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Sample records for nocturnal sleep disruption

  1. Trauma Associated Sleep Disorder: A Proposed Parasomnia Encompassing Disruptive Nocturnal Behaviors, Nightmares, and REM without Atonia in Trauma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; O'Reilly, Brian; Polchinski, Jason; Kwon, Herbert P.; Germain, Anne; Roth, Bernard J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To characterize the clinical, polysomnographic and treatment responses of patients with disruptive nocturnal behaviors (DNB) and nightmares following traumatic experiences. Methods: A case series of four young male, active duty U.S. Army Soldiers who presented with DNB and trauma related nightmares. Patients underwent a clinical evaluation in a sleep medicine clinic, attended overnight polysomnogram (PSG) and received treatment. We report pertinent clinical and PSG findings from our patients and review prior literature on sleep disturbances in trauma survivors. Results: DNB ranged from vocalizations, somnambulism to combative behaviors that injured bed partners. Nightmares were replays of the patient's traumatic experiences. All patients had REM without atonia during polysomnography; one patient had DNB and a nightmare captured during REM sleep. Prazosin improved DNB and nightmares in all patients. Conclusions: We propose Trauma associated Sleep Disorder (TSD) as a unique sleep disorder encompassing the clinical features, PSG findings, and treatment responses of patients with DNB, nightmares, and REM without atonia after trauma. Citation: Mysliwiec V, O'Reilly B, Polchinski J, Kwon HP, Germain A, Roth BJ. Trauma associated sleep disorder: a proposed parasomnia encompassing disruptive nocturnal behaviors, nightmares, and REM without atonia in trauma survivors. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(10):1143-1148. PMID:25317096

  2. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired sleep homeostasis. In conclusion, we suggest that alcohol may disrupt sleep homeostasis to cause sleep disruptions. PMID:25499829

  3. Nocturnal hypoxemia as a determinant of vigilance impairment in sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bédard, M A; Montplaisir, J; Richer, F; Malo, J

    1991-08-01

    In sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), vigilance impairment is typically associated with highly disrupted sleep, but recently, nocturnal hypoxemia has also been identified as a second pathogenetic factor in patients with a high degree of desaturation. However, although sleep disruption has been demonstrated to play a role in both the propensity to fall asleep and the capacity to stay awake, the role of nocturnal hypoxemia has been implicated only in the latter. In the present study, both sleep disruption and nocturnal hypoxemia were assessed in 20 moderately to severely apneic patients. During the day, vigilance was assessed both by the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), as a measure of the propensity to fall asleep, and by the four-choice reaction time test (FCRTT), as a measure of the capacity to stay awake in a performance task. Severity of nocturnal hypoxemia was found to predict performance on the MSLT, as well as on the FCRTT, but sleep disruption was found to predict performance only on the FCRTT. These results suggest that in moderately to severely affected SAS patients, nocturnal hypoxemia may play a primary role in the pathogenesis of vigilance impairment. PMID:1864107

  4. Minimal Effect of Daytime Napping Behavior on Nocturnal Sleep in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Rebecca M.; Wood, Annette; Okun, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess whether daytime naps negatively impact nocturnal sleep. Design: Longitudinal, prospective cohort design. Participants: 161 pregnant women recruited and evaluated in early gestation (10–20 weeks). Measurements and Results: Daily sleep information was collected in three 2-week periods (10–12, 14–16, and 18–20 weeks gestation) with a daily sleep diary and an actigraph. The average number of naps, as well as the average length of each nap, were calculated from sleep diaries. Women were categorized first as non nappers (0 naps/2-week period), moderate nappers (1–3 naps/2-week period), or frequent nappers (? 4 naps/2-week period). Then, based on the average nap length, they were categorized as short (< 90 min) or long (? 90 min) nappers. Nocturnal sleep parameters included SOL, WASO, SE, and TST. SAS procedure MIXED was used for modeling the main effects of nap group and time, and time by nap group interactions. Women who took naps had a decrease in diary-assessed nocturnal TST, but not actigraphy-assessed TST. This observation was group- and time-specific. There were no other group differences. Women who napped ? 90 min had poorer diary-assessed SE and lower diary-assessed TST than those who took shorter naps. Length of nap was not associated with any other sleep measures. Conclusions: The number of daytime naps have minimal impact on nocturnal sleep parameters; however, long nappers did exhibit modestly impaired sleep continuity and sleep quality. Overall, we propose that daytime naps provide a beneficial countermeasure to the sleep disruption commonly reported by pregnant women. This may be clinically beneficial given that sleep continuity and quality are important correlates of pregnancy outcomes. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 593. Citation: Ebert RM, Wood A, Okun ML. Minimal effect of daytime napping behavior on nocturnal sleep in pregnant women. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):635–643. PMID:25766712

  5. Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: Sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with and without diurnal naps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Dinges, David F.

    2007-02-01

    Effective sleep/wake schedules for space operations must balance severe time constraints with allocating sufficient time for sleep in order to sustain high levels of neurobehavioral performance. Developing such schedules requires knowledge about the relationship between scheduled "time in bed" (TIB) and actual physiological sleep obtained. A ground-based laboratory study in N=93 healthy adult subjects was conducted to investigate physiological sleep obtained in a range of restricted sleep schedules. Eighteen different conditions with restricted nocturnal anchor sleep, with and without diurnal naps, were examined in a response surface mapping paradigm. Sleep efficiency was found to be a function of total TIB per 24 h regardless of how the sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap sleep periods. The amounts of sleep stages 1+2 and REM showed more complex relationships with the durations of the anchor and nap sleep periods, while slow-wave sleep was essentially preserved among the different conditions of the experiment. The results of the study indicated that when sleep was chronically restricted, sleep duration was largely unaffected by whether the sleep was placed nocturnally or split between nocturnal anchor sleep periods and daytime naps. Having thus assessed that split-sleep schedules are feasible in terms of obtaining physiological sleep, further research will reveal whether these schedules and the associated variations in the distribution of sleep stages may be advantageous in mitigating neurobehavioral performance impairment in the face of limited time for sleep.

  6. Correlates among nocturnal agitation, sleep, and urinary incontinence in dementia.

    PubMed

    Rose, Karen; Specht, Janet; Forch, Windy

    2015-02-01

    Family caregivers of elders with dementia often face the challenging behaviors of nighttime agitation, sleep disturbances, and urinary incontinence. To date, no study has examined the interrelationships of these behaviors in community-dwelling persons. This single group, descriptive study employs wireless body sensors to objectively collect data on nighttime agitation, sleep, and urinary incontinence in patients with dementia in their homes over a 5- to 7-day period. The aims are to (1) examine the feasibility and acceptability of the use of body sensors in community-dwelling persons with dementia; (2) describe patterns of nocturnal agitation, sleep continuity and duration, and nighttime urinary incontinence; and (3) examine the relationships among nocturnal agitation, sleep continuity and duration, and nighttime urinary incontinence. Data collection is in early stages and is still in progress. Challenges and advantages from preliminary data collection are reported. PMID:24670931

  7. Nocturnal Sleep Disturbances: Risk Factors for Suicide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are associated with insomnia. Sleep Problems as a Risk Factor for Suicide As noted above, sleep problems are ... depressive and anxiety disorders, both of which are risk factors for suicide (Wong & Brower, 2012). Overarousal, marked by ...

  8. Nocturnal awakening and sleep efficiency estimation using unobtrusively measured ballistocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Da Woon Jung; Su Hwan Hwang; Hee Nam Yoon; Lee, Yu-Jin G; Do-Un Jeong; Kwang Suk Park

    2014-01-01

    Fragmented sleep due to frequent awakenings represents a major cause of impaired daytime performance and adverse health outcomes. Currently, the gold standard for studying and assessing sleep fragmentation is polysomnography (PSG). Here, we propose an alternative method for real-time detection of nocturnal awakening via ballistocardiography using an unobtrusive polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film sensor on a bed mattress. From ballistocardiogram, heart rate and body movement information were extracted to develop an algorithm for classifying sleeping and awakening epochs. In total, ten normal subjects (mean age 38.7 ± 14.6 years) and ten patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (mean age 44.2 ± 16.5 years) of varying symptom severity participated in this study. Our study detected awakening epochs with an average sensitivity of 85.3% and 85.2%, specificity of 98.4% and 97.7%, accuracy of 97.4% and 96.5%, and Cohen's kappa coefficient of 0.83 and 0.81 for normal subjects and OSA patients, respectively. Also, sleep efficiency was estimated using detected awakening epochs and then compared with PSG results. Mean absolute errors in sleep efficiency were 1.08% and 1.44% for normal subjects and OSA patients, respectively. The results presented here indicate that our suggested method could be reliably applied to real-time nocturnal awakening detection and sleep efficiency estimation. Furthermore, our method may ultimately be an effective tool for long-term, home monitoring of sleep-wake behavior. PMID:23955694

  9. Nocturnal sleep and daytime alertness of aircrew after transmeridian flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Anthony N.; Pascoe, Peta A.; Spencer, Michael B.; Stone, Barbara M.; Green, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    The nocturnal sleep and daytime alertness of aircrew were studied by electroencephalography and the multiple sleep latency test. After a transmeridian flight from London To San Francisco, sleep onset was faster and, although there was increased wakefulness during the second half of the night, sleep duration and efficiency over the whole night were not changed. The progressive decrease in sleep latencies observed normally in the multiple sleep latency test during the morning continued throughout the day after arrival. Of the 13 subjects, 12 took a nap of around 1-h duration in the afternoon preceding the return flight. These naps would have been encouraged by the drowsiness at this time and facilitated by the departure of the aircraft being scheduled during the early evening. An early evening departure had the further advantage that the circadian increase in vigilance expected during the early part of the day would occur during the latter part of the return flight.

  10. Nocturnal eczema: Review of sleep and circadian rhythms in children with atopic dermatitis and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Anna B; Vitaterna, Olivia; Haugh, Isabel M; Bavishi, Aakash A; Zee, Phyllis C; Turek, Fred W; Sheldon, Stephen H; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Paller, Amy S

    2015-11-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis (AD) experience significant sleep disruption, and clinically, the disease is noted to worsen in a circadian manner at night. Epidemiologic findings highlight many negative consequences of AD, such as impaired linear growth, which is uniquely related to disturbed sleep. Clinical guidelines currently recommend assessing sleep in patients with AD as a crucial parameter of disease control with appropriate treatment. In this review we describe our current understanding of the roles of sleep cycles and circadian rhythms in the nighttime exacerbation of AD (nocturnal eczema). We present a schematic to explain the mechanism of nocturnal eczema. Treatment options for sleep disturbance and future directions for research are discussed in the context of AD. PMID:26549635

  11. Sleep in the nocturnal primate, Aotus trivirgatus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, A. A.

    1971-01-01

    Measurement of the cycles of wakefulness and stages of sleep in owl monkeys during 24-hr periods divided into half dark and half light segments. Recordings of electrophysiological activity were used. Reversal of the sequence of light and dark served to test the influence of environmental lighting on the sleep-wakefulness cycles. The sleep patterns of owl monkeys expressed in percentage of rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) were compared with those of a closely related New World monkey species, Saimiri Sciureus.

  12. Sleep Patterns and Sleep Disruptions in School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeh, Avi; Raviv, Amiram; Gruber, Reut

    2000-01-01

    Assessed sleep patterns, sleep disruptions, and sleepiness of second-, fourth-, and sixth-graders. Found that older children had more delayed sleep onset times and increased reported daytime sleepiness than younger; girls spent more time in sleep than boys and had increased percentage of motionless sleep; and 18 percent of children had fragmented…

  13. [Nocturnal eating disorder--sleep or eating disorder?].

    PubMed

    Tzischinski, O; Lazer, Y

    2000-02-01

    Nocturnal eating disorder (NED) is a rare syndrome that includes disorders of both eating and sleeping. It is characterized by awakening in the middle of the night, getting out of bed, and consuming large quantities of food quickly and uncontrollably, then returning to sleep. This may occur several times during the night. Some patients are fully conscious during their nocturnal eating, while some indicate total amnesia. The etiology of NED is still unclear, as research findings are contradictory. Those suffering from NED exhibit various levels of anxiety and depression, and many lead stressful life-styles. Familial conflict, loneliness and personal crises are commonly found. Recently, a connection has been discovered between NED and unclear self-definition, faulty interpersonal communication, and low frustration threshold. Several authors link it to sleepwalking, leg movements during sleep, and sleep apnea. Treatment is still unclear and there have been trials of pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or a combination of both. However, pharmacological treatment has generally been found to be the most effective, although each case must be considered individually. In 1998, 7 women referred to our Eating Disorders Clinic, 5% of all referrals, were subsequently diagnosed as suffering from NED. Of these, 3 suffered from concurrent binge-eating disorder and 4 also from bulimia nervosa. 2 case studies representative of NED are presented. PMID:10883092

  14. Sleep Disturbances and Nocturnal Agitation Behaviors in Older Adults with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Karen M.; Beck, Cornelia; Tsai, Pao-Feng; Liem, Pham H.; Davila, David G.; Kleban, Morton; Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Kalra, Gurpreet; Richards, Kathy Culpepper

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine nighttime sleep patterns of persons with dementia showing nocturnal agitation behaviors and to determine whether restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with nocturnal agitation behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: General community. Participants: 59 participants with geriatrician-diagnosed dementia. Participants ages ranged from 66 to 88 years (mean age 79.1; SD 6.0). Mean Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 20.1 (SD 6.6). MMSE was used to measure baseline cognitive function and not for the diagnosis of dementia. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Sleep was measured by 2 nights of in-home, attended, portable polysomnography (PSG). Nocturnal agitation was measured over 3 additional nights using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory modified for direct observations. Two experts independently and via consensus identified probable RLS. Total sleep time in participants was 5.6 h (SD 1.8 h). Mean periodic limb movements in sleep index (PLMI) was 15.29, and a high percentage (49%) had moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. Probable RLS was present in 24% of participants. Those with more severe cognitive impairment had longer sleep latency. Severe cognitive impairment, low apnea hypopnea index (AHI), and probable RLS were associated with nocturnal agitation behaviors (R2 = 0.35, F3,55 = 9.40, P < 0.001). Conclusions: It appears that probable RLS is associated with nocturnal agitation behaviors in persons with dementia, while OSA and PLMS are not. Further investigation is warranted to determine if treatment of RLS impacts nocturnal agitation behaviors in persons with dementia. Citation: Rose KM; Beck C; Tsai PF; Liem PH; Davila DG; Kleban M; Gooneratne NS; Kalra G; Richards KC. Sleep disturbances and nocturnal agitation behaviors in older adults with dementia. SLEEP 2011;34(6):779-786. PMID:21629366

  15. Disruption of hierarchical predictive coding during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Melanie; Sitt, Jacobo D.; King, Jean-Remi; Elbaz, Maxime; Azizi, Leila; Buiatti, Marco; Naccache, Lionel; van Wassenhove, Virginie; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    When presented with an auditory sequence, the brain acts as a predictive-coding device that extracts regularities in the transition probabilities between sounds and detects unexpected deviations from these regularities. Does such prediction require conscious vigilance, or does it continue to unfold automatically in the sleeping brain? The mismatch negativity and P300 components of the auditory event-related potential, reflecting two steps of auditory novelty detection, have been inconsistently observed in the various sleep stages. To clarify whether these steps remain during sleep, we recorded simultaneous electroencephalographic and magnetoencephalographic signals during wakefulness and during sleep in normal subjects listening to a hierarchical auditory paradigm including short-term (local) and long-term (global) regularities. The global response, reflected in the P300, vanished during sleep, in line with the hypothesis that it is a correlate of high-level conscious error detection. The local mismatch response remained across all sleep stages (N1, N2, and REM sleep), but with an incomplete structure; compared with wakefulness, a specific peak reflecting prediction error vanished during sleep. Those results indicate that sleep leaves initial auditory processing and passive sensory response adaptation intact, but specifically disrupts both short-term and long-term auditory predictive coding. PMID:25737555

  16. The association between short and long nocturnal sleep durations and risky behaviours and the moderating factors in Taiwanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; King, Bryan H; Tang, Tze-Chun

    2010-08-30

    Sleep quantity and risky behaviours are important health issues in adolescents. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the association between short and long nocturnal sleep durations and a variety of adolescent risky behaviours, including suicidality, violence, regular alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, truancy, unprotected sex, tattooing and criminal record of theft in a large-scale, representative population of Taiwanese adolescents, and to examine the moderating factors for the association between nocturnal sleep duration and risky behaviours. A total of 8319 adolescent students in southern Taiwan were recruited into this study and completed the questionnaires. The associations between short and long nocturnal sleep durations and adolescent risky behaviours, as well as the moderating effects of depression and socio-demographic characteristics on these associations, were examined. The results indicated that short nocturnal sleep duration was significantly associated with all risky behaviours, and long nocturnal sleep duration was significantly associated with all risky behaviours except for suicidality. Meanwhile, depression, sex, age, and maternal education level had moderating effects on the association between nocturnal sleep duration and several risky behaviours. The findings imply that professionals should investigate the concomitant risky behaviours in adolescents with short or long nocturnal sleep duration. PMID:20472300

  17. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid ? plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:25956251

  18. Postoperative sleep disruptions: a potential catalyst of acute pain?

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Khoury, Samar; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2014-06-01

    Despite the substantial advances in the understanding of pain mechanisms and management, postoperative pain relief remains an important health care issue. Surgical patients also frequently report postoperative sleep complaints. Major sleep alterations in the postoperative period include sleep fragmentation, reduced total sleep time, and loss of time spent in slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Clinical and experimental studies show that sleep disturbances may exacerbate pain, whereas pain and opioid treatments disturb sleep. Surgical stress appears to be a major contributor to both sleep disruptions and altered pain perception. However, pain and the use of opioid analgesics could worsen sleep alterations, whereas sleep disruptions may contribute to intensify pain. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between postoperative sleep and pain. Although the sleep-pain interaction has been addressed from both ends, this review focuses on the impact of sleep disruptions on pain perception. A better understanding of the effect of postoperative sleep disruptions on pain perception would help in selecting patients at risk for more severe pain and may facilitate the development of more effective and safer pain management programs. PMID:24074687

  19. Sleep disruption in breast cancer patients and survivors.

    PubMed

    Palesh, Oxana; Aldridge-Gerry, Arianna; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Ortiz-Tudela, Elisabet; Capuron, Lucile; Innominato, Pasquale F

    2013-12-01

    Sleep disruption is prevalent in patients and survivors of breast cancer. Most patients undergoing chemotherapy will experience transient sleep disruption, and nearly 60% will have chronic sleep problems. Numerous factors contribute to sleep disruption in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Sleep disruption is a consequence of several biological alterations, including circadian disruption and immune and metabolic deregulations. These systems also play significant roles in the control and progression of breast cancer. Sleep disruption is associated with many side effects and psychiatric and medical comorbidities. This article discusses the relationship between stress and posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and fatigue, and how sleep disturbance might be the cause or consequence of these disorders. Current evidence for management of sleep disturbance in breast cancer and high chronic use of hypnotic medication in this population is also discussed. Finally, the differences in management of sleep disturbance during acute cancer care and during the survivorship phase are discussed. More research is needed on accurate and timely assessment of sleep disturbance associated with breast cancer, and additional tailored approaches for the management of sleep problems in breast cancer should be developed. PMID:24335687

  20. Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Michael H; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like - now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children - is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484?nm ?) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315?nm ?) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue. PMID:26374931

  1. Effects of resistance exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Alley, Jessica R; Mazzochi, John W; Smith, Caroline J; Morris, David M; Collier, Scott R

    2015-05-01

    Short sleep duration and poor quality of sleep have been associated with health risks including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Prior research has suggested that regular aerobic exercise improves the quality of sleep; however, less is known regarding resistance exercise (RE) and how RE may affect sleep architecture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of timing of RE on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure. College-aged subjects engaged in 5 laboratory visits. Visits 1 (C) and 2 provided a non-RE control day and established the 10-repetition maximum on each of 9 RE machines, respectively. During visits 3-5, the subjects reported at 0700 hours (7A), 1300 hours (1P), and 1900 hours (7P) in a randomized order to perform 30 minutes of RE. Ambulatory blood pressure and sleep-monitoring devices were worn during sleep after C, 7A, 1P, and 7P. Time to fall asleep was significantly different between RE conditions 7A and 1P and between 7A and 7P. All exercise conditions exhibited significantly fewer times woken than the non-RE control day, with 7P resulting in significantly less time awake after initially falling asleep as compared with C. Although timing of RE does not seem to statistically impact sleep stages or nocturnal blood pressure, these data indicate that engaging in RE at any time of the day may improve quality of sleep as compared with no RE. Resistance exercise may offer additional benefits regarding the ability to fall asleep and stay asleep to populations with osteoporosis, sarcopenia, anxiety, or depression. PMID:25426516

  2. Nocturnal sleep enhances working memory training in Parkinson's disease but not Lewy body dementia.

    PubMed

    Scullin, Michael K; Trotti, Lynn Marie; Wilson, Anthony G; Greer, Sophia A; Bliwise, Donald L

    2012-09-01

    Working memory is essential to higher order cognition (e.g. fluid intelligence) and to performance of daily activities. Though working memory capacity was traditionally thought to be inflexible, recent studies report that working memory capacity can be trained and that offline processes occurring during sleep may facilitate improvements in working memory performance. We utilized a 48-h in-laboratory protocol consisting of repeated digit span forward (short-term attention measure) and digit span backward (working memory measure) tests and overnight polysomnography to investigate the specific sleep-dependent processes that may facilitate working memory performance improvements in the synucleinopathies. We found that digit span backward performance improved following a nocturnal sleep interval in patients with Parkinson's disease on dopaminergic medication, but not in those not taking dopaminergic medication and not in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Furthermore, the improvements in patients with Parkinson's disease on dopaminergic medication were positively correlated with the amount of slow-wave sleep that patients obtained between training sessions and negatively correlated with severity of nocturnal oxygen desaturation. The translational implication is that working memory capacity is potentially modifiable in patients with Parkinson's disease but that sleep disturbances may first need to be corrected. PMID:22907117

  3. Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis by sleep deprivation is independent of circadian disruption and melatonin suppression.

    PubMed

    Mueller, A D; Mear, R J; Mistlberger, R E

    2011-10-13

    Procedures that restrict or fragment sleep can inhibit neurogenesis in the hippocampus of adult rodents, although the underlying mechanism is unknown. We showed that rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation (RSD) by the platform-over-water method inhibits hippocampal cell proliferation in adrenalectomized rats with low-dose corticosterone clamp. This procedure also greatly disrupts daily behavioral rhythms. Given recent evidence for circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, we asked whether disruption of circadian rhythms might play a role in the anti-neurogenic effects of sleep loss. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 4-day RSD procedure or were exposed to constant bright light (LL) for 4 days or 10 weeks, a non-invasive procedure for eliminating circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology in this species. Proliferating cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus were identified by immunolabeling for the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine. Consistent with our previous results, the RSD procedure suppressed cell proliferation by ?50%. By contrast, although LL attenuated or eliminated daily rhythms of activity and sleep-wake without affecting daily amounts of REM sleep, cell proliferation was not affected. Melatonin, a nocturnally secreted neurohormone that is inhibited by light, has been shown to promote survival of new neurons. We found that 3-weeks of LL eliminated daily rhythms and decreased plasma melatonin by 88% but did not significantly affect either total cell survival or survival of new neurons (doublecortin+). Finally, we measured cell proliferation rates at the beginning and near the end of the daily light period in rats entrained to a 12:12 light/lark (LD) cycle, but did not detect a daily rhythm. These results indicate that the antineurogenic effect of RSD is not secondary to disruption of circadian rhythms, and provide no evidence that hippocampal cell proliferation and survival are regulated by the circadian system or by nocturnal secretion of pineal melatonin. PMID:21771640

  4. Minimal nocturnal oxygen saturation predicts future subclinical carotid atherosclerosis: the Wisconsin sleep cohort.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Sverrir I; Peppard, Paul E; Korcarz, Claudia E; Barnet, Jodi H; Hagen, Erika W; Hla, K Mae; Palta, Mari; Young, Terry; Stein, James H

    2015-12-01

    Previous data on the associations between nocturnal oxygen saturation parameters and carotid atherosclerosis are conflicting. We examined the prospective associations of nocturnal oxygen saturation (SaO2 ) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaques. We used data on 689 Wisconsin sleep cohort participants who had baseline overnight polysomnography followed by carotid ultrasonography a mean (SD) of 7.8 (2.5) years later. Far wall common carotid IMT was measured using B-mode ultrasound. Bilateral common, bifurcation and internal carotid artery segments were evaluated for plaque score. Participants (8) were aged 56 years (55% male); 32% had hypertension and mean body mass index (BMI) was 31 (7) kg m(2) . Mean and minimum nocturnal SaO2 were 95% (2) and 86% (7), respectively. Mean percentage sleep time with SaO2  < 90% was 2% (8). Both mean (odds ratio [OR]: 0.60 lower plaque count per 5% higher mean SaO2 , 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.38-0.96, P = 0.033) and minimum SaO2 (OR: 0.88 lower plaque count per 5% higher minimum SaO2 , 95% CI: 0.80-0.97, P = 0.013) predicted carotid plaque score after adjusting for age, sex and BMI. Minimum SaO2 predicted future plaque score after adding adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors (OR: 0.90 lower plaque count per 5% higher minimum SaO2 , 95% CI: 0.81-0.99, P = 0.038). Mean SaO2 was not associated with carotid IMT after CVD risk factor adjustment. We conclude that minimum nocturnal SaO2 is an independent predictor of future carotid plaque burden. Other nocturnal SaO2 parameters are not associated with future carotid IMT or plaques after adjusting for traditional CVD risk factors. PMID:26096939

  5. Severity of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias correlates with intensity of sleep apnea in men.

    PubMed

    Szaboova, E; Holoubek, D; Tomori, Z; Szabo, P; Donic, V; Stancak, B

    2013-01-01

    Various cardiac arrhythmias frequently occur in patients with sleep apnea, but complex analysis of the relationship between their severity and the probable arrhythmogenic risk factors is conflicting. The question is what cardiovascular risk factors and how strongly they are associated with the severity of cardiac arrhythmias in sleep apnea. Adult males (33 with and 16 without sleep apnea), matched for cardiovascular co-morbidity were studied by polysomnography with simultaneous ECG monitoring. Arrhythmia severity was evaluated for each subject by a special 7-degree scoring system. Laboratory, clinical, echocardiographic, carotid ultrasonographic, ambulatory blood pressure, and baroreflex sensitivity values were also assessed. Moderate sleep apnea patients had benign, but more exaggerated cardiac arrhythmias than control subjects (2.53 ± 2.49 vs. 1.13 ± 1.64 degrees of cumulative severity, p < 0.05). We confirmed strong correlations between the arrhythmia severity and known arrhythmogenic risk factors (left ventricular ejection fraction and dimensions, right ventricular diameter, baroreflex sensitivity, carotid intima-media thickness, age, previous myocardial infarction, and also apnea-hypopnea index). In multivariate modelling only the apnea-hypopnea index indicating the sleep apnea intensity remained highly significantly correlated with the cumulative arrhythmia severity (beta = 0.548, p < 0.005). In conclusion, sleep apnea modifying cardiovascular risk factors and structures or functions provoked various nocturnal arrhythmias. The proposed scoring system allowed a complex analysis of the contribution of various triggers to arrhythmogenesis and confirmed the apnea-hypopnea index as an independent risk for nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia severity in sleep apnea. PMID:22826063

  6. Morning and evening physical exercise differentially regulate the autonomic nervous system during nocturnal sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yujiro; Hashimoto, Satoko; Takasu, Nana N; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Nishide, Shin-Ya; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2015-11-01

    Effects of daily physical exercise in the morning or in the evening were examined on circadian rhythms in plasma melatonin and core body temperature of healthy young males who stayed in an experimental facility for 7 days under dim light conditions (<10 lux). Sleep polysomnogram (PSG) and heart rate variability (HRV) were also measured. Subjects performed 2-h intermittent physical exercise with a bicycle ergometer at ZT3 or at ZT10 for four consecutive days, where zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0) was the time of wake-up. The rising phase of plasma melatonin rhythm was delayed by 1.1 h without exercise. Phase-delay shifts of a similar extent were detected by morning and evening exercise. But the falling phase shifted only after evening exercise by 1.0 h. The sleep PSG did not change after morning exercise, while Stage 1+2 sleep significantly decreased by 13.0% without exercise, and RE sleep decreased by 10.5% after evening exercise. The nocturnal decline of rectal temperature was attenuated by evening exercise, but not by morning exercise. HRV during sleep changed differentially. Very low frequency (VLF) waves increased without exercise. VLF, low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) waves increased after morning exercise, whereas HR increased after evening exercise. Morning exercise eventually enhanced the parasympathetic activity, as indicated by HRV, while evening exercise activated the sympathetic activity, as indicated by increase in heart rate in the following nocturnal sleep. These findings indicated differential effects of morning and evening exercise on the circadian melatonin rhythm, PSG, and HRV. PMID:26333783

  7. Effect of inducing nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations in daytime on sleep, mood, body temperature, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollins, A. B.; Zhdanova, I. V.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lynch, H. J.; Deng, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    We examined effects of very low doses of melatonin (0.1-10 mg, orally) or placebo, administered at 1145 h, on sleep latency and duration, mood, performance, oral temperature, and changes in serum melatonin levels in 20 healthy male volunteers. A repeated-measure double-blind Latin square design was used. Subjects completed a battery of tests designed to assess mood and performance between 0930 and 1730 h. The sedative-like effects of melatonin were assessed by a simple sleep test: at 1330 h subjects were asked to hold a positive pressure switch in each hand and to relax with eyes closed while reclining in a quiet darkened room. Latency and duration of switch release, indicators of sleep, were measured. Areas under the time-melatonin concentration curve varied in proportion to the different melatonin doses ingested, and the 0.1- and 0.3-mg doses generated peak serum melatonin levels that were within the normal range of nocturnal melatonin levels in untreated people. All melatonin doses tested significantly increased sleep duration, as well as self-reported sleepiness and fatigue, relative to placebo. Moreover, all of the doses significantly decreased sleep-onset latency, oral temperature, and the number of correct responses on the Wilkinson auditory vigilance task. These data indicate that orally administered melatonin can be a highly potent hypnotic agent; they also suggest that the physiological increase in serum melatonin levels, which occurs around 2100 h daily, may constitute a signal initiating normal sleep onset.

  8. Effects of desmopressin for the treatment of nocturnal polyuria in elderly women: impact on related sleep quality

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Yu, Ho Song; Chung, Ho Suck; Kwon, Dongdeuk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the efficacy, safety, and impact of desmopressin on quality of sleep in treating nocturnal polyuria in elderly women. Methods: We recruited 60 women over 60 years old with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including nocturia, and with nocturnal polyuria. Nocturnal polyuria was defined as nighttime urine production exceeding 33% of the 24-hour total urine volume determined by a frequency volume (FV) chart. All patients failed to respond to treatment of their underlying disease and evening fluid restriction. Desmopressin 0.1 mg was administered orally at bedtime for 12 weeks. The participants completed a series of questionnaires on the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) sleep scale and FV chart before and after treatment. Results: The patient population had a mean age of 69.2 ± 9.4 years (range: 61–81). The mean duration of symptoms was 61.2 ± 45.1 months. Significant decreases were evident after desmopressin treatment in the number of nocturia episodes (3.63 ± 1.61 to 2.00 ± 1.13, p = 0.01), nocturnal urine volume (p = 0.01), nocturnal polyuria index (NPI) (p = 0.01), and nocturia index (NI) p = 0.01). Among the categories of the MOS sleep scale, sleep index (p = 0.003), sleep disturbance (p = 0.001), snoring (p = 0.028), and shortness of breath (p = 0.036) significantly changed, with a decreased number of nocturia episodes. Adverse events were mild. Conclusions: Desmopressin is an effective treatment for nocturnal polyuria in elderly women, where conservative treatment has failed. Sleep quality is also improved. PMID:26600882

  9. Sleep disruption during pregnancy: how does it influence serum cytokines?

    PubMed

    Okun, Michele L; Coussons-Read, Mary E

    2007-04-01

    Women report their sleep to be disrupted during pregnancy. Sleep deprivation has been linked to elevations in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. No information currently addresses the sleep-immune relationship during pregnancy. This study explores the relationship between subjectively reported sleep variables and circulating serum cytokine levels. Pregnant women (n=35; mean age=31.0+/-3.7 years) seen once a trimester completed sleep questionnaires, gave blood and recorded their sleep on a sleep diary at home for 2 weeks. Nonpregnant women (n=43; mean age=28.2+/-5.2 years) underwent the same protocol once. Subjective sleep variables were compared to serum cytokine levels for IL-4, -6, -10 and TNF-alpha as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) determined by ELISA. Nonparametric analyses and linear regression were performed to explore relationships between the sleep and immune variables. Pregnant women subjectively reported their sleep to be worse than in the nonpregnant group. Serum cytokine levels differed between the two groups and varied by trimester. As anticipated, IL-10 was significantly higher in all trimesters; however CRP, an indicator of systemic inflammation, was higher in all trimesters compared to the nonpregnant sample. Subjectively reported sleep disruption was associated with increases in TNF-alpha in the pregnant sample and CRP in the nonpregnant sample. These data confirm that disrupted sleep experienced during pregnancy, as well as during the nonpregnant state, is related to increases in inflammatory markers. Future exploration of these relationships should include functional assessments of immunity as well as polysomnographically recorded sleep. PMID:17074396

  10. A Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Model Demonstrates That Nocturnal Hot Flashes Interrupt Objective Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Hadine; Crawford, Sybil; Economou, Nicole; Kim, Semmie; Regan, Susan; Hall, Janet E.; White, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep interruption is often reported by women with hot flashes and night sweats (or vasomotor symptoms, VMS). Although women report that VMS awaken them, polysomnography (PSG) studies have not consistently supported this contention. Design: We mimicked menopause using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) to investigate whether VMS increase awakenings and wake after sleep onset (WASO). VMS, serum estradiol, and at-home PSGs (two pretreatment, two posttreatment) were measured before and after 4 weeks on GnRHa. Regression models were used to determine the effect of increasing VMS frequency on awakenings and WASO, as measured objectively and subjectively. Participants: Twenty-nine healthy women (mean 27.3 y). Setting: Academic medical center. Interventions: Depot GnRHa (leuprolide 3.75-mg). Results: Serum estradiol was rapidly and uniformly suppressed on GnRHa. Persistent VMS were reported by 69% of women. The number of nighttime VMS correlated directly with the degree of sleep disturbance. Each additional reported nighttime VMS was associated with a 62% increase from baseline in PSG-measured WASO (P = 0.007), a 3% increase in awakenings (P = 0.05), and 6% increase in %N1 sleep (P = 0.02). Nighttime VMS were also associated with increased perceived WASO (312%; P = 0.02), awakenings (16%; P = 0.007), Insomnia Severity Index (P = 0.03), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P = 0.03) scores, and decreased perceived sleep efficiency (P = 0.01). Objectively recorded nighttime VMS correlated with PSG-measured WASO (rs = 0.45, P = 0.02). Conclusions: This menopause model demonstrates that nighttime vasomotor symptoms correlate with increased sleep fragmentation. These findings are consistent with a specific contribution of vasomotor symptoms to polysomnography-measured sleep interruption suggesting that nighttime vasomotor symptoms interrupt sleep in the setting of menopause. Citation: Joffe H; Crawford S; Economou N; Kim S; Regan S; Hall JE; White D. A gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist model demonstrates that nocturnal hot flashes interrupt objective sleep. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1977-1985. PMID:24293774

  11. Effects of filtering visual short wavelengths during nocturnal shiftwork on sleep and performance.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shadab A; Shapiro, Colin M; Wang, Flora; Ainlay, Hailey; Kazmi, Syeda; Brown, Theodore J; Casper, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    Circadian phase resetting is sensitive to visual short wavelengths (450-480 nm). Selectively filtering this range of wavelengths may reduce circadian misalignment and sleep impairment during irregular light-dark schedules associated with shiftwork. We examined the effects of filtering short wavelengths (<480 nm) during night shifts on sleep and performance in nine nurses (five females and four males; mean age ± SD: 31.3 ± 4.6 yrs). Participants were randomized to receive filtered light (intervention) or standard indoor light (baseline) on night shifts. Nighttime sleep after two night shifts and daytime sleep in between two night shifts was assessed by polysomnography (PSG). In addition, salivary melatonin levels and alertness were assessed every 2 h on the first night shift of each study period and on the middle night of a run of three night shifts in each study period. Sleep and performance under baseline and intervention conditions were compared with daytime performance on the seventh day shift, and nighttime sleep following the seventh daytime shift (comparator). On the baseline night PSG, total sleep time (TST) (p < 0.01) and sleep efficiency (p = 0.01) were significantly decreased and intervening wake times (wake after sleep onset [WASO]) (p = 0.04) were significantly increased in relation to the comparator night sleep. In contrast, under intervention, TST was increased by a mean of 40 min compared with baseline, WASO was reduced and sleep efficiency was increased to levels similar to the comparator night. Daytime sleep was significantly impaired under both baseline and intervention conditions. Salivary melatonin levels were significantly higher on the first (p < 0.05) and middle (p < 0.01) night shifts under intervention compared with baseline. Subjective sleepiness increased throughout the night under both conditions (p < 0.01). However, reaction time and throughput on vigilance tests were similar to daytime performance under intervention but impaired under baseline on the first night shift. By the middle night shift, the difference in performance was no longer significant between day shift and either of the two night shift conditions, suggesting some adaptation to the night shift had occurred under baseline conditions. These results suggest that both daytime and nighttime sleep are adversely affected in rotating-shift workers and that filtering short wavelengths may be an approach to reduce sleep disruption and improve performance in rotating-shift workers. PMID:23834705

  12. Sleep Disruption in Young Foster Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tininenko, Jennifer R.; Fisher, Philip A.; Bruce, Jacqueline; Pears, Katherine C.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, sleep actigraphy and parent-report measures were used to investigate differences in sleeping behavior among four groups of 3- to 7-year-olds (N = 79): children in regular foster care (n = 15); children receiving a therapeutic intervention in foster care (n = 17); low income community children (n = 18); and upper middle income…

  13. Marital Conflict and Disruption of Children's Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Buckhalt, Joseph, A.; Mize, Jacquelyn; Acebo, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Marital conflict was examined as a predictor of the quality and quantity of sleep in a sample of healthy 8 to 9 year-olds. Parents and children reported on marital conflict, the quantity and quality of children's sleep were examined through an actigraph worn for 7 consecutive nights, and child sleepiness was derived from child and mother reports.…

  14. The associations of bedtime, nocturnal, and daytime sleep duration with bone mineral density in pre- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Wu, Yang; Yang, Yu; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Danyu; Hu, Yongxin; Liu, Zhoujun; Xu, Juan; Shen, Qiaoxuan; Zhang, Niya; Mao, Xiaodong; Liu, Chao

    2015-06-01

    To explore the association of sleep patterns with bone mineral density (BMD) in pre- and post-menopausal women, we used a questionnaire to evaluate the sleep patterns and performed calcaneal quantitative ultrasound to estimate BMD, in 6,510 women aged 40 years or older, from June to November 2011 in Nanjing City. We found a 1.7-fold risk of osteoporosis in post-menopausalwomen with bedtime of ?0:00 am (OR = 1.69, 95 % CI 1.39-2.13), compared to those whose bedtime of <0:00 am. post-menopausalwomen with excessive total sleep (>10 h vs. 8-9 h, OR = 1.54, 95 % CI 1.05-2.02) were shown to have a higher risk of osteoporosis, however, this high risk was not detected in those with excessive nocturnal sleep (>10 h vs. 8-9 h, OR = 0.85, 95 % CI 0.62-1.30). By contrast, post-menopausalwomen with inadequate nocturnal sleep (?7 h vs. 8-9 h, OR = 1.68, 95 % CI 1.32-2.75), excessive daytime sleep (?180 min vs. 0 min, OR = 1.52, 95 % CI 1.08-2.13), and noontime nap (>60 min vs. 0 min: OR = 1.37, 95 % CI 1.06-1.76) were demonstrated to have higher risk of bone loss. Nevertheless, these associations were not found in premenopausal women. We conclude that delayed bedtime, nocturnal sleep deprivation, excessive daytime sleep, and noontime nap, but not reduced total sleep duration, could promote bone loss in post-menopausalwomen, which might be related to circadian rhythm disturbances. However, they have limited influences to BMD in women who were still in menstruating. Mechanism responsible for the phenomena warrants further investigation. PMID:25449993

  15. Feature selection from nocturnal oximetry using genetic algorithms to assist in obstructive sleep apnoea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto; Marcos, J Víctor; Del Campo, Félix

    2012-10-01

    Nocturnal pulse oximetry (NPO) has demonstrated to be a powerful tool to help in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) detection. However, additional analysis is needed to use NPO alone as an alternative to nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG), which is the gold standard for a definitive diagnosis. In the present study, we exhaustively analysed a database of blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) recordings (80 OSA-negative and 160 OSA-positive) to obtain further knowledge on the usefulness of NPO. Population set was randomly divided into training and test sets. A feature extraction stage was carried out: 16 features (time and frequency statistics and spectral and nonlinear features) were computed. A genetic algorithm (GA) approach was applied in the feature selection stage. Our methodology achieved 87.5% accuracy (90.6% sensitivity and 81.3% specificity) in the test set using a logistic regression (LR) classifier with a reduced number of complementary features (3 time domain statistics, 1 frequency domain statistic, 1 conventional spectral feature and 1 nonlinear feature) automatically selected by means of GAs. Our results improved diagnostic performance achieved with conventional oximetric indexes commonly used by physicians. We concluded that GAs could be an effective and robust tool to search for essential oximetric features that could enhance NPO in the context of OSA diagnosis. PMID:22154238

  16. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways. PMID:26530153

  17. Light pollution disrupts sleep in free-living animals

    PubMed Central

    Raap, Thomas; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Artificial lighting can alter individual behaviour, with often drastic and potentially negative effects on biological rhythms, daily activity and reproduction. Whether this is caused by a disruption of sleep, an important widespread behaviour enabling animals to recover from daily stress, is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that light pollution disrupts sleep by recording individual sleep behaviour of great tits, Parus major, that were roosting in dark nest-boxes and were exposed to light-emitting diode light the following night. Their behaviour was compared to that of control birds sleeping in dark nest-boxes on both nights. Artificial lighting caused experimental birds to wake up earlier, sleep less (–5%) and spent less time in the nest-box as they left their nest-box earlier in the morning. Experimental birds did not enter the nest-box or fall asleep later than controls. Although individuals in lit nest-boxes did not wake up more often nor decreased the length of their sleep bouts, females spent a greater proportion of the night awake. Our study provides the first direct proof that light pollution has a significant impact on sleep in free-living animals, in particular in the morning, and highlights a mechanism for potential effects of light pollution on fitness. PMID:26337732

  18. Light pollution disrupts sleep in free-living animals.

    PubMed

    Raap, Thomas; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Artificial lighting can alter individual behaviour, with often drastic and potentially negative effects on biological rhythms, daily activity and reproduction. Whether this is caused by a disruption of sleep, an important widespread behaviour enabling animals to recover from daily stress, is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that light pollution disrupts sleep by recording individual sleep behaviour of great tits, Parus major, that were roosting in dark nest-boxes and were exposed to light-emitting diode light the following night. Their behaviour was compared to that of control birds sleeping in dark nest-boxes on both nights. Artificial lighting caused experimental birds to wake up earlier, sleep less (-5%) and spent less time in the nest-box as they left their nest-box earlier in the morning. Experimental birds did not enter the nest-box or fall asleep later than controls. Although individuals in lit nest-boxes did not wake up more often nor decreased the length of their sleep bouts, females spent a greater proportion of the night awake. Our study provides the first direct proof that light pollution has a significant impact on sleep in free-living animals, in particular in the morning, and highlights a mechanism for potential effects of light pollution on fitness. PMID:26337732

  19. Dual-tasking alleviated sleep deprivation disruption in visuomotor tracking: An fMRI study

    E-print Network

    Dual-tasking alleviated sleep deprivation disruption in visuomotor tracking: An fMRI study Yunglin cortex a b s t r a c t Effects of dual-responding on tracking performance after 49-h of sleep deprivation becomes more sleep deprived and more depen- dent on technology (National Sleep Foundation, 2011 Sleep

  20. Nocturnal Melatonin Profiles in Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder and Control Sleepers.

    PubMed

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Kennaway, David J; Lack, Leon

    2015-10-01

    A significant delay in the timing of endogenous circadian rhythms has been associated with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). More recently, other mechanisms have also been proposed to account for this disorder. To further explore the etiology of DSPD, the present study compared nocturnal melatonin profiles of 26 DSPD patients (18 males, 8 females; age, 21.73 ± 4.98 years) and 17 normally timed good sleepers (10 males, 7 females; age, 23.82 ± 5.23 years) in a time-free, dim-light (<10 lux) laboratory environment. A 30-h modified constant routine with alternating 20-min sleep opportunities and 40 min of enforced wakefulness was used to measure the endogenous melatonin circadian rhythm. Salivary melatonin was sampled half-hourly from 1820 h to 0020 h and then hourly from 0120 h to 1620 h. DSPD patients had significantly later timed melatonin profiles that were delayed by approximately 3 h compared to normal sleepers, and there were no notable differences in the relative duration of secretion between groups. However, melatonin secretion between dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) and acrophase was less prominent in DSPD patients compared to good sleepers, who showed a more acute initial surge of melatonin following the DLMO. Although the regulatory role of melatonin is unknown, abnormal melatonin profiles have been linked to psychiatric and neurological disorders (e.g., major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson disease). These results therefore suggest that in addition to a delayed endogenous circadian rhythm, a diminished initial surge of melatonin secretion following DLMO may contribute to the etiology of DSPD. PMID:26149168

  1. Sleep Disruption in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: Prevalence, Severity, and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Evans, Bryan; Jeong, Jiyeon M.; Gonzalez, Brian D.; Johnston, Laura; Nelson, Ashley M.; Kesler, Shelli; Phillips, Kristin M.; Barata, Anna; Pidala, Joseph; Palesh, Oxana

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, with over 50% of patients experiencing sleep disruption pre-transplant, up to 82% experiencing moderate to severe sleep disruption during hospitalization for transplant, and up to 43% in the post-transplant period. These rates of sleep disruption are substantially higher than the general population. Although sleep disruption can be distressing to patients and contribute to diminished quality of life, it is rarely discussed during clinical visits. The goal of the current review is to draw attention to sleep disruption as a clinical problem in HCT in order to facilitate patient education, intervention, and research. The review opens with a discussion of sleep disruption measurement and clinical diagnosis of sleep disorders. An overview of the prevalence, severity, and chronicity of sleep disruption and disorders in patients receiving HCT follows. Current evidence regarding sociodemographic and clinical predictors of sleep disruption and disorders is summarized. The review concludes with suggestions for behavioral and pharmacologic management of sleep disruption and disorders as well as directions for future research. PMID:24747335

  2. Degeneration in Arousal Neurons in Chronic Sleep Disruption Modeling Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Fenik, Polina; Zhan, Guanxia; Xin, Ryan; Veasey, Sigrid C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sleep disruption (CSD) is a cardinal feature of sleep apnea that predicts impaired wakefulness. Despite effective treatment of apneas and sleep disruption, patients with sleep apnea may have persistent somnolence. Lasting wake disturbances in treated sleep apnea raise the possibility that CSD may induce sufficient degeneration in wake-activated neurons (WAN) to cause irreversible wake impairments. Implementing a stereological approach in a murine model of CSD, we found reduced neuronal counts in representative WAN groups, locus coeruleus (LC) and orexinergic neurons, reduced by 50 and 25%, respectively. Mice exposed to CSD showed shortened sleep latencies lasting at least 4 weeks into recovery from CSD. As CSD results in frequent activation of WAN, we hypothesized that CSD promotes mitochondrial metabolic stress in WAN. In support, CSD increased lipofuscin within select WAN. Further, examining the LC as a representative WAN nucleus, we observed increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and down-regulation of anti-oxidant enzyme and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. Remarkably, CSD markedly increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha within WAN, and not in adjacent neurons or glia. Thus, CSD, as observed in sleep apnea, results in a composite of lasting wake impairments, loss of select neurons, a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidative mitochondrial stress response in WAN, consistent with a degenerative process with behavioral consequences. PMID:26074865

  3. Degeneration in Arousal Neurons in Chronic Sleep Disruption Modeling Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Fenik, Polina; Zhan, Guanxia; Xin, Ryan; Veasey, Sigrid C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sleep disruption (CSD) is a cardinal feature of sleep apnea that predicts impaired wakefulness. Despite effective treatment of apneas and sleep disruption, patients with sleep apnea may have persistent somnolence. Lasting wake disturbances in treated sleep apnea raise the possibility that CSD may induce sufficient degeneration in wake-activated neurons (WAN) to cause irreversible wake impairments. Implementing a stereological approach in a murine model of CSD, we found reduced neuronal counts in representative WAN groups, locus coeruleus (LC) and orexinergic neurons, reduced by 50 and 25%, respectively. Mice exposed to CSD showed shortened sleep latencies lasting at least 4 weeks into recovery from CSD. As CSD results in frequent activation of WAN, we hypothesized that CSD promotes mitochondrial metabolic stress in WAN. In support, CSD increased lipofuscin within select WAN. Further, examining the LC as a representative WAN nucleus, we observed increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and down-regulation of anti-oxidant enzyme and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. Remarkably, CSD markedly increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha within WAN, and not in adjacent neurons or glia. Thus, CSD, as observed in sleep apnea, results in a composite of lasting wake impairments, loss of select neurons, a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidative mitochondrial stress response in WAN, consistent with a degenerative process with behavioral consequences. PMID:26074865

  4. Sleep Disruptions and Emotional Insecurity Are Pathways of Risk for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Buckhalt, Joseph A.; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Background: Sleep problems are prevalent in American children. A critical need is to identify sources and processes related to sleep disruptions and their sequelae. We examined a model linking parental marital conflict and children's emotional insecurity, sleep disruptions, and their adjustment and academic problems. Method: One hundred and…

  5. [Influence of sleep habit and nocturnal lifestyle on circadian rhythm of blood pressure among workers in Okinawa].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Mayo; Higashiuesato, Yasushi; Yamane, Nobuhisa

    2012-11-01

    We estimated the influence of sleep habit and nocturnal lifestyle on circadian rhythm of blood pressure by use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and self-estimating questionnaire formats. A total of 30 workers aged 21 to 58 years old voluntarily participated. None had any chronic diseases or regular medication. The average subject daily worked for 8 hours, waked-up at 6:00, went-to-bed at 23:45, and had 6.25-hour sleep (median). The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to % dipping of sleep blood pressure; 10 to 20% dipping as a dipper, <10% as a non-dipper, and > or = 20% as an extreme-dipper. This characterization resulted in 15 dippers (50%), 8 non-dippers(27%) and 7 extreme-dippers (23%). Of the parameters estimated, (1) sleeping hours of non-dippers were significantly shorter than those of dippers (p=0.02), (2) nighttime blood pressure of extreme-dippers were significantly lower than dippers (p=0.04), (3) the lowest blood pressure in nighttime of non-dippers were significantly higher when compared with the remaining 2 groups, (4) morning surges of blood pressure of non-dippers were the significantly smallest, whereas those of extreme-dippers were the greatest, and (5)refreshing scores of OSA sleep inventory MA version of non-dippers were significantly poorer when compared to extreme-dippers. This study could indicate the significant influence of nocturnal lifestyle with short sleep on circadian rhythm of blood pressure, and the extended prospective-study might be promising for a precise conclusion. PMID:23383574

  6. The implications of sleep disruption for cognitive and affective processing in methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Lipinska, Gosia; Timol, Ridwana; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2015-12-01

    Sleep is disrupted during active use of methamphetamine (MA), during withdrawal from the drug, and during abstinence from its use. However, relatively little is known about possible mediatory functions of disrupted sleep in the emergence, manifestation, and maintenance of cognitive and affective symptoms of MA abuse. We hypothesise that sleep functions as a mediator for stimulant drug effects. Specifically, we propose that objectively-measured sleep parameters can be used to explain some of the variability in the experience and presentation of memory deficits and emotion dysregulation in MA abusers. After describing how important healthy sleep is to unimpaired cognitive and affective functioning, we review literature describing how sleep is disrupted in MA abuse. Then, we provide a conceptual framework for our hypothesis by explaining the relationship between MA abuse, sleep disruption, memory deficits, emotion dysregulation, and changes in reward-related brain networks. We conclude by discussing implications of the hypothesis for research and treatment. PMID:26384529

  7. Sleep Influences the Severity of Memory Disruption in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    Sleep Influences the Severity of Memory Disruption in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment Results From Sleep Self-assessment and Continuous Activity Monitoring Carmen E. Westerberg, PhD, Eric MD, and Ken A. Paller, PhD Abstract: Sleep is important for declarative memory consolidation in healthy adults

  8. foraging alters resilience/vulnerability to sleep disruption and starvation in Drosophila

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    sleep deprivation. If such polymorphisms were not associated with additional costs, selective pressures, we challenged natural allelic variants of the foraging gene (for) with either sleep deprivation-term memory following 12 h of sleep deprivation. However, short-term memory is signif- icantly disrupted when

  9. Environmental disruption of the circadian clock leads to altered sleep and immune responses in mouse.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Derrick J; Savenkova, Marina I; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, one of the most salient outputs of the circadian (daily) clock is the timing of the sleep-wake cycle. Modern industrialized society has led to a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between our endogenous timekeeping systems and the solar day, disrupting normal circadian rhythms. We have argued that disrupted circadian rhythms could lead to changes in allostatic load, and the capacity of organisms to respond to other environmental challenges. In this set of studies, we apply a model of circadian disruption characterized in our lab in which mice are housed in a 20h long day, with 10h of light and 10h of darkness. We explored the effects of this environmental disruption on sleep patterns, to establish if this model results in marked sleep deprivation. Given the interaction between circadian, sleep, and immune systems, we further probed if our model of circadian disruption also alters the innate immune response to peripheral bacterial endotoxin challenge. Our results demonstrate that this model of circadian disruption does not lead to marked sleep deprivation, but instead affects the timing and quality of sleep. We also show that while circadian disruption does not lead to basal changes in the immune markers we explored, the immune response is affected, both in the brain and the periphery. Together, our findings further strengthen the important role of the circadian timing system in sleep regulation and immune responses, and provide evidence that disrupting the circadian clock increases vulnerability to further environmental stressors, including immunological challenges. PMID:25542734

  10. Dietary Carbohydrate and Nocturnal Sleep Duration in Relation to Children's BMI: Findings from the IDEFICS Study in Eight European Countries.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Monica; Mehlig, Kirsten; Börnhorst, Claudia; Hebestreit, Antje; Moreno, Luis; Veidebaum, Toomas; Kourides, Yiannis; Siani, Alfonso; Molnar, Dénes; Sioen, Isabelle; Lissner, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found an association between being overweight and short sleep duration. We hypothesized that this association could be modified by a high carbohydrate (HC) diet and that the timing and type (starch or sugar) of intake may be an important factor in this context. Participants in the prospective, eight-country European study IDEFICS were recruited from September 2007 to June 2008, when they were aged two to nine years. Data on lifestyle, dietary intake and anthropometry were collected on two occasions. This study included 5944 children at baseline and 4301 at two-year follow-up. For each meal occasion (morning, midday, and evening), starch in grams and sugar in grams were divided by total energy intake (EI), and quartiles calculated. HC-starch and HC-sugar intake categories were defined as the highest quartile for each meal occasion. In a mutually adjusted linear regression model, short sleep duration as well as HC-starch in the morning were positively associated with body mass index (BMI) z-scores at baseline. HC-starch at midday was positively associated with body mass index (BMI) z-scores in children with short sleep duration, and negatively associated with BMI z-scores in those with normal sleep. After adjustment for baseline BMI z-scores, associations between total HC from starch or sugar and high BMI z-scores at two-year follow-up did not persist. Our observations offer a perspective on optimal timing for macronutrient consumption, which is known to be influenced by circadian rhythms. Reduced carbohydrate intake, especially during morning and midday meals, and following nocturnal sleep duration recommendations are two modifiable factors that may protect children from being overweight in the future. PMID:26670249

  11. Quantity and quality of nocturnal sleep affect morning glucose measurement in acutely burned children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; Khoury, Jane; Simakajornboon, Narong; Kagan, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia after severe burn injury has long been recognized, whereas sleep deprivation after burns is a more recent finding. The postburn metabolic effects of poor sleep are not clear despite reports in other populations demonstrating the association between sleep insufficiency and deleterious endocrine consequences. The aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship between sleep and glucose dynamics exists in acutely burned children. Two overnight polysomnography runs (2200 to 0600) per subject were conducted in 40 patients with a mean (± SEM) age of 9.4?±?0.7 years, 50.1?±?2.9% TBSA burn, and 43.2?±?3.6% full-thickness injury. Serum glucose was drawn in the morning (0600) immediately after the sleep test. Insulin requirements during the 24-hour period preceding the 0600 glucose measurement were recorded. Generalized linear models were used by the authors to evaluate percent time in each stage of sleep, percent wake time, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and morning serum glucose, accounting for insulin use. Increased time awake (P = .04, linear; P = .02, quadratic) and reduced time spent in stage 1 sleep (P = .03, linear) were associated with higher glucose levels. Sleep efficiency (P = .01, linear; P = .02, quadratic) and total sleep time (P = .01 linear; P = .02, quadratic) were inversely associated with glucose level. Morning glucose levels appear to be affected by the quality and quantity of overnight sleep in children who have sustained extensive burn injuries. Future research is needed to elucidate the metabolic and neuroendocrine consequences of sleep deprivation on metabolism after burns. PMID:23966118

  12. Chronic sleep restriction disrupts sleep homeostasis and behavioral sensitivity to alcohol by reducing the extracellular accumulation of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Clasadonte, Jerome; McIver, Sally R; Schmitt, Luke I; Halassa, Michael M; Haydon, Philip G

    2014-01-29

    Sleep impairments are comorbid with a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including depression, epilepsy, and alcohol abuse. Despite the prevalence of these disorders, the cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between sleep disruption and behavior remain poorly understood. In this study, the impact of chronic sleep loss on sleep homeostasis was examined in C57BL/6J mice following 3 d of sleep restriction. The electroencephalographic power of slow-wave activity (SWA; 0.5-4 Hz) in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and adenosine tone were measured during and after sleep restriction, and following subsequent acute sleep deprivation. During the first day of sleep restriction, SWA and adenosine tone increased, indicating a homeostatic response to sleep loss. On subsequent days, SWA declined, and this was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in adenosine tone caused by a loss of one source of extracellular adenosine. Furthermore, the response to acute sleep deprivation (6 h) was significantly attenuated in sleep-restricted mice. These effects were long-lasting with reduced SWA and adenosine tone persisting for at least 2 weeks. To investigate the behavioral consequences of chronic sleep restriction, sensitivity to the motor-impairing effects of alcohol was also examined. Sleep-restricted mice were significantly less sensitive to alcohol when tested 24 h after sleep restriction, an effect that persisted for 4 weeks. Intracerebroventricular infusion of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist produced a similar decrease in sensitivity to alcohol. These results suggest that chronic sleep restriction induces a sustained impairment in adenosine-regulated sleep homeostasis and consequentially impacts the response to alcohol. PMID:24478367

  13. Chronic Sleep Restriction Disrupts Sleep Homeostasis and Behavioral Sensitivity to Alcohol by Reducing the Extracellular Accumulation of Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Clasadonte, Jerome; McIver, Sally R.; Schmitt, Luke I.; Halassa, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep impairments are comorbid with a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including depression, epilepsy, and alcohol abuse. Despite the prevalence of these disorders, the cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between sleep disruption and behavior remain poorly understood. In this study, the impact of chronic sleep loss on sleep homeostasis was examined in C57BL/6J mice following 3 d of sleep restriction. The electroencephalographic power of slow-wave activity (SWA; 0.5–4 Hz) in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and adenosine tone were measured during and after sleep restriction, and following subsequent acute sleep deprivation. During the first day of sleep restriction, SWA and adenosine tone increased, indicating a homeostatic response to sleep loss. On subsequent days, SWA declined, and this was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in adenosine tone caused by a loss of one source of extracellular adenosine. Furthermore, the response to acute sleep deprivation (6 h) was significantly attenuated in sleep-restricted mice. These effects were long-lasting with reduced SWA and adenosine tone persisting for at least 2 weeks. To investigate the behavioral consequences of chronic sleep restriction, sensitivity to the motor-impairing effects of alcohol was also examined. Sleep-restricted mice were significantly less sensitive to alcohol when tested 24 h after sleep restriction, an effect that persisted for 4 weeks. Intracerebroventricular infusion of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist produced a similar decrease in sensitivity to alcohol. These results suggest that chronic sleep restriction induces a sustained impairment in adenosine-regulated sleep homeostasis and consequentially impacts the response to alcohol. PMID:24478367

  14. Sleep Disruption Medical Intervention Forecasting (SDMIF) Module for the Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Brooker, John; Mallis, Melissa; Hursh, Steve; Caldwell, Lynn; Myers, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) assesses the risk, including likelihood and impact of occurrence, of all credible in-flight medical conditions. Fatigue due to sleep disruption is a condition that could lead to operational errors, potentially resulting in loss of mission or crew. Pharmacological consumables are mitigation strategies used to manage the risks associated with sleep deficits. The likelihood of medical intervention due to sleep disruption was estimated with a well validated sleep model and a Monte Carlo computer simulation in an effort to optimize the quantity of consumables. METHODS: The key components of the model are the mission parameter program, the calculation of sleep intensity and the diagnosis and decision module. The mission parameter program was used to create simulated daily sleep/wake schedules for an ISS increment. The hypothetical schedules included critical events such as dockings and extravehicular activities and included actual sleep time and sleep quality. The schedules were used as inputs to the Sleep, Activity, Fatigue and Task Effectiveness (SAFTE) Model (IBR Inc., Baltimore MD), which calculated sleep intensity. Sleep data from an ISS study was used to relate calculated sleep intensity to the probability of sleep medication use, using a generalized linear model for binomial regression. A human yes/no decision process using a binomial random number was also factored into sleep medication use probability. RESULTS: These probability calculations were repeated 5000 times resulting in an estimate of the most likely amount of sleep aids used during an ISS mission and a 95% confidence interval. CONCLUSIONS: These results were transferred to the parent IMM for further weighting and integration with other medical conditions, to help inform operational decisions. This model is a potential planning tool for ensuring adequate sleep during sleep disrupted periods of a mission.

