyanobacteria. 3-hydroxystearic acid was known as component of Acetobacter diazothrophycus and Gloebacter violaceous cyanobacterium. 10-hydroxystearic acid associated with Nocardia spp., which oxidizes oleic acid in organic substrates. 10-methylhexadecanoic (10Me16) acid together with 10Me14, 10Me15 and 10Me17 analogues are markers of actinomycetes. Significant part of Black Smokers organic matter is probably biogenic. Fatty acid features strongly assigns it to bacterial, microeucariotic and planta cells. Par example 3-hydroxy acids are

  1. Selective steroid oxyfunctionalisation by CYP154C5, a bacterial cytochrome P450

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases – able to regio- and stereoselectively hydroxylate non-activated carbon atoms – are important enzymes for the synthesis of valuable intermediates in the production of steroid hormones in the pharmaceutical industry. However, up to now only a few bacterial enzymes able to hydroxylate steroids have been reported. CYP154C5 from Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152, a bacterial P450 monooxygenase, was previously shown to convert testosterone to 16α-hydroxytestosterone. Since the hydroxylation at 16α-position is of special interest for the pharmaceutical industry, we have studied this enzyme in more detail to investigate its activity and selectivity in bioconversions of further steroids. Results CYP154C5 was coexpressed in Escherichia coli together with putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida as redox partners for electron transfer and applied in bioconversions of various pregnanes and androstanes [pregnenolone (1), dehydroepiandrosterone (2), progesterone (3), androstenedione (4), testosterone (5) and nandrolone (6)]. Structure elucidation of the formed products revealed an exclusive regio- and stereoselectivity of CYP154C5, always yielding the corresponding 16α-hydroxylated steroids. Application of whole cells expressing the three components, P450, Pdx and PdR, in steroid biotransformations resulted in significantly higher conversions and total turnover numbers (TTN) compared to reactions using cell-free extracts. Additionally, considerably higher substrate loads (up to 15 mM) were tolerated by the whole-cell system. Furthermore, turnover numbers (TON) were determined for the six different steroids using whole cells. Thus, testosterone was found to be the worst substrate with a TON of only 0.8 μmol substrate consumed min-1 μmol-1 CYP154C5, while progesterone and pregnenolone were converted the fastest resulting in TON of 3.3 μmol substrate consumed min-1 μmol-1 CYP154C5. Conclusion CYP154C5

  2. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  3. Heterologous Expression and Characterization of Two 1-Hydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid Dioxygenases from Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans

    PubMed Central

    Kavakiotis, Konstantinos; Kallimanis, Aristeidis; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Drainas, Constantin; Koukkou, Anna-Irini

    2012-01-01

    A protein fraction exhibiting 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1-H2NA) dioxygenase activity was purified via ion exchange, hydrophobic interactions, and gel filtration chromatography from Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans sp. nov. strain Sphe3 isolated from a Greek creosote-oil-polluted site. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and tandem MS (MS-MS) analysis revealed that the amino acid sequences of oligopeptides of the major 45-kDa protein species, as analyzed by SDS-PAGE and silver staining, comprising 29% of the whole sequence, exhibited strong homology with 1-H2NA dioxygenase of Nocardioides sp. strain KP7. A BLAST search of the recently sequenced Sphe3 genome revealed two putative open reading frames, named diox1 and diox2, showing 90% nucleotide identity to each other and 85% identity at the amino acid level with the Nocardia sp. homologue. diox1 was found on an indigenous Sphe3 plasmid, whereas diox2 was located on the chromosome. Both genes were induced by the presence of phenanthrene used as a sole carbon and energy source, and as expected, both were subject to carbon catabolite repression. The relative RNA transcription level of the chromosomal (diox2) gene was significantly higher than that of its plasmid (diox1) homologue. Both diox1 and diox2 putative genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant E. coli cells expressed 1-H2NA dioxygenase activity. Recombinant enzymes exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an apparent Km of 35 μM for Diox1 and 29 μM for Diox2, whereas they showed similar kinetic turnover characteristics with Kcat/Km values of 11 × 106 M−1 s−1 and 12 × 106 M−1 s−1, respectively. Occurrence of two diox1 and diox2 homologues in the Sphe3 genome implies that a replicative transposition event has contributed to the evolution of 1-H2NA dioxygenase in A. phenanthrenivorans. PMID:22101055

