Science.gov

Sample records for nociceptor afferent drive

  1. Modeling activity-dependent changes of axonal spike conduction in primary afferent C-nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tigerholm, Jenny; Petersson, Marcus E.; Obreja, Otilia; Lampert, Angelika; Carr, Richard; Schmelz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Action potential initiation and conduction along peripheral axons is a dynamic process that displays pronounced activity dependence. In patients with neuropathic pain, differences in the modulation of axonal conduction velocity by activity suggest that this property may provide insight into some of the pathomechanisms. To date, direct recordings of axonal membrane potential have been hampered by the small diameter of the fibers. We have therefore adopted an alternative approach to examine the basis of activity-dependent changes in axonal conduction by constructing a comprehensive mathematical model of human cutaneous C-fibers. Our model reproduced axonal spike propagation at a velocity of 0.69 m/s commensurate with recordings from human C-nociceptors. Activity-dependent slowing (ADS) of axonal propagation velocity was adequately simulated by the model. Interestingly, the property most readily associated with ADS was an increase in the concentration of intra-axonal sodium. This affected the driving potential of sodium currents, thereby producing latency changes comparable to those observed for experimental ADS. The model also adequately reproduced post-action potential excitability changes (i.e., recovery cycles) observed in vivo. We performed a series of control experiments replicating blockade of particular ion channels as well as changing temperature and extracellular ion concentrations. In the absence of direct experimental approaches, the model allows specific hypotheses to be formulated regarding the mechanisms underlying activity-dependent changes in C-fiber conduction. Because ADS might functionally act as a negative feedback to limit trains of nociceptor activity, we envisage that identifying its mechanisms may also direct efforts aimed at alleviating neuronal hyperexcitability in pain patients. PMID:24371290

  2. Search for a cardiac nociceptor: stimulation by bradykinin of sympathetic afferent nerve endings in the heart of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D G; Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Nerdrum, T

    1980-01-01

    1. We have examined the effect of bradykinin on impulse traffic in sympathetic afferent fibres from the heart, great vessels and pleura, and have attempted to identify cardiac nociceptors that on the basis of their functional characteristics might have a role in the initiation of cardiac pain. 2. In anaesthetized cats, we recorded afferent impulses from 'single-fibre' slips of the left 2nd--5th thoracic rami communicantes and associated chain, and selected fibres arising from endings in the heart, great vessels, pericardium and pleura. We applied bradykinin solution (0 . 1--1 . 0 microgram/ml.) locally to the site of the ending; we also injected bradykinin (0 . 3--1 . 0 microgram/kg) into the left atrium. 3. Afferent endings excited by bradykinin (159 of 191 tested) were of two types. The larger group (140) were primarily mechanoreceptors with A delta of C fibres (mean conduction velocity, 7 . 5 +/- 0 . 6 m/sec). They were very sensitive to light touch. Those located in the heart, great vessels or overlying pleura had a cardiac rhythm of discharge and were stimulated by an increase in blood pressure or cardiac volume. 4. Bradykinin increased mechanoreceptor firing from 0 . 7 +/- to 5 . 0 +/- 0 . 3 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) impulses/sec. Some endings appeared to be stimulated directly by bradykinin, others sensitized by it so that they responded more vigorously to the pulsatile mechanical stimulation associated with the cardiac cycle. 5. The smaller group of eighteen endings, of which ten were in the left ventricle, were primarily chemosensitive. Most had C fibres, a few had A delta fibres (mean conduction velocity, 2 . 3 +/- 0 . 7 m/sec). They were insensitive to light touch. With one exception they never fired with a cardiac rhythm, and even large increases in aortic or left ventricular pressure had little effect on impulse frequency. 6. Chemosensitive endings were stimulated by bradykinin, impulse activity increasing from 0 . 6 to 15 . 6 +/- 1 . 3 impulses/sec and

  3. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  4. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  5. Contribution of afferent feedback and descending drive to human hopping

    PubMed Central

    Zuur, Abraham T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Taube, Wolfgang; Grey, Michael J; Gollhofer, Albert; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Gruber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    During hopping an early burst can be observed in the EMG from the soleus muscle starting about 45 ms after touch-down. It may be speculated that this early EMG burst is a stretch reflex response superimposed on activity from a supra-spinal origin. We hypothesised that if a stretch reflex indeed contributes to the early EMG burst, then advancing or delaying the touch-down without the subject's knowledge should similarly advance or delay the burst. This was indeed the case when touch-down was advanced or delayed by shifting the height of a programmable platform up or down between two hops and this resulted in a correspondent shift of the early EMG burst. Our second hypothesis was that the motor cortex contributes to the first EMG burst during hopping. If so, inhibition of the motor cortex would reduce the magnitude of the burst. By applying a low-intensity magnetic stimulus it was possible to inhibit the motor cortex and this resulted in a suppression of the early EMG burst. These results suggest that sensory feedback and descending drive from the motor cortex are integrated to drive the motor neuron pool during the early EMG burst in hopping. Thus, simple reflexes work in concert with higher order structures to produce this repetitive movement. PMID:20064857

  6. Changes in vagal afferent drive alter tracheobronchial coughing in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Simera, Michal; Poliacek, Ivan; Veternik, Marcel; Babalova, Lucia; Kotmanova, Zuzana; Jakus, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral cooling of the vagus nerve (<5°C, blocking mainly conductivity of myelinated fibers) and unilateral vagotomy were employed to reduce cough afferent drive in order to evaluate the effects of these interventions on the temporal features of the cough reflex. Twenty pentobarbitone anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats were used. Cough was induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways. The number of coughs during vagal cooling was significantly decreased (p<0.001). Inspiratory cough efforts were reduced by approximately 30% (p<0.001) and expiratory motor drive by more than 80% (p<0.001). Temporal analysis showed prolonged inspiratory and expiratory phases, the total cycle duration, its active portion, and the interval between maxima of the diaphragm and the abdominal activity during coughing (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the average effects on the cough reflex between cooling of the left or the right vagus nerve. Compared to control, vagal cooling produced no significant difference in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure (p>0.05), however, cold block of vagal conduction reduced respiratory rate (p<0.001). Unilateral vagotomy significantly reduced cough number, cough-related diaphragmatic activity, and relative values of maximum expiratory esophageal pressure (all p<0.05). Our results indicate that reduced cough afferent drive (lower responsiveness) markedly attenuates the motor drive to respiratory pump muscles during coughing and alters cough temporal features. Differences in the effects of unilateral vagal cooling and vagotomy on coughing support an inhibitory role of sensory afferents that are relatively unaffected by cooling of the vagus nerve to 5°C on mechanically induced cough. PMID:27184303

  7. Type II spiral ganglion afferent neurons drive medial olivocochlear reflex suppression of the cochlear amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Froud, Kristina E.; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Cederholm, Jennie M. E.; Klugmann, Matthias; Sandow, Shaun L.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic adjustment of hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity is mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferent reflex, which suppresses the gain of the ‘cochlear amplifier' in each ear. Such efferent feedback is important for promoting discrimination of sounds in background noise, sound localization and protecting the cochleae from acoustic overstimulation. However, the sensory driver for the olivocochlear reflex is unknown. Here, we resolve this longstanding question using a mouse model null for the gene encoding the type III intermediate filament peripherin (Prph). Prph(−/−) mice lacked type II spiral ganglion neuron innervation of the outer hair cells, whereas innervation of the inner hair cells by type I spiral ganglion neurons was normal. Compared with Prph(+/+) controls, both contralateral and ipsilateral olivocochlear efferent-mediated suppression of the cochlear amplifier were absent in Prph(−/−) mice, demonstrating that outer hair cells and their type II afferents constitute the sensory drive for the olivocochlear efferent reflex. PMID:25965946

  8. Competition with Primary Sensory Afferents Drives Remodeling of Corticospinal Axons in Mature Spinal Motor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Zaaimi, Boubker

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the mature motor system drives significant spontaneous axonal sprouting instead of axon regeneration. Knowing the circuit-level determinants of axonal sprouting is important for repairing motor circuits after injury to achieve functional rehabilitation. Competitive interactions are known to shape corticospinal tract axon outgrowth and withdrawal during development. Whether and how competition contributes to reorganization of mature spinal motor circuits is unclear. To study this question, we examined plastic changes in corticospinal axons in response to two complementary proprioceptive afferent manipulations: (1) enhancing proprioceptive afferents activity by electrical stimulation; or (2) diminishing their input by dorsal rootlet rhizotomy. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. Electrical stimulation produced proprioceptive afferent sprouting that was accompanied by significant corticospinal axon withdrawal and a decrease in corticospinal connections on cholinergic interneurons in the medial intermediate zone and C boutons on motoneurons. In contrast, dorsal rootlet rhizotomy led to a significant increase in corticospinal connections, including those on cholinergic interneurons; C bouton density increased correspondingly. Motor cortex-evoked muscle potentials showed parallel changes to those of corticospinal axons, suggesting that reciprocal corticospinal axon changes are functional. Using the two complementary models, we showed that competitive interactions between proprioceptive and corticospinal axons are an important determinant in the organization of mature corticospinal axons and spinal motor circuits. The activity- and synaptic space-dependent properties of the competition enables prediction of the remodeling of spared corticospinal connection and spinal motor circuits after injury and informs the target-specific control of corticospinal connections to promote functional recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroplasticity is limited in maturity

  9. Nociceptor Sensitization Depends on Age and Pain Chronicity123

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Amanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral inflammation causes mechanical pain behavior and increased action potential firing. However, most studies examine inflammatory pain at acute, rather than chronic time points, despite the greater burden of chronic pain on patient populations, especially aged individuals. Furthermore, there is disagreement in the field about whether primary afferents contribute to chronic pain. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the contribution of nociceptor activity to the generation of pain behaviors during the acute and chronic phases of inflammation in both young and aged mice. We found that both young (2 months old) and aged (>18 months old) mice exhibited prominent pain behaviors during both acute (2 day) and chronic (8 week) inflammation. However, young mice exhibited greater behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli than their aged counterparts. Teased fiber recordings in young animals revealed a twofold mechanical sensitization in C fibers during acute inflammation, but an unexpected twofold reduction in firing during chronic inflammation. Responsiveness to capsaicin and mechanical responsiveness of A-mechanonociceptor (AM) fibers were also reduced chronically. Importantly, this lack of sensitization in afferent firing during chronic inflammation occurred even as these inflamed mice exhibited continued behavioral sensitization. Interestingly, C fibers from inflamed aged animals showed no change in mechanical firing compared with controls during either the acute or chronic inflammatory phases, despite strong behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli at these time points. These results reveal the following two important findings: (1) nociceptor sensitization to mechanical stimulation depends on age and the chronicity of injury; and (2) maintenance of chronic inflammatory pain does not rely on enhanced peripheral drive. PMID:26866058

  10. Catecholamine-induced excitation of nociceptors in sympathetically maintained pain.

    PubMed

    Jørum, Ellen; Ørstavik, Kristin; Schmidt, Roland; Namer, Barbara; Carr, Richard W; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Hilliges, Marita; Handwerker, Hermann; Torebjörk, Erik; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Sympathetically maintained pain could either be mediated by ephaptic interactions between sympathetic efferent and afferent nociceptive fibers or by catecholamine-induced activation of nociceptive nerve endings. We report here single fiber recordings from C nociceptors in a patient with sympathetically maintained pain, in whom sympathetic blockade had repeatedly eliminated the ongoing pain in both legs. We classified eight C-fibers as mechano-responsive and six as mechano-insensitive nociceptors according to their mechanical responsiveness and activity-dependent slowing of conduction velocity (latency increase of 0.5+/-1.1 vs. 7.1+/-2.0 ms for 20 pulses at 0.125 Hz). Two C-fibers were activated with a delay of several seconds following strong endogenous sympathetic bursts; they were also excited for about 3 min following the injection of norepinephrine (10 microl, 0.05%) into their innervation territory. In these two fibers, a prolonged activation by injection of low pH solution (phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, 10 microl) and sensitization of their heat response following prostaglandin E2 injection were recorded, evidencing their afferent nature. Moreover, their activity-dependent slowing was typical for mechano-insensitive nociceptors. We conclude that sensitized mechano-insensitive nociceptors can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines and thereby may contribute to sympathetically maintained pain. No evidence for ephaptic interaction between sympathetic efferent and nociceptive afferent fibers was found. PMID:16997471

  11. The Pharmacology of Nociceptor Priming

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptors and neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) that receive nociceptive input show remarkable plasticity in response to injury. This plasticity is thought to underlie the development of chronic pain states. Hence, further understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving and maintaining this plasticity has the potential to lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of chronic pain states. An important concept in pain plasticity is the presence and persistence of “hyperalgesic priming.” This priming arises from an initial injury and results in a remarkable susceptibility to normally subthreshold noxious inputs causing a prolonged pain state in primed animals. Here we describe our current understanding of how this priming is manifested through changes in signaling in the primary nociceptor as well as through memory like alterations at CNS synapses. Moreover, we discuss how commonly utilized analgesics, such as opioids, enhance priming therefore potentially contributing to the development of persistent pain states. Finally we highlight where these priming models draw parallels to common human chronic pain conditions. Collectively, these advances in our understanding of pain plasticity reveal a variety of targets for therapeutic intervention with the potential to reverse rather than palliate chronic pain states. PMID:25846612

  12. Defining the nociceptor transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Matthew; Crow, Megan; Richards, Natalie; Davey, Gareth I. J.; Levine, Emma; Kelleher, Jayne H.; Agley, Chibeza C.; Denk, Franziska; Harridge, Stephen D. R.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased “omics” techniques, such as next generation RNA-sequencing, can provide entirely novel insights into biological systems. However, cellular heterogeneity presents a significant barrier to analysis and interpretation of these datasets. The neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are an important model for studies of neuronal injury, regeneration and pain. The majority of investigators utilize a dissociated preparation of whole ganglia when studying cellular and molecular function. We demonstrate that the standard methods for producing these preparations gives a 10%-neuronal mixture of cells, with the remainder of cells constituting satellite glia and other non-neuronal cell types. Using a novel application of magnetic purification, we consistently obtain over 95% pure, viable neurons from adult tissue, significantly enriched for small diameter nociceptors expressing the voltage gated ion channel Nav1.8. Using genome-wide RNA-sequencing we compare the currently used (10% neuronal) and pure (95% nociceptor) preparations and find 920 genes enriched. This gives an unprecedented insight into the molecular composition of small nociceptive neurons in the DRG, potentially altering the interpretation of previous studies performed at the tissue level, and indicating a number of novel markers of this widely-studied population of cells. We anticipate that the ease of use, affordability and speed of this technique will see it become widely adopted, delivering a greatly improved capacity to study the roles of nociceptors in health and disease. PMID:25426020

  13. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P < 0.05) as was force (40.3 ± 12.8% vs. 57.1 ± 13.8% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Likewise, after a 2-min AP MVC, elbow flexion voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (88.3 ± 7.5% vs. 93.6 ± 3.9%; P < 0.05) as was torque (80.2 ± 4.6% vs. 86.6 ± 1.0% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Pain during ischemia was reported as Moderate to Very Strong. Postfatigue firing of group III/IV muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb. PMID:24356522

  14. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  15. Low threshold primary afferent drive onto GABAergic interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Claire A.; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition in the spinal cord dorsal horn is crucial for maintaining separation of touch and pain modalities. Disruption of this inhibition results in allodynia, allowing low threshold drive onto pain and temperature sensitive projection neurons. This low threshold excitatory pathway is normally under strong inhibition. We hypothesized that superficial dorsal horn inhibitory neurons, which would be ideally located to suppress low threshold drive onto projection neurons in a feedforward manner, are driven by low threshold input. In addition, because disinhibition-induced allodynia shares some features with the immature dorsal horn such as elevated sensitivity to low threshold input, we also questioned whether low threshold drive onto inhibitory neurons changes during postnatal maturation. To investigate these questions, slices were made at different ages from transgenic mice with EGFP expression in GABAergic neurons and whole cell recordings were made from these fluorescent neurons. Evoked synaptic activity was measured in response to electrical stimulation of the dorsal root. We demonstrate that Aβ fibers activate a significant proportion of superficial dorsal horn GABAergic neurons. This occurs with similar excitatory synaptic drive throughout postnatal maturation, but with a greater prevalence at younger ages. These GABAergic neurons are well situated to contribute to suppressing low threshold activation of output projection neurons. In addition, the majority of these GABAergic neurons also had convergent input from high threshold fibers, suggesting that this novel subclass of GABAergic neurons is important for gating innocuous as well as noxious information. PMID:19158295

  16. P2Y Receptors Sensitize Mouse and Human Colonic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, James R. F.; Tranter, Michael M.; McGuire, Cian; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Thaha, Mohamed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Knowles, Charles H.; Winchester, Wendy J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of visceral nociceptors by inflammatory mediators contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain associated with many gastrointestinal disorders. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides (e.g., ATP and UTP) are strongly implicated in this process following their release from epithelial cells during mechanical stimulation of the gut, and from immune cells during inflammation. Actions of ATP are mediated through both ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. P2X receptor activation causes excitation of visceral afferents; however, the impact of P2Y receptor activation on visceral afferents innervating the gut is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of stimulating P2Y receptors in isolated mouse colonic sensory neurons, and visceral nociceptor fibers in mouse and human nerve-gut preparations. Additionally, we investigate the role of Nav1.9 in mediating murine responses. The application of UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) sensitized colonic sensory neurons by increasing action potential firing to current injection and depolarizing the membrane potential. The application of ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13 agonist) also increased action potential firing, an effect blocked by the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500. UTP or ADP stimulated afferents, including mouse and human visceral nociceptors, in nerve-gut preparations. P2Y1 and P2Y2 transcripts were detected in 80% and 56% of retrogradely labeled colonic neurons, respectively. Nav1.9 transcripts colocalized in 86% of P2Y1-positive and 100% of P2Y2-positive colonic neurons, consistent with reduced afferent fiber responses to UTP and ADP in Nav1.9−/− mice. These data demonstrate that P2Y receptor activation stimulates mouse and human visceral nociceptors, highlighting P2Y-dependent mechanisms in the generation of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic visceral pain is a debilitating symptom of many gastrointestinal disorders. The activation of

  17. Endothelin 1 activates and sensitizes human C-nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Namer, Barbara; Hilliges, Marita; Orstavik, Kristin; Schmidt, Roland; Weidner, Christian; Torebjörk, Erik; Handwerker, Hermann; Schmelz, Martin

    2008-07-01

    Microneurography was used to record action potentials from afferent C-fibers in cutaneous fascicles of the peroneal nerve in healthy volunteers. Afferent fibers were classified according to their mechanical responsiveness to von Frey stimulation (75g) into mechano-responsive and mechano-insensitive nociceptors. Various concentrations of Endothelin1 (ET1) and Histamine were injected into the receptive fields of C-fibers. Activation and heat sensitization were monitored. Axon reflex flare and psychophysical ratings were assessed after injection of ET1 and codeine into the forearms after pre-treatment with an H1 blocker or sodium chloride. 65% of mechanosensitive nociceptors were activated by ET1. One-third showed long lasting responses (>15min). In contrast, none of thirteen mechano-insensitive fibers were activated. Sensitization to heat was observed in 62% of mechanosensitive and in 46% of mechano-insensitive fibers. Injection of ET1 produced a widespread axon reflex flare, which was suppressed by pre-treatment with an H1 receptor blocker. In addition, pain sensations were induced more often than itching by ET1 in contrast to codeine. No wheal was observed after injection of ET1. Both itching and pain were decreased after H1 blocker treatment. In summary: (1) In humans ET1 activates mechanosensitive, but not mechano-insensitive, nociceptors. (2) Histamine released from mast cells is not responsible for all effects of ET1 on C-nociceptors. (3) ET1 could have a differential role in pain compared to other chemical algogens which activate additionally or even predominantly mechano-insensitive fibers. PMID:17884295

  18. A Probabilistic Model for Estimating the Depth and Threshold Temperature of C-fiber Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Dezhdar, Tara; Moshourab, Rabih A; Fründ, Ingo; Lewin, Gary R; Schmuker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The subjective experience of thermal pain follows the detection and encoding of noxious stimuli by primary afferent neurons called nociceptors. However, nociceptor morphology has been hard to access and the mechanisms of signal transduction remain unresolved. In order to understand how heat transducers in nociceptors are activated in vivo, it is important to estimate the temperatures that directly activate the skin-embedded nociceptor membrane. Hence, the nociceptor's temperature threshold must be estimated, which in turn will depend on the depth at which transduction happens in the skin. Since the temperature at the receptor cannot be accessed experimentally, such an estimation can currently only be achieved through modeling. However, the current state-of-the-art model to estimate temperature at the receptor suffers from the fact that it cannot account for the natural stochastic variability of neuronal responses. We improve this model using a probabilistic approach which accounts for uncertainties and potential noise in system. Using a data set of 24 C-fibers recorded in vitro, we show that, even without detailed knowledge of the bio-thermal properties of the system, the probabilistic model that we propose here is capable of providing estimates of threshold and depth in cases where the classical method fails. PMID:26638830

  19. Pain behavior in the formalin test persists after ablation of the great majority of C-fiber nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Shannon D.; Cavanaugh, Daniel J.; Lee, Hyosang; Anderson, David J.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Although the formalin test is a widely used model of persistent pain, the primary afferent fiber types that underlie the cellular and behavioral responses to formalin injection are largely unknown. Here we used a combined genetic and pharmacological approach to investigate the effect of ablating subsets of primary afferent nociceptors on formalin-induced nocifensive behaviors and spinal cord Fos protein expression. Intrathecal capsaicin-induced ablation of the central terminals of TRPV1+ neurons greatly reduced the behavioral responses and Fos elicited by low-dose (0.5%) formalin. In contrast, genetic ablation of the MrgprD-expressing subset of nonpeptidergic unmyelinated afferents, which constitute a largely non-overlapping population, altered neither the behavior nor the Fos induced by low-dose formalin. Remarkably, nocifensive behavior following high-dose (2%) formalin was unchanged in mice lacking either afferent population, or even in mice lacking both populations, which together make up the great majority of C-fiber nociceptors. Thus, at high doses, which are routinely used in the formalin test, formalin-induced “pain” behavior persists in the absence of the vast majority of C-fiber nociceptors, which points to a contribution of a large spectrum of afferents secondary to non-specific formalin-induced tissue and nerve damage. PMID:20832171

  20. Silencing Nociceptor Neurons Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Burkett, Patrick R; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J F; Pascal, Maud A; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L; Tran, Johnathan V; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Bean, Bruce P; Levy, Bruce D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-07-15

    Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation, we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8(+) sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large-pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin- or house-dust-mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4(+) and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  1. A Probabilistic Model for Estimating the Depth and Threshold Temperature of C-fiber Nociceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhdar, Tara; Moshourab, Rabih A.; Fründ, Ingo; Lewin, Gary R.; Schmuker, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The subjective experience of thermal pain follows the detection and encoding of noxious stimuli by primary afferent neurons called nociceptors. However, nociceptor morphology has been hard to access and the mechanisms of signal transduction remain unresolved. In order to understand how heat transducers in nociceptors are activated in vivo, it is important to estimate the temperatures that directly activate the skin-embedded nociceptor membrane. Hence, the nociceptor’s temperature threshold must be estimated, which in turn will depend on the depth at which transduction happens in the skin. Since the temperature at the receptor cannot be accessed experimentally, such an estimation can currently only be achieved through modeling. However, the current state-of-the-art model to estimate temperature at the receptor suffers from the fact that it cannot account for the natural stochastic variability of neuronal responses. We improve this model using a probabilistic approach which accounts for uncertainties and potential noise in system. Using a data set of 24 C-fibers recorded in vitro, we show that, even without detailed knowledge of the bio-thermal properties of the system, the probabilistic model that we propose here is capable of providing estimates of threshold and depth in cases where the classical method fails.

  2. A Probabilistic Model for Estimating the Depth and Threshold Temperature of C-fiber Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Dezhdar, Tara; Moshourab, Rabih A.; Fründ, Ingo; Lewin, Gary R.; Schmuker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The subjective experience of thermal pain follows the detection and encoding of noxious stimuli by primary afferent neurons called nociceptors. However, nociceptor morphology has been hard to access and the mechanisms of signal transduction remain unresolved. In order to understand how heat transducers in nociceptors are activated in vivo, it is important to estimate the temperatures that directly activate the skin-embedded nociceptor membrane. Hence, the nociceptor’s temperature threshold must be estimated, which in turn will depend on the depth at which transduction happens in the skin. Since the temperature at the receptor cannot be accessed experimentally, such an estimation can currently only be achieved through modeling. However, the current state-of-the-art model to estimate temperature at the receptor suffers from the fact that it cannot account for the natural stochastic variability of neuronal responses. We improve this model using a probabilistic approach which accounts for uncertainties and potential noise in system. Using a data set of 24 C-fibers recorded in vitro, we show that, even without detailed knowledge of the bio-thermal properties of the system, the probabilistic model that we propose here is capable of providing estimates of threshold and depth in cases where the classical method fails. PMID:26638830

  3. Nociceptor sensitization in pain pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael S; Gebhart, Gerald F

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20–25% worldwide. Few patients with chronic pain obtain complete relief from the drugs that are currently available, and more than half report inadequate relief. Underlying the challenge of developing better drugs to manage chronic pain is incomplete understanding of the heterogeneity of mechanisms that contribute to the transition from acute tissue insult to chronic pain and to pain conditions for which the underlying pathology is not apparent. An intact central nervous system (CNS) is required for the conscious perception of pain, and changes in the CNS are clearly evident in chronic pain states. However, the blockage of nociceptive input into the CNS can effectively relieve or markedly attenuate discomfort and pain, revealing the importance of ongoing peripheral input to the maintenance of chronic pain. Accordingly, we focus here on nociceptors: their excitability, their heterogeneity and their role in initiating and maintaining pain. PMID:20948530

  4. Unmyelinated type II afferent neurons report cochlear damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, acoustic information is carried to the brain by the predominant (95%) large-diameter, myelinated type I afferents, each of which is postsynaptic to a single inner hair cell. The remaining thin, unmyelinated type II afferents extend hundreds of microns along the cochlear duct to contact many outer hair cells. Despite this extensive arbor, type II afferents are weakly activated by outer hair cell transmitter release and are insensitive to sound. Intriguingly, type II afferents remain intact in damaged regions of the cochlea. Here, we show that type II afferents are activated when outer hair cells are damaged. This response depends on both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors, binding ATP released from nearby supporting cells in response to hair cell damage. Selective activation of P2Y receptors increased type II afferent excitability by the closure of KCNQ-type potassium channels, a potential mechanism for the painful hypersensitivity (that we term “noxacusis” to distinguish from hyperacusis without pain) that can accompany hearing loss. Exposure to the KCNQ channel activator retigabine suppressed the type II fiber’s response to hair cell damage. Type II afferents may be the cochlea’s nociceptors, prompting avoidance of further damage to the irreparable inner ear. PMID:26553995

  5. Stomatin-domain protein interactions with acid-sensing ion channels modulate nociceptor mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moshourab, Rabih A; Wetzel, Christiane; Martinez-Salgado, Carlos; Lewin, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and their interaction partners of the stomatin family have all been implicated in sensory transduction. Single gene deletion of asic3, asic2, stomatin, or stoml3 all result in deficits in the mechanosensitivity of distinct cutaneous afferents in the mouse. Here, we generated asic3−/−:stomatin−/−, asic3−/−:stoml3−/− and asic2−/−:stomatin−/− double mutant mice to characterize the functional consequences of stomatin–ASIC protein interactions on sensory afferent mechanosensitivity. The absence of ASIC3 led to a clear increase in mechanosensitivity in rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors (RAMs) and a decrease in the mechanosensitivity in both Aδ- and C-fibre nociceptors. The increased mechanosensitivity of RAMs could be accounted for by a loss of adaptation which could be mimicked by local application of APETx2 a toxin that specifically blocks ASIC3. There is a substantial loss of mechanosensitivity in stoml3−/− mice in which ∼35% of the myelinated fibres lack a mechanosensitive receptive field and this phenotype was found to be identical in asic3−/−:stoml3−/− mutant mice. However, Aδ-nociceptors showed much reduced mechanosensitivity in asic3−/−:stoml3−/− mutant mice compared to asic3−/− controls. Interestingly, in asic2−/−:stomatin−/− mutant mice many Aδ-nociceptors completely lost their mechanosensitivity which was not observed in asic2−/− or stomatin−/− mice. Examination of stomatin−/−:stoml3−/− mutant mice indicated that a stomatin/STOML3 interaction is unlikely to account for the greater Aδ-nociceptor deficits in double mutant mice. A key finding from these studies is that the loss of stomatin or STOML3 in asic3−/− or asic2−/− mutant mice markedly exacerbates deficits in the mechanosensitivity of nociceptors without affecting mechanoreceptor function. PMID:23959680

  6. Isolation of an mRNA binding protein homologue that is expressed in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Eilers, Helge; Trilk, Sharon L; Lee, Sook Young; Xue, Qing; Jong, Beverly E; Moff, Irene; Levine, Jon D; Schumacher, Mark A