  15. Apnea-Induced Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Disruption Impairs Human Spatial Navigational Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P.; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restricting CPAP withdrawal to REM through real-time monitoring of the polysomnogram provides a novel way of addressing the role of REM sleep in spatial navigational memory with a physiologically relevant stimulus. Individuals spent two different nights in the laboratory, during which subjects performed timed trials before and after sleep on one of two unique 3D spatial mazes. One night of sleep was normally consolidated with use of therapeutic CPAP throughout, whereas on the other night, CPAP was reduced only in REM sleep, allowing REM OSA to recur. REM disruption via this method caused REM sleep reduction and significantly fragmented any remaining REM sleep without affecting total sleep time, sleep efficiency, or slow-wave sleep. We observed improvements in maze performance after a night of normal sleep that were significantly attenuated after a night of REM disruption without changes in psychomotor vigilance. Furthermore, the improvement in maze completion time significantly positively correlated with the mean REM run duration across both sleep conditions. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel role for REM sleep in human memory formation and highlight a significant cognitive consequence of OSA. PMID:25355211

  16. [Effects of zopiclone on sleep, daytime somnolence and nocturnal and daytime performance in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Billiard, M; Besset, A; de Lustrac, C; Brissaud, L; Cadilhac, J

    1989-05-01

    Ten healthy volunteers, aged 20 to 39, underwent 2 adaptation nights and 3 sessions of 2 consecutive experimental nights and days at 1 week intervals. In the 3 sessions, subjects received under double blind conditions either Zopiclone 3.75 mg or 7.5 mg or placebo, according to a latin-square design. On nights 1 and 2 of each session, subjects were continuously polygraphically monitored, except for a 45 min provoked wake episode 135 min after sleep onset on night 2. Sleep continuity and architecture were evaluated during night 1, degree of daytime somnolence during day 1 and residual effects during night 2 (0 h 00) and day 2 (8 h 00 and 12 h 00). Sleep continuity was not modified, except for a reduction of the number of night awakenings. NREM sleep stage 1 was reduced and stage 2 was increased (in duration but not in percentage) with Zopiclone 3.75 and 7.5 mg. NREM sleep stages 3 and 4 were increased with Zopiclone 3.75 mg only. REM sleep was reduced (in percentage only) with Zopiclone 3.75 and 7.5 mg. Daytime somnolence varied according to the time but not with the 3 different conditions. One performance test only (choice reaction time test) showed a significant impairment at 0 h 00 with Zopiclone 7.5 mg. From a subjective point of view, sleep quality was improved and night time awakening was reduced with Zopiclone 7.5 mg. PMID:2725453

  17. Circadian Disruption, Sleep Loss and Prostate Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdardottir, Lara G.; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A.; Fall, Katja; Rider, Jennifer R.; Lockley, Steven W.; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian system has been hypothesized to increase cancer risk, either due to direct disruption of the molecular machinery generating circadian rhythms or due to disruption of parameters controlled by the clock such as melatonin levels or sleep duration. This hypothesis has been studied in hormone-dependent cancers among women, but data are sparse regarding potential effects of circadian disruption on the risk of prostate cancer. This review systematically examines available data evaluating the effects of light at night, sleep patterns, and night shift work on prostate cancer risk. PMID:22564869

  18. Pediatric Pulmonology 42:374379 (2007) Nocturnal Body Position in Sleeping Children With

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    OSAS. And 185 age-, gender-, and ethnically matched children (Controls) were compared. The effect differences in AI or AHI. Obese OSAS children had increased prone position (20.4 Æ 2.0%TST vs. non-obese: 10- dependent AI. Children with OSAS spend more time sleeping supine and less time on the side. Obese children

  19. Sleep disruption impairs haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Asya; Pang, Wendy W; Ibarra, Ingrid; Colas, Damien; Bonnavion, Patricia; Korin, Ben; Heller, H Craig; Weissman, Irving L; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting the success of haematopoietic cell transplantation are still unknown. Here we show in mice that donor sleep deprivation reduces the ability of its haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to engraft and reconstitute the blood and bone marrow of an irradiated recipient by more than 50%. We demonstrate that sleep deprivation downregulates the expression of microRNA (miR)-19b, a negative regulator of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) genes, which inhibit HSC migration and homing. Accordingly, HSCs from sleep-deprived mice have higher levels of SOCS genes expression, lower migration capacity in vitro and reduced homing to the bone marrow in vivo. Recovery of sleep after sleep deprivation restored the reconstitution potential of the HSCs. Taken together, this study provides insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep deprivation on HSCs, emphasizing the potentially critical role of donor sleep in the success of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26465715

  20. Brief light stimulation during the mouse nocturnal activity phase simultaneously induces a decline in core temperature and locomotor activity followed by EEG-determined sleep

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, Keith M.; Gompf, Heinrich S.

    2013-01-01

    Light exerts a variety of effects on mammals. Unexpectedly, one of these effects is the cessation of nocturnal locomotion and the induction of behavioral sleep (photosomnolence). Here, we extend the initial observations in several ways, including the fundamental demonstration that core body temperature (Tc) drops substantially (about 1.5°C) in response to the light stimulation at CT15 or CT18 in a manner suggesting that the change is a direct response to light rather than simply a result of the locomotor suppression. The results show that 1) the decline of locomotion and Tc begin soon after nocturnal light stimulation; 2) the variability in the magnitude and onset of light-induced locomotor suppression is very large, whereas the variability in Tc is very small; 3) Tc recovers from the light-induced decline in advance of the recovery of locomotion; 4) under entrained and freerunning conditions, the daily late afternoon Tc increase occurs in advance of the corresponding increase in wheel running; and 5) toward the end of the subjective night, the nocturnally elevated Tc persists longer than does locomotor activity. Finally, EEG measurements confirm light-induced sleep and, when Tc or locomotion was measured, show their temporal association with sleep onset. Both EEG- and immobility-based sleep detection methods confirm rapid induction of light-induced sleep. The similarities between light-induced loss of locomotion and drop in Tc suggest a common cause for parallel responses. The photosomnolence response may be contingent upon both the absence of locomotion and a simultaneous low Tc. PMID:23364525

  1. Assessment of Sleep Disruption and Sleep Quality in Naval Special Warfare Operators.

    PubMed

    Harris, Erica; Taylor, Marcus K; Drummond, Sean P A; Larson, Gerald E; Potterat, Eric G

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about sleep in elite military populations who are exposed to higher operational demands, unpredictable training, deployment, and mission cycles. Twenty-nine Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Operators wore an actiwatch for an 8-day/7-night period for objective sleep assessment and completed a nightly sleep log. A total of 170 nights of actigraphically recorded sleep were collected. When comparing objectively versus subjectively recorded sleep parameter data, statistically significant differences were found. Compared with sleep log data, actigraphy data indicate NSW Operators took longer to fall asleep (an average of 25.82 minutes), spent more time awake after sleep onset (an average of 39.55 minutes), and demonstrated poorer sleep efficiency (83.88%) (ps < 0.05). Self-reported sleep quality during the study period was 6.47 (maximum score = 10). No relationships existed between the objectively derived sleep indices and the self-reported measure of sleep quality (rs = -0.29 to 0.09, all ps > 0.05). Strong inter-relationships existed among the subjectively derived sleep indices (e.g., between self-reported sleep quality and sleep efficiency; r = 0.61, p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study to objectively and subjectively quantify sleep among NSW Operators. These findings suggest sleep maintenance and sleep efficiency are impaired when compared to normative population data. PMID:26126252

  2. Are Absence Epilepsy and Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy System Epilepsies of the Sleep/Wake System?

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Péter

    2015-01-01

    System epilepsy is an emerging concept interpreting major nonlesional epilepsies as epileptic dysfunctions of physiological systems. I extend here the concept of reflex epilepsy to epilepsies linked to input dependent physiological systems. Experimental and clinical reseach data were collected to create a coherent explanation of underlying pathomechanism in AE and NFLE. We propose that AE should be interpreted as epilepsy linked to the corticothalamic burst-firing mode of NREM sleep, released by evoked vigilance level oscillations characterized by reactive slow wave response. In the genetic variation of NFLE the ascending cholinergic arousal system plays an essential role being in strong relationship with a gain mutation of the nicotinic acethylcholin receptors, rendering the arousal system hyperexcitable. I try to provide a more unitary interpretation for the variable seizure manifestation integrating them as different degree of pathological arosuals and alarm reactions. As a supporting hypothesis the similarity between arousal parasomnias and FNLE is shown, underpinned by overlaping pathomechanism and shared familiarity, but without epileptic features. Lastly we propose that both AE and NFLE are system epilepsies of the sleep-wake system representing epileptic disorders of the antagonistic sleep/arousal network. This interpretation may throw new light on the pathomechanism of AE and NFLE. PMID:26175547

  3. Orexin receptor antagonists differ from standard sleep drugs by promoting sleep at doses that do not disrupt cognition.

    PubMed

    Uslaner, Jason M; Tye, Spencer J; Eddins, Donnie M; Wang, Xiaohai; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Binns, Jacquelyn; Cannon, Christopher E; Garson, Susan L; Yao, Lihang; Hodgson, Robert; Stevens, Joanne; Bowlby, Mark R; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Brunner, Joseph; Mcdonald, Terrence P; Gotter, Anthony L; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien) and eszopiclone (Lunesta), are ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA)-positive allosteric modulators that carry a number of side effects including the potential to disrupt cognition. In an effort to develop better tolerated medicines, we have identified dual orexin 1 and 2 receptor antagonists (DORAs), which promote sleep in preclinical animal models and humans. We compare the effects of orally administered eszopiclone, zolpidem, and diazepam to the dual orexin receptor antagonist DORA-22 on sleep and the novel object recognition test in rat, and on sleep and two cognition tests (delayed match to sample and serial choice reaction time) in the rhesus monkey. Each compound's minimal dose that promoted sleep versus the minimal dose that exerted deficits in these cognitive tests was determined, and a therapeutic margin was established. We found that DORA-22 has a wider therapeutic margin for sleep versus cognitive impairment in rat and rhesus monkey compared to the other compounds tested. These data were further supported with the demonstration of a wider therapeutic margin for DORA-22 compared to the other compounds on sleep versus the expression of hippocampal activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc), an immediate-early gene product involved in synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that DORAs might provide an effective treatment for insomnia with a greater therapeutic margin for sleep versus cognitive disturbances compared to the GABAA-positive allosteric modulators currently in use. PMID:23552372

  4. Sleep loss and the inflammatory response in mice under chronic environmental circadian disruption.

    PubMed

    Brager, Allison J; Ehlen, J Christopher; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Natarajan, Divya; Delisser, Patrick; Davidson, Alec J; Paul, Ketema N

    2013-01-01

    Shift work and trans-time zone travel lead to insufficient sleep and numerous pathologies. Here, we examined sleep/wake dynamics during chronic exposure to environmental circadian disruption (ECD), and if chronic partial sleep loss associated with ECD influences the induction of shift-related inflammatory disorder. Sleep and wakefulness were telemetrically recorded across three months of ECD, in which the dark-phase of a light-dark cycle was advanced weekly by 6 h. A three month regimen of ECD caused a temporary reorganization of sleep (NREM and REM) and wake processes across each week, resulting in an approximately 10% net loss of sleep each week relative to baseline levels. A separate group of mice were subjected to ECD or a regimen of imposed wakefulness (IW) aimed to mimic sleep amounts under ECD for one month. Fos-immunoreactivity (IR) was quantified in sleep-wake regulatory areas: the nucleus accumbens (NAc), basal forebrain (BF), and medial preoptic area (MnPO). To assess the inflammatory response, trunk blood was treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent release of IL-6 was measured. Fos-IR was greatest in the NAc, BF, and MnPO of mice subjected to IW. The inflammatory response to LPS was elevated in mice subjected to ECD, but not mice subjected to IW. Thus, the net sleep loss that occurs under ECD is not associated with a pathological immune response. PMID:23696854

  5. Adolescent Problematic Social Networking and School Experiences: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Disruptions and Sleep Quality.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Lynette; Barber, Bonnie L; Modecki, Kathryn L

    2015-07-01

    An important developmental task for adolescents is to become increasingly responsible for their own health behaviors. Establishing healthy sleep routines and controlling media use before bedtime are important for adequate, quality sleep so adolescents are alert during the day and perform well at school. Despite the prevalence of adolescent social media use and the large percentage of computers and cell phones in adolescents' bedrooms, no studies to date have investigated the link between problematic adolescent investment in social networking, their sleep practices, and associated experiences at school. A sample of 1,886 students in Australia aged between 12 and 18 years of age completed self-report data on problematic social networking use, sleep disturbances, sleep quality, and school satisfaction. Structural equation modeling (SEM) substantiated the serial mediation hypothesis: for adolescents, problematic social networking use significantly increased sleep disturbances, which adversely affected perceptions of sleep quality that, in turn, lowered adolescents' appraisals of their school satisfaction. This significant pattern was largely driven by the indirect effect of sleep disturbances. These findings suggest that adolescents are vulnerable to negative consequences from social networking use. Specifically, problematic social networking is associated with poor school experiences, which result from poor sleep habits. Promoting better sleep routines by minimizing sleep disturbances from social media use could improve school experiences for adolescents with enhanced emotional engagement and improved subjective well-being. PMID:26167837

  6. Aligning work and circadian time in shift workers improves sleep and reduces circadian disruption.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Céline; Fischer, Dorothee; Matera, Joana L; Roenneberg, Till

    2015-03-30

    Sleep loss and circadian disruption-a state of misalignment between physiological functions and imposed sleep/wake behavior-supposedly play central roles in the etiology of shift work-related pathologies [1-4]. Circadian entrainment is, however, highly individual [5], resulting in different chronotypes [6, 7]. Chronotype in turn modulates the effects of working times: compared to late chronotypes, earlier ones sleep worse and shorter and show higher levels of circadian misalignment during night shifts, while late types experience more sleep and circadian disruption than early types when working morning shifts [8]. To promote sleep and reduce the mismatch between circadian and working time, we implemented a chronotype-adjusted (CTA) shift schedule in a factory. We abolished the most strenuous shifts for extreme chronotypes (i.e., mornings for late chronotypes, nights for early ones) and examined whether sleep duration and quality, social jetlag [9, 10], wellbeing, subjective stress perception, and satisfaction with leisure time improved in this schedule. Intermediate chronotypes (quartiles 2 and 3) served as a control group, still working morning (6:00-14:00), evening (14:00-22:00), and night (22:00-6:00) shifts, with two strenuous shifts (out of twelve per month) replaced by evening ones. We observed a significant increase of self-reported sleep duration and quality, along with increased wellbeing ratings on workdays among extreme chronotypes. The CTA schedule reduced overall social jetlag by 1 hr, did not alter stress levels, and increased satisfaction with leisure time (early types only). Chronotype-based schedules thus can reduce circadian disruption and improve sleep; potential long-term effects on health and economic indicators need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25772446

  7. Insomnia and sleep disruption: relevance for athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Leger, Damien; Metlaine, Arnaud; Choudat, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Insomnia is a common sleep complaint even in young adults and has important daytime consequences. Several subjective and objective tools are recommended to assess the magnitude of the problem and to try to find a cause. Chronic insomnia is often caused by precipitating factors, such as acute stress, work conditions, illness, and travel, and perpetuating factors, such as poor sleep hygiene, anxiety, and medications. Insomnia may have implications in athletic performance resulting from physical and cognitive effects. Several pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are employed in the management of insomnia that have proven effective for short-term treatment. The pharmacologic approaches include the use of zolpidem and specific GABA agonists, benzodiazepines for specific indications, antidepressants, and melatonin. The nonpharmacologic approaches include stimulus control, sleep restriction, relaxation strategies, and cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:15892923

  8. Chronically restricted or disrupted sleep as a causal factor in the development of depression.

    PubMed

    Meerlo, Peter; Havekes, Robbert; Steiger, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Sleep problems are a common complaint in the majority of people suffering from depression. While sleep complaints were traditionally seen as a symptom of mood disorders, accumulating evidence suggests that in many cases the relationship may be reverse as well. A long list of longitudinal studies shows that sleep complaints often precede the onset of depression and constitute an independent risk factor for the development of the disorder. Additionally, experimental studies in animals show that chronically restricted or disrupted sleep may gradually induce neurobiological changes that are very similar to what has been reported for depressed patients. The mechanisms through which insufficient sleep increases the risk for depression are poorly understood but may include effects of sleep disturbance on neuroendocrine stress systems, serotonergic neurotransmission, and various interacting signaling pathways involved in the regulation of neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis. Because sleep is considered to play a crucial role in regulating neuronal plasticity and synaptic strength, chronically insufficient sleep may contribute to depression through an impairment of these plasticity processes leading to altered connectivity and communication within and between brain regions involved in the regulation of mood. PMID:25646723

  9. Cold Hands, Warm Feet: Sleep Deprivation Disrupts Thermoregulation and Its Association with Vigilance

    PubMed Central

    Romeijn, Nico; Verweij, Ilse M.; Koeleman, Anne; Mooij, Anne; Steimke, Rosa; Virkkala, Jussi; van der Werf, Ysbrand; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Vigilance is affected by induced and spontaneous skin temperature fluctuations. Whereas sleep deprivation strongly affects vigilance, no previous study examined in detail its effect on human skin temperature fluctuations and their association with vigilance. Design: In a repeated-measures constant routine design, skin temperatures were assessed continuously from 14 locations while performance was assessed using a reaction time task, including eyes-open video monitoring, performed five times a day for 2 days, after a normal sleep or sleep deprivation night. Setting: Participants were seated in a dimly lit, temperature-controlled laboratory. Patients or Participants: Eight healthy young adults (five males, age 22.0 ± 1.8 yr (mean ± standard deviation)). Intervention: One night of sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Mixed-effect regression models were used to evaluate the effect of sleep deprivation on skin temperature gradients of the upper (ear-mastoid), middle (hand-arm), and lower (foot-leg) body, and on the association between fluctuations in performance and in temperature gradients. Sleep deprivation induced a marked dissociation of thermoregulatory skin temperature gradients, indicative of attenuated heat loss from the hands co-occurring with enhanced heat loss from the feet. Sleep deprivation moreover attenuated the association between fluctuations in performance and temperature gradients; the association was best preserved for the upper body gradient. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation disrupts coordination of fluctuations in thermoregulatory skin temperature gradients. The dissociation of middle and lower body temperature gradients may therefore be evaluated as a marker for sleep debt, and the upper body gradient as a possible aid in vigilance assessment when sleep debt is unknown. Importantly, our findings suggest that sleep deprivation affects the coordination between skin blood flow fluctuations and the baroreceptor-mediated cardiovascular regulation that prevents venous pooling of blood in the lower limbs when there is the orthostatic challenge of an upright posture. Citation: Romeijn N; Verweij IM; Koeleman A; Mooij A; Steimke R; Vikkala J; van der Werg Y; Van Someren EJW. Cold hands, warm feet: sleep deprivation disrupts thermoregulation and its association with vigilance. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1673-1683. PMID:23204610

  10. Association Between Childhood Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Disruptive Behavior Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Evelyn; Low, Nancy C P; Dugas, Erika; Karp, Igor; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    We examined the association between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and disruptive behavior disorders in 605 children participating in a population-based cohort study. Nineteen percent of children snored (sometimes or often) and 10% had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) symptoms. Thirteen percent had an ADHD diagnosis or symptoms and 5-9% had behavioral problems or a conduct disorder. Snoring or OSA symptoms were associated with a twofold difference in the odds of ADHD diagnosis or symptoms. OSA symptoms were associated with a threefold to fourfold difference in the odds of behavioral problems or conduct disorder. Clinicians should consider inquiring about SDB in children with disruptive behavior disorders and should also consider disruptive behavior disorders as potential sequelae of SDB. PMID:25102357

  11. Chronic Snoring and Sleep in Children: A Demonstration of Sleep Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes, M. Cecilia; Guilleminault, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chronic snoring that does not adhere to the criteria for a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome may be associated with learning and behavioral problems. We investigated the sleep structure of chronic snorers who had an apnea-hypopnea index of less than 1 event per hour and analyzed the cyclic alternating pattern. Methods:…

  12. Environmental noise and sleep disturbances: A threat to health?

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Demian

    2014-01-01

    Environmental noise, especially that caused by transportation means, is viewed as a significant cause of sleep disturbances. Poor sleep causes endocrine and metabolic measurable perturbations and is associated with a number of cardiometabolic, psychiatric and social negative outcomes both in adults and children. Nocturnal environmental noise also provokes measurable biological changes in the form of a stress response, and clearly affects sleep architecture, as well as subjective sleep quality. These sleep perturbations are similar in their nature to those observed in endogenous sleep disorders. Apart from these measurable effects and the subjective feeling of disturbed sleep, people who struggle with nocturnal environmental noise often also suffer the next day from daytime sleepiness and tiredness, annoyance, mood changes as well as decreased well-being and cognitive performance. But there is also emerging evidence that these short-term effects of environmental noise, particularly when the exposure is nocturnal, may be followed by long-term adverse cardiometabolic outcomes. Nocturnal environmental noise may be the most worrying form of noise pollution in terms of its health consequences because of its synergistic direct and indirect (through sleep disturbances acting as a mediator) influence on biological systems. Duration and quality of sleep should thus be regarded as risk factors or markers significantly influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to modification through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health. One of the means that should be proposed is avoidance at all costs of sleep disruptions caused by environmental noise. PMID:26483931

  13. Sleep disruption and its effect on lymphocyte redeployment following an acute bout of exercise.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Lesley A; Simpson, Richard J; Malone, Eva; Florida-James, Geraint D

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disruption and deprivation are common in contemporary society and have been linked with poor health, decreased job performance and increased life-stress. The rapid redeployment of lymphocytes between the blood and tissues is an archetypal feature of the acute stress response, but it is not known if short-term perturbations in sleep architecture affect lymphocyte redeployment. We examined the effects of a disrupted night sleep on the exercise-induced redeployment of lymphocytes and their subtypes. 10 healthy male cyclists performed 1h of cycling at a fixed power output on an indoor cycle ergometer, following a night of undisrupted sleep (US) or a night of disrupted sleep (DS). Blood was collected before, immediately after and 1h after exercise completion. Lymphocytes and their subtypes were enumerated using direct immunofluorescence assays and 4-colour flow cytometry. DS was associated with elevated concentrations of total lymphocytes and CD3(-)/CD56(+) NK-cells. Although not affecting baseline levels, DS augmented the exercise-induced redeployment of CD8(+) T-cells, with the naïve/early differentiated subtypes (KLRG1(-)/CD45RA(+)) being affected most. While the mobilisation of cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets (NK cells, CD8(+) T-cells ?? T-cells), tended to be larger in response to exercise following DS, their enhanced egress at 1h post-exercise was more marked. This occurred despite similar serum cortisol and catecholamine levels between the US and DS trials. NK-cells redeployed with exercise after DS retained their expression of perforin and Granzyme-B indicating that DS did not affect NK-cell 'arming'. Our findings indicate that short-term changes in sleep architecture may 'prime' the immune system and cause minor enhancements in lymphocyte trafficking in response to acute dynamic exercise. PMID:25582807

  14. Impact of nocturnal sleep deprivation on declarative memory retrieval in students at an orphanage: a psychoneuroradiological study

    PubMed Central

    Tantawy, Ahmed O; Tallawy, Hamdy N El; Farghaly, Hussein RS; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Hussein, Amr S

    2013-01-01

    Background and methods This study investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on total and partial (early and late) declarative memory and activation in the areas of the brain involved in these activities. The study included two experiments. Experiment 1 included 40 male residents of an orphanage aged 16–19 years, who were divided into four groups (n = 10 each) and subjected to total sleep deprivation, normal sleep, early-night sleep deprivation, or late-night sleep deprivation. Experiment 2 included eight students from the same institution who were divided into the same four groups (n = 2) as in experiment 1. Declarative memory was tested using lists of associated word pairs in both experiments, and activation of the relevant brain regions was measured before and after retrieval by single-photon emission computed tomography for subjects in experiment 2 only. Results Students subjected to normal sleep had significantly higher scores for declarative memory retrieval than those subjected to total sleep deprivation (P = 0.002), early-night sleep deprivation (P = 0.005), or late-night sleep deprivation (P = 0.02). The left temporal lobe showed the highest rate of activity during memory retrieval after normal sleep, whereas the frontal, parietal, and right temporal lobes were more active after sleep deprivation. Conclusion Both slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep play an active role in consolidation of declarative memory, which in turn allows memory traces to be actively reprocessed and strengthened during sleep, leading to improved performance in memory recall. PMID:23569380

  15. Dietary Carbohydrate and Nocturnal Sleep Duration in Relation to Children’s BMI: Findings from the IDEFICS Study in Eight European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Monica; Mehlig, Kirsten; Börnhorst, Claudia; Hebestreit, Antje; Moreno, Luis; Veidebaum, Toomas; Kourides, Yiannis; Siani, Alfonso; Molnar, Dénes; Sioen, Isabelle; Lissner, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found an association between being overweight and short sleep duration. We hypothesized that this association could be modified by a high carbohydrate (HC) diet and that the timing and type (starch or sugar) of intake may be an important factor in this context. Participants in the prospective, eight-country European study IDEFICS were recruited from September 2007 to June 2008, when they were aged two to nine years. Data on lifestyle, dietary intake and anthropometry were collected on two occasions. This study included 5944 children at baseline and 4301 at two-year follow-up. For each meal occasion (morning, midday, and evening), starch in grams and sugar in grams were divided by total energy intake (EI), and quartiles calculated. HC-starch and HC-sugar intake categories were defined as the highest quartile for each meal occasion. In a mutually adjusted linear regression model, short sleep duration as well as HC-starch in the morning were positively associated with body mass index (BMI) z-scores at baseline. HC-starch at midday was positively associated with body mass index (BMI) z-scores in children with short sleep duration, and negatively associated with BMI z-scores in those with normal sleep. After adjustment for baseline BMI z-scores, associations between total HC from starch or sugar and high BMI z-scores at two-year follow-up did not persist. Our observations offer a perspective on optimal timing for macronutrient consumption, which is known to be influenced by circadian rhythms. Reduced carbohydrate intake, especially during morning and midday meals, and following nocturnal sleep duration recommendations are two modifiable factors that may protect children from being overweight in the future. PMID:26670249

  16. Nocturnal Asthma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Director, Health Initiatives View full profile Nocturnal Asthma Worsening of asthma at night, or nocturnal asthma, ... With Us View Events Calendar Read the News Asthma Treatment Program At National Jewish Health, we offer ...

  17. [Sleep disturbances in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Vecchierini, Marie-Françoise

    2010-03-01

    Sleep in dementias has been mainly studied in Alzheimer disease (AD). Sleep disturbances are found in 25 to 35% of subjects with AD. Subjective and objective disturbances are described. Long nocturnal awakenings disrupt sleep; total sleep time and sleep efficiency are reduced. Slow wave sleep is decreased and sometimes disappears. REM sleep percentage is also reduced and at a later stage of the disease, REM latency is increased. Sleep fragmentation can be associated with excessive daytime napping and sleepiness, and with other behavioral symptoms such as the sundowning syndrome and nocturnal agitation. Sleep abnormalities closely parallel the level of severity of dementia. The rest/activity ratio and the sleep-wake rhythms are more and more disturbed; the phase delay of the temperature rhythm is associated with the severity of the sundowning syndrome. Sleep disturbances and behavioral symptoms are the main reasons to institutionalize the patient. Sleep disturbances are related to multiple factors. Pathophysiological changes resulting of the disease itself, such as damage to the cholinergic pathways and to the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, contribute to sleep changes in AD. Associated medical and psychiatric illness and their different treatments as well as environmental factors also induced sleep disturbances. Sleep-disordered breathing is a highly prevalent condition in AD patients and restless leg syndrome may account for nocturnal agitation. In Parkinson and in Lewy body dementias, sleep disturbances are more severe than in DA and REM sleep behavior disorder can precede by several years these diseases. Sleep attacks and sleepiness are very frequent in Parkinson disease. Specific etiologies should drive specific treatment. Several non pharmacologic treatments are usually associated to treat sleep disturbances in AD: information, increased daytime physical, social activities to minimize daytime naps and exposure to bright light. Some studies found advantages to associate melatonin in the evening. PMID:20215095

  18. Estimating the Need for Medical Intervention due to Sleep Disruption on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Brooker, John E.; Hurst, S. R.; Mallis, Melissa M.; Caldwell, J. Lynn

    2008-01-01

    During ISS and shuttle missions, difficulties with sleep affect more than half of all US crews. Mitigation strategies to help astronauts cope with the challenges of disrupted sleep patterns can negatively impact both mission planning and vehicle design. The methods for addressing known detrimental impacts for some mission scenarios may have a substantial impact on vehicle specific consumable mass or volume or on the mission timeline. As part of the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) task, NASA Glenn Research Center is leading the development of a Monte Carlo based forecasting tool designed to determine the consumables required to address risks related to sleep disruption. The model currently focuses on the International Space Station and uses an algorithm that assembles representative mission schedules and feeds this into a well validated model that predicts relative levels of performance, and need for sleep (SAFTE Model, IBR Inc). Correlation of the resulting output to self-diagnosed needs for hypnotics, stimulants, and other pharmaceutical countermeasures, allows prediction of pharmaceutical use and the uncertainty of the specified prediction. This paper outlines a conceptual model for determining a rate of pharmaceutical utilization that can be used in the IMM model for comparison and optimization of mitigation methods with respect to all other significant medical needs and interventions.

  19. Poor quality of life, depressed mood, and memory impairment may be mediated by sleep disruption in patients with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michelle; Wolf, Pedro S A; Ross, Ian L; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2015-11-01

    Standard replacement therapy for Addison's disease (AD) does not restore a normal circadian rhythm. In fact, hydrocortisone replacement in AD patients likely induces disrupted sleep. Given that healthy sleep plays an important role in improving quality of life, optimizing cognition, and ensuring affect regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether poor quality of life, mood alterations, and memory complaints reported by AD patients are associated with their disrupted sleep patterns. Sixty patients with AD and 60 matched healthy controls completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing perceived physical and mental health (Short-Form 36), mood (Beck Depression Inventory-II), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and cognition (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire). A latent variable model revealed that although AD had a significant direct effect on quality of life, the indirect effect of sleep was significantly greater. Furthermore, although AD had no direct effect on cognitive functioning, the indirect effect of sleep was significant. The overall model showed a good fit (comparative fit index = 0.91, root mean square of approximation = 0.09, and standardized root mean square residual = 0.05). Our findings suggest that disrupted sleep, and not the disease per se, may induce poor quality of life, memory impairment, and affect dysregulation in patients with AD. We think that improving sleep architecture may improve cognitive, affective, and physical functioning. PMID:26256520

  20. Recovery of Neurological Function Despite Immediate Sleep Disruption Following Diffuse Brain Injury in the Mouse: Clinical Relevance to Medically Untreated Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Harrison, Jordan L.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: We investigated the relationship between immediate disruption of posttraumatic sleep and functional outcome in the diffuse brain-injured mouse. Design: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to moderate midline fluid percussion injury (n = 65; 1.4 atm; 6-10 min righting reflex time) or sham injury (n = 44). Cohorts received either intentional sleep disruption (minimally stressful gentle handling) or no sleep disruption for 6 h following injury. Following disruption, serum corticosterone levels (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and posttraumatic sleep (noninvasive piezoelectric sleep cages) were measured. For 1-7 days postinjury, sensorimotor outcome was assessed by Rotarod and a modified Neurological Severity Score (NSS). Cognitive function was measured using Novel Object Recognition (NOR) and Morris water maze (MWM) in the first week postinjury. Setting: Neurotrauma research laboratory. Measurements and Results: Disrupting posttraumatic sleep for 6 h did not affect serum corticosterone levels or functional outcome. In the hour following the first dark onset, sleep-disrupted mice exhibited a significant increase in sleep; however, this increase was not sustained and there was no rebound of lost sleep. Regardless of sleep disruption, mice showed a time-dependent improvement in Rotarod performance, with brain-injured mice having significantly shorter latencies on day 7 compared to sham. Further, brain-injured mice, regardless of sleep disruption, had significantly higher NSS scores postinjury compared with sham. Cognitive behavioral testing showed no group differences among any treatment group measured by MWM and NOR. Conclusion: Short-duration disruption of posttraumatic sleep did not affect functional outcome, measured by motor and cognitive performance. These data raise uncertainty about posttraumatic sleep as a mechanism of recovery from diffuse brain injury. Citation: Rowe RK; Harrison JL; O'Hara BF; Lifshitz J. Recovery of neurological function despite immediate sleep disruption following diffuse brain injury in the mouse: clinical relevance to medically untreated concussion. SLEEP 2014;37(4):743-752. PMID:24899763

  1. Differential activation of immune factors in neurons and glia contribute to individual differences in resilience/vulnerability to sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Dissel, Stephane; Seugnet, Laurent; Thimgan, Matthew S; Silverman, Neal; Angadi, Veena; Thacher, Pamela V; Burnham, Melissa M; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Individuals frequently find themselves confronted with a variety of challenges that threaten their wellbeing. While some individuals face these challenges efficiently and thrive (resilient) others are unable to cope and may suffer persistent consequences (vulnerable). Resilience/vulnerability to sleep disruption may contribute to the vulnerability of individuals exposed to challenging conditions. With that in mind we exploited individual differences in a fly's ability to form short-term memory (STM) following 3 different types of sleep disruption to identify the underlying genes. Our analysis showed that in each category of flies examined, there are individuals that form STM in the face of sleep loss (resilient) while other individuals show dramatic declines in cognitive behavior (vulnerable). Molecular genetic studies revealed that Antimicrobial Peptides, factors important for innate immunity, were candidates for conferring resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation. Specifically, Metchnikowin (Mtk), drosocin (dro) and Attacin (Att) transcript levels seemed to be differentially increased by sleep deprivation in glia (Mtk), neurons (dro) or primarily in the head fat body (Att). Follow-up genetic studies confirmed that expressing Mtk in glia but not neurons, and expressing dro in neurons but not glia, disrupted memory while modulating sleep in opposite directions. These data indicate that various factors within glia or neurons can contribute to individual differences in resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation. PMID:25451614

  2. Deletion of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2 & mGlu3) in Mice Disrupts Sleep and Wheel-Running Activity, and Increases the Sensitivity of the Circadian System to Light

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett, David; Jagannath, Aarti; Brown, Laurence A.; Tam, Shu K. E.; Hasan, Sibah; Gatti, Silvia; Harrison, Paul J.; Bannerman, David M.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep and/or circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is seen in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients. The co-morbidity of schizophrenia and SCRD may in part stem from dysfunction in common brain mechanisms, which include the glutamate system, and in particular, the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3 (encoded by the genes Grm2 and Grm3). These receptors are relevant to the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia, and have also been implicated in sleep and circadian function. In the present study, we characterised the sleep and circadian rhythms of Grm2/3 double knockout (Grm2/3-/-) mice, to provide further evidence for the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of sleep and circadian rhythms. We report several novel findings. Firstly, Grm2/3-/- mice demonstrated a decrease in immobility-determined sleep time and an increase in immobility-determined sleep fragmentation. Secondly, Grm2/3-/- mice showed heightened sensitivity to the circadian effects of light, manifested as increased period lengthening in constant light, and greater phase delays in response to nocturnal light pulses. Greater light-induced phase delays were also exhibited by wildtype C57Bl/6J mice following administration of the mGlu2/3 negative allosteric modulator RO4432717. These results confirm the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in photic entrainment and sleep regulation pathways. Finally, the diurnal wheel-running rhythms of Grm2/3-/- mice were perturbed under a standard light/dark cycle, but their diurnal rest-activity rhythms were unaltered in cages lacking running wheels, as determined with passive infrared motion detectors. Hence, when assessing the diurnal rest-activity rhythms of mice, the choice of assay can have a major bearing on the results obtained. PMID:25950516

  3. Deletion of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2 & mGlu3) in Mice Disrupts Sleep and Wheel-Running Activity, and Increases the Sensitivity of the Circadian System to Light.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Jagannath, Aarti; Brown, Laurence A; Tam, Shu K E; Hasan, Sibah; Gatti, Silvia; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-01-01

    Sleep and/or circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is seen in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients. The co-morbidity of schizophrenia and SCRD may in part stem from dysfunction in common brain mechanisms, which include the glutamate system, and in particular, the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3 (encoded by the genes Grm2 and Grm3). These receptors are relevant to the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia, and have also been implicated in sleep and circadian function. In the present study, we characterised the sleep and circadian rhythms of Grm2/3 double knockout (Grm2/3-/-) mice, to provide further evidence for the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of sleep and circadian rhythms. We report several novel findings. Firstly, Grm2/3-/- mice demonstrated a decrease in immobility-determined sleep time and an increase in immobility-determined sleep fragmentation. Secondly, Grm2/3-/- mice showed heightened sensitivity to the circadian effects of light, manifested as increased period lengthening in constant light, and greater phase delays in response to nocturnal light pulses. Greater light-induced phase delays were also exhibited by wildtype C57Bl/6J mice following administration of the mGlu2/3 negative allosteric modulator RO4432717. These results confirm the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in photic entrainment and sleep regulation pathways. Finally, the diurnal wheel-running rhythms of Grm2/3-/- mice were perturbed under a standard light/dark cycle, but their diurnal rest-activity rhythms were unaltered in cages lacking running wheels, as determined with passive infrared motion detectors. Hence, when assessing the diurnal rest-activity rhythms of mice, the choice of assay can have a major bearing on the results obtained. PMID:25950516

  4. Abnormal nocturnal heart rate variability response among chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients during wakefulness and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Ranpuria, Reena; Hall, Martica; Hotchkiss, John R.; Chan, Chris T.; Unruh, Mark L.; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Background. Dialysis patients and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience a substantial risk for abnormal autonomic function and abnormal heart rate variability (HRV). It remains unknown whether HRV changes across sleep stages in patients with different severity of CKD or dialysis dependency. We hypothesized that high-frequency (HF) HRV (vagal tone) will be attenuated from wakefulness to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and then to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in dialysis patients as compared to patients with CKD. Methods. In-home polysomnography was performed in 95 patients with stages 4–5 CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD). HRV was measured using fast Fourier transform of interbeat intervals during wakefulness and sleep. Low-frequency (LF) and HF intervals were generated. Natural logarithm HF (LNHF) and the logarithm LF/HF ratio (sympathovagal tone) were analysed by multivariable quantile regression and generalized estimating equations. Results. Of the 95 patients, 63.2% (n = 60) was male, 35.8% (n = 34) was African American and 20.4% (n = 19) was diabetic. Average age was 51.6 ± 15.1 (range 19–82). HRV variables were significantly associated with diabetic status, higher periodic limb movement indices and lower bicarbonate levels. Patients with advanced CKD did not differ from dialysis patients in their inability to increase vagal tone during sleep. During wakefulness, female gender (P = 0.05) was associated with the increases in the vagal tone. Conclusions. Patients with CKD/ESRD exhibit dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system tone manifesting as a failure to increase HRV during wakefulness and sleep. Different patient characteristics are associated with changes in HRV at different sleep stages. PMID:20466675

  5. Toward optimizing lighting as a countermeasure to sleep and circadian disruption in space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucci, Robert L.; Gardner, James; Hanifin, John P.; Jasser, Samar; Byrne, Brenda; Gerner, Edward; Rollag, Mark; Brainard, George C.

    2005-05-01

    Light is being used as a pre-launch countermeasure to circadian and sleep disruption in astronauts. The effect of light on the circadian system is readily monitored by measurement of plasma melatonin. Our group has established an action spectrum for human melatonin regulation and determined the region of 446-477 nm to be the most potent for suppressing plasma melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 460 and 555 nm for suppressing melatonin using a within-subjects design. Subjects ( N=12) were exposed to equal photon densities ( 7.18×1012photons/cm2/s) at 460 and 555 nm. Melatonin suppression was significantly stronger at 460 nm ( p<0.02). An extension to the action spectrum showed that 420 nm light at 16 and 32?W/cm2 significantly suppressed melatonin ( p<0.04 and p<0.002). These studies will help optimize lighting countermeasures to circadian and sleep disruption during spaceflight.

  6. Electroencephalographic studies of sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.; Agnew, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Various experimental studies on sleep are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) effect of altered day length on sleep, (2) effect of a partial loss of sleep on subsequent nocturnal sleep; (3) effect of rigid control over sleep-wake-up times; (4) sleep and wakefulness in a time-free environment; (5) distribution of spindles during a full night of sleep; and (6) effect on sleep and performance of swiftly changing shifts of work.

  7. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-11-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72?h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST, mesor, circadian quotient, 24-h autocorrelation and bed and wake times; PER3 was associated with amplitude, 24-h autocorrelation, acrophase and bed and wake times. Most of the observed associations involved a significant interaction between genotype and HIV. In this chronic illness population, polymorphisms in several circadian genes were associated with measures of sleep disruption and timing. These findings extend the evidence for an association between genetic variability in circadian regulation and sleep outcomes to include the sleep-wake patterns experienced by adults living with HIV/AIDS. These results provide direction for future intervention research related to circadian sleep-wake behavior patterns. PMID:26512752

  8. Bidirectional communication between the brain and the immune system: implications for physiological sleep and disorders with disrupted sleep.

    PubMed

    Lorton, Dianne; Lubahn, Cheri L; Estus, Chris; Millar, Brooke A; Carter, Jeffery L; Wood, Carlo A; Bellinger, Denise L

    2006-01-01

    This review describes mechanisms of immune-to-brain and brain-to-immune signaling involved in mediating physiological sleep and altered sleep with disease. The central nervous system (CNS) modulates immune function by signaling target cells of the immune system through autonomic and neuroendocrine pathways. Neurotransmitters and hormones produced and released by these pathways interact with immune cells to alter immune functions, including cytokine production. Cytokines produced by cells of the immune and nervous systems regulate sleep. Cytokines released by immune cells, particularly interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, signal neuroendocrine, autonomic, limbic and cortical areas of the CNS to affect neural activity and modify behaviors (including sleep), hormone release and autonomic function. In this manner, immune cells function as a sense organ, informing the CNS of peripheral events related to infection and injury. Equally important, homeostatic mechanisms, involving all levels of the neuroaxis, are needed, not only to turn off the immune response after a pathogen is cleared or tissue repair is completed, but also to restore and regulate natural diurnal fluctuations in cytokine production and sleep. The immune system's ability to affect behavior has important implications for understanding normal and pathological sleep. Sleep disorders are commonly associated with chronic inflammatory diseases and chronic age- or stress-related disorders. The best studied are rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndromes. This article reviews our current understanding of neuroimmune interactions in normal sleep and sleep deprivation, and the influence of these interactions on selected disorders characterized by pathological sleep. PMID:17709958

  9. Sleep abnormality in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yijun; Pan, Liping; Fu, Ying; Sun, Na; Li, Yu-Jing; Cai, Hao; Su, Lei; Shen, Yi; Cui, Linyang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the sleep structure of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and the association of abnormalities with brain lesions. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study. Thirty-three patients with NMOSD and 20 matched healthy individuals were enrolled. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were collected. Questionnaires were used to assess quality of sleep, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and depression. Nocturnal polysomnography was performed. Results: Compared with healthy controls, patients with NMOSD had decreases in sleep efficiency (7%; p = 0.0341), non-REM sleep N3 (12%; p < 0.0001), and arousal index (6; p = 0.0138). REM sleep increased by 4% (p = 0.0423). There were correlations between arousal index and REM% or Epworth Sleepiness Scale (r = ?0.0145; p = 0.0386, respectively). Six patients with NMOSD (18%, 5 without infratentorial lesions and 1 with infratentorial lesions) had a hypopnea index >5, and all of those with sleep apnea had predominantly the peripheral type. The periodic leg movement (PLM) index was higher in patients with NMOSD than in healthy controls (20 vs 2, p = 0.0457). Surprisingly, 77% of the patients with PLM manifested infratentorial lesions. Conclusions: Sleep architecture was markedly disrupted in patients with NMOSD. Surveillance of nocturnal symptoms and adequate symptomatic control are expected to improve the quality of life of patients with NMOSD. PMID:25918736

  10. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Hvolby, Allan

    2015-03-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals with ADHD with typically developing controls is most concordant for associations of ADHD with: hypopnea/apnea and peripheral limb movements in sleep or nocturnal motricity in polysomnographic studies; increased sleep onset latency and shorter sleep time in actigraphic studies; and bedtime resistance, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian-rhythm sleep disorders). Psychostimulant medications are associated with disrupted or disturbed sleep, but also 'paradoxically' calm some patients with ADHD for sleep by alleviating their symptoms. Long-acting formulations may have insufficient duration of action, leading to symptom rebound at bedtime. Current guidelines recommend assessment of sleep disturbance during evaluation of ADHD, and before initiation of pharmacotherapy, with healthy sleep practices the first-line option for addressing sleep problems. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the relationships between ADHD and sleep, and presents a conceptual model of the modes of interaction: ADHD may cause sleep problems as an intrinsic feature of the disorder; sleep problems may cause or mimic ADHD; ADHD and sleep problems may interact, with reciprocal causation and possible involvement of comorbidity; and ADHD and sleep problems may share a common underlying neurological etiology. PMID:25127644

  11. Sleep-like behavior and 24-h rhythm disruption in the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heise, I; Fisher, S P; Banks, G T; Wells, S; Peirson, S N; Foster, R G; Nolan, P M

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome is a common disorder associated with intellectual disability in humans. Among a variety of severe health problems, patients with Down syndrome exhibit disrupted sleep and abnormal 24-h rest/activity patterns. The transchromosomic mouse model of Down syndrome, Tc1, is a trans-species mouse model for Down syndrome, carrying most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal complement of mouse chromosomes and expresses many of the phenotypes characteristic of Down syndrome. To date, however, sleep and circadian rhythms have not been characterized in Tc1 mice. Using both circadian wheel-running analysis and video-based sleep scoring, we showed that these mice exhibited fragmented patterns of sleep-like behaviour during the light phase of a 12:12-h light/dark (LD) cycle with an extended period of continuous wakefulness at the beginning of the dark phase. Moreover, an acute light pulse during night-time was less effective in inducing sleep-like behaviour in Tc1 animals than in wild-type controls. In wheel-running analysis, free running in constant light (LL) or constant darkness (DD) showed no changes in the circadian period of Tc1 animals although they did express subtle behavioural differences including a reduction in total distance travelled on the wheel and differences in the acrophase of activity in LD and in DD. Our data confirm that Tc1 mice express sleep-related phenotypes that are comparable with those seen in Down syndrome patients with moderate disruptions in rest/activity patterns and hyperactive episodes, while circadian period under constant lighting conditions is essentially unaffected. PMID:25558895

  12. Sleep under extreme environments: effects of heat and cold exposure, altitude, hyperbaric pressure and microgravity in space.

    PubMed

    Buguet, Alain

    2007-11-15

    Human sleep is sensitive to the individual's environment. The present review examines current knowledge of human sleep patterns under different environments: heat exposure, cold exposure, altitude, high pressure and microgravity in space. Heat exposure has two effects. In people living in temperate conditions, moderate heat loads (hot bath, sauna) prior to sleep provoke a delayed reaction across time (diachronic reaction) whereby slow-wave sleep (SWS) augments in the following night (neurogenic adaptive pathway). Melanoids and Caucasians living in the Sahel dry tropical climate experience diachronic increases in SWS throughout seasonal acclimatization. Such increases are greater during the hot season, being further enhanced after daytime exercise. On the contrary, when subjects are acutely exposed to heat, diachronic decreases in total sleep time and SWS occur, being often accompanied by synchronic (concomitant) diminution in REM sleep. Stress hormones increase. Nocturnal cold exposure provokes a synchronic decrease in REM sleep along with an activation of stress hormones (synchronic somatic reaction). SWS remains undisturbed as it still occurs at the beginning of the night before nocturnal body cooling. Altitude and high pressure are deleterious to sleep, especially in non-acclimatized individuals. In their controlled environment, astronauts can sleep well in microgravity. Exercise-induced sleep changes help to understand environmental effects on sleep: well-tolerated environmental strains may improve sleep through a neurogenic adaptive pathway; when this "central" adaptive pathway is overloaded or bypassed, diachronic and synchronic sleep disruptions occur. PMID:17706676

  13. The Impact of Sleep Disruption on Executive Function in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, C.-C.; Spano, G.; Edgin, J. O.

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of sleep disorders, particularly obstructive sleep apnea, is well established in children with Down syndrome. However, only a few studies have focused on older children and young adults in this population. Given the presence of sleep disorders and the early emergence of Alzheimer's disease, more work is needed to examine the…

  14. Pain Disrupts Sleep in Children and Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breau, Lynn M.; Camfield, Carol S.

    2011-01-01

    Both chronic pain and sleep problems are common for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Although one study has revealed a relationship between having a medical condition and sleep problems in this population, the role of pain was not examined independently. Thus, the goal of this study was to clarify the specific role…

  15. Sleep Disruption as a Correlate to Cognitive and Adaptive Behavior Problems in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Matthew A.; Schreck, Kimberly A.; Mulick, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep problems associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been well documented, but less is known about the effects of sleep problems on day-time cognitive and adaptive performance in this population. Children diagnosed with autism or pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) (N = 335) from 1 to 10 years of age…

  16. Sleep deprivation selectively disrupts top-down adaptation to cognitive conflict in the Stroop test.

    PubMed

    Gevers, Wim; Deliens, Gaetane; Hoffmann, Sophie; Notebaert, Wim; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to exert detrimental effects on various cognitive domains, including attention, vigilance and working memory. Seemingly at odds with these findings, prior studies repeatedly failed to evidence an impact of prior sleep deprivation on cognitive interference in the Stroop test, a hallmark paradigm in the study of cognitive control abilities. The present study investigated further the effect of sleep deprivation on cognitive control using an adapted version of the Stroop test that allows to segregate top-down (attentional reconfiguration on incongruent items) and bottom-up (facilitated processing after repetitions in responses and/or features of stimuli) components of performance. Participants underwent a regular night of sleep or a night of total sleep deprivation before cognitive testing. Results disclosed that sleep deprivation selectively impairs top-down adaptation mechanisms: cognitive control no longer increased upon detection of response conflict at the preceding trial. In parallel, bottom-up abilities were found unaffected by sleep deprivation: beneficial effects of stimulus and response repetitions persisted. Changes in vigilance states due to sleep deprivation selectively impact on cognitive control in the Stroop test by affecting top-down, but not bottom-up, mechanisms that guide adaptive behaviours. PMID:26173051

  17. Determinants of shortened, disrupted, and mistimed sleep and associated metabolic health consequences in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Recent increases in the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in modern societies have been paralleled by reductions in the time their denizens spend asleep. Epidemiological studies have shown that disturbed sleep-comprising short, low-quality, and mistimed sleep-increases the risk of metabolic diseases, especially obesity and T2DM. Supporting a causal role of disturbed sleep, experimental animal and human studies have found that sleep loss can impair metabolic control and body weight regulation. Possible mechanisms for the observed changes comprise sleep loss-induced changes in appetite-signaling hormones (e.g., higher levels of the hunger-promoting hormone ghrelin) or hedonic brain responses, altered responses of peripheral tissues to metabolic signals, and changes in energy intake and expenditure. Even though the overall consensus is that sleep loss leads to metabolic perturbations promoting the development of obesity and T2DM, experimental evidence supporting the validity of this view has been inconsistent. This Perspective aims at discussing molecular to behavioral factors through which short, low-quality, and mistimed sleep may threaten metabolic public health. In this context, possible factors that may determine the extent to which poor sleep patterns increase the risk of metabolic pathologies within and across generations will be discussed (e.g., timing and genetics). PMID:25805757

  18. Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex: reversal by antipsychotic drugs

    E-print Network

    Frau, Roberto; Orrù , Marco; Puligheddu, Monica; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Mereu, Giampaolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Bortolato, Marco

    2008-11-01

    startling effects of weak prestimulation. Psychophysiology 12, 238–248. Jouvet D, Vimont P, Delorme F (1964). Study of selective deprivation of the paradoxal phase of sleep in the cat. Journal of Physiology (Paris) 56, 381. Keshavan MS, Pettegrew JW...