  4. Clinical Analysis of Pulmonary Nocardiosis in Patients With Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Song, Xin yu; Zhao, Yu yue; Xu, Kai; Bi, Ya Lan; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuo jun

    2015-09-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection that most commonly involves the lung; however, only a few case reports of autoimmune disease complicated by pulmonary nocardiosis exist in the literature. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 24 cases of both autoimmune disease and pulmonary nocardiosis at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital between 1990 and 2012. Fifty-two cases were hospitalized with nocardiosis, 24 of whom had at least 1 autoimmune disease before the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis. The cohort patients consisted of 5 men and 19 women, with a mean age of 44.2 years. All were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. All but 1 patient had received immunosuppressants, including corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, methotrexate, or hydroxychloroquine. Fever (87.5%), cough (83.3%), and sputum (79.2%) were the most common clinical manifestations. Ten cases were accompanied by subcutaneous nodules and/or cutaneous abscesses, and 4 had brain abscess. Half of them were lymphocytopenic. Thirteen of the 16 cases who underwent lymphocyte subtype analysis had decreased CD4+ T-cell counts. Nineteen cases had decreased serum albumin levels. Nocardia was isolated from sputum (13/24), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (4/6), lung tissue (5/6), pleural effusions (3/5), skin or cutaneous pus (7/10), and brain tissue (1/1). The most common imaging findings were air-space opacities (83.3%), followed by nodules (62.5%), cavitations (45.8%), and masses (37.5%). Five were administered co-trimoxazole only, and the others were treated with 2 or more antibiotics. All 5 cases with skin abscesses and 2 of the 4 cases with brain abscesses were treated by surgical incision and drainage. None underwent thoracic surgery. Corticosteroid dosages were decreased in all cases, and cytotoxic agents were discontinued in some cases. Twenty-two cases recovered, and 2 died. Pulmonary nocardiosis associated with an underlying autoimmune disease showed a female predominance and

  5. Clinical Analysis of Pulmonary Nocardiosis in Patients With Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Song, Xin yu; Zhao, Yu yue; Xu, Kai; Bi, Ya lan; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuo jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection that most commonly involves the lung; however, only a few case reports of autoimmune disease complicated by pulmonary nocardiosis exist in the literature. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 24 cases of both autoimmune disease and pulmonary nocardiosis at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital between 1990 and 2012. Fifty-two cases were hospitalized with nocardiosis, 24 of whom had at least 1 autoimmune disease before the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis. The cohort patients consisted of 5 men and 19 women, with a mean age of 44.2 years. All were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. All but 1 patient had received immunosuppressants, including corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, methotrexate, or hydroxychloroquine. Fever (87.5%), cough (83.3%), and sputum (79.2%) were the most common clinical manifestations. Ten cases were accompanied by subcutaneous nodules and/or cutaneous abscesses, and 4 had brain abscess. Half of them were lymphocytopenic. Thirteen of the 16 cases who underwent lymphocyte subtype analysis had decreased CD4+ T-cell counts. Nineteen cases had decreased serum albumin levels. Nocardia was isolated from sputum (13/24), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (4/6), lung tissue (5/6), pleural effusions (3/5), skin or cutaneous pus (7/10), and brain tissue (1/1). The most common imaging findings were air-space opacities (83.3%), followed by nodules (62.5%), cavitations (45.8%), and masses (37.5%). Five were administered co-trimoxazole only, and the others were treated with 2 or more antibiotics. All 5 cases with skin abscesses and 2 of the 4 cases with brain abscesses were treated by surgical incision and drainage. None underwent thoracic surgery. Corticosteroid dosages were decreased in all cases, and cytotoxic agents were discontinued in some cases. Twenty-two cases recovered, and 2 died. Pulmonary nocardiosis associated with an underlying autoimmune disease showed a female

  6. Identification of polybacterial communities in patients with postoperative, posttraumatic, and endogenous endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, Rajagopalaboopathi; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Prabagaran, Solai Ramatchandirane