    2004-11-01

    The peripheral detection of painful stimuli requires the activation of small-diameter primary afferent neurons known as nociceptors. We have exploited two features of nociceptor biology, expression of the high affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (TrkA) and sensitivity to capsaicin, to isolate novel proteins using a differential display cloning scheme. A resulting approximately 4.3-kb cDNA was isolated and sequence analysis inferred a approximately 157-kDa protein containing a signal/mitochondrial targeting peptide sequence. Due to its molecular weight and significant amino acid identity with 'human leucine-rich protein 130'[leucine-rich pentatricopeptide motif containing (LRPPRC)], we termed the cDNA candidate leucine-rich protein 157 (rLRP157). Western blot analysis of HEK293 cells over-expressing the candidate cDNA showed a single protein product of similar size to that found in rat dorsal root ganglion as well as in other neuronal tissues and cell lines. Although expressed in a wide variety of tissues, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in dorsal root ganglion revealed that rLRP157 expression was restricted to the small-diameter neurons. Sequence identity with previously characterized mRNA binding proteins and its subcellular localization in sensory neurons suggest that rLRP157 is associated with mitochondrial function. Moreover, the genetic basis of French-Canadian Leigh syndrome, which confers a loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and is characterized by neurodegeneration, was recently mapped to a mutation in the LRPPRC gene. Taken together with its expression in small-diameter sensory neurons, we hypothesize that rLRP157, the rat orthologue of the human LRPPRC, may play a role in the modulation of peripheral pain transduction and serve as a novel marker for nociceptor subtypes. PMID:15525270

  7. Spinal cord injury triggers an intrinsic growth-promoting state in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Supinder S; Lago, Michael T; Masha, Luke I; Crook, Robyn J; Grill, Raymond J; Walters, Edgar T

    2012-03-20

    Although most investigations of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) have examined the central nervous system (CNS), recent studies have shown that nociceptive primary afferent neurons display persistent hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity in their peripheral branches and somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after SCI. This suggests that SCI-induced alterations of primary nociceptors contribute to central sensitization and chronic pain after SCI. Does SCI also promote growth of these neurons' fibers, as has been suggested in some reports? The present study tests the hypothesis that SCI induces an intrinsic growth-promoting state in DRG neurons. This was tested by dissociating DRG neurons 3 days or 1 month after spinal contusion injury at thoracic level T10 and measuring neuritic growth 1 day later. Neurons cultured 3 days after SCI exhibited longer neurites without increases in branching ("elongating growth"), compared to neurons from sham-treated or untreated (naïve) rats. Robust promotion of elongating growth was found in small and medium-sized neurons (but not large neurons) from lumbar (L3-L5) and thoracic ganglia immediately above (T9) and below (T10-T11) the contusion site, but not from cervical DRG. Elongating growth was also found in neurons immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), suggesting that some of the neurons exhibiting enhanced neuritic growth were nociceptors. The same measurements made on neurons dissociated 1 month after SCI revealed no evidence of elongating growth, although evidence for accelerated initiation of neurite outgrowth was found. Under certain conditions this transient growth-promoting state in nociceptors might be important for the development of chronic pain and hyperreflexia after SCI. PMID:21939395

  8. Spinal Cord Injury Triggers an Intrinsic Growth-Promoting State in Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lago, Michael T.; Masha, Luke I.; Crook, Robyn J.; Grill, Raymond J.; Walters, Edgar T.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Although most investigations of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) have examined the central nervous system (CNS), recent studies have shown that nociceptive primary afferent neurons display persistent hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity in their peripheral branches and somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after SCI. This suggests that SCI-induced alterations of primary nociceptors contribute to central sensitization and chronic pain after SCI. Does SCI also promote growth of these neurons' fibers, as has been suggested in some reports? The present study tests the hypothesis that SCI induces an intrinsic growth-promoting state in DRG neurons. This was tested by dissociating DRG neurons 3 days or 1 month after spinal contusion injury at thoracic level T10 and measuring neuritic growth 1 day later. Neurons cultured 3 days after SCI exhibited longer neurites without increases in branching (“elongating growth”), compared to neurons from sham-treated or untreated (naïve) rats. Robust promotion of elongating growth was found in small and medium-sized neurons (but not large neurons) from lumbar (L3–L5) and thoracic ganglia immediately above (T9) and below (T10–T11) the contusion site, but not from cervical DRG. Elongating growth was also found in neurons immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), suggesting that some of the neurons exhibiting enhanced neuritic growth were nociceptors. The same measurements made on neurons dissociated 1 month after SCI revealed no evidence of elongating growth, although evidence for accelerated initiation of neurite outgrowth was found. Under certain conditions this transient growth-promoting state in nociceptors might be important for the development of chronic pain and hyperreflexia after SCI. PMID:21939395

  9. Distribution of presumptive chemosensory afferents with FMRFamide- or substance P-like immunoreactivity in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M

    1997-01-23

    In five species of decapod crustaceans--Cherax destructor (crayfish), Carcinus maenas (crab), Homarus americanus (clawed lobster), Eriocheir sinensis (crab), Macrobrachium rosenbergii (shrimp)--immunocytochemical stainings revealed the presence of sensory afferents with FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system. These afferents were extremely thin, very numerous, and innervated all sensory neuropils except the optic and olfactory lobes. In their target neuropils they gave rise to condensed net- or ball-like terminal structures. Only in Homarus americanus but not in any other studied species immunocytochemistry revealed a separate, non-overlapping class of sensory afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity. Also the afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity were very thin and numerous, innervated all sensory neuropils except optic and olfactory lobes, and gave rise to condensed terminal structures. From their morphological characteristics it can be concluded that likely both classes of afferents are chemosensory. The substance P-like immunoreactivity suggests a link with the nociceptor afferents of vertebrates, with which both classes of afferents share several other morphological features. PMID:9037486

  10. Bradykinin Induces TRPV1 Exocytotic Recruitment in Peptidergic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Devesa, Isabel; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid I (TRPV1) sensitization in peripheral nociceptors is a prominent phenomenon that occurs in inflammatory pain conditions. Pro-algesic agents can potentiate TRPV1 activity in nociceptors through both stimulation of its channel gating and mobilization of channels to the neuronal surface in a context dependent manner. A recent study reported that ATP-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors involves the exocytotic release of channels trafficked by large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) that cargo alpha-calcitonin gene related peptide alpha (αCGRP). We hypothesized that, similar to ATP, bradykinin may also use different mechanisms to sensitize TRPV1 channels in peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors. We found that bradykinin notably enhances the excitability of peptidergic nociceptors, and sensitizes TRPV1, primarily through the bradykinin receptor 2 pathway. Notably, bradykinin sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors was significantly blocked by inhibiting Ca2+-dependent neuronal exocytosis. In addition, silencing αCGRP gene expression, but not substance P, drastically reduced bradykinin-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors. Taken together, these findings indicate that bradykinin-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors is partially mediated by the exocytotic mobilization of new channels trafficked by αCGRP-loaded LDCVs to the neuronal membrane. Our findings further imply a central role of αCGRP peptidergic nociceptors in peripheral algesic sensitization, and substantiate that inhibition of LDCVs exocytosis is a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat pain, as it concurrently reduces the release of pro-inflammatory peptides and the membrane recruitment of thermoTRP channels. PMID:27445816

  11. ATP responses in human C nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Hilliges, Marita; Weidner, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Schmidt, Roland; Ørstavik, Kristin; Torebjörk, Erik; Handwerker, Hermann

    2002-07-01

    Microelectrode recordings of impulse activity in nociceptive C fibres were performed in cutaneous fascicles of the peroneal nerve at the knee level in healthy human subjects. Mechano-heat responsive C units (CMH), mechano-insensitive but heat-responsive (CH) as well as mechano-insensitive and heat-insensitive C units (CM(i)H(i)) were identified. A subgroup of the mechano-insensitive units was readily activated by histamine. We studied the responsiveness of these nociceptor classes to injection of 20 microl 5 mM adenosintriphosphate (ATP) using saline injections as control. Because of mechanical distension during injection, which typically activates mechano-responsive C fibres, interest was focused on responsiveness to ATP after withdrawal of the injection needle. Post-injection responses were observed in 17/27 (63%) mechano-responsive units and in 14/22 (64%) mechano-insensitive units. Excitation by ATP occurred in 9/11 CH units and in 5/11 CM(i)H(i) units. ATP responsive units were found both within the histamine-responsive and the histamine-insensitive group of mechano-insensitive fibres. ATP responses appeared with a delay of 0-180 s after completion of injection; responses were most pronounced during the first 1-3 min of activation, and irregular ongoing activity was observed for up to 10 or even 20 min. ATP responses were dose-dependent, concentrations lower than 5 mM gave weaker responses. No heat or mechanical sensitisation was observed in any of the major fibre classes. In conclusion, we have shown that ATP injections at high concentrations activate C-nociceptors in healthy human skin, without preference for mechano-responsive or mechano-insensitive units. ATP did not sensitise human C fibres for mechanical or heat stimuli. We discuss how various mechanisms might contribute to the observed responses to ATP. PMID:12098617

  12. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  13. Noninvasive diode laser activation of transient receptor potential proteins and nociceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Cooper, Brian Y.; Nemenov, Michael I.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated diode laser (980 nm) evoked activation of transient receptor potential proteins (TRPV1 and TRPV2). C and A-delta (Aδ) nociceptor families are primarily responsible for pain mediation in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 proteins have been associated with heat evoked pain in C fibers while Aδ fibers have been associated with TRPV2. Diode laser stimulation allows a margin of safety between non-invasive activation and damage 19, 22, 34. Laser pulses (20-50 ms, 0.1-10 W, 980 nm) were used to stimulate: A) in vitro: excised patches from HEK293 cells expressing TRPV1; B) in vitro: rat DRG nociceptors expressing either TRPV1 or TRPV2; and C) in vivo: C-fibers of the rat saphenous nerve (SN) trunk. Cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp methods. The SN was also stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes. Stimulation (20-50 ms) of HEK and DRG cells expressing TRPV1 was highly reproducible. Activation and peak currents were achieved at estimated peak temperatures of 55°C and 70°C. Threshold activation was also observed in DRG neurons expressing TRPV2. The conduction velocity for laser-activated saphenous nerve afferents was in the C fiber range (0.5-1 m/s). Electrically stimulated nerve contained stimulation artifacts and complex neural components with conduction velocities ranging from 0.3-30 m/s. Diode laser activation of TRPV1 protein is a reproducible and effective means to probe TRP activity in both in vivo and in vitro preparations

  14. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  15. Excitation of cutaneous C nociceptors by intraplantar administration of anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Potenzieri, Carl; Brink, Thaddeus S.; Simone, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Anandamide has been characterized as both an endocannabinoid and endovanilloid. Consistent with its actions as an endovanilloid, previous studies have demonstrated that anandamide can excite primary sensory neurons in vitro via transient receptor potential vanilloid type one (TRPV1) receptors. In the present study, we sought to determine if anandamide excited cutaneous C nociceptors in vivo and if this excitation correlated with nocifensive behaviors. Using teased-fiber electrophysiological methods in the rat, C nociceptors isolated from the tibial nerve with receptive fields (RFs) on the plantar surface of the hindpaw were studied. Injection of anandamide into the RF dose-dependently excited nociceptors at doses of 10 and 100 μg. The TRPV1 receptor antagonists, capsazepine or SB 366791, were applied to the RF to determine if excitation by anandamide was mediated through TRPV1 receptors. Intraplantar injection of either capsazepine (10 μg) or SB 366791 (3 μg) attenuated the excitation produced by 100 μg anandamide. We also determined whether excitation of C nociceptors by anandamide was associated with nocifensive behaviors. Intraplantar injection of 100 μg anandamide produced nocifensive behaviors that were attenuated by pre-treatment with either capsazepine or SB 366791. Furthermore, we determined if intraplantar injection of anandamide altered withdrawal responses to radiant heat. Neither intraplantar injection of anandamide or vehicle produced antinociception or hyperalgesia to radiant heat. Our results indicate that anandamide excited cutaneous C nociceptors and produced nocifensive behaviors via activation of TRPV1 receptors. PMID:19285051

  16. Nociceptor activation and damage by pulsed E-fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nene, Deepti; Jiang, Nan; Rau, Kristofer K.; Richardson, Martin; Cooper, Brian Y.

    2006-05-01

    We assessed the capacity of ultrashort E-fields to activate rat cutaneous nociceptors. Experiments were conducted in vitro on nociceptive neurons representing hairy skin and glabrous skin. Electrical and optical recording methods were used to assess action potentials and membrane damage thresholds. Strength duration (SD) curves were formed for E-field pulses from 500 μsec to 350 ns. There were no differences in the SD time contant (taue (59 μsec) or ultrashort thresholds (129 V/cm at 350 ns) for hairy or glabrous skin nociceptors, for nociceptors with distinct geometry or for nociceptors expressing different combinations of voltage sensitive Na + channels (TTX s and TTX r Na v) or hyperpolarization activated channels (HCN; I H). Subthreshold activation was possible with high frequency pulsing at ultrashort durations (350 ns; 4,000 Hz). Relative to single pulse thresholds, activation threshold could be reduced over 50% by high frequency burst trains (4,000 Hz; 1-40 msec). Nociceptors were not damaged by E-field activation. Irreversible membrane disruption occurred at significantly higher field strength and varied by cell radius (3,266-4,240 V/cm, 350 ns, 40 Hz, 5 sec). Pulse frequency had no influence on acute membrane failure (10, 20, 40, 4,000 Hz; 5 sec).

  17. Nociceptor-Enriched Genes Required for Normal Thermal Nociception.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Ken; Mauthner, Stephanie E; Wang, Yu; Skene, J H Pate; Tracey, W Daniel

    2016-07-12

    Here, we describe a targeted reverse genetic screen for thermal nociception genes in Drosophila larvae. Using laser capture microdissection and microarray analyses of nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, we identified 275 nociceptor-enriched genes. We then tested the function of the enriched genes with nociceptor-specific RNAi and thermal nociception assays. Tissue-specific RNAi targeted against 14 genes caused insensitive thermal nociception while targeting of 22 genes caused hypersensitive thermal nociception. Previously uncategorized genes were named for heat resistance (i.e., boilerman, fire dancer, oven mitt, trivet, thawb, and bunker gear) or heat sensitivity (firelighter, black match, eucalyptus, primacord, jet fuel, detonator, gasoline, smoke alarm, and jetboil). Insensitive nociception phenotypes were often associated with severely reduced branching of nociceptor neurites and hyperbranched dendrites were seen in two of the hypersensitive cases. Many genes that we identified are conserved in mammals. PMID:27346357

  18. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain. PMID:25017887

  19. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  20. Modeling pain in vitro using nociceptor neurons reprogrammed from fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wainger, Brian J.; Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Oliveira, Julia T.; Mellin, Cassidy; Lee, Seungkyu; Saber, Wardiya Afshar; Wang, Amy; Ichida, Justin K.; Chiu, Isaac M.; Barrett, Lee; Huebner, Eric A.; Bilgin, Canan; Tsujimoto, Naomi; Brenneis, Christian; Kapur, Kush; Rubin, Lee L.; Eggan, Kevin; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells from one cell fate to another can generate specific neurons suitable for disease modeling. To maximize the utility of patient-derived neurons, they must model not only disease-relevant cell classes but also the diversity of neuronal subtypes found in vivo and the pathophysiological changes that underlie specific clinical diseases. Here, we identify five transcription factors that reprogram mouse and human fibroblasts into noxious stimulus-detecting (nociceptor) neurons that recapitulate the expression of quintessential nociceptor-specific functional receptors and channels found in adult mouse nociceptor neurons as well as native subtype diversity. Moreover, the derived nociceptor neurons exhibit TrpV1 sensitization to the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 and the chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin, modeling the inherent mechanisms underlying inflammatory pain hypersensitivity and painful chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. Using fibroblasts from patients with familial dysautonomia (hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III), we show that the technique can reveal novel aspects of human disease phenotypes in vitro. PMID:25420066

  1. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain123

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8+ primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch+ mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2+-Arch+mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch+ mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8+ afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  2. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (Iacid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (Icap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all Iacid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and Icap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. PMID:27493509

  3. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P < 0.001). After a 2-min knee flexor maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P < 0.01). After the contralateral (left) MVC (experiment 3; n = 8), mean voluntary activation of the right leg was similar with or without ischemia (92 ± 6% vs. 93 ± 4%; P = 0.65). After fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. PMID:25525208

  4. Selective sensitization of C-fiber nociceptors by hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuka; Tsubota, Maho; Nishimoto, Yuta; Maeda, Yumi; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of NaHS, an H2S donor, known to cause T-type Ca(2+) channel (T-channel)-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia, on responsiveness to electric stimulation with 5, 250 and 2000 Hz sine waves (SW) that selectively excites C, Aδ and Aβ fibers, respectively. NaHS, given i.pl., caused behavioral hypersensitivity to SW stimulation at 5 Hz, but not 250 or 2000 Hz, in rats. NaHS also enhanced phosphorylation of spinal ERK following 5 Hz SW stimulation. Three distinct T-channel blockers abolished the NaHS-induced behavioral hypersensitivity to 5 Hz SW stimulation. Thus, H2S selectively sensitizes C-fiber nociceptors via T-channels. PMID:26826903

  5. LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis Sensitizes Capsaicin-Sensitive Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi; Diógenes, Aníbal; Henry, Michael A.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Although odontogenic infections are often accompanied by pain, little is known about the potential mechanisms mediating this effect. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that trigeminal nociceptive neurons are directly sensitized by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from an endodontic pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). In vitro studies conducted with cultures of rat trigeminal neurons demonstrated that pretreatment with LPS produced a significant increase in the capsaicin-evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) when compared to vehicle pretreatment, thus showing sensitization of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, by LPS. Furthermore, confocal microscopic examination of human tooth pulp samples showed the colocalization of the LPS receptor (toll-like receptor 4; TLR4) with CGRP containing nerve fibers. Collectively, these results suggest the direct sensitization of nociceptors by LPS at concentrations found in infected canal systems as one mechanism responsible for the pain associated with bacterial infections. PMID:21146075

  6. Kv3.4 channel function and dysfunction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, David M; Zemel, Benjamin M; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the isolation of the Kv3.4 current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and described dysregulation of this current in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model of chronic pain. These studies strongly suggest that rat Kv3.4 channels are major regulators of excitability in DRG neurons from pups and adult females, where they help determine action potential (AP) repolarization and spiking properties. Here, we characterized the Kv3.4 current in rat DRG neurons from adult males and show that it transfers 40–70% of the total repolarizing charge during the AP across all ages and sexes. Following SCI, we also found remodeling of the repolarizing currents during the AP. In the light of these studies, homomeric Kv3.4 channels expressed in DRG nociceptors are emerging novel targets that may help develop new approaches to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:26039360

  7. Nociceptors as chronic drivers of pain and hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury: an adaptive-maladaptive hyperfunctional state hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Edgar T.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes chronic peripheral sensitization of nociceptors and persistent generation of spontaneous action potentials (SA) in peripheral branches and the somata of hyperexcitable nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Here it is proposed that SCI triggers in numerous nociceptors a persistent hyperfunctional state (peripheral, synaptic, and somal) that originally evolved as an adaptive response to compensate for loss of sensory terminals after severe but survivable peripheral injury. In this hypothesis, nociceptor somata monitor the status of their own receptive field and the rest of the body by integrating signals received by their peripheral and central branches and the soma itself. A nociceptor switches into a potentially permanent hyperfunctional state when central neural, glial, and inflammatory signal combinations are detected that indicate extensive peripheral injury. Similar signal combinations are produced by SCI and disseminated widely to uninjured as well as injured nociceptors. This paper focuses on the uninjured nociceptors that are altered by SCI. Enhanced activity generated in below-level nociceptors promotes below-level central sensitization, somatic and autonomic hyperreflexia, and visceral dysfunction. If sufficient ascending fibers survive, enhanced activity in below-level nociceptors contributes to below-level pain. Nociceptor activity generated above the injury level contributes to at- and above-level sensitization and pain (evoked and spontaneous). Thus, SCI triggers a potent nociceptor state that may have been adaptive (from an evolutionary perspective) after severe peripheral injury but is maladaptive after SCI. Evidence that hyperfunctional nociceptors make large contributions to behavioral hypersensitivity after SCI suggests that nociceptor-specific ion channels required for nociceptor SA and hypersensitivity offer promising targets for treating chronic pain and hyperreflexia after SCI. PMID:22934060

  8. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-03-15

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  9. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-01-01

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  10. Utricular afferents: morphology of peripheral terminals

    PubMed Central

    Huwe, J. A.; Logan, G. J.; Williams, B.; Rowe, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The utricle provides critical information about spatiotemporal properties of head movement. It comprises multiple subdivisions whose functional roles are poorly understood. We previously identified four subdivisions in turtle utricle, based on hair bundle structure and mechanics, otoconial membrane structure and hair bundle coupling, and immunoreactivity to calcium-binding proteins. Here we ask whether these macular subdivisions are innervated by distinctive populations of afferents to help us understand the role each subdivision plays in signaling head movements. We quantified the morphology of 173 afferents and identified six afferent classes, which differ in structure and macular locus. Calyceal and dimorphic afferents innervate one striolar band. Bouton afferents innervate a second striolar band; they have elongated terminals and the thickest processes and axons of all bouton units. Bouton afferents in lateral (LES) and medial (MES) extrastriolae have small-diameter axons but differ in collecting area, bouton number, and hair cell contacts (LES >> MES). A fourth, distinctive population of bouton afferents supplies the juxtastriola. These results, combined with our earlier findings on utricular hair cells and the otoconial membrane, suggest the hypotheses that MES and calyceal afferents encode head movement direction with high spatial resolution and that MES afferents are well suited to signal three-dimensional head orientation and striolar afferents to signal head movement onset. PMID:25632074

  11. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  12. Extrinsic and intrinsic signals converge on the Runx1/CBFβ transcription factor for nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Siyi; O'Donovan, Kevin J; Turner, Eric E; Zhong, Jian; Ginty, David D

    2015-01-01

    The generation of diverse neuronal subtypes involves specification of neural progenitors and, subsequently, postmitotic neuronal differentiation, a relatively poorly understood process. Here, we describe a mechanism whereby the neurotrophic factor NGF and the transcription factor Runx1 coordinate postmitotic differentiation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors, a major nociceptor subtype. We show that the integrity of a Runx1/CBFβ holocomplex is crucial for NGF-dependent nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation. NGF signals through the ERK/MAPK pathway to promote expression of Cbfb but not Runx1 prior to maturation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors. In contrast, transcriptional initiation of Runx1 in nonpeptidergic nociceptor precursors is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor Islet1, which is largely dispensable for Cbfb expression. Thus, an NGF/TrkA-MAPK-CBFβ pathway converges with Islet1-Runx1 signaling to promote Runx1/CBFβ holocomplex formation and nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation. Convergence of extrinsic and intrinsic signals to control heterodimeric transcription factor complex formation provides a robust mechanism for postmitotic neuronal subtype specification. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10874.001 PMID:26418744

  13. αCGRP is essential for algesic exocytotic mobilization of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Devesa, Isabel; Ferrándiz-Huertas, Clotilde; Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Wolf, Christoph; Luján, Rafael; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Proalgesic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors in painful syndromes is a complex molecular process poorly understood that involves mobilization of thermosensory receptors to the neuronal surface. However, whether recruitment of vesicular thermoTRP channels is a general mechanism underlying sensitization of all nociceptor types or is subtype-specific remains controversial. We report that sensitization-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic insertion of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors to the neuronal plasma membrane is a mechanism specifically used by peptidergic nociceptors to potentiate their excitability. Notably, we found that TRPV1 is present in large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) that were mobilized to the neuronal surface in response to a sensitizing insult. Deletion or silencing of calcitonin-gene-related peptide alpha (αCGRP) gene expression drastically reduced proalgesic TRPV1 potentiation in peptidergic nociceptors by abrogating its Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic recruitment. These findings uncover a context-dependent molecular mechanism of TRPV1 algesic sensitization and a previously unrecognized role of αCGRP in LDCV mobilization in peptidergic nociceptors. Furthermore, these results imply that concurrent secretion of neuropeptides and channels in peptidergic C-type nociceptors facilitates a rapid modulation of pain signaling. PMID:25489075

  14. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S.; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15–60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14–28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14–28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs. PMID:22859364

  15. In pursuit of P2X3 antagonists: novel therapeutics for chronic pain and afferent sensitization.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anthony P

    2012-02-01

    Treating pain by inhibiting ATP activation of P2X3-containing receptors heralds an exciting new approach to pain management, and Afferent's program marks the vanguard in a new class of drugs poised to explore this approach to meet the significant unmet needs in pain management. P2X3 receptor subunits are expressed predominately and selectively in so-called C- and Aδ-fiber primary afferent neurons in most tissues and organ systems, including skin, joints, and hollow organs, suggesting a high degree of specificity to the pain sensing system in the human body. P2X3 antagonists block the activation of these fibers by ATP and stand to offer an alternative approach to the management of pain and discomfort. In addition, P2X3 is expressed pre-synaptically at central terminals of C-fiber afferent neurons, where ATP further sensitizes transmission of painful signals. As a result of the selectivity of the expression of P2X3, there is a lower likelihood of adverse effects in the brain, gastrointestinal, or cardiovascular tissues, effects which remain limiting factors for many existing pain therapeutics. In the periphery, ATP (the factor that triggers P2X3 receptor activation) can be released from various cells as a result of tissue inflammation, injury or stress, as well as visceral organ distension, and stimulate these local nociceptors. The P2X3 receptor rationale has aroused a formidable level of investigation producing many reports that clarify the potential role of ATP as a pain mediator, in chronic sensitized states in particular, and has piqued the interest of pharmaceutical companies. P2X receptor-mediated afferent activation has been implicated in inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain states, as well as in airways hyperreactivity, migraine, itch, and cancer pain. It is well appreciated that oftentimes new mechanisms translate poorly from models into clinical efficacy and effectiveness; however, the breadth of activity seen from P2X3 inhibition in models offers

  16. Psychophysical evidence of nociceptor sensitization in vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bohm-Starke, N; Hilliges, M; Brodda-Jansen, G; Rylander, E; Torebjörk, E

    2001-11-01

    Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) is a long lasting disorder of superficial dyspareunia in young women. Quantitative sensory testing, including mechanical and temperature pain thresholds and warm/cold difference limen (WCL), was performed in the vestibular mucosa in 22 women (mean age 25.0 years) with vestibulitis and 20 control subjects (mean age 25.6 years). The tests were carried out on days 7-11 of the menstrual cycle. Patients had allodynia to mechanical testing with von Frey filaments, 14.3+/-3.1mN in the symptomatic posterior area as compared with 158+/-33.5mN in healthy subjects, P<0.0001. The pain threshold to heat was 38.6+/-0.6 degrees C in patients and 43.8+/-0.8 degrees C in controls, P<0.0001. In addition, pain threshold to cold was 21.6+/-1.2 degrees C in patients whereas cooling down to 6 degrees C was usually not painful in controls. WCL was 4.9+/-0.5 degrees C in patients and 9.6+/-1.5 degrees C in healthy subjects, P<0.01. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that patients with VVS have an increased innervation and/or sensitization of thermoreceptors and nociceptors in their vestibular mucosa. PMID:11690731

  17. Neurotoxic catecholamine metabolite in nociceptors contributes to painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Khasar, Sachia G; Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Bogen, Oliver; Chen, Xiaojie; Green, Paul G; Reichling, David B; Messing, Robert O; Levine, Jon D

    2008-09-01

    The neurotoxic effects of catecholamine metabolites have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. As some sensory neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase (MAO), we investigated the potential contribution of catecholamine metabolites to neuropathic pain in a model of alcoholic neuropathy. The presence of catecholamines in sensory neurons is supported by capsaicin-stimulated epinephrine release, an effect enhanced in ethanol-fed rats. mRNA for enzymes in dorsal root ganglia involved in catecholamine uptake and metabolism, dopamine beta-hydroxylase and MAO-A, were decreased by neonatal administration of capsaicin. Ethanol-induced hyperalgesia was attenuated by systemic and local peripheral administration of inhibitors of MAO-A, reduction of norepinephrine transporter (NET) in sensory neurons and a NET inhibitor. Finally, intradermal injection of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycolaldehyde (DOPEGAL), a neurotoxic MAO-A catecholamine metabolite, produced robust mechanical hyperalgesia. These observations suggest that catecholamines in nociceptors are metabolized to neurotoxic products by MAO-A, which can cause neuronal dysfunction underlying neuropathic pain. PMID:18783367

  18. Vagal afferents, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory resistance in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Adams, J M; Farkas, G A; Rochester, D F

    1988-06-01

    This study tests three hypotheses regarding mechanisms that produce rapid shallow breathing during a severe inspiratory resistive load (IRL): 1) an intact vagal afferent pathway is necessary; 2) diaphragm fatigue contributes to tachypnea; and 3) hypoxia may alter the pattern of respiration. We imposed a severe IRL on pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dogs, followed by bilateral vagotomy, then by supplemental O2. IRL alone produced rapid shallow breathing associated with hypercapnia and hypoxia. After the vagotomy, the breathing pattern became slow and deep, restoring arterial PCO2 but not arterial PO2 toward the control values. Relief of hypoxia had no effect, and at no time was there any evidence of fatigue of the diaphragm as measured by the response to phrenic nerve stimulation. We conclude that an intact afferent vagal pathway is necessary for the tachypnea resulting from a severe IRL, neither hypoxia nor diaphragm fatigue played a role, and, although we cannot rule out stimulation of vagal afferents, the simplest explanation for the increased frequency in our experiments is increased respiratory drive due to hypercapnia. PMID:3136122