  19. Arousal from sleep mechanisms in infants.

    PubMed

    Franco, Patricia; Kato, Ineko; Richardson, Heidi L; Yang, Joel S C; Montemitro, Enza; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2010-08-01

    Arousals from sleep allow sleep to continue in the face of stimuli that normally elicit responses during wakefulness and also permit awakening. Such an adaptive mechanism implies that any malfunction may have clinical importance. Inadequate control of arousal in infants and children is associated with a variety of sleep-related problems. An excessive propensity to arouse from sleep favors the development of repeated sleep disruptions and insomnia, with impairment of daytime alertness and performance. A lack of an adequate arousal response to a noxious nocturnal stimulus reduces an infant's chances of autoresuscitation, and thus survival, increasing the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The study of arousability is complicated by many factors including the definition of an arousal; the scoring methodology; the techniques used (spontaneous arousability versus arousal responses to endogenous or exogenous stimuli); and the confounding factors that complicate the determination of arousal thresholds by changing the sleeper's responses to a given stimulus such as prenatal drug, alcohol, or cigarette use. Infant age and previous sleep deprivation also modify thresholds. Other confounding factors include time of night, sleep stages, the sleeper's body position, and sleeping conditions. In this paper, we will review these different aspects for the study of arousals in infants and also report the importance of these studies for the understanding of the pathophysiology of some clinical conditions, particularly SIDS. PMID:20630799

  20. Disrupted sleep-wake regulation in type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, T; Ramesh, V; Dworak, M; Choi, D-S; McCarley, R W; Kalinchuk, A V; Basheer, R

    2015-09-10

    The type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) is implicated in regulating levels of extracellular adenosine ([AD]ex). In the basal forebrain (BF) levels of [AD]ex increase during wakefulness and closely correspond to the increases in the electroencephalogram (EEG) delta (0.75-4.5Hz) activity (NR?) during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Thus in the BF, [AD]ex serves as a biochemical marker of sleep homeostasis. Waking EEG activity in theta range (5-9Hz, W?) is also described as a marker of sleep homeostasis. An hour-by-hour temporal relationship between the W? and NR? is unclear. In this study we examined the relationship between these EEG markers of sleep homeostasis during spontaneous sleep-wakefulness and during sleep deprivation (SD) and recovery sleep in the ENT1 gene knockout (ENT1KO) mouse. We observed that baseline NREMS amount was decreased during the light period in ENT1KO mice, accompanied by a weak correlation between W? of each hour and NR? of its subsequent hour when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Perfusion of low dose of adenosine into BF not only strengthened the W?-NR? relationship, but also increased NREMS to match with the WT littermates suggesting decreased [AD]ex in ENT1KO mice. However, the SD-induced [AD]ex increase in the BF and the linear correlation between the EEG markers of sleep homeostasis were unaffected in ENT1KO mice suggesting that during SD, sources other than ENT1 contribute to increase in [AD]ex. Our data provide evidence for a differential regulation of wakefulness-associated [AD]ex during spontaneous vs prolonged waking. PMID:26143012

  1. In Utero Exposure to Valproic Acid Changes Sleep in Juvenile Rats: A Model for Sleep Disturbances in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Cusmano, Danielle M.; Mong, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether sleep disturbances are found in the valproic acid model of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Design: Comparative study for sleep behavior, sleep architecture, electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral analysis, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65/67 protein expression in juvenile rats exposed to valproic acid (VPA), sodium salt, or saline in utero. Setting: N/A. Participants: Juvenile (postnatal day 32) male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: In utero exposure to either saline or 400 mg/kg VPA administered intraperitoneally to the dams on gestational day 12.5. On postnatal days 22-24, all rats were implanted with transmitters to record EEG and electromyogram (EMG) activity. Measurements and Results: During the light phase, when nocturnal animals are typically quiescent, the VPA-exposed animals spent significantly more time in wake (?35 min) and significantly less time in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (?26 min) compared to the saline controls. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the EEG reveled that VPA-exposed animals exhibited increased high-frequency activity during wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and reduced theta power across all vigilance states. Interestingly, the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system, which modulates the induction and maintenance of sleep states, was also disrupted, with reduced levels of both GAD 65 and GAD67 in the cortical tissue of VPA-exposed animals compared to saline controls. Conclusions: To date, the current animal models of ASD have been underutilized in the investigation of associated sleep disturbances. The VPA animal model recapitulates aspects of sleep disruptions reported clinically, providing a tool to investigate cellular and molecular dysregulation contributing to sleep disruptions in ASD. Citation: Cusmano DM, Mong JA. In utero exposure to valproic acid changes sleep in juvenile rats: a model for sleep disturbances in autism. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1489-1499. PMID:25142574

  2. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. PMID:26118912

  3. Disrupted directed connectivity along the cingulate cortex determines vigilance after sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Cheung, Bing Leung P.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Romeijn, Nico; Riedner, Brady A.; Tononi, Giulio; Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D.; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2013-01-01

    The cingulate cortex is regarded as the backbone of structural and functional connectivity of the brain. While its functional connectivity has been intensively studied, little is known about its effective connectivity, its modulation by behavioral states, and its involvement in cognitive performance. Given their previously reported effects on cingulate functional connectivity, we investigated how eye-closure and sleep deprivation changed cingulate effective connectivity, estimated from resting-state high-density electroencephalography (EEG) using a novel method to calculate Granger Causality directly in source space. Effective connectivity along the cingulate cortex was dominant in the forward direction. Eyes-open connectivity in the forward direction was greater compared to eyes-closed, in well-rested participants. The difference between eyes-open and eyes-closed connectivity was attenuated and no longer significant after sleep deprivation. Individual variability in the forward connectivity after sleep deprivation predicted subsequent task performance, such that those subjects who showed a greater increase in forward connectivity between the eyes-open and the eyes-closed periods also performed better on a sustained attention task. Effective connectivity in the opposite, backward, direction was not affected by whether the eyes were open or closed or by sleep deprivation. These findings indicate that the effective connectivity from posterior to anterior cingulate regions is enhanced when a well-rested subject has his eyes open compared to when they are closed. Sleep deprivation impairs this directed information flow, proportional to its deleterious effect on vigilance. Therefore, sleep may play a role in the maintenance of waking effective connectivity. PMID:23643925

  4. REM sleep deprivation generates cognitive and neurochemical disruptions in the intranigral rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ana Carolina D; Castro, Marcela Alexandra V; Jose, Elis Angela K; Delattre, Ana Márcia; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Da Cunha, Claudio; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2013-11-01

    The recently described intranigral rotenone model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in rodents provides an interesting model for studying mechanisms of toxin-induced dopaminergic neuronal injury. The relevance of this model remains unexplored with regard to sleep disorders that occur in PD. On this basis, the construction of a PD model depicting several behavioral and neurochemical alterations related to sleep would be helpful in understanding the association between PD and sleep regulation. We performed bilateral intranigral injections of rotenone (12??g) on day 0 and the open-field test initially on day 20 after rotenone. Acquisition phase of the object-recognition test, executed also during day 20, was followed by an exact period of 24 hr of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD; day 21). In the subsequent day (22), the rats were re-exposed to the open-field test and to the object-recognition test (choice phase). After the last session of behavioral tests, the rat brains were immediately dissected, and their striata were collected for neurochemical purposes. We observed that a brief exposure to REMSD was able to impair drastically the object-recognition test, similarly to a nigrostriatal lesion promoted by intranigral rotenone. However, the combination of REMSD and rotenone surprisingly did not inflict memory impairment, concomitant with a moderate compensatory mechanism mediated by striatal dopamine release. In addition, we demonstrated the existence of changes in serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmissions within the striatum mostly as a function of REMSD and REMSD plus rotenone, respectively. PMID:23908011

  5. Dual-Tasking Alleviated Sleep Deprivation Disruption in Visuomotor Tracking: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazes, Yunglin; Rakitin, Brian C.; Steffener, Jason; Habeck, Christian; Butterfield, Brady; Basner, Robert C.; Ghez, Claude; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Effects of dual-responding on tracking performance after 49-h of sleep deprivation (SD) were evaluated behaviorally and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Continuous visuomotor tracking was performed simultaneously with an intermittent color-matching visual detection task in which a pair of color-matched stimuli constituted a…

  6. Emotional trait and memory associates of sleep timing and quality.

    PubMed

    Pace-Schott, Edward F; Rubin, Zoe S; Tracy, Lauren E; Spencer, Rebecca M C; Orr, Scott P; Verga, Patrick W

    2015-10-30

    Poor ability to remember the extinction of conditioned fear, elevated trait anxiety, and delayed or disrupted nocturnal sleep are reported in anxiety disorders. The current study examines the interrelationship of these factors in healthy young-adult males. Skin-conductance response was conditioned to two differently colored lamps. One color but not the other was then extinguished. After varying delays, both colors were presented to determine extinction recall and generalization. Questionnaires measured sleep quality, morningness-eveningness, neuroticism and trait anxiety. A subset produced a mean 7.0 nights of actigraphy and sleep diaries. Median split of mean sleep midpoint defined early- and late-"sleep timers". Extinction was more rapidly learned in the morning than evening only in early timers who also better generalized extinction recall. Extinction recall was greater with higher sleep efficiency. Sleep efficiency and morningness were negatively associated with neuroticism and anxiety. However, neuroticism and anxiety did not predict extinction learning, recall or generalization. Therefore, neuroticism/anxiety and deficient fear extinction, although both associated with poor quality and late timing of sleep, are not directly associated with each other. Elevated trait anxiety, in addition to predisposing directly to anxiety disorders, may thus also indirectly promote such disorders by impairing sleep and, consequently, extinction memory. PMID:26257092

  7. The sleep-wake cycle and motor activity, but not temperature, are disrupted over the light-dark cycle in mice genetically depleted of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Solarewicz, Julia Z; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role that serotonin has in the modulation of sleep and wakefulness across a 12-h:12-h light-dark cycle and determined whether temperature and motor activity are directly responsible for potential disruptions to arousal state. Telemetry transmitters were implanted in 24 wild-type mice (Tph2(+/+)) and 24 mice with a null mutation for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2(-/-)). After surgery, electroencephalography, core body temperature, and motor activity were recorded for 24 h. Temperature for a given arousal state (quiet and active wake, non-rapid eye movement, and paradoxical sleep) was similar in the Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice across the light-dark cycle. The percentage of time spent in active wakefulness, along with motor activity, was decreased in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice at the start and end of the dark cycle. This difference persisted into the light cycle. In contrast, the time spent in a given arousal state was similar at the remaining time points. Despite this similarity, periods of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and wakefulness were less consolidated in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice throughout the light-dark cycle. We conclude that the depletion of serotonin does not disrupt the diurnal variation in the sleep-wake cycle, motor activity, and temperature. However, serotonin may suppress photic and nonphotic inputs that manifest at light-dark transitions and serve to shorten the ultraradian duration of wakefulness and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Finally, alterations in the sleep-wake cycle following depletion of serotonin are unrelated to disruptions in the modulation of temperature. PMID:25394829

  8. Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition and induces psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Petrovsky, Nadine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Hill, Antje; Frenzel, Leonie; Meyhöfer, Inga; Wagner, Michael; Backhaus, Jutta; Kumari, Veena

    2014-07-01

    Translational biomarkers, such as prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, are playing an increasingly important role in the development of antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia and related conditions. However, attempts to reliably induce a PPI deficit by psychotomimetic drugs have not been successful, leaving an unmet need for a cross-species psychosis model sensitive to this widely studied surrogate treatment target. Sleep deprivation (SD) might be such a model as it has previously been shown to induce PPI deficits in rats, which could be selectively prevented with antipsychotic but not anxiolytic or antidepressant compounds. Here, in a first proof-of-concept study we tested whether SD induces a deficit in PPI and an increase in psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans. In two counterbalanced sessions, acoustic PPI and self-reported psychosis-like symptoms (Psychotomimetic States Inventory) were measured in 24 healthy human volunteers after a normal night's sleep and after a night of total SD. SD decreased PPI (p = 0.001) without affecting the magnitude or habituation of the startle response (all p > 0.13). SD also induced perceptual distortions, cognitive disorganization, and anhedonia (all p < 0.02). Thus, extending previous rodent work, we conclude that SD, in combination with the PPI biomarker, might be a promising translational surrogate model for psychosis as this method represents a possibility to partially and reversibly mimic the pathogenesis of psychotic states. PMID:24990933

  9. Clinical significance of sleep-disordered breathing in Alzheimer's disease. Preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Hoch, C C; Reynolds, C F; Nebes, R D; Kupfer, D J; Berman, S R; Campbell, D

    1989-02-01

    In a study of 15 probable Alzheimer's patients and 12 healthy elderly control subjects, Alzheimer's patients had a significantly higher apnea index (patients versus controls, mean +/- SD: 6.3 +/- 6.6 vs 1.8 +/- 2.7, P less than .05) and greater maximal duration of apnea (patients versus controls, median: 50.0 vs 28.5 seconds, P less than .001), but no significant increase in oxyhemoglobin desaturation compared with controls. (The accepted normal threshold for abnormality is an apnea index more than 5.) Although three of seven psychometric tests (odd-even, category retrieval, face-hand test) showed diurnal effects on one or more of their subscores, with Alzheimer's patients having significantly poorer scores at the AM than at PM testing, overnight change scores in the psychometric tests were not significantly correlated with severity of sleep-disordered breathing. Further, only 18.1% of the disruptive (ie, requiring intervention) nocturnal behaviors of the Alzheimer's patients were temporally linked to sleep-disordered breathing. The current data suggest that sleep-disordered breathing in nonmedicated Alzheimer's patients is relatively mild and is not a predictor of either overnight mental status changes, of disruptive nocturnal behaviors, or of daytime behavioral fluctuations. Additional studies of more severely demented patients and possibly of sleeping pill effects would be useful in further evaluating the role of sleep apnea in Alzheimer behavioral changes. PMID:2910971

  10. Disruption of Circadian Rhythms and Sleep in Critical Illness and its Impact on Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Viola; Westphalen, Kristin; Koeppen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The earth rotates on its axis around the sun, creating a day and night cycle, that caused the development of circadian rhythms. The circadian rhythm is primarily entrained by light, which is detected by the retina. Retinal ganglion cells project to a part of the hypothalamus termed suprachiasmatic nucleus. Here, we find the master molecular clock, composed of a transcription-translation-loop at its core. The master clock indirectly influences the innate immune system via different biological systems. Also, the master clock controls the peripheral clocks, which are present in innate immune cells. Here, circadian rhythm proteins influence the response of immune cells to pathogens. Furthermore, the master clock influences our sleep-pattern, the most important restorative physiological function. In critically ill patients the circadian rhythm is substantially altered, supporting a dysfunctional innate immune response. This review discusses recent basic science findings on the interaction of the circadian rhythm and the innate immune system. Furthermore we give an outlook on potential future therapeutic strategies. PMID:26144943

  11. Research on sleep, circadian rhythms and aging - Applications to manned spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Chiasera, August J.; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    1991-01-01

    Disorders of sleep and circadian rhythmicity are characteristic of both advancing age and manned spaceflight. Sleep fragmentation, reduced nocturnal sleep tendency and sleep efficiency, reduced daytime alertness, and increased daytime napping are common to both of these conditions. Recent research on the pathophysiology and treatment of disrupted sleep in older people has led to a better understanding of how the human circadian pacemaker regulates the timing of the daily sleep-wake cycle and how it responds to the periodic changes in the light-dark cycle to which we are ordinarily exposed. These findings have led to new treatments for some of the sleep disorders common to older individuals, using carefully timed exposure to bright light and darkness to manipulate the phase and/or amplitude of the circadian timing system. These insights and treatment approaches have direct applications in the design of countermeasures allowing astronauts to overcome some of the challenges which manned spaceflight poses for the human circadian timing system. We have conducted an operational feasibility study on the use of scheduled exposure to bright light and darkness prior to launch in order to facilitate adaptation of the circadian system of a NASA Space Shuttle crew to the altered sleep-wake schedule required for their mission. The results of this study illustrate how an understanding of the properties of the human circadian timing system and the consequences of circadian disruption can be applied to manned spaceflight.

  12. Sleeping with an electric blanket: effects on core temperature, sleep, and melatonin in young adults.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, A; van den Heuvel, C; Dawson, D

    1999-05-01

    Previous studies have inferred a relationship between core temperature and sleep disruption from manipulations of core temperature such as heating prior to sleep or administration of hyperthermic substances. To examine the relationship more directly, this study aimed to produce a direct increase in core temperature during the sleep period. Following an adaptation night, 16 subjects underwent counter-balanced baseline and experimental conditions, on non-consecutive nights between 1900 and 0800h. In the experimental condition, subjects were heated between 0230h and wake up, which significantly increased mean core temperature from baseline levels between 0400 and 0700h by 0.18 +/- 0.03 degree C (mean +/- SEM, p < 0.05). This increase in core temperature was associated with a significant decrease in sleep efficiency between 0330 and 0730h of 5.5 +/- 0.9% (mean +/- SD, p < 0.05). Polysomnographic measures indicated a significant increase in the number of stage changes and the amounts of stage 0 and stage 1 sleep (p < 0.05). Other stages of sleep and the number and duration of arousals were not significantly effected by heating. There was a strong trend toward and increase in the number of arousals (p = 0.054), however, core body temperature did not increase across arousals. Also, melatonin output was not effected by heating. Taken together, these results suggest that increased nocturnal core temperature alone may disrupt sleep. Additionally, the results support evidence suggesting that the circadian regulation of the sleep/wake cycle may be mediated via core temperature. PMID:10341381

  13. [Diagnosis of sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Kesper, Karl; Cassel, Werner; Hildebrandt, Olaf; Koehler, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a clinically significant condition associated with an increase in cardiovascular risk, daytime sleepiness and in risk of accidents. Diagnosis usually relies on a detailed anamnesis and an ambulatory nocturnal polygraphy. Suspecting the presence of OSA or a persisting unclear daytime sleepiness in need of treatment further polysomnographic diagnosis should be performed in a specialized sleep center. Cardiorespiratory polysomnography is the diagnostic gold standard in differentiating sleep-related breathing and movement disorders. PMID:26710202

  14. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  15. Nocturia Compounds Nocturnal Wakefulness in Older Individuals with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Hernandez, Beatriz; Friedman, Leah; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the impact of nocturia on objective measures of sleep in older individuals with insomnia. Methods: The sleep and toileting patterns of a group of community-dwelling older men (n = 55, aged 64.3 ± 7.52 years) and women (n = 92, aged 62.5 ± 6.73 years) with insomnia were studied for two weeks using sleep logs and one week using actigraphy. The relationships between nocturia and various sleep parameters were analyzed with ANOVA and linear regression. Results: More than half (54.2% ± 39.9%) of all log-reported nocturnal awakenings were associated with nocturia. A greater number of trips to the toilet was associated with worse log-reported restedness (p < 0.01) and sleep efficiency (p < 0.001), as well as increases in actigraph-derived measures of the number and length of nocturnal wake bouts (p < 0.001) and wake after sleep onset (p < 0.001). Actigraph-determined wake bouts were 11.5% ± 23.5% longer on nights on which there was a trip to the toilet and wake after sleep onset was 20.8% ± 33.0% longer during these nights. Conclusions: Nocturia is a common occurrence in older individuals with insomnia and is significantly associated with increased nocturnal wakefulness and decreased subjective restedness after sleep. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 263. Citation: Zeitzer JM; Bliwise DL; Hernandez B; Friedman L; Yesavage JA. Nocturia compounds nocturnal wakefulness in older individuals with insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(3):259-262. PMID:23493881

  16. Sleep disorders in the elderly

    MedlinePLUS

    Sleep disorders in the elderly involve any disrupted sleep pattern. This can include problems falling or staying asleep, ... for medical causes and determine which type of sleep disorder is causing the problem.

  17. Sleep and epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    Sleep and epilepsy have a close relationship. About 20% of patients suffer seizures only during the night, approximately 40% only during the day and approximately 35% during the day and night. In certain epilepsy syndromes, the occurrence of seizures is strongly related to sleep or awakening. Infantile spasms appear predominately on awakening, and hypsarrhythmia is sometimes visible only in sleep. Children with Panayiotopoulos syndrome or benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) have seizures mostly when asleep, and in both syndromes interictal spike waves are markedly accentuated in slow wave sleep. Electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep/continuous spike wave discharges during sleep (ESES/CSWS), atypical benign partial epilepsy, and Landau-Kleffner syndrome are epileptic encephalopathies with substantial behavioral and cognitive deficits, various seizures, and continuous spike-wave activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The hallmark of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and grand mal seizures on awakening are seizure symptoms within 2 hours after awakening, often provoked by sleep deprivation. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is sometimes mistaken for parasomnia. Differentiation is possible when the clinical symptoms and the frequency of the paroxysmal events per night and month are carefully observed and nocturnal video electroencephalography (EEG) performed. Sleep EEG recordings may be helpful in patients with suspected epilepsy and nonconclusive awake EEG. Depending on the clinical question, sleep recordings should be performed during nap (natural sleep or drug induced), during the night, or after sleep deprivation. PMID:25965811

  18. Delay in the Recovery of Normal Sleep-Wake Cycle after Disruption of the Light-Dark Cycle in Mice: A Bipolar Disorder-Prone Animal Model?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sun Hwa; Moon, Eunsoo; Chung, Young In; Lee, Byung Dae; Lee, Young Min; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Jeong, Hee Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Disruption of the circadian rhythm is known as a provoking factor for manic episodes. Individual differences exist in the recovery rate from disruption in the general population. To develop a screening method to detect individuals vulnerable to bipolar disorder, the authors observed the relationship between the recovery of the normal sleep-wake cycle after switching the light-dark (LD) cycle and quinpirole-induced hyperactivity in mice. Methods Sixteen male mice (age of 5 weeks, weight 28-29 gm) were subjected to a circadian rhythm disruption protocol. Sleep-wake behaviors were checked every 5 min for a total duration of 15 days, i.e., 2 days of baseline observations, 3 days of LD cycle changes, and 10 days of recovery. During the dark cycle on the 16th experimental day, their general locomotor activities were measured in an open field for 120 minutes after an injection of quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.). Results The individual differences in the recovery rate of the baseline sleep-wake cycle were noted after 3 days of switching the LD cycle. Fifty percent (n=8) of the mice returned to the baseline cycle within 6 days after normalizing the LD cycle (early recovery group). The locomotor activities of mice that failed to recover within 6 days (delayed recovery group) were significantly higher (mean rank=12.25) than those of the early recovery group (mean rank=4.75, u=62.0, p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Conclusion Given that the quinpirole-induced hyperactivity is an animal model of bipolar disorder, our results suggest individuals who have difficulties in recovery from circadian rhythm disruption may be vulnerable to bipolar disorder. PMID:25395982

  19. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called sleep apnea. When someone has sleep apnea, oxygen levels in the body may fall and sleep can be disrupted. You ... airway during sleep Continue Symptoms When breathing stops, oxygen levels in the body drop. This usually triggers the brain to briefly ...

  20. Nocturnal hypoxemia in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Regina Terse Trindade; Santana, Maria Angélica Pinheiro; Almeida, Priscila de Carvalho; Machado, Almério de Souza; Araújo-Filho, José Bouzas; Salles, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nocturnal hypoxemia and its association with pulmonary function, nutritional status, sleep macrostructure, and obstructive respiratory events during sleep in a population of clinically stable children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 67 children and adolescents with CF between 2 and 14 years of age. All of the participants underwent polysomnography, and SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. We also evaluated the Shwachman-Kulczycki (S-K) scores, spirometry findings, and nutritional status of the patients. RESULTS: The study involved 67 patients. The mean age of the patients was 8 years. The S-K scores differed significantly between the patients with and without nocturnal hypoxemia, which was defined as an SpO2 < 90% for more than 5% of the total sleep time (73.75 ± 6.29 vs. 86.38 ± 8.70; p < 0.01). Nocturnal hypoxemia correlated with the severity of lung disease, FEV1 (rs = ?0.42; p = 0.01), FVC (rs = ?0.46; p = 0.01), microarousal index (rs = 0.32; p = 0.01), and apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.56; p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients with CF and mild-to-moderate lung disease, nocturnal oxygenation correlated with the S-K score, spirometry variables, sleep macrostructure variables, and the apnea-hypopnea index. PMID:24473760

  1. Nocturnal light and nocturnal rodents: similar regulation of disparate functions?

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P

    2013-04-01

    Investigators typically study one function of the circadian visual system at a time, be it photoreception, transmission of photic information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), light control of rhythm phase, locomotor activity, or gene expression. There are good reasons for such a focused approach, but sometimes it is advantageous to look at the broader picture, asking how all the parts and functions complete the whole. Here, several seemingly disparate functions of the circadian visual system are examined. They share common characteristics with respect to regulation by light and, to the extent known, share a common input neuroanatomy. The argument presented is that the 3 hypothalamically mediated effects of light for which there are the most data, circadian clock phase shifts, suppression of nocturnal locomotion ("negative masking"), and suppression of nocturnal pineal function, are regulated by a common photic input pathway terminating in the SCN. For each, light triggers a relatively fixed interval response that is irradiance-dependent, the effective stimulus can be very brief light exposure, and the response continues to completion in the absence of additional light. The presence of a triggered, fixed-length response interval is of particular importance to the understanding of the circuitry and mechanisms regulating circadian rhythm phase shifts because it implies that the SCN clock response to light is not instantaneous. It also may explain why certain stimuli (neuropeptide Y or novel wheel running) administered many minutes after light exposure are able to block light-induced phase shifts. The understanding of negative masking is complicated by the fact that it can be represented as a positive change, that is, light-induced sleep, not just as a reduction in locomotion. Acute nocturnal light exposure also induces adrenal hormone secretion and a rapid drop in body temperature, physiological responses that appear to be regulated similarly to the other light effects. The likelihood of a common regulatory basis for the several responses suggests that additional light-induced responses will be forthcoming and raises questions about the relationships between light, SCN cellular anatomy, the molecular clockworks of SCN neurons, and SCN throughput mechanisms for regulating disparate downstream activities. PMID:23606609

  2. DELIRIUM: IS SLEEP IMPORTANT?

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Paula L.; Ceriana, Piero; Fanfulla, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Delirium and poor sleep quality are common and often co-exist in hospitalized patients. A link between these disorders has been hypothesized but whether this link is a cause and effect relationship or simply an association resulting from shared mechanisms is yet to be determined. Potential shared mechanisms include: abnormalities of neurotransmitters, tissue ischemia, inflammation, and sedative exposure. Sedatives, while decreasing sleep latency, often cause a decrease in slow wave sleep and stage REM sleep and therefore may not provide the same restorative properties as natural sleep. Mechanical ventilation, an important cause of sleep disruption in ICU patients, may lead to sleep disruption not only from the discomfort of the endotracheal tube but also as a result of ineffective respiratory efforts and by inducing central apnea events if not properly adjusted for the patient’s physiologic needs. When possible, efforts should be made to optimize the patient-ventilator interaction to minimize sleep disruptions. PMID:23040286

  3. [GERD and sleep disorder].

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Yumiko; Murakami, Noriko; Fukunaga, Mikihiko; Nakai, Yoshihide

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Japan. Symptoms of GERD negatively affect their quality of life and sleep. There are several reasons for sleep disorder with GERD as follows. Nocturnal GERD symptoms sometimes directly avoid sleeping. Sleep apnea syndrome and GERD are sometimes concomitant. The both are sharing similar risk factor such as obesity and cause sleep disorder. When untypical symptoms of GERD are not diagnosed, patients are severely anxious about their physical condition. Then they feel stressful and sometimes get secondary depressive state including sleep disorder. We had better take care about patients' psychosocial factors and treat symptoms of GERD and sleep disorder together with holistic approach. PMID:16838662

  4. When to Suspect Sleep Apnea and What to Do About It.

    PubMed

    Kimoff, R John

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep with resultant hypoxia-reoxygenation and sleep fragmentation, is prevalent among patients with cardiovascular disease. Refractory hypertension, nocturnal angina or arrhythmias, and stroke in particular should prompt consideration of OSA. The symptoms of OSA include snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness; risk factors include obesity and reduced upper airway dimensions. Up to 50% of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) may manifest OSA, central sleep apnea-Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR), or both. Patients with CSA-CSR may present with fatigue, disrupted sleep, and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. Objective sleep recording is required to document the nature and severity of sleep apnea. The gold standard is in-laboratory overnight polysomnography (PSG), including monitoring of electroencephalography and other signals to determine sleep-wake state, and recording of body position, airflow, respiratory effort, and pulse oximetry. Portable cardiorespiratory recorders are now approved for diagnosis in patients without comorbidities. Full PSG is recommended for diagnosis in all other cases, although OSA and CSA-CSR can be identified from portable recorders in some patients with CHF and other conditions. The objectives of treatment are to improve symptoms, quality of life, and cardiovascular outcomes. The mainstay of treatment for moderate-to-severe OSA is positive airway pressure (PAP). Automated PAP devices may be used in uncomplicated OSA, whereas continuous fixed PAP is the treatment of choice for other patients with OSA, and may also treat a proportion of patients with CSA-CSR. A form of bi-level PAP known as adaptive servoventilation is effective in treating a majority of patients with CSA-CSR. PMID:26112305

  5. Sleep and pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dinner, D S

    1989-01-01

    Characteristic of the intimate relationship between sleep and epilepsy are an increase in IEA in nonREM sleep and a decrease in REM sleep, in both generalized and partial epilepsies. The morphology of epileptiform discharges may also be affected by sleep, with a change or breakdown of the generalized pattern in generalized epilepsy, but a better definition of sharp waves in partial epilepsy, during nonREM sleep. One notes a predilection for certain types of epilepsy to occur in sleep, such as benign focal epilepsy of childhood, or to occur shortly after awakening (juvenile myoclonic epilepsy). Epilepsy may disrupt the sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and a decrease in deep sleep, and an increase in awake time after sleep onset. Sleep is an important activator of IEA and is of value both in the routine EEG evaluation of epilepsy as well as in more prolonged studies used in epilepsy monitoring units. PMID:2659214

  6. Loss of Melanopsin Photoreception and Antagonism of the Histamine H3 Receptor by Ciproxifan Inhibit Light-Induced Sleep in Mice

    E-print Network

    Muindi, Fanuel

    Light has direct effects on sleep and wakefulness causing arousal in diurnal animals and sleep in nocturnal animals. In the present study, we assessed the modulation of light-induced sleep by melanopsin and the histaminergic ...

  7. Neuroimmunologic aspects of sleep and sleep loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, N. L.; Szuba, M. P.; Staab, J. P.; Evans, D. L.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    The complex and intimate interactions between the sleep and immune systems have been the focus of study for several years. Immune factors, particularly the interleukins, regulate sleep and in turn are altered by sleep and sleep deprivation. The sleep-wake cycle likewise regulates normal functioning of the immune system. Although a large number of studies have focused on the relationship between the immune system and sleep, relatively few studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on immune parameters. Studies of sleep deprivation's effects are important for several reasons. First, in the 21st century, various societal pressures require humans to work longer and sleep less. Sleep deprivation is becoming an occupational hazard in many industries. Second, to garner a greater understanding of the regulatory effects of sleep on the immune system, one must understand the consequences of sleep deprivation on the immune system. Significant detrimental effects on immune functioning can be seen after a few days of total sleep deprivation or even several days of partial sleep deprivation. Interestingly, not all of the changes in immune physiology that occur as a result of sleep deprivation appear to be negative. Numerous medical disorders involving the immune system are associated with changes in the sleep-wake physiology--either being caused by sleep dysfunction or being exacerbated by sleep disruption. These disorders include infectious diseases, fibromyalgia, cancers, and major depressive disorder. In this article, we will describe the relationships between sleep physiology and the immune system, in states of health and disease. Interspersed will be proposals for future research that may illuminate the clinical relevance of the relationships between sleeping, sleep loss and immune function in humans. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  8. The nocturnal polyuria syndrome (NPS).

    PubMed

    Asplund, R

    1995-10-01

    1. The nocturnal polyuria syndrome (NPS) is characterized by an increased nocturnal urine output. The diurnal rhythm in the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) system is absent, and often there is no detectable ADH in the plasma at all during the night. The 24-hr urine output is normal or only moderately increased. Men without nocturnal micturition, normally have a substantial increase in their nocturnal plasma ADH, while those with a need to micturate during the night have the same ADH level at night as in the daytime. Women have lower ADH levels than men, and no nocturnal increase in ADH irrespective of nocturnal voiding. Subjects with an increased nocturnal voiding frequency due to increased nocturnal urine output have an increased thirst, most markedly at night. They often avoid drinking in the evening, but they are unable to resist the impulse to drink during the night. People with polyuria at night wake up often because of the need to void, and accordingly are often tired during the day. 2. An increased nocturnal urine output can be reduced by administration of desmopressin at night. In a short-term study of elderly sufferers from NPS, treated with 20 micrograms desmopressin as nose drops in the evening the nocturnal urine output was reduced from 65 +/- 8% of the 24-hr urine output before treatment to 50 +/- 15% during treatment. In another study elderly with NPS were treated with 40 micrograms desmopressin as an intranasal aerosol in the evening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7590108

  9. A Mixed-Method Examination of Maternal and Paternal Nocturnal Caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Insana, Salvatore P.; Craig, Garfield F.; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study objectives were to describe and compare causes of, and activities during, postpartum parents’ nocturnal awakenings. Methods Twenty-one primiparous postpartum couples were studied for one week with qualitative and quantitative methods. Results Mothers reported more awakenings per night (3.3±1.1) and more wake after sleep onset (116.0±60.0 minutes) compared to fathers (2.4±0.5 and 42.7±39.4 minutes, respectively). ‘Actions taken’ during maternal nocturnal awakenings were primarily for infant feeding (49.0%), general infant care (18.5%), and infant changing (12.0%). ‘Actions taken’ during paternal nocturnal awakenings were primarily ‘passive awakenings’ (35.9%), for self-care (18.4%), and for infant feeding (9.4%). Conclusions Qualitative analyses revealed ways that new families can optimize the sleep of both parents’ while also providing optimal nocturnal infant care. PMID:24007974

  10. Age-related changes in sleep spindles characteristics during daytime recovery following a 25-hour sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosinvil, T.; Lafortune, M.; Sekerovic, Z.; Bouchard, M.; Dubé, J.; Latulipe-Loiselle, A.; Martin, N.; Lina, J. M.; Carrier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11–15 Hz; >0.5 s) help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g., daytime), even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explored whether spindles characteristics in baseline nocturnal sleep were associated with the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery periods in both age groups. Methods: Twenty-nine young (15 women and 14 men; 27.3 y ± 5.0) and 31 middle-aged (19 women and 13 men; 51.6 y ± 5.1) healthy subjects participated in a baseline nocturnal sleep and a daytime recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Spindles were detected on artifact-free Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep epochs. Spindle density (nb/min), amplitude (?V), frequency (Hz), and duration (s) were analyzed on parasagittal (linked-ears) derivations. Results: In young subjects, spindle frequency increased during daytime recovery sleep as compared to baseline nocturnal sleep in all derivations, whereas middle-aged subjects showed spindle frequency enhancement only in the prefrontal derivation. No other significant interaction between age group and sleep condition was observed. Spindle density for all derivations and centro-occipital spindle amplitude decreased whereas prefrontal spindle amplitude increased from baseline to daytime recovery sleep in both age groups. Finally, no significant correlation was found between spindle characteristics during baseline nocturnal sleep and the marked reduction in sleep efficiency during daytime recovery sleep in both young and middle-aged subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between homeostatic and circadian pressure modulates spindle frequency differently in aging. Spindle characteristics do not seem to be linked with the ability to maintain daytime recovery sleep. PMID:26089788

  11. d-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mice show enhanced short-term memory performance and heightened anxiety, but no sleep or circadian rhythm disruption.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Hasan, Sibah; Tam, Shu K E; Engle, Sandra J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Sharp, Trevor; Foster, Russell G; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-05-01

    d-amino acid oxidase (DAO, DAAO) is an enzyme that degrades d-serine, the primary endogenous co-agonist of the synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Convergent evidence implicates DAO in the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia. To better understand the functional role of DAO, we characterized the behaviour of the first genetically engineered Dao knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mouse. Our primary objective was to assess both spatial and non-spatial short-term memory performance. Relative to wildtype (Dao(+/+) ) littermate controls, Dao(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced spatial recognition memory performance, improved odour recognition memory performance, and enhanced spontaneous alternation in the T-maze. In addition, Dao(-/-) mice displayed increased anxiety-like behaviour in five tests of approach/avoidance conflict: the open field test, elevated plus maze, successive alleys, light/dark box and novelty-suppressed feeding. Despite evidence of a reciprocal relationship between anxiety and sleep and circadian function in rodents, we found no evidence of sleep or circadian rhythm disruption in Dao(-/-) mice. Overall, our observations are consistent with, and extend, findings in the natural mutant ddY/Dao(-) line. These data add to a growing body of preclinical evidence linking the inhibition, inactivation or deletion of DAO with enhanced cognitive performance. Our results have implications for the development of DAO inhibitors as therapeutic agents. PMID:25816902

  12. Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Jehan, Shazia; Masters-Isarilov, Alina; Salifu, Idoko; Zizi, Ferdinand; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Gupta, Ravi; Brzezinski, Amnon; McFarlane, Samy I

    2015-01-01

    One of the core symptoms of the menopausal transition is sleep disturbance. Peri-menopausal women often complain of difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep with frequent nocturnal and early morning awakenings. Factors that may play a role in this type of insomnia include vasomotor symptoms, changing reproductive hormone levels, circadian rhythm abnormalities, mood disorders, coexistent medical conditions, and lifestyle. Other common sleep problems in this age group, such as obstructive sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome, can also worsen the sleep quality. Exogenous melatonin use reportedly induces drowsiness and sleep and may ameliorate sleep disturbances, including the nocturnal awakenings associated with old age and the menopausal transition. Recently, more potent melatonin analogs (selective melatonin-1 (MT1) and melatonin-2 (MT2) receptor agonists) with prolonged effects and slow-release melatonin preparations have been developed. They were found effective in increasing total sleep time and sleep efficiency as well as in reducing sleep latency in insomnia patients. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on the changes in hormonal status to sleep problems among menopausal and postmenopausal women. PMID:26512337

  13. Sleep Disturbances in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Jayesh; Virdi, Sundeep; Winokur, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and play a critical role in the morbidity and mortality associated with the illness. Subjective and objective assessments of sleep in patients with schizophrenia have identified certain consistent findings. Findings related to the sleep structure abnormalities have shown correlations with important clinical aspects of the illness. Disruption of specific neurotransmitter systems and dysregulation of clock genes may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia-related sleep disturbances. Antipsychotic medications play an important role in the treatment of sleep disturbances in these patients and have an impact on their sleep structure. PMID:26600108

  14. [Sleep deprivation in somnambulism. Effect of arousal, deep sleep and sleep stage changes].

    PubMed

    Mayer, G; Neissner, V; Schwarzmayr, P; Meier-Ewert, K

    1998-06-01

    Diagnosis of parasomnias in the sleep laboratory is difficult since the nocturnal behavior reported by the patients often does not show up in the laboratory. To test the efficacy of sleep deprivation as a tool to provoke somnambulism we investigated ten patients (three women and seven men, mean age 27 +/- 3.4) with somnambulism. Their standard polysomnographies and videomonitored nocturnal behavior was compared to that of sex- and age-matched controls and to polysomnography and behavior after sleep deprivation. Patients with parasomnias and controls did not show significant differences in sleep parameters with the exception of longer arousal duration in controls, which was nonsignificant. In magnetic resonance tomography, patients with parasomnias did not reveal abnormality of the brain that might explain release of nocturnal behavior. Sleep deprivation led to significantly reduced number of arousals, reduced arousal index, significantly prolonged arousal duration and more stage shifts from all sleep stages (nonsignificant). Complex behavior during sleep increased under sleep deprivation, whereas sleepwalking did not increase. The majority of complex behavior during sleep is triggered by stage shifts and not by arousal in the sense of the arousal definition of the American Sleep Disorder Society. Complex behavior in sleep is stereotypical and nonviolent. Its complexity seems to depend on the duration and intensity of arousals. Sleep deprivation can be recommended as an efficacious method of increasing complex behavior in sleep, which is a preliminary stage of sleepwalking. Concerning the underlying pathology it seems to be important to register the quality and duration of stimuli that trigger arousals instead of focusing the number of arousals alone. PMID:9673973

  15. Response surface mapping of neurobehavioral performance: Testing the feasibility of split sleep schedules for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Rogers, Naomi L.; Dinges, David F.

    The demands of sustaining high levels of neurobehavioral performance during space operations necessitate precise scheduling of sleep opportunities in order to best preserve optimal performance. We report here the results of the first split sleep, dose-response experiment involving a range of sleep/wake scenarios with chronically reduced nocturnal sleep, augmented with a diurnal nap. To characterize performance over all combinations of split sleep in the range studied, we used response surface mapping methodology. Waking neurobehavioral performance was studied in N=90 subjects each assigned to one of 18 sleep regimens consisting of a restricted nocturnal anchor sleep period and a diurnal nap. Psychomotor vigilance task performance and subjective assessments of sleepiness were found to be primarily a function of total time in bed per 24 h regardless of how sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap periods. Digit symbol substitution task performance was also found to be primarily a function of total time in bed per 24 h; however, accounting for nocturnal sleep duration and nap duration separately provided a small but significant enhancement in the variance explained. The results suggest that reductions in total daily sleep result in a near-linear accumulation of impairment regardless of whether sleep is scheduled as a consolidated nocturnal sleep period or split into a nocturnal anchor sleep period and a diurnal nap. Thus, split sleep schedules are feasible and can be used to enhance the flexibility of sleep/work schedules for space operations involving restricted nocturnal sleep due to mission-critical task scheduling. These results are generally applicable to any continuous industrial operation that involves sleep restriction, night operations, and shift work.

  16. Sleep Disorders NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    National Center On Sleep Disorders Research NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH SLEEP DISORDERS RESEARCH to the risk of sleep and circadian disorders and disturbances, and their role in the development of sleep and circadian disorders, chronic sleep deficiency, and circadian disruption, and evaluate

  17. Sleep and protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity: impacts of sleep loss and stress

    PubMed Central

    Grønli, Janne; Soulé, Jonathan; Bramham, Clive R.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has been ascribed a critical role in cognitive functioning. Several lines of evidence implicate sleep in the consolidation of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. Stress disrupts sleep while impairing synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. Here, we discuss evidence linking sleep to mechanisms of protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity and synaptic scaling. We then consider how disruption of sleep by acute and chronic stress may impair these mechanisms and degrade sleep function. PMID:24478645

  18. Ambient Light Intensity, Actigraphy, Sleep and Respiration, Circadian Temperature and Melatonin Rhythms and Daytime Performance of Crew Members During Space Flight on STS-90 and STS-95 Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Dijk, D.-J.; Neri, D. F.; Hughes, R. J.; Ronda, J. M.; Wyatt, J. K.; West, J. B.; Prisk, G. K.; Elliott, A. R.; Young, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep disruption and associated waking sleepiness and fatigue are common during space flight. A survey of 58 crew members from nine space shuttle missions revealed that most suffered from sleep disruption, and reportedly slept an average of only 6.1 hours per day of flight as compared to an average of 7.9 hours per day on the ground. Nineteen percent of crewmembers on single shift missions and 50 percent of the crewmembers in dual shift operations reported sleeping pill usage (benzodiazepines) during their missions. Benzodiazepines are effective as hypnotics, however, not without adverse side effects including carryover sedation and performance impairment, anterograde amnesia, and alterations in sleep EEG. Our preliminary ground-based data suggest that pre-sleep administration of 0.3 mg of the pineal hormone melatonin may have the acute hypnotic properties needed for treating the sleep disruption of space flight without producing the adverse side effects associated with benzodiazepines. We hypothesize that pre-sleep administration of melatonin will result in decreased sleep latency, reduced nocturnal sleep disruption, improved sleep efficiency, and enhanced next-day alertness and cognitive performance both in ground-based simulations and during the space shuttle missions. Specifically, we have carried out experiments in which: (1) ambient light intensity aboard the space shuttle is assessed during flight; (2) the impact of space flight on sleep (assessed polysomnographically and actigraphically), respiration during sleep, circadian temperature and melatonin rhythms, waking neurobehavioral alertness and performance is assessed in crew members of the Neurolab and STS-95 missions; (3) the effectiveness of melatonin as a hypnotic is assessed independently of its effects on the phase of the endogenous circadian pacemaker in ground-based studies, using a powerful experimental model of the dyssomnia of space flight; (4) the effectiveness of melatonin as a hypnotic is assessed during the STS-90 (Neurolab) and STS-95 missions in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. In both flight-based experiments, the effects of melatonin on sleep stages and spectral composition of the EEG during sleep will be determined as well as its effects on daytime alertness and performance; (5) the impact of space flight on sleep and waking neurobehavioral alertness and performance in 30-45-year-old astronauts is compared with its impact in a 77-year-old astronaut. This case study is the first to assess the effects of space flight on an older individual. Because the investigators are still blind to the treatment in this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, preliminary results will be presented independent of the drug condition.

  19. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Sleep in Children.

    PubMed

    Herman, John H

    2015-06-01

    Basic assumptions about ADHD in children and sleep are not supported by research. It is unclear that children with hyperactivity or inattention have disrupted sleep. Parents of children with ADHD consistently report more bedtime resistance, but there is no objective evidence that sleep is subsequently disrupted. Treatment of ADHD with stimulants may disrupt sleep. Studies of comorbid sleep or psychiatric disorders consistently show that they disrupt sleep. Melatonin is an effective treatment of sleep problems in children with ADHD. Before any child is placed on stimulants, the pediatrician or other health care professional should insure that the child is obtaining adequate sleep. PMID:26055862

  20. The Relationship between Thermoregulation and REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, George; Bolitho, Samuel; Grunstein, Ronald; Naismith, Sharon Linda; Lewis, Simon John Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explored the relationship between symptoms of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, thermoregulation and sleep in Parkinson’s Disease. Methods The study group comprised 12 patients with Parkinson’s Disease and 11 healthy age-matched controls. We investigated markers of thermoregulation (core-body temperature profile), circadian rhythm (locomotor actigraphy) and sleep (polysomnography). Results The mesor (the mean value around which the core temperature rhythm oscillates) of the core-body temperature in patients with Parkinson’s Disease was significantly lower than that of controls. In addition, the nocturnal fall in CBT (the difference between the mesor and the nadir temperature) was also significantly reduced in PD patients relative to controls. Furthermore, in patients the reduction in the amplitude of their core-body temperature profile was strongly correlated with the severity of self-reported rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder symptom, reduction in the percentage of REM sleep and prolonged sleep latency. By contrast, these disturbances of thermoregulation and sleep architecture were not found in controls and were not related to other markers of circadian rhythm or times of sleep onset and offset. Conclusions These findings suggest that the brainstem pathology associated with disruption of thermoregulation in Parkinson’s disease may also contribute to rapid eye movement sleep behavioural disorder. It is possible that detailed analysis of the core-body temperature profile in at risk populations such as those patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder might help identify those who are at high risk of transitioning to Parkinson’s Disease. PMID:23991135

  1. Sleep Problems, Sleepiness and Daytime Behavior in Preschool-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Tang, Karen; Liu, Jingyi; Anders, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep problems are a common complaint of parents of preschool children. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders have even more disrupted sleep than typically developing children. Although disrupted nighttime sleep has been reported to affect daytime behavior, the pathway from sleep disruption to sleep problems, to impairments in…

  2. Sleep and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Norah; Dinges, David F

    2007-12-01

    Among adults in the United States, sleep durations appear to have decreased in recent years. Inadequate sleep and sleep deprivation cause numerous neurobehavioral and physiological changes. A number of recent studies have reported associations between disrupted sleep/sleep deprivation and inflammatory responses, although the physiological mechanisms underlying these relationships remain unclear. Alterations in sleep due to lifestyle factors, the aging process, and disease states have all been associated with increases in a range of inflammatory markers. Several of these inflammatory processes have been associated with reduced health status (e.g., C-reactive protein and cardiovascular disease). Thus, maintaining adequate sleep duration and quality through good sleep habits and treatment of sleep disorders may reduce inflammatory processes associated with aging and increase the wellness phenotype. PMID:18240557

  3. Behavioral Treatment for Nocturnal Enuresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; Jones, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is one of the most prevalent and distressing of all childhood problems. The treatment of nocturnal enuresis has shifted in the past few decades from a strictly psychopathological perspective to a biobehavioral perspective. Although the primary clinical features of this disorder are medical/organic, there is currently strong…

  4. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  5. Development of sleep patterns in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Laberge, L; Petit, D; Simard, C; Vitaro, F; Tremblay, R E; Montplaisir, J

    2001-03-01

    This study examines the developmental changes of sleep patterns as a function of gender and puberty and assesses the prevalence of sleep habits and sleep disturbances in early adolescence. It also investigates the relationship between sleep patterns, sleep habits and difficulty falling asleep and nocturnal awakenings. The present analyses are based on results available for 588 boys and 558 girls for whom mothers completed questions concerning demographics and sleep at annual intervals when their child was aged 10--13 years. The results indicated that nocturnal sleep times decreased, bedtimes were delayed and differences between weekend and school day sleep schedules progressively increased with age. Gender and puberty were both associated with the timing of sleep on weekends. Girls presented longer weekend time in bed (TIB) and later weekend wake time than boys. Similarly, subjects with higher pubertal status showed longer weekend TIB and later weekend wake time than subjects with lower pubertal status. Difficulty falling asleep was associated with later weekend wake time and with sleeping with a night light. In conclusion, the gender differences commonly reported in adolescents' sleep patterns are most likely explained by girls' higher pubertal status. This study emphasizes the link between puberty and a putative physiological need for more sleep, in presence of a general reduction of sleep times during adolescence. From age 10--13 years, the delay and lengthening of the sleep period on weekends in comparison to schooldays is associated with difficulty falling asleep. PMID:11285056

  6. Sleep benefits subsequent hippocampal functioning.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Altena, Ellemarije; Schoonheim, Menno M; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto J; Vis, José C; De Rijke, Wim; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2009-02-01

    Sleep before learning benefits memory encoding through unknown mechanisms. We found that even a mild sleep disruption that suppressed slow-wave activity and induced shallow sleep, but did not reduce total sleep time, was sufficient to affect subsequent successful encoding-related hippocampal activation and memory performance in healthy human subjects. Implicit learning was not affected. Our results suggest that the hippocampus is particularly sensitive to shallow, but intact, sleep. PMID:19151712

  7. Diurnal and nocturnal drooling in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalf, J G; Bloem, B R; Munneke, M

    2012-01-01

    Drooling as symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) has thus far been poorly defined. This uncertainty is reflected by high variations in published prevalence rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of saliva loss versus accumulation of saliva as a possible preliminary stage, and diurnal drooling versus nocturnal drooling. In addition, we evaluated the association between drooling severity and the severity of facial and oral motor disorders. We collected age, disease duration, UPDRS III and Hoehn & Yahr stage from 104 consecutive outpatients with PD. Diurnal and nocturnal drooling was evaluated with a validated questionnaire (ROMP-saliva). A speech pathologist, blinded for drooling severity, rated facial expression, involuntary mouth opening and difficulty with nose breathing and also interviewed patients about sleeping position and nose-breathing during the night. Thirty patients (29%) had no complaints with saliva control ('non-droolers'), 45 patients (43%) experienced accumulation of saliva or only nocturnal drooling ('pre-droolers'), and 29 (28%) had diurnal drooling (24 of which also drooled during the night; 'droolers'). The droolers had longer disease duration (10 vs. 7 years, p = 0.01) and drooling was independently associated with involuntary mouth opening (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.02-3.99) and swallowing complaints (OR = 1.2; 95% CI 1.03-1.31). Diurnal drooling-defined as dribbling of saliva while awake-is present in about 28% of PD patients. This is less than usually reported. Diurnal drooling typically appeared later in the disease course. The association with oral motor behavior should encourage the development of behavioral treatment approaches. PMID:21698387

  8. Assessment Of Noise-induced Sleep Fragility In Two Age Ranges By Means Of Polysomnographic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzano, M. G.; Parrino, L.; Spaggiari, M. C.; Buccino, G. P.; Fioriti, G.; Depoortere, H.

    1993-04-01

    The microstructure of sleep, which translates the short-lived fluctuations of the arousal level, is a commonly neglected feature in polysomnographic studies. Specifically arranged microstructural EEG events may provide important information on the dynamic characteristics of the sleep process. CAP (cyclic alternating pattern) and non-CAP are complementary modalities in which arousal-related "phasic" EEG phenomena are organized in non-REM sleep, and they correspond to opposite conditions of unstable and stable sleep depth, respectively. Thus, arousal instability can be measured by the CAP rate, the percentage ratio of total CAP time to total non-REM sleep time. The CAP rate, an age-related physiological variable that increases in several pathological conditions, is highly sensitive to acoustic perturbation. In the present study, two groups of healthy subjects without complaints about sleep, belonging to different age ranges (six young adults, three males and three females, between 20 and 30 years, and six middle-aged individuals, three males and three females, between 40 and 55 years) slept, after adaptation to the sleep laboratory, in a random sequence for two non-consecutive nights either under silent baseline (27·3 dB(A) Lcq) or noise-disturbed (continuous 55 dB(A) white noise) conditions. Age-related and noise-related effects on traditional sleep parameters and on the CAP rate were statistically evaluated by a split-plot test. Compared to young adults, the middle-aged individuals showed a significant reduction of total sleep time, stage 2 and REM sleep and significantly higher values of nocturnal awakenings and the CAP rate. The noisy nights were characterized by similar alterations. The disruptive effects of acoustic perturbation were greater on the more fragile sleep architecture of the older group. The increased fragility of sleep associated with aging probably reflects the decreased capacity of the sleeping brain to maintain steady states of vigilance. Total non-REM sleep described by traditional parameters was statistically unaffected during the disturbed nights, but the perturbing effects of noise on non-REM sleep stability and continuity were revealed by a significant increase in the CAP rate. The perspectives for a wide-ranging exploitation of this sleep parameter are discussed.

  9. Increased nocturnal interleukin-6 excretion in patients with primary insomnia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Ivonne; Richter, Linda; Klein, Torsten; Fiebich, Bernd; Feige, Bernd; Lieb, Klaus; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Riemann, Dieter

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there is a difference in evening/nocturnal interleukin-6 (IL-6) serum excretion in patients with primary insomnia compared to controls. We hypothesized that in insomniac patients, the excretion of evening/nocturnal IL-6 is enhanced, like observed in aged adults and after sleep deprivation in healthy subjects. We studied IL-6 serum concentrations in 11 patients (two males and nine females) with primary insomnia and 11 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Sleep was monitored polysomnographically for three consecutive nights. The measurement of IL-6 (from 19:00 h to 09:00 h) in 2-h intervals were performed prior to and during the last laboratory night. Polysomnographically determined sleep parameters and subjective ratings of sleep demonstrated clear-cut impairments of sleep in the insomniac group. Nocturnal IL-6 secretion was significantly increased (p<.05) in insomniac patients for the whole measurement period (mean area under the curve+/-SD: 27.94+/-14.15 pg/ml x 2h) compared to controls (16.70+/-7.64 pg/ml x 2h). Total IL-6 secretion correlated inversely with subjectively perceived sleep quality and amount of slow wave sleep in the insomniac patients. Amount of Wake Time correlated positively with IL-6 excretion in insomniacs. The results of the present study demonstrate significantly increased nocturnal IL-6 secretion in insomniacs. It might be speculated that chronic primary insomnia with polysomnographically documented sleep impairments activates the production of IL-6 analogous to sleep deprivation studies in healthy subjects. This might also implicate a higher risk for inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases in patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:16084689

  10. Sleep in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Weinhouse, Gerald L; Schwab, Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Critically ill patients are known to suffer from severely fragmented sleep with a predominance of stage I sleep and a paucity of slow wave and REM sleep. The causes of this sleep disruption include the intensive care unit (ICU) environment, medical illness, psychological stress, and many of the medications and other treatments used to help those who are critically ill. The clinical importance of this type of sleep disruption in critically ill patients, however, is not known. This article reviews the literature on sleep disruption in the ICU, the effects of sepsis on sleep, the effects of commonly used ICU medications on sleep, the relationship between sleep and sedation, and the literature on the biological and psychological consequences of sleep deprivation specifically as it relates to the critically ill. Finally, an integrative approach to improving sleep in the ICU is described. PMID:16774162

  11. Nocturnal Systemic Hypotension Increases the Risk of Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, Mary E.; de Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Link, Alissa; Wells, Martin T.; Harmon, Gregory; Peterson, Janey C.; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective, longitudinal study of patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) was to determine whether patients with nocturnal hypotension are at greater risk for visual field (VF) loss over 12 months than those without nocturnal hypotension. Design Prospective, longitudinal study. Participants Consecutive patients with NTG with at least 5 prior VF tests were screened for eligibility. Methods The baseline evaluation assessed demographic and clinical characteristics, covering systemic comorbid conditions, including systemic hypertension. All oral and ophthalmologic medications were recorded. A complete ophthalmological examination was performed at baseline and follow-up. Patients had their blood pressure (BP) monitored every 30 minutes for 48 hours with an ambulatory recording device at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was based on the global rates of VF progression by linear regression of the mean VF threshold sensitivity over time (decibels/year). Results Eighty-five patients with NTG (166 eyes; mean age, 65 years; 67% were women) were included. Of the 85 patients, 29% had progressed in the 5 VFs collected before study enrollment. The nocturnal mean arterial pressure (MAP) was compared with the daytime MAP. Multivariate analysis showed that the total time that sleep MAP was 10 mmHg below the daytime MAP was a significant predictor of subsequent VF progression (P<0.02). Conclusions Cumulative nocturnal hypotension predicted VF loss in this cohort. Our data suggest that the duration and magnitude of decrease in nocturnal blood pressure below the daytime MAP, especially pressures that are 10 mmHg lower than daytime MAP, predict progression of NTG. Low nocturnal blood pressure, whether occurring spontaneously or as a result of medications, may lead to worsening of VF defects. PMID:24869467

  12. The function of nocturnal transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfautsch, Sebastian; Resco de Dios, Víctor; Loik, Michael; Tissue, David

    2014-05-01

    Nocturnal transpiration is an important source of water loss, accounting for up to 25% of daytime transpiration in some species. Nocturnal water losses cannot be explained under the prevailing 'paradigm' of optimizing carbon gain while minimizing water loss because carbon fixation does not occur at night. Alternative explanations regarding the function and potential evolutionary advantage of nocturnal transpiration have been proposed, such as enhanced nutrient uptake and transport or delivery of O2 to parenchyma cells for respiration. However, recent evidence suggests that the role of nocturnal transpiration in supplementing the overall plant nutrient budget is relatively small, and the O2 hypothesis is difficult to test experimentally. Here, we propose that the main function of nocturnal transpiration (and water transport) is to prevent catastrophic xylem failure by restoring depleted stem 'capacitors' and enhancing early morning CO2 uptake, as stomata 'prepare' for daytime conditions. Nocturnal sap flux was highest in Eucalyptus grandis trees in the field following a heat wave (reaching 47C with VPDs > 8kPa in the daytime) generating maximal daytime water losses compared with cooler and lower VPD periods, indicating the importance of nocturnal stomatal conductance for stem refilling. Moreover, we observed that the time for stomata to respond to light early in the morning (dawn) across 25 different genotypes of E. camaldulensis in a glasshouse was shortest in those genotypes with highest nocturnal stomatal conductance, which was also correlated with higher daytime photosynthesis. This observation is consistent with previous observations that nocturnal stomatal conductance is partially controlled by the clock, which is utilised to anticipate daytime conditions. Data from the literature suggests that eucalypts respond similarly to other C3 species, suggesting that mechanisms regulating night-time transpiration may be universal.