    2014-05-01

    Endophthalmitis is a potential vision-threatening complication following surgical procedures (postoperative endophthalmitis [POE]), trauma (posttraumatic endophthalmitis [PTE]), and bacteremic seeding of the eye from a distant infection site (endogenous endophthalmitis [EE]). Several studies have revealed the polybacterial characteristics of endophthalmitis, which make the administration of antibiotics to treat the disease challenging. However, until now, the polybacterial communities of POE, PTE, and EE have not been precisely studied. Hence, the present study was designed to identify the bacterial community of endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries. Of the 40 intraocular samples tested, 30 libraries were constructed with bacterial nested-PCR-positive samples. The obtained recombinant clones were screened through amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) to identify unique clones. The multiple types of ARDRA patterns (P=0.345) and diverse bacterial sequences (P=0.277) within the libraries revealed the polybacterial nature of infection in POE, PTE, and EE. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on polybacterial infection in EE. Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus spp. (n=19), Streptococcus spp. (n=18), Staphylococcus spp. (n=6), Exiguobacterium spp. (n=3), Gemella spp. (n=2), Enterococcus spp. (n=2), a Lysinibacillus sp. (n=1), a Clostridium sp. (n=1), and a Nocardia sp. (n=1), and Gram-negative bacteria, including Serratia spp. (n=18), Pseudomonas spp. (n=10), Enterobacter spp. (n=8), Acinetobacter spp. (n=3), Pantoea spp. (n=3), a Haemophilus sp. (n=1), and a Massilia sp. (n=1), were identified. Interestingly, among them, 10 bacterial species were not previously reported to be associated with endophthalmitis or other ocular infections. Besides, the presence of 4 unidentifiable clones suggests the possibility of novel organisms that might cause eye infections. Therefore, it is recommended that, in addition to the

  7. Bioreactor-based bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted Niger Delta marine sediment, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chikere, Chioma Blaise; Chikere, Blaise Ositadinma; Okpokwasili, Gideon Chijioke

    2012-03-01

    Crude oil-polluted marine sediment from Bonny River loading jetty Port Harcourt, Nigeria was treated in seven 2.5 l stirred-tank bioreactors designated BNPK, BNK5, BPD, BNO(3), BUNa, BAUT, and BUK over a 56-day period. Five bioreactors were biostimulated with either K(2)HPO(4), NH(4)NO(3), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NPK, urea or poultry droppings while unamended (BUNa) and heat-killed (BAUT) treatments were controls. For each bioreactor, 1 kg (wet weight) sediment amended with 1 l seawater were spiked with 20 ml and 20 mg of crude oil and anthracene which gave a total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) range of 106.4-116 ppm on day 0. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in all spiked sediment slurry ranged from 96.6 to 104.4 ppm. TPH in each treatment was ≤14.9 ppm while PAH was ≤6.8 ppm by day 56. Treatment BNO(3) recorded highest heterotrophic bacterial count (9.8 × 10(8) cfu/g) and hydrocarbon utilizers (1.15 × 10(8) cfu/g). By day 56, the percentages of biodegradation of PAHs, as measured with GC-FID were BNK5 (97.93%), BNPK (98.38%), BUK (98.82%), BUNa (98.13%), BAUT (93.08%), BPD (98.92%), and BNO(3) (98.02%). BPD gave the highest degradation rate for PAH. TPH degradation rates were as follows: BNK5 (94.50%), BNPK (94.77%), BUK (94.10%), BUNa (94.77%), BAUT (75.04%), BPD (95.35%), BNO(3) (95.54%). Fifty-six hydrocarbon utilizing bacterial isolates obtained were Micrococcus spp. 5 (9.62%), Staphylococcus spp. 3 (5.78%), Pseudomonas spp. 7 (13.46%), Citrobacter sp. 1 (1.92%), Klebsiella sp. 1 (1.92%), Corynebacterium spp. 5 (9.62%), Bacillus spp. 5 (9.62%), Rhodococcus spp. 7 (13.46%), Alcanivorax spp. 7 (13.46%), Alcaligenes sp. 1 (1.92%), Serratia spp. 2 (3.85%), Arthrobacter spp. 7 (13.46%), Nocardia spp. 2 (3.85%), Flavobacterium sp. 1 (1.92%), Escherichia sp. 1 (1.92%), Acinetobacter sp. 1 (1.92%), Proteus sp. 1 (1.92%) and unidentified bacteria 10 (17%). These results indicate that the marine sediment investigated is amenable to bioreactor