  19. TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and nociceptor sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Dina, Olayinka A.; Chen, Xiaoje; Levine, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) contributes to mechanical hyperalgesia of diverse etiologies, presumably as part of a mechanoreceptor signaling complex (Alessandri-Haber et al., 2008). To investigate the hypothesis that a functional interaction between TRPV4 and stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) is involved in this mechanical transduction mechanism, we used a selective SACs inhibitor, GsMTx-4. Intradermal injection of GsMTx-4 in the rat hind paw reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by intradermal injection of inflammatory mediators. In vivo single fiber recordings showed that GsMTx-4 reversed inflammatory mediator-induced decrease in mechanical threshold in half of sensitized C-fibers. Furthermore, GsMTx-4 reduced hyperalgesia to both mechanical and hypotonic stimuli in different models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain while it had no effect on baseline mechanical nociceptive thresholds. TRPC1 and TRPC6, two GsMTx-4-sensitive SACs are expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Single-cell RT-PCR showed that messenger RNAs for TRPV4, TRPC1 and TRPC6 are frequently co-expressed in DRG neurons. Spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to TRPC1 and TRPC6, like that to TRPV4, reversed the hyperalgesia to mechanical and hypotonic stimuli induced by inflammatory mediators without affecting baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold. However, antisense to TRPC6, but not to TRPC1, reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by a thermal injury or the TRPV4 selective agonist 4α-PDD. We conclude that TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 channels to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and primary afferent nociceptor sensitization although they may have distinctive roles. PMID:19439599

  20. Inflammation meets sensitization--an explanation for spontaneous nociceptor activity?

    PubMed

    Rukwied, Roman; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Main, Maurice; Obreja, Otilia; Schmelz, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (anti-NGF) treatment is analgesic in chronic inflammatory pain conditions without reducing inflammation. Hypothesizing that ongoing pain induced by inflammatory mediators is increased by long term sensitization of nociceptors, we combined the non-inflammatory NGF-sensitization model with an inflammatory ultraviolet-B (UV-B) model in human volunteers. UV-B irradiation of the skin presensitized with NGF 3 weeks before intensified the pre-existing NGF hyperalgesia during the inflammatory phase of UV-B and caused spontaneous pain in about 70% of the subjects. Pain levels paralleled the intensity of UVB inflammation. Hyperalgesia recorded on a VAS (0-100) was additive after combined NGF/UV-B treatment versus single NGF or UV-B treatment for mechanical impact and tonic heat stimuli, again paralleling the intensity of the UV-B inflammation. In contrast, ratings to tonic mechanical pressure (100 kPa for 10 seconds, peak VAS 58 ± 7 vs VAS 21 ± 5 [NGF] and VAS 12 ± 3 [UV-B]) and pinprick (150 mN for 5 seconds, peak VAS 33 ± 7 vs VAS 10 ± 2 [NGF] and VAS 8 ± 3 [UV-B]) increased in a supra-additive manner. This supra-additive effect faded 24 hours after irradiation, although heat sensitization remained increased. Hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain coexisted in NGF/UV-B treated skin but did not significantly correlate (r < -0.1 at day 1 and r < 0.2 at day 3). We conclude that NGF can sensitize nociceptive endings such that inflammatory mediators may cause sufficient excitation to provoke spontaneous pain. Our results suggest that neuronal sensitization and level of inflammation represent independent therapeutic targets in chronic inflammatory pain conditions. PMID:23933233

  1. Botulinum Toxin B in the Sensory Afferent: Transmitter release, Spinal activation and Pain Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Marc J.; Terashima, Tetsuji; Steinauer, Joanne J.; Eddinger, Kelly A.; Yaksh, Tony L.; Xu, Qinghao

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the hypothesis that intraplantar Botulinum toxin B (rimabotulinumtoxin B: BoNT-B) has an early local effect upon peripheral afferent terminal releasing function and over time will be transported to the central terminals of the primary afferent. Once in the terminals it will cleave synaptic protein, block spinal afferent transmitter release and thereby prevent spinal nociceptive excitation and behavior. In mice, C57Bl/6 males, intraplantar BoNT-B (1U), given unilaterally into the hind paw had no effect upon survival or motor function but ipsilaterally decreased: i) intraplantar formalin evoked flinching; ii) intraplantar capsaicin evoked plasma extravasation in the hindpaw measured by Evans blue in the paw; iii) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn SP release (NK1 receptor internalization); iv) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn neuronal activation (cFos); v) ipsilateral DRG VAMP; vi) ipsilateral SP release otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal capsaicin; vii) ipsilateral activation of cFos otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal substance P. These results indicate that BoNT-B after unilateral intraplantar delivery is taken up by the peripheral terminal, is locally active (blocking plasma extravasation), is transported to the ipsilateral DRG to cleave VAMP and is acting presynaptically to block release from the spinal peptidergic terminal. The observations following intrathecal SP offer evidence for a possible transsynaptic effect of intraplantar BoNT. These results provide robust evidence that peripheral BoNT-B can alter peripheral and central terminal release from a nociceptor and attenuate downstream nociceptive processing via a presynaptic effect, with further evidence suggesting a possible postsynaptic effect. PMID:24333775

  2. Differential contributions of A- and C-nociceptors to primary and secondary inflammatory hypersensitivity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Tzu; Donaldson, Lucy F; Lumb, Bridget M

    2015-06-01

    Primary hyperalgesia is characterized by increased responsiveness to both heat and mechanical stimulation in the area of injury. By contrast, secondary hyperalgesia is generally associated with increased responses to mechanical but not heat stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that sensitization in secondary hyperalgesia is dependent on the class of peripheral nociceptor (C- or A-nociceptor) rather than the modality of stimulation (mechanical vs heat). A- and C-nociceptors were selectively activated using contact heat ramps applied to the hind paw dorsum in animals with hind paw inflammation (primary hyperalgesia) and knee inflammatory arthritis (secondary hyperalgesia). Sensitization to A- and C-nociceptor activation in primary and secondary hyperalgesia was assessed by reflex withdrawal thresholds and by Fos immunocytochemistry in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, as an index of neuronal activation. In primary hyperalgesia, only C-nociceptor-evoked withdrawal reflexes were sensitized. This was associated with increased spinal lamina I neuronal activation to both A- and C-nociceptor activation. Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) was unchanged in other dorsal horn laminae. In secondary hyperalgesia, only A-nociceptor-evoked withdrawal reflexes were sensitized, and FLI was increased in both superficial and deep dorsal laminae. Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn receive and process nociceptor inputs from the area of primary hyperalgesia, resulting in functional sensitization to C-nociceptive inputs. In inflammatory arthritis, secondary hyperalgesia is evoked by A-nociceptor thermal stimulation, suggesting that secondary hyperalgesia is A-nociceptor, rather than stimulus modality (mechanical vs thermal), dependent. Fos-like immunoreactivity evoked by A-nociceptor stimulation in secondary hyperalgesia suggests that the sensitization is underpinned by spinal neuronal sensitization in laminae I and IV/V. PMID:25760474

  3. Differential contributions of A- and C-nociceptors to primary and secondary inflammatory hypersensitivity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Tzu; Donaldson, Lucy F.; Lumb, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary hyperalgesia is characterized by increased responsiveness to both heat and mechanical stimulation in the area of injury. By contrast, secondary hyperalgesia is generally associated with increased responses to mechanical but not heat stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that sensitization in secondary hyperalgesia is dependent on the class of peripheral nociceptor (C- or A-nociceptor) rather than the modality of stimulation (mechanical vs heat). A- and C-nociceptors were selectively activated using contact heat ramps applied to the hind paw dorsum in animals with hind paw inflammation (primary hyperalgesia) and knee inflammatory arthritis (secondary hyperalgesia). Sensitization to A- and C-nociceptor activation in primary and secondary hyperalgesia was assessed by reflex withdrawal thresholds and by Fos immunocytochemistry in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, as an index of neuronal activation. In primary hyperalgesia, only C-nociceptor-evoked withdrawal reflexes were sensitized. This was associated with increased spinal lamina I neuronal activation to both A- and C-nociceptor activation. Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) was unchanged in other dorsal horn laminae. In secondary hyperalgesia, only A-nociceptor-evoked withdrawal reflexes were sensitized, and FLI was increased in both superficial and deep dorsal laminae. Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn receive and process nociceptor inputs from the area of primary hyperalgesia, resulting in functional sensitization to C-nociceptive inputs. In inflammatory arthritis, secondary hyperalgesia is evoked by A-nociceptor thermal stimulation, suggesting that secondary hyperalgesia is A-nociceptor, rather than stimulus modality (mechanical vs thermal), dependent. Fos-like immunoreactivity evoked by A-nociceptor stimulation in secondary hyperalgesia suggests that the sensitization is underpinned by spinal neuronal sensitization in laminae I and IV/V. PMID:25760474

  4. Responses in muscle afferent fibres of slow conduction velocity to contractions and ischaemia in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Mense, S; Stahnke, M

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out to what extent muscle receptors with slowly conducting afferent fibres (group III and IV) are activated by muscular contractions of moderate force, and what kind of muscle afferents could mediate the pain of ischaemic exercise. In chloralose-anaesthetized cats, the impulse activity of single afferent units from the triceps surae muscle was recorded from dorsal root filaments during muscular contractions with intact blood supply and after occlusion of the muscle artery. Two types of responses were observed to contractions without muscular ischaemia. One was characterized by sudden onset and a graded response amplitude to contractions of increasing force. In most cases stretching the muscle was also an effective stimulus. Units showing this response behaviour were labelled c.s.m (contraction-sensitive with mechanical mechanism of activation). The other response type had a more delayed onset and often outlasted the exercise period; because of the unknown mechanism of activation, units of this kind were labelled c.s.x. The proportion of c.s.m receptors was significantly higher amongst group III than amongst group IV units. During ischaemic contractions of comparable force the c.s.m and c.s.x receptors exhibited an unchanged or a decreased response amplitude. Under these conditions another receptor type (N, for nociceptive) was activated which did not respond to contractions with intact blood supply. Vigorous activations during ischaemic work were only observed in group IV receptors. The majority of the 131 group III and IV units tested did not respond to contractions at all. These contraction-insensitive (c.i.) endings probably comprised different receptor populations (nociceptors, thermoreceptors, low-threshold mechanoreceptors). It is concluded that the various central nervous effects of muscular exercise without ischaemia which are known to be due to raised activity in thin muscle afferents (e.g. cardiopulmonary adjustments

  5. Nerve growth factor induces sensitization of nociceptors without evidence for increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Michael; Rukwied, Roman; Gromann, Alois; Turnquist, Brian; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Francke, Klaus; Albrecht, Philip; Rice, Frank; Hägglöf, Björn; Ringkamp, Matthias; Engelhardt, Maren; Schultz, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Obreja, Otilia

    2013-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is involved in the long-term sensitization of nociceptive processing linked to chronic pain. Functional and structural ("sprouting") changes can contribute. Thus, humans report long-lasting hyperalgesia to mechanical and electrical stimulation after intradermal NGF injection and NGF-induced sprouting has been reported to underlie cancer bone pain and visceral pain. Using a human-like animal model we investigated the relationship between the structure and function of unmyelinated porcine nociceptors 3 weeks after intradermal NGF treatment. Axonal and sensory characteristics were studied by in vivo single-fiber electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry. C fibers recorded extracellularly were classified based on mechanical response and activity-dependent slowing (ADS) of conduction velocity. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) densities were assessed by immunohistochemistry in pigs and in human volunteers using the same NGF model. NGF increased conduction velocity and reduced ADS and propagation failure in mechano-insensitive nociceptors. The proportion of mechano-sensitive C nociceptors within NGF-treated skin areas increased from 45.1% (control) to 71% and their median mechanical thresholds decreased from 40 to 20 mN. After NGF application, the mechanical receptive fields of nociceptors increased from 25 to 43 mm(2). At the structural level, however, IENF density was not increased by NGF. In conclusion, intradermal NGF induces long-lasting axonal and mechanical sensitization in porcine C nociceptors that corresponds to hyperalgesia observed in humans. Sensitization is not accompanied by increased IENF density, suggesting that NGF-induced hyperalgesia might not depend on changes in nerve fiber density but could be linked to the recruitment of previously silent nociceptors. PMID:23891896

  6. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion. I. Rhythm generation

    PubMed Central

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical systems methods, in a series of two papers, we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed and open loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback and to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structure in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury. PMID:22058274

  7. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical system methods, in a series of two papers we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed- and open-loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback, and then to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structures in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury. PMID:22058274

  8. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical system methods, in a series of two papers we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed- and open-loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback, and then to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structures in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury.

  9. Transcriptional profile in afferent lymph cells following vaccination with liposomes incorporating CpG

    PubMed Central

    Neeland, Melanie R; Elhay, Martin J; Powell, David R; Rossello, Fernando J; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine formulations incorporating innate immune stimulants are highly immunogenic; however, the biological signals that originate in the peripheral tissues at the site of injection and are transmitted to the local lymph node to induce immunity remain unclear. By directly cannulating the ovine afferent lymphatic vessels, we have previously shown that it takes 72 hr for mature antigen-loaded dendritic cells and monocytes to appear within afferent lymph following injection of a liposomal formulation containing the Toll-like receptor ligand CpG. In this present study, we characterize the global transcriptional signatures at this time-point in ovine afferent lymph cells as they migrate from the injection site into the lymphatics following vaccination with a liposome antigen formulation incorporating CpG. We show that at 72 hr post vaccination, liposomes alone induce no changes in gene expression and inflammatory profiles within afferent lymph; however, the incorporation of CpG drives interferon, antiviral and cytotoxic gene programmes. This study also measures the expression of key genes within individual cell types in afferent lymph. Antiviral gene signatures are most prominent in lymphocytes, which may play a significant and unexpected role in sustaining the immune response to vaccination at the site of injection. These findings provide a comprehensive analysis of the in vivo immunological pathways that connect the injection site with the local draining lymph node following vaccination. PMID:25308816

  10. Transcriptional profile in afferent lymph cells following vaccination with liposomes incorporating CpG.

    PubMed

    Neeland, Melanie R; Elhay, Martin J; Powell, David R; Rossello, Fernando J; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2014-10-10

    Vaccine formulations incorporating innate immune stimulants are highly immunogenic, however the biological signals that originate in the peripheral tissues at the site of injection and are transmitted to the local lymph node to induce immunity remain unclear. By directly cannulating the ovine afferent lymphatic vessels, we have previously shown that it takes 72 hours for mature antigen-loaded dendritic cells and monocytes to appear within afferent lymph following injection of a liposomal formulation containing the TLR ligand CpG. In this present study, we characterise the global transcriptional signatures at this time point in ovine afferent lymph cells as they migrate from the injection site into the lymphatics following vaccination with a liposome antigen formulation incorporating CpG. We show that at 72h post vaccination, liposomes alone induce no changes in gene expression and inflammatory profiles within afferent lymph; however the incorporation of CpG drives interferon, antiviral and cytotoxic gene programs. This study also measures the expression of key genes within individual cell types in afferent lymph. Antiviral gene signatures are most prominent in lymphocytes, which may play a significant and unexpected role in sustaining the immune response to vaccination at the site of injection. These findings provide a comprehensive analysis of the in vivo immunological pathways that connect the injection site with the local draining lymph node following vaccination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID:25308816

  11. An in vivo tethered toxin approach for the cell-autonomous inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channel currents in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Stürzebecher, Annika S; Hu, Jing; Smith, Ewan St John; Frahm, Silke; Santos-Torres, Julio; Kampfrath, Branka; Auer, Sebastian; Lewin, Gary R; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2010-01-01

    Understanding information flow in sensory pathways requires cell-selective approaches to manipulate the activity of defined neurones. Primary afferent nociceptors, which detect painful stimuli, are enriched in specific voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) subtypes. Toxins derived from venomous animals can be used to dissect the contributions of particular ion currents to cell physiology. Here we have used a transgenic approach to target a membrane-tethered isoform of the conotoxin MrVIa (t-MrVIa) only to nociceptive neurones in mice. T-MrVIa transgenic mice show a 44 ± 7% reduction of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) VGSC current densities. This inhibition is permanent, reversible and does not result in functional upregulation of TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) VGSCs, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels present in nociceptive neurones. As a consequence of the reduction of TTX-R VGSC currents, t-MrVIa transgenic mice display decreased inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, cold pain insensitivity and reduced firing of cutaneous C-fibres sensitive to noxious cold temperatures. These data validate the use of genetically encoded t-toxins as a powerful tool to manipulate VGSCs in specific cell types within the mammalian nervous system. This novel genetic methodology can be used for circuit mapping and has the key advantage that it enables the dissection of the contribution of specific ionic currents to neuronal function and to behaviour. PMID:20308253

  12. Exposure to Gulf War Illness chemicals induces functional muscarinic receptor maladaptations in muscle nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B Y; Johnson, R D; Nutter, T J

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is a component of the multisymptom disease known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). There is evidence that pain symptoms could have been a consequence of prolonged and/or excessive exposure to anticholinesterases and other GW chemicals. We previously reported that rats exposed, for 8 weeks, to a mixture of anticholinesterases (pyridostigmine bromide, chlorpyrifos) and a Nav (voltage activated Na(+) channel) deactivation-inhibiting pyrethroid, permethrin, exhibited a behavior pattern that was consistent with a delayed myalgia. This myalgia-like behavior was accompanied by persistent changes to Kv (voltage activated K(+)) channel physiology in muscle nociceptors (Kv7, KDR). In the present study, we examined how exposure to the above agents altered the reactivity of Kv channels to a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist (oxotremorine-M). Comparisons between muscle nociceptors harvested from vehicle and GW chemical-exposed rats revealed that mAChR suppression of Kv7 activity was enhanced in exposed rats. Yet in these same muscle nociceptors, a Stromatoxin-insensitive component of the KDR (voltage activated delayed rectifier K(+) channel) exhibited decreased sensitivity to activation of mAChR. We have previously shown that a unique mAChR-induced depolarization and burst discharge (MDBD) was exaggerated in muscle nociceptors of rats exposed to GW chemicals. We now provide evidence that both muscle and vascular nociceptors of naïve rats exhibit MDBD. Examination of the molecular basis of the MDBD in naïve animals revealed that while the mAChR depolarization was independent of Kv7, the action potential burst was modulated by Kv7 status. mAChR depolarizations were shown to be dependent, in part, on TRPA1. We argue that dysfunction of the MDBD could be a functional convergence point for maladapted ion channels and receptors consequent to exposure to GW chemicals. PMID:27058124

  13. Systemic morphine treatment induces changes in firing patterns and responses of nociceptive afferent fibers in mouse glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dale; Baker, Alyssa L; Morón, Jose A; Carlton, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Patients receiving opioids for pain may experience decreased effectiveness of the drug and even abnormal pain sensitivity-hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. We hypothesized that peripheral nociceptor hyperexcitability contributes to opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tested this using an in vitro mouse glabrous skin-nerve preparation. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of morphine (5, 8, 10, 15 mg/kg) or saline every 12 hours for 48 hours and killed approximately 12 hours after the last injection. Receptive fields of nociceptors were tested for mechanical, heat, and cold sensitivity. Activity was also measured during an initial 2-minute period and during 5-minute periods between stimuli. Aberrant activity was common in fibers from morphine-treated mice but rare in saline-treated mice. Resting background activity was elevated in C-fibers from morphine-treated mice. Both C- and Aδ-fibers had afterdischarge in response to mechanical, heat, and/or cold stimulation of the skin as well as spontaneous, unevoked activity. Compared to saline, morphine treatment increased the proportion of fibers displaying polymodal rather than mechanical-only responses. A significant increase in Aδ-mechanoreceptive fibers responding to cold accounted for most of this change. In agreement with this, morphine-treated mice showed increased sensitivity in the cold tail flick test. In morphine-treated mice, aberrant activity and hyperexcitability of nociceptors could contribute to increased pain sensitivity. Importantly, this activity is likely driving central sensitization, a phenomenon contributing to abnormal sensory processing and chronic pain. If similar changes occur in human patients, aberrant nociceptor activity is likely to be interpreted as pain and could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:23711478

  14. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  15. Vestibular afferent responses to microrotational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1991-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recording/labeling techniques were used to investigate vestibular afferent responses in the bullfrog, to very small amplitude (less than 5 deg p-p) sinusoidal rotations in the vertical plane over the frequency range of 0.063-4 Hz. Robust responses to peak accelerations as low as 0.031 deg/sec per sec were obtained from units subsequently traced to either the central portion of the anterior canal crista or the striolar region of the utricle. All of these microrotationally sensitive afferent neurons had irregular resting discharge rates, and the majority had transfer ratios (relative to rotational velocity) of 1-40 spikes/sec per deg/sec. Individual utricular afferent velocity transfer ratios were nearly constant over the frequency range of 0.125-4 Hz. Canal units displayed decreasing response transfer ratios as stimulus frequencies increased. These findings indicate that, although utricular striolar and central crista afferent velocity transfer ratios to microrotations were very similar, utricular striolar afferent neurons were more faithful sensors of very small amplitude rotational velocity in the vertical plane.

  16. Afferent control of locomotor CPG: insights from a simple neuromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Markin, Sergey N; Klishko, Alexander N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Lemay, Michel A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A

    2010-06-01

    A simple neuromechanical model has been developed that describes a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) controlling the locomotor movement of a single-joint limb via activation of two antagonist (flexor and extensor) muscles. The limb performs rhythmic movements under control of the muscular, gravitational and ground reaction forces. Muscle afferents provide length-dependent (types Ia and II) and force-dependent (type Ib from the extensor) feedback to the CPG. We show that afferent feedback adjusts CPG operation to the kinematics and dynamics of the limb providing stable "locomotion." Increasing the supraspinal drive to the CPG increases locomotion speed by reducing the duration of stance phase. We show that such asymmetric, extensor-dominated control of locomotor speed (with relatively constant swing duration) is provided by afferent feedback independent of the asymmetric rhythmic pattern generated by the CPG alone (in "fictive locomotion" conditions). Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of reestablishing stable locomotion after removal of the supraspinal drive (associated with spinal cord injury) by increasing the weights of afferent inputs to the CPG, which is thought to occur following locomotor training. PMID:20536917

  17. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C. Y.; Fitzpatrick, Richard C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance. PMID:25894558

  18. The innate response to peanut extract in ovine afferent lymph and its correlation with allergen sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Van Gramberg, Jenna L; Bischof, Robert J; O'Hehir, Robyn E; de Veer, Michael J; Meeusen, Els N

    2015-07-01

    The innate response generated after initial allergen exposure is crucial for polarising adaptive immunity, but little is known about how it drives an atopic or type-2 immune response. The present study characterises the response of skin-draining afferent lymph in sheep following injection with peanut (PN) extract in the presence or absence of aluminium hydroxide (AlOH) adjuvant. Lymph was collected and innate cell populations characterised over an 84 h time period. The innate response to PN extract in afferent lymph displayed an early increase in neutrophils and monocytes without any changes in the dendritic cell (DC) population. PN antigen was transported by neutrophils and monocytes for the first 36 h, after which time DCs were the major antigen trafficking cells. AlOH adjuvant gradually increased antigen uptake by DCs at the later time points. Following lymphatic characterisation, sheep were sensitised with PN extract by three subcutaneous injections of PN in AlOH, and the level of PN-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was determined. Sheep with higher levels of steady-state DCs in afferent lymph showed increased monocytic recruitment in afferent lymph and reduced PN-specific IgE following sensitisation. In addition, DCs from afferent lymph that had ingested PN antigen increased the expression of monocyte chemoattractant mRNA. The results of this study show that the innate response to PN extract involves a dynamic change in cell populations in the afferent lymph over time. In addition, DCs may determine the strength of the initial inflammatory cell response, which in turn may determine the nature of the antigen-specific adaptive response. PMID:25666095

  19. Cannabinoids mediate analgesia largely via peripheral type 1 cannabinoid receptors in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Nitin; Pacher, Pal; Tegeder, Irmgard; Amaya, Fumimasa; Constantin, Cristina E; Brenner, Gary J; Rubino, Tiziana; Michalski, Christoph W; Marsicano, Giovanni; Monory, Krisztina; Mackie, Ken; Marian, Claudiu; Batkai, Sandor; Parolaro, Daniela; Fischer, Michael J; Reeh, Peter; Kunos, George; Kress, Michaela; Lutz, Beat; Woolf, Clifford J; Kuner, Rohini

    2008-01-01

    Although endocannabinoids constitute one of the first lines of defense against pain, the anatomical locus and the precise receptor mechanisms underlying cannabinergic modulation of pain are uncertain. Clinical exploitation of the system is severely hindered by the cognitive deficits, memory impairment, motor disturbances and psychotropic effects resulting from the central actions of cannabinoids. We deleted the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) specifically in nociceptive neurons localized in the peripheral nervous system of mice, preserving its expression in the CNS, and analyzed these genetically modified mice in preclinical models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The nociceptor-specific loss of CB1 substantially reduced the analgesia produced by local and systemic, but not intrathecal, delivery of cannabinoids. We conclude that the contribution of CB1-type receptors expressed on the peripheral terminals of nociceptors to cannabinoid-induced analgesia is paramount, which should enable the development of peripherally acting CB1 analgesic agonists without any central side effects. PMID:17558404

  20. Neuroanatomy of extrinsic afferents supplying the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Blackshaw, L A; Brookes, S J H; Grundy, D

    2004-04-01

    Here we discuss the neuroanatomy of extrinsic gastrointestinal (GI) afferent neurones, the relationship between structure and function and the role of afferents in disease. Three pathways connect the gut to the central nervous system: vagal afferents signal mainly from upper GI regions, pelvic afferents mainly from the colorectal region and splanchnic afferents from throughout. Vagal afferents mediate reflex regulation of gut function and behaviour, operating mainly at physiological levels. There are two major functional classes - tension receptors, responding to muscular contraction and distension, and mucosal receptors. The function of vagal endings correlates well with their anatomy: tracing studies show intramuscular arrays (IMAs) and intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs); IGLEs are now known to respond to tension. Functional mucosal receptors correlate with endings traced to the lamina propria. Pelvic afferents serve similar functions to vagal afferents, and additionally mediate both innocuous and noxious sensations. Splanchnic afferents comprise mucosal and stretch-sensitive afferents with low thresholds in addition to high-threshold serosal/mesenteric afferents suggesting diverse roles. IGLEs, probably of pelvic origin, have been identified recently in the rectum and respond similarly to gastric vagal IGLEs. Gastrointestinal afferents may be sensitized or inhibited by chemical mediators released from several cell types. Whether functional changes have anatomical correlates is not known, but it is likely that they underlie diseases involving visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15066001

  1. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain. PMID:26520849

  2. Mechanical sensibility of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fast-conducting afferents is modulated by skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Eisenach, James C; Ririe, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish mechanical from thermal input is a critical component of peripheral somatosensory function. Polymodal C fibers respond to both stimuli. However, mechanosensitive, modality-specific fast-conducting tactile and nociceptor afferents theoretically carry information only about mechanical forces independent of the thermal environment. We hypothesize that the thermal environment can nonetheless modulate mechanical force sensibility in fibers that do not respond directly to change in temperature. To study this, fast-conducting mechanosensitive peripheral sensory fibers in male Sprague-Dawley rats were accessed at the soma in the dorsal root ganglia from T11 or L4/L5. Neuronal identification was performed using receptive field characteristics and passive and active electrical properties. Neurons responded to mechanical stimuli but failed to generate action potentials in response to changes in temperature alone, except for the tactile mechanical and cold sensitive neurons. Heat and cold ramps were utilized to determine temperature-induced modulation of response to mechanical stimuli. Mechanically evoked electrical activity in non-nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptors (tactile afferents) decreased in response to changes in temperature while mechanically induced activity was increased in nociceptive, fast-conducting, high-threshold mechanoreceptors in response to the same changes in temperature. These data suggest that mechanical activation does not occur in isolation but rather that temperature changes appear to alter mechanical afferent activity and input to the central nervous system in a dynamic fashion. Further studies to understand the psychophysiological implications of thermal modulation of fast-conducting mechanical input to the spinal cord will provide greater insight into the implications of these findings. PMID:26581873

  3. Contractile properties of afferent and efferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Abe, K

    1997-07-01

    1. The balance of vascular tone of the afferent and efferent arteriole is a crucial determinant of glomerular haemodynamics. Despite their intimate anatomical relationship in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, the mechanisms that regulate afferent and efferent arteriolar tone are different. 2. In the afferent arteriole, two intrinsic mechanisms, the myogenic response and macula densa-mediated tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) play a dominant role, maintaining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at a constant level over a wide range of renal perfusion pressure. Studies have shown that these two mechanisms are modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In addition, an interaction between TGF and angiotensin II (AngII) seems to be essential to maintaining GFR despite large variations in daily intake of salt and water. 3. In the efferent arteriole, neither myogenic response nor TGF seems to be important, while AngII is one major factor involved in the control of vascular resistance. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence that NO and prostaglandins produced by the glomerulus may control resistance of the downstream efferent arteriole. 4. As the early segment of the efferent arteriole resides within the glomerulus, various autacoid hormones produced by the glomerulus may reach and directly act on this segment, thereby controlling the glomerular capillary pressure. Thus, it would be important to understand the differences in the mechanisms operating at the afferent and efferent arteriole, as well as their alterations in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9248673