  13. Effects of Night-Time Use of Rotigotine on Nocturnal Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vallderiola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Aparicio, Javier; Tarradellas, Jaume; Salazar, Gabriel; Oliver, Josep María; Callén, Antonio; Delgado, Tania; Nobbe, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This open-label study assessed the efficacy and safety of exclusive night-time administration of transdermal rotigotine in patients with nocturnal and early morning PD symptoms. Methods. Patients with PD and nocturnal and early morning symptoms received transdermal rotigotine patches (2–16?mg/24?h) applied in the evening and removed in the morning for 3 months. Sleep disturbance was assessed with modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2). Other outcomes included a pain visual analogue scale (VAS) and short-form Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) for quality of life. Results. 74 patients completed treatment in this study. At the end of treatment, PDSS-2 total score had improved by mean 10.9 points from baseline (p < 0.001). All three PDSS-2 domain scores (sleep disturbances, nocturnal motor symptoms, and nocturnal symptoms) were also significantly improved by 41%, 56%, and 48%, respectively (p < 0.001). VAS-pain score decreased from 3.2 to 2.3 (p < 0.001). PDQ-8 score decreased from 23.8 to 18.1 (p < 0.001). The most frequently reported adverse events included nausea (9%), anxiety (4%), and dizziness (4%). Conclusions. Night-time administration of transdermal rotigotine is an effective and well tolerated treatment for nocturnal symptoms in patients with PD. PMID:26576319

  14. Respiratory disorders during sleep in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Oreste; Salvaggio, Adriana; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Patients with COPD may show slow, progressive deteriorations in arterial blood gases during the night, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This is mainly due to hypoventilation, while a deterioration of ventilation/perfusion mismatch plays a minor role. The severity of gas exchanges alterations is proportional to the degree of impairment of diurnal pulmonary function tests, particularly of partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) in arterial blood, but correlations between diurnal and nocturnal blood gas levels are rather loose. Subjects with diurnal PaO2 of 60–70 mmHg are distinguished in “desaturators” and “nondesaturators” according to nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation behavior. The role of nocturnal hypoxemia as a determinant of alterations in sleep structure observed in COPD is dubious. Effects of the “desaturator” condition on pulmonary hemodynamics, evolution of diurnal blood gases, and life expectancy are also controversial. Conversely, it is generally accepted that occurrence of sleep apneas in COPD is associated with a worse evolution of the disease. Nocturnal polysomnographic monitoring in COPD is usually performed when coexistence of sleep apnea (“overlap syndrome”) is suspected, while in most other cases nocturnal oximetry may be enough. Nocturnal oxygen attenuates sleep desaturations among stable patients, without increases in PaCO2 of clinical concern. Nocturnal treatment with positive pressure ventilators may give benefit to some stable hypercapnic subjects and patients with the overlap syndrome. PMID:18044093

  15. CPAP Treats Muscle Cramps in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Andrew J.; Spector, Andrew R.; Auerbach, Sanford H.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case series of 4 patients with varying degrees of obstructive sleep apnea who incidentally had a history of nocturnal leg cramps. None of the patients had periodic limb movements during the study and denied symptoms consistent with restless legs syndrome. In 3 of the 4 patients, nocturnal leg cramps resolved with CPAP treatment for OSA, while the fourth patient noted near-resolution of cramping after starting CPAP. In patients presenting with muscle cramps, obstructive sleep apnea should be considered. Citation: Westwood AJ, Spector AR, Auerbach SH. CPAP treats muscle cramps in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(6):691-692. PMID:24932152

  16. Nocturnal Orgasm in College Women: Its Relation to Dreams and Anxiety Associated with Sexual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henton, Comradge L.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 774 female undergraduates were administered a structured questionnaire and an anxiety scale. It was found that women do experience nocturnal orgasms during sleep. Differences were found according to year at school as well as a positive correlation between level of anxiety and sexual excitement. (MS)

  17. Nocturnal hypoxemia, night-day arterial pressure changes and left ventricular geometry in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, C; Benedetto, F A; Tripepi, G; Cambareri, F; Panuccio, V; Candela, V; Mallamaci, F; Enia, G; Labate, C; Tassone, F

    1998-04-01

    It is well established that nocturnal hypoxemia in sleep apnea causes an inversion of the circadian arterial pressure rhythm and triggers nocturnal hypertension. Since sleep apnea is very frequent in dialysis patients, we hypothesized that nocturnal hypoxemia may be a factor that contributes to alter the 24-hour arterial pressure profile in these patients. To test the hypothesis 32 dialysis patients underwent 24-hour blood pressure (BP) monitoring and continuous monitoring of arterial O2 saturation during the night-time. Hemodialysis patients were studied during the non-dialysis day. All patients underwent an echocardiographic study. Thirteen patients had no episode of nocturnal hypoxemia (group I), 7 had at least one episode overnight but less than 2 episodes/hr (group II) and 12 had > or = 2 episodes/hr (group III). The average daytime systolic pressure was similar in the three groups. However, the average nocturnal systolic pressure fell in the first group (-2.5 +/- 4.2%) and rose in the second (+2.0 +/- 3.6%) and in the third (+3.9 +/- 2.2%) group (one way ANOVA, P < 0.005). The relative wall thickness of the left ventricle (RWT) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in group III than in group I, and in the aggregate (N = 32) there was an inverse relationship between average nocturnal SaO2 and RWT (r = -0.43, P = 0.015). The proportion of patients with concentric remodeling or concentric hypertrophy was higher (P = 0.05) in the group with a more severe degree of nocturnal hypoxemia (group III, 8 of 12) than in the other two groups (group I, 3 of 13; group II, 2 of 7). Nocturnal hypoxemia is associated with the "non-dipping" arterial pressure profile in dialysis patients. Disturbed respiratory control during the night may represent an important cardiovascular risk factor in dialysis patients. PMID:9551420

  18. Sleep and sleep disorders in Don Quixote.

    PubMed

    Iranzo, Alex; Santamaria, Joan; de Riquer, Martín

    2004-01-01

    In Don Quijote de la Mancha, Miguel de Cervantes presents Don Quixote as an amazing character of the 17th century who suffers from delusions and illusions, believing himself to be a medieval knight errant. Besides this neuropsychiatric condition, Cervantes included masterful descriptions of several sleep disorders such as insomnia, sleep deprivation, disruptive loud snoring and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In addition, he described the occurrence of physiological, vivid dreams and habitual, post-prandial sleepiness--the siesta. Cervantes' concept of sleep as a passive state where all cerebral activities are almost absent is in conflict with his description of abnormal behaviours during sleep and vivid, fantastic dreams. His concept of sleep was shared by his contemporary, Shakespeare, and could have been influenced by the reading of the classical Spanish book of psychiatry Examen de Ingenios (1575). PMID:14725836

  19. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare bone marrow failure disorder that manifests with hemolytic anemia, thrombosis, and peripheral blood cytopenias. The absence of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, CD55 and CD59, leads to uncontrolled complement activation that accounts for hemolysis and other PNH manifestations. GPI anchor protein deficiency is almost always due to somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA), a gene involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis; however, alternative mutations that cause PNH have recently been discovered. In addition, hypomorphic germ-line PIGA mutations that do not cause PNH have been shown to be responsible for a condition known as multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 2. Eculizumab, a first-in-class monoclonal antibody that inhibits terminal complement, is the treatment of choice for patients with severe manifestations of PNH. Bone marrow transplantation remains the only cure for PNH but should be reserved for patients with suboptimal response to eculizumab. PMID:25237200

  20. Does Sleep Improve Memory Organization?

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Masashi; Furuta, Hisakazu; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Suzuki, Michio; Ochiai, Yoko; Hosokawa, Munehito; Matsui, Mie; Kurachi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Sleep can integrate information into existing memory networks, look for common patterns and distil overarching rules, or simply stabilize and strengthen the memory exactly as it was learned. Recent research has shown that sleep facilitates abstraction of gist information as well as integration across multiple memories, insight into hidden solutions, and even the ability to make creative connections between distantly related ideas and concepts. To investigate the effect of sleep on memory organization, 35 normal volunteers were randomly assigned either to the sleep (n?=?17) or wake group (n?=?18). The sleep subjects performed the Japanese Verbal Learning Test (JVLT), a measure of learning and memory, three times in the evening, and slept. On the following morning (9?h later), they were asked to recall the words on the list. The wake subjects took the same test in the morning, and were asked to recall the words in the same time interval as in the sleep group. The semantic clustering ratio (SCR), divided by the total number of words recalled, was used as an index of memory organization. Our main interest was whether the sleep subjects elicit a greater increase in this measure from the third to the fourth assessments. Time?×?Group interaction effect on SCR was not significant between the sleep group and wake group as a whole. Meanwhile, the change in the SCR between the third and fourth trials was negatively correlated with duration of nocturnal waking in the sleep group, but not other sleep indices. Based on this observation, further analysis was conducted for subjects in the sleep group who awoke nocturnally for <60?min for comparison with the wake group. A significant Time?×?Group interaction was noted; these “good-sleepers” showed a significantly greater improvement in the memory index compared with the wake subjects. These results provide the first suggestion that sleep may enhance memory organization, which requires further study. PMID:24782726

  1. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Associations between Sleep, Napping, Fatigue and the Cortisol Diurnal Rhythm in Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tell, Dina; Mathews, Herbert L.; Janusek, Linda Witek

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine whether day-to-day variations in sleep behaviors, ongoing sleep disturbance and fatigue predict the cortisol diurnal rhythm in women recently diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. Methods Women (N=130, age=55. 6±9.4 years) collected saliva 5×/day/2 days for cortisol. Diaries were used to assess prior-day nap duration, nocturnal awakenings, sleep latency, and morning restfulness. Ongoing fatigue and sleep disturbance were measured using the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Inventory. Data were analyzed using multilevel growth curve modeling. Results Greater ongoing fatigue (b=0.035, p = .032), or sleep disturbance (b=0.026, p = .006) predicted a slower cortisol decline. Greater ongoing fatigue also predicted higher awakening cortisol (b=0.154, p = .030) and lower cortisol awakening response (CAR) (b=?0.146, p = .005). Longer prior-day naps predicted higher CAR (b=0.042, p=.050), and a steeper cortisol decline (b=?0.035, p = .003). Longer sleep latency predicted both a greater cortisol linear decline (b=?0.013, p < .001), and a greater quadratic slope curvature (b=0.0007, p < .001). Feeling less rested in the morning predicted lower awakening cortisol (b=?0.187, p= .004), higher CAR (b=0.124, p=.016) and a slower cortisol decline (b=0.023, p=.042). CONCLUSIONS Both daily variations in sleep behaviors and ongoing sleep disturbance and fatigue associated with a disrupted cortisol rhythm. In contrast, prior-day napping associated with a more robust cortisol rhythm. These findings are particularly relevant to women with breast cancer who often experience sleep disturbance and fatigue. Additional research is needed to determine causal pathways between sleep disturbance and dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with breast cancer. PMID:25186656

  2. Usefulness of a Nocturnal SOREMP for Diagnosing Narcolepsy with Cataplexy in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Joel; Katz, Eliot; Scammell, Thomas E.; Maski, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of a nocturnal sleep onset rapid eye movement sleep period (nSOREMP) for the identification of narcolepsy with cataplexy (N+C) among children and adolescents referred to the sleep laboratory for an overnight polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Design: Retrospective chart review of sleep clinic notes and PSG and MSLT reports. Setting: Boston Children's Hospital sleep laboratory and outpatient clinics. Patients: All patients 6–18 y old, referred for consecutive PSG and MSLT for the evaluation of central hypersomnias, between January 2005 and January 2014. Measurements and Results: We analyzed the records of 148 patients and established diagnostic categories using the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd Edition. Patient diagnoses included narcolepsy with cataplexy (28.4%), narcolepsy without cataplexy (8.1%), other hypersomnia conditions (9.5%), delayed sleep phase syndrome (12.2%), behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome (4.1%), other sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, periodic limb movements of sleep; 6.8%), isolated cataplexy (2%), and various diagnoses (29.1%). There were 54.8% of the N+C patients who had an nSOREMP, but only 2.4% of all other patients had an nSOREMP. The specificity of an nSOREMP for detection of N+C was high at 97.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 92.2–99.4%), but the sensitivity was moderate at 54.8% (95% CI: 38.7–70.2%). Overall, the positive predictive value of an nSOREMP for the diagnosis of N+C was 88.5% (95% CI: 69.8–97.4%). Conclusions: In children, the presence of an nocturnal sleep onset rapid eye movement sleep period is highly suggestive of narcolepsy with cataplexy and provides further evidence of rapid eye movement sleep dysregulation in this condition. Citation: Reiter J, Katz E, Scammell TE, Maski K. Usefulness of a nocturnal SOREMP for diagnosing narcolepsy with cataplexy in a pediatric population. SLEEP 2015;38(6):859–865. PMID:25325489

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  4. Sleep Studies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Studies? Sleep studies are tests that measure how well you sleep ... sleep disorder and how severe it is. Sleep studies are important because untreated sleep disorders can raise ...

  5. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is sleep apnea? Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder. People who have sleep apnea stop breathing for ... doctor may ask you to go to a sleep disorder center for a sleep study. Tests done at ...

  6. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is Sleep Apnea? Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder characterized by brief interruptions of breathing during sleep. ... better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea. NIH Patient Recruitment for ...

  7. Doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer is driven by light at night-induced disruption of the circadian melatonin signal.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shulin; Dauchy, Robert T; Hauch, Adam; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Wren, Melissa A; Belancio, Victoria P; Mondal, Debasis; Frasch, Tripp; Blask, David E; Hill, Steven M

    2015-08-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance, particularly to doxorubicin (Dox), represents a major impediment to successfully treating breast cancer and is linked to elevated tumor metabolism and tumor over-expression and/or activation of various families of receptor- and non-receptor-associated tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian time structure and suppression of nocturnal melatonin production by dim light exposure at night (dLEN), as occurs with shift work, and/or disturbed sleep-wake cycles, is associated with a significantly increased risk of an array of diseases, including breast cancer. Melatonin inhibits human breast cancer growth via mechanisms that include the suppression of tumor metabolism and inhibition of expression or phospho-activation of the receptor kinases AKT and ERK1/2 and various other kinases and transcription factors. We demonstrate in tissue-isolated estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER?+) MCF-7 human breast cancer xenografts, grown in nude rats maintained on a light/dark cycle of LD 12:12 in which dLEN is present during the dark phase (suppressed endogenous nocturnal melatonin), a significant shortening of tumor latency-to-onset, increased tumor metabolism and growth, and complete intrinsic resistance to Dox therapy. Conversely, a LD 12:12 dLEN environment incorporating nocturnal melatonin replacement resulted in significantly lengthened tumor latency-to-onset, tumor regression, suppression of nighttime tumor metabolism, and kinase and transcription factor phosphorylation, while Dox sensitivity was completely restored. Melatonin acts as both a tumor metabolic inhibitor and circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to Dox and drive tumor regression, indicating that dLEN-induced circadian disruption of nocturnal melatonin production contributes to a complete loss of tumor sensitivity to Dox chemotherapy. PMID:25857269

  8. Experimental Pain and Opioid Analgesia in Volunteers at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Doufas, Anthony G.; Tian, Lu; Padrez, Kevin A.; Suwanprathes, Puntarica; Cardell, James A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Panousis, Periklis

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. Methods After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml), an ?-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. Results Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA) were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO2, P?=?0.0440; IGFBP-1, P?=?0.0013). Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1?, P?=?0.0218; TNF-?, P?=?0.0276). Conclusions Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1) was associated with hypoalgesia and increased potency to opioid analgesia; other pro-inflammatory mediators also predicted an enhanced opioid potency. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00672737. PMID:23382975

  9. Multi-Modal Treatment of Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Caroline; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The article reports a multimodal treatment of nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior in a mildly mentally retarded woman. Behavioral treatment and removal of caffeine from the subject's diet eliminated both nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior. (Author/DB)

  10. Comparison of Subjective and Objective Assessments of Sleep in Healthy Older Subjects Without Sleep Complaints

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Deirdre; Silva, Edward J.; Munch, Mirjam; Ronda, Joseph M.; Wang, Wei; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Older adults have reduced sleep quality compared to younger adults when sleeping at habitual times, and greater sleep disruption when their sleep is at adverse times. The purpose of this analysis was to investigate how subjective measures of sleep relate to objectively-recorded sleep in older subjects scheduled to sleep at all times of day. We analyzed data from 24 healthy older (55–74 years) subjects who took part in a 32-day inpatient study where polysomnography (PSG) was recorded each night and subjective sleep was assessed after each scheduled wake time. The study included baseline nights and a forced desynchrony (FD) protocol when the subjects lived on a 20-hr rest-activity schedule. Our post-sleep questionnaire both included quantitative and qualitative questions about the prior sleep. Under baseline and FD conditions, objective and subjective sleep latency were correlated, subjective sleep duration was related to slow wave sleep and wake after sleep onset, subjective sleep quality was related to Stage 1 and 2 sleep, and sleepiness and refreshment at wake time were related to duration of premature awakening. During FD, most measures of objective and subjective sleep varied with circadian phase, and many additional correlations between objective and subjective sleep were present. Our findings show that when sleeping at habitual times, these healthy older subjects did not perceive their generally poor sleep quality, but under FD conditions where sleep quality changed from day-to-day their subjective sleep ratings were more associated with their objective sleep. PMID:19645969

  11. Sleep and respiration in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    Sleep studies conducted during the STS-90 Neurolab mission are explored. The relationship between sleep, melatonin, and circadian phase is reviewed. The study contained both sleep and awake components. The objectives of the sleep component were to test five hypotheses: that circadian rhythms of core body temperature and urinary melatonin are synchronized to required sleep-wake schedules, that spaceflight results in substantial disruption of sleep, that the pattern of chest and abdominal wall motion alters during the different sleep stages in microgravity, that arterial oxygen saturation is reduced during some stages of sleep in microgravity, and that pre-sleep administration of melatonin during microgravity results in improved sleep quality. The awake component tested three hypotheses: that ventilatory response to carbon dioxide is increased during exposure to microgravity and that this exacerbates sleep disruption, that ventilatory response to hypoxia is increased by exposure to microgravity, and that the improved sleep resulting from the pre-sleep administration of melatonin enhances next day cognition when compared to placebo.

  12. Midlife Decline in Declarative Memory Consolidation Is Correlated with a Decline in Slow Wave Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backhaus, Jutta; Born, Jan; Hoeckesfeld, Ralf; Fokuhl, Sylvia; Hohagen, Fritz; Junghanns, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Sleep architecture as well as memory function are strongly age dependent. Slow wave sleep (SWS), in particular, decreases dramatically with increasing age, starting already beyond the age of 30. SWS normally predominates during early nocturnal sleep and is implicated in declarative memory consolidation. However, the consequences of changes in…

  13. Sleep Related Breathing Disorders in Adults with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resta, Onofrio; Barbaro, Maria Pia Foschino; Giliberti, Tiziana; Caratozzolo, Gennaro; Cagnazzo, Maria Grazia; Scarpelli, Franco; Nocerino, Maria Cristina

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated sleep-related breathing disorders in six adults with Down syndrome. Five were found to have respiratory events justifying the diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome. Results suggest that the nocturnal respiratory pattern of adults with Down syndrome depends on several pathogenetic factors such as age, severity of upper airway…

  14. Sleep Disruption and Daytime Sleepiness Correlating with Disease Severity and Insulin Resistance in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Comparison with Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Bernsmeier, Christine; Weisskopf, Diego M.; Pflueger, Marlon O.; Mosimann, Jan; Campana, Benedetta; Terracciano, Luigi; Beglinger, Christoph; Heim, Markus H.; Cajochen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sleep disturbance is associated with the development of obesity, diabetes and hepatic steatosis in murine models. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation oscillates in a circadian rhythm regulated by clock genes, light-dark cycle and feeding time in mice. The role of the sleep-wake cycle in the pathogenesis of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is indeterminate. We sought to detail sleep characteristics, daytime sleepiness and meal times in relation to disease severity in patients with NAFLD. Methods Basic Sleep duration and latency, daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale), Pittsburgh sleep quality index, positive and negative affect scale, Munich Chronotype Questionnaire and an eating habit questionnaire were assessed in 46 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 22 healthy controls, and correlated with biochemical and histological parameters. Results In NAFLD compared to healthy controls, time to fall asleep was vastly prolonged (26.9 vs. 9.8 min., p = 0.0176) and sleep duration was shortened (6.3 vs. 7.2 hours, p = 0.0149). Sleep quality was poor (Pittsburgh sleep quality index 8.2 vs. 4.7, p = 0.0074) and correlated with changes in affect. Meal frequency was shifted towards night-times (p = 0.001). In NAFLD but not controls, daytime sleepiness significantly correlated with liver enzymes (ALAT [r = 0.44, p = 0.0029], ASAT [r = 0.46, p = 0.0017]) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR [r = 0.5, p = 0.0009]) independent of cirrhosis. In patients with fibrosis, daytime sleepiness correlated with the degree of fibrosis (r = 0.364, p = 0.019). Conclusions In NAFLD sleep duration was shortened, sleep onset was delayed and sleep quality poor. Food-intake was shifted towards the night. Daytime sleepiness was positively linked to biochemical and histologic surrogates of disease severity. The data may indicate a role for sleep-wake cycle regulation and timing of food-intake in the pathogenesis of human NAFLD as suggested from murine models. PMID:26576055

  15. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Sarah; Byerley, Sydney D; Coy, Jeanee R.; Aziz, Aisyah; Wolf, Jamie A.; Gnerlich, Amanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences. PMID:26339552

  16. Trichotillomania and Non-Epileptic Seizures as Sleep-Related Dissociative Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Franco, Melina; Bush-Martínez, Alejandra; Nenclares-Portocarrero, Alejandro; Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of non-epileptic seizures (NES) and trichotillomania during sleep is rare. We describe the case of an adult woman with a personal history of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric morbidity (major depression, trichotillomania, and conversion disorder), who was referred to the sleep unit because of nocturnal hair-pulling and psychomotor agitation during sleep. An all-night PSG recording with audiovisual monitoring documented seven episodes of trichotillomania and one NES, all of which arose from unequivocal wakefulness. Improvement of nocturnal behaviors was observed after long-term psychotherapy. This case illustrates that nocturnal trichotillomania and NES may be symptoms of a sleep-related dissociative disorder. Citation: Angulo-Franco M, Bush-Martínez A, Nenclares-Portocarrero A, Jiménez-Genchi A. Trichotillomania and non-epileptic seizures as sleep-related dissociative phenomena. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):271–273. PMID:25515284

  17. Sleep and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Benefits Side Effects Variations Tips Healthy Sleep Habits Sleep Disorders by Category Insomnias Insomnia Child Insomnia Short Sleeper ... Work SIDS Sleep apnea Sleep Debt Sleep Deprivation Sleep Disorders Sleep history Sleep hygiene sleep length Sleep Need ...

  18. [Sleep disorders in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kotterba, S

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorders can be diagnosed in approximately 15?% of the population and have been shown to increase with age. The relationship between sleep disorders and neurological disorders, however, is still insufficiently considered in the clinical practice. Sleep disorders can be an early symptom of the disease, such as the presence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) as an early indicator of neurodegeneration. Sleep disorders have also been shown to be a main symptom of various neurological syndromes, such as in restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and narcolepsy. The international classification of sleep disorders 2nd edition (ICSD 2) describes the main diagnoses, insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, sleep-related breathing disorders and hypersomnia but all of these can also appear as symptoms in various neurological diseases. Parasomnias are largely considered a differential diagnosis to nocturnal epilepsy. In this review, the main sleep disorders are described with a particular focus on how they relate to neurological diseases; in particular, how they influence disease-related symptoms and how they affect the course of the disease. PMID:26062945

  19. Residential cooling by nocturnal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.L.

    1983-05-01

    Data were collected from an adobe building in Tucson with a metal roof to evaluate residential cooling by nocturnal radiation. Experimental results were correlated by an equation similar to that used to describe solar collector performance, relating the heat rejection rate (-q/sub u/), to the net radiation term (R), the inlet fluid (t/sub fl/) and ambient air temperature (t/sub a/), using a plate efficiency factor (F/sub R/) and heat loss coefficient (U/sub L/). Cooling by nocturnal radiation alone was found to be inadequate during peak summer cooling periods. The results were extrapolated to the case of evaporative cooling using a wetted roof; heat rejection from the wet roof appears adequate for residental cooling in a hot, arid climate.

  20. Circadian Desynchrony Promotes Metabolic Disruption in a Mouse Model of Shiftwork

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Johanna L.; Husse, Jana; Bode, Brid; Naujokat, Nadine; Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Schmid, Sebastian M.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Oster, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Shiftwork is associated with adverse metabolic pathophysiology, and the rising incidence of shiftwork in modern societies is thought to contribute to the worldwide increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but may involve direct physiological effects of nocturnal light exposure, or indirect consequences of perturbed endogenous circadian clocks. This study employs a two-week paradigm in mice to model the early molecular and physiological effects of shiftwork. Two weeks of timed sleep restriction has moderate effects on diurnal activity patterns, feeding behavior, and clock gene regulation in the circadian pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In contrast, microarray analyses reveal global disruption of diurnal liver transcriptome rhythms, enriched for pathways involved in glucose and lipid metabolism and correlating with first indications of altered metabolism. Although altered food timing itself is not sufficient to provoke these effects, stabilizing peripheral clocks by timed food access can restore molecular rhythms and metabolic function under sleep restriction conditions. This study suggests that peripheral circadian desynchrony marks an early event in the metabolic disruption associated with chronic shiftwork. Thus, strengthening the peripheral circadian system by minimizing food intake during night shifts may counteract the adverse physiological consequences frequently observed in human shift workers. PMID:22629359

  1. Sustained Sleep Fragmentation Induces Sleep Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Maxime O.; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Petit, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is an integral feature of sleep apnea and other prevalent sleep disorders. Although the effect of repetitive arousals on cognitive performance is well documented, the effects of long-term SF on electroencephalography (EEG) and molecular markers of sleep homeostasis remain poorly investigated. To address this question, we developed a mouse model of chronic SF and characterized its effect on EEG spectral frequencies and the expression of genes previously linked to sleep homeostasis including clock genes, heat shock proteins, and plasticity-related genes. Design: N/A. Setting: Animal sleep research laboratory. Participants : Sixty-six C57BL6/J adult mice. Interventions: Instrumental sleep disruption at a rate of 60/h during 14 days Measurements and Results: Locomotor activity and EEG were recorded during 14 days of SF followed by recovery for 2 days. Despite a dramatic number of arousals and decreased sleep bout duration, SF minimally reduced total quantity of sleep and did not significantly alter its circadian distribution. Spectral analysis during SF revealed a homeostatic drive for slow wave activity (SWA; 1–4 Hz) and other frequencies as well (4–40 Hz). Recordings during recovery revealed slow wave sleep consolidation and a transient rebound in SWA, and paradoxical sleep duration. The expression of selected genes was not induced following chronic SF. Conclusions: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increased sleep pressure confirming that altered quality with preserved quantity triggers core sleep homeostasis mechanisms. However, it did not induce the expression of genes induced by sleep loss, suggesting that these molecular pathways are not sustainably activated in chronic diseases involving SF. Citation: Baud MO, Magistretti PJ, Petit JM. Sustained sleep fragmentation induces sleep homeostasis in mice. SLEEP 2015;38(4):567–579. PMID:25325477

  2. Tuned in Parenting and Infant Sleep Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priddis, Lynn E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on infant sleep behaviour that is of concern to mothers of young infants, and disruptive to families. It reports on the incidence of sleep problems in dyads that self-referred to a specialist clinic, and the relationship between the mother's sensitive responsiveness and infant sleep patterns in a sample of 65 Australian infants.…

  3. Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Anxious Traits.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Schubert, Jessica R; Nota, Jacob A

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety is adaptive and plays an important role in keeping us safe. However, when anxiety becomes too extreme, it can cause significant disruptions and distress. Understanding the mechanisms underlying excessive anxiety and how to best treat it is a priority for researchers and clinicians. There is increasing recognition that disruptions in the amount and timing of sleep are associated with anxiety symptoms and characteristics. In the current paper, we explore the intersections between sleep, circadian rhythms, and anxiety. First, we review accumulating evidence that anxiety is associated with disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both clinical and nonclinical samples and across ages. Next, we discuss the data linking sleep disruptions with anxiety-related traits (anxiety sensitivity, neuroticism, and perfectionism) and patterns of cognition and emotion. Finally, potential treatment implications are highlighted. Overall, these data suggest that delineating the role of disruptions in the amount and timing of sleep holds promise for improving the lives of individuals with heightened anxiety. PMID:26216591

  4. Sporadic nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy: A consecutive series of 8 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shih-Bin; Schenck, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To present findings on a series of cases of sporadic nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE), a form of NFLE that is infrequently reported, in contrast to familial (autosomal dominant) NFLE. Both forms of NFLE need to be distinguished from parasomnias, nocturnal temporal lobe epilepsy, and other nocturnal disorders. Methods Eight consecutive cases of sporadic NFLE were evaluated at a sleep clinic in Taiwan. All patients had clinical evaluations, daytime waking and sleeping EEGs, brain MRIs, and overnight video-polysomnography (vPSG) with seizure montage. Results Gender was equal (four males, four females); mean age was 18.4 yrs (range, 7–41 yrs). Age of NFLE onset was by puberty. Premorbid history was negative for any neurologic, medical or psychiatric disorder. NFLE subtypes: nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia, n=6; paroxysmal arousals, n=2. MRI brain scan abnormalities with clinical correlates were found in one patient. Daytime awake EEGs were negative for ictal/interictal activity in all patients, but two patients had daytime sleep EEGs with interictal epileptiform EEG activity. During vPSG studies, three of eight patients with NFLE seizure events had concurrent epileptiform EEG activity, and two patients had interictal epileptiform EEG activity during their vPSG studies. No case had a spontaneous remission. Anticonvulsant therapy was highly effective in all eight cases (>75% reduction in seizure frequency). Discussion These cases confirm that sporadic NFLE closely resembles familial NFLE, and comprises a set of distinct clinical manifestations, with variable intensity, and variable scalp EEG epileptiform abnormalities across sleep and wakefulness, which have previously been identified in Caucasian patients from Europe and North America. PMID:26483923

  5. Dopamine D2 receptor as a cellular component controlling nocturnal hyperactivities in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyunghee; Kikuno, Keiko; Bahn, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Kyeong-Man; Park, Jae H

    2013-05-01

    Dysfunctional regulation of brain dopamine (DA) functions has been found in patients with drug addiction and various neurological disorders that frequently accompany disturbance in sleep behavior. In this study, the roles of the dopaminergic nervous system on the regulation of daily locomotor activity rhythm were investigated in Drosophila melanogaster. Reduced synaptic DA release by expressing tetanus toxin gradually attenuated peak activity levels by altering activity patterns, particularly under constant darkness. Besides, flies with a mutant dopamine transporter fumin (fmn), in which the synaptic DA levels were elevated, displayed increased activities in both daytime and nighttime, but did more so at nighttime, suggesting that DA function is involved in regulation of fruit fly's nocturnal locomotor activities. Furthermore, flies treated with bromocriptine, an agonist of Drosophila dopamine D2 receptor (dD2R), exhibited nocturnal locomotor hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was inhibited in dD2R knockdown flies. When mutant flies null for period (per), timeless (tim), dClock (dClk), or cycle (cyc) were treated with bromocriptine, only cycle-null flies (cyc(01)) did not show induced nocturnal hyperactivities, suggesting that cyc might play a role in bromocriptine-induced nocturnal hyperactivities. Elevation of experimental temperature also increased nocturnal activities at the expense of daytime activities. The heat-induced increase in nocturnal activities gradually returned to basal levels at continuously elevated temperature. Inhibition of DA synthesis did not suppress heat-induced early development of nocturnal hyperactivity but prevented gradual decrement of initially elevated nocturnal activities, suggesting that DA impinges on certain adaptive roles in response to changes in environmental temperature. These results overall suggest that controlling dopaminergic transmission is important for daily locomotor behavior and bromocriptine-induced nocturnal hyperactivity which is mediated through dD2R receptor and CYC functions. In parallel to these results, excessive activation of dopaminergic neurotransmission, the primary cause of schizophrenia, is associated with abnormally elevated nocturnal locomotor activities through D2-type receptor in Drosophila. The results suggest that fruit flies are an excellent model system to provide some answers to previously unexplainable observations regarding the compromised dopaminergic nervous system and the related therapeutic agents. PMID:23286280

  6. Sleep Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard ... problems called parasomnias. There are treatments for most sleep disorders. Sometimes just having regular sleep habits can help.

  7. Stress, arousal, and sleep.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Larry D; Suchecki, Deborah; Meerlo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Stress is considered to be an important cause of disrupted sleep and insomnia. However, controlled and experimental studies in rodents indicate that effects of stress on sleep-wake regulation are complex and may strongly depend on the nature of the stressor. While most stressors are associated with at least a brief period of arousal and wakefulness, the subsequent amount and architecture of recovery sleep can vary dramatically across conditions even though classical markers of acute stress such as corticosterone are virtually the same. Sleep after stress appears to be highly influenced by situational variables including whether the stressor was controllable and/or predictable, whether the individual had the possibility to learn and adapt, and by the relative resilience and vulnerability of the individual experiencing stress. There are multiple brain regions and neurochemical systems linking stress and sleep, and the specific balance and interactions between these systems may ultimately determine the alterations in sleep-wake architecture. Factors that appear to play an important role in stress-induced wakefulness and sleep changes include various monominergic neurotransmitters, hypocretins, corticotropin releasing factor, and prolactin. In addition to the brain regions directly involved in stress responses such as the hypothalamus, the locus coeruleus, and the amygdala, differential effects of stressor controllability on behavior and sleep may be mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex. These various brain regions interact and influence each other and in turn affect the activity of sleep-wake controlling centers in the brain. Also, these regions likely play significant roles in memory processes and participate in the way stressful memories may affect arousal and sleep. Finally, stress-induced changes in sleep-architecture may affect sleep-related neuronal plasticity processes and thereby contribute to cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24852799

  8. CONTROL OF SLEEP AND WAKEFULNESS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Basheer, Radhika; McKenna, James T.; Strecker, Robert E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, resulting in large-amplitude, slow EEG oscillations. Local, activity-dependent factors modulate the amplitude and frequency of cortical slow oscillations. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep results in conservation of brain energy and facilitates memory consolidation through the modulation of synaptic weights. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep results from the interaction of brain stem cholinergic, aminergic, and GABAergic neurons which control the activity of glutamatergic reticular formation neurons leading to REM sleep phenomena such as muscle atonia, REMs, dreaming, and cortical activation. Strong activation of limbic regions during REM sleep suggests a role in regulation of emotion. Genetic studies suggest that brain mechanisms controlling waking and NREM sleep are strongly conserved throughout evolution, underscoring their enormous importance for brain function. Sleep disruption interferes with the normal restorative functions of NREM and REM sleep, resulting in disruptions of breathing and cardiovascular function, changes in emotional reactivity, and cognitive impairments in attention, memory, and decision making. PMID:22811426

  9. The Role of Sleep and Sleep Disorders in the Development, Diagnosis, and Management of Neurocognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle A

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that sleep plays an important role in the maintenance, disease prevention, repair, and restoration of both mind and body. The sleep and wake cycles are controlled by the pacemaker activity of the superchiasmic nucleus in the hypothalamus but can be disrupted by diseases of the nervous system causing disordered sleep. A lack of sleep has been associated with an increase in all-cause mortality. Likewise, sleep disturbances and sleep disorders may disrupt neuronal pathways and have an impact on neurological diseases. Sleep deprivation studies in normal subjects demonstrate that a lack of sleep can cause attention and working memory impairment. Moreover, untreated sleep disturbances and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnoe (OSA) can also lead to cognitive impairment. Poor sleep and sleep disorders may present a significant risk factor for the development of dementia. In this review, the underlying mechanisms and the role of sleep and sleep disorders in the development of neurocognitive disorders [dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)] and how the presence of sleep disorders could direct the process of diagnosis and management of neurocognitive disorders will be discussed. PMID:26557104

  10. The Role of Sleep and Sleep Disorders in the Development, Diagnosis, and Management of Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that sleep plays an important role in the maintenance, disease prevention, repair, and restoration of both mind and body. The sleep and wake cycles are controlled by the pacemaker activity of the superchiasmic nucleus in the hypothalamus but can be disrupted by diseases of the nervous system causing disordered sleep. A lack of sleep has been associated with an increase in all-cause mortality. Likewise, sleep disturbances and sleep disorders may disrupt neuronal pathways and have an impact on neurological diseases. Sleep deprivation studies in normal subjects demonstrate that a lack of sleep can cause attention and working memory impairment. Moreover, untreated sleep disturbances and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnoe (OSA) can also lead to cognitive impairment. Poor sleep and sleep disorders may present a significant risk factor for the development of dementia. In this review, the underlying mechanisms and the role of sleep and sleep disorders in the development of neurocognitive disorders [dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)] and how the presence of sleep disorders could direct the process of diagnosis and management of neurocognitive disorders will be discussed. PMID:26557104

  11. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: many causes, few therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; McIntyre, Deborah J

    2012-03-15

    Sleep symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are frequent and have multifactorial and multilayered causes. Primary involvement of sleep/wake regulating centers in the brainstem, sleep problems caused by the nocturnal manifestation of motor and dysautonomic signs and medication-induced sleep problems are often impossible to disentangle in the individual patient. Two syndromes, hypersomnia and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), are increasingly recognized as harbingers of the core PD motor syndrome. RBD, associated with a panoply of other nonmotor symptoms, may predispose to a specific PD phenotype. Long-acting dopaminergic stimulation, when abating nocturnal akinesia, also improves subjective sleep quantity. While this strategy is backed up by several randomized controlled trials (RCT), other treatment recommendations are mostly based on case series or expert opinion. Thus we identified only two other RCT, one treating insomnia with eszopiclone, the other nocturnal behavioral abnormalities in demented PD patients with memantine. While the causal complexity of sleep problems in PD certainly hampers the design of therapeutic studies, multiple general treatment strategies against sleep disorders can however be applied efficiently in PD patients as well. PMID:22118862

  12. [Dream recall and sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Schredl, M; Bozzer, A; Morlock, M

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between dream recall and sleep disorders. The sample comprised 762 patients who were diagnosed in the sleep laboratory. In the course of the examination they completed the sleep questionnaire SF-B (Görtelmeyer 1986). The results showed a heightened dream recall frequency (DRF) in insomniacs and patients with myoclonia. This result as well as the findings in the control group supports the arousal-retrieval model of dream recall (Koulack u. Goodenough 1976) which emphasizes the importance of nocturnal awakenings. However, this model seems only to be valid for males. In females, DRF is mainly influenced by emotional stress which is best explained by the salience hypothesis of Cohen and MacNeilage (1974). They pointed out that intensive dream emotions lead to high recallability of dream experience. The data gives evidence to the hypothesis of Ermann et al. (1993, 1994) which states that reduced DRF in terms of unsuccessful dream work is accompanied by frequent nocturnal awakenings. DRF of patients with sleep apnea syndrome did not differ from DRF in healthy controls. In addition, sleep apnea parameters did not correlate substantially with DRF. The finding that insomniacs reported more negatively toned dreams in comparison to persons who were examined for sleep apnea but did not showed a pathological apnea index. This may be an hint to increased emotional stress in this patient group. To summarize, the results are promising in clarifying the relationship between sleep disorders and dream life. The next step is to investigate dream reports of these patients by means of content analysis. PMID:9206791

  13. Prospective Assessment of Nocturnal Awakenings in a Case Series of Treatment-Seeking Chronic Insomnia Patients: A Pilot Study of Subjective and Objective Causes

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Barry; Romero, Edward; Ulibarri, Victor A.; Kikta, Shara

    2012-01-01

    Background: The cause of nocturnal awakenings in patients with chronic insomnia is rarely researched. This study prospectively assessed the etiology of nocturnal awakenings (subjectively and objectively) among patients with insomnia at a private, community-based sleep medical center. Methods: Twenty adult patients with chronic insomnia enrolled between April 2008 and February 2010 met diagnostic criteria for an insomnia disorder, never previously visited a sleep specialist or underwent sleep testing, and reported no classic sleep disordered breathing symptoms. Patients completed validated scales for insomnia, sleepiness, impairment, anxiety, depression, and quality of life, a qualitative interview to assess subjective reasons for awakenings, and a diagnostic sleep study to objectively assess awakenings and their precipitants. Results: Subjective and objective data showed clinically meaningful insomnia, primarily sleep maintenance insomnia. The most common self-reported reasons for awakenings were: uncertain cause (50%), nightmares (45%), nocturia (35%), bedroom distractions (20%), or pain (15%). No patient identified breathing symptoms as a cause. Objectively, 531 awakenings were observed in the total sample, and 478 (90%) were preceded by sleep breathing events (apnea, hypopnea, or respiratory effort-related event). Fifty-three awakenings were caused by other factors (independent leg jerks [7], spontaneous [14], and sleep that was laboratory-induced [32]). Thirty awakenings ? 5 min—a duration sufficient to predispose toward an insomnia episode—were each preceded by a breathing event. Conclusions: Among patients with insomnia with no classic sleep breathing symptoms and therefore low probability of a sleep breathing disorder, most of their awakenings were precipitated by a medical condition (sleep disordered breathing), which contrasted sharply with their perceptions about their awakenings. Citation: Krakow B; Romero E; Ulibarri VA; Kikta S. Prospective assessment of nocturnal awakenings in a case series of treatment-seeking chronic insomnia patients: a pilot study of subjective and objective causes. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1685-1692. PMID:23204611

  14. The Effectiveness of Silodosin for Nocturnal Polyuria in Elderly Men With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Won; Park, Jinsung; Chung, Hong; Kim, Hong-Wook; Kim, Hyung Joon; Jung, Jae Hung; Kim, Won Tae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate improvement in nocturia and nocturnal polyuria in nocturnal polyuria patients after silodosin administration by using a 3-day frequency volume chart. Methods: This was a prospective multicenter study. We enrolled nocturnal polyuria patients (nocturnal polyuria index [NPi]>0.33), aged ?60 years, diagnosed with the 3-day frequency volume charts of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia taking ?-blockers. Of the 54 patients, 30 (55.6%) completed the study according to the study protocol (per-protocol group), and 24 dropped out (dropout group). Results: Of the 24 patients in the dropout group, 5 withdrew consent due to side effects or lack of efficacy, 7 were lost to follow-up at 4 weeks, 8 were lost to follow-up at 12 weeks, and 4 dropped out due to failure to complete 3-day frequency volume charts at 12 weeks. In the per-protocol group, there was significant improvement in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), especially question numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and the quality of life question (P=0.001, P=0.007, P<0.001, P=0.003, P=0.049, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). The Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ) score for the sleep question improved from 64.36 to 70.43 (P=0.039). The NPi reduced from 0.4005 to 0.3573 (P=0.027); however, in many cases, there was no improvement in nocturnal polyuria itself. In intention-to-treat analysis, there were significant improvements in IPSS and LSEQ in 45 patients. Conclusions: In elderly nocturnal polyuria patients, silodosin monotherapy exhibits good efficacy in improving nocturia and nocturnal polyuria; however, the mean NPi was still >0.33. Considering the high dropout rate of our study due to no implementation of 3-day frequency volume charts, prospective and large-scale studies are needed to confirm our results. PMID:26620902

  15. Investigation of the effectiveness of a split sleep schedule in sustaining sleep and maintaining performance.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Banks, Siobhan; Belenky, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    Shift work is common in today's society, and is associated with negative health outcomes, and accidents and incidents. These detrimental effects can be primarily attributed to sleeping and working at an adverse circadian time. The aim of this study was to examine whether a split sleep schedule is as effective as a consolidated day shift or night shift schedule for maintaining performance and sustaining sleep. Fifty-three healthy male volunteers (mean?±?SD age?=?26.51?±?4.07 years) underwent a randomized three condition study design. A split sleep condition involving two 5-h sleeping opportunities in 24?h [time in bed (TIB) 0300?h-0800?h and 1500?h-2000?h] was compared to a 10-h consolidated nighttime sleep (TIB 2200?h-0800?h) and 10-h consolidated daytime sleep (TIB 1000?h-2000?h). All participants underwent a baseline period of 10?h of nocturnal time in bed (TIB) followed by a 5-d simulated workweek spent in one of the three conditions. Polysomnography, psychomotor vigilance task, digit-symbol substitution task and subjective state were assessed. During the 5-d simulated workweek, participants in the nighttime sleep condition slept the most (total sleep time per day (TST) 8.4?h?±?13.4?min), followed by the split sleep condition (TST 7.16?h?±?14.2?min) and the daytime sleep condition (TST 6.4?h?±?15.3?min). Subjective sleepiness was highest in the daytime sleep condition and lowest in the nighttime sleep condition. No significant differences in performance were observed between the conditions. Compared to a nighttime consolidated sleep opportunity or split sleep, placement of a consolidated sleep opportunity during the day yielded truncated sleep and increased sleepiness. Further research in real-world situations is warranted to fully assess the efficacy of alternative split sleep schedules for improving safety and productivity. PMID:25222346

  16. Sleep-Related Declarative Memory Consolidation and Verbal Replay during Sleep Talking in Patients with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Uguccioni, Ginevra; Pallanca, Olivier; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Dodet, Pauline; Herlin, Bastien; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if sleep talkers with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) would utter during REM sleep sentences learned before sleep, and to evaluate their verbal memory consolidation during sleep. Methods Eighteen patients with RBD and 10 controls performed two verbal memory tasks (16 words from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test and a 220-263 word long modified Story Recall Test) in the evening, followed by nocturnal video-polysomnography and morning recall (night-time consolidation). In 9 patients with RBD, daytime consolidation (morning learning/recall, evening recall) was also evaluated with the modified Story Recall Test in a cross-over order. Two RBD patients with dementia were studied separately. Sleep talking was recorded using video-polysomnography, and the utterances were compared to the studied texts by two external judges. Results Sleep-related verbal memory consolidation was maintained in patients with RBD (+24±36% words) as in controls (+9±18%, p=0.3). The two demented patients with RBD also exhibited excellent nighttime consolidation. The post-sleep performance was unrelated to the sleep measures (including continuity, stages, fragmentation and apnea-hypopnea index). Daytime consolidation (-9±19%) was worse than night-time consolidation (+29±45%, p=0.03) in the subgroup of 9 patients with RBD. Eleven patients with RBD spoke during REM sleep and pronounced a median of 20 words, which represented 0.0003% of sleep with spoken language. A single patient uttered a sentence that was judged to be semantically (but not literally) related to the text learned before sleep. Conclusion Verbal declarative memory normally consolidates during sleep in patients with RBD. The incorporation of learned material within REM sleep-associated sleep talking in one patient (unbeknownst to himself) at the semantic level suggests a replay at a highly cognitive creative level. PMID:24349492

  17. Nocturnal light environments and species ecology: implications for nocturnal color vision in forests.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Cummings, Molly E

    2012-12-01

    Although variation in the color of light in terrestrial diurnal and twilight environments has been well documented, relatively little work has examined the color of light in nocturnal habitats. Understanding the range and sources of variation in nocturnal light environments has important implications for nocturnal vision, particularly following recent discoveries of nocturnal color vision. In this study, we measured nocturnal irradiance in a dry forest/woodland and a rainforest in Madagascar over 34 nights. We found that a simple linear model including the additive effects of lunar altitude, lunar phase and canopy openness successfully predicted total irradiance flux measurements across 242 clear sky measurements (r=0.85, P<0.0001). However, the relationship between these variables and spectral irradiance was more complex, as interactions between lunar altitude, lunar phase and canopy openness were also important predictors of spectral variation. Further, in contrast to diurnal conditions, nocturnal forests and woodlands share a yellow-green-dominant light environment with peak flux at 560 nm. To explore how nocturnal light environments influence nocturnal vision, we compared photoreceptor spectral tuning, habitat preference and diet in 32 nocturnal mammals. In many species, long-wavelength-sensitive cone spectral sensitivity matched the peak flux present in nocturnal forests and woodlands, suggesting a possible adaptation to maximize photon absorption at night. Further, controlling for phylogeny, we found that fruit/flower consumption significantly predicted short-wavelength-sensitive cone spectral tuning in nocturnal mammals (P=0.002). These results suggest that variation in nocturnal light environments and species ecology together influence cone spectral tuning and color vision in nocturnal mammals. PMID:22899522

  18. The diurnal and nocturnal effects of travoprost in normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the diurnal and nocturnal effects of travoprost with sofZia® (Travatan Z® [TZ]) on intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods Twenty-seven subjects with NTG were admitted to an inpatient sleep laboratory for three 24-hour sessions monitoring IOP, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate every 2 hours in the habitual position (diurnal period: upright; nocturnal period: supine). Baseline IOP and OPP levels were compared to those during active treatment with TZ and 3 days after stopping the medication. OPP was calculated as 2/3 [diastolic BP + 1/3 (systolic BP – diastolic BP)] – IOP. Results TZ significantly reduced the mean diurnal and nocturnal IOP levels compared to baseline at all time points. During treatment, mean IOP decreased from 17.1±3.4 to 14.7±3.0 mmHg during the diurnal period (P<0.01) and from 19.9±3.6 to 18.8±3.5 mmHg during the nocturnal period (P<0.01). Once treatment was discontinued, mean IOP remained at levels significantly less than baseline during both the diurnal (15.6±3.2 mmHg) and nocturnal (18.7±3.7 mmHg) periods. Mean OPP was not significantly changed with treatment during either period. Conclusion In this population of NTG patients, TZ significantly lowers IOP at all time points throughout the diurnal and nocturnal periods. The treatment effect on IOP endures for up to 3 days after the last dose. Treatment did not significantly improve OPP. PMID:25382969

  19. The cognitive cost of sleep lost.

    PubMed

    McCoy, John G; Strecker, Robert E

    2011-11-01

    A substantial body of literature supports the intuitive notion that a good night's sleep can facilitate human cognitive performance the next day. Deficits in attention, learning & memory, emotional reactivity, and higher-order cognitive processes, such as executive function and decision making, have all been documented following sleep disruption in humans. Thus, whilst numerous clinical and experimental studies link human sleep disturbance to cognitive deficits, attempts to develop valid and reliable rodent models of these phenomena are fewer, and relatively more recent. This review focuses primarily on the cognitive impairments produced by sleep disruption in rodent models of several human patterns of sleep loss/sleep disturbance. Though not an exclusive list, this review will focus on four specific types of sleep disturbance: total sleep deprivation, experimental sleep fragmentation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic sleep restriction. The use of rodent models can provide greater opportunities to understand the neurobiological changes underlying sleep loss induced cognitive impairments. Thus, this review concludes with a description of recent neurobiological findings concerning the neuroplastic changes and putative brain mechanisms that may underlie the cognitive deficits produced by sleep disturbances. PMID:21875679

  20. The cognitive cost of sleep lost

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, John G.; Strecker, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of literature supports the intuitive notion that a good night’s sleep can facilitate human cognitive performance the next day. Deficits in attention, learning & memory, emotional reactivity, and higher-order cognitive processes, such as executive function and decision making, have all been documented following sleep disruption in humans. Thus, whilst numerous clinical and experimental studies link human sleep disturbance to cognitive deficits, attempts to develop valid and reliable rodent models of these phenomena are fewer, and relatively more recent. This review focuses primarily on the cognitive impairments produced by sleep disruption in rodent models of several human patterns of sleep loss/sleep disturbance. Though not an exclusive list, this review will focus on four specific types of sleep disturbance: total sleep deprivation, experimental sleep fragmentation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic sleep restriction. The use of rodent models can provide greater opportunities to understand the neurobiological changes underlying sleep loss induced cognitive impairments. Thus, this review concludes with a description of recent neurobiological findings concerning the neuroplastic changes and putative brain mechanisms that may underlie the cognitive deficits produced by sleep disturbances. PMID:21875679

  1. Effects of Sleep Fragmentation on Sleep and Markers of Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Rita A; Verhulst, Steve; Toth, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Many people in our society experience curtailment and disruption of sleep due to work responsibilities, care-giving, or life style choice. Delineating the health effect of acute and chronic disruptions in sleep is essential to raising awareness of and creating interventions to manage these prevalent concerns. To provide a platform for studying the health impact and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with inadequate sleep, we developed and characterized an approach to creating chronic disruption of sleep in laboratory mice. We used this method to evaluate how 3 durations of sleep fragmentation (SF) affect sleep recuperation and blood and lung analyte concentrations in male C57BL/6J mice. Mice housed in environmentally controlled chambers were exposed to automated SF for periods of 6, 12, or 24 h or for 12 h daily during the light (somnolent) phase for 4 sequential days. Sleep time, slow-wave amplitude, or bout lengths were significantly higher when uninterrupted sleep was permitted after each of the 3 SF durations. However, mice did not recover all of the lost slow-wave sleep during the subsequent 12- to 24-h period and maintained a net loss of sleep. Light-phase SF was associated with significant changes in serum and lung levels of some inflammatory substances, but these changes were not consistent or sustained. The data indicate that acute light-phase SF can result in a sustained sleep debt in mice and may disrupt the inflammatory steady-state in serum and lung. PMID:24512957

  2. Circadian Variation of Heart Rate Variability Across Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Philippe; Yeh, Wei-Hsien; Dumont, Guy A.; Boivin, Diane B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nocturnal cardiovascular events are more frequent at the beginning and end of the night. It was proposed that this pattern reflects the nocturnal distribution of sleep and sleep stages. Using heart rate variability (HRV), we recently showed an interaction between the circadian system and vigilance states on the regulation of cardiac rhythmicity. Here, we further investigate this interaction in order to clarify the specific effects of sleep stages on the regulation of the heart. Design: Participants underwent a 72-h ultradian sleep-wake cycle procedure in time isolation consisting of alternating 60-min wake episodes in dim light and 60-min nap opportunities in total darkness. Setting: Time isolation suite. Patients or participants: Fifteen healthy young participants; two were subsequently excluded. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The current study revealed that sleep onset and progression to deeper sleep stages was associated with a shift toward greater parasympathetic modulation, whereas rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was associated with a shift toward greater sympathetic modulation. We found a circadian rhythm of heart rate (HR) and high-frequency power during wakefulness and all non-REM sleep stages. A significant circadian rhythm of HR and sympathovagal balance of the heart was also observed during REM sleep. During slow wave sleep, maximal parasympathetic modulation was observed at ?02:00, whereas during REM sleep, maximal sympathetic modulation occurred in the early morning. Conclusion: The circadian and sleep stage-specific effects on heart rate variability are clinically relevant and contribute to the understanding of the degree of cardiovascular vulnerability during sleep. Citation: Boudreau P; Yeh WH; Dumont GA; Boivin DB. Circadian variation of heart rate variability across sleep stages. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1919-1928. PMID:24293767

  3. Sleeping soundly should come easy after a hard day at school or work. But, for many of us, nighttime slumber is disrupted by thoughts of our "to-do" list, worries about our studies or workload, or interruptions

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Sleep Sleeping soundly should come easy after a hard day at school or work. But, for many of us, or interruptions from roommates, children or snoring partners. One third of all American adults experience that sleeplessness may compromise the immune system. Sleep Quantity vs. Quality The amount of sleep each of us

  4. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep disruption in microgravity is not the result of respiratory factors.

  5. Slow Wave Sleep and Long Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Orr, Martin; Arias, Diana; Rueger, Melanie; Johnston, Smith; Leveton, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    While ground research has clearly shown that preserving adequate quantities of sleep is essential for optimal health and performance, changes in the progression, order and /or duration of specific stages of sleep is also associated with deleterious outcomes. As seen in Figure 1, in healthy individuals, REM and Non-REM sleep alternate cyclically, with stages of Non-REM sleep structured chronologically. In the early parts of the night, for instance, Non-REM stages 3 and 4 (Slow Wave Sleep, or SWS) last longer while REM sleep spans shorter; as night progresses, the length of SWS is reduced as REM sleep lengthens. This process allows for SWS to establish precedence , with increases in SWS seen when recovering from sleep deprivation. SWS is indeed regarded as the most restorative portion of sleep. During SWS, physiological activities such as hormone secretion, muscle recovery, and immune responses are underway, while neurological processes required for long term learning and memory consolidation, also occur. The structure and duration of specific sleep stages may vary independent of total sleep duration, and changes in the structure and duration have been shown to be associated with deleterious outcomes. Individuals with narcolepsy enter sleep through REM as opposed to stage 1 of NREM. Disrupting slow wave sleep for several consecutive nights without reducing total sleep duration or sleep efficiency is associated with decreased pain threshold, increased discomfort, fatigue, and the inflammatory flare response in skin. Depression has been shown to be associated with a reduction of slow wave sleep and increased REM sleep. Given research that shows deleterious outcomes are associated with changes in sleep structure, it is essential to characterize and mitigate not only total sleep duration, but also changes in sleep stages.

  6. An overview of the management of nocturnal enuresis in children.

    PubMed

    Rogers, June

    Nocturnal enuresis is one of the common conditions of childhood and left untreated can cause increasing stress and anxiety for the child and disruption for the family. This article gives an overview of the potential contributory factors to the cause of bedwetting and highlights the importance of carrying out a focused assessment using the 'three systems' approach, to not only exclude any underlying pathology but also help direct treatment. The different treatment options are discussed and emphasis is placed on involving the child and family in the decision-making process. A child-focused approach will help ensure that whatever treatment is chosen, either the alarm or desmopressin will lead towards the best treatment outcome. PMID:12937365

  7. Effect of diabetes mellitus on sleep quality

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim; Brito, Veronica; Surani, Asif; Ghamande, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a highly prevalent condition affecting about 347 million people worldwide. In addition to its numerous clinical implications, DM also exerts a negative effect on patient’s sleep quality. Impaired sleep quality disrupts the adequate glycemic control regarded as corner stone in DM management and also lead to many deleterious effects causing a profound impact on health related quality of life. This article outlines various factors leading to impaired sleep quality among diabetics and delineates how individual factor influences sleep. The article also discusses potential interventions and lifestyle changes to promote healthy sleep among diabetics. PMID:26131327

  8. Good Night's Sleep

    MedlinePLUS

    ... symptoms to see if you might have a sleep disorder like insomnia, sleep apnea, or a movement disorder. ... sleep. Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea is another serious sleep disorder. A person with sleep apnea has short pauses ...

  9. Sleep Reduces False Memory in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lo, June C.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of post-learning sleep and sleep architecture on false memory in healthy older adults. Design: Balanced, crossover design. False memory was induced using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm and assessed following nocturnal sleep and following a period of daytime wakefulness. Post-learning sleep structure was evaluated using polysomnography (PSG). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy older adults from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study (mean age ± standard deviation = 66.6 ± 4.1 y; 7 males). Measurements and Results: At encoding, participants studied lists of words that were semantically related to non-presented critical lures. At retrieval, they made “remember”/“know” and “new” judgments. Compared to wakefulness, post-learning sleep was associated with reduced “remember” responses, but not “know” responses to critical lures. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the veridical recognition of studied words, false recognition of unrelated distractors, discriminability, or response bias between the sleep and the wake conditions. More post-learning slow wave sleep was associated with greater reduction in false memory. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, sleep facilitates the reduction in false memory without affecting veridical memory. This benefit correlates with the amount of slow wave sleep in the post-learning sleep episode. Citation: Lo JC; Sim SK; Chee MW. Sleep reduces false memory in healthy older adults. SLEEP 2014;37(4):665-671. PMID:24744453

  10. Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation in Children.