  4. Whisker-related afferents in superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A; Favero, Morgana

    2016-05-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to explore the environment, and the superior colliculus is part of the neural circuits that process this sensorimotor information. Cells in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus integrate trigeminotectal afferents from trigeminal complex and corticotectal afferents from barrel cortex. Using histological methods in mice, we found that trigeminotectal and corticotectal synapses overlap somewhat as they innervate the lower and upper portions of the intermediate granular layer, respectively. Using electrophysiological recordings and optogenetics in anesthetized mice in vivo, we showed that, similar to rats, whisker deflections produce two successive responses that are driven by trigeminotectal and corticotectal afferents. We then employed in vivo and slice experiments to characterize the response properties of these afferents. In vivo, corticotectal responses triggered by electrical stimulation of the barrel cortex evoke activity in the superior colliculus that increases with stimulus intensity and depresses with increasing frequency. In slices from adult mice, optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing trigeminotectal and corticotectal fibers revealed that cells in the intermediate layers receive more efficacious trigeminotectal, than corticotectal, synaptic inputs. Moreover, the efficacy of trigeminotectal inputs depresses more strongly with increasing frequency than that of corticotectal inputs. The intermediate layers of superior colliculus appear to be tuned to process strong but infrequent trigeminal inputs and weak but more persistent cortical inputs, which explains features of sensory responsiveness, such as the robust rapid sensory adaptation of whisker responses in the superior colliculus. PMID:26864754

  5. Steroid Receptor Isoform Expression in Drosophila Nociceptor Neurons Is Required for Normal Dendritic Arbor and Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    McParland, Aidan L.; Follansbee, Taylor L.; Vesenka, Gwendolyn D.; Panaitiu, Alexandra E.; Ganter, Geoffrey K.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones organize many aspects of development, including that of the nervous system. Steroids also play neuromodulatory and other activational roles, including regulation of sensitivity to painful stimuli in mammals. In Drosophila, ecdysteroids are the only steroid hormones, and therefore the fly represents a simplified model system in which to explore mechanisms of steroid neuromodulation of nociception. In this report, we present evidence that ecdysteroids, acting through two isoforms of their nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR), modulate sensitivity to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli in the fly larva. We show that EcRA and EcRB1 are expressed by third instar larvae in the primary nociceptor neurons, known as the class IV multidendritic neurons. Suppression of EcRA by RNA interference in these cells leads to hyposensitivity to noxious stimulation. Suppression of EcRB1 leads to reduction of dendritic branching and length of nociceptor neurons. We show that specific isoforms of the ecdysone receptor play critical cell autonomous roles in modulating the sensitivity of nociceptor neurons and may indicate human orthologs that represent targets for novel analgesic drugs. PMID:26495837

  6. Chemical response pattern of different classes of C-nociceptors to pruritogens and algogens.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Schmidt, R; Weidner, C; Hilliges, Marita; Torebjork, H E; Handwerker, H O

    2003-05-01

    Vasoneuroactive substances were applied through intradermal microdialysis membranes and characterized as itch- or pain-inducing in psychophysical experiments. Histamine always provoked itching and rarely pain, capsaicin always pain but never itching. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) led preferentially to moderate itching. Serotonin, acetylcholine, and bradykinin induced pain more often than itching. Subsequently the same substances were used in microneurography experiments to characterize the sensitivity profile of human cutaneous C-nociceptors. The responses of 89 mechanoresponsive (CMH, polymodal nociceptors), 52 mechanoinsensitive, histamine-negative (CMi(His-)), and 24 mechanoinsensitive, histamine-positive (CMi(His+)) units were compared. CMi(His+) units were most responsive to histamine and to PGE(2) and less to serotonin, ACh, bradykinin, and capsaicin. CMH units (polymodal nociceptors) and CMi(His-) units showed significantly weaker responses to histamine, PGE(2), and acetylcholine. Capsaicin and bradykinin responses were not significantly different in the two classes of mechano-insensitive units. We conclude that CMi(His+) units are "selective," but not "specific" for pruritogenic substances and that the pruritic potency of a mediator increases with its ability to activate CMi(His+) units but decreases with activation of CMH and CMi(His-) units. PMID:12611975

  7. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain

    PubMed Central

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J.; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A.; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  8. 5,6-EET Is Released upon Neuronal Activity and Induces Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity via TRPA1 on Central Afferent Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Park, Chul-Kyu; Angioni, Carlo; Zhang, Dong Dong; von Hehn, Christian; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kumaran, Vigneswara; Lu, Ruirui; Grant, Andrew; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidtko, Achim; Reeh, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus; Brenneis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450-epoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid that act as endogenous signaling molecules in multiple biological systems. Here we have investigated the specific contribution of 5,6-EET to transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation in nociceptor neurons and its consequence for nociceptive processing. We found that, during capsaicin-induced nociception, 5,6-EET levels increased in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the dorsal spinal cord, and 5,6-EET is released from activated sensory neurons in vitro. 5,6-EET potently induced a calcium flux (100 nm) in cultured DRG neurons that was completely abolished when TRPA1 was deleted or inhibited. In spinal cord slices, 5,6-EET dose dependently enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons that also responded to mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate), indicating a presynaptic action. Furthermore, 5,6-EET-induced enhancement of sEPSC frequency was abolished in TRPA1-null mice, suggesting that 5,6-EET presynaptically facilitated spinal cord synaptic transmission by TRPA1. Finally, in vivo intrathecal injection of 5,6-EET caused mechanical allodynia in wild-type but not TRPA1-null mice. We conclude that 5,6-EET is synthesized on the acute activation of nociceptors and can produce mechanical hypersensitivity via TRPA1 at central afferent terminals in the spinal cord. PMID:22553041

  9. Persistent Electrical Activity in Primary Nociceptors after Spinal Cord Injury Is Maintained by Scaffolded Adenylyl Cyclase and Protein Kinase A and Is Associated with Altered Adenylyl Cyclase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bavencoffe, Alexis; Li, Yong; Wu, Zizhen; Yang, Qing; Herrera, Juan; Kennedy, Eileen J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about intracellular signaling mechanisms that persistently excite neurons in pain pathways. Persistent spontaneous activity (SA) generated in the cell bodies of primary nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been found to make major contributions to chronic pain in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI) (Bedi et al., 2010; Yang et al., 2014). The occurrence of SCI-induced SA in a large fraction of DRG neurons and the persistence of this SA long after dissociation of the neurons provide an opportunity to define intrinsic cell signaling mechanisms that chronically drive SA in pain pathways. The present study demonstrates that SCI-induced SA requires continuing activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), as well as a scaffolded complex containing AC5/6, A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), and PKA. SCI caused a small but significant increase in the expression of AKAP150 but not other AKAPs. DRG membranes isolated from SCI animals revealed a novel alteration in the regulation of AC. AC activity stimulated by Ca2+-calmodulin increased, while the inhibition of AC activity by Gαi showed an unexpected and dramatic decrease after SCI. Localized enhancement of the activity of AC within scaffolded complexes containing PKA is likely to contribute to chronic pathophysiological consequences of SCI, including pain, that are promoted by persistent hyperactivity in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic neuropathic pain is a major clinical problem with poorly understood mechanisms and inadequate treatments. Recent findings indicate that chronic pain in a rat SCI model depends upon hyperactivity in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Although cAMP signaling is involved in many forms of neural plasticity, including hypersensitivity of nociceptors in the presence of inflammatory mediators, our finding that continuing cAMP-PKA signaling is required for persistent SA months after SCI and long after isolation of

  10. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:22409855

  11. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human disease–derived stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, James R.F.; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Yip, Ping K.; Chan, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Winchester, Wendy J.; Knowles, Charles H.; Bulmer, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and for sensitization of mouse colonic afferents by mediators from inflammatory bowel disease tissues, and by noxious inflammatory mediators individually. Excitatory responses to ATP or PGE2 were substantially reduced in NaV1.9−/− mice. Deletion of NaV1.9 substantially attenuates excitation and subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity after application of inflammatory soup (IS) (bradykinin, ATP, histamine, PGE2, and 5HT) to visceral nociceptors located in the serosa and mesentery. Responses to mechanical stimulation of mesenteric afferents were also reduced by loss of NaV1.9, and there was a rightward shift in stimulus–response function to ramp colonic distension. By contrast, responses to rapid, high-intensity phasic distension of the colon are initially unaffected; however, run-down of responses to repeat phasic distension were exacerbated in NaV1.9−/− afferents. Finally colonic afferent activation by supernatants derived from inflamed human tissue was greatly reduced in NaV1.9−/− mice. These results demonstrate that NaV1.9 is required for persistence of responses to intense mechanical stimulation, contributes to inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, and is essential for activation by noxious inflammatory mediators, including those from diseased human bowel. These observations indicate that NaV1.9 represents a high-value target for development of visceral analgesics. PMID:24972070

  12. Involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerves in the proteinase-activated receptor 2-mediated vasodilatation in the rat dura mater.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Rosta, J; Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2009-07-01

    Neurogenic inflammation of the dura mater encephali has been suggested to contribute to the mechanisms of meningeal nociception and blood flow regulation. Recent findings demonstrated that the rat dura mater is innervated by trigeminal capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic nociceptive afferent nerves which mediate meningeal vascular responses through activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. The present work explored the functional significance of the capsaicin-sensitive subpopulation of dural afferent nerves via their contribution to the meningeal vascular responses evoked through activation of the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). The vascular responses of the dura mater were studied by laser Doppler flowmetry in a rat open cranial window preparation. Topical applications of trypsin, a PAR-2-activator, or Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-amide (SLIGRL-NH(2)), a selective PAR-2 agonist peptide, resulted in dose-dependent increases in meningeal blood flow. The SLIGRL-NH(2)-induced vasodilatation was significantly reduced following capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerve defunctionalization by prior systemic capsaicin treatment and by pretreatment of the dura mater with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37). Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) an unspecific inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production, but not 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole (TRIM), a neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, also inhibited the vasodilator response to SLIGRL-NH(2). The vasodilator responses elicited by very low concentrations of capsaicin (10 nM) were significantly enhanced by prior application of SLIGRL-NH(2). The present findings demonstrate that activation of the PAR-2 localized on capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal nociceptive afferent nerves induces vasodilatation in the dural vascular bed by mechanisms involving NO and CGRP release. The results indicate that the PAR-2-mediated activation and

  13. Blockage of vibrissae afferents: I. Motor effects.

    PubMed

    Prchal, A; Albarracín, A L; Décima, E E

    2004-02-01

    In the past, it has been proposed that the rat vibrissae play an important role in other hand, postural abnormalities, muscle tone decreases and hypomotility after sensory organ destructions were proposed as evidence supporting the "level setting" or "tonic" hypothesis. This hypothesis postulates that afferent activity, besides its well know transductive functions, sets the excitability state of the central nervous system. We thought the vibrissal system to be a good model to dissect these two postulated roles because vibrissae trimming would annul the transductive function without affecting the integrity of nerve activity. Thus we compare the effects of trimming the whiskers with blocking the vibrissal afferent nerves on two types of motor behavior: activity in an open field and walking over a rope connecting two elevated platforms. We found that only vibrissal afferent blockage (both nerve section and local anaesthesia) produced severe failures in the motor performances studied. These effects could not be fully explained by the abolition of the vibrissae as a sensory modality because cutting the whiskers did not significantly affect the motor performance. These data are discussed in reference to a tonic or general excitatory function of sensory inputs upon the central nervous system. PMID:15143620

  14. Role of Nociceptor Estrogen Receptor GPR30 in a Rat Model of Endometriosis Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Bogen, Oliver; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis, the most common cause of chronic pelvic pain, is an estrogen-dependent disease in which classic estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) play an important role. While recent evidence suggests that the novel G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) also plays a key role in the progression of endometriosis, whether it is also involved in endometriosis pain is still unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that GPR30 expressed by nociceptors contributes to endometriosis pain. Intramuscular injection of the GPR30 agonists raloxifene or 17β-estradiol produced a fast-onset, persistent, mechanical hyperalgesia at the site of the injection. Intrathecal antisense (AS) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), but not mismatch (MM) ODN, targeting mRNA for GPR30 markedly inhibited its protein expression in nociceptors and attenuated the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by local raloxifene or 17β-estradiol. Pre-treatment with the GPR30 antagonist G-36 also inhibited the hyperalgesia induced by raloxifene or 17β-estradiol, in naïve control rats. Surgical implant of autologous uterine tissue onto the gastrocnemius muscle, which induces endometriosis-like lesions, produced local mechanical hyperalgesia. Intrathecal AS, but not MM, ODN targeting GPR30 mRNA reversibly inhibited the mechanical hyperalgesia at the site of endometriotic lesions. Finally, intralesional injection of the GPR30 antagonist G-36 also inhibited the mechanical hyperalgesia at the site of ectopic uterine tissue. We conclude that local GPR30 agonists produce persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in naïve female rats, whereas local GPR30 antagonists inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia in a model of endometriosis pain. Thus, GPR30 expressed by nociceptors innervating ectopic uterine lesions might play a major role in endometriosis pain. PMID:25280432

  15. ThermoTRP Channels in Nociceptors: Taking a Lead from Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptors with peripheral and central projections express temperature sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, also called thermoTRP’s. Chemosensitivity of thermoTRP’s to certain natural compounds eliciting pain or exhibiting thermal properties has proven to be a good tool in characterizing these receptors. Capsaicin, a pungent chemical in hot peppers, has assisted in the cloning of the first thermoTRP, TRPV1. This discovery initiated the search for other receptors encoding the response to a wide range of temperatures encountered by the body. Of these, TRPV1 and TRPV2 encode unique modalities of thermal pain when exposed to noxious heat. The ability of TRPA1 to encode noxious cold is presently being debated. The role of TRPV1 in peripheral inflammatory pain and central sensitization during chronic pain is well known. In addition to endogenous agonists, a wide variety of chemical agonists and antagonists have been discovered to activate and inhibit TRPV1. Efforts are underway to determine conditions under which agonist-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 or inhibition by antagonists can produce analgesia. Also, identification of specific second messenger molecules that regulate phosphorylation of TRPV1 has been the focus of intense research, to exploit a broader approach to pain treatment. The search for a role of TRPV2 in pain remains dormant due to the lack of suitable experimental models. However, progress into TRPA1’s role in pain has received much attention recently. Another thermoTRP, TRPM8, encoding for the cool sensation and also expressed in nociceptors, has recently been shown to reduce pain via a central mechanism, thus opening a novel strategy for achieving analgesia. The role of other thermoTRP’s (TRPV3 and TRPV4) encoding for detection of warm temperatures and expressed in nociceptors cannot be excluded. This review will discuss current knowledge on the role of nociceptor thermoTRPs in pain and therapy and describes the

  16. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-07-15

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2-3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4% versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ± s.d.; P < 0.001) and superimposed twitches were larger (4.1 ± 1.1% versus 1.8 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC, P = 0.01) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing elbow extensor contraction, maximal flexion torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9% versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P = 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7% versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P = 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2% versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P = 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb. PMID:23652589

  17. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  18. Peripheral Nociceptors as Immune Sensors in the Development of Pain and Itch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system and the immune system perform a series of similar functionalities such as recognizing, responding, and adapting to external or internal stimuli despite significant morphological differences. The peripheral nervous system actively communicates and coordinates with the immune system to function as a unified defense system. The peripheral nervous system is highly regulated by the immune system, especially under inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, the nervous system can modulate the immune system via neurotransmitters and chemokines released by the peripheral nerve endings, particularly from nociceptors. In both physiological and pathological conditions, peripheral nociceptive (including pruriceptive) neurons may express a variety of immune-related receptors, such as chemokine receptors and immunoglobulin (Fc) receptors that are usually found on immune cells. Certain ligands such as chemokines and immune complexes may induce abnormal neuronal hyperexcitability and even ectopic action potential discharges, therefore producing the sensation of pain and/or itch in immune-related diseases. The immune-sensing mechanisms of peripheral nociceptors may play an important role in the development of chronic pain and pruritus and may indicate novel therapeutic strategies for these pathological conditions. PMID:26900064

  19. Do fishes have nociceptors? Evidence for the evolution of a vertebrate sensory system.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, Lynne U; Braithwaite, Victoria A; Gentle, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Nociception is the detection of a noxious tissue-damaging stimulus and is sometimes accompanied by a reflex response such as withdrawal. Pain perception, as distinct from nociception, has been demonstrated in birds and mammals but has not been systematically studied in lower vertebrates. We assessed whether a fish possessed cutaneous nociceptors capable of detecting noxious stimuli and whether its behaviour was sufficiently adversely affected by the administration of a noxious stimulus. Electrophysiological recordings from trigeminal nerves identified polymodal nociceptors on the head of the trout with physiological properties similar to those described in higher vertebrates. These receptors responded to mechanical pressure, temperatures in the noxious range (more than 40 degrees C) and 1% acetic acid, a noxious substance. In higher vertebrates nociceptive nerves are either A-delta or C fibres with C fibres being the predominating fibre type. However, in the rainbow trout A-delta fibres were most common, and this offers insights into the evolution of nociceptive systems. Administration of noxious substances to the lips of the trout affected both the physiology and the behaviour of the animal and resulted in a significant increase in opercular beat rate and the time taken to resume feeding, as well as anomalous behaviours. This study provides significant evidence of nociception in teleost fishes and furthermore demonstrates that behaviour and physiology are affected over a prolonged period of time, suggesting discomfort. PMID:12816648

  20. A Role for K2P Channels in the Operation of Somatosensory Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli is critical to normal physiology and the perception of pain. Contact with noxious stimuli triggers a complex series of events that initiate innate protective mechanisms designed to minimize or avoid injury. Extreme temperatures, mechanical stress, and chemical irritants are detected by specific ion channels and receptors clustered on the terminals of nociceptive sensory nerve fibers and transduced into electrical information. Propagation of these signals, from distant sites in the body to the spinal cord and the higher processing centers of the brain, is also orchestrated by distinct groups of ion channels. Since their identification in 1995, evidence has emerged to support roles for K2P channels at each step along this pathway, as receptors for physiological and noxious stimuli, and as determinants of nociceptor excitability and conductivity. In addition, the many subtypes of K2P channels expressed in somatosensory neurons are also implicated in mediating the effects of volatile, general anesthetics on the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, I offer a critical review of the existing data supporting these attributes of K2P channel function and discuss how diverse regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of K2P channels act to govern the operation of nociceptors. PMID:22403526

  1. DEG/ENaC but not TRP channels are the major mechanoelectrical transduction channels in a C. elegans nociceptor

    PubMed Central

    Geffeney, Shana L.; Cueva, Juan G.; Glauser, Dominique A.; Doll, Joseph C.; Lee, Tim Hau-Chen; Montoya, Misty; Karania, Snetu; Garakani, Arman M.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Many nociceptors detect mechanical cues, but the ion channels responsible for mechanotransduction in these sensory neurons remain obscure. Using in vivo recordings and genetic dissection, we identified the DEG/ENaC protein, DEG-1, as the major mechanotransduction channel in ASH, a polymodal nociceptor in Caenorhabditis elegans. But, DEG-1 is not the only mechanotransduction channel in ASH: loss of deg-1 revealed a minor current whose properties differ from those expected of DEG/ENaC channels. This current was independent of two TRPV channels expressed in ASH. Although loss of these TRPV channels inhibits behavioral responses to noxious stimuli, we found that both mechanoreceptor currents and potentials were essentially wild-type in TRPV mutants. We propose that ASH nociceptors rely on two genetically-distinct mechanotransduction channels and that TRPV channels contribute to encoding and transmitting information. Because mammalian and insect nociceptors also co-express DEG/ENaCs and TRPVs, the cellular functions elaborated here for these ion channels may be conserved. PMID:21903078

  2. Opioids inhibit visceral afferent activation of catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cui, R J; Roberts, B L; Zhao, H; Andresen, M C; Appleyard, S M

    2012-10-11

    Brainstem A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) influence many homeostatic functions, including food intake, stress, respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. They also play a role in both opioid reward and withdrawal. Injections of opioids into the NTS modulate many autonomic functions influenced by catecholamine neurons including food intake and cardiac function. We recently showed that NTS-CA neurons are directly activated by incoming visceral afferent inputs. Here we determined whether opioid agonists modulate afferent activation of NTS-CA neurons using transgenic mice with EGFP expressed under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. The opioid agonist Met-enkephalin (Met-Enk) significantly attenuated solitary tract-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs) in NTS TH-EGFP neurons by 80%, an effect reversed by wash or the mu opioid receptor-specific antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP). Met-Enk had a significantly greater effect to inhibit afferent inputs onto TH-EGFP-positive neurons than EGFP-negative neurons, which were only inhibited by 50%. The mu agonist, DAMGO, also inhibited the ST-EPSC in TH-EGFP neurons in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither the delta agonist DPDPE, nor the kappa agonist, U69,593, consistently inhibited the ST-EPSC amplitude. Met-Enk and DAMGO increased the paired pulse ratio, decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of mini-EPSCs and had no effect on holding current, input resistance or current-voltage relationships in TH-EGFP neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action on afferent terminals. Met-Enk significantly reduced both the basal firing rate of NTS TH-EGFP neurons and the ability of afferent stimulation to evoke an action potential. These results suggest that opioids inhibit NTS-CA neurons by reducing an excitatory afferent drive onto these neurons through presynaptic inhibition of

  3. Divergence in Endothelin-1- and Bradykinin-Activated Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Afferent Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Gomez, Ruben; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and bradykinin (BK) are endogenous peptides that signal through Gαq/11-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to produce nociceptor sensitization and pain. Both peptides activate phospholipase C to stimulate Ca2+ accumulation, diacylglycerol production, and protein kinase C activation and are rapidly desensitized via a G-protein receptor kinase 2-dependent mechanism. However, ET-1 produces a greater response and longer lasting nocifensive behavior than BK in multiple models, indicating a potentially divergent signaling mechanism in primary afferent sensory neurons. Using cultured sensory neurons, we demonstrate significant differences in both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores following ET-1 and BK treatments. As intracellular store depletion may contribute to the regulation of other signaling cascades downstream of GPCRs, we concentrated our investigation on store-operated Ca2+ channels. Using pharmacological approaches, we identified transient receptor potential canonical channel 3 (TRPC3) as a dominant contributor to Ca2+ influx subsequent to ET-1 treatment. On the other hand, BK treatment stimulated Orai1 activation, with only minor input from TRPC3. Taken together, data presented here suggest that ET-1 signaling targets TRPC3, generating a prolonged Ca2+ signal that perpetuates nocifensive responses. In contrast, Orai1 dominates as the downstream target of BK receptor activation and results in transient intracellular Ca2+ increases and abridged nocifensive responses. PMID:25873305

  4. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  5. Selective inhibition of meningeal nociceptors by botulinum neurotoxin type A: Therapeutic implications for migraine and other pains

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Rami; Zhang, XiChun; Levy, Dan; Aoki, K Roger

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningeal and other trigeminal nociceptors are thought to play important roles in the initiation of migraine headache. Currently, the only approved peripherally administered chronic migraine prophylactic drug is onabotulinumtoxinA. The purpose of this study was to determine how botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) affects naïve and sensitized meningeal nociceptors. Material and methods Using electrophysiological techniques, we identified 43 C- and 36 Aδ-meningeal nociceptors, and measured their spontaneous and evoked firing before and after BoNT-A administration to intracranial dura and extracranial suture-receptive fields. Results As a rule, BoNT-A inhibited C- but not Aδ-meningeal nociceptors. When applied to nonsensitized C-units, BoNT-A inhibited responses to mechanical stimulation of the dura with suprathreshold forces. When applied to sensitized units, BoNT-A reversed mechanical hypersensitivity. When applied before sensitization, BoNT-A prevented development of mechanical hypersensitivity. When applied extracranially to suture branches of intracranial meningeal nociceptors, BoNT-A inhibited the mechanical responsiveness of the suture branch but not dural axon. In contrast, BoNT-A did not inhibit C-unit responses to mechanical stimulation of the dura with threshold forces, or their spontaneous activity. Discussion The study provides evidence for the ability of BoNT-A to inhibit mechanical nociception in peripheral trigeminovascular neurons. These findings suggest that BoNT-A interferes with neuronal surface expression of high-threshold mechanosensitive ion channels linked preferentially to mechanical pain by preventing their fusion into the nerve terminal membrane. PMID:24694964

  6. Differential ATF3 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons reveals the profile of primary afferents engaged by diverse noxious chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, João M.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Although transgenic and knockout mice have helped delineate the mechanisms of action of diverse noxious compounds, it is still difficult to determine unequivocally the subpopulations of primary afferent nociceptor that these molecules engage. As most noxious stimuli lead to tissue and/or nerve injury, here we used induction of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a reliable marker of nerve injury, to assess the populations of primary afferent fibers that are activated after peripheral administration of noxious chemical stimuli. In wild-type mice, hindpaw injections of capsaicin, formalin, mustard oil or menthol induce expression of ATF3 in distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. Interestingly, even though these noxious chemicals are thought to act through subtypes of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, all compounds also induced ATF3 in neurons that appear not to express the expected TRP channel subtypes. On the other hand, capsaicin failed to induce ATF3 in mice lacking TRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 is required for both the direct and indirect induction of ATF3 in sensory neurons. By contrast, only low doses of formalin or mustard oil failed to induce ATF3 in TRPA1 null mice, indicating that injections of high doses (>0.5%) of formalin or mustard oil recruit both TRPA1 and non-TRPA1 expressing primary afferent fibers. Finally, peripheral injection of menthol, a TRPM8 receptor agonist, induced ATF3 in a wide variety of sensory neurons, but in a TRPM8-independent manner. We conclude that purportedly selective agonists can activate a heterogeneous population of sensory neurons, which ultimately could contribute to the behavioral responses evoked. PMID:20605331

  7. Does antidromic activation of nociceptors play a role in sciatic radicular pain?

    PubMed

    Xavier, A V; Farrell, C E; McDanal, J; Kissin, I

    1990-01-01

    We describe a case where transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the right sciatic nerve in a patient with right L5 radiculopathy reproduced the patient's pathological pain in the leg. Following a right ankle block with 0.5% bupivacaine, the sciatic nerve stimulation induced pain in the thigh and the calf but not in the foot. Despite an increase in the magnitude of stimulation by 50% (compared with the stimulation before the block) the pain was not perceived below the level of blockade. We suggest that in this case the electrical stimulation generated impulses propagated antidromically into the leg and activated nociceptors in it. The bupivacaine blockade prevented antidromic propagation of impulses into the foot, therefore pain in this region was not perceived. PMID:2339019

  8. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  9. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  10. Circadian variation in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Frisby, Claudine L; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Food intake is coordinated to cellular metabolism by clock gene expression with a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus synchronized by light exposure. Gastric vagal afferents play a role in regulating food intake, but it is unknown whether they exhibit circadian variation in their mechanosensitivity. We aimed to determine whether gastric vagal afferents express clock genes and whether their response to mechanical stimuli oscillates throughout the light/dark cycle. Nodose ganglia were collected from 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice every 3 h starting at lights off (1800 h) to quantify Bmal1, Per1, Per2, and Nr1d1 mRNA by qRT-PCR. Additionally in vitro single-fiber recordings of gastric vagal mechanoreceptors were taken at all time points. Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Nr1d1 mRNA is expressed in the nodose ganglia and levels oscillated over a 24 h period. In mice fed ad libitum, gastric content was 3 times higher at 0000 h and 0300 h than 1200 h. The response of tension receptors to 3 g stretch was reduced by up to 70% at 2100 h, 0000 h, and 0300 h compared with 1200 h. Gastric mucosal receptor response to stroking with a 50 mg von Frey hair was 3 times greater at 1200 h and 1500 h than the response at 0000 h. Similar findings were obtained in mice fasted for 6 h or maintained in darkness for 3 d before study. Therefore, these changes do not result from food intake or the light/dark cycle. Thus, gastric vagal mechanoreceptors display circadian rhythm, which may act to control food intake differentially at different times of the day. PMID:24305819

  11. Identification and properties of parietal pleural afferents in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, Yves; Trousse, Delphine; Delpierre, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    Although pain and dyspnoea are common symptoms in pleural diseases, there are few studies on the sensory innervation of the pleura. Using rabbits, after removal of all muscles in the intercostal space to be studied, we investigated the afferents of the internal intercostal nerve by applying to the internal thoracic wall pieces of gauze soaked in warmed (37°C), buffered saline (mechanical stimulation) or solutions containing lactic acid, inflammatory mediators or capsaicin (chemical stimulation). The afferent conduction velocity ranged from 0.5 to 14 m s−1. Most units (97%) were activated by mechanical stimulation of the pleura (local positive pressure range = 4.5–8.5 cmH2O) and we found a linear relationship between the discharge rate of afferents and the force applied to the thoracic wall. The majority of mechanosensitive units (70%) also responded to one or several chemical agents. Thus, the afferents were activated by lactic acid (49%) and/or a mixture of inflammatory mediators (50%). Local application of capsaicin elicited an initial increased or decreased background afferent activity in 57% of the afferents, a delayed decrease in firing rate being noted in some units initially activated by capsaicin. Capsaicin blocked the afferent response to a further application of inflammatory mediators but did not affect the mechanosensitive units. Thus, sensory endings connected with thin myelinated and unmyelinated fibres in the internal intercostal nerve detect the mechanical and chemical events of pleural diseases. PMID:15975985