    PubMed

    Maski, Kiran P

    2015-06-01

    In the past 30 years, much research has been conducted elucidating the role of sleep in memory and learning; however, the interaction between sleep and cognitive functioning may be unknown in clinical realms. This article serves to provide a primer on sleep-dependent memory consolidation, a process in which memory is stabilized or even enhanced over a period of sleep. Given the increased amounts of sleep needed in infancy and childhood, the link between sleep and neuronal plasticity is highlighted in this article. Furthermore, sleep disruptions are common to children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; thus, recent studies showing direct relationships between sleep and memory functioning in such vulnerable groups are discussed. PMID:26072343

  11. Disturbed dreaming and sleep quality: altered sleep architecture in subjects with frequent nightmares.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára; Gombos, Ferenc; Takács, Krisztina P; Bódizs, Róbert

    2012-12-01

    Nightmares are intense, emotionally negative mental experiences that usually occur during late-night sleep and result in abrupt awakenings. Questionnaire-based studies have shown that nightmares are related to impaired sleep quality; however, the polysomnographic profile of nightmare subjects has been only scarcely investigated. We investigated the sleep architecture of 17 individuals with frequent nightmares and 23 control subjects based on polysomnographic recordings of a second night spent in the laboratory after an adaptation night. Nightmare subjects in comparison with control subjects were characterized by impaired sleep architecture, as reflected by reduced sleep efficiency, increased wakefulness, a reduced amount of slow wave sleep, and increased nocturnal awakenings, especially from Stage 2 sleep. While these differences were independent of the effects of waking psychopathology, nightmare subjects also exhibited longer durations of REM sleep that was mediated by heightened negative affect. Our results support that nightmares are related to altered sleep architecture, showing impaired sleep continuity and emotion-related increase in REM propensity. PMID:22526731

  12. [Sleep Medicine: 1965 to 2015].

    PubMed

    Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal houses one of the first sleep centers founded 40 years ago. This center contributed to virtually every aspect of sleep medicine. It grew considerably over time to become one of the largest sleep centers worldwide. It is now called the Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine (CARSM). Fourteen researchers and more than 30 research PhDs and postdoctoral fellows are working together in a 1,500 square-meter facility that includes separate units for fundamental and clinical studies and for the sleep disorders clinic. It has 10 polysomnographic recording rooms, 3 isolated units devoted to chronobiological studies, a high resolution SPECT imaging laboratory specifically devoted to sleep research, a high-density EEG unit and a psychophysiological laboratory to study the interaction between pain and sleep. This article relates the history of the CARSM and also presents a personal sleep odyssey.The CARSM has been very active in the description of clinical features and definitions of the phenotype of most sleep disorders. It contributed specifically to the development of diagnostic tools in narcolepsy (the multiple sleep latency test in different age groups), in nocturnal epilepsy (development of a method to localize the primary focus using in-depth electrodes recording during rapid eye movement sleep), in sleep bruxism (a method for scoring masticatory muscle activity during sleep and definition of cut-off values), in the restless legs syndrome (RLS: the suggested immobilisation test), in sleepwalking (sleep deprivation and experimental awakenings) and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD: development of the first polygraphic method to diagnose RBD).The CARSM also contributed to the knowledge on the epidemiology of sleep disorders, conducting the first population-based prevalence study of RLS and of sleep bruxism. Researchers at the CARMS also looked at the impact of sleep disorders like narcolepsy, RLS, sleep apnea and the parasomnias on daytime cognitive functions and cardiovascular health. The CARSM collaborates with researchers throughout the world to elucidate the genetic bases of several disorders, especially narcolepsy, RLS, RBD and parasomnias in children and adults, through large well-defined cohorts of patients and normal subjects.Finally, the CARSM has made original contributions to the development of new treatments of sleep disorders, especially the dopaminergic treatments of RLS (first with levodopa and then with pramipexole). Current research also involves the identification of prodromal markers of Parkinson disease and dementia in patients with RBD as to build a ready-to trial cohort to test the efficacy of neuroprotective agents.In summary, the CARSM is a center dedicated to basic and clinical research on sleep and circadian rhythms. It is located at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal but involves several other researchers at the Université de Montréal and at other universities in Canada and in the world. PMID:26559218

  13. [Polygraphic aspects of periodic movements in sleep].

    PubMed

    Reimão, R; Lemmi, H; Belluomini, J

    1984-12-01

    One hundred patients were analyzed sequentially regarding to the presence of periodic movements in sleep (PMS) or nocturnal myoclonus. The criteria for considering PMS was the presence of 5 or more myoclonic movements per hour of sleep. The 18 patients included in the PMS category were compared with the remaining 82. Those with PMS had tendency to be older than the others. The movements were observed in stage 2 and less commonly in stages 3, 1, 4 and REM. Patients with PMS had generally higher number of arousals and K complexes. There was no difference between both groups regarding sex, history complaints, sleep efficiency, total sleep time, time in each stage and final diagnosis. PMID:6535549

  14. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Cardiometabolic Health.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Knutson, Kristen L

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity are highly prevalent diseases associated with reduced quality of life and life expectancy. We discuss a novel risk factor for these cardiometabolic diseases: circadian disruption. Circadian disruption occurs when the internal circadian (?24-hour) rhythms are not in synchrony with the environment or each other. This paper reviews (1) cardiometabolic health of shift work, which often leads to circadian disruption, (2) effects of experimentally disrupted circadian rhythms on cardiometabolic function, (3) observational studies of sleep timing and behavioral chronotype, and (4) potential mediators linking chronotype and shift work to circadian disruption and cardiometabolic health. PMID:26568122

  15. The relationships among sleep efficiency, pulmonary functions, and quality of life in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Akira; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Harada, Tomoya; Fukushima, Takehito; Takata, Miki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Nishimura, Koichi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbance is commonly observed in patients with asthma, especially in those with poorly controlled asthma. Evaluating sleep quality to achieve good control of asthma is important since nocturnal asthmatic symptoms such as cough, wheezing, and chest tightness may disturb sleep. Actigraphy is an objective, ambulatory monitoring method for tracking a patient’s sleep and wake activities and for assessing sleep quality, as reflected by total sleep time, sleep efficiency, duration of awakening after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep onset latency. Patients and methods Fifty patients with asthma were enrolled in this study. Sleep quality was assessed employing wristwatch-type actigraphy (Actiwatch 2). The level of asthma control was assessed by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), and asthma-related quality of life was assessed by the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The parameters for sleep quality were compared using ACQ scores, AQLQ scores, and pulmonary function test results. Results The total sleep time was 387.2 minutes, WASO was 55.8 minutes, sleep efficiency was 87.01%, sleep onset latency was 8.17 minutes, and the average ACQ was 0.36. Neither sleep efficiency nor WASO correlated with respiratory functions, ACQ scores, or AQLQ scores. Conclusion Sleep-related parameters assessed by actigraphy in well-controlled asthma do not correlate with pulmonary functions, the asthma control level, or daytime quality of life. Sleep quality should be evaluated independently when asthma is well-controlled. PMID:25419157

  16. Signs of REM sleep dependent enhancement of implicit face memory: a repetition priming study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ullrich; Hallschmid, Manfred; Verleger, Rolf; Born, Jan

    2003-03-01

    Faces are processed and stored in distinct neuroanatomical systems. Based on evidence of a critical role of sleep in memory processes, we investigated the impact of nocturnal sleep on implicit memories for faces in healthy men. Face repetition effects in reaction times were compared across sleep periods early in the night, which are dominated by slow wave sleep (SWS), and late in the night, where rapid eye movement (REM) sleep prevails, as well as across corresponding nocturnal intervals of wakefulness. An inverse priming effect was found selectively across REM sleep rich late sleep, as indicated by distinctly prolonged response latencies to previously presented faces compared with novel faces after this period of sleep (P<0.05). We assumed this inverse priming to reflect a facilitated identification of previously presented faces after extended REM sleep periods, thereby producing interference with the response generation in our task which did not require face identification but rather required recognizing formal features of the faces. This interpretation was supported by a supplementary experiment where enhanced positive repetition priming was found across late, REM sleep dominated sleep in a task requiring face identification. Together, these findings indicate that implicit face memories particularly benefit from REM sleep associated brain mechanisms. PMID:12633978

  17. Sleep in Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Before and During Treatment with Methylphenidate: A Controlled Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sobanski, Esther; Schredl, Michael; Kettler, Nina; Alm, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep problems are frequently associated with childhood ADHD, as indicated by numerous polysomnographic investigations showing increased nocturnal movements, reduced sleep efficiency, and decreased percentage of REM sleep (although findings are not consistent over all studies). Data on objective and subjective sleep parameters in adults with ADHD are sparse, and to date the impact of stimulants, the most widely used pharmacological treatment for ADHD, on sleep in adults with ADHD has not been examined. Thus the objectives of our study were to assess objective and subjective sleep parameters in adults with ADHD and the impact of stimulant medication on sleep. Design: Two-group comparison and open-label therapy study. Participants: We enrolled 34 nonmedicated patients with ADHD, of whom 24 were without current comorbid psychiatric disorders, and 34 sex- and gender-matched control subjects without current psychiatric disorders or psychotropic medication. Interventions: Ten patients were treated with methylphenidate over ?26 days with a mean daily dose of 36.7 ± 11.2 mg. Measurements: Polysomnographic recording over 2 consecutive nights as well as assessments of subjective sleep parameters were performed in all patients and controls before treatment and reassessed in those patients receiving methylphenidate. Results: Compared to controls untreated patients showed increased nocturnal activity, reduced sleep efficiency, more nocturnal awakenings and reduced percentage of REM sleep. Treatment with methylphenidate resulted in increased sleep efficiency as well as a subjective feeling of improved restorative value of sleep. Conclusions: Sleep problems in patients with ADHD continue from childhood to adulthood, with similar objective sleep characteristics in adults and children with ADHD. Medication with methylphenidate appears to have beneficial effects on sleep parameters in adults with ADHD. Citation: Sobanski E; Schredl M; Kettler N; Alm B. Sleep in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) before and during treatment with methylphenidate: a controlled polysomnographic study. SLEEP 2007;31(3):375-381. PMID:18363314

  18. Sleep and Adjustment in Preschool Children: Sleep Diary Reports by Mothers Relate to Behavior Reports by Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, John E.; Viken, Richard J.; Alexander, Douglas B.; Beyers, Jennifer; Stockton, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between sleep patterns and behavioral adjustment with 4- to 5-year-old children from low-income families. Found that disrupted child sleep patterns, including variability in parentally reported amount of sleep, variability in bedtime, and lateness of bedtime, predicted less optimal adjustment in preschool, even after…

  19. Sleep disturbances in drug naïve Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and effect of levodopa on sleep

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Teresa; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Kharbanda, Parampreet S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with sleep disturbances, attributed to the neurodegenerative process and therapeutic drugs. Studies have found levodopa to increase wakefulness in some patients while increasing sleepiness in others. Aims: To confirm sleep disturbances in drug naïve PD patients and understand the impact of levodopa on their sleep. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three drug naïve PD patients and 31 age-gender matched controls were compared using the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A polysomnogram objectively compared sleep quality. Of the 23 patients, the 12 initiated on levodopa were reassessed subjectively and through polysomnography after 2 months of therapy. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation, median, and range. Continuous variables were analyzed by Student's T test for normally distributed data and Mann–Whitney U test for skewed data. Discrete variables were compared by Chi Square tests (Pearson Chi square Test or Fisher's Exact Test). Wilcoxon signed ranks test was applied in the analysis of paired data pre- and post-levodopa. A P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Statistical analysis of the data was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12. Results: Drug naïve PD patients had lower PDSS scores than controls. The sleep architecture changes observed on polysomnogram were reduced NREM Stage III and REM sleep and increased sleep latency and wake after sleep onset time. Following levodopa, improved sleep efficiency with reduced sleep latency and wake after sleep onset time was noted, coupled with improved PDSS scores. However, NREM Stage III and REM sleep duration did not increase. Discussion: PD patients take longer to fall asleep and have difficulty in sleep maintenance. Sleep maintenance is affected by nocturia, REM behavioral disorder, nocturnal cramps, akinesia, and tremors, as observed in PDSS scores. Levodopa improves sleep efficiency by improving motor scores without altering sleep architecture. Conclusions: Poor sleep quality and sleep architecture changes occur secondary to the neurodegenerative process in PD patients. Though levodopa improves sleep quality by reducing rigidity and tremor, it does not reverse sleep architecture changes. PMID:25506163

  20. Treatment issues related to sleep and depression.

    PubMed

    Thase, M E

    2000-01-01

    In the management of depression, the role of sleep and sleep disturbances is important for several reasons. The same neurotransmitter systems that regulate mood, interest, energy, and other functions that may be disturbed in depression also regulate sleep. Sleep disturbances may be responsive to treatment with some antidepressants and may be worsened during treatment with other antidepressants. Serotonergic neurons play a critical role in modulating the onset and maintenance of sleep, and it is thought that insomnia in depression is caused by dysfunction of serotonergic systems. For a significant minority, SSRIs can have negative effects on sleep patterns resulting in insomnia that requires concomitant sedatives or anxiolytics. By contrast, agents that block the serotonin type 2 (5-HT2) receptor have beneficial effects on depressive insomnia. For example, a recent 8-week study comparing the effects of nefazodone and fluoxetine on sleep disturbances in outpatients with nonpsychotic depression and insomnia found that fluoxetine was associated with approximately a 30% increase in the number of nocturnal awakenings whereas nefazodone was associated with about a 15% decrease, a net difference of 45%. Long-term studies must be conducted to determine whether sleep benefits provided by the newer antidepressants will continue past the acute treatment phase. PMID:10926055

  1. Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Is Independently Associated with Reduced Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Bariatric Patients Suffering from Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Alparslan; You, Jing; Egan, Cameron; Fu, Alex; Khanna, Ashish; Eshraghi, Yashar; Ghosh, Raktim; Bose, Somnath; Qavi, Shahbaz; Arora, Lovkesh; Sessler, Daniel I.; Doufas, Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that recurrent nocturnal hypoxemia may affect pain response and/or the sensitivity to opioid analgesia. We tested the hypothesis that nocturnal hypoxemia, quantified by sleep time spent at an arterial saturation (SaO2) < 90% and minimum nocturnal SaO2 on polysomnography, are associated with decreased pain and reduced opioid consumption during the initial 72 postoperative hours in patients having laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Methods With Institutional Review Board approval, we examined the records of all patients who underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2010 and had an available nocturnal polysomnography study. We assessed the relationships between the time-weighted average of pain score and total opioid consumption during the initial 72 postoperative hours, and: (a) the percentage of total sleep time spent at SaO2 < 90%, (b) the minimum nocturnal SaO2, and (c) the number of apnea/hypopnea episodes per hour of sleep. We used multivariable regression models to adjust for both clinical and sleep-related confounders. Results Two hundred eighteen patients were included in the analysis. Percentage of total sleep time spent at SaO2 < 90% was inversely associated with total postoperative opioid consumption; a 5-%- absolute increase in the former would relatively decrease median opioid consumption by 16% (98.75% CI: 2% to 28%, P = 0.006). However, the percentage of total sleep time spent at SaO2 < 90% was not associated with pain. The minimum nocturnal SaO2 was associated neither with total postoperative opioid consumption nor with pain. In addition, neither pain nor total opioid consumption was significantly associated with the number of apnea/hypopnea episodes per hour of sleep. Conclusions Preoperative nocturnal intermittent hypoxia may enhance sensitivity to opioids. PMID:26010491

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (often shortened to ADNFLE ) On this page: Description ... What is ADNFLE? Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that ...

  3. Sleep Quality and Psychological Wellbeing in Mothers of Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Judy; Richdale, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    Sleep and behavioural difficulties are common in children with developmental disabilities. Mothers often wake and tend to their child when their child is having sleep difficulties. Therefore, mothers of children with developmental disabilities can have poor sleep quality due to these disruptions. The present study investigated the impact of sleep

  4. Sleep state instabilities in major depressive disorder: Detection and quantification with electrocardiogram-

    E-print Network

    Sleep state instabilities in major depressive disorder: Detection and quantification/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Abstract Sleep disruption is an important aspect of major depressive disorder, 2004). However, unlike other sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, in which the nature and severity

  5. Is sleep-related verbal memory consolidation impaired in sleepwalkers?

    PubMed

    Uguccioni, Ginevra; Pallanca, Olivier; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    In order to evaluate verbal memory consolidation during sleep in subjects experiencing sleepwalking or sleep terror, 19 patients experiencing sleepwalking/sleep terror and 19 controls performed two verbal memory tasks (16-word list from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test, and a 220- and 263-word modified story recall test) in the evening, followed by nocturnal video polysomnography (n = 29) and morning recall (night-time consolidation after 14 h, n = 38). The following morning, they were given a daytime learning task using the modified story recall test in reverse order, followed by an evening recall test after 9 h of wakefulness (daytime consolidation, n = 38). The patients experiencing sleepwalking/sleep terror exhibited more frequent awakenings during slow-wave sleep and longer wakefulness after sleep onset than the controls. Despite this reduction in sleep quality among sleepwalking/sleep terror patients, they improved their scores on the verbal tests the morning after sleep compared with the previous evening (+16 ± 33%) equally well as the controls (+2 ± 13%). The performance of both groups worsened during the daytime in the absence of sleep (-16 ± 15% for the sleepwalking/sleep terror group and -14 ± 11% for the control group). There was no significant correlation between the rate of memory consolidation and any of the sleep measures. Seven patients experiencing sleepwalking also sleep-talked during slow-wave sleep, but their sentences were unrelated to the tests or the list of words learned during the evening. In conclusion, the alteration of slow-wave sleep during sleepwalking/sleep terror does not noticeably impact on sleep-related verbal memory consolidation. PMID:25212397

  6. Nocturnal Risk of Gout Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyon K.; Niu, Jingbo; Neogi, Tuhina; Chen, Clara A.; Chaisson, Christine; Hunter, David; Zhang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several plausible mechanisms and anecdotal descriptions suggest that gout attacks often occur at night, although there are no scientific data supporting this. We undertook this study to evaluate the hypothesis that gout attacks occur more frequently at night. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study to examine the risk of acute gout attacks in relation to the time of the day. Gout patients were prospectively recruited and followed up via the internet for 1 year. Participants were asked about the following information concerning their gout attacks: the date and hour of attack onset, symptoms and signs, medication use, and purported risk factors during the 24- and 48-hour periods prior to the gout attack. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) of gout attacks (with 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) according to three 8-hour time blocks of the day (i.e., 12:00 am to 7:59 am, 8:00 am to 3:59 pm [reference], and 4:00 pm to 11:59 pm) using conditional logistic regression. Results Our study included 724 gout patients who experienced a total of 1,433 attacks (733, 310, and 390 attacks during the first, second, and third 8-hour time blocks, respectively) over 1 year. The risk of gout flares in the 8-hour overnight time block (12:00 am to 7:59 am) was 2.36 times higher than in the daytime (8:00 am to 3:59 pm) (OR 2.36 [95% CI 2.05–2.73]). The corresponding OR in the evening (4:00 pm to 11:59 pm) was 1.26 (95% CI 1.07–1.48). These associations persisted among those with no alcohol use and in the lowest quintile of purine intake in the 24 hours prior to attack onset. Furthermore, these associations persisted in subgroups according to sex, age group, obesity status, diuretic use, and use of allopurinol, colchicine, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Conclusion These findings provide the first prospective evidence that the risk of gout attacks during the night and early morning is 2.4 times higher than in the daytime. Further, these data support the purported mechanisms and historical descriptions of the nocturnal onset of gout attacks and may have implications for antigout prophylactic measures. PMID:25504842

  7. Cross-hemispheric Alternating Current Stimulation During a Nap Disrupts Slow Wave Activity and Associated Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Garside, Peter; Arizpe, Joseph; Lau, Chi-Ieong; Goh, Crystal; Walsh, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background Slow Wave Activity (SWA), the low frequency (<4 Hz) oscillations that characterize Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) are thought to relate causally to declarative memory consolidation during nocturnal sleep. Evidence is conflicting relating SWA to memory consolidation during nap however. Objective/hypothesis We applied transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) – which, with a cross-hemispheric electrode montage (F3 and F4 – International 10:20 EEG system), is able to disrupt brain oscillations–to determine if disruption of low frequency oscillation generation during afternoon nap is causally related to disruption in declarative memory consolidation. Methods Eight human subjects each participated in stimulation and sham nap sessions. A verbal paired associate learning (PAL) task measured memory changes. During each nap period, five 5-min stimulation (0.75 Hz cross-hemispheric frontal tACS) or sham intervals were applied with 1-min post-stimulation intervals (PSI's). Spectral EEG power for Slow (0.7–0.8 Hz), Delta (1.0–4.0 Hz), Theta (4.0–8.0 Hz), Alpha (8.0–12.0 Hz), and Spindle-range (12.0–14.0) frequencies was analyzed during the 1-min preceding the onset of stimulation and the 1-min PSI's. Results As hypothesized, power reduction due to stimulation positively correlated with reduction in word-pair recall post-nap specifically for Slow (P < 0.0022) and Delta (P < 0.037) frequency bands. Conclusions These results provide preliminary evidence suggesting a causal and specific role of SWA in declarative memory consolidation during nap. PMID:25697588

  8. Scaling behavior of EEG amplitude and frequency time series across sleep stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Tismer, Sebastian; Gans, Fabian; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Penzel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We study short-term and long-term persistence properties (related with auto-correlations) of amplitudes and frequencies of EEG oscillations in 176 healthy subjects and 40 patients during nocturnal sleep. The amplitudes show scaling from 2 to 500 seconds (depending on the considered band) with large fluctuation exponents during (nocturnal) wakefulness (0.73-0.83) and small ones during deep sleep (0.50-0.69). Light sleep is similar to deep sleep, while REM sleep (0.64-0.76) is closer to wakefulness except for the EEG ? band. Some of the frequency time series also show long-term scaling, depending on the selected bands and stages. Only minor deviations are seen for patients with depression, anxiety, or Parkinson's disease.

  9. Noninvasive Ventilation Improves Sleep in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Prospective Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Vrijsen, Bart; Buyse, Bertien; Belge, Catharina; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Decramer, Marc; Testelmans, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effects of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on sleep in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after meticulous titration with polysomnography (PSG). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 24 ALS patients were admitted to the sleep laboratory during 4 nights for in-hospital NIV titration with PSG and nocturnal capnography. Questionnaires were used to assess subjective sleep quality and quality of life (QoL). Patients were readmitted after one month. Results: In the total group, slow wave sleep and REM sleep increased and the arousal-awakening index improved. The group without bulbar involvement (non-bulbar) showed the same improvements, together with an increase in sleep efficiency. Nocturnal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels improved in the total and non-bulbar group. Except for oxygen saturation during REM sleep, no improvement in respiratory function or sleep structure was found in bulbar patients. However, these patients showed less room for improvement. Patient-reported outcomes showed improvement in sleep quality and QoL for the total and non-bulbar group, while bulbar patients only reported improvements in very few subscores. Conclusions: This study shows an improvement of sleep architecture, carbon dioxide, and nocturnal oxygen saturation at the end of NIV titration and after one month of NIV in ALS patients. More studies are needed to identify the appropriate time to start NIV in bulbar patients. Our results suggest that accurate titration of NIV by PSG improves sleep quality. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 511. Citation: Vrijsen B, Buyse B, Belge C, Robberecht W, Van Damme P, Decramer M, Testelmans D. Noninvasive ventilation improves sleep in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a prospective polysomnographic study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):559–566. PMID:25766713

  10. Sleeping Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... asthma, arthritis or heart failure Medicines and certain foods or drinks back to top Why Is It Important to Get Help? Poor sleep can slow your loved one’s recovery. Sleep problems can lead to depression, memory problems ...

  11. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and his inability to stick with the treatment led to more symptoms. However, after using the CPAP ... Institutes of Health- (NIH) supported research is shedding light on how sleep and lack of sleep affect ...

  12. Transoral robotic sleep surgery: the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Julia A; Montevecchi, Fliippo; Montevechi, Filippo; Vicini, Claudio; Magnuson, J Scott

    2014-06-01

    Nocturnal upper airway collapse is often multi-level in nature but typically will involve some degree of obstruction at the level of the tongue-base. Several surgical procedures have been developed in recent years to address this area in patients resistant to continuous positive airway pressure. This article outlines a novel way to treat obstructive sleep apnea lingual obstruction using the da Vinci robotic surgical system. This technique offers significant potential advantages over other established approaches and it should be included in the surgical armamentarium of sleep surgeons. PMID:24882797

  13. The impact of nocturnal disturbances on daily quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rwei-Ling; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to explore nocturnal disturbances in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to assess their impact on quality of life (QoL). Methods A total of 211 patients with PD were recruited for this study, and each participant was evaluated using the mini-mental state examination, PD sleep scale – second version (PDSS-2), pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), PD QoL questionnaire (PDQ), Epworth sleepiness scale, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging, and unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (UPDRS). Multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the contribution of the predictive variables on QoL. Results There were 56.4% males (mean age: 64.08 years; disease duration: 6.02 years; H&Y stage: 2.25; and UPDRS: 33.01) in this study. Our patients’ actual sleep time was 5.96±1.16 hours and the average sleep efficiency was 82.93%±12.79%. Up to 64.4% of patients were classified as “poor” sleepers and 23.8% suffered from daytime sleepiness. The final stepwise regression model revealed that UPDRS parts I and II, the sleep disturbance and daytime dysfunction components of the PSQI, the PD symptoms at night subscale of the PDSS-2, and the levodopa equivalent dose were significant predictors of the PDQ score (R2=53, F7,165=28.746; P<0.001). Conclusion Most of the PD patients have sleep problems, and nearly one-quarter of them have abnormal daytime somnolence. The nocturnal disturbances were found to result in worse QoL in PD patients. Ethnicity-specific effects of susceptibility to sleep disturbances were discussed, and these results also highlighted the direction for further studies to explore when examining effective management programs toward these disturbances. PMID:26273203

  14. Factors influencing phototaxis in nocturnal migrating birds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuebing; Chen, Mingyan; Wu, Zhaolu; Wang, Zijiang

    2014-12-01

    Many migratory bird species fly during the night (nocturnal migrants) and have been shown to display some phototaxis to artificial light. During 2006 to 2009, we investigated phototaxis in nocturnal migrants at Jinshan Yakou in Xinping County (N23°56', E101°30'; 2400 m above sea-level), and at the Niaowang Mountain in Funing County (N23°30', E105°35'; 1400 m above sea-level), both in the Yunnan Province of Southwest China. A total of 5069 birds, representing 129 species, were captured by mist-netting and artificial light. The extent of phototaxis effect on bird migration was examined during all four seasons, three phases of the moon, and under two weather conditions (mist and wind). Data were statistically analyzed to determine the extent to which these factors may impact phototaxis of nocturnal migrants. The results point to phototaxis in birds migrating in the spring and autumn, especially in the autumn. Furthermore, migrating birds were more readily attracted to artificial lights during nights with little moonlight, mist, and a headwind. Regardless of the initial orientation in which birds flew, either following the wind or against the wind, birds would always fly against the wind when flying towards the light. This study broadens our understanding of the nocturnal bird migration, potentially resulting in improved bird ringing practices, increased awareness, and better policies regarding bird protection. PMID:25483789

  15. Sleep and melatonin in infants: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, A

    1997-03-01

    Sleep-wake patterns of 20 normal, healthy infants (16 girls and four boys; age range: 26-37 weeks) were recorded for a period of 1 week with a miniature activity monitor. Urine samples were extracted from the infants' disposable diapers that were collected during a 60-hour period to determine the levels of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s, a melatonin metabolite) using a radioimmunoassay test. Infants with "mature" secretion patterns (i.e. with an adult-like circadian rhythm) had a significantly delayed sleep-wake cycle in comparison to those with "immature" patterns. The onset of their nocturnal-sleep episode was delayed by almost 1 hour (22.1 vs. 21.2 hours; p < 0.05). Higher secretion rates of aMT6s during the evening hours (6:00-10:00 p.m.) were associated with earlier onset of nocturnal sleep (r = 0.51; p < 0.05). A delayed peak of melatonin was associated with more fragmented sleep during the night (e.g. r = 0.49; p < 0.05; for lower sleep percent). These findings suggest that melatonin plays an important role in the evolution of the sleep-wake system. PMID:9178914

  16. Crepuscular and nocturnal illumination and its effects on color perception by the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Sönke; Kelber, Almut; Warrant, Eric; Sweeney, Alison M; Widder, Edith A; Lee, Raymond L; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that certain nocturnal insect and vertebrate species have true color vision under nocturnal illumination. Thus, their vision is potentially affected by changes in the spectral quality of twilight and nocturnal illumination, due to the presence or absence of the moon, artificial light pollution and other factors. We investigated this in the following manner. First we measured the spectral irradiance (from 300 to 700 nm) during the day, sunset, twilight, full moon, new moon, and in the presence of high levels of light pollution. The spectra were then converted to both human-based chromaticities and to relative quantum catches for the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor, which has color vision. The reflectance spectra of various flowers and leaves and the red hindwings of D. elpenor were also converted to chromaticities and relative quantum catches. Finally, the achromatic and chromatic contrasts (with and without von Kries color constancy) of the flowers and hindwings against a leaf background were determined under the various lighting environments. The twilight and nocturnal illuminants were substantially different from each other, resulting in significantly different contrasts. The addition of von Kries color constancy significantly reduced the effect of changing illuminants on chromatic contrast, suggesting that, even in this light-limited environment, the ability of color vision to provide reliable signals under changing illuminants may offset the concurrent threefold decrease in sensitivity and spatial resolution. Given this, color vision may be more common in crepuscular and nocturnal species than previously considered. PMID:16481568

  17. Too Hot to Sleep? Sleep Behaviour and Surface Body Temperature of Wahlberg’s Epauletted Fruit Bat

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Colleen T.; Awuah, Adwoa; Jordaan, Maryna; Magagula, Londiwe; Mkhize, Truth; Paine, Christine; Raymond-Bourret, Esmaella; Hart, Lorinda A.

    2015-01-01

    The significance of sleep and factors that affect it have been well documented, however, in light of global climate change the effect of temperature on sleep patterns has only recently gained attention. Unlike many mammals, bats (order: Chiroptera) are nocturnal and little is known about their sleep and the effects of ambient temperature (Ta) on their sleep. Consequently we investigated seasonal temperature effects on sleep behaviour and surface body temperature of free-ranging Wahlberg’s epauletted fruit bat, Epomophorus wahlbergi, at a tree roost. Sleep behaviours of E. wahlbergi were recorded, including: sleep duration and sleep incidences (i.e. one eye open and both eyes closed). Sleep differed significantly across all the individuals in terms of sleep duration and sleep incidences. Individuals generally spent more time awake than sleeping. The percentage of each day bats spent asleep was significantly higher during winter (27.6%), compared with summer (15.6%). In summer, 20.7% of the sleeping bats used one eye open sleep, and this is possibly the first evidence of one-eye-sleep in non-marine mammals. Sleep duration decreased with extreme heat as bats spent significantly more time trying to cool by licking their fur, spreading their wings and panting. Skin temperatures of E. wahlbergi were significantly higher when Ta was ?35°C and no bats slept at these high temperatures. Consequently extremely hot days negatively impact roosting fruit bats, as they were forced to be awake to cool themselves. This has implications for these bats given predicted climate change scenarios. PMID:25775371

  18. Prolonged Sleep under Stone Age Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piosczyk, Hannah; Landmann, Nina; Holz, Johannes; Feige, Bernd; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: We report on a unique experiment designed to investigate the impact of prehistoric living conditions on sleep-wake behavior. Methods: A group of five healthy adults were assessed during life in a Stone Age-like settlement over two months. Results: The most notable finding was that nocturnal time in bed and estimated sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, markedly increased during the experimental period compared to the periods prior to and following the experiment. These increases were primarily driven by a phase-advance shift of sleep onset. Subjective assessments of health and functioning did not reveal any relevant changes across the study. Conclusions: Our observations provide further evidence for the long-held belief that the absence of modern living conditions is associated with an earlier sleep phase and prolonged sleep duration. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 723. Citation: Piosczyk H, Landmann N, Holz J, Feige B, Riemann D, Nissen C, Voderholzer U. Prolonged sleep under Stone Age conditions. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):719-722. PMID:25024647

  19. Analysis of sleep on Shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.; Kapanka, Heidi; Davis, Jeffrey R.; Stewart, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The sleep patterns of 58 Space Shuttle crew members are analyzed statistically on the basis of debriefing forms filled out within 3 days postflight. The data are compiled in a table, and photographs of typical sleep conditions on the Shuttle are provided. It is found that sleep disruption is relatively common on Shuttle missions, especially on the first and last days. Sleep medication was used by 19.4 percent of crew on single-shift flights and 50 percent of crew on dual-shift flights.

  20. Human Puberty SIMULTANEOUS AUGMENTED SECRETION OF LUTEINIZING HORMONE AND TESTOSTERONE DURING SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    Boyar, R. M.; Rosenfeld, R. S.; Kapen, S.; Finkelstein, J. W.; Roffwarg, H. P.; Weitzman, E. D.; Hellman, Leon

    1974-01-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone (T) were measured by radioimmunoassay in nine pubertal boys and three sexually mature young men at 20-min intervals for 24 h. Plasma LH and T were also measured in one boy during a delayed sleep onset study. Polygraphic monitoring was carried out to identify precisely sleep onset. Wakefulness, and specific sleep stages. In all nine pubertal boys the plasma T concentration fluctuated and was significantly higher during normal nocturnal sleep as compared to daytime waking. This increased T secretion during sleep was temporally linked to the characteristic pubertal sleep augmentation of LH secretion. To define further the relationship of this increased T secretion to sleep, plasma LH and T were also measured in three of the pubertal boys after acute (1-day) reversal of the sleep-wake cycle. One of these boys was also studied after 3 days of sleep-wake cycle reversal. The results of these studies showed that plasma T was now augmented during the reversed daytime sleep period; the mean T concentrations during this period were significantly higher (P < 0.001) than during nocturnal waking in all four studies. Measurement of plasma LH and T in the three sexually mature young men showed episodic secretion of LH and T during both waking and sleep periods; there was no consistent significant augmentation of LH or T secretion during sleep. This study demonstrates that (a) in normal pubertal boys and sexually mature young men plasma T fluctuates episodically; (b) there is marked augmentation of T secretion during sleep in pubertal boys, which is dependent on increased LH secretion; (c) this pubertal LH-T secretory “program” is dependent on sleep, since it shifts with delayed sleep onset and reversal of the sleep-wake cycle; and (d) this demonstrable tropic effect of LH on T is evident only during puberty, since sexually mature young men fail to show any consistent relationship between LH and T secretion either awake or asleep. PMID:4852310

  1. Deprivation and Recovery of Sleep in Succession Enhances Reflexive Motor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Andreas; Weber, Frederik D; Machner, Bjoern; Talamo, Silke; Scheffelmeier, Sabine; Bethke, Judith; Helmchen, Christoph; Gais, Steffen; Kimmig, Hubert; Born, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Sleep deprivation impairs inhibitory control over reflexive behavior, and this impairment is commonly assumed to dissipate after recovery sleep. Contrary to this belief, here we show that fast reflexive behaviors, when practiced during sleep deprivation, is consolidated across recovery sleep and, thereby, becomes preserved. As a model for the study of sleep effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated inhibitory control in humans, we examined reflexive saccadic eye movements (express saccades), as well as speeded 2-choice finger motor responses. Different groups of subjects were trained on a standard prosaccade gap paradigm before periods of nocturnal sleep and sleep deprivation. Saccade performance was retested in the next morning and again 24 h later. The rate of express saccades was not affected by sleep after training, but slightly increased after sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, this increase augmented even further after recovery sleep and was still present 4 weeks later. Additional experiments revealed that the short testing after sleep deprivation was sufficient to increase express saccades across recovery sleep. An increase in speeded responses across recovery sleep was likewise found for finger motor responses. Our findings indicate that recovery sleep can consolidate motor disinhibition for behaviors practiced during prior sleep deprivation, thereby persistently enhancing response automatization. PMID:26048955

  2. Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs when inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance, inadequate alertness, and deterioration in health. It is incompletely understood why humans need sleep, although some theories include energy conservation, restoration, and information processing. Sleep deprivation has many deleterious health effects. Residency programs have enacted strict work restrictions because of medically related errors due to sleep deprivation. Because obstetrics is an unpredictable specialty with long irregular hours, enacting a hospitalist program enhances patient safety, decreases malpractice risk, and improves the physician's quality of life by allowing obstetricians to get sufficient rest. PMID:26333639

  3. New neurons in the adult brain: the role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistlberger, Ralph E; Jacobs, Barry L; Heller, H Craig; McGinty, Dennis

    2009-06-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a matter of debate. In the case of the hippocampus, integration of new cells in to the existing neuronal circuitry may be involved in memory processes and the regulation of emotionality. In recent years, various studies have examined how the production of new cells and their development into neurons is affected by sleep and sleep loss. While disruption of sleep for a period shorter than one day appears to have little effect on the basal rate of cell proliferation, prolonged restriction or disruption of sleep may have cumulative effects leading to a major decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation, cell survival and neurogenesis. Importantly, while short sleep deprivation may not affect the basal rate of cell proliferation, one study in rats shows that even mild sleep restriction may interfere with the increase in neurogenesis that normally occurs with hippocampus-dependent learning. Since sleep deprivation also disturbs memory formation, these data suggest that promoting survival, maturation and integration of new cells may be an unexplored mechanism by which sleep supports learning and memory processes. Most methods of sleep deprivation that have been employed affect both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Available data favor the hypothesis that decreases in cell proliferation are related to a reduction in REM sleep, whereas decreases in the number of cells that subsequently develop into adult neurons may be related to reductions in both NREM and REM sleep. The mechanisms by which sleep loss affects different aspects of adult neurogenesis are unknown. It has been proposed that adverse effects of sleep disruption may be mediated by stress and glucocorticoids. However, a number of studies clearly show that prolonged sleep loss can inhibit hippocampal neurogenesis independent of adrenal stress hormones. In conclusion, while modest sleep restriction may interfere with the enhancement of neurogenesis associated with learning processes, prolonged sleep disruption may even affect the basal rates of cell proliferation and neurogenesis. These effects of sleep loss may endanger hippocampal integrity, thereby leading to cognitive dysfunction and contributing to the development of mood disorders. PMID:18848476

  4. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that a small but significant number of participants in sleep deprivation studies or in simulated shift work experiments manifests an exaggerated performance decrement when they reach a critical point in the experiment, usually near the trough of the circadian cycle or the middle of the night. Those who show this exaggerated response do not appear to differ from other non-nal volunteers in any substantial way according to usual screening criteria or baseline values. The present study aims to examine factors that may provide the basis for this extreme response. We propose that a preexisting sleep deficit-as manifested by low values on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)-may account for extreme responders. Roth and colleagues (1993) have shown that among normal volunteers screened for a variety of studies, approximately 20 to 25 percent show low (< 6 minutes) MSLT scores on a consistent basis, whereas a like proportion shows consistently high MSLT scores (> 13 minutes). Additionally, studies by this group have indicated that subjects with low MSLT scores may suffer from chronic insufficient sleep (Roth et al., 1993), as further substantiated by the finding that they have consistently higher nocturnal sleep efficiency and that their MSLT scores rise to normal values when sleep is extended (Roehrs et al., 1996). We hypothesize that the short MSLT subjects have a significant long-term sleep deficit that leads to a marked intolerance for sleep deprivation or shift work. We further suggest that this sleep debt may signify an increased sleep need in these individuals that is not met either due to personal preference or to societal pressures (or both). If this speculation is accurate, then we predict that the tolerance for sleep deprivation in such individuals can be increased by "pretreatment" with sleep extension. Thus, the present study is designed to test the following two hypotheses: subjects with nominal sleep patterns who have low MSLT scores (e.g., Sleepy subjects) will show an exaggerated response (performance decrement) to sleep loss compared to subjects who have high MSLT scores (Alert subjects) on a nominal sleep schedule. when permitted to extend sleep-thus discharging their sleep debt-the Sleepy subjects will show a sleep-loss response resembling that of the Alert subjects.

  5. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that a small but significant number of participants in sleep deprivation studies or in simulated shift work experiments manifests an exaggerated performance decrement when they reach a critical point in the experiment, usually near the trough of the circadian cycle or the middle of the night. Those who show this exaggerated response do not appear to differ from other normal volunteers in any substantial way according to usual screening criteria or baseline values. The present study aims to examine factors that may provide the basis for this extreme response. We propose that a preexisting sleep deficit-as manifested by low values on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)-may account for extreme responders. Roth and colleagues (1993) have shown that among normal volunteers screened for a variety of studies, approximately 20 to 25 percent show low (< or = 6 minutes) MSLT scores on a consistent basis, whereas a like proportion shows consistently high MSLT scores (> or = 13 minutes). Additionally, studies by this group have indicated that subjects with low MSLT scores may suffer from chronic insufficient sleep (Roth et al., 1993), as further substantiated by the finding that they have consistently higher nocturnal sleep efficiency and that their MSLT scores rise to normal values when sleep is extended (Roehrs et al., 1996). We hypothesize that the short MSLT subjects have a significant long-term sleep deficit that leads to a marked intolerance for sleep deprivation or shift work. We further suggest that this sleep debt may signify an increased sleep need in these individuals that is not met either due to personal preference or to societal pressures (or both). If this speculation is accurate, then we predict that the tolerance for sleep deprivation in such individuals can be increased by "pretreatment" with sleep extension. Thus, the present study is designed to test the following two hypotheses: subjects with nominal sleep patterns who have low MSLT scores (e.g., Sleepy subjects) will show an exaggerated response (performance decrement) to sleep loss compared to subjects who have high MSLT scores (Alert subjects) on a nominal sleep schedule. When permitted to extend sleep-thus discharging their sleep debt-the Sleepy subjects will show a sleep-loss response resembling that of the Alert subjects.

  6. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that a small but significant number of participants in sleep deprivation studies or in simulated shift work experiments manifests an exaggerated performance decrement when they reach a critical point in the experiment, usually near the trough of the circadian cycle or the middle of the night. Those who show this exaggerated response do not appear to differ from other non-nal volunteers in any substantial way according to usual screening criteria or baseline values. The present study aims to examine factors that may provide the basis for this extreme response. We propose that a preexisting sleep deficit-as manifested by low values on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)-may account for extreme responders. It has been shown that among normal volunteers screened for a variety of studies, approximately 20 to 25 percent show low (< 6 minutes) MSLT scores on a consistent basis, whereas a like proportion shows consistently high MSLT scores (> 13 minutes). Additionally, studies by this group have indicated that subjects with low MSLT scores may suffer from chronic insufficient sleep, as further substantiated by the finding that they have consistently higher nocturnal sleep efficiency and that their MSLT scores rise to normal values when sleep is extended. We hypothesize that the short MSLT subjects have a significant long-term sleep deficit that leads to a marked intolerance for sleep deprivation or shift work. We further suggest that this sleep debt may signify an increased sleep need in these individuals that is not met either due to personal preference or to societal pressures (or both). If this speculation is accurate, then we predict that the tolerance for sleep deprivation in such individuals can be increased by "pretreatment" with sleep extension. Thus, the present study is designed to test the following two hypotheses: (1) subjects with nominal sleep patterns who have low MSLT scores (e.g., Sleepy subjects) will show an exaggerated response (performance decrement) to sleep loss compared to subjects who have high MSLT scores (Alert subjects) on a nominal sleep schedule; (2) when permitted to extend sleep--thus discharging their sleep debt-the Sleepy subjects will show a sleep-loss response resembling that of the Alert subjects.

  7. Japanese version of the Munich Parasomnia Screening: translation and linguistic validation of a screening instrument for parasomnias and nocturnal behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Komada, Yoko; Breugelmans, Raoul; Fulda, Stephany; Nakano, Sae; Watanabe, Aya; Noda, Chieri; Nishida, Shingo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is no broad screening instrument that can comprehensively assess parasomnias and sleep-related movement disorders listed in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. The aim of this study was to develop the Japanese version of the Munich Parasomnia Screening (MUPS), a screening instrument for parasomnias and nocturnal behaviors, which was developed and validated at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry. Methods A multi-step translation methodology consisting of forward translation, back translation, expert review, and cognitive debriefing interviews was performed between June and November 2011. Results The English version of the MUPS was translated into Japanese, and the original author performed an expert review on the basis of a detailed report on the forward and back translation steps. The cognitive debriefing was carried out in five patients with parasomnia. The mean time to fill out the questionnaire was 8 minutes (ranging from 2 to 17 minutes). The authors reviewed and discussed the results of the cognitive debriefing interviews and modified the Japanese version. The final Japanese version was confirmed to be conceptually equivalent to the original English version. Conclusion The Japanese version of the MUPS is an easy-to-use self-rating instrument for parasomnia and nocturnal behavior screening, consistent with the original version. The usage of this instrument would enable clinicians to quickly screen the past history and current frequency of nocturnal behaviors. PMID:26648727

  8. [Sleep disturbances and suicidality: relationships and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Norra, C; Richter, N

    2013-10-01

    Besides several risk factors for suicide, there is a recent increase in clinical and epidemiological studies pointing to a potential relationship between sleep loss or sleep disturbances and suicidality. This work, based on a systematic literature research, gives an overview on the findings of relationships between suicidality (i. e., suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, suicides) and sleep disturbances, especially insomnia, nightmares, but also hypersomnia and nocturnal panic attacks. There is evidence that sleep disturbances in suicidal insomniacs with comorbid psychiatric disorder are independently predictive for suicidality, too. Shared aspects of pathogenesis of the two entities and therapeutic options are also discussed. Recognition of sleep disturbances is essential for suicide prevention in clinical practice. PMID:24081516

  9. Effect of cessation of late-night landing noise on sleep electrophysiology in the home

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Fidell, S.; Bennett, R. L.; Friedman, J.; Globus, G.

    1974-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of noise exposure and sleep electrophysiology were made in homes before and after cessation of nighttime aircraft landing noise. Six people were tested, all of whom had been exposed to intense aircraft noise for at least two years. Noise measurements indicated a large reduction in the hourly noise level during nighttime hours, but no charge during the daytime hours. Sleep measures indicated no dramatic changes in sleep patterns either immediately after a marked change in nocturnal noise exposure or approximately a month thereafter. No strong relationship was observed between noise level and sleep disturbances over the range from 60 to 90 db(A).

  10. Pathophysiology of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Sigrid C.; Morgan, Barbara J.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep-induced apnea and disordered breathing refers to intermittent, cyclical cessations or reductions of airflow, with or without obstructions of the upper airway (OSA). In the presence of an anatomically compromised, collapsible airway, the sleep-induced loss of compensatory tonic input to the upper airway dilator muscle motor neurons leads to collapse of the pharyngeal airway. In turn, the ability of the sleeping subject to compensate for this airway obstruction will determine the degree of cycling of these events. Several of the classic neurotransmitters and a growing list of neuromodulators have now been identified that contribute to neurochemical regulation of pharyngeal motor neuron activity and airway patency. Limited progress has been made in developing pharmacotherapies with acceptable specificity for the treatment of sleep-induced airway obstruction. We review three types of major long-term sequelae to severe OSA that have been assessed in humans through use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and in animal models via long-term intermittent hypoxemia (IH): 1) cardiovascular. The evidence is strongest to support daytime systemic hypertension as a consequence of severe OSA, with less conclusive effects on pulmonary hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, and cardiac arrhythmias. The underlying mechanisms mediating hypertension include enhanced chemoreceptor sensitivity causing excessive daytime sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, combined with overproduction of superoxide ion and inflammatory effects on resistance vessels. 2) Insulin sensitivity and homeostasis of glucose regulation are negatively impacted by both intermittent hypoxemia and sleep disruption, but whether these influences of OSA are sufficient, independent of obesity, to contribute significantly to the “metabolic syndrome” remains unsettled. 3) Neurocognitive effects include daytime sleepiness and impaired memory and concentration. These effects reflect hypoxic-induced “neural injury.” We discuss future research into understanding the pathophysiology of sleep apnea as a basis for uncovering newer forms of treatment of both the ventilatory disorder and its multiple sequelae. PMID:20086074

  11. Insulinoma Masquerading as Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Sato, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insulinoma is a rare endocrine tumor that can cause a wide variety of symptoms, including abnormal nocturnal behavior. We report on 3 patients with insulinoma who presented with abnormal nocturnal behavior and injury during sleep, which simulated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). In case 1, the fasting glucose level was 15?mg/dL, and insulin levels were elevated (15??U/mL). In case 3, when the patient was transferred to the hospital because of a disturbance of consciousness, hypoglycemia (29?mg/dL) was detected. In contrast, in case 2, fasting glucose sampling did not indicate hypoglycemia, but continuous glucose monitoring revealed nocturnal hypoglycemia. The time from initial symptoms to a diagnosis of insulinoma ranged from 7 months to 2 years. All 3 patients had previously received anticonvulsant drugs for suspected epilepsy, but the medications were ineffective. Polysomnography showed no evidence of REM sleep without atonia in any of the 3 patients. No patient remembered any events that occurred during sleep. When a patient manifests abnormal behavior during the night and early morning, glucose monitoring should be performed, especially during the night and early morning. Clinicians should be aware that although insulinomas are rare, they can mimic parasomnias, such as RBD. PMID:26107678

  12. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  13. REM and NREM sleep as natural accompaniments of the evolution of warm-bloodedness.

    PubMed

    Lee Kavanau, J

    2002-12-01

    Divergence of primitive sleep into REM and NREM states is thought to have occurred in the nocturnal Triassic ancestors of mammals as a natural accompaniment of the evolution of warm-bloodedness. As ambient temperatures during twilight portions of primitive sleep traversed these evolving ancestors' core temperature, mechanisms of thermoregulatory control that employ muscle contractions became superfluous. The resulting loss of need for such contractions during twilight sleep led to muscle atonia. With muscle tone absent, selection favored the persistence of the fast waves of nocturnal activity during twilight sleep. Stimulations by these waves reinforce motor circuits at the increasing temperatures of evolving warm-bloodedness without leading to sleep-disturbing muscle contractions. By these and related interlinked adaptations, twilight sleep evolved into REM sleep. The daytime period of sleep became NREM sleep. The evolution of NREM and REM sleep following this scenario has implications for sleep's maintenance processes for long-term memories. During NREM sleep, there is an unsynchronized, uncoordinated stimulation and reinforcement of individual distributed component circuits of consolidated memories by slow wave potentials, a process termed 'uncoordinated reinforcement'. The corresponding process during REM sleep is the coordinated stimulation and reinforcement of these circuits by fast wave potentials. This action temporally binds the individual component circuit outputs into fully formed memories, a process termed 'coordinated reinforcement'. Sequential uncoordinated and coordinated reinforcement, that is, NREM followed by REM sleep, emerges as the most effective mechanism of long-term memory maintenance in vertebrates. With the evolution of this two-stage mechanism of long-term memory maintenance, it became adaptive to partition sleep into several NREM-REM cycles, thereby achieving a more lengthy application of the cooperative sequential actions. PMID:12667495

  14. An event-related analysis of awakening reactions due to nocturnal church bell noise.

    PubMed

    Brink, Mark; Omlin, Sarah; Müller, Christian; Pieren, Reto; Basner, Mathias

    2011-11-15

    The sleep disturbing effects of nocturnal ambient non-traffic related noises such as bell strokes emitted from church bell towers on nearby residents are presently unknown. Nonetheless, this specific noise source is suspected to cause sleep disturbances in a small but qualified minority of people living in the vicinity of the bell towers that throughout the night indicate the time with bell ringings. A field study was carried out to elucidate whether acoustic properties of such bell strokes relate to awakening and to provide event-related exposure-effect functions between acoustical predictors and awakening probability. Awakening reactions were determined in 27 voluntary subjects, measured in their home setting for four consecutive nights with ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) and concurrent acoustic recordings in- and outside the dwelling. Results indicate that the bell ringing events increase awakenings in a similar fashion as has previously been reported with transportation noise events and that awakening probability first and foremost depends on maximum sound pressure level of an event. The number of bell strokes and the personal variables gender, age, and noise sensitivity did not influence awakening probability significantly. Awakening probability by tendency increased with elapsed time after sleep onset, and was decreased during slow wave sleep and REM sleep compared to S2 sleep. The results suggest that a reduction of the maximum sound pressure level or an interruption of ringings during nighttime might reduce awakenings. The determined exposure-effect relationships are compared with similar functions for impulsive noise and transportation noise, more specifically, aircraft noise. The paper concludes with a few considerations regarding nighttime noise regulation. PMID:21978615

  15. Differential acute effects of sleep on spontaneous and stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor in men.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Stoyan; Besedovsky, Luciana; Born, Jan; Lange, Tanja

    2015-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered a key molecule in the regulation of sleep in health and disease. Conversely, sleep compared to sleep deprivation can modulate TNF release, but overall results are conflicting. In this study we focused on the influence of sleep on spontaneous, i.e., unstimulated TNF production, which might be involved in sleep regulation under normal non-infectious conditions, and on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated TNF production, which reflects the capacity of the immune system to respond to a pathogen. To this end, we monitored 10 healthy men during a regular sleep-wake cycle and during 24h of wakefulness while blood was sampled repeatedly to analyze circulating TNF levels in serum as well as intracellular TNF production in monocytes spontaneously and after stimulation with LPS employing whole blood cell cultures. In addition we assessed numbers of monocyte subsets and levels of various hormones in blood. In comparison with nocturnal wakefulness, sleep acutely decreased serum TNF levels, with no parallel decrease in spontaneous monocytic TNF production, but was associated with a striking nighttime increase in the percentage of TNF producing monocytes after stimulation with LPS. The following day circulating TNF showed a reverse pattern with higher levels after regular sleep than after the nocturnal vigil. The mechanisms mediating the differential effects of sleep on circulating TNF (acutely decreased) vs. stimulated monocytic TNF production (acutely increased) remain unclear, although explorative correlational analyses pointed to a regulatory involvement of cortisol, norepinephrine and prolactin. The acute enhancing effect of sleep on LPS stimulated monocytic TNF production adds to the notion that nocturnal sleep favors immune defense to a microbial challenge. PMID:25500219

  16. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  17. Correlations between depression behaviors and sleep parameters after repeated corticosterone injections in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-jun; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Xue-qiong; Sheng, Zhao-fu; Li, Sheng-jie; Huang, Yuan-li; Cao, Qing; Cui, Xiang-yu; Cui, Su-ying; Zhang, Yong-he

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Disrupted sleep may be a prodromal symptom or a predictor of depressive disorders. In this study we investigated the relationship between depression symptoms and disrupted sleep using a novel model of stress-mimicked sleep disorders in rats. Methods: SD rats were injected with corticosterone (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg, sc) or vehicle for 7 d. Their sleep-wake behavior was monitored through implanted EEG and EMG electrodes. Their depressive behaviors were assessed using forced swim test, open field test and sucrose preference test. Results: The corticosterone-treated rats showed significantly reduced sleep time, disinhibition of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and altered power spectra during non-REM sleep. All depressive behavioral tests did not show significant difference across the groups. However, individual correlation analysis revealed statistically significance: the immobility time (despair) was negatively correlated with REM sleep latency, slow wave sleep (SWS) time ratio, SWS bouts and delta power density, and it was positively correlated with REM sleep bouts and beta power density. Meanwhile, sucrose preference (anhedonia) was positively correlated with total sleep time and light sleep bouts, and it was negatively correlated with the REM sleep time ratio. Conclusion: In stress-mimicked rats, sleep disturbances are a predictor of depressive disorders, and certain symptoms of depression may be related to the disruption of several specific sleep parameters. PMID:24989251

  18. [An introduction to sleep disorders--their concept and diagnostic classification].

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Y

    1998-02-01

    Not only physical and mental conditions but also social adaptation of a great number of persons are often disturbed by sleep disorders. For example, unexpected inattention and drowsiness due to different sleep disorders including sleep apnea syndrome, narcolepsy, nocturnal insomnia etc, during car-driving and other working situations may lead to traffic accidents and other disasters. This indicates that sleep disorders are not only important medical but also social problems. Recent progresses in the field of sleep disorders medicine have enabled to distinguish many sleep disorders with different clinical manifestations, pathophysiologies and etiologies. Two kinds of international diagnostic classification of sleep disorders are available at present: ICSD (1990) and ICD-10 (1992). Outlines of these international classifications were introduced and their outstanding points and shortcomings were discussed. PMID:9503833

  19. A case of sleep-related painful erections with chronic daytime genital discomfort.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Miguel

    2015-09-18

    Sleep-related painful erections (SRPE) are an uncommon condition characterized by recurrent nocturnal penile tumescence accompanied by penile pain without penile pathology, which occurs during the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stage. A report of a 59-year-old patient with SRPE is described. Turgid painful erections (five to seven episodes of tumescence) during the sleep hours caused pain together with burning and tingling sensations in the penis and perineal zone during the daytime hours. Swelling of the pubic and perineal area was recurrent. Sleep loss, chronic fatigue, mild anxiety, lack of concentration and decreased work occurred along with this condition. Polysomnographic findings indicated REM sleep fragmentation. Attempts to treat this condition with muscle relaxants or anxiolytics did not prompt an improvement of this disorder, but a single daily dose of gabapentin 300 mg in combination with 1 mg clonazepam at bedtime improved total sleep time and reduced full sleep erections. PMID:24803352

  20. Effects of afternoon "siesta" naps on sleep, alertness, performance, and circadian rhythms in the elderly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Carrier, J.; Billy, B. D.; Rose, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of a 90-minute afternoon nap regimen on nocturnal sleep, circadian rhythms, and evening alertness and performance levels in the healthy elderly. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nine healthy elderly subjects (4m, 5f, age range 74y-87y) each experienced both nap and no-nap conditions in two studies each lasting 17 days (14 at home, 3 in the laboratory). In the nap condition a 90-minute nap was enforced between 13:30 and 15:00 every day, in the no-nap condition daytime napping was prohibited, and activity encouraged in the 13:30-15:00 interval. The order of the two conditions was counterbalanced. PARTICIPANTS: N/A INTERVENTIONS: N/A MEASUREMENTS: Diary measures, pencil and paper alertness tests, and wrist actigraphy were used at home. In the 72 hour laboratory studies, these measures were augmented by polysomnographic sleep recording, continuous rectal temperature measurement, a daily evening single trial of a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), and computerized tests of mood, activation and performance efficiency. RESULTS: By the second week in the "at home" study, an average of 58 minutes of sleep was reported per siesta nap; in the laboratory, polysomnography confirmed an average of 57 minutes of sleep per nap. When nap and no-nap conditions were compared, mixed effects on nocturnal sleep were observed. Diary measures indicated no significant difference in nocturnal sleep duration, but a significant increase (of 38 mins.) in 24-hour Total Sleep Time (TST) when nocturnal sleeps and naps were added together (p<0.025). The laboratory study revealed a decrease of 2.4% in nocturnal sleep efficiency in the nap condition (p<0.025), a reduction of nocturnal Total Sleep Time (TST) by 48 mins. in the nap condition (p<0.001) which resulted primarily from significantly earlier waketimes (p<0.005), but no reliable effects on Wake After Sleep Onset (WASO), delta sleep measures, or percent stages 1 & 2. Unlike the diary study, the laboratory study yielded no overall increase in 24-hour TST consequent upon the siesta nap regimen. The only measure of evening alertness or performance to show an improvement was sleep latency in a single-trial evening MSLT (nap: 15.6 mins., no nap: 11.5 mins., p<0.005). No significant change in circadian rhythm parameters was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy seniors were able to adopt a napping regimen involving a 90-minute siesta nap each day between 13:30 and 15:00, achieving about one hour of actual sleep per nap. There were some negative consequences for nocturnal sleep in terms of reduced sleep efficiency and earlier waketimes, but also some positive consequences for objective evening performance and (in the diary study) 24-hour sleep totals. Subjective alertness measures and performance measures showed no reliable effects and circadian phase parameters appeared unchanged.