  12. Sensory afferent segregation in three-eared frogs resemble the dominance columns observed in three-eyed frogs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Karen L.; Houston, Douglas W.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The formation of proper sensory afferent connections during development is essential for brain function. Activity-based competition is believed to drive ocular dominance columns (ODC) in mammals and in experimentally-generated three-eyed frogs. ODC formation is thus a compromise of activity differences between two eyes and similar molecular cues. To gauge the generality of graphical map formation in the brain, we investigated the inner ear projection, known for its well-defined and early segregation of afferents from vestibular and auditory endorgans. In analogy to three eyed-frogs, we generated three-eared frogs to assess to what extent vestibular afferents from two adjacent ears could segregate. Donor ears were transplanted either in the native orientation or rotated by 90 degrees. These manipulations should result in either similar or different induced activity between both ears, respectively. Three-eared frogs with normal orientation showed normal swimming whereas those with a rotated third ear showed aberrant behaviors. Projection studies revealed that only afferents from the rotated ears segregated from those from the native ear within the vestibular nucleus, resembling the ocular dominance columns formed in three-eyed frogs. Vestibular segregation suggests that mechanisms comparable to those operating in the ODC formation of the visual system may act on vestibular projection refinements. PMID:25661240

  13. The TTX-Resistant Sodium Channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3): Expression and Correlation with Membrane Properties in Rat Nociceptive Primary Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Djouhri, Laiche; Fang, Xin; Okuse, Kenji; Wood, John N; Berry, Carol M; Lawson, Sally N

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the sensory neuron-specific Na+ channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) in nociceptive and non-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and whether its distribution is related to neuronal membrane properties. Nav1.8-like immunoreactivity (Nav1.8-LI) was examined with an affinity purified polyclonal antiserum (SNS11) in rat DRG neurons that were classified according to sensory receptive properties and by conduction velocity (CV) as C-, Aδ- or Aα/β. A significantly higher proportion of nociceptive than low threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons showed Nav1.8-LI, and nociceptive neurons had significantly more intense immunoreactivity in their somata than LTM neurons. Results showed that 89, 93 and 60 % of C-, Aδ- and Aα/β-fibre nociceptive units respectively and 88 % of C-unresponsive units were positive. C-unresponsive units had electrical membrane properties similar to C-nociceptors and were considered to be nociceptive-type neurons. Weak positive Nav1.8-LI was also present in some LTM units including a C LTM, all Aδ LTM units (D hair), about 10 % of cutaneous LTM Aα/β-units, but no muscle spindle afferent units. Nav1.8-LI intensity was negatively correlated with soma size (all neurons) and with dorsal root CVs in A- but not C-fibre neurons. Nav1.8-LI intensity was positively correlated with action potential (AP) duration (both rise and fall time) in A-fibre neurons and with AP rise time only in positive C-fibre neurons. It was also positively correlated with AP overshoot in positive neurons. Thus high levels of Nav1.8 protein may contribute to the longer AP durations (especially in A-fibre neurons) and larger AP overshoots that are typical of nociceptors. PMID:12794175

  14. Spinal dorsal horn neuronal responses to myelinated versus unmyelinated heat nociceptors and their modulation by activation of the periaqueductal grey in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Simon; Lumb, Bridget M

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this study was to further understand the central processing of inputs arising from unmyelinated and myelinated nociceptors by (i) determining the response characteristics of Class 2 dorsal horn neurones to preferential activation of C- and A-fibre heat nociceptors, and (ii) investigating the control exerted by the dorsolateral/lateral region of the midbrain periaqueductal grey (DL/L-PAG) on C- and A-fibre-evoked responses of these neurones. The use of different rates of skin heating to preferentially activate unmyelinated (C-fibre; 2.5 degrees C s(-1)) versus myelinated (A-fibre; 7.5 degrees C s(-1)) heat nociceptors revealed that, in response to C-nociceptor activation, Class 2 neurones encode well only over the first 5 degrees C above threshold, and that at higher temperatures responses decline. In contrast, responses to A-nociceptor activation are linear and encode skin temperature over more than 10 degrees C, and almost certainly into the tissue-damaging range. PAG stimulation raised thresholds and decreased significantly the magnitude of responses to A- and C-nociceptor activation. However, differences were revealed in the effects of descending control on the relationships between skin temperature and neuronal firing rate; the linear relationship that occurred over the first 5 degrees C of slow rates of skin heating was no longer evident, whereas that to fast rates of skin heating was maintained over the entire range, albeit shifted to the right. These data indicate that the sensori-discriminative information conveyed in A-fibre nociceptors is maintained and that the information from C-nociceptors is lost in the presence of descending control from the DL/L-PAG. The data are discussed in relation to the role of the DL/L-PAG in mediating active coping strategies. PMID:16916903

  15. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  16. Similar nociceptive afferents mediate psychophysical and electrophysiological responses to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iannetti, G D; Zambreanu, L; Tracey, I

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perceive and withdraw rapidly from noxious environmental stimuli is crucial for survival. When heat stimuli are applied to primate hairy skin, first pain sensation is mediated by type-II A-fibre nociceptors (II-AMHs). In contrast, the reported absence of first pain and II-AMH microneurographical responses when heat stimuli are applied to the hand palm has led to the notion that II-AMHs are lacking in this primate glabrous skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of hairy and glabrous skin stimulation on neural transmission of nociceptive inputs elicited by different kinds of thermal heating. We recorded psychophysical and EEG brain responses to radiant (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs) and contact heat stimuli (contact heat-evoked potentials, CHEPs) delivered to the dorsum and the palm of the hand in normal volunteers. Brain responses were analysed at a single-trial level, using an automated approach based on multiple linear regression. Laser stimulation of hairy and glabrous skin at the same energy elicited remarkably similar psychophysical ratings and LEPs. This finding provides strong evidence that first pain to heat does exist in glabrous skin, and suggests that similar nociceptive afferents, with the physiological properties of II-AMHs, mediate first pain to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans. In contrast, when contact heat stimuli were employed, a significantly higher nominal temperature had to be applied to glabrous skin in order to achieve psychophysical ratings similar to those obtained following hairy skin stimulation, and CHEPs following glabrous skin stimulation had significantly longer latencies (N2 wave, +25%; P2 wave, +24%) and smaller amplitudes (N2 wave, −40%; P2 wave, −44%) than CHEPs following hairy skin stimulation. Irrespective of the stimulated territory, CHEPs always had significantly longer latencies (hairy skin N2 wave, +75%; P2 wave, +56%) and smaller amplitudes (hairy skin N2 wave, −42%; P

  17. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  18. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  19. Functional expression and axonal transport of α7 nAChRs by peptidergic nociceptors of rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Shelukhina, Irina; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tsetlin, Victor

    2015-07-01

    In recent pain studies on animal models, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists demonstrated analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, apparently acting through some peripheral receptors. Assuming possible involvement of α7 nAChRs on nociceptive sensory neurons, we investigated the morphological and neurochemical features of the α7 nAChR-expressing subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and their ability to transport α7 nAChR axonally. In addition, α7 receptor activity and its putative role in pain signal neurotransmitter release were studied. Medium-sized α7 nAChR-expressing neurons prevailed, although the range covered all cell sizes. These cells accounted for one-fifth of total medium and large DRG neurons and <5% of small ones. 83.2% of α7 nAChR-expressing DRG neurons were peptidergic nociceptors (CGRP-immunopositive), one half of which had non-myelinated C-fibers and the other half had myelinated Aδ- and likely Aα/β-fibers, whereas 15.2% were non-peptidergic C-fiber nociceptors binding isolectin B4. All non-peptidergic and a third of peptidergic α7 nAChR-bearing nociceptors expressed TRPV1, a capsaicin-sensitive noxious stimulus transducer. Nerve crush experiments demonstrated that CGRPergic DRG nociceptors axonally transported α7 nAChRs both to the spinal cord and periphery. α7 nAChRs in DRG neurons were functional as their specific agonist PNU282987 evoked calcium rise enhanced by α7-selective positive allosteric modulator PNU120596. However, α7 nAChRs do not modulate neurotransmitter CGRP and glutamate release from DRG neurons since nicotinic ligands affected neither their basal nor provoked levels, showing the necessity of further studies to elucidate the true role of α7 nAChRs in those neurons. PMID:24706047

  20. Anti-migraine action of triptans is preceded by transient aggravation of headache caused by activation of meningeal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Rami; Jakubowski, Moshe; Levy, Dan

    2005-05-01

    Consistent with previous accounts, some of the patients visiting our pain clinic during the course of a migraine attack have indicated-without solicitation-that sumatriptan injection initially intensified their headache before they were able to appreciate any pain relief. In this study, those patients who came forward complaining about pain exacerbation were asked to rate their headache intensity every 5 min. Within 5-15 min of sumatriptan injection, 17 of the 31 patients studied (55%) reported that their migraine pain intensified for 10-15 min before they started to notice any pain relief. Similar pattern of pain exacerbation was also observed in migraine attacks treated with oral formulation of almotriptan, eletriptan, rizatriptan, and zolmitriptan. To investigate the possible mechanism underlying this transient exacerbation of pain, we examined whether intravenous administration of sumatriptan can alter the response properties of C- and Adelta-meningeal nociceptors in the rat. Five to twenty minutes after intravenous administration of 300 microg/kg sumatriptan, 8/10 C-units and 2/8 Adelta-units increased their firing rate, and 6/10 C-units and 7/8 Adelta-units developed mechanical hyper-responsiveness to dural indentation. The minimal effective dose for activation and sensitization of meningeal nociceptors by sumatriptan was 3 microg/kg, suggesting that relatively low levels of triptans entering the circulation shortly after their administration can alter the physiological properties of meningeal nociceptors and produce a transient exacerbation of headache. PMID:15836966

  1. Nociceptive sensory neurons drive interleukin-23-mediated psoriasiform skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Paust, Silke; Wood, John N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2014-06-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbours specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing γδ T (γδT17) cells, the aberrant activation of which by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibres. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear. We exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod, which induces IL-23-dependent psoriasis-like inflammation. Here we show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and Nav1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in imiquimod-exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23-dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were markedly reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response. These findings indicate that TRPV1(+)Nav1.8(+) nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  2. Nociceptive Sensory Neurons Drive Interleukin-23 Mediated Psoriasiform Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Wood, John N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbors specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17 producing γδ T cells (γδT17), whose aberrant activation by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation1–4. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibers. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear5,6. Here, we have exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod (IMQ), which induces IL-23 dependent psoriasis-like inflammation7,8. We show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and NaV1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors9–11, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in IMQ exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23 dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were dramatically reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response12. These findings indicate that TRPV1+NaV1.8+ nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  3. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  4. TRPV channel-mediated calcium transients in nociceptor neurons are dispensable for avoidance behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Lindy, Amanda S.; Parekh, Puja K.; Zhu, Richard; Kanju, Patrick; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr; Patterson, Randen L.; Anishkin, Andriy; van Rossum, Damian B.; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Animals need to sense and react to potentially dangerous environments. TRP ion channels participate in nociception, presumably via Ca2+ influx, in most animal species. However, the relationship between ion permeation and animals’ nocifensive behaviour is unknown. Here we use an invertebrate animal model with relevance for mammalian pain. We analyse the putative selectivity filter of OSM-9, a TRPV channel, in osmotic avoidance behaviour of Caenorhabditis elegans. Using mutagenized OSM-9 expressed in the head nociceptor neuron, ASH, we study nocifensive behaviour and Ca2+ influx. Within the selectivity filter, M601-F609, Y604G strongly reduces avoidance behaviour and eliminates Ca2+ transients. Y604F also abolishes Ca2+ transients in ASH, while sustaining avoidance behaviour, yet it disrupts behavioral plasticity. Homology modelling of the OSM-9 pore suggests that Y604 may assume a scaffolding role. Thus, aromatic residues in the OSM-9 selectivity filter are critical for pain behaviour and ion permeation. These findings have relevance for understanding evolutionary roots of mammalian nociception. PMID:25178952

  5. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx–TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  6. Serotonin differentially modulates Ca2+ transients and depolarization in a C. elegans nociceptor

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul D. E.; Summers, Philip J.; Komuniecki, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Monoamines and neuropeptides modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic strengths, shaping circuit activity to optimize behavioral output. In C. elegans, a pair of bipolar polymodal nociceptors, the ASHs, sense 1-octanol to initiate escape responses. In the present study, 1-octanol stimulated large increases in ASH Ca2+, mediated by L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in the cell soma and L-plus P/Q-type VGCCs in the axon, which were further amplified by Ca2+ released from intracellular stores. Importantly, 1-octanol-dependent aversive responses were not inhibited by reducing ASH L-VGCC activity genetically or pharmacologically. Serotonin, an enhancer of 1-octanol avoidance, potentiated 1-octanol-dependent ASH depolarization measured electrophysiologically, but surprisingly, decreased the ASH somal Ca2+ transients. These results suggest that ASH somal Ca2+ transient amplitudes may not always be predictive of neuronal depolarization and synaptic output. Therefore, although increases in steady-state Ca2+ can reliably indicate when neurons become active, quantitative relationships between Ca2+ transient amplitudes and neuronal activity may not be as straightforward as previously anticipated. PMID:25411461

  7. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  8. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Kewei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  9. Spinal Nerve Ligation in Mouse Upregulates TRPV1 Heat Function in Injured IB4 Positive Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Vilceanu, Daniel; Honore, Prisca; Hogan, Quinn H.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to neuropathic pain, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The TRPV1 channel expressed by nociceptors is one receptor for noxious heat and inflammatory molecules. Lumbar 4 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in mice induced persistent heat hyperalgesia 4–10 days following injury. The heat hypersensitivity was completely reversed by the TRPV1 antagonist A-425619. Furthermore, DRG neurons were isolated from the injured L4 ganglia or adjacent L3 ganglia 4–10 days after L4 SNL. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed and heat stimuli (22–50°C/3 sec) were applied to the soma. Neurons were classified by soma size and isolectin-B4 (IB4) binding. Among directly injured L4 neurons, SNL increased the percentage of small-diameter IB4 positive neurons that were heat sensitive from 13% (naive controls) to 56% and conversely, decreased the proportion of small IB4-negative neurons that were heat sensitive from 66% (naive controls) to 34%. There was no change in IB4 binding in neurons from the injured ganglia. Surprisingly, in neurons from the adjacent L3 ganglia, SNL had no effect on the heat responsiveness of either IB4 positive or negative small neurons. Also, SNL had no effect on heat responses in medium-large diameter neurons from either the injured or adjacent ganglia. PMID:20015699

  10. Methylglyoxal Activates Nociceptors through Transient Receptor Potential Channel A1 (TRPA1)

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Leffler, Andreas; de la Roche, Jeanne; Kistner, Katrin; Fischer, Michael J.; Fleming, Thomas; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Reeh, Peter W.; Sauer, Susanne K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can develop as an agonizing sequela of diabetes mellitus and chronic uremia. A chemical link between both conditions of altered metabolism is the highly reactive compound methylglyoxal (MG), which accumulates in all cells, in particular neurons, and leaks into plasma as an index of the severity of the disorder. The electrophilic structure of this cytotoxic ketoaldehyde suggests TRPA1, a receptor channel deeply involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain, as a molecular target. We demonstrate that extracellularly applied MG accesses specific intracellular binding sites of TRPA1, activating inward currents and calcium influx in transfected cells and sensory neurons, slowing conduction velocity in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, and stimulating release of proinflammatory neuropeptides from and action potential firing in cutaneous nociceptors. Using a model peptide of the N terminus of human TRPA1, we demonstrate the formation of disulfide bonds based on MG-induced modification of cysteines as a novel mechanism. In conclusion, MG is proposed to be a candidate metabolite that causes neuropathic pain in metabolic disorders and thus is a promising target for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22740698

  11. Histaminergic afferent system in the cerebellum: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Histaminergic afferent system of the cerebellum, having been considered as an essential component of the direct hypothalamocerebellar circuits, originates from the tuberomammillary nucleus in the hypothalamus. Unlike the mossy fibers and climbing fibers, the histaminergic afferent fibers, a third type of cerebellar afferents, extend fine varicose fibers throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. Histamine receptors, belonging to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, are widely present in the cerebellum. Through these histamine receptors, histamine directly excites Purkinje cells and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as the cerebellar nuclear neurons. Therefore, the histaminergic afferents parallelly modulate these dominant components in the cerebellar circuitry and consequently influence the final output of the cerebellum. In this way, the histaminergic afferent system actively participates in the cerebellum-mediated motor balance and coordination and nonsomatic functions. Accordingly, histaminergic reagents may become potential drugs for clinical treatment of cerebellar ataxia and other cerebellar disease. On the other hand, considering the hypothalamus is a high regulatory center for autonomic and visceral activities, the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers/projections, bridging the nonsomatic center to somatic structure, may play a critical role in the somatic-nonsomatic integration. PMID:26331029

  12. In vitro Functional Characterization of Mouse Colorectal Afferent Endings

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    This video demonstrates in detail an in vitro single-fiber electrophysiological recording protocol using a mouse colorectum-nerve preparation. The approach allows unbiased identification and functional characterization of individual colorectal afferents. Extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials (APs) that originate from one or a few afferent (i.e., single-fiber) receptive fields (RFs) in the colorectum are made from teased nerve fiber fascicles. The colorectum is removed with either the pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached and opened longitudinally. The tissue is placed in a recording chamber, pinned flat and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Focal electrical stimulation is used to locate the colorectal afferent endings, which are further tested by three distinct mechanical stimuli (blunt probing, mucosal stroking and circumferential stretch) to functionally categorize the afferents into five mechanosensitive classes. Endings responding to none of these mechanical stimuli are categorized as mechanically-insensitive afferents (MIAs). Both mechanosensitive and MIAs can be assessed for sensitization (i.e., enhanced response, reduced threshold, and/or acquisition of mechanosensitivity) by localized exposure of RFs to chemicals (e.g., inflammatory soup (IS), capsaicin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)). We describe the equipment and colorectum–nerve recording preparation, harvest of colorectum with attached PN or LSN, identification of RFs in the colorectum, single-fiber recording from nerve fascicles, and localized application of chemicals to the RF. In addition, challenges of the preparation and application of standardized mechanical stimulation are also discussed. PMID:25651300

  13. Semicircular Canal Geometry, Afferent Sensitivity And Animal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hullar, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry of the semicircular canals has been used in evolutionary studies to predict the behaviors of extinct animals. These predictions have relied on an assumption that the responses of the canals can be determined from their dimensions, and that an organism’s behavior can be determined from these responses. However, the relationship between a canal’s sensitivity and its size is not well known. An intraspecies comparison among canal responses in each of three species (cat, squirrel monkey, and pigeon) was undertaken to evaluate various models of canal function and determine how their dimensions may be related to afferent physiology. All models predicted the responses of the cat afferents, but the models performed less well for squirrel monkey and pigeon. Possible causes for this discrepancy include incorrectly assuming that afferent responses accurately represent canal function, or errors in current biophysical models of the canals. These findings leave open the question as to how reliably canal anatomy can be used to estimate afferent responses and how closely afferent responses are related to behavior. Other labyrinthine features—such as orientation of the horizontal canal, which is reliably held near earth-horizontal across many species—may be better to use when extrapolating the posture and related behavior of extinct animals from labyrinthine morphology. PMID:16550591

  14. Differentiated adipose-derived stem cells promote the recovery of nociceptor function in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Tomita, Koichi; Kiya, Koichiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2016-10-19

    The loss of nociceptive function in the skin because of trauma or surgery can impair the quality of life. The recovery of nociceptor function is mediated by two different axonal responses: nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent collateral sprouting of undamaged nerves and NGF-independent regeneration of damaged nerves. We reported previously that adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can transdifferentiate into Schwann cell (SC)-like cells (dASCs) and that transplantation of dASCs increases axonal density in skin flaps. In the present study, we used an animal model that allowed for the individual assessment of collateral sprouting and regeneration. In-vitro differentiation of ASCs to dASCs significantly increased the production of NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to levels comparable with SCs. In-vivo experiments showed that dASC and SC transplantation significantly increased the area of the mechano-nociceptive field in both collateral sprouting and regeneration models, whereas ASC transplantation exerted no significant effect. Antibody blocking experiment showed that these effects of dASC transplantation in the regeneration model were partly mediated by BDNF. Interestingly, the final areas of nociceptive fields between the two experimental models did not differ significantly for any treatment condition. These results indicate that dASC transplantation differentially facilitates collateral sprouting and axonal regeneration by delivering NGF and other neurotrophic factors (e.g. BDNF), respectively. Although there is a limit to nociceptive field enlargement irrespective of axonal response, dASC transplantation could present a new approach for improving nociceptive function in denervated skin. PMID:27513202

  15. Multiple impairments of cutaneous nociceptor function induced by cardiotoxic doses of Adriamycin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Boros, Krisztina; Jancsó, Gábor; Dux, Mária; Fekécs, Zoltán; Bencsik, Péter; Oszlács, Orsolya; Katona, Márta; Ferdinandy, Péter; Nógrádi, Antal; Sántha, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Besides their deleterious action on cardiac muscle, anthracycline-type cytostatic agents exert significant neurotoxic effects on primary sensory neurons. Since cardiac sensory nerves confer protective effects on heart muscle and share common traits with cutaneous chemosensitive nerves, this study examined the effects of cardiotoxic doses of adriamycin on the function and morphology of epidermal nerves. Sensory neurogenic vasodilatation, plasma extravasation, and the neural CGRP release evoked by TRPV1 and TRPA1 agonists in vitro were examined by using laser Doppler flowmetry, the Evans blue technique, and ELISA, respectively. Carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia was assessed with the Hargreaves method. Immunohistochemistry was utilized to study cutaneous innervation. Adriamycin treatment resulted in profound reductions in the cutaneous neurogenic sensory vasodilatation and plasma extravasation evoked by the TRPV1 and TRPA1 agonists capsaicin and mustard oil, respectively. The in vitro capsaicin-, but not high potassium-evoked neural release of the major sensory neuropeptide, CGRP, was markedly attenuated after adriamycin treatment. Carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia was largely abolished following the administration of adriamycin. Immunohistochemistry revealed a substantial loss of epidermal TRPV1-expressing nociceptive nerves and a marked thinning of the epidermis. These findings indicate impairments in the functions of TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors expressed on cutaneous chemosensitive nociceptive nerves and the loss of epidermal axons following the administration of cardiotoxic doses of adriamycin. Monitoring of the cutaneous nociceptor function in the course of adriamycin therapy may well be of predictive value for early detection of the deterioration of cardiac nerves which confer protection against the deleterious effects of the drug. PMID:27342418

  16. Determinants of Spatial and Temporal Coding by Semicircular Canal Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Holstein, Gay R.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components—one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below. PMID:15845995

  17. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  18. The afferent pupillary defect in acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute optic neuritis were studied by the techniques of infrared pupillometry and visual evoked responses (VER) to pattern reversal. A relative afferent pupillary defect was found in all cases and the magnitude of this defect was found to be related to the amplitude, but not to the latency, of the VER. During follow-up the afferent defect was found to remain persistently abnormal while other methods of clinical evaluation could not demonstrate abnormality reliably. The amplitude of the VER also remained low. PMID:501365

  19. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  20. Changes in monkey horizontal semicircular canal afferent responses after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.; Sirota, M. G.; Iakushin, S. B.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular responses from single horizontal semicircular canal afferents in two rhesus monkeys were studied after recovery from a 14-day biosatellite (Cosmos 2044) orbital spaceflight. On the 1st postflight day, the mean gain for 9 different horizontal canal afferents, tested using one or several different passive yaw rotation waveforms, was nearly twice that for 20 horizontal canal afferents similarly tested during preflight and postflight control studies. Adaptation of the afferent response to passive yaw rotation on the 1st postflight day was also greater. These results suggest that at least one component of the vestibular end organ (the semicircular canals) is transiently modified after exposure to 14 days of microgravity. It is unclear whether the changes are secondary to other effects of microgravity, such as calcium loss, or an adaptive response. If the response is adaptive, then this report is the first evidence that the response of the vestibular end organ may be modified (presumably by the central nervous system via efferent connections) after prolonged unusual vestibular stimulation. If this is the case, the sites of plasticity of vestibular responses may not be exclusively within central nervous system vestibular structures, as previously believed.

  1. The non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 attenuates responses of C-fiber nociceptors in a murine model of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Uhelski, Megan L.; Cain, David M.; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Pain from cancer can be severe, difficult to treat, and greatly diminishes patients’ quality of life. It is therefore important to gain new information on the mechanisms of cancer pain and develop new treatment strategies. We have used a murine model of bone cancer pain to investigate underlying peripheral neural mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In this model, implantation of fibrosarcoma cells into and around the calcaneous bone produces mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. C-fiber nociceptors in tumor-bearing mice develop spontaneous ongoing activity and sensitization to thermal stimuli. However, it is unclear whether sensitization of nociceptors to mechanical stimuli underlies the mechanical hyperalgesia seen in tumor-bearing mice. We therefore examined responses of C-fiber nociceptors to suprathreshold mechanical stimuli in tumor-bearing mice and found they did not differ from those of C-nociceptors in control mice. Thus, sensitization of C-fiber nociceptors to mechanical stimulation does not appear to underlie tumor-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia in this murine model of bone cancer pain. We also examined the effect of the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55, 212-2, on spontaneous activity and responses evoked by mechanical stimuli of C-fiber nociceptors innervating the tumor-bearing paw. Selective CB1 and CB2 antagonists were administered to determine the contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of WIN 55,212-2. Intraplantar administration of WIN 55,212-2 attenuated spontaneous discharge and responses evoked by mechanical stimulation of C-fiber nociceptors. These effects were inhibited by prior intraplantar administration of selective CB1 (AM281) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists but not by vehicle. These results indicate that activation of either CB1 or CB2 receptors reduced the spontaneous activity of C-fiber nociceptors associated with tumor growth as well as their evoked responses. Our results provide

  2. Differential antinociceptive effects of spinal opioids on foot withdrawal responses evoked by C fibre or Aδ nociceptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Pirec, V; Yeomans, D C

    1997-01-01

    Intrathecal application of μ, δ, and κ opioids attenuate responses on several tests of animal nociception. However, the potency of these opioids differ depending on which tests were used. One factor contributing to these discrepancies is that different types of noxious stimuli activate different sets of nociceptor types, which may be differentially sensitive to opiate inhibition. To examine this hypothesis, we used a recently developed behavioural test which allows for differential assessment of nociception evoked by the activation of myelinated (Aδ) and unmyelinated C thermonociceptors. Administration of a κ-selective agonist was ineffective on either type of response. δ1 drugs were slightly more potent on C fibre-mediated responses than on Aδ-mediated responses. Intrathecal μ and δ2 drugs were antinociceptive on both Aδ and C nociceptor-mediated responses. However, unlike the δ1 effects, the dose-response curves for μ and δ2 drugs were significantly more steep for Aδ than for C fibre-mediated responses, potentially indicating differences in the mechanisms by which the drugs act on these 2 response types. PMID:9249259

  3. Uncoupling of Molecular Maturation from Peripheral Target Innervation in Nociceptors Expressing a Chimeric TrkA/TrkC Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gorokhova, Svetlana; Gaillard, Stéphane; Urien, Louise; Malapert, Pascale; Legha, Wassim; Baronian, Grégory; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Alonso, Serge; Moqrich, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors control a number of cellular processes, such as survival, gene expression and axonal growth, by activating multiple signalling pathways in peripheral neurons. Whether each of these pathways controls a distinct developmental process remains unknown. Here we describe a novel knock-in mouse model expressing a chimeric TrkA/TrkC (TrkAC) receptor from TrkA locus. In these mice, prospective nociceptors survived, segregated into appropriate peptidergic and nonpeptidergic subsets, projected normally to distinct laminae of the dorsal spinal cord, but displayed aberrant peripheral target innervation. This study provides the first in vivo evidence that intracellular parts of different Trk receptors are interchangeable to promote survival and maturation of nociceptors and shows that these developmental processes can be uncoupled from peripheral target innervation. Moreover, adult homozygous TrkAC knock-in mice displayed severe deficits in acute and tissue injury-induced pain, representing the first viable adult Trk mouse mutant with a pain phenotype. PMID:24516396

  4. Ileal bladder substitute: antireflux nipple or afferent tubular segment?

    PubMed

    Studer, U E; Spiegel, T; Casanova, G A; Springer, J; Gerber, E; Ackermann, D K; Gurtner, F; Zingg, E J

    1991-01-01

    Spheroidal bladder substitutes made from double-folded ileal segments, similar to Goodwin's cup-patch technique, are devoid of major coordinated wall contractions. This, together with the reservoir's direct anastomosis to the membranous urethra, prevents major intraluminal pressure peaks and assures a residue-free voiding of sterile urine. In order to determine whether, under these conditions, an afferent tubular isoperistaltic ileal segment of 20-cm length protects the upper urinary tract as efficiently as an antireflux nipple, 60 male patients who were subjected to radical cystectomy were prospectively randomised to groups in which a bladder substitute was formed together with either of these 2 antireflux devices. An analysis of the results obtained in 20 patients from each group who could be followed for more than 1 year (median observation time 30 and 36 months) showed no differences between the groups in metabolic disturbances, kidney size, reservoir capacity, diurnal and nocturnal urinary continence, the incidence of urinary tract infection or episodes of acute pyelonephritis. Later than 1 year postoperatively, intravenous urograms of the renoureteral units of 25% of the patients with antireflux nipples showed persistent but generally slight dilatation of the upper urinary tracts. This observation was significantly more frequent than it was in patients with afferent tubular segments. Urodynamic and radiographic studies showed that the competence of the antireflux nipples was secured by the raised surrounding intravesical pressure. This, however, also resulted in a transient functional obstruction, and a gradual rise of the basal pressure in the upper urinary tracts was recorded. In patients with afferent ileal tubular segments, contrast medium could be forced upwards into the renal pelvis when the bladder substitutes were overfilled. However, despite raised intravesical pressures, peristalsis in the isoperistaltic afferent tubular segment gradually returned