  1. MCH levels in the CSF, brain preproMCH and MCHR1 gene expression during paradoxical sleep deprivation, sleep rebound and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Dias Abdo Agamme, Ana Luiza; Aguilar Calegare, Bruno Frederico; Fernandes, Leandro; Costa, Alicia; Lagos, Patricia; Torterolo, Pablo; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2015-12-01

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as neuromodulator are located in the lateral hypothalamus and incerto-hypothalamic area. These neurons project throughout the central nervous system and play a role in sleep regulation. With the hypothesis that the MCHergic system function would be modified by the time of the day as well as by disruptions of the sleep-wake cycle, we quantified in rats the concentration of MCH in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the expression of the MCH precursor (Pmch) gene in the hypothalamus, and the expression of the MCH receptor 1 (Mchr1) gene in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. These analyses were performed during paradoxical sleep deprivation (by a modified multiple platform technique), paradoxical sleep rebound and chronic sleep restriction, both at the end of the active (dark) phase (lights were turned on at Zeitgeber time zero, ZT0) and during the inactive (light) phase (ZT8). We observed that in control condition (waking and sleep ad libitum), Mchr1 gene expression was larger at ZT8 (when sleep predominates) than at ZT0, both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. In addition, compared to control, disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle produced the following effects: paradoxical sleep deprivation for 96 and 120h reduced the expression of Mchr1 gene in frontal cortex at ZT0. Sleep rebound that followed 96h of paradoxical sleep deprivation increased the MCH concentration in the CSF also at ZT0. Twenty-one days of sleep restriction produced a significant increment in MCH CSF levels at ZT8. Finally, sleep disruptions unveiled day/night differences in MCH CSF levels and in Pmch gene expression that were not observed in control (undisturbed) conditions. In conclusion, the time of the day and sleep disruptions produced subtle modifications in the physiology of the MCHergic system. PMID:26456505

  2. Sleep Hygiene and Recovery Strategies in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Nédélec, Mathieu; Halson, Shona; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Abaidia, Abd-Elbasset; Ahmaidi, Said; Dupont, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    In elite soccer, players are frequently exposed to various situations and conditions that can interfere with sleep (e.g., playing night matches interspersed with 3 days; performing activities demanding high levels of concentration close to bedtime; use of products containing caffeine or alcohol in the period preceding bedtime; regular daytime napping throughout the week; variable wake-up times or bedtime), potentially leading to sleep deprivation. We outline simple, practical, and pharmaceutical-free sleep strategies that are coordinated to the constraints of elite soccer in order to promote sleep. Sleep deprivation is best alleviated by sleep extension; however, sleep hygiene strategies (i.e., consistent sleep pattern, appropriate napping, and active daytime behaviors) can be utilized to promote restorative sleep. Light has a profound impact on sleep, and sleep hygiene strategies that support the natural environmental light-dark cycle (i.e., red-light treatment prior to sleep, dawn-simulation therapy prior to waking) and prevent cycle disruption (i.e., filtering short wavelengths prior to sleep) may be beneficial to elite soccer players. Under conditions of inordinate stress, techniques such as brainwave entrainment and meditation are promising sleep-promoting strategies, but future studies are required to ascertain the applicability of these techniques to elite soccer players. Consuming high-electrolyte fluids such as milk, high-glycemic index carbohydrates, some forms of protein immediately prior to sleep, as well as tart cherry juice concentrate and tryptophan may promote rehydration, substrate stores replenishment, muscle-damage repair and/or restorative sleep. The influence of cold water immersion performed close to bedtime on subsequent sleep is still debated. Conversely, the potential detrimental effects of sleeping medication must be recognized. Sleep initiation is influenced by numerous factors, reinforcing the need for future research to identify such factors. Efficient and individualized sleep hygiene strategies may consequently be proposed. PMID:26275673

  3. Cell Injury and Repair Resulting from Sleep Loss and Sleep Recovery in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Carol A.; Henchen, Christopher J.; Szabo, Aniko; Hogg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Increased cell injury would provide the type of change in constitution that would underlie sleep disruption as a risk factor for multiple diseases. The current study was undertaken to investigate cell injury and altered cell fate as consequences of sleep deprivation, which were predicted from systemic clues. Design: Partial (35% sleep reduction) and total sleep deprivation were produced in rats for 10 days, which was tolerated and without overtly deteriorated health. Recovery rats were similarly sleep deprived for 10 days, then allowed undisturbed sleep for 2 days. The plasma, liver, lung, intestine, heart, and spleen were analyzed and compared to control values for damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids; apoptotic cell signaling and death; cell proliferation; and concentrations of glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Measurements and Results: Oxidative DNA damage in totally sleep deprived rats was 139% of control values, with organ-specific effects in the liver (247%), lung (166%), and small intestine (145%). Overall and organ-specific DNA damage was also increased in partially sleep deprived rats. In the intestinal epithelium, total sleep deprivation resulted in 5.3-fold increases in dying cells and 1.5-fold increases in proliferating cells, compared with control. Two days of recovery sleep restored the balance between DNA damage and repair, and resulted in normal or below-normal metabolic burdens and oxidative damage. Conclusions: These findings provide physical evidence that sleep loss causes cell damage, and in a manner expected to predispose to replication errors and metabolic abnormalities; thereby providing linkage between sleep loss and disease risk observed in epidemiological findings. Properties of recovery sleep include biochemical and molecular events that restore balance and decrease cell injury. Citation: Everson CA, Henchen CJ, Szabo A, Hogg N. Cell injury and repair resulting from sleep loss and sleep recovery in laboratory rats. SLEEP 2014;37(12):1929-1940. PMID:25325492

  4. Gastrointestinal motility during sleep assessed by tracking of telemetric capsules combined with polysomnography – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Anne-Mette; Fallet, Sibylle; Otto, Marit; Scott, S Mark; Schlageter, Vincent; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Studies of gastrointestinal function during sleep are hampered by lack of applicable techniques. Recent development of a novel ambulatory telemetric capsule system, which can be used in conjunction with polysomnography, offers a solution to this problem. The 3D-Transit system consists of ingestible electromagnetic capsules traceable through a portable extracorporeal receiver while traversing the gut. During sleep monitored by polysomnography, gastrointestinal motility was concurrently investigated using 3D-Transit in nine healthy subjects. Overall, the amplitude of gastric contractions decreased with depth of sleep (light sleep, N2 versus deep sleep, N3; P<0.05). Progression through the small intestine did not change with depth of sleep (Kruskal–Wallis probability =0.1), and there was no association between nocturnal awakenings or arousals and the occurrence of colonic or small intestinal propagating movements. Basal colonic activity was suppressed during both deep sleep (P<0.05) and light sleep (P<0.05) when compared with nocturnal wake periods. In conclusion, the novel ambulatory 3D-Transit system combined with polysomnography allows minimally invasive and completely ambulatory investigation of associations between sleep patterns and gastrointestinal motility. PMID:26677340

  5. Wireless remote monitoring system for sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Sleep plays the important role of rejuvenating the body, especially the central nervous system. However, more than thirty million people suffer from sleep disorders and sleep deprivation. That can cause serious health consequences by increasing the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart attack and so on. Apart from the physical health risk, sleep disorders can lead to social problems when sleep disorders are not diagnosed and treated. Currently, sleep disorders are diagnosed through sleep study in a sleep laboratory overnight. This involves large expenses in addition to the inconvenience of overnight hospitalization and disruption of daily life activities. Although some systems provide home based diagnosis, most of systems record the sleep data in a memory card, the patient has to face the inconvenience of sending the memory card to a doctor for diagnosis. To solve the problem, we propose a wireless sensor system for sleep apnea, which enables remote monitoring while the patient is at home. The system has 5 channels to measure ECG, Nasal airflow, body position, abdominal/chest efforts and oxygen saturation. A wireless transmitter unit transmits signals with Zigbee and a receiver unit which has two RF modules, Zigbee and Wi-Fi, receives signals from the transmitter unit and retransmits signals to the remote monitoring system with Zigbee and Wi-Fi, respectively. By using both Zigbee and Wi-Fi, the wireless sensor system can achieve a low power consumption and wide range coverage. The system's features are presented, as well as continuous monitoring results of vital signals.

  6. The reorganisation of memory during sleep.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Nina; Kuhn, Marion; Piosczyk, Hannah; Feige, Bernd; Baglioni, Chiara; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Frase, Lukas; Riemann, Dieter; Sterr, Annette; Nissen, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    Sleep after learning promotes the quantitative strengthening of new memories. Less is known about the impact of sleep on the qualitative reorganisation of memory, which is the focus of this review. Studies have shown that, in the declarative system, sleep facilitates the abstraction of rules (schema formation), the integration of knowledge into existing schemas (schema integration) and creativity that requires the disbandment of existing patterns (schema disintegration). Schema formation and integration might primarily benefit from slow wave sleep, whereas the disintegration of a schema might be facilitated by rapid eye movement sleep. In the procedural system, sleep fosters the reorganisation of motor memory. The neural mechanisms of these processes remain to be determined. Notably, emotions have been shown to modulate the sleep-related reorganisation of memories. In the final section of this review, we propose that the sleep-related reorganisation of memories might be particularly relevant for mental disorders. Thus, sleep disruptions might contribute to disturbed memory reorganisation and to the development of mental disorders. Therefore, sleep-related interventions might modulate the reorganisation of memories and provide new inroads into treatment. PMID:24813468

  7. Nocturia Reported in Nightly Sleep Diaries: Common Occurrence with Significant Implications?

    PubMed Central

    Bliwise, Donald L.; Friedman, Leah; Hernandez, Beatriz; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Kushida, Clete A.; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nocturia (nocturnal awakenings associated with urination) is so common a nocturnal behavior that its association with poor sleep is often overlooked. This study examined nocturia and its potential role in poor sleep by examining reported nightly awakenings and associated bathroom trips. Methods Sleep diaries were kept by 119 adults with poor sleep for intervals up to 14 days. Diaries collected data on nightly number of awakenings and nightly number of bathroom trips. The proportion of nocturnal awakenings accompanied by voiding for each night was calculated and averaged within each individual. Demographics and various health conditions were examined in relation to this measure. Results Nocturia was defined when at least two-thirds of all awakenings were associated with nocturnal voiding. Absence of nocturia was defined when less than one-third of awakenings were associated with voiding. Remaining cases were defined as having possible nocturia. Estimates of nocturia derived from pre-study screening were related to nocturia as defined by sleep diaries. Neither gender nor sleep apnea was associated with nocturia. Unadjusted analyses indicated that individuals with nocturia were more likely to have arthritis and attribute their nighttime awakenings to urge to void than individuals without nocturia. Conclusions Nocturia is an exceedingly common phenomenon and may be associated with multiple morbidities. Results are discussed in terms of causality and whether the perceived urge to void precedes or follows nocturnal awakening. Correlates of nocturia have important implications, because they can inform interventions that target brain (e.g., cognitive behavioral treatments for insomnia, sedative/hypnotic medications) vs. bladder (e.g., bladder control exercises, medications affecting urine production or urgency). PMID:24245840

  8. Severe Central Sleep Apnea in Vici Syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Kersh, Karim; Jungbluth, Heinz; Gringras, Paul; Senthilvel, Egambaram

    2015-11-01

    Vici syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder due to recessive mutations in the key autophagy regulator EPG5. Vici syndrome is characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, hypopigmentation, immunodeficiency, cataracts, and cardiomyopathy, with variable additional multisystem involvement. Here we report on a 5-year-old girl who presented with global developmental delay, seizures, callosal agenesis, cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmentation, and immunodeficiency with a low CD4 count and recurrent infections. EPG5 sequencing (prompted by suggestive clinical features) revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.1007A>G (p.Gln336Arg). The patient was referred to our center for evaluation of nocturnal apnea. Overnight polysomnography showed severe central sleep apnea (CSA) with an overall apnea-hypopnea index of 100.5 events per hour of sleep (central apnea index of 97.5, mixed apnea index of 2, and obstructive hypopnea index of 1). The patient responded to bilevel positive airway pressure therapy with a backup rate with normalization of the apnea-hypopnea index and maintenance of oxygen saturation >90%. Despite successful control of the severe CSA, the patient was eventually started on nocturnal oxygen therapy due to excessive upper airway secretions and the high risk of possible aspiration with positive airway pressure therapy. This is the first report of EPG5-related Vici syndrome associated with CSA. We discuss the polysomnographic findings in our patient in the context of a brief literature review of the reported sleep abnormalities in Vici syndrome. PMID:26482670

  9. In-Car Nocturnal Blue Light Exposure Improves Motorway Driving: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taillard, Jacques; Capelli, Aurore; Sagaspe, Patricia; Anund, Anna; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Philip, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness greatly decreases nocturnal driving performance. The development of in-car countermeasures is a future challenge to prevent sleep-related accidents. The aim of this study is to determine whether continuous exposure to monochromatic light in the short wavelengths (blue light), placed on the dashboard, improves night-time driving performance. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 48 healthy male participants (aged 20–50 years) drove 400 km (250 miles) on motorway during night-time. They randomly and consecutively received either continuous blue light exposure (GOLite, Philips, 468 nm) during driving or 2*200 mg of caffeine or placebo of caffeine before and during the break. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. The outcomes were number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) and mean standard deviation of the lateral position (SDLP). Eight participants (17%) complained about dazzle during blue light exposure and were removed from the analysis. Results from the 40 remaining participants (mean age ± SD: 32.9±11.1) showed that countermeasures reduced the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) (F(2,91.11)?=?6.64; p<0.05). Indeed, ILC were lower with coffee (12.51 [95% CI, 5.86 to 19.66], p?=?0.001) and blue light (14.58 [CI, 8.75 to 22.58], p?=?0.003) than with placebo (26.42 [CI, 19.90 to 33.71]). Similar results were found for SDLP. Treatments did not modify the quality, quantity and timing of 3 subsequent nocturnal sleep episodes. Despite a lesser tolerance, a non-inferior efficacy of continuous nocturnal blue light exposure compared with caffeine suggests that this in-car countermeasure, used occasionally, could be used to fight nocturnal sleepiness at the wheel in blue light-tolerant drivers, whatever their age. More studies are needed to determine the reproducibility of data and to verify if it can be generalized to women. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01070004 PMID:23094031

  10. Sleep and Impulsivity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scullin, Michael K.; Sollinger, Ann B.; Land, Julia; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Zanders, Lavezza; Lee, Raven; Freeman, Alan; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Impulsive behavior and poor sleep are important non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that negatively impact the quality of life of patients and their families. Previous research suggests a higher level of sleep complaints in PD patients who demonstrate impulsive behaviors, but the nature of the sleep disturbances has yet to be comprehensively tested. Methods Consecutive idiopathic PD patients (N=143) completed the Minnesota Impulse Disorder Interview and a sleep questionnaire that assessed sleep efficiency, excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs symptoms, snoring, dreams/nightmares, and nocturia. Patients were also given a Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale motor examination and they completed cognitive testing. Results Impulsive PD patients endorsed more sleep complaints than non-impulsive PD patients. The group difference was primarily attributable to poor sleep efficiency (e.g., greater nocturnal awakenings), p < .01, and greater daytime sleepiness, p < .01, in the impulsive PD patients. Interestingly, restless legs symptoms were also greater in the impulsive PD patients, p < .05. The results could not be explained by medications or disease severity. Conclusions Poor sleep efficiency, restless legs symptoms, and increased daytime sleepiness are associated with impulsivity in PD. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether sleep disturbances precede impulsivity in PD. PMID:23880026

  11. Assessment and treatment of common pediatric sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Avis, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that chronically disrupted sleep in children and adolescents can lead to problems in cognitive functioning. Behavioral interventions for pediatric sleep problems (e.g., graduated extinction, parent education, positive bedtime routines), especially in young children, have been shown to produce clinically significant improvements. This review describes a few pertinent conditions of sleep disorders in children and adolescents as well as provides clinically useful approaches to sleep complaints and both pharmacologic and nonpharmacological treatments of some common pediatric sleep disorders. PMID:20622943

  12. The Skylab sleep monitoring experiment - Methodology and initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Delucchi, M. R.; Shumate, W. H.; Booher, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    The sleep monitoring experiment permitted an objective evaluation of sleep characteristics during the first two manned Skylab flights. Hardware located onboard the spacecraft accomplished data acquisition, analysis, and preservation, thereby permitting near-real-time evaluation of sleep during the flights and more detailed postmission analysis. The crewman studied during the 28-Day Mission showed some decrease in total sleep time and an increase in the percentage of Stage 4 sleep, while the subject in the 59-Day Mission exhibited little change in total sleep time and a small decrease in Stage 4 and REM sleep. Some disruption of sleep characteristics was seen in the final days of both missions, and both subjects exhibited decreases in REM-onset latency in the immediate postflight period. The relatively minor changes seen were not of the type nor magnitude which might be expected to be associated with significant degradation of performance capability.

  13. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePLUS

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may occur 30 times or more an hour. The ... blocked during sleep. Normal breathing starts again with a snort or choking ...

  14. Sleep Tight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2000-01-01

    At the same time their biological systems program them for later sleep and waking times, adolescents' schedules and lifestyles keep them from getting a healthy amount of sleep. Although a few schools have altered their schedules, most are confounded by costs and contractual complications. Minnesota schools are leaders. (MLH)

  15. Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Callum J; Pocock, Michael J O; Fox, Richard; Evans, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world. 2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted. 3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate. 4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested. PMID:25914438

  16. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, M. M.; DeRoshia, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and performance proficiency in both ground-based simulations and space mission studies, as described in the 2003 NASA Task Book, will be reviewed.

  17. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and performance proficiency in both ground-based simulations and space mission studies, as described in the 2003 NASA Task Book, will be reviewed. PMID:15943202

  18. Just a scary dream? A brief review of sleep terrors, nightmares, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Mark; Sheldon, Stephen H; Loghmanee, Darius

    2013-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of sleep disorders in children is broad, ranging from primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome to complex sleep-related behaviors and movement disorders. Although snoring and OSA typically receive significant attention and discussion, other biologically based sleep disorders are as common, if not more common, in children. A general pediatrician is frequently presented with the complaint of sleep talking, sleep walking, or abnormal movements during sleep. Even more alarming is the presentation of the child suddenly and explosively screaming during sleep. Such complaints fall under the category of parasomnias. Exclusive to sleep and wake-to-sleep transitions, these parasomnias include arousals with abnormal motor, behavioral, autonomic, or sensory symptoms. Parasomnias can be noticeably dissimilar in clinical manifestations, but most share biologic characteristics. Three parasomnias associated with loud vocalizations associated with sleep that can present to general practitioners include sleep terrors, nightmares, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although usually benign, these sleep disorders can be disruptive and even potentially dangerous to the patient and can often be threatening to quality of life. In this article, we describe the clinical features of some of these disorders and how to differentiate between their alarming presentations. PMID:24126984

  19. Sleep, recovery, and metaregulation: explaining the benefits of sleep

    PubMed Central

    Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V

    2015-01-01

    A commonly held view is that extended wakefulness is causal for a broad spectrum of deleterious effects at molecular, cellular, network, physiological, psychological, and behavioral levels. Consequently, it is often presumed that sleep plays an active role in providing renormalization of the changes incurred during preceding waking. Not surprisingly, unequivocal empirical evidence supporting such a simple bi-directional interaction between waking and sleep is often limited or controversial. One difficulty is that, invariably, a constellation of many intricately interrelated factors, including the time of day, specific activities or behaviors during preceding waking, metabolic status and stress are present at the time of measurement, shaping the overall effect observed. In addition to this, although insufficient or disrupted sleep is thought to prevent efficient recovery of specific physiological variables, it is also often difficult to attribute specific changes to the lack of sleep proper. Furthermore, sleep is a complex phenomenon characterized by a multitude of processes, whose unique and distinct contributions to the purported functions of sleep are difficult to determine, because they are interrelated. Intensive research effort over the last decades has greatly progressed current understanding of the cellular and physiological processes underlying the regulation of vigilance states. Notably, it also highlighted the infinite complexity within both waking and sleep, and revealed a number of fundamental conceptual and technical obstacles that need to be overcome in order to fully understand these processes. A promising approach could be to view sleep not as an entity, which has specific function(s) and is subject to direct regulation, but as a manifestation of the process of metaregulation, which enables efficient moment-to-moment integration between internal and external factors, preceding history and current homeostatic needs. PMID:26719733

  20. Evaluation of a Behavioral Treatment Package to Reduce Sleep Problems in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Keith D.; Kuhn, Brett R.; DeHaai, Kristi A.; Wallace, Dustin P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a behavioral treatment package to reduce chronic sleep problems in children with Angelman Syndrome. Participants were five children, 2-11 years-of-age. Parents maintained sleep diaries to record sleep and disruptive nighttime behaviors. Actigraphy was added to provide…

  1. Sleep Disturbance and Expressive Language Development in Preschool-Age Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgin, Jamie O.; Tooley, Ursula; Demara, Bianca; Nyhuis, Casandra; Anand, Payal; Spanò, Goffredina

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that sleep may facilitate language learning. This study examined variation in language ability in 29 toddlers with Down syndrome (DS) in relation to levels of sleep disruption. Toddlers with DS and poor sleep (66%, n = 19) showed greater deficits on parent-reported and objective measures of language, including…

  2. Adolescence and Parental History of Alcoholism: Insights from the Sleep EEG

    E-print Network

    Adolescence and Parental History of Alcoholism: Insights from the Sleep EEG Leila Tarokh, Eliza Van Background: Disrupted sleep is a common complaint of individuals with alcohol use disorder and in abstinent alcoholics. Furthermore, among recovering alcoholics, poor sleep predicts relapse to drink- ing. Whether

  3. Acute Versus Chronic Partial Sleep Deprivation in Middle-Aged People: Differential Effect on Performance and Sleepiness

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Pierre; Sagaspe, Patricia; Prague, Mélanie; Tassi, Patricia; Capelli, Aurore; Bioulac, Bernard; Commenges, Daniel; Taillard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effects of acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction on vigilance, performance, and self-perception of sleepiness. Design: Habitual night followed by 1 night of total sleep loss (acute sleep deprivation) or 5 consecutive nights of 4 hr of sleep (chronic sleep restriction) and recovery night. Participants: Eighteen healthy middle-aged male participants (age [(± standard deviation] = 49.7 ± 2.6 yr, range 46-55 yr). Measurements: Multiple sleep latency test trials, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale scores, simple reaction time test (lapses and 10% fastest reaction times), and nocturnal polysomnography data were recorded. Results: Objective and subjective sleepiness increased immediately in response to sleep restriction. Sleep latencies after the second and third nights of sleep restriction reached levels equivalent to those observed after acute sleep deprivation, whereas Karolinska Sleepiness Scale scores did not reach these levels. Lapse occurrence increased after the second day of sleep restriction and reached levels equivalent to those observed after acute sleep deprivation. A statistical model revealed that sleepiness and lapses did not progressively worsen across days of sleep restriction. Ten percent fastest reaction times (i.e., optimal alertness) were not affected by acute or chronic sleep deprivation. Recovery to baseline levels of alertness and performance occurred after 8-hr recovery night. Conclusions: In middle-aged study participants, sleep restriction induced a high increase in sleep propensity but adaptation to chronic sleep restriction occurred beyond day 3 of restriction. This sleepiness attenuation was underestimated by the participants. One recovery night restores daytime sleepiness and cognitive performance deficits induced by acute or chronic sleep deprivation. Citation: Philip P; Sagaspe P; Prague M; Tassi P; Capelli A; Bioulac B; Commenges D; Taillard J. Acute versus chronic partial sleep deprivation in middle-aged people: differential effect on performance and sleepiness. SLEEP 2012;35(7):997–1002. PMID:22754046

  4. Cued Memory Reactivation During Sleep Influences Skill Learning

    PubMed Central

    Antony, James W.; Gobel, Eric W.; O'Hare, Justin K.; Reber, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Information acquired during waking can be reactivated during sleep, promoting memory stabilization. After people learned to produce two melodies in time with moving visual symbols, we produced a relative improvement in performance by presenting one melody during an afternoon nap. Electrophysiological signs of memory processing during sleep corroborated the notion that appropriate auditory stimulation that does not disrupt sleep can nevertheless bias memory consolidation in relevant brain circuitry. PMID:22751035

  5. Sleep in Schizophrenia: Pathology and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Benson, Kathleen L

    2015-03-01

    Both subjective and objective assessments of sleep patterns in schizophrenia include a wide range of dyssomnias, with insomnia being the most frequently cited. Early and middle insomnia can range from mild disruption to total sleeplessness. Severe insomnia is a prodromal sign of clinical exacerbation or relapse. In general, most antipsychotic agents (APs) ameliorate this insomnia. However, in some schizophrenics APs can be associated with residual insomnia or with significant daytime somnolence. Furthermore, in some schizophrenics APs can induce or exacerbate comorbid sleep disorders such as restless legs syndrome, sleep-disordered breathing, and parasomnias such as sleepwalking. PMID:26055673

  6. Sleep deprivation, physician performance, and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Olson, Eric J; Drage, Lisa A; Auger, R Robert

    2009-11-01

    Long work hours, overnight call duty, and rotating shifts are implicit features of hospital medical practice. Rigorous schedules have been deemed necessary to fulfill the professional obligation of patient beneficence, to optimize trainee learning, and to respond to economic realities. However, the resultant disruption and restriction of physicians' sleep produce demonstrable neurobehavioral impairments that may threaten other fundamental professional mandates, such as that of primum non nocere ("first, do no harm"). This article provides a basic overview of sleep/wake regulatory processes, examines the impact of physician schedules on sleep/wake homeostasis, summarizes the laboratory-demonstrated effects of sleep loss on humans, highlights recent literature on the personal and professional effects of sleep loss on physicians, and, finally, discusses the specific countermeasure of work-hour limits applicable to resident physicians but not attending physicians. PMID:19892678

  7. [Indications in sleep-apnea syndrome. When and why is further assessment meaningful?].

    PubMed

    Bloch, K E; Russi, E W

    1997-03-11

    Forms of sleep apnea syndrome: Interrupted breathing and hypoventilation during sleep lead to sleep disorders and to cardiovascular sequelae. In the common obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) apneas are related to intermittent obstruction of the upper airways. In the rarer central sleep apnea syndrome certain cardiovascular or central nervous system disorders lead to disturbed regulation of respiration connected with periodic breathing. Signs indicating OSAS: Loud, cyclic snoring, interrupted by cessation of breathing during sleep observed by relatives and excessive daytime to diurnal sleepiness indicate OSAS. Furthermore alteration of personality, headache in the morning, non-refreshing sleep and nocturnal choking sensations may indicate OSAS. When is evaluation necessary? Patients with complaints possibly induced by OSAS should be further evaluated since nocturnal application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by means of a nose mask and other treatment forms often lead to significant improvement of OSAS. In addition patients with untreated OSAS have an increased risk for car accidents and premature death as consequence of cardiovascular diseases. The type and extent of a supposed respiratory disorder is evaluated by means of a sleep study. PMID:9190646

  8. Circadian misalignment augments markers of insulin resistance and inflammation, independently of sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Leproult, Rachel; Holmbäck, Ulf; Van Cauter, Eve

    2014-06-01

    Shift workers, who are exposed to irregular sleep schedules resulting in sleep deprivation and misalignment of circadian rhythms, have an increased risk of diabetes relative to day workers. In healthy adults, sleep restriction without circadian misalignment promotes insulin resistance. To determine whether the misalignment of circadian rhythms that typically occurs in shift work involves intrinsic adverse metabolic effects independently of sleep loss, a parallel group design was used to study 26 healthy adults. Both interventions involved 3 inpatient days with 10-h bedtimes, followed by 8 inpatient days of sleep restriction to 5 h with fixed nocturnal bedtimes (circadian alignment) or with bedtimes delayed by 8.5 h on 4 of the 8 days (circadian misalignment). Daily total sleep time (SD) during the intervention was nearly identical in the aligned and misaligned conditions (4 h 48 min [5 min] vs. 4 h 45 min [6 min]). In both groups, insulin sensitivity (SI) significantly decreased after sleep restriction, without a compensatory increase in insulin secretion, and inflammation increased. In male participants exposed to circadian misalignment, the reduction in SI and the increase in inflammation both doubled compared with those who maintained regular nocturnal bedtimes. Circadian misalignment that occurs in shift work may increase diabetes risk and inflammation, independently of sleep loss. PMID:24458353

  9. A new function of rapid eye movement sleep: improvement of muscular efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zi-Jian

    2015-05-15

    Previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep (SWS) functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by emotional memories randomly accumulated during waking, while the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep played the opposite role. Many experimental results have unambiguously shown that various emotional memories are processed during REM sleep. In this article, it is attempted to combine this confirmed function of REM sleep with the atonic state unique to REM sleep, and to integrate a new theory suggesting that improvement of muscular efficiency be a new function of REM sleep. This new function of REM sleep is more advantageous than the function of REM sleep in emotional memories and disinhibited drives to account for the phylogenetic variations of REM sleep, especially the absence of REM sleep in dolphins and short duration of REM sleep in birds in contrary to that in humans and rodents, the absence of penile erections in REM sleep in armadillo, as well as the higher voltage in EEG during REM sleep in platypus and ostrich. Besides, this new function of REM sleep is also advantageous to explain the association of REM sleep with the atonic episodes in SWS, the absence of drastic menopausal change in duration of REM sleep, and the effects of ambient temperature on the duration of REM sleep. These comparative and experimental evidences support the improvement of muscular efficiency as a new and major function of REM sleep. PMID:25770701

  10. Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids

    PubMed Central

    Hölker, Franz; Heller, Stefan; Berghahn, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month’s exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m × 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift. PMID:24688857

  11. Visual orientation and navigation in nocturnal arthropods.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2010-01-01

    With their highly sensitive visual systems, the arthropods have evolved a remarkable capacity to orient and navigate at night. Whereas some navigate under the open sky, and take full advantage of the celestial cues available there, others navigate in more difficult conditions, such as through the dense understory of a tropical rainforest. Four major classes of orientation are performed by arthropods at night, some of which involve true navigation (i.e. travel to a distant goal that lies beyond the range of direct sensory contact): (1) simple straight-line orientation, typically for escape purposes; (2) nightly short-distance movements relative to a shoreline, typically in the context of feeding; (3) long-distance nocturnal migration at high altitude in the quest to locate favorable feeding or breeding sites, and (4) nocturnal excursions to and from a fixed nest or food site (i.e. homing), a task that in most species involves path integration and/or the learning and recollection of visual landmarks. These four classes of orientation--and their visual basis--are reviewed here, with special emphasis given to the best-understood animal systems that are representative of each. PMID:20733292

  12. Arvicanthis ansorgei, a Novel Model for the Study of Sleep and Waking in Diurnal Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Jeffrey; Ruppert, Elisabeth; Calvel, Laurent; Robin-Choteau, Ludivine; Gropp, Claire-Marie; Allemann, Caroline; Reibel, Sophie; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Bourgin, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep neurobiology studies use nocturnal species, mainly rats and mice. However, because their daily sleep/wake organization is inverted as compared to humans, a diurnal model for sleep studies is needed. To fill this gap, we phenotyped sleep and waking in Arvicanthis ansorgei, a diurnal rodent widely used for the study of circadian rhythms. Design: Video-electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOG) recordings. Setting: Rodent sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen male Arvicanthis ansorgei, aged 3 mo. Interventions: 12 h light (L):12 h dark (D) baseline condition, 24-h constant darkness, 6-h sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep showed similar electrophysiological characteristics as nocturnal rodents. On average, animals spent 12.9 h ± 0.4 awake per 24-h cycle, of which 6.88 h ± 0.3 was during the light period. NREM sleep accounted for 9.63 h ± 0.4, which of 5.13 h ± 0.2 during dark period, and REM sleep for 89.9 min ± 6.7, which of 52.8 min ± 4.4 during dark period. The time-course of sleep and waking across the 12 h light:12 h dark was overall inverted to that observed in rats or mice, though with larger amounts of crepuscular activity at light and dark transitions. A dominant crepuscular regulation of sleep and waking persisted under constant darkness, showing the lack of a strong circadian drive in the absence of clock reinforcement by external cues, such as a running wheel. Conservation of the homeostatic regulation was confirmed with the observation of higher delta power following sustained waking periods and a 6-h sleep deprivation, with subsequent decrease during recovery sleep. Conclusions: Arvicanthis ansorgei is a valid diurnal rodent model for studying the regulatory mechanisms of sleep and so represents a valuable tool for further understanding the nocturnality/diurnality switch. Citation: Hubbard J, Ruppert E, Calvel L, Robin-Choteau L, Gropp CM, Allemann C, Reibel S, Sage-Ciocca D, Bourgin P. Arvicanthis ansorgei, a novel model for the study of sleep and waking in diurnal rodents. SLEEP 2015;38(6):979–988. PMID:25409107

  13. Estimating sleep from multisensory armband measurements: validity and reliability in teens.

    PubMed

    Roane, Brandy M; Van Reen, Eliza; Hart, Chantelle N; Wing, Rena; Carskadon, Mary A

    2015-12-01

    Given the recognition that sleep may influence obesity risk, there is increasing interest in measuring sleep parameters within obesity studies. The goal of the current analyses was to determine whether the SenseWear(®) Pro3 Armband (armband), typically used to assess physical activity, is reliable at assessing sleep parameters. The armband was compared with the AMI Motionlogger(®) (actigraph), a validated activity monitor for sleep assessment, and with polysomnography, the gold standard for assessing sleep. Participants were 20 adolescents (mean age = 15.5 years) with a mean body mass index percentile of 63.7. All participants wore the armband and actigraph on their non-dominant arm while in-lab during a nocturnal polysomnographic recording (600 min). Epoch-by-epoch sleep/wake data and concordance of sleep parameters were examined. No significant sleep parameter differences were found between the armband and polysomnography; the actigraph tended to overestimate sleep and underestimate wake compared with polysomnography. Both devices showed high sleep sensitivity, but lower wake detection rates. Bland-Altman plots showed large individual differences in armband sleep parameter concordance rates. The armband did well estimating sleep overall, with group results more similar to polysomnography than the actigraph; however, the armband was less accurate at an individual level than the actigraph. PMID:26126746

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: natural history, diagnosis, and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Gharibeh, Tarek; Mehra, Reena

    2010-01-01

    Sleep apnea is an entity characterized by repetitive upper airway obstruction resulting in nocturnal hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. It is estimated that 2%–4% of the middle-aged population has sleep apnea with a predilection in men relative to women. Risk factors of sleep apnea include obesity, gender, age, menopause, familial factors, craniofacial abnormalities, and alcohol. Sleep apnea has been increasingly recognized as a major health burden associated with hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Increased airway collapsibility and derangement in ventilatory control responses are the major pathological features of this disorder. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold-standard method for diagnosis of sleep apnea and assessment of sleep apnea severity; however, portable sleep monitoring has a diagnostic role in the setting of high pretest probability sleep apnea in the absence of significant comorbidity. Positive pressure therapy is the mainstay therapy of sleep apnea. Other treatment modalities, such as upper airway surgery or oral appliances, may be used for the treatment of sleep apnea in select cases. In this review, we focus on describing the sleep apnea definition, risk factor profile, underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, associated adverse consequences, diagnostic modalities, and treatment strategies. PMID:23616712

  15. Ecology and Neurophysiology of Sleep in Two Wild Sloth Species

    PubMed Central

    Voirin, Bryson; Scriba, Madeleine F.; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Wikelski, Martin; Rattenborg, Niels C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Interspecific variation in sleep measured in captivity correlates with various physiological and environmental factors, including estimates of predation risk in the wild. However, it remains unclear whether prior comparative studies have been confounded by the captive recording environment. Herein we examine the effect of predation pressure on sleep in sloths living in the wild. Design: Comparison of two closely related sloth species, one exposed to predation and one free from predation. Setting: Panamanian mainland rainforest (predators present) and island mangrove (predators absent). Participants: Mainland (Bradypus variegatus, five males and four females) and island (Bradypus pygmaeus, six males) sloths. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded using a miniature data logger. Although both species spent between 9 and 10 h per day sleeping, the mainland sloths showed a preference for sleeping at night, whereas island sloths showed no preference for sleeping during the day or night. Standardized EEG activity during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed lower low-frequency power, and increased spindle and higher frequency power in island sloths when compared to mainland sloths. Conclusions: In sloths sleeping in the wild, predation pressure influenced the timing of sleep, but not the amount of time spent asleep. The preference for sleeping at night in mainland sloths may be a strategy to avoid detection by nocturnal cats. The pronounced differences in the NREM sleep EEG spectrum remain unexplained, but might be related to genetic or environmental factors. Citation: Voirin B; Scriba MF; Martinez-Gonzalez D; Vyssotski AL; Wikelski M; Rattenborg NC. Ecology and neurophysiology of sleep in two wild sloth species. SLEEP 2014;37(4):753-761. PMID:24899764

  16. Insomnia and sleep apnea in midlife women: prevalence and consequences to health and functioning

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common during the menopausal transition, with numerous downstream consequences to health and functioning, including reduced quality of life, impaired mental health, and increased physical health morbidity. Insomnia affects approximately 50% of midlife women and is characterized by nocturnal symptoms of difficulties initiating or maintaining sleep (or both) and daytime symptoms that impair occupational, social, or other components of functioning. In addition, approximately 20% of midlife women develop sleep-disordered breathing during the menopausal transition. This commentary summarizes the prevalence, risk factors, and treatment options for each of these sleep disorders in midlife women, with specific focus on first-line treatments for insomnia (cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia) and sleep-disordered breathing (continuous positive airway pressure) and unique considerations for treating sleep disorders in midlife women. Future directions are also discussed. PMID:26097736

  17. Systemic growth hormone corrects sleep disturbance in Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Masahiro; Hayashi, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Shimohira, Masayuki; Kohyama, Jun

    2004-10-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by an interstitial deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. Sleep problems such as nocturnal awakening and abnormality in the percentage of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are frequently observed in patients with SMS, and several medications have been administered to improve the sleep disorders. Here we present a female case of SMS showing early waking and reduction of REM sleep, which were corrected by human growth hormone (GH) replacement for her dwarfism. Also, we report changes in the sleep-wakefulness circadian rhythm and polysomnographical data before and after the start of human GH replacement. It is speculated that GH deficiency could be involved in sleep disturbance in SMS. PMID:15351087

  18. Physiological changes, sleep, and morning mood in an isolated environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Norbert O.; Inoue, Natsuhiko; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Murai, Tadashi; Sekiguchi, Chiharu; Orasanu, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous isolation studies have shown increased 24-h urine volumes and body weight gains in subjects. This project examined those and other physiological variables in relationship to sleep motor activity, subjective sleep quality, mood, and complaints during confinement. METHODS: Six male and two female subjects lived for 7 d in the National Space Development Agency of Japan's isolation chamber, which simulates the interior of the Japanese Experiment Module. Each 24-h period included 6 h of sleep, 3 meals, and 20 min of exercise. Each morning, subjects completed Sleep Sensation and Complaint Index questionnaires. Catecholamine and creatinine excretion, urine volume, and body weight were measured on the 2 d before and 2 d after confinement, and sleep motor activity was measured during confinement. RESULTS: Confinement produced no significant change in body weight, urine volume, or questionnaire results. In contrast, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and sleep motor activity exhibited significant differences during confinement (p < 0.05). Higher nocturnal norepinephrine excretion correlated with higher sleep motor activity. CONCLUSION: The 24-h epinephrine values were slightly higher than normal throughout the experiment, but lower than for subjects working under time-stress. High sympathetic activity (as indicated by norepinephrine) may have interfered with sleep.

  19. Quality of Sleep in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Askarian, Zahra; Najafi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder causing motor and non-motor symptoms. The latter are common and include autonomic dysfunction, cognitive impairment, and sleep difficulties. Many of the non-motor aspects of PD such as sleep disturbance are more common and significantly affect the day-to-day activities of patients and their quality of life. The most important aim of this study was to evaluate the sleep quality in patients with PD. Methods: This case-control study was performed on patients with PD referred to the Neurology Clinic of our teaching hospital in 2011. Thirty-four patients with PD and 34 healthy people as control group were enrolled in this study. Sleep quality of patients and control was evaluated by Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS) questionnaire. PDSS is a reliable and valid tool to measure sleep disorders in PD. Results: The mean total PDSS score in patient group was 55.29 (SD = 26.92) indicating moderate to severe sleep disturbances whereas, the mean total score in control group was 20.34 (SD = 10.65). Difference between the two groups’ mean scores was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that patients with PD experienced poorer nocturnal sleep quality than the control group. PMID:23776729

  20. Risk markers for depression in adolescents: sleep and HPA measures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Uma; Hammen, Constance L; Poland, Russell E

    2009-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated reliable electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) changes associated with adult major depressive disorder. These changes might be evident before clinical manifestation of the illness in at-risk persons. The aim of the study was to identify depression-related EEG sleep and HPA changes in healthy adolescents at high risk for depression, and to examine the relationship between EEG sleep (or HPA) changes and the onset of depression. Forty-eight adolescent volunteers with no personal history of a psychiatric illness, including depression, but who were at high risk for developing depression by virtue of parental depression (high-risk group), and 48 adolescent volunteers with no personal or family history of a psychiatric disorder (normal controls) were recruited. EEG sleep and HPA measures were collected on three consecutive evenings and nights at baseline. Clinical follow-up evaluations were conducted at regular intervals over a 5-year period. Compared with normal controls, adolescents at high risk for depression had shorter latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, increased phasic REM sleep, more REM sleep and elevated nocturnal urinary-free cortisol (NUFC) excretion at baseline. Shorter REM latency, higher REM density and elevated NUFC (measured at baseline) were associated with the development of depression during follow-up. The findings that REM sleep abnormalities and elevated HPA activity occur before the onset of depression in at-risk adolescents suggest that these variables serve as vulnerability markers for the illness. PMID:19262465

  1. Effects of playing a computer game using a bright display on presleep physiological variables, sleep latency, slow wave sleep and REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Shigekazu; Motohashi, Yutaka; Liu, Yang; Maeda, Akira

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that playing a computer game at night delays bedtime and shortens sleeping hours, but the effects on sleep architecture and quality have remained unclear. In the present study, the effects of playing a computer game and using a bright display on nocturnal sleep were examined in a laboratory. Seven male adults (24.7+/-5.6 years old) played exciting computer games with a bright display (game-BD) and a dark display (game-DD) and performed simple tasks with low mental load as a control condition in front of a BD (control-BD) and DD (control-DD) between 23:00 and 1:45 hours in randomized order and then went to bed at 2:00 hours and slept until 8:00 hours. Rectal temperature, electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rate and subjective sleepiness were recorded before sleep and a polysomnogram was recorded during sleep. Heart rate was significantly higher after playing games than after the control conditions, and it was also significantly higher after using the BD than after using the DD. Subjective sleepiness and relative theta power of EEG were significantly lower after playing games than after the control conditions. Sleep latency was significantly longer after playing games than after the control conditions. REM sleep was significantly shorter after the playing games than after the control conditions. No significant effects of either computer games or BD were found on slow-wave sleep. These results suggest that playing an exciting computer game affects sleep latency and REM sleep but that a bright display does not affect sleep variables. PMID:16120101

  2. Sleep disturbance and the effects of extended-release zolpidem during cannabis withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Vandrey, Ryan; Smith, Michael T.; McCann, Una D.; Budney, Alan J.; Curran, Erin M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sleep difficulty is a common symptom of cannabis withdrawal, but little research has objectively measured sleep or explored the effects of hypnotic medication on sleep during cannabis withdrawal. Methods Twenty daily cannabis users completed a within-subject crossover study. Participants alternated between periods of ad-libitum cannabis use and short-term cannabis abstinence (3 days). Placebo was administered at bedtime during one abstinence period (withdrawal test) and extended-release zolpidem, a non-benzodiazepine GABAA receptor agonist, was administered during the other. Polysomnographic (PSG) sleep architecture measures, subjective ratings, and cognitive performance effects were assessed each day. Results During the placebo-abstinence period, participants had decreased sleep efficiency, total sleep time, percent time spent in Stage 1 and Stage 2 sleep, REM latency and subjective sleep quality, as well as increased sleep latency and time spent in REM sleep compared with when they were using cannabis. Zolpidem attenuated the effects of abstinence on sleep architecture and normalized sleep efficiency scores, but had no effect on sleep latency. Zolpidem was not associated with any significant side effects or next-day cognitive performance impairments. Conclusions These data extend prior research that indicates abrupt abstinence from cannabis can lead to clinically significant sleep disruption in daily users. The findings also indicate that sleep disruption associated with cannabis withdrawal can be attenuated by zolpidem, suggesting that hypnotic medications might be useful adjunct pharmacotherapies in the treatment of cannabis use disorders. PMID:21296508

  3. Circadian rhythms in glucose and lipid metabolism in nocturnal and diurnal mammals.

    PubMed

    Kumar Jha, Pawan; Challet, Etienne; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-12-15

    Most aspects of energy metabolism display clear variations during day and night. This daily rhythmicity of metabolic functions, including hormone release, is governed by a circadian system that consists of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) and many secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral organs. The SCN control peripheral timing via the autonomic and neuroendocrine system, as well as via behavioral outputs. The sleep-wake cycle, the feeding/fasting rhythm and most hormonal rhythms, including that of leptin, ghrelin and glucocorticoids, usually show an opposite phase (relative to the light-dark cycle) in diurnal and nocturnal species. By contrast, the SCN clock is most active at the same astronomical times in these two categories of mammals. Moreover, in both species, pineal melatonin is secreted only at night. In this review we describe the current knowledge on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism by central and peripheral clock mechanisms. Most experimental knowledge comes from studies in nocturnal laboratory rodents. Nevertheless, we will also mention some relevant findings in diurnal mammals, including humans. It will become clear that as a consequence of the tight connections between the circadian clock system and energy metabolism, circadian clock impairments (e.g., mutations or knock-out of clock genes) and circadian clock misalignments (such as during shift work and chronic jet-lag) have an adverse effect on energy metabolism, that may trigger or enhancing obese and diabetic symptoms. PMID:25662277

  4. Nocturnal Hypertension and Attenuated Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping is Common in Pediatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. Fallon; Swartz, Sarah J.; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an important manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but reports of prevalence vary between 20-70% in published reports of adult and pediatric patients. For both children and adults with SLE, the clinical diagnosis and management of hypertension has traditionally been based on guidelines developed for the general population. In clinical trials, the criteria used for defining participants with hypertension are mostly undefined. As a first step towards formally assessing the blood pressure (BP) patterns of children diagnosed with SLE, 24-hr ambulatory BP monitoring data was analyzed on clinic patients who presented with prehypertension or stage I hypertension. In this pediatric SLE cohort (n=10), 20% met daytime criteria for a diagnosis of hypertension. Patterns of BP elevation varied widely with white coat, masked, isolated systolic, and diastolic nocturnal hypertension all identified. Nocturnal hypertension was detected in 60% and attenuated nocturnal BP dipping in 90% of both hypertensive and normotensive SLE patients. In SLE patients, the median nighttime systolic and diastolic loads were 25% and 15.5% compared with median daily loads of 12.5% and 11.5%. Daytime and nighttime systolic and diastolic BP load and nocturnal dipping was compared to a control population consisting of 85 non-SLE patients under 21 years old with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension presenting to hypertension clinic. Median systolic BP dipped 5.3 mmHg in SLE patients compared to 11.9 mmHg in non-lupus ( p-value = 0.001). Median diastolic BP dipped 12.9 mmHg versus 18.5 mmHg in non-lupus ( p-value = 0.003). Patterns of BP dysregulation in pediatric SLE merit further exploration. Children with or without SLE displaying prehypertensive or stage 1 casual BP measurements had similar rates of hypertension by ambulatory BP monitoring. However, regardless of BP diagnosis, and independent of kidney involvement, there was an increased proportion with attenuated nocturnal dipping and nocturnal hypertension in SLE patients. PMID:26664705

  5. Sleep Quiz

    MedlinePLUS

    ... RLS. 8. False is correct. The human body's biological clock programs each person to feel sleepy during ... sleep during the day are constantly fighting their biological clocks. This puts them at risk of error ...

  6. Sleep Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet ... Flickr FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory Committees ... Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to ...

  7. National Sleep Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NSF Official Sleepiness Test Sleep Tips The Bedroom Environment Videos View More Items Journal Go Back View ... Works Myths and Facts about Sleep The Sleep Environment Ask The Expert Sleep Hygiene Children and Bedtime ...

  8. Sleep disorders - overview

    MedlinePLUS

    Sleep disorders are problems with sleeping. These include: Trouble falling or staying asleep Falling asleep at the wrong ... Mononucleosis or other viral illnesses Narcolepsy and other sleep disorders Obesity, especially if it causes obstructive sleep apnea ...

  9. The effects of current-concern- and nonconcern-related waking suggestions on nocturnal dream content.

    PubMed

    Nikles, C D; Brecht, D L; Klinger, E; Bursell, A L

    1998-07-01

    In previous research, presleep suggestions influenced nocturnal dream content. It was hypothesized that suggesting topics associated with participants' current concerns would influence dream content more than suggesting other topics. Ten students spent 4 nights in a sleep laboratory: an adaptation night, a baseline night, and 2 nights under suggestions to dream about a concern-related or other topic. Concern-related suggestions influenced dream content--largely its central imagery--more than did other suggestions, which did not differ from nonsuggestion. Number of transformations within dreams was uncorrelated with dream vividness, contrary to extended activation-synthesis theory. Thus, the concern-related status of suggestions moderates their effectiveness and, inconsistent with extended activation-synthesis theory but consistent with current-concerns and distributed-activation theories, motivational and volitional processes actively influence dream content. PMID:9686462

  10. Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Comorbidities in Drug-Naïve Narcolepsy-Spectrum Disorders—A Japanese Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a large cross-sectional study which aimed to investigate comorbidity rate, degree of sleep-related breathing disorder, polysomnigraphically diagnosible rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder/rapid eye movement sleep without atonia and periodic limb movements during sleep in Japanese drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy-spectrum disorders. A total of 158 consecutive drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 295 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 395 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time were enrolled. From retrospectively analyzed data of nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test, higher rates of periodic limb movements during sleep (> = 15 h-1) (10.2%) and polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (1.9%) were found in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. They had more severe periodic limb movements during sleep especially during rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentages of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia than the other two patient groups. In the present large sample study, Japanese drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed the highest comorbidity rates of periodic limb movements during sleep, polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia among those with the other narcolepsy-spectrum disorders; the rates were lower than those for Western patients. PMID:26322978

  11. Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Comorbidities in Drug-Naïve Narcolepsy-Spectrum Disorders--A Japanese Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Kinoshita, Akihiko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    This is a large cross-sectional study which aimed to investigate comorbidity rate, degree of sleep-related breathing disorder, polysomnigraphically diagnosible rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder/rapid eye movement sleep without atonia and periodic limb movements during sleep in Japanese drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy-spectrum disorders. A total of 158 consecutive drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 295 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 395 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time were enrolled. From retrospectively analyzed data of nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test, higher rates of periodic limb movements during sleep (> = 15 h(-1)) (10.2%) and polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (1.9%) were found in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. They had more severe periodic limb movements during sleep especially during rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentages of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia than the other two patient groups. In the present large sample study, Japanese drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed the highest comorbidity rates of periodic limb movements during sleep, polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia among those with the other narcolepsy-spectrum disorders; the rates were lower than those for Western patients. PMID:26322978

  12. Delayed sleep onset in depressed young people

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The circadian abnormality of delayed sleep phase has been suggested to characterise a subgroup of depressed young adults with different risk factors and course of illness. We aim to assess the prevalence and factors, particularly substance use, associated with such delay in a large help-seeking cohort of young people with mental health problems. Methods From a consecutively recruited sample of 802 help-seeking young people, 305 (38%) had at least moderate depressive symptoms (QIDS-C16 >10), sleep data and did not have a chronic severe mental illness. Demographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated through self report and clinical interview. Delayed sleep phase was defined as a sleep onset between the hours of 02:00 a.m. – 06:00 a.m. and the characteristics of this group were compared to normal phase sleepers. Results Delayed sleep onset was reported amongst 18% (n?=?56/305) of the depressed group compared to 11% of the non-depressed young people. Amongst the depressed group, delayed sleep onset was associated with tobacco, alcohol and cannabis misuse and short sleep duration (x?: 5.8 hrs vs. x?: 7.8 hrs). There were no differences in demographic factors, personality traits or symptoms. Tobacco smoking was very common: In logistic regression analyses only tobacco use (OR 2.28, 95% CI: 1.04 - 5.01) was associated with delayed sleep onset. There was no interaction with age. Conclusions Delayed sleep onset was twice as common in depressed young people as the general population and young people with other mental health problems, and is a potential marker for a subgroup of mood disorders. Those with delayed sleep onset were not more severely depressed but had short sleep duration, a risk for chronic psychological ill health, and higher levels of tobacco use. Nicotine use was common in this group, has biological evidence as a sleep disrupter, and requires specifically addressing in this population. PMID:24506941

  13. Primary sleep disorders in people with epilepsy: clinical questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The questions facing clinicians with patients with sleep disorder and epilepsy are addressed in this article. Both adult and child epilepsy are discussed in the context of the most typical questions a clinician would have, such as "Are parasomnias more common in people with epilepsy?", "Is sleep architecture abnormal in children with epilepsy", along with outcomes of numerous questionnaire-based, case-based, and double-blind placebo studies on such aspects as sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, anxiety and fears, limb movement, nocturnal seizures, agitation, behavioral disorders, and learning disorders. PMID:25455580

  14. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  15. Sleep quality, sleep propensity and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Howell, Andrew J; Jahrig, Jesse C; Powell, Russell A

    2004-10-01

    We examined associations between measures of sleep propensity on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep quality on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and academic performance by GPA and grades in introductory psychology for 414 students. In the total sample, neither sleep propensity nor sleep quality correlated with GPA or introductory psychology grades. However, among students carrying a full course load, those reporting poor sleep quality performed less well on academic measures than those reporting a better quality of sleep. Further research is needed to assess the moderating influence of overall demands of daytime functioning on the association between sleep quality and academic performance. PMID:15560340

  16. Nocturnal bruxism and hypnotherapy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dowd, E Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study of a hypnotherapeutic treatment of nocturnal bruxism. The author saw the client for a total of 7 sessions. Hypnotherapy was interspersed with an exploration of tacit and initially denied hostility in the client's life as well as aspects of a somewhat difficult childhood. At the end, the bruxism had disappeared. Follow-up 1 year later indicated that the bruxism had not returned, and the client had become more assertive in her relations with others and had more exploratory activities in her life directions. The latter had not been dealt with in therapy. Thus, there appeared to be a "ripple effect" of successful therapy from one part of her life into its other aspects. PMID:23427844

  17. [Non-surgical treatment in case of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Avila Castañón, Lourdes; Alvidrez, Rafael; Espinola Reyna, Gerardo; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis; del Río Navarro, Blanca

    2003-01-01

    Consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children include reduced performance during day, behaviour problems, diurmal hypersomnia, psychomotor development delay, severe forms of cor pulmonale, systemic hypertension, growing delay and death. This paper describes the clinical case of a 3-year-old girl with perennial symptoms of nasal obstruction characterized by nocturnal snoring, oral breathing, nasal voice, sleep apnea, nasal pruritus and rhinorrhea. Her treatment is also described. PMID:14968987

  18. The Zurich 3-Step Concept for the Management of Behavioral Sleep Disorders in Children: A Before-and-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Helene; Hunkeler, Peter; Benz, Caroline; Molinari, Luciano; Guyer, Caroline; Häfliger, Fabienne; Huber, Reto; Jenni, Oskar G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several strategies have been found to be effective for the treatment of childhood behavioral sleep disorders. One which has yet to be evaluated is the Zurich 3-step concept, which combines basic notions of the two-process model of sleep regulation (introducing a regular rhythm and adjusting bedtime to sleep need) with behavioral strategies. This uncontrolled before-and-after study describes our concept and its step-wise approach, assesses changes in sleep-wake variables and behavior problems, and also examines associations between changes in sleep-wake variables and behavior problems. Methods: A total of 79 children with sleep problems (age range 6–47 months, 42% females) were included. Sleep problems were assessed by the Infant Sleep Questionnaire, sleep-wake variables by diary and actigraphy, and behavior problems of children ? 18 months by the Child Behavior Checklist. Results: A significant decrease in nocturnal wake duration (Cohen's d = ?0.34) and a significant increase in the duration of the longest continuous nocturnal sleep period (Cohen's d = 0.19) were found from before to after intervention (on average 2.7 months, SD 1.5). The variability for sleep onset and end time decreased, and actigraphically measured circadian rest-activity cycle measures improved. Parent-reported internalizing and total behavior problems also decreased (Cohen's d = 0.66). Conclusions: The findings of both objective and subjective assessment techniques suggest that the Zurich 3-step concept is effective. Thus, the intervention concept may be useful in clinical practice with sleep-disordered children. Citation: Werner H, Hunkeler P, Benz C, Molinari L, Guyer C, Häfliger F, Huber R, Jenni OG. The Zurich 3-step concept for the management of behavioral sleep disorders in children: a before-and-after study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):241–249. PMID:25580603

  19. Nocturnal flow on a western Colorado slope

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, J.M. Jr.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1990-04-01

    The Department of Energy sponsored Atomspheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program has conducted a research program designed to increase our knowledge and understanding of terrain-dominated flows with specific emphasis on nocturnal flows within mountain valleys. ASCOT has sponsored both field studies and numerical modeling efforts to improve our understanding of the wind, temperature and turbulence structure of nocturnal drainage flows. One of the most recent ASCOT sponsored field studies involves a study within the Mesa Creek Basin in western Colorado to investigate the seasonal frequency of occurrence of drainage flows along the sloped surfaces and within the basin, and to evaluate the effect of the ambient meteorology on their development. The Mesa Creek Basin, situated on the north slope of the Grand Mesa, encompasses a roughly 10 {times} 20 km area that is approximately 30 km east of Grand Junction. The observational segment of the study was undertaken jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and involved the operation of network of eight meteorological towers and a monostatic sodar within the Mesa Creek study area over a period of one year that extended from December 1988 through November 1989. These measurements were augmented by tethersonde observations to define the vertical wind and temperature structure during a few nights. The modeling portion of the study is being undertaken by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory using a three-dimensional prognostic boundary layer model to gain further insight into the dynamics of the seasonal variations and the effect of cloud cover on the development of the drainage flows. It is the purpose of this paper to present preliminary results form a numerical simulation done as part of this study. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  20. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  1. Covert waking brain activity reveals instantaneous sleep depth.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Scott M; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Buxton, Orfeu M; Solet, Jo M; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for resolving early positions along this continuum is the alpha oscillation, an 8-13 Hz electroencephalographic rhythm prominent over posterior scalp locations. The brain activation signature of wakefulness, alpha expression discloses immediate levels of alertness and dissipates in concert with fading awareness as sleep begins. This brain activity pattern, however, is largely ignored once sleep begins. Here we show that the intensity of spectral power in the alpha band actually continues to disclose instantaneous responsiveness to noise--a measure of sleep depth--throughout a night of sleep. By systematically challenging sleep with realistic and varied acoustic disruption, we found that sleepers exhibited markedly greater sensitivity to sounds during moments of elevated alpha expression. This result demonstrates that alpha power is not a binary marker of the transition between sleep and wakefulness, but carries rich information about immediate sleep stability. Further, it shows that an empirical and ecologically relevant form of sleep depth is revealed in real-time by EEG spectral content in the alpha band, a measure that affords prediction on the order of minutes. This signal, which transcends the boundaries of classical sleep stages, could potentially be used for real-time feedback to novel, adaptive drug delivery systems for inducing sleep. PMID:21408616

  2. Exercise augments the nocturnal prolactin rise in exercise-trained men

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, Anthony C.; Davis, Hope C.; Lane, Amy R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to profile over a 24 h period the prolactin responses of exercise-trained men on a day involving rest with no exercise in comparison to a day involving exercise training sessions. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental design study using repeated measures determination of 24 h prolactin responses in exercise-trained men (n = 16; age = 27.3± 3.3 years (mean ± standard deviation)). Blood samples were taken hourly over a 24 h period on a day involving two intensive exercise training sessions (ED), and on a separate control day (CD) with no exercise activity. The order of the ED and CD was randomized. Physical activity and diet were controlled and replicated for the ED and CD. Blood specimens were handled, prepared and analyzed utilizing appropriate standard clinical practices. The data were analyzed with the Friedman analysis of variance and Nemenyi post hoc statistical procedure for repeated measures. Results: On the CD, prolactin displayed a typical circadian rhythm with daytime values of the hormone being less than the nocturnal rise once sleep had begun (p < 0.05; 16:00–20:00 h > all other times). On the ED, prolactin responses were noticeably different from those of the CD. The morning and afternoon exercise sessions included significant increases in prolactin immediately at the end of the exercise sessions, being greater than corresponding CD time points (p < 0.01; 01:00 h and 10:00 h); also for the second hour (2 h) following the morning exercise session. On the ED there was a displayed circadian nocturnal response in the hormone with 16:00–24:00 h being elevated above the all nonexercise effected values for that specific day (p < 0.01). Finally, the ED nocturnal elevation for prolactin for 16:00–24:00 h was significantly greater than the same respective hours on the CD (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Findings clearly demonstrated that nocturnal prolactin responses are augmented in exercise-trained men on days when they perform exercise. The mechanisms inducing this adaptive response are unclear but warrant further investigation. PMID:26445644

  3. Sleep deprivation due to shift work.

    PubMed

    Costa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation due to shift work is related to perturbation of the sleep/wake cycle, associated with the modified activity/rest pattern. This may cause a significant disruption of circadian rhythms of biologic functions, driven by the body clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Shift and night workers have to change sleep times and strategies according to their duty periods; consequently, both sleep length and quality can be considerably affected depending on the variable start and finish times on different shifts. About 10% of night and rotating shift workers, aged between 18 and 65 years, have been estimated to have a diagnosable "shift-work sleep disorder," according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, version 2 (ICSD-2). In the long run, this may lead to persistent and severe disturbances of sleep, chronic fatigue and psychoneurotic syndromes, besides being a risk or aggravating factor for accidents, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and reproductive disorders, as well as, probably, for cancer. Preventive and corrective actions deal with the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria, careful health surveillance, appropriate education and training on effective countermeasures, in particular, sleep hygiene and napping. PMID:26563802

  4. Sleep Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Etiology, Impact, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Siddiqi, Tauseef A.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and may frequently be complicated by sleep disorders. Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea are commonly encountered in patients with COPD. Nocturnal hypoxemia is also prevalent in COPD may occur despite adequate awake oxygenation and can be especially severe in rapid eye movement sleep. Additionally, several factors—some of them unique to COPD—can contribute to sleep-related hypoventilation. Recognition of hypoventilation can be vital as supplemental oxygen therapy itself can acutely worsen hypoventilation and lead to disastrous consequences. Finally, accruing data establish an association between restless leg syndrome and COPD— an association that may be driven by hypoxemia and/or hypercapnia. Comorbid sleep disorders portend worse sleep quality, diminished quality of life, and multifarious other adverse consequences. The awareness and knowledge regarding sleep comorbidities in COPD has continued to evolve over past many years. There are still several lacunae, however, in our understanding of the etiologies, impact, and therapies of sleep disorders, specifically in patients with COPD. This review summarizes the latest concepts in prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of diverse sleep disorders in COPD. Citation: Budhiraja R, Siddiqi TA, Quan SF. Sleep disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: etiology, impact, and management. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):259–270. PMID:25700872

  5. Assessing Individual Differences in Adaptation to Extreme Environments: A 36-Hour Sleep Deprivation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Jacqueline; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    In space, astronauts may experience effects of cumulative sleep loss due to demanding work schedules that can result in cognitive performance impairments, mood state deteriorations, and sleep-wake cycle disruption. Individuals who experience sleep deprivation of six hours beyond normal sleep times experience detrimental changes in their mood and performance states. Hence, the potential for life threatening errors increases exponentially with sleep deprivation. We explored the effects of 36-hours of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance, mood states, and physiological responses to identify which metrics may best predict fatigue induced performance decrements of individuals.