  5. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release

    PubMed Central

    Estacion, Mark; Turner, Jamie; Mis, Malgorzata A.; Wilbrey, Anna; Payne, Elizabeth C.; Gutteridge, Alex; Cox, Peter J.; Doyle, Rachel; Printzenhoff, David; Lin, Zhixin; Marron, Brian E.; West, Christopher; Swain, Nigel A.; Storer, R. Ian; Stupple, Paul A.; Castle, Neil A.; Hounshell, James A.; Rivara, Mirko; Randall, Andrew; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Krafte, Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G.; Patel, Manoj K.; Butt, Richard P.; Stevens, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7’s role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission. PMID:27050761

  6. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Aristos J; Brown, Adam R; Chapman, Mark L; Estacion, Mark; Turner, Jamie; Mis, Malgorzata A; Wilbrey, Anna; Payne, Elizabeth C; Gutteridge, Alex; Cox, Peter J; Doyle, Rachel; Printzenhoff, David; Lin, Zhixin; Marron, Brian E; West, Christopher; Swain, Nigel A; Storer, R Ian; Stupple, Paul A; Castle, Neil A; Hounshell, James A; Rivara, Mirko; Randall, Andrew; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Krafte, Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G; Patel, Manoj K; Butt, Richard P; Stevens, Edward B

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission. PMID:27050761

  7. Central changes in primary afferent fibers following peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Lekan, H A; Doubell, T P; Allchorne, A; Woolf, C J

    1997-04-01

    Cutting or crushing rat sciatic nerve does not significantly reduce the number of central myelinated sensory axons in the dorsal roots entering the fourth and fifth lumbar segments even over very extended periods of time. Unmyelinated axons were reduced by approximately 50%, but only long after sciatic nerve lesions (four to eight months), and reinnervation of the peripheral target did not rescue these axons. This indicates that a peripheral nerve lesion sets up a slowly developing but major shift towards large afferent fiber domination of primary afferent input into the spinal cord. In addition, since myelinated axons are never lost, this is good evidence that the cells that give rise to these fibers are also not lost. If this is the case, this would indicate that adult primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons do not depend on peripheral target innervation for survival. PMID:9130791

  8. Enhanced Muscle Afferent Signals during Motor Learning in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Much has been revealed concerning human motor learning at the behavioral level [1, 2], but less is known about changes in the involved neural circuits and signals. By examining muscle spindle responses during a classic visuomotor adaptation task [3-6] performed by fully alert humans, I found substantial modulation of sensory afferent signals as a function of adaptation state. Specifically, spindle control was independent of concurrent muscle activity but was specific to movement direction (representing muscle lengthening versus shortening) and to different stages of learning. Increased spindle afferent responses to muscle stretch occurring early during learning reflected individual error size and were negatively related to subsequent antagonist activity (i.e., 60-80 ms thereafter). Relative increases in tonic afferent output early during learning were predictive of the subjects' adaptation rate. I also found that independent spindle control during sensory realignment (the "washout" stage) induced afferent signal "linearization" with respect to muscle length (i.e., signals were more tuned to hand position). The results demonstrate for the first time that motor learning also involves independent and state-related modulation of sensory mechanoreceptor signals. The current findings suggest that adaptive motor performance also relies on the independent control of sensors, not just of muscles. I propose that the "γ" motor system innervating spindles acts to facilitate the acquisition and extraction of task-relevant information at the early stages of sensorimotor adaptation. This designates a more active and targeted role for the human proprioceptive system during motor learning. PMID:27040776

  9. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  10. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  11. Endothelin-1 induced desensitization in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terika P.; Smith, Sherika N.; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a known algogen that causes acute pain and sensitization in humans and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors when injected into the periphery in rats, and is elevated during vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Previously, our lab has shown that a priming dose of ET-1 produces sensitization to capsaicin-induce secondary hyperalgesia. The goal of this study was to determine if the sensitization induced by ET-1 priming is occurring at the level of the primary afferent neuron. Calcium imaging in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was utilized to examine the effects of ET-1 on primary afferent neurons. ET-1 induces [Ca2+]i transients in unprimed cells. ET-1 induced [Ca2+]i transients are attenuated by priming with ET-1. This priming effect occurs whether the priming dose is given 0-4 days prior to the challenge dose. Similarly, ET-1 priming decreases capsaicin-induced [Ca2+]i transients. At the level of the primary afferent neuron, ET-1 priming has a desensitizing effect on challenge exposures to ET-1 and capsaicin. PMID:25220703

  12. Subcortical afferent connections of the amygdala in the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The cells of origin of the afferent connections of the amygdala in the rhesus and squirrel monkeys are determined according to the retrograde axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase injected into various quadrants of the amygdala. Analysis of the distribution of enzyme-labeled cells reveals afferent amygdalar connections with the ipsilateral halves of the midline nucleus paraventricularis thalami and both the parvo- and magnocellular parts of the nucleus subparafascicularis in the dorsal thalamus, all the subdivisions of the midline nucleus centralis complex, the nucleus reuniens ventralis and the nucleus interventralis. The largest populations of enzyme-labeled cells in the hypothalamus are found to lie in the middle and posterior parts of the ipsilateral, lateral hypothalamus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, with scattered cells in the supramammillary and dorsomedial nuclei and the posterior hypothalamic area, Tsai's ventral tegmental area, the rostral and caudal subdivisions of the nucleus linearis in the midbrain and the dorsal raphe nucleus. The most conspicuous subdiencephalic source of amygdalar afferent connections is observed to be the pars lateralis of the nucleus parabrachialis in the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum, with a few labeled cells differentiated from pigmented cells in the locus coeruleus.

  13. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  14. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    PubMed

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve. PMID:2719524

  15. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  16. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving stylesmore » in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.« less

  17. Severe hypoxia affects exercise performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Laursen, Paul B; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that hypoxia centrally affects performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue, we conducted two experiments under complete vascular occlusion of the exercising muscle under different systemic O(2) environmental conditions. In experiment 1, 12 subjects performed repeated submaximal isometric contractions of the elbow flexor to exhaustion (RCTE) with inspired O(2) fraction fixed at 9% (severe hypoxia, SevHyp), 14% (moderate hypoxia, ModHyp), 21% (normoxia, Norm), or 30% (hyperoxia, Hyper). The number of contractions (performance), muscle (biceps brachii), and prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) parameters and high-frequency paired-pulse (PS100) evoked responses to electrical muscle stimulation were monitored. In experiment 2, 10 subjects performed another RCTE in SevHyp and Norm conditions in which the number of contractions, biceps brachii electromyography responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M wave), and transcranial magnetic stimulation responses (motor-evoked potentials, MEP, and cortical silent period, CSP) were recorded. Performance during RCTE was significantly reduced by 10-15% in SevHyp (arterial O(2) saturation, SpO(2) = ∼75%) compared with ModHyp (SpO(2) = ∼90%) or Norm/Hyper (SpO(2) > 97%). Performance reduction in SevHyp occurred despite similar 1) metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters) and functional (changes in PS100 and M wave) muscle states and 2) MEP and CSP responses, suggesting comparable corticospinal excitability and spinal and cortical inhibition between SevHyp and Norm. It is concluded that, in SevHyp, performance and central drive can be altered independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue. It is concluded that submaximal performance in SevHyp is partly reduced by a mechanism related directly to brain oxygenation. PMID:22323647

  18. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an

  19. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  20. Characterization of Mouse Lumbar Splanchnic and Pelvic Nerve Urinary Bladder Mechanosensory Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linjing; Gebhart, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information from the urinary bladder is conveyed via lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and sacral pelvic (PN) nerves to the spinal cord. In the present report we compared the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers in these two pathways using an in vitro mouse bladder preparation. Mechanosensitive primary afferents were recorded from the LSN or PN and distinguished based on their response to receptive field stimulation with different mechanical stimuli: probing (160 mg to 2 g), stretch (1–25 g), and stroking of the urothelium (10–1,000 mg). Four different classes of afferent were recorded from the LSN and PN: serosal, muscular, muscular/urothielial, and urothelial. The LSN contained principally serosal and muscular afferents (97% of the total sample), whereas all four afferent classes of afferent were present in the PN (63% of which were muscular afferents). In addition, the respective proportions and receptive field distributions differed between the two pathways. Both low- and high-threshold stretch-sensitive muscular afferents were present in both pathways, and muscular afferents in the PN were shown to sensitize after exposure to an inflammatory soup cocktail. The LSN and PN pathways contain different populations of mechanosensitive afferents capable of detecting a range of mechanical stimuli and individually tuned to detect the type, magnitude, and duration of the stimulus. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the potential roles these two pathways play in conveying mechanical information from the bladder to the spinal cord. PMID:18003875

  1. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  2. Midbrain control of spinal nociception discriminates between responses evoked by myelinated and unmyelinated heat nociceptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Simon; Lumb, Bridget M

    2006-09-01

    Descending control of spinal nociception is a major determinant of normal and chronic pain. Myelinated (A-fibre) and unmyelinated (C-fibre) nociceptors convey different qualities of the pain signal (first and second pain, respectively), and they play different roles in the development and maintenance of chronic pain states. It is of considerable importance, therefore, to determine whether descending control has differential effects on the central processing of A- vs. C-nociceptive input. In anaesthetised rats, biceps femoris EMG was recorded to monitor the thresholds and encoding properties of responses evoked by fast (7.5 degrees Cs(-1)) or slow (2.5 degrees Cs(-1)) rates of skin heating of the dorsal surface of a hindpaw to preferentially activate myelinated or unmyelinated heat nociceptors, respectively. Activation of neurones in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) by microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (DLH) or bicuculline (BIC) significantly increased response thresholds to slow rates of heating (P<0.001), but not those to fast rates of heating (P>0.05). The ability of the EMG to encode the stimulus intensity of fast rates of skin heating remained intact and unaltered (r2=0.99, P<0.001) following BIC but not DLH injection. In contrast, encoding of the stimulus intensity of slow rates of skin heating was abolished following BIC and DLH injection. The functional significance of differential descending control of the central processing of C- and A-nociceptive inputs is discussed with respect to role of the PAG in mediating antinociception as part of active coping strategies in emergency situations and the role of C- and A-nociceptive inputs in animal models of chronic pain. PMID:16650581

  3. Effect of hypergravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    Gravity is a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system, as prolonged prenatal exposures to either micro- or hypergravity will alter the pattern of projections from specific vestibular organs to specific targets in the vestibular nuclei. This study addresses the effect of gravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar projections. In adult rats the semicircular canal afferents project mainly to the cerebellar nodulus whereas the otolith maculae project mainly to the ventral uvula of the cerebellum. To determine if the distribution pattern of these afferents is altered by exposures to altered gravity, 10 pregnant rats were exposed to hypergravity (1.5g) from embryonic day 12 (before vestibular ganglion neurons contact vestibular nuclei) to embryonic day 21 (near the time when the vestibular system becomes functional). Controls were exposed to Earth's gravity but otherwise received the same treatment. At the end of the exposure the embryos were deeply anesthetized and fixed by transcardiac perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH7.4). Filter strips coated with DiI and PTIR were implanted into the saccule (gravistatic vestibular receptor) or into the posterior vertical canal (angular acceleration receptor), and allowed to diffuse for 2 weeks at 37°C. Then the brains were dissected and sectioned for fluorescent confocal imaging. Examination of the control cerebella revealed that the canal and otolith afferents have reached the nodulus and uvula, and axons extend into the internal granular, Purkinje, and molecular layers. Projections from the saccule and posterior vertical canal were partially segregated into their respective domains, the uvula and nodulus. In contrast, in hypergravity-exposed rat fetuses the saccule and posterior vertical canal projections were poorly segregated, and both organs contributed labeled fibers to all layers of the nodulus and uvula. This contrasts with the increased afferent segregation

  4. Impaired intestinal afferent nerve satiety signalling and vagal afferent excitability in diet induced obesity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donna M; Park, Sung Jin; Valinsky, William C; Beyak, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Gastrointestinal vagal afferents transmit satiety signals to the brain via both chemical and mechanical mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these signals may be attenuated in obesity. We hypothesized that responses to satiety mediators and distension of the gut would be attenuated after induction of diet induced obesity. Obesity was induced by feeding a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). Low fat fed mice (10% kcal from fat) served as a control. High fat fed mice were obese, with increased visceral fat, but were not hyperglycaemic. Recordings from jejunal afferents demonstrated attenuated responses to the satiety mediators cholecystokinin (CCK, 100 nm) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 μm), as was the response to low intensity jejunal distension, while responses to higher distension pressures were preserved. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings on nodose ganglion neurons, both unlabelled, and those labelled by fast blue injection into the wall of the jejunum. The cell membrane of both labelled and unlabelled nodose ganglion neurons was less excitable in HFF mice, with an elevated rheobase and decreased number of action potentials at twice rheobase. Input resistance of HFF neurons was also significantly decreased. Calcium imaging experiments revealed reduced proportion of nodose ganglion neurons responding to CCK and 5-HT in obese mice. These results demonstrate a marked reduction in afferent sensitivity to satiety related stimuli after a chronic high fat diet. A major mechanism underlying this change is reduced excitability of the neuronal cell membrane. This may explain the development of hyperphagia when a high fat diet is consumed. Improving sensitivity of gastrointestinal afferent nerves may prove useful to limit food intake in obesity. PMID:21486762

  5. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors BAC Effects Prevention Additional Resources How big is the problem? In 2014, 9,967 people ... Driving: A Threat to Everyone (October 2011) Additional Data Drunk Driving State Data and Maps Motor Vehicle ...

  6. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  7. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    PubMed Central

    Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding characteristics of colorectal afferents. The colorectum with PN attached was dissected, opened longitudinally, and pinned flat in a Sylgard-lined chamber. Action potentials of afferent fibers evoked by circumferential stretch (servo-controlled force actuator) were recorded from the PN. Stretch-sensitive fibers were categorized into the following four groups: colonic muscular, colonic muscular/mucosal, rectal muscular, and rectal muscular/mucosal. Seventy-nine stretch-sensitive PN afferents evenly distributed into the above four groups were studied. Rectal muscular afferents had significantly greater stretch-responses than the other three groups. Virtually all rectal afferents (98%) had low thresholds for response and encoded stimulus intensity into the noxious range without obvious saturation. Most colonic afferents (72%) also had low thresholds (<14 mmHg), but a significant proportion (28%) had high thresholds (>18 mmHg) for response. These high-threshold colonic afferents were sensitized to stretch by inflammatory soup; response threshold was significantly reduced (from 23 to 12 mmHg), and response magnitude significantly increased. These results suggest that the encoding of mechanosensory information differs between colonic and rectal stretch-sensitive PN afferents. Rectal afferents have a wide response range to stretch, whereas high-threshold colonic afferents likely contribute to visceral nociception. PMID:20075141

  8. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel in Aβ afferent fibers subjected to chronic peripheral inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional alterations in the properties of Aβ afferent fibers may account for the increased pain sensitivity observed under peripheral chronic inflammation. Among the voltage-gated sodium channels involved in the pathophysiology of pain, Nav1.8 has been shown to participate in the peripheral sensitization of nociceptors. However, to date, there is no evidence for a role of Nav1.8 in controlling Aβ-fiber excitability following persistent inflammation. Methods Distribution and expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves were qualitatively or quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining and by real time-polymerase chain reaction at different time points following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) administration. Using a whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, we further determined both total INa and TTX-R Nav1.8 currents in large-soma dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons isolated from sham or CFA-treated rats. Finally, we analyzed the effects of ambroxol, a Nav1.8-preferring blocker on the electrophysiological properties of Nav1.8 currents and on the mechanical sensitivity and inflammation of the hind paw in CFA-treated rats. Results Our findings revealed that Nav1.8 is up-regulated in NF200-positive large sensory neurons and is subsequently anterogradely transported from the DRG cell bodies along the axons toward the periphery after CFA-induced inflammation. We also demonstrated that both total INa and Nav1.8 peak current densities are enhanced in inflamed large myelinated Aβ-fiber neurons. Persistent inflammation leading to nociception also induced time-dependent changes in Aβ-fiber neuron excitability by shifting the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.8 in the hyperpolarizing direction, thus decreasing the current threshold for triggering action potentials. Finally, we found that ambroxol significantly reduces the potentiation of Nav1.8 currents in Aβ-fiber neurons observed following intraplantar CFA injection and

  9. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the distal colorectum with the pelvic nerve attached was removed for single-fiber electrophysiological recordings. Colorectal afferent endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. Intracolonic zymosan produced persistent colorectal hypersensitivity (>24 days) associated with brief colorectal inflammation. Pelvic nerve muscular-mucosal but not muscular mechanosensitive afferents recorded from mice with colorectal hypersensitivity exhibited persistent sensitization. In addition, the proportion of MIAs (relative to control) was significantly reduced from 27% to 13%, whereas the proportion of serosal afferents was significantly increased from 34% to 53%, suggesting that MIAs acquired mechanosensitivity. PGP9.5 immunostaining revealed no significant loss of colorectal nerve fiber density, suggesting that the reduction in MIAs is not due to peripheral fiber loss after intracolonic zymosan. These results indicate that colorectal MIAs and sensitized muscular-mucosal afferents that respond to stretch contribute significantly to the afferent input that sustains hypersensitivity to CRD, suggesting that targeted management of colorectal afferent input could significantly reduce patients' complaints of pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:22268098

  10. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. PMID:23201828

  11. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Frances L.; Kirk, Matthew E.; Rennie, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  12. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  13. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  14. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers). PMID:19139872

  15. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  16. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  17. Directional sensitivity of human periodontal mechanoreceptive afferents to forces applied to the teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Trulsson, M; Johansson, R S; Olsson, K A

    1992-01-01

    1. Single-unit impulse activity from thirty-eight mechanoreceptive afferent fibres was recorded in the human inferior alveolar nerve using tungsten microelectrodes. All afferents responded to mechanical stimulation of the teeth and most likely supplied periodontal mechanoreceptors. 2. All afferents showed their highest sensitivity to forces applied to a particular tooth (the lower incisors, the canine or the first premolar). Forces with 'ramp-and-hold' shaped profiles of similar magnitudes were applied to that tooth in the following six directions: lingual, labial, mesial and distal in the horizontal plane, and up and down in the axial direction of the tooth. Both static and dynamic response components were analysed. 3. All afferents were 'slowly adapting' since they discharged continuously in response to static forces in at least one stimulation direction. Twenty-five afferents (66%) were spontaneously active in the sense that they showed an on-going discharge in the absence of external stimulation. 4. Diverse receptive fields were observed. Most afferents (74%) responded to static forces in two or three of the four horizontal directions. Likewise, all units showed excitatory responses to axial loading with a majority (74%) responding in one of the two axial directions and the remainder in both axial directions. Spontaneously active afferents generally decreased their discharge rate when stimulated in directions opposite to the directions exciting the afferent. With regard to population responses, approximately half of the afferents showed excitatory responses to each stimulus direction except for downwards, in which 86% responded. 5. Twenty-three afferents (61%) exhibited the strongest response to forces in one of the horizontal directions. Of those, a majority were most responsive to the lingual direction (52%) and some to the labial direction (30%). Accordingly, the discharge rates during force application averaged over the whole afferent sample were highest in

  18. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  19. Microsecond-Scale Timing Precision in Rodent Trigeminal Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Campagner, Dario; Erskine, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the nervous system occurs by spikes: the timing precision with which spikes are fired is a fundamental limit on neural information processing. In sensory systems, spike-timing precision is constrained by first-order neurons. We found that spike-timing precision of trigeminal primary afferents in rats and mice is limited both by stimulus speed and by electrophysiological sampling rate. High-speed video of behaving mice revealed whisker velocities of at least 17,000°/s, so we delivered an ultrafast “ping” (>50,000°/s) to single whiskers and sampled primary afferent activity at 500 kHz. Median spike jitter was 17.4 μs; 29% of neurons had spike jitter < 10 μs. These results indicate that the input stage of the trigeminal pathway has extraordinary spike-timing precision and very high potential information capacity. This timing precision ranks among the highest in biology. PMID:25878266

  20. Interactions between visceral afferent signaling and stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Hugo D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral afferent signals to the brain influence thoughts, feelings and behavior. Here we highlight the findings of a set of empirical investigations in humans concerning body-mind interaction that focus on how feedback from states of autonomic arousal shapes cognition and emotion. There is a longstanding debate regarding the contribution of the body to mental processes. Recent theoretical models broadly acknowledge the role of (autonomically-mediated) physiological arousal to emotional, social and motivational behaviors, yet the underlying mechanisms are only partially characterized. Neuroimaging is overcoming this shortfall; first, by demonstrating correlations between autonomic change and discrete patterns of evoked, and task-independent, neural activity; second, by mapping the central consequences of clinical perturbations in autonomic response and; third, by probing how dynamic fluctuations in peripheral autonomic state are integrated with perceptual, cognitive and emotional processes. Building on the notion that an important source of the brain's representation of physiological arousal is derived from afferent information from arterial baroreceptors, we have exploited the phasic nature of these signals to show their differential contribution to the processing of emotionally-salient stimuli. This recent work highlights the facilitation at neural and behavioral levels of fear and threat processing that contrasts with the more established observations of the inhibition of central pain processing during baroreceptors activation. The implications of this body-brain-mind axis are discussed. PMID:26379481

  1. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  2. Pattern of Functional TTX-Resistant Sodium Channels Reveals a Developmental Stage of Human iPSC- and ESC-Derived Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Esther; Havlicek, Steven; Schmidt, Diana; Link, Andrea S; Neacsu, Cristian; Kohl, Zacharias; Hampl, Martin; Kist, Andreas M; Klinger, Alexandra; Nau, Carla; Schüttler, Jürgen; Alzheimer, Christian; Winkler, Jürgen; Namer, Barbara; Winner, Beate; Lampert, Angelika

    2015-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer the opportunity to generate neuronal cells, including nociceptors. Using a chemical-based approach, we generated nociceptive sensory neurons from HUES6 embryonic stem cells and retrovirally reprogrammed induced hPSCs derived from fibroblasts. The nociceptive neurons expressed respective markers and showed tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTXs) and -resistant (TTXr) voltage-gated sodium currents in patch-clamp experiments. In contrast to their counterparts from rodent dorsal root ganglia, TTXr currents of hPSC-derived nociceptors unexpectedly displayed a significantly more hyperpolarized voltage dependence of activation and fast inactivation. This apparent discrepancy is most likely due to a substantial expression of the developmentally important sodium channel NAV1.5. In view of the obstacles to recapitulate neuropathic pain in animal models, our data advance hPSC-derived nociceptors as a better model to study developmental and pathogenetic processes in human nociceptive neurons and to develop more specific small molecules to attenuate pain. PMID:26321143

  3. The fast exercise drive to breathe.

    PubMed

    Duffin, James

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a personal view of research into the exercise drive to breathe that can be observed to act immediately to increase breathing at the start of rhythmic exercise. It is based on a talk given at the Experimental Biology 2013 meeting in a session entitled 'Recent advances in understanding mechanisms regulating breathing during exercise'. This drive to breathe has its origin in a combination of central command, whereby voluntary motor commands to the exercising muscles produce a concurrent respiratory drive, and afferent feedback, whereby afferent information from the exercising muscles affects breathing. The drive at the start and end of rhythmic exercise is proportional to limb movement frequency, and its magnitude decays as exercise continues so that the immediate decrease of ventilation at the end of exercise is about 60% of the immediate increase at the start. With such evidence for the effect of this fast drive to breathe at the start and end of rhythmic exercise, its existence during exercise is hypothesised. Experiments to test this hypothesis have, however, provided debatable evidence. A fast drive to breathe during both ramp and sine wave changes in treadmill exercise speed and grade appears to be present in some individuals, but is not as evident in the general population. Recent sine-wave cycling experiments show that when cadence is varied sinusoidally the ventilation response lags by about 10 s, whereas when pedal loading is varied ventilation lags by about 30 s. It therefore appears that limb movement frequency is effective in influencing ventilation during exercise as well as at the start and end of exercise. PMID:23940383

  4. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in hypertrophic intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Pengmin; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Grundy, David; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-03-15

    Partial intestinal obstruction causes smooth muscle hypertrophy, enteric neuronal plasticity, motility disorders, and biomechanical remodeling. In this study we characterized the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the partially obstructed jejunum. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled mechanical tissue properties or from adaptive afferent processes. Partial obstruction was created by placing a polyethylene ring for 2 wk in jejunum of seven rats. Sham obstruction was made in six rats and seven rats served as normal controls. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerve bundles was recorded during mechanical ramp, relaxation, and creep tests. Stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and firing rate in single units were assessed for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations, histomorphometry data, and afferent nerve discharge. Partial intestinal obstruction resulted in hypertrophy and jejunal stiffening proximal to the obstruction site. Low SRIR at low strains during fast distension and at high stresses during slow distension was found in the obstructed rats. Single unit analysis showed increased proportion of mechanosensitive units but absent high-threshold (HT) units during slow stimulation, decreased number of HT units during fast stimulation, and shift from HT sensitivity towards low threshold sensitivity in the obstructed jejunum. Biomechanical remodeling and altered afferent response to mechanical stimulations were found in the obstructed jejunum. Afferents from obstructed jejunum preserved their function in encoding ongoing mechanical stimulation but showed changes in their responsiveness. The findings support that mechanical factors rather than adaption are important for afferent remodeling. PMID:26585414

  5. Experiment K-7-31: Studies of Vestibular Primary Afferents and Eye Movements in Normal, Hypergravity and Hypogravity - Axon Cosmos Flight 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Sirota, M.; Yakushin, S.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1994-01-01

    Fourteen days of active head movements in microgravity appear to modify the gain and neural adaptation properties of the horizontal semicircular canals in the rhesus monkey. This is the first demonstration of adaptive plasticity in the sensory receptor. Reversing prisms, for example, do not modify the gain of the primary afferent response. Pulse yaw rotation, sinusoidal rotation, and sum of sinusoidal rotation testing during the first day following recovery revealed that the gain of a sample of afferents was significantly greater than the gain derived from afferent responses obtained during pre-flight and control monkey testing. There was no strong evidence of tilt sensitivity in the sample of afferents that we tested either during the pre-flight or control tests or during the first day post-flight. Two irregular afferents tested on postflight day 2 showed changes with tilt but the responses were not systematic. The spontaneous discharge did not change following flight. Mean firing rate and coefficient of variation remained constant during the post flight tests and was near the value measured during pre flight tests. The change in gain of horizontal canal afferents might be adaptive. The animals were required to look at a target for food. This required active head and eye movements. Active head movements have been shown to be hypometric and eye movements have been shown to be hypermetric during the first few days of past Cosmos flights (see introduction). It might be that the increased gain in the horizontal semicircular canals permit accurate target acquisition during hypometric head movements by driving the eyes to greater angles for smaller angles of head movement. The mechanism by which the semicircular canals recalibrate (increase their gain) is unknown. The efferent vestibular system is a logical candidate. Horizontal nystagmus during rotation about an earth vertical axis with the horizontal semicircular canals in the plane of rotation produced the same

  6. Perceptual responses to microstimulation of single afferents innervating joints, muscles and skin of the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, G; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1990-01-01

    1. Microneurographic techniques were used to isolate single afferent axons within cutaneous and motor fascicles of the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist in thirteen subjects. Of the sixty-five identified afferents, eleven innervated the interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints, sixteen innervated muscle spindles, three innervated Golgi tendon organs and thirty-five supplied the glabrous skin of the hand. 2. Intrafascicular stimulation through the recording microelectrode, using trains of constant-voltage positive pulses (0.3-0.8 V, 0.1-0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz) or constant-current biphasic pulses (0.4-13.0 microA, 0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz), evoked specific sensations from sites associated with some afferent species but not others. 3. Microstimulation of eight of the eleven joint afferent sites (73%) evoked specific sensations. With four, subjects reported innocuous deep sensations referred to the relevant joint. With the other four, the subjects reported a sensation of joint displacement that partially reflected the responsiveness of the afferents to joint rotation. 4. Microstimulation of fourteen of the sixteen muscle spindle afferent sites (88%) generated no perceptions when the stimuli did not produce overt movement. However, subjects could correctly detect the slight movements generated when the stimuli excited the motor axons to the parent muscle. 5. With seven of the nine rapidly adapting (type RA or FAI) cutaneous afferents (88%) microstimulation evoked sensations of 'flutter-vibration', and with two of eight slowly adapting (type SAI) afferents (25%) it evoked sensations of 'sustained pressure'. Of the eighteen SAII afferents, which were classified as such by their responses to planar skin stretch, the majority (83%) generated no perceptions, confirming previous work, but three evoked sensations of movements or pressure. 6. The present results suggest a relatively secure transmission of joint afferent traffic to perceptual levels, and it is concluded that the

  7. Coexpression of auxiliary subunits KChIP and DPPL in potassium channel Kv4-positive nociceptors and pain-modulating spinal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chau-Fu; Wang, Wan-Chen; Huang, Chia-Yi; Du, Po-Hau; Yang, Jung-Hui; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Subthreshold A-type K(+) currents (ISA s) have been recorded from the somata of nociceptors and spinal lamina II excitatory interneurons, which sense and modulate pain, respectively. Kv4 channels are responsible for the somatodendritic ISA s. Accumulative evidence suggests that neuronal Kv4 channels are ternary complexes including pore-forming Kv4 subunits and two types of auxiliary subunits: K(+) channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins (DPPLs). Previous reports have shown Kv4.3 in a subset of nonpeptidergic nociceptors and Kv4.2/Kv4.3 in certain spinal lamina II excitatory interneurons. However, whether and which KChIP and DPPL are coexpressed with Kv4 in these ISA -expressing pain-related neurons is unknown. In this study we mapped the protein distribution of KChIP1, KChIP2, KChIP3, DPP6, and DPP10 in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. In the DRG, we found colocalization of KChIP1, KChIP2, and DPP10 in the somatic surface and cytoplasm of Kv4.3(+) nociceptors. KChIP3 appears in most Aβ and Aδ sensory neurons as well as a small population of peptidergic nociceptors, whereas DPP6 is absent in sensory neurons. In the spinal cord, KChIP1 is coexpressed with Kv4.3 in the cell bodies of a subset of lamina II excitatory interneurons, while KChIP1, KChIP2, and DPP6 are colocalized with Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 in their dendrites. Within the dorsal horn, besides KChIP3 in the inner lamina II and lamina III, we detected DPP10 in most projection neurons, which transmit pain signal to brain. The results suggest the existence of Kv4/KChIP/DPPL ternary complexes in ISA -expressing nociceptors and pain-modulating spinal interneurons. PMID:26239200

  8. Electrophysiological Properties of Dural Afferents in the Absence and Presence of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Andrea M.; Gold, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating condition characterized by recurrent severe head pain. Although mechanisms underlying a migraine attack remain controversial, one proposal is that inflammatory mediator (IM)–induced activation and sensitization of dural afferents contribute to the initiation of migraine pain. We and others have shown that the electrophysiological properties of afferents, both in the absence and the presence of IM, vary as a function of target of innervation. These differences may account for unique aspects of pain syndromes associated with specific body regions. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the electrophysiological properties of dural afferents differ from those innervating the temporalis muscle (TM), a structure in close proximity to the dura but that is not associated with pain syndromes at all similar to migraine. Acutely dissociated retrograde labeled primary afferents innervating the dura and TM were examined with whole cell current-clamp recordings. Passive and active electrophysiological properties were determined before and after the application of IM: (in μM) prostaglandin E2 (1), bradykinin (10), and histamine (1). In the absence of IM, there were significant differences between the two populations, particularly with respect to the response to suprathreshold stimulation where dural afferents were more excitable than TM afferents. Importantly, although both populations of afferents were sensitized by IM, the pattern of passive and active electrophysiological changes associated with IM-induced sensitization of these two populations of afferents suggested that there were both similarities and marked differences between the two with respect to underlying mechanisms of sensitization. If the differences between dural and TM afferents are due to a differential pattern of ion channel expression rather than differences in the relative density/biophysical properties of the same ion channels, it may be

  9. Transient contractions of urinary bladder smooth muscle are drivers of afferent nerve activity during filling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Hill-Eubanks, David; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-04-01

    Activation of afferent nerves during urinary bladder (UB) filling conveys the sensation of UB fullness to the central nervous system (CNS). Although this sensory outflow is presumed to reflect graded increases in pressure associated with filling, UBs also exhibit nonvoiding, transient contractions (TCs) that cause small, rapid increases in intravesical pressure. Here, using an ex vivo mouse bladder preparation, we explored the relative contributions of filling pressure and TC-induced pressure transients to sensory nerve stimulation. Continuous UB filling caused an increase in afferent nerve activity composed of a graded increase in baseline activity and activity associated with increases in intravesical pressure produced by TCs. For each ∼4-mmHg pressure increase, filling pressure increased baseline afferent activity by ∼60 action potentials per second. In contrast, a similar pressure elevation induced by a TC evoked an ∼10-fold greater increase in afferent activity. Filling pressure did not affect TC frequency but did increase the TC rate of rise, reflecting a change in the length-tension relationship of detrusor smooth muscle. The frequency of afferent bursts depended on the TC rate of rise and peaked before maximum pressure. Inhibition of small- and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)(SK and BK) channels increased TC amplitude and afferent nerve activity. After inhibiting detrusor muscle contractility, simulating the waveform of a TC by gently compressing the bladder evoked similar increases in afferent activity. Notably, afferent activity elicited by simulated TCs was augmented by SK channel inhibition. Our results show that afferent nerve activity evoked by TCs represents the majority of afferent outflow conveyed to the CNS during UB filling and suggest that the maximum TC rate of rise corresponds to an optimal length-tension relationship for efficient UB contraction. Furthermore, our findings implicate SK channels in controlling the gain of sensory

  10. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  11. Cortical and subcortical plasticity in the brains of humans, primates, and rats after damage to sensory afferents in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaas, Jon H.; Qi, Hui-Xin; Burish, Mark; Gharbawie, Omar; Onifer, Stephen M.; Massey, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The failure of injured axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury deprives brain neurons of their normal sources of activation. These injuries also result in the reorganization of affected areas of the central nervous system that is thought to drive both the ensuing recovery of function and the formation of maladaptive neuronal circuitry. Better understanding of the physiological consequences of novel synaptic connections produced by injury and the mechanisms that control their formation are important to the development of new successful strategies for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injuries. Here we discuss the anatomical, physiological and behavioral changes that take place in response to injury-induced plasticity after damage to the dorsal column pathway in rats and monkeys. Complete section of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord at a high cervical level in monkeys and rats interrupts the ascending axon branches of low threshold mechanoreceptor afferents subserving the forelimb and the rest of the lower body. Such lesions render the corresponding part of the somatotopic representation of primary somatosensory cortex totally unresponsive to tactile stimuli. There are also behavioral consequences of the sensory loss, including an impaired use of the hand/forelimb in manipulating small objects. In monkeys, if some of the afferents from the hand remain intact after dorsal column lesions, these remaining afferents extensively reactivate portions of somatosensory cortex formerly representing the hand. This functional reorganization develops over a postoperative period of one month, during which hand use rapidly improves. These recoveries appear to be mediated, at least in part, by the sprouting of preserved afferents within the cuneate nucleus of the dorsal column-trigeminal complex. In rats, such functional collateral sprouting has been promoted by the post-lesion digestion of the perineuronal net in the cuneate nucleus. Thus, this and other

  12. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Christopher M.; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5–9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1–5 or 6–15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough

  13. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor.

    PubMed

    Laine, Christopher M; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5-9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1-5 or 6-15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough exploration

  14. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  15. Interleukin-1β sensitizes abdominal visceral afferents of cats to ischaemia and histamine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    1999-01-01

    Activation of abdominal splanchnic visceral afferents during mesenteric ischaemia induces visceral pain and evokes excitatory cardiovascular responses. Previous studies have shown that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentration is increased locally in tissues during ischaemia and reperfusion. Local administration of IL-1β sensitizes somatic afferents to mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-1β stimulates or sensitizes splanchnic visceral afferents to ischaemia and to the action of chemical stimuli such as histamine. The concentration of IL-1β in mesenteric lymph and portal venous plasma in anaesthetized cats was measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before, during and after 10 min of abdominal ischaemia. The level of IL-1β was significantly increased during ischaemia in lymph, but not in plasma. Discharge activity of single-unit abdominal visceral C fibre afferents was measured from the right thoracic sympathetic chain. Ischaemically sensitive C fibre afferents were identified according to their response to 5–10 min of abdominal ischaemia. Intra-arterial (i.a.) injection of a high dose of IL-1β (500 ng kg−1), but not of a lower dose (i.e. 15, 50 or 150 ng kg−1), stimulated most (six of seven) abdominal visceral afferents. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly enhanced the increased activity of 11 of 13 C fibre afferents during 10 min of ischaemia. Conversely, an IL-1 type I receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, 1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the increased activity in six of seven other C fibre afferents during ischaemia. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly augmented the responses of 13 of 16 ischaemically sensitive abdominal afferents to histamine (5–10 μg kg−1, i.a.). Conversely, IL-1ra (1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the responses of five of six other C fibre afferents to histamine. These data strongly suggest that stimulation of IL-1 type I receptors by IL-1

  16. Functional dopamine D2 receptors on rat vagal afferent neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A J; Krstew, E; Jarrott, B

    1995-01-01

    1. In the present study in vitro electrophysiology and receptor autoradiography were used to determine whether rat vagal afferent neurones possess dopamine D2 receptors. 2. Dopamine (10-300 microM) elicited a temperature- and concentration-dependent depolarization of the rat isolated nodose ganglion preparation. When applied to the tissue 15 min prior to agonist, raclopride (10 microM), clozapine (10 microM) or a mixture of raclopride and clozapine (10 microM each) all produced a threefold parallel shift to the right of the dopamine concentration-response curve. In contrast, SCH 23390 (100 nM), phentolamine and propranolol (1 microM each) failed to antagonize the dopamine-mediated depolarization. 3. [125I]-NCQ 298 (0.5 nM), a D2 selective radioligand, bound topographically to sections of rat brainstem. Densitometric quantification of autoradiograms revealed 93.8 +/- 0.5% specific binding of this salicylamide radioligand, as determined by raclopride (10 microM, n = 10 animals). Binding was highest in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), particularly the medial and gelatinous subnuclei. In addition, specific binding was also observed in the interpolar spinal trigeminal nucleus and the inferior olive. 4. Unilateral nodose ganglionectomy caused a 36.6 +/- 3.0% reduction in specific binding in the denervated NTS compared to the contralateral NTS. Furthermore, the loss of binding was confined to the dorsal aspect of the medial subnucleus of the NTS. Sham surgery had no effect on the binding of [125I]-NCQ 298 in rat brainstem. 5. The present data provide evidence for the presence of functionally relevant dopamine D2 receptors on both the soma and central terminals of rat vagal afferent neurones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:7606337

  17. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay safe with a cell phone in the car. ... for Disease Control and Prevention Injury Prevention & Control. Motor Vehicle Safety. www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving . Accessed May ...

  18. Driving Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... drivers’ flexibility and coordination, and reduced driving errors. S l Hand grip strengthening to help you hold on to the steering wheel l Shoulder and upper arm flexibility exercises to make ...

  19. Distracted Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... combines all three types of distraction. 3 How big is the problem? Deaths In 2013, 3,154 ... European countries. More A CDC study analyzed 2011 data on distracted driving, including talking on a cell ...

  20. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sam M; Andresen, Michael C; Aicher, Sue A

    2016-03-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  1. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander; Liao, James C

    2015-01-15

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  2. Technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning in evaluation of afferent loop syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sivelli, R.; Farinon, A.M.; Sianesi, M.; Percudani, M.; Ugolotti, G.; Calbiani, B.

    1984-08-01

    A study of 118 patients, operated on with Billroth II gastrectomy for peptic disease and affected by postgastrectomy syndromes, was carried out. Fifty patients were investigated by means of technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning. In 18 patients, in whom an afferent loop syndrome was clinically suspected, hepatobiliary scanning demonstrated an altered afferent loop emptying in 8 and atonic distension of the gallbladder without afferent loop motility changes in 10. Among the patients in the first group, four were treated with a biliary diversion surgical procedure and in the second group, two patients underwent cholecystectomy. Our findings indicate that biliary vomiting, right upper abdominal pain pyrosis, and biliary diarrhea in Billroth II gastrectomized patients are not always pathognomonic symptoms of afferent loop syndrome. Technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning represents the only diagnostic means of afferent loop syndrome definition. A differential diagnosis of abnormal afferent loop emptying and gallbladder dyskinesia is necessary for the management planning of these patients, and furthermore, when a surgical treatment is required, biliary diversion with Roux-Y anastomosis or Braun's biliary diversion seems the treatment of choice for afferent loop syndrome, whereas cholecystectomy represents the best procedure for atonic distension of the gallbladder.

  3. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  4. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  5. Novel Afferent Terminal Structure in the Crista Ampullaris of the Goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, Pamela J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1996-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we have identified a new type of afferent terminal structure in the crista ampullaris of the goldfish Carassius auratus. In addition to the bouton-type afferent terminals previously described in the ear of this species, the crista also contained enlarged afferent terminals that enveloped a portion of the basolateral hair cell membrane. The hair cell membrane was evaginated and protruded into the afferent terminal in a glove-and-finger configuration. The membranes of the two cells were regularly aligned in the protruded region of the contact and had a distinct symmetrical electron density. The electron-dense profiles of these contacts were easily identified and were present in every crista sampled. In some cases, efferent terminals synapsed onto the afferents at a point where the hair cell protruded into the terminal. The ultrastructural similarities of the goldfish crista afferents to calyx afferents found in amniotes (birds, reptiles, and mammals) are discussed. The results of the study support the hypothesis that structural variation in the vertebrate inner ear may have evolved much earlier in evolution than previously supposed.

  6. Modulation of vagal afferent excitation and reduction of food intake by leptin and cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Peters, James H; Simasko, Steven M; Ritter, Robert C

    2006-11-30

    The gut-peptide, cholecystokinin (CCK), reduces food intake by acting at CCK-1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons, whereas the feeding effects of the adipokine hormone, leptin, are associated primarily with its action on receptors (ObRb) in the hypothalamus. Recently, however, ObRb mRNA has been reported in vagal afferent neurons, some of which also express CCK-1 receptor, suggesting that leptin, alone or in cooperation with CCK, might activate vagal afferent neurons, and influence food intake via a vagal route. To evaluate these possibilities we have been examining the cellular and behavioral effects of leptin and CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In cultured vagal afferent neurons leptin and CCK evoked short latency, transient depolarizations, often leading to action potentials, and increases in cytosolic calcium. There was a much higher prevalence of CCK and leptin sensitivity amongst cultured vagal afferent neurons that innervate stomach or duodenum than there was in the overall vagal afferent population. Furthermore, almost all leptin-responsive gastric and duodenal vagal afferents also were sensitive to CCK. Leptin, infused into the upper GI tract arterial supply, reduced meal size, and enhanced satiation evoked by CCK. These results indicate that vagal afferent neurons are activated by leptin, and that this activation is likely to participate in meal termination, perhaps by enhancing vagal sensitivity to CCK. Our findings are consistent with the view that leptin and CCK exert their influence on food intake by accessing multiple neural systems (viscerosensory, motivational, affective and motor) at multiple points along the neuroaxis. PMID:16872644

  7. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  8. The afferent signaling complex: Regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron responses in the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Reijntjes, Daniël O J; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-06-01

    The spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the first action potential generating neurons in the auditory pathway. The type I SGNs contact the sensory inner hair cells via their peripheral dendrites and relay auditory information to the brainstem via their central axon fibers. Individual afferent fibers show differences in response properties that are essential for normal hearing. The mechanisms that give rise to the heterogeneity of afferent responses are very poorly understood but are likely already in place at the peripheral dendrites where synapses are formed and action potentials are generated. To identify these molecular mechanisms, this review synthesizes a variety of literature and comprehensively outlines the cellular and molecular components positioned to regulate SGN afferent dendrite excitability, especially following glutamate release. These components include 1) proteins of the SGN postsynapses and neighboring supporting cells that together shape glutamatergic signaling, 2) the ion channels and transporters that determine the intrinsic excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites, and 3) the neurotransmitter receptors that extrinsically modify this excitability via synaptic input from the lateral olivocochlear efferents. This cellular and molecular machinery, together with presynaptic specializations of the inner hair cells, can be collectively referred to as the type I afferent signaling complex. As this review underscores, interactions of this signaling complex determine excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites and the afferent fiber responses. Moreover, this complex establishes the environmental milieu critical for the development and maintenance of the SGN afferent dendrites and synapses. Motivated by these important functions, this review also indicates areas of future research to elucidate the contributions of the afferent signaling complex to both normal hearing and also hearing loss. PMID:27018296

  9. Excitation by irritant chemical substances of sensory afferent units in the cat's cornea.

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, C; Gallar, J; Pozo, M A; Rebollo, I

    1991-01-01

    1. Single-unit electrical activity was recorded from thin myelinated sensory nerve fibres innervating the cornea of deeply anaesthetized cats. 2. Based on their responses to mechanical (calibrated von Frey hairs), chemical (10 mM-acetic acid and/or 616 mM-NaCl) and thermal (ice-cold or heat up to 51 degrees C) stimuli, corneal A delta fibres were classified as polymodal nociceptors (63%), high-threshold mechanoceptors (22%) and mechano-heat nociceptors (15%). Thin myelinated fibres responding only to cold were found in the limbus of the eye. 3. Application of 10 mM-acetic acid on the corneal surface for 30 s evoked in polymodal fibres a brisk discharge of impulses often followed by a low-frequency impulse activity. NaCl (616 mM) produced a more gradual and sustained firing response. 4. The responses of polymodal fibres to acid were proportional to extracellular pH values (pH range: 4.5-6.0). After sensitization to repeated heating, most mechano-heat units developed a sensitivity to acidic stimulation. 5. Topical 0.33 mM-capsaicin excited polymodal nociceptors of the cornea; 5 min after capsaicin about 15% of these fibres were inactivated to all subsequent stimuli. In the rest of the fibres, chemical and thermal sensitivity disappeared after 0.33-3.3 mM-capsaicin, but mechanosensitivity was preserved. 6. Corneal mechanoceptors and limbal cold receptors were not affected by capsaicin (up to 33 mM). 7. These experiments demonstrate that the cornea of the cat is innervated by polymodal as well as mechanoceptive A delta nociceptors. In polymodal nociceptive fibres, mechanical and chemical sensitivities appear to be subserved by separate transduction mechanisms. PMID:1890657

  10. Enterolith Causing Afferent Loop Obstruction: A Case Report and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Michael C.; Bui, James T.; Knuttinen, M-Grace; Gaba, Ron C.; Scott Helton, W.; Owens, Charles A.

    2009-09-15

    Enterolith formation is a rare cause of afferent limb obstruction following Billroth II gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy surgery. A case of ascending cholangitis caused by an enterolith incarcerated in the afferent loop of a 15-year-old Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was emergently decompressed under direct ultrasound guidance prior to surgery. This is the thirteenth reported case of an enterolith causing afferent loop obstruction. A discussion of our management approach and a review of the relevant literature are presented.

  11. Percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Han, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of afferent loop syndrome, jejunostomy or Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy have tended to represent the preferred procedures. In patients who are not good candidates for surgery, palliative treatment-i.e., percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or percutaneous direct transperitoneal jejunostomy techniques-have been applied. Transhepatic biliary drainage confers a risk of ascending cholangitis. Direct percutaneous transperitoneal drainage may be impractical when overlying bowel loops prevent access to deeply located afferent loops. In the present case, percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma was performed successfully for palliation of afferent loop syndrome. PMID:25433418

  12. A phenotypically restricted set of primary afferent nerve fibers innervate the bone versus skin: therapeutic opportunity for treating skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Xu, Kevin Haili; Ferng, Alice S.; Dussor, Gregory; Vanderah, Todd W.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of chronic pain and physical disability in both developed as well as developing countries, relatively little is known about the nerve fibers and mechanisms that drive skeletal pain. Small diameter sensory nerve fibers, most of which are C-fiber nociceptors, can be separated into two broad populations: the peptide-rich and peptide-poor nerve fibers. Peptide-rich nerve fibers express substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In contrast, the peptide-poor nerve fibers bind to isolectin B4 (IB4) and express the purinergic receptor P2X3 and Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor member d (Mrgprd). In the present report, we used mice in which the Mrgprd+ nerve fibers express genetically encoded axonal tracers to determine the peptide-rich and peptide-poor sensory nerve fibers that innervate the glabrous skin of the hindpaw as compared to the bone marrow, mineralized bone and periosteum of the femur. Whereas the skin is richly innervated by CGRP+, SP+, P2X3+ and Mrgprd+ sensory nerve fibers, the bone marrow, mineralized bone and periosteum receive a significant innervation by SP+ and CGRP+, but not Mrgprd+ and P2X3+ nerve fibers. This lack of redundancy in the populations of C-fibers that innervate the bone may present a unique therapeutic opportunity for targeting skeletal pain, as the peptide-rich and peptide-poor sensory nerve fibers generally express a different repertoire of receptors and channels to detect noxious stimuli. Thus, therapies that target the specific types of C-nerve fibers that innervate the bone may be uniquely effective in attenuating skeletal pain as compared to skin pain. PMID:19766746

  13. GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Distinguish Ribbon-Associated from Ribbonless Afferent Contacts on Rat Cochlear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Liu, Chang; Weisz, Catherine; Vyas, Pankhuri; Fuchs, Paul Albert; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells release glutamate at ribbon synapses to excite postsynaptic afferent neurons, via AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs). However, type II afferent neurons contacting outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea were thought to differ in this respect, failing to show GluA immunolabeling and with many "ribbonless" afferent contacts. Here it is shown that antibodies to the AMPAR subunit GluA2 labeled afferent contacts below inner and outer hair cells in the rat cochlea, and that synaptic currents in type II afferents had AMPAR-specific pharmacology. Only half the postsynaptic densities of type II afferents that labeled for PSD-95, Shank, or Homer were associated with GluA2 immunopuncta or presynaptic ribbons, the "empty slots" corresponding to ribbonless contacts described previously. These results extend the universality of AMPAergic transmission by hair cells, and support the existence of silent afferent contacts. PMID:27257620

  14. Suppression of peripheral pain by blockade of Cav2.2 channels in nociceptors induces RANKL and impairs recovery from inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baddack, Uta; Frahm, Silke; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Grobe, Jenny; Lipp, Martin; Müller, Gerd; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objective A hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the chronic pain that accompanies the inflammation and joint deformation. Patients with RA rate pain relief with highest priority, however, few studies have addressed the efficacy and safety of therapies directed specifically towards pain pathways. The conotoxin MVIIA (Prialt/Ziconotide) is used in humans to alleviate persistent pain syndromes because it specifically blocks the CaV2.2 voltage-gated calcium channel, which mediates the release of neurotransmitters and proinflammatory mediators from peripheral nociceptor nerve terminals. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether block of CaV2.2 can suppress arthritic pain, and to examine the progression of induced arthritis during persistent CaV2.2 blockade. Methods Transgenic mice (Tg-MVIIA) expressing a membrane-tethered form of the ω-conotoxin MVIIA, under the control of a nociceptor-specific gene, were employed. These mice were subjected to unilateral induction of joint inflammation using the Antigen- and Collagen-Induced Arthritis (ACIA) model. Results We observed that CaV2.2-blockade mediated by t-MVIIA effectively suppressed arthritis-induced pain; however, in contrast to their wild-type littermates, which ultimately regained use of their injured joint as inflammation subsides, Tg-MVIIA mice showed continued inflammation with an up-regulation of the osteoclast activator RANKL and concomitant joint and bone destruction. Conclusion Altogether, our results indicate that alleviation of peripheral pain by blockade of CaV2.2- mediated calcium influx and signaling in nociceptor sensory neurons, impairs recovery from induced arthritis and point to the potentially devastating effects of using CaV2.2 channel blockers as analgesics during inflammation. PMID:25733371

  15. Functional specializations of primary auditory afferents on the Mauthner cells: interactions between membrane and synaptic properties.

    PubMed

    Curti, Sebastian; Pereda, Alberto E

    2010-01-01

    Primary auditory afferents are usually perceived as passive, timing-preserving, lines of communication. Contrasting this view, a special class of auditory afferents to teleost Mauthner cells, a command neuron that organizes tail-flip escape responses, undergoes potentiation of their mixed (electrical and chemical) synapses in response to high frequency cellular activity. This property is likely to represent a mechanism of input sensitization as these neurons provide the Mauthner cell with essential information for the initiation of an escape response. We review here the anatomical and physiological specializations of these identifiable auditory afferents. In particular, we discuss how their membrane and synaptic properties act in concert to more efficaciously activate the Mauthner cells. The striking functional specializations of these neurons suggest that primary auditory afferents might be capable of more sophisticated contributions to auditory processing than has been generally recognized. PMID:19941953

  16. Response properties of gerbil otolith afferents to small angle pitch and roll tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Angelaki, D. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The responses from isolated single otolith afferent fibers were obtained to small angle sinusoidal pitch and roll tilts in anesthetized gerbils. The stimulus directions that produced the maximum (response vector) and minimum response sensitivities were determined for each otolith afferent, with response vectors for the units being spread throughout the horizontal plane, similar to those reported for other species. A breadth of tuning measure was derived, with narrowly tuned neurons responding maximally to stimulation in one direction and minimally along an orthogonal ('null') direction. Most (approximately 80%) otolith afferents are narrowly tuned, however, some fibers were broadly tuned responding significantly to stimulations in any direction in the horizontal plane. The number of broadly tuned otolith afferents (approximately 20%) differs significantly from the more substantial number of broadly tuned vestibular nuclei neurons (88%) recently reported in rats.

  17. Influence of map scale on primary afferent terminal field geometry in cat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R J; Pubols, L M; Sonty, R V; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W E; Brown, P B

    1991-09-01

    1. Thirty-one physiologically identified primary afferent fibers were labeled intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). 2. A computer analysis was used to determine whether the distribution of cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferent terminals varies as a function of location within the dorsal horn somatotopic map. 3. An analysis of the geometry of the projections of these afferents has shown that 1) terminal arbors have a greater mediolateral width within the region of the foot representation than lateral to it, 2) terminal arbors have larger length-to-width ratios outside the foot representation than within it, and 3) the orientation of terminal arbors near the boundary of the foot representation reflects the angle of the boundary. Previous attribution of mediolateral width variations to primary afferent type are probably in error, although there appear to be genuine variations of longitudinal extent as a function of primary afferent type. 4. Nonuniform terminal distributions represent the first of a three-component process underlying assembly of the monosynaptic portions of cell receptive fields (RFs) and the somatotopic map. The other two components consist of the elaboration of cell dendritic trees and the establishment of selective connections. 5. The variation of primary afferent terminal distributions with map location is not an absolute requirement for development of the map; for example, the RFs of postsynaptic cells could be assembled with the use of a uniform terminal distribution for all afferents, everywhere in the map, as long as cell dendrites penetrate the appropriate portions of the presynaptic neuropil and receive connections only from afferent axons contributing to their RFs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1753281

  18. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  19. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  20. Genetic and pharmacological evidence for low-abundance TRPV3 expression in primary vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Lindberg, Jonathan E M; Peters, James H

    2016-05-01

    Primary vagal afferent neurons express a multitude of thermosensitive ion channels. Within this family of ion channels, the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) greatly influences vagal afferent signaling by determining the threshold for action-potential initiation at the peripheral endings, while controlling temperature-sensitive forms of glutamate release at central vagal terminals. Genetic deletion of TRPV1 does not completely eliminate these temperature-dependent effects, suggesting involvement of additional thermosensitive ion channels. The warm-sensitive, calcium-permeable, ion channel TRPV3 is commonly expressed with TRPV1; however, the extent to which TRPV3 is found in vagal afferent neurons is unknown. Here, we begin to characterize the genetic and functional expression of TRPV3 in vagal afferent neurons using molecular biology (RT-PCR and RT-quantitative PCR) in whole nodose and isolated neurons and fluorescent calcium imaging on primary cultures of nodose ganglia neurons. We confirmed low-level TRPV3 expression in vagal afferent neurons and observed direct activation with putative TRPV3 agonists eugenol, ethyl vanillin (EVA), and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Agonist activation stimulated neurons also containing TRPV1 and was blocked by ruthenium red. FPP sensitivity overlapped with EVA and eugenol but represented the smallest percentage of vagal afferent neurons, and it was the only agonist that did not stimulate neurons from TRPV3(-/-1) mice, suggesting FPP has the highest selectivity. Further, FPP was predictive of enhanced responses to capsaicin, EVA, and eugenol in rats. From our results, we conclude TRPV3 is expressed in a discrete subpopulation of vagal afferent neurons and may contribute to vagal afferent signaling either directly or in combination with TRPV1. PMID:26843581

  1. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  2. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1− ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1− inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  3. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  4. Afference copy as a quantitative neurophysiological model for consciousness.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D

    2014-06-01

    Consciousness is a topic of considerable human curiosity with a long history of philosophical analysis and debate. We consider there is nothing particularly complicated about consciousness when viewed as a necessary process of the vertebrate nervous system. Here, we propose a physiological "explanatory gap" is created during each present moment by the temporal requirements of neuronal activity. The gap extends from the time exteroceptive and proprioceptive stimuli activate the nervous system until they emerge into consciousness. During this "moment", it is impossible for an organism to have any conscious knowledge of the ongoing evolution of its environment. In our schematic model, a mechanism of "afference copy" is employed to bridge the explanatory gap with consciously experienced percepts. These percepts are fabricated from the conjunction of the cumulative memory of previous relevant experience and the given stimuli. They are structured to provide the best possible prediction of the expected content of subjective conscious experience likely to occur during the period of the gap. The model is based on the proposition that the neural circuitry necessary to support consciousness is a product of sub/preconscious reflexive learning and recall processes. Based on a review of various psychological and neurophysiological findings, we develop a framework which contextualizes the model and briefly discuss further implications. PMID:25012715

  5. State-space decoding of primary afferent neuron firing rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. B.; Ventura, V.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Kinematic state feedback is important for neuroprostheses to generate stable and adaptive movements of an extremity. State information, represented in the firing rates of populations of primary afferent (PA) neurons, can be recorded at the level of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Previous work in cats showed the feasibility of using DRG recordings to predict the kinematic state of the hind limb using reverse regression. Although accurate decoding results were attained, reverse regression does not make efficient use of the information embedded in the firing rates of the neural population. In this paper, we present decoding results based on state-space modeling, and show that it is a more principled and more efficient method for decoding the firing rates in an ensemble of PA neurons. In particular, we show that we can extract confounded information from neurons that respond to multiple kinematic parameters, and that including velocity components in the firing rate models significantly increases the accuracy of the decoded trajectory. We show that, on average, state-space decoding is twice as efficient as reverse regression for decoding joint and endpoint kinematics.