  6. Nocturnal light environments influence color vision and signatures of selection on the OPN1SW opsin gene in nocturnal lemurs.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Louis, Edward E; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2013-06-01

    Although loss of short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) cones and dichromatic color vision in mammals has traditionally been linked to a nocturnal lifestyle, recent studies have identified variation in selective pressure for the maintenance of the OPN1SW opsin gene (and thus, potentially dichromacy) among nocturnal mammalian lineages. These studies hypothesize that purifying selection to retain SWS cones may be associated with a selective advantage for nocturnal color vision under certain ecological conditions. In this study, we explore the effect of nocturnal light environment on OPN1SW opsin gene evolution in a diverse sample of nocturnal lemurs (106 individuals, 19 species, and 5 genera). Using both phylogenetic and population genetic approaches, we test whether species from closed canopy rainforests, which are impoverished in short-wavelength light, have experienced relaxed selection compared with species from open canopy forests. We identify clear signatures of differential selection on OPN1SW by habitat type. Our results suggest that open canopy species generally experience strong purifying selection to maintain SWS cones. In contrast, closed canopy species experience weaker purifying selection or a relaxation of selection on OPN1SW. We also found evidence of nonfunctional OPN1SW genes in all Phaner species and in Cheirogaleus medius, implying at least three independent losses of SWS cones in cheirogaleids. Our results suggest that the evolution of color vision in nocturnal lemurs has been influenced by nocturnal light environment. PMID:23519316

  7. Prevalence of Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy in the Adult Population of Bologna and Modena, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Vignatelli, Luca; Bisulli, Francesca; Giovannini, Giada; Licchetta, Laura; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Rubboli, Guido; Provini, Federica; Tinuper, Paolo; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) in the adults of two areas of the Emilia-Romagna region (northeast Italy) and to describe the clinical features from a population-based perspective. Design: Population-based retrospective cohort study including adults with NFLE. Setting: Two areas of the Emilia-Romagna region: the city of Bologna (330,901 adult residents) and five districts of the province of Modena (424,007). Prevalence day: December 31, 2010. Participants: Patients with NFLE collected from multiple databases of neurologic hub centers of the districts involved. Diagnostic criteria: clinical history of sleep related bizarre motor attacks and videopolysomnographic recording confirming the typical features of NFLE. Inclusion criteria for prevalence calculation: residence in one of the two geographic areas on the prevalence day and an “active” or “in remission with treatment” form of NFLE. Measurements and Results: Six subjects from Bologna and eight from Modena were included. Crude prevalence (per 100,000 residents) was 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.7–4.0) in Bologna and 1.9 (0.8–3.7) in Modena. Similarly, the main clinical features were consistent: onset during adolescence (median age 11–13 y), mainly hyperkinetic seizures, nonlesional form in more than two-thirds of cases, an active form of epilepsy in more than two-thirds of cases. A family history of epilepsy was reported only for two patients. Conclusions: This epidemiologic study establishes that nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is a rare epileptic condition, fulfilling the definition for rare disease. Because of methodological limitations of our case ascertainment, the estimates we disclose must be considered the minimum prevalence. Citation: Vignatelli L, Bisulli F, Giovannini G, Licchetta L, Naldi I, Mostacci B, Rubboli G, Provini F, Tinuper P, Meletti S. Prevalence of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in the adult population of Bologna and Modena, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy. SLEEP 2015;38(3):479–485. PMID:25406112

  8. Sleep, immunity, and circadian clocks: a mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Thomas; Bollinger, Annalena; Oster, Henrik; Solbach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The lack of sufficient amounts of sleep is a hallmark of modern living, and it is commonly perceived that in the long run this makes us sick. An increasing amount of scientific data indicate that sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on immune function. Conversely, immune responses feedback on sleep phase and architecture. Several studies have investigated the impact of short-term sleep deprivation on different immune parameters, whereas only a few studies have addressed the influence of sleep restriction on the immune system. In many cases, sleep deprivation and restriction impair immune responses by disrupting circadian rhythms at the level of immune cells, which might be a consequence of disrupted endocrine and physiological circadian rhythms. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the circadian regulation of immunity, but recent studies have suggested that local as well as central circadian clocks drive the rhythms of immune function. In this review, we present a mechanistic model which proposes that sleep (through soluble factors and body temperature) primes immune cells on the one hand, and, on the other hand, provides a timing signal for hematopoietic circadian clocks. We hypothesize that chronic sleep disruption desynchronizes these clocks and, through this mechanism, deregulates immune responses. PMID:20130392

  9. A Path to Sleep Is through the Eye1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Light has long been known to modulate sleep, but recent discoveries support its use as an effective nocturnal stimulus for eliciting sleep in certain rodents. “Photosomnolence” is mediated by classical and ganglion cell photoreceptors and occurs despite the ongoing high levels of locomotion at the time of stimulus onset. Brief photic stimuli trigger rapid locomotor suppression, sleep, and a large drop in core body temperature (Tc; Phase 1), followed by a relatively fixed duration interval of sleep (Phase 2) and recovery (Phase 3) to pre-sleep activity levels. Additional light can lengthen Phase 2. Potential retinal pathways through which the sleep system might be light-activated are described and the potential roles of orexin (hypocretin) and melanin-concentrating hormone are discussed. The visual input route is a practical avenue to follow in pursuit of the neural circuitry and mechanisms governing sleep and arousal in small nocturnal mammals and the organizational principles may be similar in diurnal humans. Photosomnolence studies are likely to be particularly advantageous because the timing of sleep is largely under experimenter control. Sleep can now be effectively studied using uncomplicated, nonintrusive methods with behavior evaluation software tools; surgery for EEG electrode placement is avoidable. The research protocol for light-induced sleep is easily implemented and useful for assessing the effects of experimental manipulations on the sleep induction pathway. Moreover, the experimental designs and associated results benefit from a substantial amount of existing neuroanatomical and pharmacological literature that provides a solid framework guiding the conduct and interpretation of future investigations. PMID:26464977

  10. Differential Sleep, Sleepiness, and Neurophysiology in the Insomnia Phenotypes of Shift Work Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Belcher, Ren; Drake, Christopher L.; Roth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To characterize and compare insomnia symptoms within two common phenotypes of Shift Work Disorder. Design: Observational laboratory and field study. Setting: Hospital sleep center. Participants: 34 permanent night workers. Subjects were classified by Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Insomnia Severity Index into 3 subgroups: asymptomatic controls, alert insomniacs (AI), and sleepy insomniacs (SI). Measurements: Sleep parameters were assessed by sleep diary. Circadian phase was evaluated by dim-light salivary melatonin onset (DLMO). Objective sleepiness was measured using the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Brain activity was measured using the N1 event-related potential (ERP). A tandem repeat in PER3 was genotyped from saliva DNA. Results: (1) AI group showed normal MSLT scores but elevated N1 amplitudes indicating cortical hyperarousal. (2) SI group showed pathologically low MSLT scores but normal N1 amplitudes. (3) AI and SI groups were not significantly different from one another in circadian phase, while controls were significantly phase-delayed relative to both SWD groups. (4) AI showed significantly longer sleep latencies and lower sleep efficiency than controls during both nocturnal and diurnal sleep. SI significantly differed from controls in nocturnal sleep parameters, but differences during diurnal sleep periods were smaller and not statistically significant. (5) Genotype × phenotype ?2 analysis showed significant differences in the PER3 VNTR: 9 of 10 shift workers reporting sleepiness in a post hoc genetic substudy were found to carry the long tandem repeat on PER3, while 4 of 14 shift workers without excessive sleepiness carried the long allele. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the sleepy insomnia phenotype is comprehensively explained by circadian misalignment, while the alert insomnia phenotype resembles an insomnia disorder precipitated by shift work. Citation: Gumenyuk V, Belcher R, Drake CL, Roth T. Differential sleep, sleepiness, and neurophysiology in the insomnia phenotypes of shift work disorder. SLEEP 2015;38(1):119–126. PMID:25325466

  11. Sleeping Birds Do Not Respond to Predator Odour

    PubMed Central

    Amo, Luisa; Caro, Samuel P.; Visser, Marcel E.

    2011-01-01

    Background During sleep animals are relatively unresponsive and unaware of their environment, and therefore, more exposed to predation risk than alert and awake animals. This vulnerability might influence when, where and how animals sleep depending on the risk of predation perceived before going to sleep. Less clear is whether animals remain sensitive to predation cues when already asleep. Methodology/Principal Findings We experimentally tested whether great tits are able to detect the chemical cues of a common nocturnal predator while sleeping. We predicted that birds exposed to the scent of a mammalian predator (mustelid) twice during the night would not go into torpor (which reduces their vigilance) and hence would not reduce their body temperature as much as control birds, exposed to the scent of another mammal that does not represent a danger for the birds (rabbit). As a consequence of the higher body temperature birds exposed to the scent of a predator are predicted to have a higher resting metabolic rate (RMR) and to lose more body mass. In the experiment, all birds decreased their body temperature during the night, but we did not find any influence of the treatment on body temperature, RMR, or body mass. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that birds are not able to detect predator chemical cues while sleeping. As a consequence, antipredatory strategies taken before sleep, such as roosting sites inspection, may be crucial to cope with the vulnerability to predation risk while sleeping. PMID:22110676

  12. Strength Training and Walking Exercise and Social Activity Improve Sleep in Nursing Home and Assisted Living Residents: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kathy C.; Lambert, Corinne; Beck, Cornelia K.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Evans, William J.; Kalra, Gurpreet K.; Kleban, Morton H.; Lorenz, Rebecca; Rose, Karen; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Sullivan, Dennis H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effects of physical resistance strength training and walking (E), individualized social activity (SA), and both E and SA (ESA) compared to a usual care control group on total nocturnal sleep time in nursing home and assisted living residents. Design, Setting and Participants The study used a pretest-posttest experimental design with assignment to 1 of 4 groups for 7 weeks: 1) E (n = 55); 2) SA (n = 50); 3) ESA (n = 41); or 4) usual care control (n = 47). 193 residents in 10 nursing homes and 3 assisted living facilities were randomly assigned and 165 completed the study. Interventions The E group participated in high intensity physical resistance strength training 3 days a week and on 2 days walked for up to 45 minutes. The SA group received social activity 1 hour daily 5 days a week. The ESA group received both E and SA, and the control group participated in usual activities provided in the homes. Measurement Total nocturnal sleep time was measured by 2 nights of polysomnography at pre-and post-intervention. Sleep efficiency (SE), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, and sleep onset latency were also analyzed. Results Total nocturnal sleep time significantly increased in the ESA group over that of control group (adjusted means 364.2 minutes versus 328.9 minutes), as did SE and NREM sleep. Conclusion High intensity physical resistance strength training and walking combined with social activity significantly improves sleep in nursing home and assisted living residents. The interventions by themselves did not have significant effects on sleep in this population. PMID:21314643

  13. Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a pathophysiological implication.

  14. The Development of SleepWake Rhythms and the Search for Elemental Circuits in the Infant Brain

    E-print Network

    and theories about sleep and its associated ultradian and circadian rhythms. Here we argue that developmental processes, and the emergence of diurnal or nocturnal circadian rhythms. The devel- opmental perspective to aging and disease. Keywords: circadian rhythm, ultradian rhythm, suprachiasmatic nucleus, Norway rat

  15. Visual cues and parental favouritism in a nocturnal bird.

    PubMed

    Parejo, Deseada; Avilés, Jesús M; Rodríguez, Juan

    2010-04-23

    Visual signals are crucial for parent-offspring communication, although their functioning has been neglected for nocturnal birds. Here, we investigated parental preference for nestling coloration in nocturnal conditions--a question hitherto unexplored--in a nocturnal raptor, the scops owl (Otus scops). We assessed how parents allocated food during the night in relation to a manipulation of ultraviolet (UV) reflectance of the cere (skin above the beak) of their offspring. Reflectance of the cere shows a marked peak in the UV part of the spectrum, and location of the UV peak is related to nestling body mass (i.e. heavier nestlings have a UV peak at lower wavelengths). We found evidence of parental bias in favour of lighter offspring: UV-reduced nestlings gained more weight during the night than their control siblings. This study provides the first experimental evidence of the use of visual cues for parent-offspring communication in a nocturnal bird. PMID:19864276

  16. Visual cues and parental favouritism in a nocturnal bird

    PubMed Central

    Parejo, Deseada; Avilés, Jesús M.; Rodríguez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Visual signals are crucial for parent–offspring communication, although their functioning has been neglected for nocturnal birds. Here, we investigated parental preference for nestling coloration in nocturnal conditions—a question hitherto unexplored—in a nocturnal raptor, the scops owl (Otus scops). We assessed how parents allocated food during the night in relation to a manipulation of ultraviolet (UV) reflectance of the cere (skin above the beak) of their offspring. Reflectance of the cere shows a marked peak in the UV part of the spectrum, and location of the UV peak is related to nestling body mass (i.e. heavier nestlings have a UV peak at lower wavelengths). We found evidence of parental bias in favour of lighter offspring: UV-reduced nestlings gained more weight during the night than their control siblings. This study provides the first experimental evidence of the use of visual cues for parent–offspring communication in a nocturnal bird. PMID:19864276

  17. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia in patients receiving conventional treatment with insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Pramming, S; Thorsteinsson, B; Bendtson, I; Rønn, B; Binder, C

    1985-01-01

    The prevalence of nocturnal biochemical hypoglycaemia--that is, blood glucose concentrations below 3 mmol/l (55 mg/100 ml)--was evaluated in a random sample of 58 insulin dependent diabetics receiving twice daily insulin. Seventeen patients had at least one blood glucose value below 3 mmol/l (55 mg/100 ml) and five a value below 2 mmol/l (36 mg/100 ml) during the night. Both bedtime (2300) and fasting morning (0700) blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower in the group with nocturnal hypoglycaemia compared with the group without (p less than 0.00001). If the bedtime blood glucose concentration was below 6 mmol/l (108 mg/100 ml) the risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia was 80% (95% confidence limits 51-96%). If the bedtime blood glucose concentration was above 6 mmol/l the likelihood of hypoglycaemia not occurring during the night was 88% (74-96%). The mean glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentration in the group with nocturnal biochemical hypoglycaemia (8.2 (range 5.0-12.4)%) was significantly lower than that in the group without (9.4(7.0-14.2)%) (p less than 0.02). The prevalence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in the patients receiving twice daily insulin (29%) was compared with that in 15 patients receiving thrice daily insulin (47%) and was not found to be significantly different. The likelihood of this risk being greater with thrice daily insulin was, however, 88%. No patient with nocturnal biochemical hypoglycaemia woke up during the night with symptomatic hypoglycaemia. Nocturnal biochemical hypoglycaemia is common during twice daily treatment with insulin, and low values of HbA1c might be associated with a higher risk of such hypoglycaemia. The blood glucose concentration at bedtime is a significant predictor of nocturnal biochemical hypoglycaemia, and HbA1c values might be of help in identifying patients at risk. PMID:3926200

  18. Sleep Patterns, Sleep Instability, and Health Related Quality of Life in Parents of Ventilator-Assisted Children

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Sanchez-Ortuno, Maria M.; Edinger, Jack D.; Avis, Kristin T.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Parents of children with chronic illnesses have poorer health related quality of life (HRQoL), shorter sleep duration, and poorer sleep quality than parents of healthy children. However, night-to-night variability of sleep in parents has not previously been considered. This study compared the sleep patterns of parents of ventilator-assisted children (VENT) and healthy, typically developing children (HEALTHY), and examined the relationship between sleep variability and perceived HRQoL. Methods: Seventy-nine mothers and 33 fathers from 42 VENT families (n = 56) and 40 HEALTHY (n = 56) families completed the SF-36 and wore an actigraph for 2 weeks. Reported bedtime and wake time, along with actigraphic total sleep time (TST), wake after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep efficiency (SE) were examined using both average values and night-tonight instability (mean square successive differences). Results: VENT parents showed significantly later bedtimes, shorter TST, longer WASO, and lower SE than HEALTHY parents. VENT parents also exhibited greater instability in their reported wake time, WASO, and SE. Adjusting for family type and gender, greater instability of wake times, WASO and SE were related to poorer SF-36 subscale scores, while averaged sleep values were not. Conclusions: Many parents of ventilator-assisted children experience deficient sleep and show significant instability in their sleep, which was related to HRQoL. Similar to shift workers, variable sleep schedules that may result from caregiving responsibilities or stress may impact parental caregivers' health and well-being. Additional studies are needed to determine how support and other interventions can reduce sleep disruptions in parental caregivers. Citation: Meltzer LJ, Sanchez-Ortuno MM, Edinger JD, Avis KT. Sleep patterns, sleep instability, and health related quality of life in parents of ventilator-assisted children. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):251–258. PMID:25515280

  19. Novel mechanisms, treatments, and outcome measures in childhood sleep

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Annalisa; Smith, Anna B.; Pal, Deb K.; Gringras, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders and sleep of insufficient duration and quality are on the increase due to changes in our lifestyle, particularly in children and adolescents. Sleep disruption is also more common in children with medical conditions, compounding their difficulties. Recent studies have focused on new mechanisms that explain how learning and cognitive performance depend on a good night’s sleep. Growing alongside this latest understanding is an innovative new field of non-drug interventions that improve sleep architecture, with resulting cognitive improvements. However, we need to rigorously evaluate such potentially popular and self-administered sleep interventions with equally state-of-the-art outcome measurement tools. Animated hand-held games, that incorporate embedded sleep-dependent learning tasks, promise to offer new robust methods of measuring changes in overnight learning. Portable computing technology has the potential to offer practical, inexpensive and reliable tools to indirectly assess the quality of sleep. They may be adopted in both clinical and educational settings, providing a unique way of monitoring the effect of sleep disruption on learning, leading also to a radical rethink of how we manage chronic diseases. PMID:26029140

  20. Dietary Modulation of Drosophila Sleep-Wake Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Catterson, James H.; Knowles-Barley, Seymour; James, Katherine; Heck, Margarete M. S.; Harmar, Anthony J.; Hartley, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Background A complex relationship exists between diet and sleep but despite its impact on human health, this relationship remains uncharacterized and poorly understood. Drosophila melanogaster is an important model for the study of metabolism and behaviour, however the effect of diet upon Drosophila sleep remains largely unaddressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Using automated behavioural monitoring, a capillary feeding assay and pharmacological treatments, we examined the effect of dietary yeast and sucrose upon Drosophila sleep-wake behaviour for three consecutive days. We found that dietary yeast deconsolidated the sleep-wake behaviour of flies by promoting arousal from sleep in males and shortening periods of locomotor activity in females. We also demonstrate that arousal from nocturnal sleep exhibits a significant ultradian rhythmicity with a periodicity of 85 minutes. Increasing the dietary sucrose concentration from 5% to 35% had no effect on total sucrose ingestion per day nor any affect on arousal, however it did lengthen the time that males and females remained active. Higher dietary sucrose led to reduced total sleep by male but not female flies. Locomotor activity was reduced by feeding flies Metformin, a drug that inhibits oxidative phosphorylation, however Metformin did not affect any aspects of sleep. Conclusions We conclude that arousal from sleep is under ultradian control and regulated in a sex-dependent manner by dietary yeast and that dietary sucrose regulates the length of time that flies sustain periods of wakefulness. These findings highlight Drosophila as an important model with which to understand how diet impacts upon sleep and wakefulness in mammals and humans. PMID:20706579

  1. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

  2. Metabolic and glycemic sequelae of sleep disturbances in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations. PMID:25398202

  3. Crew factors in flight operations. Part 4: Sleep and wakefulness in international aircrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graeber, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological recordings of sleep and wakefulness in operating international (B-747) flight crews were obtained. Crews spent their first layover (48 h) of a trip in a sleep laboratory where standardized EEG, electro-oculograph (EOC), and electromyograph (EMG) sleep recordings were carried out whenever volunteers chose to sleep. During periods of wakefulness they underwent multiple sleep latency tests every 2 h in order to assess daytime drowsiness. The same standardized recordings were carried out at a home-based laboratory before departure. Approximately four crews each participated in flights over 7 to 9 time zones on five routes. All participants were encouraged to use whatever sleep-wake strategies they thought would provide them with the most satisfactory crew rest. Overall, layover sleep quality was not seriously disturbed, but eastward flights produced greater sleep disruption. The contributors of individual factors and the usefulness of various sleep strategies are discussed in the individual laboratory reports and in an operational summary.

  4. Sleep during the third trimester of pregnancy: the role of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Robledillo, N; Canário, C; Dias, C C; Moya-Albiol, L; Figueiredo, B

    2015-12-01

    Depression has been associated with sleep disturbances in pregnancy; however, no previous research has controlled the possible confounding effect of anxiety on this association. This study aims to analyze the effect of depression on sleep during the third trimester of pregnancy controlling for anxiety. The sample was composed by 143 depressed (n = 77) and non-depressed (n = 66) pregnant women who completed measures of depression, anxiety, and sleep. Differences between groups in sleep controlling for anxiety were found. Depressed pregnant women present higher number of nocturnal awakenings and spent more hours trying falling asleep during the night and the entire 24?h period. Present findings point out the effect of depression on sleep in late pregnancy, after controlling for anxiety. PMID:25715641

  5. Nocturnal Enuresis Is Associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Conduct Problems

    PubMed Central

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Hong, Soon-Beom; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Cho, Soo-Churl

    2013-01-01

    Objective There are no published prevalence estimates of elimination disorders and their association with disruptive-behavior disorders among children in the Asian region using standardized diagnostic interviews. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of elimination disorders and its association with disruptive-behavior disorders in a representative sample of children in Seoul, Korea. Methods The diagnosis of enuresis and encopresis was derived from parent-reported data for "enuresis and encopresis," collected using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, from a representative sample of 6- to 12-year-old children (n=1,645) who participated in the 2005 Seoul Child and Adolescent Mental Health Survey. Prevalence data for attention deficit and disruptive-behavior disorders were collected from the same sample. Results The overall 12-month prevalence of nocturnal enuresis and encopresis was 1.8% and 0.6%, respectively. Enuresis and encopresis prevalence in boys was significantly greater than that in girls. Enuresis and encopresis was most common at 7 to 9 years of age. Enuresis was significantly associated with ADHD (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.0-6.9) and conduct disorder (CD; OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.0-22.4). Conclusion Enuresis is significantly associated with ADHD and CD, so these conditions must be assessed together during the evaluation of children with enuresis. PMID:24302948

  6. Sleep Related Hypermotor Seizures with a Right Parietal Onset.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Steve A; Figorilli, Michela; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Proserpio, Paola; Nobili, Lino

    2015-08-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a syndrome characterized by the occurrence of sleep related seizures of variable complexity and duration. Hypermotor seizures (HMS) represent a classic manifestation of this syndrome, associated with a perturbation of the ventromesial frontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus regions. Nevertheless, in recent years, reports have showed that the seizure onset zone (SOZ) need not be of frontal origin to generate HMS. Here we report an unusual case of a patient presenting with a seven-year history of drug-resistant sleep related HMS arising from the mesial parietal region. The presence of an infrequent feeling of levitation before the HMS was key to suspecting a subtle focal cortical dysplasia in the right precuneus region. A stereo-EEG investigation confirmed the extra-frontal seizure onset of the HMS and highlighted the interrelationship between unstable sleep and seizure precipitation. PMID:25902821

  7. Sleep in Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster (1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Haynes, Paula R; Donelson, Nathan C; Aharon, Shani; Griffith, Leslie C

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a diurnal insect active during the day with consolidated sleep at night. Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations. Here, we use a commercially available locomotor activity monitor (LAM25H) system to record and analyze sleep behavior. Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals. Like individual flies, groups of flies show circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep, as well as sexual dimorphism in sleep pattern and sensitivity to starvation and a known sleep-disrupting mutation (amnesiac). Populations of flies, however, exhibit distinct sleep characteristics from individuals. Differences in sleep appear to be due to olfaction-dependent social interactions and change with population size and sex ratio. These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions. PMID:26465005

  8. Flight crew sleep during multiple layover polar flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Mitsuo; Kurosaki, Yuko S.; Spinweber, Cheryl L.; Graeber, R. C.; Takahashi, Toshiharu

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated changes in sleep after multiple transmeridian flights. The subjects were 12 B747 airline pilots operating on the following polar flight: Tokyo (TYO)-Anchorage (ANC)-London (LON)-Anchorage-Tokyo. Sleep polysmonograms were recorded on two baseline nights (B1, B2), during layovers, and, after returning to Tokyo, two recovery nights were recorded (R1, R2). In ANC (outbound), total sleep time was reduced and, sleep efficiency was low (72.0 percent). In London, time in bed increased slightly, but sleep efficiency was still reduced. On return to ANC (inbound), there was considerable slow wave sleep rebound and multiple awakenings reduced sleep efficiency to 76.8 percent. Sleep efficiency on R2 was significantly lower than on B1 but not different from R1. To sum up, sleep of aircrews flying multiple transmeridian flights is disrupted during layovers and this effect persists during the two recovery nights. As a result, there is a marked cumulative sleep loss during multilegs polar route trip in comparison to single leg flights. These findings suggest that following such extensive transmeridian trips, crews should have at least three nights of recovery sleep in their home time zone before returning to duty.

  9. Sleep in Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Haynes, Paula R.; Donelson, Nathan C.; Aharon, Shani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a diurnal insect active during the day with consolidated sleep at night. Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations. Here, we use a commercially available locomotor activity monitor (LAM25H) system to record and analyze sleep behavior. Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals. Like individual flies, groups of flies show circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep, as well as sexual dimorphism in sleep pattern and sensitivity to starvation and a known sleep-disrupting mutation (amnesiac). Populations of flies, however, exhibit distinct sleep characteristics from individuals. Differences in sleep appear to be due to olfaction-dependent social interactions and change with population size and sex ratio. These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions. PMID:26465005

  10. Deficiency of FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 51 alters sleep architecture and recovery sleep responses to stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Albu, Stefana; Romanowski, Christoph P N; Letizia Curzi, M; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Gassen, Nils C; Hartmann, Jakob; Schmidt, Mathias V; Schmidt, Ulrike; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Hausch, Felix; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Kimura, Mayumi

    2014-04-01

    FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is a co-chaperone of the glucocorticoid receptor, functionally linked to its activity via an ultra-short negative feedback loop. Thus, FKBP51 plays an important regulatory role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis necessary for stress adaptation and recovery. Previous investigations illustrated that HPA functionality is influenced by polymorphisms in the gene encoding FKBP51, which are associated with both increased protein levels and depressive episodes. Because FKBP51 is a key molecule in stress responses, we hypothesized that its deletion impacts sleep. To study FKBP51-involved changes in sleep, polysomnograms of FKBP51 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were compared at baseline and in the recovery phase after 6-h sleep deprivation (SD) and 1-h restraint stress (RS). Using another set of animals, the 24-h profiles of hippocampal free corticosterone levels were also determined. The most dominant effect of FKBP51 deletion appeared as increased nocturnal wake, where the bout length was significantly extended while non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid eye movement sleep were rather suppressed. After both SD and RS, FKBP51KO mice exhibited less recovery or rebound sleep than WTs, although slow-wave activity during NREMS was higher in KOs, particularly after SD. Sleep compositions of KOs were nearly opposite to sleep profiles observed in human depression. This might result from lower levels of free corticosterone in FKBP51KO mice, confirming reduced HPA reactivity. The results indicate that an FKBP51 deletion yields a pro-resilience sleep phenotype. FKBP51 could therefore be a therapeutic target for stress-induced mood and sleep disorders. PMID:24354785

  11. Sleep in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi): A semi-restrictive, non-invasive, polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Aguilar, Manuel Alejandro; Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso; Jiménez-Anguiano, Anabel; Santillán-Doherty, Ana María; García-Orduña, Francisco; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2015-02-01

    The normal sleep patterns of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) have not been described yet. The objective of this study was to characterize the electrophysiological patterns, sleeping postures, and sleep-wake cycle in semi-restricted spider monkeys. Continuous 24-hr polysomnographic (PSG) recordings, involving simultaneous recording of non-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG), electro-oculographic (EOG), and electromyographic (EMG) activities, were carried out in captive monkeys living in outdoor rainforest enclosures. Electrode placement was done according to the human international 10-20 system. Specific behaviors displayed by monkeys during the sleep-wake cycles were correlated with the PSG recordings. The nycthemeral distribution of the sleep-wake cycle was also calculated. The results show that electrophysiological N-REM sleep patterns in spider monkeys are similar to those observed in other primates, including human beings. Furthermore, a vertical semi-fetal posture was observed during N-REM and REM sleep phases. The amount of nocturnal sleep was significantly higher than that of the diurnal period, showing that the spider monkey is a diurnal primate. An outstanding finding was the absence of muscular atonia during the spider monkey's REM sleep, which suggests that arboreal primates have developed a neuromuscular mechanism specialized for sleeping in a vertical posture. PMID:25231936

  12. Insulinoma Masquerading as Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Sato, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Insulinoma is a rare endocrine tumor that can cause a wide variety of symptoms, including abnormal nocturnal behavior. We report on 3 patients with insulinoma who presented with abnormal nocturnal behavior and injury during sleep, which simulated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). In case 1, the fasting glucose level was 15 ?mg/dL, and insulin levels were elevated (15 ??U/mL). In case 3, when the patient was transferred to the hospital because of a disturbance of consciousness, hypoglycemia (29? mg/dL) was detected. In contrast, in case 2, fasting glucose sampling did not indicate hypoglycemia, but continuous glucose monitoring revealed nocturnal hypoglycemia. The time from initial symptoms to a diagnosis of insulinoma ranged from 7 months to 2 years. All 3 patients had previously received anticonvulsant drugs for suspected epilepsy, but the medications were ineffective. Polysomnography showed no evidence of REM sleep without atonia in any of the 3 patients. No patient remembered any events that occurred during sleep. When a patient manifests abnormal behavior during the night and early morning, glucose monitoring should be performed, especially during the night and early morning. Clinicians should be aware that although insulinomas are rare, they can mimic parasomnias, such as RBD. PMID:26107678

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Patir, Pusem; Isik, Yakup; Turk, Yigit; Ugur, Mehmet Can; Ceylan, Cengiz; Gorgun, Gulnur; Mete Gokmen, Nihal; Saydam, Guray; Sahin, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin) flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient's leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF. PMID:26347833

  14. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health.

    PubMed

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiologic homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ-system, and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults shows circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system, is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also affect their progression. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurologic disorders. This article discusses the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26568123

  15. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Musiek, Erik S; Xiong, David D; Holtzman, David M

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in the sleep–wake cycle and circadian rhythms are common symptoms of Alzheimer Disease (AD), and they have generally been considered as late consequences of the neurodegenerative processes. Recent evidence demonstrates that sleep–wake and circadian disruption often occur early in the course of the disease and may even precede the development of cognitive symptoms. Furthermore, the sleep–wake cycle appears to regulate levels of the pathogenic amyloid-beta peptide in the brain, and manipulating sleep can influence AD-related pathology in mouse models via multiple mechanisms. Finally, the circadian clock system, which controls the sleep–wake cycle and other diurnal oscillations in mice and humans, may also have a role in the neurodegenerative process. In this review, we examine the current literature related to the mechanisms by which sleep and circadian rhythms might impact AD pathogenesis, and we discuss potential therapeutic strategies targeting these systems for the prevention of AD. PMID:25766617

  16. Functional consequences of inadequate sleep in adolescents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shochat, Tamar; Cohen-Zion, Mairav; Tzischinsky, Orna

    2014-02-01

    During adolescence, changes in sleep patterns due to biological and environmental factors are well documented. Later bedtimes and inadequate sleep, i.e., short and disrupted sleep patterns, insomnia and daytime sleepiness, have become increasingly common. Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep plays a crucial role in healthy adolescent development. This review systematically explores descriptive evidence, based on prospective and cross sectional investigations, indicating that inadequate sleep is associated with negative outcomes in several areas of health and functioning, including somatic and psychosocial health, school performance and risk taking behavior. Findings highlight the need for longitudinal investigations aimed at establishing the underpinnings of these associations and for developing and implementing interventions designed to achieve healthier and more balanced sleep patterns in the adolescent population. PMID:23806891

  17. Treatment of insomnia. Getting to the root of sleeping problems.

    PubMed

    Pary, R; Tobias, C R; Webb, W K; Lippmann, S B

    1996-11-01

    Insomnia may be periodic and transient, as caused by situational stress, or persistent, as caused by a chronic sleep disorder. Physicians can gain much information concerning the type, probable cause, onset, and duration of insomnia through history taking. A sleep diary may reveal helpful information, and input from the patient's sleeping partner can also be valuable. Complicating disorders, such as heart failure, prostatism, or depression, should be sought and specific treatment prescribed. Chemical dependency, too, requires appropriate treatment. These measures, institution of good sleep-hygiene practices, and behavior modification may resolve sleeplessness. The primary indication for use of hypnotic agents is transient sleep disruption caused by acute stress. When an agent is chosen, onset of action, metabolism, and side effects should be considered, especially in elderly patients. Addictive agents should not be given to patients with substance abuse problems. If insomnia persists, evaluation at a sleep-disorder center is recommended to facilitate design of an appropriate therapeutic regimen. PMID:8917333

  18. Control of sleep and wakefulness in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Zeitzer, Jamie M

    2013-01-01

    Sleep and wake are actively promoted states of consciousness that are dependent on a network of state-modulating neurons arising from both the brain stem and hypothalamus. This network helps to coordinate the occurrence of a sleep state in billions of cortical neurons. In many neurological diseases, there is a specific disruption to one of the components of this network. Under conditions of such disruptions, we often gain an improved understanding of the underlying function of the specific component under nonpathological conditions. The loss or dysfunction of one of the hypothalamic or brain stem regions that are responsible for promotion of sleep or wake can lead to disruptions in sleep and wake states that are often subtle, but sometime quite pronounced and of significant medical importance. By understanding the neural substrate and its pathophysiology, one can more appropriately target therapies that might help the specific sleep disruption. This chapter reviews what is currently understood about the neurobiological underpinnings of sleep and wake regulation and how various pathologies evoke changes in these regulatory mechanisms. PMID:23899597

  19. Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS Request free mailed brochure Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep Request free mailed brochure Do ... our daily lives. We now know that our brains are very active during sleep. Moreover, sleep affects ...

  20. The Aging of Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joel

    1978-01-01

    Describes the nature of sleep among the elderly. Points to a number of correlations between sleep patterns and aging. Suggests that mortality rate is very high among those who sleep either extremely long or short periods. (GA)

  1. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePLUS

    Loud snoring is a telltale symptom of sleep apnea. Snoring is caused by air squeezing through the narrowed or blocked airway. However, not every child who snores has sleep apnea. Children with sleep ...

  2. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - Isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes in which the person is unable to move or speak. ...

  3. American Sleep Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ASA Join ASA Press Room Online Store Patients / Public Health Professionals American Sleep Association Share Patients / Public – Sleep ... ASA Join ASA Press Room Online Store Patients / Public Health Professionals Search for: Sleep Info New Posts Forums ...

  4. Sleep physiology and sleep disorders in childhood.

    PubMed

    El Shakankiry, Hanan M

    2011-01-01

    Sleep has long been considered as a passive phenomenon, but it is now clear that it is a period of intense brain activity involving higher cortical functions. Overall, sleep affects every aspect of a child's development, particularly higher cognitive functions. Sleep concerns are ranked as the fifth leading concern of parents. Close to one third of all children suffer from sleep disorders, the prevalence of which is increased in certain pediatric populations, such as children with special needs, children with psychiatric or medical diagnoses and children with autism or pervasive developmental disorders. The paper reviews sleep physiology and the impact, classification, and management of sleep disorders in the pediatric age group. PMID:23616721

  5. Narcolepsy and Predictors of Positive MSLTs in the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Goldbart, Aviv; Peppard, Paul; Finn, Laurel; Ruoff, Chad M.; Barnet, Jodi; Young, Terry; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To study whether positive multiple sleep latency tests (MSLTs, mean sleep latency [MSL] ? 8 minutes, ? 2 sleep onset REM sleep periods [SOREMPs]) and/or nocturnal SOREMP (REM sleep latency ? 15 minutes during nocturnal polysomonography [NPSG]) are stable traits and can reflect incipient narcolepsy. Design and Setting: Cross-sectional and longitudinal investigation of the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study. Participants: Adults (44% females, 30-81 years) underwent NPSG (n = 4,866 in 1,518 subjects), and clinical MSLT (n = 1,135), with 823 having a repeat NPSG-MSLT at 4-year intervals, totaling 1725 NPSG with MSLT studies. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, and the stability of positive MSLTs was explored using ? statistics. Measurements and Results: Prevalence of a nocturnal SOREMP on a NPSG, of ? 2 SOREMPs on the MSLT, of MSL ? 8 minutes on the MSLT, and of a positive MSLT (MSL ? 8 minutes plus ? 2 SOREMPs) were 0.35%, 7.0%, 22%, and 3.4%, respectively. Correlates of a positive MSLT were shift work (OR = 7.8, P = 0.0001) and short sleep (OR = 1.51/h, P = 0.04). Test-retest for these parameters was poor, with ? < 0.2 (n.s.) after excluding shift workers and short sleepers. Excluding shift-work, short sleep, and subjects with negative MSLTs, we found one undiagnosed subject with possible cataplexy (? 1/month) and a NPSG SOREMPs; one subject previously diagnosed with narcolepsy without cataplexy with 2 NPSG SOREMPs and a positive MSLT, and two subjects with 2 independently positive MSLTs (66% human leukocyte antigen [HLA] positive). The proportions for narcolepsy with and without cataplexy were 0.07% (95% CI: 0.02-0.37%) and 0.20% (95% CI: 0.07-0.58%), respectively. Conclusions: The diagnostic value of multiple sleep latency tests is strongly altered by shift work and to a lesser extent by chronic sleep deprivation. The prevalence of narcolepsy without cataplexy may be 3-fold higher than that of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Citation: Goldbart A, Peppard P, Finn L, Ruoff CM, Barnet J, Young T, Mignot E. Narcolepsy and predictors of positive MSLTs in the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1043-1051. PMID:24882899

  6. Cardiac autonomic control in the obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gammoudi, Nouha; Ben Cheikh, Ridha; Saafi, Mohamed Ali; Sakly, Ghazi; Dogui, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sympathetic activation is considered to be the main mechanism involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The heart rate variability (HRV) analysis represents a non-invasive tool allowing the study of the autonomic nervous system. The impairment of HRV parameters in OSA has been documented. However, only a few studies tackled the dynamics of the autonomic nervous system during sleep in patients having OSA. Aims To analyze the HRV over sleep stages and across sleep periods in order to clarify the impact of OSA on cardiac autonomic modulation. The second objective is to examine the nocturnal HRV of OSA patients to find out which HRV parameter is the best to reflect the symptoms severity. Methods The study was retrospective. We have included 30 patients undergoing overnight polysomnography. Subjects were categorized into two groups according to apnea–hypopnea index (AHI): mild-to-moderate OSAS group (AHI: 5–30) and severe OSAS group (AHI>30). The HRV measures for participants with low apnea–hypopnea indices were compared to those of patients with high rates of apnea–hypopnea across the sleep period and sleep stages. Results HRV measures during sleep stages for the group with low rates of apnea–hypopnea have indicated a parasympathetic activation during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, no significant difference has been observed in the high AHI group except for the mean of RR intervals (mean RR). The parasympathetic activity tended to increase across the night but without a statistical difference. After control of age and body mass index, the most significant correlation found was for the mean RR (p=0.0001, r=?0.248). Conclusion OSA affects sympathovagal modulation during sleep, and this impact has been correlated to the severity of the disease. The mean RR seemed to be a better index allowing the sympathovagal balance appreciation during the night in OSA. PMID:25861821

  7. Modeling aircraft noise induced sleep disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Sarah M.

    One of the primary impacts of aircraft noise on a community is its disruption of sleep. Aircraft noise increases the time to fall asleep, the number of awakenings, and decreases the amount of rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Understanding these changes in sleep may be important as they could increase the risk for developing next-day effects such as sleepiness and reduced performance and long-term health effects such as cardiovascular disease. There are models that have been developed to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. However, most of these models only predict the percentage of the population that is awakened. Markov and nonlinear dynamic models have been developed to predict an individual's sleep structure during the night. However, both of these models have limitations. The Markov model only accounts for whether an aircraft event occurred not the noise level or other sound characteristics of the event that may affect the degree of disturbance. The nonlinear dynamic models were developed to describe normal sleep regulation and do not have a noise effects component. In addition, the nonlinear dynamic models have slow dynamics which make it difficult to predict short duration awakenings which occur both spontaneously and as a result of nighttime noise exposure. The purpose of this research was to examine these sleep structure models to determine how they could be altered to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. Different approaches for adding a noise level dependence to the Markov Model was explored and the modified model was validated by comparing predictions to behavioral awakening data. In order to determine how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic sleep models it was necessary to have a more detailed sleep stage classification than was available from visual scoring of sleep data. An automatic sleep stage classification algorithm was developed which extracts different features of polysomnography data including the occurrence of rapid eye movements, sleep spindles, and slow wave sleep. Using these features an approach for classifying sleep stages every one second during the night was developed. From observation of the results of the sleep stage classification, it was determined how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic model. Slow and fast REM activity are modeled separately and the activity in the gamma frequency band of the EEG signal is used to model both spontaneous and noise-induced awakenings. The nonlinear model predicts changes in sleep structure similar to those found by other researchers and reported in the sleep literature and similar to those found in obtained survey data. To compare sleep disturbance model predictions, flight operations data from US airports were obtained and sleep disturbance in communities was predicted for different operations scenarios using the modified Markov model, the nonlinear dynamic model, and other aircraft noise awakening models. Similarities and differences in model predictions were evaluated in order to determine if the use of the developed sleep structure model leads to improved predictions of the impact of nighttime noise on communities.

  8. Renal involvement in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S; Qureshi, A; Kazi, J

    2013-01-01

    Renal involvement in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is not usually apparent but in cases with clinical involvement varies from reversible acute dysfunction to chronic irreversible damage. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial to prevent disease progression and irreversible chronic kidney disease (CKD). The ultimate outcome of CKD in many patients is the need for renal replacement therapy, which necessitates ever-growing dialysis and transplantation programs, thereby imposing a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. In a third-world country like Pakistan, increased burden due to CKD can be very hard on families. Doctor visits, hospitalization, and dialysis are all out-of-pocket expenses, therefore prevention, early detection, and timely intervention are the only cost-effective strategies. We report a case of acute kidney injury (AKI) due to PNH. This case shows AKI as one of the complications of PNH which may have a clinical course like acute tubular necrosis (ATN). This could be due to ATN or AKI superimposed on CKD due to hemosiderin deposits in the renal tubular epithelial cells. Our patient was dialyzed initially and discharged with a permanent catheter in place with advice to continue dialysis three times a week. He required dialysis for 1 week then started producing urine. His subsequent outpatient visits showed improved renal function. The permanent catheter was removed and maintenance dialysis was stopped. Here, we briefly review the literature on renal involvement in PNH, treatment options for PNH and pigment-induced nephropathy followed by a question-and-answer session at the clinicopathological conference held on March 4, 2011, at Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation in Karachi, Pakistan. PMID:23752125

  9. Landfills, nocturnal foraging, and risk to aircraft.

    PubMed

    Burger, J

    2001-10-12

    Open landfills serve as an attractant to birds, with increasing risk of bird-plane collisions. Managers are searching for methods to allow landfilling while reducing potential bird problems near airports. Some municipalities are considering nighttime landfilling as an avian deterrent, particularly where waste management facilities are located near airports. The objective of this report was to evaluate whether nighttime landfilling will result in increased risk to aircraft from birds at the Atlantic County Airport in coastal New Jersey. The risk to nearby aircraft from nighttime landfill is a function of (1) attractiveness of landfills, airports, or other habitats, (2) nocturnal behavior of gulls and other birds, (3) elevations and flight paths of birds, (4) changes in population levels of gulls and other potentially hazardous birds, and (5) harassment techniques that can deter birds from the landfills, adjacent habitat, and airports. The latter, however, can serve to move birds to locations or altitudes that pose an even greater risk to aircraft. The number of strikes is generally increasing. While most air strikes occur during the day at the Atlantic County Airport, over 12% occur at night and nearly 20% occur at dawn when any garbage remaining from nighttime landfilling would be an attractant. The peak of strikes occurs in the early fall, when young birds are learning to forage. Risk data suggests that gulls and a wide variety of other birds are active at night, and if any garbage is available they will be attracted, increasing the risk to aircraft landing at night. Some actual night dumping has been carried out since October 3 1997 without apparently attracting gulls, suggesting that careful operations with appropriate institutional controls can make nighttime dumping feasible. PMID:11594704

  10. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Margaret I.; Kamilar, Jason M.; Kirk, E. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Most vertebrate groups exhibit eye shapes that vary predictably with activity pattern. Nocturnal vertebrates typically have large corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual sensitivity. Conversely, diurnal vertebrates generally demonstrate smaller corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual acuity. By contrast, several studies have concluded that many mammals exhibit typical nocturnal eye shapes, regardless of activity pattern. However, a recent study has argued that new statistical methods allow eye shape to accurately predict activity patterns of mammals, including cathemeral species (animals that are equally likely to be awake and active at any time of day or night). Here, we conduct a detailed analysis of eye shape and activity pattern in mammals, using a broad comparative sample of 266 species. We find that the eye shapes of cathemeral mammals completely overlap with nocturnal and diurnal species. Additionally, most diurnal and cathemeral mammals have eye shapes that are most similar to those of nocturnal birds and lizards. The only mammalian clade that diverges from this pattern is anthropoids, which have convergently evolved eye shapes similar to those of diurnal birds and lizards. Our results provide additional evidence for a nocturnal ‘bottleneck’ in the early evolution of crown mammals. PMID:23097513

  11. Deep Sleep and Parietal Cortex Gene Expression Changes Are Related to Cognitive Deficits with Age

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Searcy, James L.; Porter, Nada M.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related cognitive deficits negatively affect quality of life and can presage serious neurodegenerative disorders. Despite sleep disruption's well-recognized negative influence on cognition, and its prevalence with age, surprisingly few studies have tested sleep's relationship to cognitive aging. Methodology We measured sleep stages in young adult and aged F344 rats during inactive (enhanced sleep) and active (enhanced wake) periods. Animals were behaviorally characterized on the Morris water maze and gene expression profiles of their parietal cortices were taken. Principal Findings Water maze performance was impaired, and inactive period deep sleep was decreased with age. However, increased deep sleep during the active period was most strongly correlated to maze performance. Transcriptional profiles were strongly associated with behavior and age, and were validated against prior studies. Bioinformatic analysis revealed increased translation and decreased myelin/neuronal pathways. Conclusions The F344 rat appears to serve as a reasonable model for some common sleep architecture and cognitive changes seen with age in humans, including the cognitively disrupting influence of active period deep sleep. Microarray analysis suggests that the processes engaged by this sleep are consistent with its function. Thus, active period deep sleep appears temporally misaligned but mechanistically intact, leading to the following: first, aged brain tissue appears capable of generating the slow waves necessary for deep sleep, albeit at a weaker intensity than in young. Second, this activity, presented during the active period, seems disruptive rather than beneficial to cognition. Third, this active period deep sleep may be a cognitively pathologic attempt to recover age-related loss of inactive period deep sleep. Finally, therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing active period deep sleep (e.g., by promoting active period wakefulness and/or inactive period deep sleep) may be highly relevant to cognitive function in the aging community. PMID:21483696

  12. Complementary roles of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in emotional memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Power, Rebecca; Lewis, Penelope A

    2015-06-01

    Although rapid eye movement sleep (REM) is regularly implicated in emotional memory consolidation, the role of slow-wave sleep (SWS) in this process is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, we investigated the relative impacts of nocturnal SWS and REM upon the consolidation of emotional memories using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and polysomnography (PSG). Participants encoded emotionally positive, negative, and neutral images (remote memories) before a night of PSG-monitored sleep. Twenty-four hours later, they encoded a second set of images (recent memories) immediately before a recognition test in an MRI scanner. SWS predicted superior memory for remote negative images and a reduction in right hippocampal responses during the recollection of these items. REM, however, predicted an overnight increase in hippocampal-neocortical connectivity associated with negative remote memory. These findings provide physiological support for sequential views of sleep-dependent memory processing, demonstrating that SWS and REM serve distinct but complementary functions in consolidation. Furthermore, these findings extend those ideas to emotional memory by showing that, once selectively reorganized away from the hippocampus during SWS, emotionally aversive representations undergo a comparably targeted process during subsequent REM. PMID:24408956

  13. Circadian Modulation of Consolidated Memory Retrieval Following Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Glou, Eric Le; Seugnet, Laurent; Shaw, Paul J.; Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several lines of evidence indicate that sleep plays a critical role in learning and memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate anesthesia resistant memory following sleep deprivation in Drosophila. Design: Four to 16 h after aversive olfactory training, flies were sleep deprived for 4 h. Memory was assessed 24 h after training. Training, sleep deprivation, and memory tests were performed at different times during the day to evaluate the importance of the time of day for memory formation. The role of circadian rhythms was further evaluated using circadian clock mutants. Results Memory was disrupted when flies were exposed to 4 h of sleep deprivation during the consolidation phase. Interestingly, normal memory was observed following sleep deprivation when the memory test was performed during the 2 h preceding lights-off, a period characterized by maximum wake in flies. We also show that anesthesia resistant memory was less sensitive to sleep deprivation in flies with disrupted circadian rhythms. Conclusions Our results indicate that anesthesia resistant memory, a consolidated memory less costly than long-term memory, is sensitive to sleep deprivation. In addition, we provide evidence that circadian factors influence memory vulnerability to sleep deprivation and memory retrieval. Taken together, the data show that memories weakened by sleep deprivation can be retrieved if the animals are tested at the optimal circadian time. Citation: Le Glou E; Seugnet L; Shaw PJ; Preat T; Goguel V. Circadian modulation of consolidated memory retrieval following sleep deprivation in Drosophila. SLEEP 2012;35(10):1377-1384. PMID:23024436

  14. Sleep disturbances as the hallmark of PTSD: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Germain, Anne

    2013-04-01

    The hypothesis that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disturbances are the hallmark of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), proposed by Ross and colleagues in 1989, has stimulated a wealth of clinical, preclinical, and animal studies on the role of sleep in the pathophysiology of PTSD. The present review revisits this influential hypothesis in light of clinical and experimental findings that have since accumulated. Polysomnographic studies conducted in adults with PTSD have yielded mixed findings regarding REM sleep disturbances, and they generally suggest modest and nonspecific sleep disruptions. Prospective and treatment studies have provided more robust evidence for the relationship between sleep disturbances and psychiatric outcomes and symptoms. Experimental animal and human studies that have probed the relationship between REM sleep and fear responses, as well as studies focused more broadly on sleep-dependent affective and memory processes, also provide strong support for the hypothesis that sleep plays an important role in PTSD-relevant processes. Overall, the literature suggests that disturbed REM or non-REM sleep can contribute to maladaptive stress and trauma responses and may constitute a modifiable risk factor for poor psychiatric outcomes. Clinicians need to consider that the chronic sleep disruption associated with nightmares may affect the efficacy of first-line PTSD treatments, but targeted sleep treatments may accelerate recovery from PTSD. The field is ripe for prospective and longitudinal studies in high-risk groups to clarify how changes in sleep physiology and neurobiology contribute to increased risk of poor psychiatric outcomes. PMID:23223954

  15. Rapid Palatal Expansion to Treat Nocturnal Enuretic Children: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Karim; Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Morvarid; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Balmeh, Pouya; Nosrati, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Refractory nocturnal enuresis possesses a heavy psychosocial burden for the affected child. Only a 15% spontaneous annual cure rate is reported. Purpose This patient-level meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of rapid palatal expansion to treat nocturnal enuresis among children. Materials and Method A sensitive search of electronic databases of PubMed (since 1966), SCOPUS (containing EMBASE, since 1980), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL and EBSCO till Jan 2014 was performed. A set of regular terms was used for searching in data banks except for PubMed, for which medical subject headings (MeSH) keywords were used. Children aged at least six years old at the time of recruitment of either gender who underwent rapid palatal expansion and had attempted any type of pharmacotherapy prior to orthodontic intervention were included. Results Six non-randomized clinical trials were found relevant, of which five studies had no control group. Eighty children were investigated with the mean age of 118 (28.12) months ranged from 74 to 185 months. The median time to become completely dry was 2.87 months [confidence interval (CI) 95% 2.07-2.93 months]. After one year, the average rate of becoming complete dry was 31%. The presence of posterior cross bite [relative risk (RR): 0.31, CI 95%: 0.12-0.79] and signs of upper respiratory obstruction during sleep (RR: 5.1, CI 95%: 1.44-18.04) significantly decreased and increased the chance of improvement, respectively. Meanwhile, the other predictors did not significantly predict the outcome after simultaneous adjustment in Cox regression model. Conclusion Rapid palatal expansion may be considered when other treatment modalities have failed. The 31% rate of cure is promising when compared to the spontaneous cure rate. Though, high-level evidence from the rigorous randomized controlled trials is scarce (Level of evidence: C). PMID:26331141

  16. Use of Drosophila in the investigation of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Donelson, Nathan C; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2015-12-01

    Genetic underpinnings for sleep disorders in humans remain poorly identified, investigated and understood. This is due to the inherent complexity of sleep and a disruption of normal sleep parameters in a number of neurological disorders. On the other hand, there have been steady and remarkable developments in the investigation of sleep using model organisms such as Drosophila. These studies have illuminated conserved genetic pathways, neural circuits and intra-cellular signaling modules in the regulation of sleep. Additionally, work in model systems is beginning to clarify the role of the circadian clock and basal sleep need in this process. There have also been initial efforts to directly model sleep disorders in flies in a few instances where a genetic basis has been suspected. Here, we discuss the opportunities and limitations of studying sleep disorders in Drosophila and propose that a greater convergence of basic sleep research in model organisms and human genetics should catalyze better understanding of sleep disorders and generate viable therapeutic options. PMID:26160555

  17. Sleep Position Trainer versus Tennis Ball Technique in Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods: 29 patients were treated with the sleep position trainer (SPT), 26 patients with the tennis ball technique (TBT). At baseline and 1 month polysomnography, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (QSQ) were taken. Daily compliance was objectively measured in both groups. Results: Both therapies prevent supine sleep position to a median of 0% (min-max: SPT 0.0% to 67%, TBT 0.0% to 38.9%), resulting in a treatment success (AHI < 5) in 68.0% of the SPT and 42.9% of the TBT patients. The ESS at baseline was < 10 in both groups. Sleep quality parameters, such as wake after sleep onset (WASO; p = 0.001) and awakenings (p = 0.006), improved more in the SPT group. Total QSQ scores (0.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.03), the QSQ domains nocturnal symptoms (0.7 ± 0.2, p = 0.01), and social interactions (0.8 ± 0.3, p = 0.02) changed in favor of the SPT group. Effective compliance (? 4 h/night + ? 5 days/week) was 75.9% for the SPT and 42.3% for the TBT users (p = 0.01). Conclusion: In mild POSAS with normal EES the new SPT device and the standard TBT are equally effective in reducing respiratory indices. However, compared to the TBT, sleep quality, quality of life, and compliance improved significantly more in the SPT group. Citation: Eijsvogel MM, Ubbink R, Dekker J, Oppersma E, de Jongh FH, van der Palen J, Brusse-Keizer MG. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):139–147. PMID:25515276

  18. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options. PMID:26600110

  19. College residential sleep environment.

    PubMed

    Sexton-Radek, Kathy; Hartley, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    College students regularly report increased sleep disturbances as well as concomitant reductions in performance (e.g., academic grades) upon entering college. Sleep hygiene refers to healthy sleep practices that are commonly used as first interventions in sleep disturbances. One widely used practice of this sort involves arranging the sleep environment to minimize disturbances from excessive noise and light at bedtime. Communal sleep situations such as those in college residence halls do not easily support this intervention. Following several focus groups, a questionnaire was designed to gather self-reported information on sleep disturbances in a college population. The present study used The Young Adult Sleep Environment Inventory (YASEI) and sleep logs to investigate the sleep environment of college students living in residential halls. A summary of responses indicated that noise and light are significant sleep disturbances in these environments. Recommendations are presented related to these findings. PMID:24693819

  20. Sleep and rest facilitate implicit memory in a visual search task.

    PubMed

    Mednick, S C; Makovski, T; Cai, D J; Jiang, Y V

    2009-10-01

    Several forms of learning have been demonstrated to show improvements with sleep. Based on rodent models, it has been suggested that replay of waking events in the hippocampus during sleep may underlie memory consolidation in humans. However, behavioral data for the role of sleep in human hippocampal-related memory have been inconsistent. To further investigate the role of sleep in hippocampal-mediated learning, we tested subjects in two sessions of a contextual cueing paradigm, a form of hippocampus-dependent implicit learning, separated by intervals of sleep, active wake, or carefully controlled quiet rest. Participants completed a visual search task, and unbeknownst to them, some search displays were occasionally repeated in the experiment. Contextual cueing was revealed by faster search speed on repeated trials (Old) than unrepeated ones (New), even though subjects were unaware of the trial repetition. Notably, performance in a second testing session was equivalent for participants who underwent quiet resting, daytime sleep, or nocturnal sleep between the two sessions. These four groups showed equivalent transfer of learning from Session 1. Notably, learning of New configurations in Session 2 was absent in the active wake group, but was equally strong among the other three groups. These results indicate that this form of hippocampal learning is independent of sleep, and vulnerable to proactive interference during active wake. They prompt a reevaluation of the hippocampal replay hypothesis as a general model of sleep-dependent learning. PMID:19379769

  1. The Relationship between Sleep-Wake Cycle and Cognitive Functioning in Young People with Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Joanne S.; Robillard, Rébecca; Lee, Rico S. C.; Hermens, Daniel F.; Naismith, Sharon L.; White, Django; Whitwell, Bradley; Scott, Elizabeth M.; Hickie, Ian B.