  6. Control of arousal through neuropeptide afferents of the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Gerard A

    2016-06-15

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephine (LC-NE) system is implicated in mediating several aspects of arousal. Alterations in LC neuronal discharge is associated with distinct changes in behavior, cognition, sensory processing and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Changes in LC output and subsequent release of NE in target brain regions help adjust arousal state to respond appropriately to environmental conditions and behavioral circumstances. One way in which LC activity is controlled is through release of endogenous neuropeptides. Based on the sleep-wake cycle and environmental cues specific neuropeptide afferent systems are activated, innervating the LC. These neuropeptides include: corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), orexin (ORX), endogenous opioids, substance P (SP), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS). This review summarizes studies examining the neuroanatomical projections of these neuropeptides, their receptors in the LC, the actions on LC neurons and downstream NE release, as well as the behavioral and cognitive effects associated individual neuropeptide-mediated innervation of the LC. Finally, the relationship between individual neuropeptides, the LC-NE system and various clinical disorders is discussed, providing evidence for possible therapeutic targets for treatment of several arousal- and stress-related disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26688115

  7. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    urinary bladder also 2 phase relations (less stable) existed per oscillation period of 110 ms in a functional unit between the APs of a sphincteric alpha-motoneuron, a fusimotor and a secondary spindle afferent fibre. The phase relations changed with time following stimulation of mainly somatic afferents. A second functional unit organized by phase related interactions was phase related to the first functional unit. 5. Following painful bladder catheter pulling, the parasympathetic division was transiently activated several times in the paraplegic. At times of activation of the parasympathetic division, 3 broad phase relations occurred within and between the two functional units, indicating that the parasympathetic division in the sacral micturition and defecation center channeled an additional input to the somatic oscillatory firing neuronal networks driving motoneurons which innervate the external bladder and/or anal sphincters. 6. It is conceivable that the mutual inhibitory action of detrusor and external bladder sphincter has the capacity to recover, if the functional neuronal organization of the sacral micturition center is improved in the direction of more stable phase relations between the firings of neurons and neuronal ensembles by natural coordinated afferent inputs from continence organs, supraspinal neurons, and functionally connected neuronal networks. For supraspinal control and improvement of neuronal organization some kinds of bulbo-spinal-bulbo pathways have to exist or to be reconstructed by regeneration. 7. It will be shown in a following article that the sacral micturition centre can be repaired after spinal cord injury by a functional reorganization and limited regeneration of the human spinal cord by administering coordination dynamics therapy. PMID:20349554

  8. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  9. Information analysis of posterior canal afferents in the turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Michael H.; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2011-01-01

    We have used sinusoidal and band limited Gaussian noise stimuli along with information measures to characterize the linear and non-linear responses of morpho-physiologically identified posterior canal (PC) afferents and to examine the relationship between mutual information rate and other physiological parameters Our major findings are: 1) spike generation in most PC afferents is effectively a stochastic renewal process, and spontaneous discharges are fully characterized by their first order statistics; 2) a regular discharge, as measured by normalized coefficient of variation (cv*), reduces intrinsic noise in afferent discharges at frequencies below the mean firing rate; 3) coherence and mutual information rates, calculated from responses to band limited Gaussian noise, are jointly determined by gain and intrinsic noise (discharge regularity), the two major determinants of signal to noise ratio in the afferent response; 4) measures of optimal non-linear encoding were only moderately greater than optimal linear encoding, indicating that linear stimulus encoding is limited primarily by internal noise rather than by non-linearities; 5) a leaky integrate and fire model reproduces these results and supports the suggestion that the combination of high discharge regularity and high discharge rates serves to extend the linear encoding range of afferents to higher frequencies. These results provide a framework for future assessments of afferent encoding of signals generated during natural head movements and for comparison with coding strategies used by other sensory systems. PMID:21890114

  10. Blockade of B2 receptors attenuates the responses of group III afferents to static contraction.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Stone, Audrey J; Yamauchi, Katsuya; McCord, Jennifer L; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-25

    Recent evidence has been presented demonstrating that group III mechanoreceptors comprise an important part of the sensory arm of the exercise pressor reflex, which in turn functions to increase arterial blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles. Although group III afferents are stimulated by mechanical distortion of their receptive fields, they are also stimulated by bradykinin, which is produced by skeletal muscle when it contracts. Moreover, blockade of B (bradykinin)2 receptors has been shown to decrease the magnitude of the exercise pressor reflex. Nevertheless, the effect of blockade of B2 receptors on responses of group III afferents to contraction is not known. We therefore determined the effect of B2 receptor blockade with HOE 140 (40μg/kg) on the responses to both static and intermittent contraction of group III afferents with endings in the triceps surae muscle of decerebrated unanesthetized cats. We found that HOE 140 significantly attenuated (P=0.04) the responses of 14 group III afferents to static contraction, but did not significantly attenuate (P=0.16) the responses of 16 group III afferents to intermittent contraction. The attenuation induced by HOE 140 was present throughout the static contraction period, and led us to speculate that blockade of B2 receptors on the endings of group III afferents decreased their sensitivity to mechanical events occurring in the working muscles. PMID:24036460

  11. Coarse topographic organization of pheromone-sensitive afferents from different antennal surfaces in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Kamimura, Itsuro; Yokohari, Fumio; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-05-19

    In contrast to visual, auditory, taste, and mechanosensory neuropils, in which sensory afferents are topographically organized on the basis of their peripheral soma locations, axons of cognate sensory neurons from different locations of the olfactory sense organ converge onto a small spherical neuropil (glomerulus) in the first-order olfactory center. In the cockroach Periplaneta americana, sex pheromone-sensitive afferents with somata in the antero-dorsal and postero-ventral surfaces of a long whip-like antenna are biased toward the anterior and posterior regions of a macroglomerulus, respectively. In each region, afferents with somata in the more proximal antenna project to more proximal region, relative to the axonal entry points. However, precise topography of afferents in the macroglomerulus has remained unknown. Using single and multiple neuronal stainings, we showed that afferents arising from anterior, dorsal, ventral and posterior surfaces of the proximal regions of an antenna were biased progressively from the anterior to posterior region of the macroglomerulus, reflecting chiasmatic axonal re-arrangements that occur immediately before entering the antennal lobe. Morphologies of individual afferents originating from the proximal antenna matched results of mass neuronal stainings, but their three-dimensional origins in the antenna were hardly predictable on the basis of the projection patterns. Such projection biases made by neuronal populations differ from strict somatotopic projections of antennal mechanosensory neurons in the same species, suggesting a unique sensory mechanism to process information about odor location and direction on a single antenna. PMID:25849528

  12. Effects of gastric distension and infusion of umami and bitter taste stimuli on vagal afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Murat, Chloé; Rosazza, Matthew; Still, Liz

    2011-10-24

    Until recently, sensory nerve pathways from the stomach to the brain were thought to detect distension and play little role in nutritional signaling. Newer data have challenged this view, including reports on the presence of taste receptors in the gastrointestinal lumen and the stimulation of multi-unit vagal afferent activity by glutamate infusions into the stomach. However, assessing these chemosensory effects is difficult because gastric infusions typically evoke a distension-related vagal afferent response. In the current study, we recorded gastric vagal afferent activity in the rat to investigate the possibility that umami (glutamate, 150 mM) and bitter (denatonium, 10 mM) responses could be dissociated from distension responses by adjusting the infusion rate and opening or closing the drainage port in the stomach. Slow infusions of saline (5 ml over 2 min, open port) produced no significant effects on vagal activity. Using the same infusion rate, glutamate or denatonium solutions produced little or no effects on vagal afferent activity. In an attempt to reproduce a prior report that showed distention and glutamate responses, we produced a distension response by closing the exit port. Under this condition, response to the infusion of glutamate or denatonium was similar to saline. In summary, we found little or no effect of gastric infusion of glutamate or denatonium on gastric vagal afferent activity that could be distinguished from distension responses. The current results suggest that sensitivity to umami or bitter stimuli is not a common property of gastric vagal afferent fibers. PMID:21925651

  13. Inflammation-induced plasticity of the afferent innervation of the airways.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M J; Undem, B J

    2001-01-01

    The activation of primary afferent neurons that innervate the airways leads to homeostatic and defensive reflexes. The anatomic and physiologic characteristics of these afferent fibers do not appear to be static properties but rather appear to change rapidly in response to inflammation. The threshold for activation of airway afferent neurons to various stimuli, for example, is not fixed; these fibers can be become sensitized during inflammation. A subset of nociceptive-like (C-fibers) airway afferent neurons not only participates in centrally mediated reflexes but is also thought to release neuropeptides at their peripheral terminals, leading to neurogenic inflammation. An increase in the content of tachykinins is commonly seen in inflamed tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that irritation and inflammation of the airways is associated with the induction of tachykinin synthesis in non-nociceptive airway afferent fibers that under normal conditions do not contain neuropeptides. The release of neurokinins from the peripheral terminals in the airways and their central terminals in the brain stem may contribute to the symptoms of inflammatory airway diseases. Elevated release of neurokinins from peripheral terminals may promote local inflammatory responses, and the release of neurokinins in the brainstem, together with inflammation-induced increases in the excitability of afferent fibers, may culminate in altered visceral autonomic reflex activity, changes in breathing pattern, and cough. PMID:11544165

  14. Microstimulation of the lumbar DRG recruits primary afferent neurons in localized regions of lower limb.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Christopher A; Fisher, Lee E; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Patterned microstimulation of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) has been proposed as a method for delivering tactile and proprioceptive feedback to amputees. Previous studies demonstrated that large- and medium-diameter afferent neurons could be recruited separately, even several months after implantation. However, those studies did not examine the anatomical localization of sensory fibers recruited by microstimulation in the DRG. Achieving precise recruitment with respect to both modality and receptive field locations will likely be crucial to create a viable sensory neuroprosthesis. In this study, penetrating microelectrode arrays were implanted in the L5, L6, and L7 DRG of four isoflurane-anesthetized cats instrumented with nerve cuff electrodes around the proximal and distal branches of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A binary search was used to find the recruitment threshold for evoking a response in each nerve cuff. The selectivity of DRG stimulation was characterized by the ability to recruit individual distal branches to the exclusion of all others at threshold; 84.7% (n = 201) of the stimulation electrodes recruited a single nerve branch, with 9 of the 15 instrumented nerves recruited selectively. The median stimulation threshold was 0.68 nC/phase, and the median dynamic range (increase in charge while stimulation remained selective) was 0.36 nC/phase. These results demonstrate the ability of DRG microstimulation to achieve selective recruitment of the major nerve branches of the hindlimb, suggesting that this approach could be used to drive sensory input from localized regions of the limb. This sensory input might be useful for restoring tactile and proprioceptive feedback to a lower-limb amputee. PMID:27052583

  15. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion. II. Phase asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper, we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  16. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  17. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  18. Purinergic 2 receptor blockade prevents the responses of group IV afferents to post-contraction circulatory occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, Angela E; Hayes, Shawn G; Kaufman, Marc P

    2007-01-01

    ATP, by activating purinergic 2 (P2) receptors on group III and IV afferents, is thought to evoke the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. Previously we have shown that injection of PPADS, a P2 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of skeletal muscle of decerebrated cats attenuated the responses of group III and IV afferents to static contraction while the muscles were freely perfused. We have now tested the hypothesis that injection of PPADS (10 mg kg−1) attenuated the responses of group III (n = 13) and group IV afferents (n = 9) to post-contraction circulatory occlusion. In the present study, we found that PPADS attenuated the group III afferent responses to static contraction during circulatory occlusion (P < 0.05). Likewise, PPADS abolished the group IV afferent responses to static contraction during occlusion (P = 0.001). During a 1 minute period of post-contraction circulatory occlusion, four of the 13 group III afferents and eight of the nine group IV afferents maintained their increased discharge. A Fischer's exact probability test revealed that more group IV afferents than group III afferents were stimulated by post-contraction circulatory occlusion (P < 0.02). In addition, the nine group IV afferents increased their mean discharge rate over baseline levels during the post-contraction circulatory occlusion period, whereas the 13 group III afferents did not (P < 0.05). PPADS abolished this post-contraction increase in discharge by the group IV afferents (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that P2 receptors on group IV afferents play a role in evoking the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:17038431

  19. Enhanced excitability of MRGPRA3- and MRGPRD-positive nociceptors in a model of inflammatory itch and pain

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lintao; Fan, Ni; Ma, Chao; Wang, Tao; Han, Liang; Fu, Kai; Wang, Yingdi; Shimada, Steven G.; Dong, Xinzhong

    2014-01-01

    Itch is a common symptom of diseases of the skin but can also accompany diseases of other tissues including the nervous system. Acute itch from chemicals experimentally applied to the skin is initiated and maintained by action potential activity in a subset of nociceptive neurons. But whether these pruriceptive neurons are active or might become intrinsically more excitable under the pathological conditions that produce persistent itch and nociceptive sensations in humans is largely unexplored. Recently, two distinct types of cutaneous nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons were identified as responding to pruritic chemicals and playing a role in itch sensation. One expressed the mas-related G-coupled protein receptor MRGPRA3 and the other MRGPRD (MRGPRA3+ and MRGPRD+ neurons, respectively). Here we tested whether these two distinct pruriceptive nociceptors exhibited an enhanced excitability after the development of contact hypersensitivity, an animal model of allergic contact dermatitis, a common pruritic disorder in humans. The characteristics of increased excitability of pruriceptive neurons during this disorder may also pertain to the same types of neurons active in other pruritic diseases or pathologies that affect the nervous system and other tissues or organs. We found that challenging the skin of the calf of the hind paw or the cheek of previously sensitized mice with the hapten, squaric acid dibutyl ester, produced symptoms of contact hypersensitivity including an increase in skin thickness and site-directed spontaneous pain-like (licking or wiping) and itch-like (biting or scratching) behaviours. Ablation of MRGPRA3+ neurons led to a significant reduction in spontaneous scratching of the hapten-challenged nape of the neck of previously sensitized mice. In vivo, electrophysiological recordings revealed that MRGPRA3+ and MRGPRD+ neurons innervating the hapten-challenged skin exhibited a greater incidence of spontaneous activity and/or abnormal after

  20. Endogenous bradykinin activates ischaemically sensitive cardiac visceral afferents through kinin B2 receptors in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Pan, Hui-Lin; Longhurst, John C

    1998-01-01

    Activity of ischaemically sensitive cardiac visceral afferents during myocardial ischaemia induces both angina and cardiovascular reflexes. Increased production of bradykinin (BK) and cyclo-oxygenase products (i.e. prostaglandins (PGs)) occurs during myocardial ischaemia. However, the role of these agents in activation of ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents has not been established. The present study tested the hypothesis that BK produced during ischaemia activates cardiac afferents through kinin B2 receptors. Single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the left ventricle was recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1–T4) of anaesthetized cats. Ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents were identified according to their response to 5 min of myocardial ischaemia. The mechanism of BK in activation of ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents was determined by injection of BK (1 μg kg−1 i.a.), des-Arg9-BK (1 μg kg−1 i.a., a specific kinin B1 receptor agonist), kinin B2 receptor antagonists: HOE140 (30 μg kg−1 i.v.) and NPC-17731 (40 μg kg−1 i.v.), cyclo-oxygenase inhibition with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 i.v.) and NPC-17731 (40 μg kg−1 i.v.) after pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 i.v.). We observed that BK increased the discharge rate of all eleven ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents from 0.39 ± 0.12 to 1.47 ± 0.37 impulses s−1 (P < 0.05). Conversely, des-Arg9-BK did not significantly increase the activity of eleven ischaemically sensitive fibres (0.58 ± 0.02 vs. 0.50 ± 0.18 impulses s−1). HOE140 significantly attenuated the response of twelve afferents to ischaemia (0.61 ± 0.22 to 1.85 ± 0.5 vs. 0.53 ± 0.16 to 1.09 ± 0.4 impulses s−1). NPC-17731, another kinin B2 receptor antagonist, had similar inhibitory effects on six other ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents (0.35 ± 0.14 to 1.19 ± 0.29 vs. 0.22 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.07 impulses s−1). Indomethacin significantly reduced the

  1. Facilitation of motor evoked potentials by somatosensory afferent stimulation.

    PubMed

    Deletis, V; Schild, J H; Berić, A; Dimitrijević, M R

    1992-10-01

    The effect of an electrically induced peripheral afferent volley upon electrical and magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from muscles of the upper and lower extremities was studied in 16 healthy volunteers. A standard conditioning-test (C-T) paradigm was employed whereby the test stimulus (transcranial electric or magnetic) was applied at random time intervals, from 10 msec prior to 90 msec after the conditioning stimulus (peripheral nerve stimulus). MEP amplitude facilitation was observed for the majority of the upper extremity muscles tested at two distinct periods, one occurring at short, and the other at long C-T intervals. This bimodal trend of MEP facilitation was found to be equally as prominent in the lower extremity muscles tested. The period of short C-T interval facilitation is consistent with modifications in the spinal excitability of the segmental motoneuron pool. On the other hand, the period of long C-T interval facilitation is suggested to be due to alterations in excitability of the motor cortex as a result of the arrival of the orthodromic sensory volley. Although most pronounced in muscles innervated by the nerve to which the conditioning stimulus was applied, this bimodal facilitatory effect was also observed in adjacent muscles not innervated by the stimulated nerve. Qualitatively, the conditioned MEPs from the upper and lower extremities responded similarly to both electrical and magnetic trans-cranial stimulation. In addition, our study demonstrates that the C-T paradigm has potential for use in the assessment of spinal and cortical sensorimotor integration by providing quantitative information which cannot be obtained through isolated assessment of sensory and/or motor pathways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1385090

  2. Endoscopic management of afferent loop syndrome after a pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenecotomy presenting with obstructive jaundice and ascending cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Kyung; Park, Chan Hyuk; Huh, Ji Hye; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jaebock; Bang, Seungmin

    2011-09-01

    Afferent loop syndrome is a rare complication of gastrojejunostomy. Patients usually present with abdominal distention and bilious vomiting. Afferent loop syndrome in patients who have undergone a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy can present with ascending cholangitis. This condition is related to a large volume of reflux through the biliary-enteric anastomosis and static materials with bacterial overgrowth in the afferent loop. Patients with afferent loop syndrome after pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy frequently cannot be confirmed as surgical candidates due to poor medical condition. In that situation, a non-surgical palliation should be considered. Herein, we report two patients with afferent loop syndrome presenting with obstructive jaundice and ascending cholangitis. The patients suffered from the recurrence of pancreatic cancer after pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The diagnosis of afferent loop syndrome was confirmed, and the patients were successfully treated by inserting an endoscopic metal stent using a colonoscopic endoscope. PMID:22741115

  3. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  4. Efferent Control of Hair Cell and Afferent Responses in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Richard; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The sensations of sound and motion generated by the inner ear are controlled by the brain through extensive centripetal innervation originating within the brain stem. In the semicircular canals, brain stem efferent neurons make synaptic contacts with mechanosensory hair cells and with the dendrites of afferent neurons. Here, we examine the relative contributions of efferent action on hair cells and afferents. Experiments were performed in vivo in the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The efferent system was activated via electrical pulses to the brain stem and sensory responses to motion stimuli were quantified by simultaneous voltage recording from afferents and intracellular current- and/or voltage-clamp recordings from hair cells. Results showed synaptic inputs to both afferents and hair cells leading to relatively long-latency intracellular signaling responses: excitatory in afferents and inhibitory in hair cells. Generally, the net effect of efferent action was an increase in afferent background discharge and a simultaneous decrease in gain to angular motion stimuli. Inhibition of hair cells was likely the result of a ligand-gated opening of a major basolateral conductance. The reversal potential of the efferent-evoked current was just below the hair cell resting potential, thus resulting in a small hyperpolarization. The onset latency averaged about 90 ms and latency to peak response was 150–400 ms. Hair cell inhibition often outlasted afferent excitation and, in some cases, latched hair cells in the “off” condition for >1 s following cessation of stimulus. These features endow the animal with a powerful means to adjust the sensitivity and dynamic range of motion sensation. PMID:19571186

  5. Vascular Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Regulation in Afferent Autonomic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by loss of afferent autonomic neural fiber signaling and consequent profound impairment of arterial baroreflex function and blood pressure regulation. Whether vascular endothelial dysfunction contributes to defective vasomotor control in this form of afferent autonomic failure is not known. METHODS We assessed blood pressure response to orthostatic stress and vascular endothelial function with brachial artery reactivity testing in 34 FD subjects with afferent autonomic failure and 34 healthy control subjects. RESULTS Forty-four percent of the afferent autonomic failure subjects had uncontrolled hypertension at supine rest (median systolic blood pressure = 148mm Hg, interquartile range (IQR) = 144–155mm Hg; median diastolic blood pressure = 83mm Hg, IQR = 78–105mm Hg), and 88% had abnormal response to orthostatic stress (median decrease in systolic blood pressure after upright tilt = 48mm Hg, IQR = 29–61mm Hg). Flow-mediated brachial artery reactivity did not differ in subjects with afferent autonomic failure vs. healthy control subjects (median = 6.00%, IQR = 1.86–11.77%; vs. median = 6.27%, IQR = 4.65–9.34%; P = 0.75). In afferent autonomic failure subjects, brachial artery reactivity was not associated with resting blood pressure or the magnitude of orthostatic hypotension but was decreased in association with reduced glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Brachial artery reactivity was preserved in subjects with afferent autonomic failure despite the presence of marked blood pressure dysregulation. Comorbid renal dysfunction was associated with reduced brachial artery reactivity. PMID:25128693

  6. Withdrawal and Restoration of Central Vagal Afferents Within the Dorsal Vagal Complex Following Subdiaphragmatic Vagotomy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, James H.; Gallaher, Zachary R.; Ryu, Vitaly; Czaja, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Vagotomy, a severing of the peripheral axons of the vagus nerve, has been extensively utilized to determine the role of vagal afferents in viscerosensory signaling. Vagotomy is also an unavoidable component of some bariatric surgeries. Although it is known that peripheral axons of the vagus nerve degenerate and then regenerate to a limited extent following vagotomy, very little is known about the response of central vagal afferents in the dorsal vagal complex to this type of damage. We tested the hypothesis that vagotomy results in the transient withdrawal of central vagal afferent terminals from their primary central target, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and were sacrificed 10, 30, or 60 days later. Plastic changes in vagal afferent fibers and synapses were investigated at the morphological and functional levels by using a combination of an anterograde tracer, synapse-specific markers, and patch-clamp electrophysiology in horizontal brain sections. Morphological data revealed that numbers of vagal afferent fibers and synapses in the NTS were significantly reduced 10 days following vagotomy and were restored to control levels by 30 days and 60 days, respectively. Electrophysiology revealed transient decreases in spontaneous glutamate release, glutamate release probability, and the number of primary afferent inputs. Our results demonstrate that subdiaphragmatic vagotomy triggers transient withdrawal and remodeling of central vagal afferent terminals in the NTS. The observed vagotomy-induced plasticity within this key feeding center of the brain may be partially responsible for the response of bariatric patients following gastric bypass surgery. PMID:23749657

  7. PAR-2 elicits afferent arteriolar vasodilation by NO-dependent and NO-independent actions.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Greg; Hollenberg, Morley; Wang, Xuemei; Gui, Yu; Loutzenhiser, Kathy; Loutzenhiser, Rodger

    2002-05-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel class of G protein-coupled receptors that respond to signals through endogenous proteinases. PAR activation involves enzymatic cleavage of the extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain and unmasking of a new NH(2) terminus, which serves as an anchored ligand to activate the receptor. At least four PAR subtypes have been identified. In the present study, we used the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney to examine the effects of activating PAR-2 on the afferent arteriole. The synthetic peptide SLIGRL-NH(2), which corresponds to the exposed ligand sequence and selectively activates PAR-2, did not alter basal afferent arteriolar diameter but caused a concentration-dependent vasodilation (3-30 microM) of arterioles preconstricted by angiotensin II (0.1 nM). A modified peptide sequence (LSIGRL-NH(2), inactive at PAR-2) had no effect. This vasodilation was characterized by an initial transient component followed by a smaller sustained response. A similar pattern of vasodilation was seen when SLIGRL-NH(2) was administered to isolated perfused normal rat kidney. The sustained component of the PAR-2-induced afferent arteriolar vasodilation was eliminated by nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition (100 microM nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In contrast, the transient vasodilation persisted under these conditions. This transient response was not observed when afferent arterioles were preconstricted with elevated KCl, suggesting involvement of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Finally, RT-PCR revealed the presence of PAR-2 mRNA in isolated afferent arterioles. These findings indicate that PAR-2 is expressed in the afferent arteriole and that its activation elicits afferent arteriolar vasodilation by NO-dependent and NO-independent mechanisms. PMID:11934700

  8. Functional analysis of ultra high information rates conveyed by rat vibrissal primary afferents

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, André M.; Theis, Lucas; Sengupta, Biswa; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Bethge, Matthias; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Sensory receptors determine the type and the quantity of information available for perception. Here, we quantified and characterized the information transferred by primary afferents in the rat whisker system using neural system identification. Quantification of “how much” information is conveyed by primary afferents, using the direct method (DM), a classical information theoretic tool, revealed that primary afferents transfer huge amounts of information (up to 529 bits/s). Information theoretic analysis of instantaneous spike-triggered kinematic stimulus features was used to gain functional insight on “what” is coded by primary afferents. Amongst the kinematic variables tested—position, velocity, and acceleration—primary afferent spikes encoded velocity best. The other two variables contributed to information transfer, but only if combined with velocity. We further revealed three additional characteristics that play a role in information transfer by primary afferents. Firstly, primary afferent spikes show preference for well separated multiple stimuli (i.e., well separated sets of combinations of the three instantaneous kinematic variables). Secondly, neurons are sensitive to short strips of the stimulus trajectory (up to 10 ms pre-spike time), and thirdly, they show spike patterns (precise doublet and triplet spiking). In order to deal with these complexities, we used a flexible probabilistic neuron model fitting mixtures of Gaussians to the spike triggered stimulus distributions, which quantitatively captured the contribution of the mentioned features and allowed us to achieve a full functional analysis of the total information rate indicated by the DM. We found that instantaneous position, velocity, and acceleration explained about 50% of the total information rate. Adding a 10 ms pre-spike interval of stimulus trajectory achieved 80–90%. The final 10–20% were found to be due to non-linear coding by spike bursts. PMID:24367295

  9. Capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons contribute to the detection of pathogenic bacterial colonization in the gut.

    PubMed

    Riley, T P; Neal-McKinney, J M; Buelow, D R; Konkel, M E; Simasko, S M

    2013-04-15

    Vagal activation can reduce inflammation and disease activity in various animal models of intestinal inflammation via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In the current model of this pathway, activation of descending vagal efferents is dependent on a signal initiated by stimulation of vagal afferents. However, little is known about how vagal afferents are activated, especially in the context of subclinical or clinical pathogenic bacterial infection. To address this question, we first determined if selective lesions of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents altered c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) after mice were inoculated with either Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella typhimurium. Our results demonstrate that the activation of nTS neurons by intraluminal pathogenic bacteria is dependent on intact, capsaicin sensitive vagal afferents. We next determined if inflammatory mediators could cause the observed increase in c-Fos expression in the nTS by a direct action on vagal afferents. This was tested by the use of single-cell calcium measurements in cultured vagal afferent neurons. We found that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly activate cultured vagal afferent neurons and that almost all TNFα and LPS responsive neurons were sensitive to capsaicin. We conclude that activation of the afferent arm of the parasympathetic neuroimmune reflex by pathogenic bacteria in the gut is dependent on capsaicin sensitive vagal afferent neurons and that the release of inflammatory mediators into intestinal tissue can be directly sensed by these neurons. PMID:23481698

  10. Capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons contribute to the detection of pathogenic bacterial colonization in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Riley, T.P.; Neal-McKinney, J.M.; Buelow, D.R.; Konkel, M.E.; Simasko, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Vagal activation can reduce inflammation and disease activity in various animal models of intestinal inflammation via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In the current model of this pathway, activation of descending vagal efferents is dependent on a signal initiated by stimulation of vagal afferents. However, little is known about how vagal afferents are activated, especially in the context of subclinical or clinical pathogenic bacterial infection. To address this question, we first determined if selective lesions of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents altered c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) after mice were inoculated with either Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella typhimurium. Our results demonstrate that the activation of nTS neurons by intraluminal pathogenic bacteria is dependent on intact, capsaicin sensitive vagal afferents. We next determined if inflammatory mediators could cause the observed increase in c-Fos expression in the nTS by a direct action on vagal afferents. This was tested by the use of single-cell calcium measurements in cultured vagal afferent neurons. We found that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly activate cultured vagal afferent neurons and that almost all TNFα and LPS responsive neurons were sensitive to capsaicin. We conclude that activation of the afferent arm of the parasympathetic neuroimmune reflex by pathogenic bacteria in the gut is dependent on capsaicin sensitive vagal afferent neurons and that the release of inflammatory mediators into intestinal tissue can be directly sensed by these neurons. PMID:23481698