    2015-01-01

    Although early-stage affective disorders are associated with both cognitive dysfunction and sleep-wake disruptions, relationships between these factors have not been specifically examined in young adults. Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in those with affective disorders are considerably heterogeneous, and may not relate to cognitive dysfunction in a simple linear fashion. This study aimed to characterise profiles of sleep and circadian disturbance in young people with affective disorders and examine associations between these profiles and cognitive performance. Actigraphy monitoring was completed in 152 young people (16–30 years; 66% female) with primary diagnoses of affective disorders, and 69 healthy controls (18–30 years; 57% female). Patients also underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment. Actigraphy data were processed to estimate both sleep and circadian parameters. Overall neuropsychological performance in patients was poor on tasks relating to mental flexibility and visual memory. Two hierarchical cluster analyses identified three distinct patient groups based on sleep variables and three based on circadian variables. Sleep clusters included a ‘long sleep’ cluster, a ‘disrupted sleep’ cluster, and a ‘delayed and disrupted sleep’ cluster. Circadian clusters included a ‘strong circadian’ cluster, a ‘weak circadian’ cluster, and a ‘delayed circadian’ cluster. Medication use differed between clusters. The ‘long sleep’ cluster displayed significantly worse visual memory performance compared to the ‘disrupted sleep’ cluster. No other cognitive functions differed between clusters. These results highlight the heterogeneity of sleep and circadian profiles in young people with affective disorders, and provide preliminary evidence in support of a relationship between sleep and visual memory, which may be mediated by use of antipsychotic medication. These findings have implications for the personalisation of treatments and improvement of functioning in young adults early in the course of affective illness. PMID:25898321

  2. Sleep for cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is essential for effective cognitive functioning. Loosing even a few hours of sleep can have detrimental effects on a wide variety of cognitive processes such as attention, language, reasoning, decision making, learning and memory. While sleep is necessary to ensure normal healthy cognitive functioning, it can also enhance performance beyond the boundaries of the normal condition. This article discusses the enhancing potential of sleep, mainly focusing on the domain of learning and memory. Sleep is known to facilitate the consolidation of memories learned before sleep as well as the acquisition of new memories to be learned after sleep. According to a widely held model this beneficial effect of sleep relies on the neuronal reactivation of memories during sleep that is associated with sleep-specific brain oscillations (slow oscillations, spindles, ripples) as well as a characteristic neurotransmitter milieu. Recent research indicates that memory processing during sleep can be boosted by (i) cueing memory reactivation during sleep; (ii) stimulating sleep-specific brain oscillations; and (iii) targeting specific neurotransmitter systems pharmacologically. Olfactory and auditory cues can be used, for example, to increase reactivation of associated memories during post-learning sleep. Intensifying neocortical slow oscillations (the hallmark of slow wave sleep (SWS)) by electrical or auditory stimulation and modulating specific neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline and glutamate likewise facilitates memory processing during sleep. With this evidence in mind, this article concludes by discussing different methodological caveats and ethical issues that should be considered when thinking about using sleep for cognitive enhancement in everyday applications. PMID:24765066

  3. Sleep for cognitive enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is essential for effective cognitive functioning. Loosing even a few hours of sleep can have detrimental effects on a wide variety of cognitive processes such as attention, language, reasoning, decision making, learning and memory. While sleep is necessary to ensure normal healthy cognitive functioning, it can also enhance performance beyond the boundaries of the normal condition. This article discusses the enhancing potential of sleep, mainly focusing on the domain of learning and memory. Sleep is known to facilitate the consolidation of memories learned before sleep as well as the acquisition of new memories to be learned after sleep. According to a widely held model this beneficial effect of sleep relies on the neuronal reactivation of memories during sleep that is associated with sleep-specific brain oscillations (slow oscillations, spindles, ripples) as well as a characteristic neurotransmitter milieu. Recent research indicates that memory processing during sleep can be boosted by (i) cueing memory reactivation during sleep; (ii) stimulating sleep-specific brain oscillations; and (iii) targeting specific neurotransmitter systems pharmacologically. Olfactory and auditory cues can be used, for example, to increase reactivation of associated memories during post-learning sleep. Intensifying neocortical slow oscillations (the hallmark of slow wave sleep (SWS)) by electrical or auditory stimulation and modulating specific neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline and glutamate likewise facilitates memory processing during sleep. With this evidence in mind, this article concludes by discussing different methodological caveats and ethical issues that should be considered when thinking about using sleep for cognitive enhancement in everyday applications. PMID:24765066

  4. The eyes of Macrosoma sp. (Lepidoptera: Hedyloidea): A nocturnal butterfly with superposition optics

    E-print Network

    Yack, Jayne E.

    The eyes of Macrosoma sp. (Lepidoptera: Hedyloidea): A nocturnal butterfly with superposition 2006; accepted 7 June 2006 Abstract The visual system of nocturnal Hedyloidea butterflies eyes of true butterflies (Papilionoidea), and, to gain insights into the sensory ecology

  5. Working for Food Shifts Nocturnal Mouse Activity into the Day

    PubMed Central

    Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Daan, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal rodents show diurnal food anticipatory activity when food access is restricted to a few hours in daytime. Timed food access also results in reduced food intake, but the role of food intake in circadian organization per se has not been described. By simulating natural food shortage in mice that work for food we show that reduced food intake alone shifts the activity phase from the night into the day and eventually causes nocturnal torpor (natural hypothermia). Release into continuous darkness with ad libitum food, elicits immediate reversal of activity to the previous nocturnal phase, indicating that the classical circadian pacemaker maintained its phase to the light-dark cycle. This flexibility in behavioral timing would allow mice to exploit the diurnal temporal niche while minimizing energy expenditure under poor feeding conditions in nature. This study reveals an intimate link between metabolism and mammalian circadian organization. PMID:21479166

  6. Prevalence of Insufficient Sleep: Statistics by State

    MedlinePLUS

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep and Sleep Disorders Share Compartir Fact Sheets Fact sheets on insufficient ... audio/Podcast Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep and Chronic Disease How Much Sleep Do ...

  7. Things that go bump in the night: diagnosing sleep-related movement disorders without a sleep laboratory.

    PubMed

    Reading, P

    2014-01-01

    It is common for general physicians to experience diagnostic doubt and trepidation whenever faced with patients who exhibit abnormal nocturnal behaviours or excessive movements at night. There is also a perception that expensive and often poorly available overnight tests are usually required for diagnostic precision. In fact, the majority of conditions, whether they be parasomnias or, more rarely, nocturnal seizures, can be reliably diagnosed from a directed history, if available. Although the evidence base for treating parasomnias and sleep-related movement disorders remains minimal, accurate recognition is important for a variety of reasons. This review covers the diagnostic features of the full range of parasomnias and movement disorders that might present to a multidisciplinary adult sleep clinic. Throughout, it will be argued that the recognition of key or salient features obtained from a good history is the most important diagnostic tool. Indeed, when diagnostic doubt remains after a thorough sleep history, it is relatively rare for detailed tests to add much in the way of useful information. PMID:24995451

  8. Internalizing and externalizing traits predict changes in sleep efficiency in emerging adulthood: an actigraphy study

    PubMed Central

    Yaugher, Ashley C.; Alexander, Gerianne M.

    2015-01-01

    Research on psychopathology and experimental studies of sleep restriction support a relationship between sleep disruption and both internalizing and externalizing disorders. The objective of the current study was to extend this research by examining sleep, impulsivity, antisocial personality traits, and internalizing traits in a university sample. Three hundred and eighty six individuals (161 males) between the ages of 18 and 27 years (M = 18.59, SD = 0.98) wore actigraphs for 7 days and completed established measures of disorder-linked personality traits and sleep quality (i.e., Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), Triarchic Psychopathy Measure, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). As expected, sleep measures and questionnaire scores fell within the normal range of values and sex differences in sleep and personality were consistent with previous research results. Similar to findings in predominantly male forensic psychiatric settings, higher levels of impulsivity predicted poorer subjective sleep quality in both women and men. Consistent with well-established associations between depression and sleep, higher levels of depression in both sexes predicted poorer subjective sleep quality. Bidirectional analyses showed that better sleep efficiency decreases depression. Finally, moderation analyses showed that gender does have a primary role in sleep efficiency and marginal effects were found. The observed relations between sleep and personality traits in a typical university sample add to converging evidence of the relationship between sleep and psychopathology and may inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology in young adulthood. PMID:26500575

  9. The sleep–wake cycle and Alzheimer’s disease: what do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Miranda M.; Gerstner, Jason R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Sleep–wake disturbances are a highly prevalent and often disabling feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A cardinal feature of AD includes the formation of amyloid plaques, associated with the extracellular accumulation of the amyloid-? (A?) peptide. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that A? pathology may disrupt the sleep–wake cycle, in that as A? accumulates, more sleep–wake fragmentation develops. Furthermore, recent research in animal and human studies suggests that the sleep–wake cycle itself may influence Alzheimer’s disease onset and progression. Chronic sleep deprivation increases amyloid plaque deposition, and sleep extension results in fewer plaques in experimental models. In this review geared towards the practicing clinician, we discuss possible mechanisms underlying the reciprocal relationship between the sleep–wake cycle and AD pathology and behavior, and present current approaches to therapy for sleep disorders in AD. PMID:25405649

  10. The role of anxiety sensitivity in sleep disturbance in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hoge, E A; Marques, L; Wechsler, R S; Lasky, A K; Delong, H R; Jacoby, R J; Worthington, J J; Pollack, M H; Simon, N M

    2011-05-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that individuals with panic disorder (PD) report significant sleep disturbances, although the mechanism of this disturbance is not clear. Patients with PD tend to report abnormally high levels of anxiety sensitivity (AS). Because higher AS involves increases in attention and fearfulness about anxiety and associated physical sensations, which in turn may cause excessive psychological and physiologic arousal, we hypothesized that amongst individuals with PD, higher AS would be associated with sleep disruption, particularly in the form of increased sleep latency. As expected, PD was associated with poorer sleep as measured by the Global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) compared to controls and AS was significantly associated with longer sleep latency. Our data suggest that sleep disturbance, and in particular sleep latency, in PD may be partly due to high levels of AS, which can be targeted with cognitive-behavioral therapeutic strategies. PMID:21277737

  11. Adolescents' Sleep Behaviors and Perceptions of Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noland, Heather; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph; Telljohann, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep duration affects the health of children and adolescents. Shorter sleep durations have been associated with poorer academic performance, unintentional injuries, and obesity in adolescents. This study extends our understanding of how adolescents perceive and deal with their sleep issues. Methods: General education classes were…

  12. Neurobehavioral Dynamics Following Chronic Sleep Restriction: Dose-Response Effects of One Night for Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Siobhan; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Establish the dose-response relationship between increasing sleep durations in a single night and recovery of neurobehavioral functions following chronic sleep restriction. Design: Intent-to-treat design in which subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 recovery sleep doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h TIB) for 1 night following 5 nights of sleep restriction to 4 h TIB. Setting: Twelve consecutive days in a controlled laboratory environment. Participants: N = 159 healthy adults (aged 22-45 y), median = 29 y). Interventions: Following a week of home monitoring with actigraphy and 2 baseline nights of 10 h TIB, subjects were randomized to either sleep restriction to 4 h TIB per night for 5 nights followed by randomization to 1 of 6 nocturnal acute recovery sleep conditions (N = 142), or to a control condition involving 10 h TIB on all nights (N = 17). Measurements and Results: Primary neurobehavioral outcomes included lapses on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), subjective sleepiness from the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and physiological sleepiness from a modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Secondary outcomes included psychomotor and cognitive speed as measured by PVT fastest RTs and number correct on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), respectively, and subjective fatigue from the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The dynamics of neurobehavioral outcomes following acute recovery sleep were statistically modeled across the 0 h-10 h recovery sleep doses. While TST, stage 2, REM sleep and NREM slow wave energy (SWE) increased linearly across recovery sleep doses, best-fitting neurobehavioral recovery functions were exponential across recovery sleep doses for PVT and KSS outcomes, and linear for the MWT. Analyses based on return to baseline and on estimated intersection with control condition means revealed recovery was incomplete at the 10 h TIB (8.96 h TST) for PVT performance, KSS sleepiness, and POMS fatigue. Both TST and SWE were elevated above baseline at the maximum recovery dose of 10 h TIB. Conclusions: Neurobehavioral deficits induced by 5 nights of sleep restricted to 4 h improved monotonically as acute recovery sleep dose increased, but some deficits remained after 10 h TIB for recovery. Complete recovery from such sleep restriction may require a longer sleep period during 1 night, and/or multiple nights of recovery sleep. It appears that acute recovery from chronic sleep restriction occurs as a result of elevated sleep pressure evident in both increased SWE and TST. Citation: Banks S; Van Dongen HPA; Maislin G; Dinges DF. Neurobehavioral dynamics following chronic sleep restriction: dose-response effects of one night for recovery. SLEEP 2010;33(8):1013–1026. PMID:20815182

  13. A Novel, Open Access Method to Assess Sleep Duration Using a Wrist-Worn Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kirstie N.; Denton, Sarah J.; Oliver, James; Catt, Michael; Abell, Jessica G.; Kivimäki, Mika; Trenell, Michael I.; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Wrist-worn accelerometers are increasingly being used for the assessment of physical activity in population studies, but little is known about their value for sleep assessment. We developed a novel method of assessing sleep duration using data from 4,094 Whitehall II Study (United Kingdom, 2012–2013) participants aged 60–83 who wore the accelerometer for 9 consecutive days, filled in a sleep log and reported sleep duration via questionnaire. Our sleep detection algorithm defined (nocturnal) sleep as a period of sustained inactivity, itself detected as the absence of change in arm angle greater than 5 degrees for 5 minutes or more, during a period recorded as sleep by the participant in their sleep log. The resulting estimate of sleep duration had a moderate (but similar to previous findings) agreement with questionnaire based measures for time in bed, defined as the difference between sleep onset and waking time (kappa = 0.32, 95%CI:0.29,0.34) and total sleep duration (kappa = 0.39, 0.36,0.42). This estimate was lower for time in bed for women, depressed participants, those reporting more insomnia symptoms, and on weekend days. No such group differences were found for total sleep duration. Our algorithm was validated against data from a polysomnography study on 28 persons which found a longer time window and lower angle threshold to have better sensitivity to wakefulness, while the reverse was true for sensitivity to sleep. The novelty of our method is the use of a generic algorithm that will allow comparison between studies rather than a “count” based, device specific method. PMID:26569414

  14. Increases in nocturnal bruxism among college students implicate stress.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R A; Conti, P A; Bragg, H R

    1990-12-01

    While the etiology of nocturnal bruxism is unknown, three major categories of theories have been advanced to explain its cause(s), i.e., local-mechanical theories, psychological theories and systemic/neurophysiological theories. The recent report of a four-fold increase in the incidence of self-reported nocturnal bruxism in college students over the last 23-year period emphasizes the role that psychological variables may play in the development of this disorder and it is suggested that the personality traits which contribute to stress management are primary among these. PMID:2090924

  15. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Meppiel, Elodie; Crassard, Isabelle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; de Guibert, Sophie; Terriou, Louis; Chabriat, Hugues; Socié, Gérard; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by hemolytic anemia, marrow failure, and a high incidence of life-threatening venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous system is the second most frequent location of thrombosis after hepatic veins. However, data about PNH-related cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are very scarce because of the rarity of both the disorders. We report a French study about PNH patients with CVT. Patients were recruited retrospectively, from the Société Française d’Hématologie (SFH) registry of 465 patients with PNH; the Lariboisière registry of 399 patients with CVT; and a direct contact with 26 French Hematology Units. We review cases reported since 1938 in the English and French language literature. We then compared patients of our series with cases from the literature, with non-PNH-related CVT cases from Lariboisière registry, and with PNH patients without CVT from SFH registry. Fifteen patients were included between 1990 and 2012. Most patients were women (12/15) and half of them presented associated hormonal venous thrombosis risk factors. Three patients had concomitant hepatic vein thrombosis. CVT was the first manifestation of PNH in 4 patients. No major difference in CVT characteristics was found compared with non-PNH-related CVT cases, except for a younger age at diagnosis in PNH patients (P?

  16. Regulation of Sleep by Neuropeptide Y-Like System in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunxia; Yang, Yunyan; Zhang, Mingming; Price, Jeffrey L.; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is important for maintenance of normal physiology in animals. In mammals, neuropeptide Y (NPY), a homolog of Drosophila neuropeptide F (NPF), is involved in sleep regulation, with different effects in human and rat. However, the function of NPF on sleep in Drosophila melanogaster has not yet been described. In this study, we investigated the effects of NPF and its receptor-neuropeptide F receptor (NPFR1) on Drosophila sleep. Male flies over-expressing NPF or NPFR1 exhibited increased sleep during the nighttime. Further analysis demonstrated that sleep episode duration during nighttime was greatly increased and sleep latency was significantly reduced, indicating that NPF and NPFR1 promote sleep quality, and their action on sleep is not because of an impact of the NPF signal system on development. Moreover, the homeostatic regulation of flies after sleep deprivation was disrupted by altered NPF signaling, since sleep deprivation decreased transcription of NPF in control flies, and there were less sleep loss during sleep deprivation and less sleep gain after sleep deprivation in flies overexpressing NPF and NPFR1 than in control flies, suggesting that NPF system auto-regulation plays an important role in sleep homeostasis. However, these effects did not occur in females, suggesting a sex-dependent regulatory function in sleep for NPF and NPFR1. NPF in D1 brain neurons showed male-specific expression, providing the cellular locus for male-specific regulation of sleep by NPF and NPFR1. This study brings a new understanding into sleep studies of a sexually dimorphic regulatory mode in female and male flies. PMID:24040211

  17. Regional Reductions in Sleep Electroencephalography Power in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A High-Density EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie G.; Riedner, Brady A.; Smith, Richard F.; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio; Davidson, Richard J.; Benca, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significant alterations in neuronal integrity resulting from either hypoxemia and/or sleep loss. A large body of imaging research supports reductions in gray matter volume, alterations in white matter integrity and resting state activity, and functional abnormalities in response to cognitive challenge in various brain regions in patients with OSA. In this study, we used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG), a functional imaging tool that could potentially be used during routine clinical care, to examine the regional distribution of neural activity in a non-clinical sample of untreated men and women with moderate/severe OSA. Design: Sleep was recorded with 256-channel EEG in relatively healthy subjects with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 10, as well as age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched controls selected from a research population initially recruited for a study on sleep and meditation. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients or Participants: Nine subjects with AHI > 10 and nine matched controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Topographic analysis of hdEEG data revealed a broadband reduction in EEG power in a circumscribed region overlying the parietal cortex in OSA subjects. This parietal reduction in neural activity was present, to some extent, across all frequency bands in all stages and episodes of nonrapid eye movement sleep. Conclusion: This investigation suggests that regional deficits in electroencephalography (EEG) power generation may be a useful clinical marker for neural disruption in obstructive sleep apnea, and that high-density EEG may have the sensitivity to detect pathological cortical changes early in the disease process. Citation: Jones SG; Riedner BA; Smith RF; Ferrarelli F; Tononi G; Davidson RJ; Benca RM. Regional reductions in sleep electroencephalography power in obstructive sleep apnea: a high-density EEG study. SLEEP 2014;37(2):399-407. PMID:24497668

  18. Sleep and Infant Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarullo, Amanda R.; Balsam, Peter D.; Fifer, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Human neonates spend the majority of their time sleeping. Despite the limited waking hours available for environmental exploration, the first few months of life are a time of rapid learning about the environment. The organization of neonate sleep differs qualitatively from adult sleep, and the unique characteristics of neonatal sleep may promote…

  19. Sleep Disorders (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The two main phases of sleep are rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM): REM sleep, also known as "dream sleep," ... taken during sleep that show: Brain wave changes. Eye movements. Breathing rate. Blood pressure . Heart rate and electrical ...

  20. How sleep and wakefulness influence circadian rhythmicity: effects of insufficient and mistimed sleep on the animal and human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Archer, Simon N; Oster, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The mammalian circadian system is a multi-oscillator, hierarchically organised system where a central pacemaker synchronises behavioural, physiological and gene expression rhythms in peripheral tissues. Epidemiological studies show that disruption of this internal synchronisation by short sleep and shift work is associated with adverse health outcomes through mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. Here, we review recent animal and human studies demonstrating the profound effects of insufficient and mistimed sleep on the rhythms of gene expression in central and peripheral tissues. In mice, sleep restriction leads to an ~80% reduction in circadian transcripts in the brain and profound disruption of the liver transcriptome. In humans, sleep restriction leads to a 1.9% reduction in circadian transcripts in whole blood, and when sleep is displaced to the daytime, 97% of rhythmic genes become arrhythmic and one-third of all genes show changes in temporal expression profiles. These changes in mice and humans include a significant reduction in the circadian regulation of transcription and translation and core clock genes in the periphery, while at the same time rhythms within the suprachiasmatic nucleus are not disrupted. Although the physiological mediators of these sleep disruption effects on the transcriptome have not been established, altered food intake, changes in hormones such as cortisol, and changes in body and brain temperature may play important roles. Processes and molecular pathways associated with these disruptions include metabolism, immune function, inflammatory and stress responses, and point to the molecular mechanisms underlying the established adverse health outcomes associated with short sleep duration and shift work, such as metabolic syndrome and cancer. PMID:26059855

  1. Adverse childhood experiences associated with sleep in primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bader, Klaus; Schäfer, Valérie; Schenkel, Maya; Nissen, Lukas; Schwander, Jürg

    2007-09-01

    The objectives were to explore the association between self-reported adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and sleep in adults suffering from primary insomnia and to examine the impact of presleep stress on this relationship. Fifty-nine patients with primary insomnia, aged 21-55 years, were administered the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and then divided into two groups according to the achieved scores: with moderate/severe or low/no reports of ACE. The participants spent three consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory in order to record polysomnographic and actigraphic sleep parameters. A stress induction technique was administered by activating negative autobiographical memories immediately before sleep in the second or third night. Results show that 46% of the insomniac patients reported moderate to severe ACE. This group exhibited a significantly greater number of awakenings and more movement arousals compared to patients with low or no reports of ACE. Actigraphic data also indicated more disturbed sleep and increased nocturnal activity for the high-ACE group. On the other hand, no specific group differences were found with regard to stress condition. The results support the assumption that it is possible to identify a subgroup among patients with primary insomnia who has experienced severe maltreatment in childhood and adolescence. This subgroup appears to differ in several sleep parameters, indicating a more disturbed sleep compared to primary insomniacs with low or no reports of ACE. With regard to sleep-disturbing nightly patterns of arousal, parallels between individuals with high ACE and trauma victims as well as post-traumatic stress disorder-patients suggest themselves. PMID:17716278

  2. Epidemiological aspects of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, John F.; Pengo, Martino F.; Drakatos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is probably the most common respiratory disorder, with recent data from the United States and Europe suggesting that between 14% and 49% of middle-aged men have clinically significant OSA. The intimate relationship between OSA and obesity means that its prevalence will only increase as the global obesity epidemic evolves. At an individual level, OSA leads to a significant decrease in quality of life (QOL) and functional capacity, alongside a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Emerging data also suggest that the presence and severity of OSA and associated nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cancer. At a societal level, OSA not only leads to reduced economic productivity, but also constitutes a major treatable risk factor for hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. This article addresses OSA from an epidemiological perspective, from prevalence studies to economic aspects to co-morbidity. PMID:26101650

  3. Effects of zolpidem on sleep architecture, night time ventilation, daytime vigilance and performance in heavy snorers.

    PubMed

    Quera-Salva, M A; McCann, C; Boudet, J; Frisk, M; Borderies, P; Meyer, P

    1994-06-01

    1. In a double-blind, crossover, placebo controlled trial, zolpidem 10 mg, a new imidazopyridine hypnotic drug, was administered in a single dose to 10 healthy non-obese heavy snorers. 2. Nocturnal polysomnography showed that zolpidem increased total sleep time, sleep efficiency and the percentage of stage 2. 3. Respiratory monitoring showed that zolpidem did not modify the percentage of total sleep time spent snoring. The percentages of total sleep time with a SaO2 < 4% of the baseline value and with a SaO2 < 90% and the mean SaO2 were also unchanged with zolpidem. The respiratory disturbance index was modestly increased by zolpidem although in all but one subject it remained < 5 with both treatments. 4. Zolpidem intake did not impair daytime vigilance and performance evaluated the day after. PMID:7917771

  4. Clinical manifestations of obstructive sleep apnoea in pregnancy: more than snoring and witnessed apnoeas.

    PubMed

    Bourjeily, G; Barbara, N; Larson, L; He, M

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disordered breathing and its symptoms have been associated with a multitude of fetal and maternal complications including gestational hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes and possibly pre-term labour and other markers of alterations in fetal wellbeing. The disease remains underdiagnosed in the general population but likely also in pregnancy, mostly because providers do not appropriately screen for the disorder. Sleep disordered breathing may manifest differently in women, since women report more fatigue and less snoring than men do. This paper discusses typical presentations of sleep disordered breathing but also reports some less obvious presentations to help providers recognise those manifestations and screen for the disorder when warranted. Our case series describes patients with diagnoses such as chronic hypertension, pre-eclampsia, pulmonary hypertension, nocturnal asthma and panic attacks, who were diagnosed with sleep disordered breathing and offered treatment with CPAP during pregnancy. PMID:22663313

  5. Sleep, sleep disturbance, and fertility in women.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Perlis, Michael L; Zamzow, Jessica A; Culnan, Elizabeth J; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-08-01

    Sleep and sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as determinants of women's health and well-being, particularly in the context of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause. At present, however, little is known about whether fertility is affected by sleep quantity and quality. That is, to what degree, and by what mechanisms, do sleep and/or its disturbances affect fertility? The purpose of this review is to synthesize what is known about sleep disturbances in relation to reproductive capacity. A model is provided, whereby stress, sleep dysregulation, and circadian misalignment are delineated for their potential relevance to infertility. Ultimately, if it is the case that sleep disturbance is associated with infertility, new avenues for clinical intervention may be possible. PMID:25458772

  6. Ostriches Sleep like Platypuses

    PubMed Central

    Lesku, John A.; Meyer, Leith C. R.; Fuller, Andrea; Maloney, Shane K.; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    Mammals and birds engage in two distinct states of sleep, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. SWS is characterized by slow, high amplitude brain waves, while REM sleep is characterized by fast, low amplitude waves, known as activation, occurring with rapid eye movements and reduced muscle tone. However, monotremes (platypuses and echidnas), the most basal (or ‘ancient’) group of living mammals, show only a single sleep state that combines elements of SWS and REM sleep, suggesting that these states became temporally segregated in the common ancestor to marsupial and eutherian mammals. Whether sleep in basal birds resembles that of monotremes or other mammals and birds is unknown. Here, we provide the first description of brain activity during sleep in ostriches (Struthio camelus), a member of the most basal group of living birds. We found that the brain activity of sleeping ostriches is unique. Episodes of REM sleep were delineated by rapid eye movements, reduced muscle tone, and head movements, similar to those observed in other birds and mammals engaged in REM sleep; however, during REM sleep in ostriches, forebrain activity would flip between REM sleep-like activation and SWS-like slow waves, the latter reminiscent of sleep in the platypus. Moreover, the amount of REM sleep in ostriches is greater than in any other bird, just as in platypuses, which have more REM sleep than other mammals. These findings reveal a recurring sequence of steps in the evolution of sleep in which SWS and REM sleep arose from a single heterogeneous state that became temporally segregated into two distinct states. This common trajectory suggests that forebrain activation during REM sleep is an evolutionarily new feature, presumably involved in performing new sleep functions not found in more basal animals. PMID:21887239

  7. Effects of sleep deprivation on sleep homeostasis and restoration during methadone-maintenance: a [31] P MRS brain imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Plante, David T.; Penetar, David M.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Maywalt, Melissa A.; Brendel, Michael; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Insomnia afflicts many individuals, but particularly those in chronic methadone treatment. Studies examining sleep deprivation (SD) have begun to identify sleep restoration processes involving brain bioenergetics. The technique [31]P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can measure brain changes in the high-energy phosphates: alpha-, beta-, and gamma-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP). In the present study, 21 methadone-maintained (MM) and 16 control participants underwent baseline (BL), SD (40 wakeful hrs), recovery1 (RE1), and recovery2 (RE2) study nights. Polysomnographic sleep was recorded each night and [31]P MRS brain scanning conducted each morning using a 4T MR scanner (dual-tuned proton/phosphorus headcoil). Interestingly, increases in total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficiency index (SEI) commonly associated with RE sleep were not apparent in MM participants. Analysis of methadone treatment duration revealed that the lack of RE sleep increases in TST and SEI were primarily exhibited by short-term MM participants (methadone<12 months), while RE sleep in long-term MM (methadone>12 months) participants was more comparable to control participants. Slow wave sleep increased during RE1, but there was no difference between MM and control participants. Spectral power analysis revealed that compared to control participants; MM participants had greater delta, theta, and alpha spectral power during BL and RE sleep. [31]P MRS revealed that elevations in brain beta-NTP (a direct measure of ATP) following RE sleep were greater in MM compared to control participants. Results suggest that differences in sleep and brain chemistry during RE in MM participants may be reflective of a disruption in homeostatic sleep function. PMID:19775835

  8. Breastfeeding, Maternal Depressive Mood and Room Sharing as Predictors of Sleep Fragmentation in 12-Week-Old Infants: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Valerie; Lara-Carrasco, Jessica; Paquette, Tyna; Nielsen, Tore

    2011-01-01

    Sleep fragmentation in infancy can burden a family by disrupting the sleep of all its members. However, there has been no longitudinal prospective investigation of the determinants of infant sleep fragmentation. We undertook such an investigation. New mothers (N = 106) completed questionnaires and were administered structured telephone interviews…

  9. Case-Control Study of Subjective and Objective Differences in Sleep Patterns in Older Adults with Insomnia Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Pack, Frances; Staley, Beth; Schutte-Rodin, Sharon; Dinges, David F.; Pack, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Older adults have high prevalence rates of insomnia symptoms, yet it is unclear if these insomnia symptoms are associated with objective impairments in sleep. We hypothesized that insomnia complaints in older adults would be associated with objective differences in sleep compared to those without insomnia complaints. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a cross-sectional study in which older adults with insomnia complaints (cases, n=100) were compared to older adults without insomnia complaints (controls, n=100) using dual-night in-lab nocturnal polysomnography, study questionnaires and seven days of at-home actigraphy and sleep diaries. Cases were noted to have reduced objective total sleep time compared to controls (25.8 minutes +/? 8.56, p=0.003). This was largely due to increased wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), and not increased sleep latency. When participants with sleep-related breathing disorder or periodic limb movement disorder were excluded, the polysomnography total sleep time difference became even larger. Cases also had reduced slow-wave sleep (5.10 +/? 1.38 vs 10.57 +/? 2.29 minutes, effect size ?0.29, p=0.04). When comparing self-reported sleep latency and sleep efficiency to objective polysomnographic findings, cases demonstrated low, but statistically significant correlations, while no such correlations were observed in controls. Cases tended to under-estimate their sleep efficiency by 1.6% (+/? 18.4%), while controls over-estimated their sleep efficiency by 12.4% (+/? 14.5%). In conclusion, we noted that older adults with insomnia complaints have significant differences in several objective sleep findings relative to controls, suggesting that insomnia complaints in older adults are associated with objective impairments in sleep. PMID:20887395

  10. Sleep deprivation during a specific 3-hour time window post-training impairs hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Wimmer, Mathieu; Choi, Jennifer; Havekes, Robbert; Aton, Sara; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Sleep deprivation disrupts hippocampal function and plasticity. In particular, long-term memory consolidation is impaired by sleep deprivation, suggesting that a specific critical period exists following learning during which sleep is necessary. To elucidate the impact of sleep deprivation on long-term memory consolidation and synaptic plasticity, long-term memory was assessed when mice were sleep deprived following training in the hippocampus-dependent object place recognition task. We found that 3 hours of sleep deprivation significantly impaired memory when deprivation began 1 hour after training. In contrast, 3 hours of deprivation beginning immediately post-training did not impair spatial memory. Furthermore, a 3-hour sleep deprivation beginning 1 hour after training impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas sleep deprivation immediately after training did not affect LTP. Together, our findings define a specific 3-hour critical period, extending from 1 to 4 hours after training, during which sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal function. PMID:24380868

  11. Arousal from sleep - The physiological and subjective effects of a 15 dB/A/ reduction in aircraft flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levere, T. E.; Davis, N.

    1977-01-01

    The present research was concerned with whether or not a 15 dB(A) reduction in overall noise level would lessen the sleep disturbing properties of jet aircraft flyover noise and, if less disturbing, whether this would be subjectively appreciated by the sleeping individual. The results indicate that a reduction of 15 dB (A) does result in less sleep disruption but only during sleep characterized by fast-wave electroencephalographic activity. During sleep characterized by slow-wave electroencephalographic activity, such a reduction in the sleep-disturbing properties of jet aircraft noise has little effect. Moreover, even when effective during fast-wave sleep, the decreased arousal produced by the lower noise levels is not subjectively appreciated by the individual in terms of his estimate of the quality of his night's sleep. Thus, reducing the overall noise level of jet aircraft flyovers by some 15 dB(A), is, at best, minimally beneficial to sleep.

  12. The effects on human sleep and circadian rhythms of 17 days of continuous bedrest in the absence of daylight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Billy, B. D.; Kennedy, K. S.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a larger bedrest study involving various life science experiments, a study was conducted on the effects of 17 days of continuous bedrest and elimination of daylight on circadian rectal temperature rhythms, mood, alertness, and sleep (objective and diary) in eight healthy middle-aged men. Sleep was timed from 2300 to 0700 hours throughout. Three 72-hour measurement blocks were compared: ambulatory prebedrest, early bedrest (days 5-7), and late bedrest (days 15-17). Temperature rhythms showed reduced amplitude and later phases resulting from the bedrest conditions. This was associated with longer nocturnal sleep onset latencies and poorer subjectively rated sleep but with no reliable changes in any of the other sleep parameters. Daily changes in posture and/or exposure to daylight appear to be important determinants of a properly entrained circadian system.

  13. Arousal from sleep: The uniqueness of an individual's response and the problem of noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levere, T. E.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic nature of sleep is reviewed. Research is then presented concerning two fundamental issues: (1) does an individual react differently to auditory sounds when asleep as compared to when the individual is awake and (2) does sleep disruption necessarily involve behavioral awakening?

  14. International cooperative study of aircrew layover sleep Operational summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graeber, R. Curtis; Dement, William C.; Nicholson, Anthony N.; Sasaki, Mitsuo; Wegmann, Hans M.

    1986-01-01

    The findings of this cooperative study of layover sleep have direct implications for flight operations. In the consensus view of the principal investigators, these can be divided into their relevance for eastward or westward flight. Eastward flight produced more sleep disruption than westward. Different sleep and scheduling strategies are recommended for each flight direction, and the importance of individual crewmember factors is discussed in relation to age and circadian type. Despite the limitations of this study with regard to trip simplicity and the baseline data, the results for each airline are highly consistent and should be applicable to a wide range of long-haul crewmembers and carriers.

  15. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  16. Cardio-Respiratory Coordination Increases during Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Maik; Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F.; Penzel, Thomas; Kurths, Juergen; Wessel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main source of morbidity and mortality in the United States with costs of more than $170 billion. Repetitive respiratory disorders during sleep are assumed to be a major cause of these diseases. Therefore, the understanding of the cardio-respiratory regulation during these events is of high public interest. One of the governing mechanisms is the mutual influence of the cardiac and respiratory oscillations on their respective onsets, the cardio-respiratory coordination (CRC). We analyze this mechanism based on nocturnal measurements of 27 males suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Here we find, by using an advanced analysis technique, the coordigram, not only that the occurrence of CRC is significantly more frequent during respiratory sleep disturbances than in normal respiration (p-value<10?51) but also more frequent after these events (p-value<10?15). Especially, the latter finding contradicts the common assumption that spontaneous CRC can only be observed in epochs of relaxed conditions, while our newly discovered epochs of CRC after disturbances are characterized by high autonomic stress. Our findings on the connection between CRC and the appearance of sleep-disordered events require a substantial extension of the current understanding of obstructive sleep apneas and hypopneas. PMID:24718564

  17. Nocturnal male sex drive in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinsuke; Krishnan, Parthasarathy; Hardin, Paul; Amrein, Hubert

    2007-02-01

    Many behaviors and physiological processes including locomotor activity, feeding, sleep, mating, and migration are dependent on daily or seasonally reoccurring, external stimuli. In D. melanogaster, one of the best-studied circadian behaviors is locomotion. The fruit fly is considered a diurnal (day active/night inactive) insect, based on locomotor-activity recordings of single, socially naive flies. We developed a new circadian paradigm that can simultaneously monitor two flies in simple social contexts. We find that heterosexual couples exhibit a drastically different locomotor-activity pattern than individual males, females, or homosexual couples. Specifically, male-female couples exhibit a brief rest phase around dusk but are highly active throughout the night and early morning. This distinct locomotor-activity rhythm is dependent on the clock genes and synchronized with close-proximity encounters, which reflect courtship, between the male and female. The close-proximity rhythm is dependent on the male and not the female and requires circadian oscillators in the brain and the antenna. Taken together, our data show that constant exposure to stimuli emanating from the female and received by the male olfactory and other sensory systems is responsible for the significant shift in intrinsic locomotor output of socially interacting flies. PMID:17276917

  18. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carina; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F; Rocha, Susana; Herrera-Solís, Andrea; Salas-Pacheco, José; García-García, Fabio; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called adult neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of adult neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview on how rhythms and sleep cycles regulate hippocampal and subventricular zone neurogenesis, discussing some potential underlying mechanisms. In addition, our review highlights some interacting points between sleep and adult neurogenesis in brain function, such as learning, memory, and mood states, and provides some insights on the effects of antidepressants and hypnotic drugs on adult neurogenesis. PMID:25926773

  19. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Carina; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F.; Rocha, Susana; Herrera-Solís, Andrea; Salas-Pacheco, José; García-García, Fabio; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called adult neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of adult neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview on how rhythms and sleep cycles regulate hippocampal and subventricular zone neurogenesis, discussing some potential underlying mechanisms. In addition, our review highlights some interacting points between sleep and adult neurogenesis in brain function, such as learning, memory, and mood states, and provides some insights on the effects of antidepressants and hypnotic drugs on adult neurogenesis. PMID:25926773

  20. Treatment of the sleep disorders associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Bliwise, Donald L

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and preliminary work has suggested viable treatment options for many of these disorders. For rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, melatonin and clonazepam are most commonly used, while rivastigmine might be a useful option in patients whose behaviors are refractory to the former. Optimal treatments for insomnia in PD have yet to be determined, but preliminary evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy, light therapy, eszopiclone, donepezil, and melatonin might be beneficial. Use of the wake-promoting agent modafinil results in significant improvement in subjective measures of excessive daytime sleepiness, but not of fatigue. Optimal treatment of restless legs syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea in PD are not yet established, although a trial of continuous positive airway pressure for sleep apnea was recently completed in PD patients. In those patients with early morning motor dysfunction and disrupted sleep, the rotigotine patch provides significant benefit. PMID:24272458

  1. Self Organized Criticality as a new paradigm of sleep regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    2012-02-01

    Humans and animals often exhibit brief awakenings from sleep (arousals), which are traditionally viewed as random disruptions of sleep caused by external stimuli or pathologic perturbations. However, our recent findings show that arousals exhibit complex temporal organization and scale-invariant behavior, characterized by a power-law probability distribution for their durations, while sleep stage durations exhibit exponential behavior. The co-existence of both scale-invariant and exponential processes generated by a single regulatory mechanism has not been observed in physiological systems until now. Such co-existence resembles the dynamical features of non-equilibrium systems exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC). Our empirical analysis and modeling approaches based on modern concepts from statistical physics indicate that arousals are an integral part of sleep regulation and may be necessary to maintain and regulate healthy sleep by releasing accumulated excitations in the regulatory neuronal networks, following a SOC-type temporal organization.

  2. Wild Chimpanzees on the Edge: Nocturnal Activities in Croplands

    PubMed Central

    Krief, Sabrina; Cibot, Marie; Bortolamiol, Sarah; Seguya, Andrew; Krief, Jean-Michel; Masi, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    In a rapidly changing landscape highly impacted by anthropogenic activities, the great apes are facing new challenges to coexist with humans. For chimpanzee communities inhabiting encroached territories, not bordered by rival conspecifics but by human agricultural fields, such boundaries are risky areas. To investigate the hypothesis that they use specific strategies for incursions out of the forest into maize fields to prevent the risk of detection by humans guarding their field, we carried out video recordings of chimpanzees at the edge of the forest bordered by a maize plantation in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Contrary to our expectations, large parties are engaged in crop-raids, including vulnerable individuals such as females with clinging infants. More surprisingly chimpanzees were crop-raiding during the night. They also stayed longer in the maize field and presented few signs of vigilance and anxiety during these nocturnal crop-raids. While nocturnal activities of chimpanzees have been reported during full moon periods, this is the first record of frequent and repeated nocturnal activities after twilight, in darkness. Habitat destruction may have promoted behavioural adjustments such as nocturnal exploitation of open croplands. PMID:25338066

  3. Spectral sensitivity of the nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus,as a vector of West Nile virus is the target of many surveillance and control efforts. Surveillance of this species primarily consists of light traps baited with a variety of chemical lures. While much research has focused on optimization of the olfa...

  4. Opsin Genes and Visual Ecology in a Nocturnal Folivorous Lemur

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Molly E.

    and modeled performance of possible S and M/L pigment pairs for detecting these food items under different, we united molecular analyses of cone visual pigment (opsin) genes with visual modeling analyses nocturnal illuminations (e.g. twilight, moonlight). We found that the observed cone pigment pair in Avahi

  5. Brief Communications Nocturnal Light Exposure Impairs Affective Responses in a

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Randy J.

    include television and computer screens, light pollution, shift work, compact fluorescent light (CFLBrief Communications Nocturnal Light Exposure Impairs Affective Responses in a Wavelength; light is the most potent entraining cue. In mammals, light is detected by (1) rods and cones, which

  6. Wild chimpanzees on the edge: nocturnal activities in croplands.

    PubMed

    Krief, Sabrina; Cibot, Marie; Bortolamiol, Sarah; Seguya, Andrew; Krief, Jean-Michel; Masi, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    In a rapidly changing landscape highly impacted by anthropogenic activities, the great apes are facing new challenges to coexist with humans. For chimpanzee communities inhabiting encroached territories, not bordered by rival conspecifics but by human agricultural fields, such boundaries are risky areas. To investigate the hypothesis that they use specific strategies for incursions out of the forest into maize fields to prevent the risk of detection by humans guarding their field, we carried out video recordings of chimpanzees at the edge of the forest bordered by a maize plantation in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Contrary to our expectations, large parties are engaged in crop-raids, including vulnerable individuals such as females with clinging infants. More surprisingly chimpanzees were crop-raiding during the night. They also stayed longer in the maize field and presented few signs of vigilance and anxiety during these nocturnal crop-raids. While nocturnal activities of chimpanzees have been reported during full moon periods, this is the first record of frequent and repeated nocturnal activities after twilight, in darkness. Habitat destruction may have promoted behavioural adjustments such as nocturnal exploitation of open croplands. PMID:25338066

  7. Enhanced slow wave sleep and improved sleep maintenance after gaboxadol administration during seven nights of exposure to a traffic noise model of transient insomnia.

    PubMed

    Dijk, D-J; Stanley, N; Lundahl, J; Groeger, J A; Legters, A; Trap Huusom, A K; Deacon, S

    2012-08-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) has been reported to correlate with sleep maintenance, but whether pharmacological enhancement of SWS also leads to improved sleep maintenance is not known. Here we evaluate the time-course of the effects of gaboxadol, an extra-synaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist, on SWS, sleep maintenance, and other sleep measures in a traffic noise model of transient insomnia. After a placebo run-in, 101 healthy subjects (20-78?y) were randomized to gaboxadol (n?=?50; 15?mg in subjects <65?y and 10?mg in subjects ?65?y) or placebo (n?=?51) for 7 nights (N1-N7). The model caused some disruption of sleep initiation and maintenance, with greatest effects on N1. Compared with placebo, gaboxadol increased SWS and slow wave activity throughout N1 to N7 (p?sleep overall (N1-N7) by 4.5?min and on N1 by 11?min (both p?sleep time (TST) overall by 16?min (p?sleep onset was reduced by 11?min overall (p?sleep onset latency overall and on N1 (both p?sleep quality improved overall (p?sleep maintenance and subjective sleep quality under placebo and gaboxadol (p?disruptive effects of noise on sleep initiation and maintenance. PMID:22002961

  8. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that accounts for most cases of dementia. Accumulation

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Randy J.

    this hypothesis. The sleep-wake cycle regulates amyloid-beta (A) levels in both mice and humans. Sleep deprivation with sleep disruption, diurnal mood swings, and elevated nocturnal body tem- perature; manipulation of sleep between the circadian system and AD pathology. Discussion A reciprocal link among sleep, circadian rhythms

  9. Relationship between zolpidem concentrations and sleep parameters in pediatric burn patients.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Chris; Gottschlich, Michele M; Healy, Daniel; Khoury, Jane C; Mayes, Theresa; Sherwin, Catherine M T; Spigarelli, Michael G; Kagan, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Zolpidem is a short-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotic that is used to improve sleep architecture in patients with burn injuries. This study evaluated the relationship between zolpidem administration and sleep parameters in a cohort of children with severe burn injuries. Standard age-based zolpidem dosing practices were employed. Polysomnography data were recorded at 30-second intervals throughout the night. Serum concentrations of zolpidem were measured at 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 8 hours after administration of the first dose. The relationship between zolpidem concentrations and sleep parameters was evaluated using Markov mixed-effects pharmacodynamic models. Ten children received two doses of zolpidem at 22:00 and 02:00 hours. The median total amount of sleep was 361.0 (interquartile range [IQR]: 299.0-418.5) minutes; approximately 65% of the normal reference value for an 8-hour period. Slow-wave and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were also dramatically reduced (18-37% of normal). With two doses of zolpidem, stage 2 sleep was 99% of normal levels. Higher peak zolpidem concentrations were associated with increased stage 2 sleep (r = .54; P = .04). Despite this, a median of 120.0 (IQR: 99.5-143.5) transitions between nocturnal sleep stages were recorded, with a median of 55.5 (IQR: 36-75) night-time awakenings per patient. In pediatric burn patients, higher zolpidem serum concentrations were associated with restoration of stage 2 sleep to normal levels. Nonetheless, slow-wave and REM sleep were profoundly depressed with frequent transitions between sleep stages, suggesting that alternative hypnotic agents may be required to restore normal sleep architecture in severely burned children. PMID:25185933

  10. Sleep Disturbances and Health-Related Quality of Life in Adults with Steady-State Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiya; Tang, Yan; Lin, Zhimin; Li, Huimin; Gao, Yang; Luo, Qun; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Rongchang

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbances are common in patients with chronic lung diseases, but little is known about the prevalence in patients with bronchiectasis. A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and determinants associated with sleep disturbances, and the correlation between sleep disturbances and quality of life (QoL) in adults with steady-state bronchiectasis. Methods One hundred and forty-four bronchiectasis patients and eighty healthy subjects were enrolled. Sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness, and QoL were measured by utilizing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), respectively. Demographic, clinical indices, radiology, spirometry, bacteriology, anxiety and depression were also assessed. Results Adults with steady-state bronchiectasis had a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances (PSQI>5) (57% vs. 29%, P<0.001), but not daytime sleepiness (ESS?10) (32% vs. 30%, P?=?0.76), compared with healthy subjects. In the multivariate model, determinants associated with sleep disturbances in bronchiectasis patients included depression (OR, 10.09; 95% CI, 3.46–29.37; P<0.001), nocturnal cough (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.13–3.18; P?=?0.016), aging (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01–1.07; P?=?0.009) and increased 24-hour sputum volume (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.22–3.33; P?=?0.006). Patients with sleep disturbances had more significantly impaired QoL affecting all domains than those without. Only 6.2% of patients reported using a sleep medication at least weekly. Conclusions In adults with steady-state bronchiectasis, sleep disturbances are more common than in healthy subjects and are related to poorer QoL. Determinants associated with sleep disturbances include depression, aging, nighttime cough and increased sputum volume. Assessment and intervention of sleep disturbances are warranted and may improve QoL. PMID:25036723

  11. Decreased Connectivity between the Thalamus and the Neocortex during Human Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Picchioni, Dante; Pixa, Morgan L.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Carr, Walter S.; Horovitz, Silvina G.; Braun, Allen R.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether thalamocortical signaling between the thalamus and the neocortex decreases from wakefulness to nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Design: Electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected simultaneously at 02:30 after 44 h of sleep deprivation. Setting: Clinical research hospital. Participants: There were six volunteers (mean age 24.2 y, one male) who yielded sufficient amounts of usable, artifact-free data. All were healthy, right-handed native English speakers who consumed less than 710 mL of caffeinated beverages per day. Psychiatric, neurological, circadian, and sleep disorders were ruled out by reviewing each patient's clinical history. A standard clinical nocturnal polysomnogram was negative for sleep disorders. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: A functional connectivity analysis was performed using the centromedian nucleus as the seed region. We determined the statistical significance of the difference between correlations obtained during wakefulness and during slow wave sleep. Neocortical regions displaying decreased thalamic connectivity were all heteromodal regions (e.g., medial frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate/precuneus), whereas there was a complete absence of neocortical regions displaying increased thalamic connectivity. Although more clusters of significant decreases were observed in stage 2 sleep, these results were similar to the results for slow wave sleep. Conclusions: Results of this study provide evidence of a functional deafferentation of the neocortex during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in humans. This deafferentation likely accounts for increased sensory awareness thresholds during NREM sleep. Decreased thalamocortical connectivity in regions such as the posterior cingulate/precuneus also are observed in coma and general anesthesia, suggesting that changes in thalamocortical connectivity may act as a universal “control switch” for changes in consciousness that are observed in coma, general anesthesia, and natural sleep. Citation: Picchioni D; Pixa ML; Fukunaga M; Carr WS; Horovitz SG; Braun AR; Duyn JH. Decreased connectivity between the thalamus and the neocortex during human nonrapid eye movement sleep. SLEEP 2014;37(2):387-397. PMID:24497667

  12. Polysomnographic Features of Sleep Disturbances and REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in the Unilateral 6-OHDA Lesioned Hemiparkinsonian Rat.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quynh; Gilmour, Timothy P; Venkiteswaran, Kala; Fang, Jidong; Subramanian, Thyagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Sleep pattern disruption, specifically REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is a major nonmotor cause of disability in PD. Understanding the pathophysiology of these sleep pattern disturbances is critical to find effective treatments. 24-hour polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard for sleep studies, has never been used to test sleep dysfunction in the standard 6-OHDA lesioned hemiparkinsonian (HP) rat PD model. In this study, we recorded 24-hour PSG from normal and HP rats. Recordings were scored into wake, rapid eye movement (REM), and non-REM (NREM). We then examined EEG to identify REM periods and EMG to check muscle activity during REM. Normal rats showed higher wakefulness (70-80%) during the dark phase and lower wakefulness (20%) during the light phase. HP rats showed 30-50% sleep in both phases, less modulation and synchronization to the light schedule (P < 0.0001), and more long run lengths of wakefulness (P < 0.05). HP rats also had more REM epochs with muscle activity than control rats (P < 0.05). Our findings that the sleep architecture in the HP rat resembles that of PD patients demonstrate the value of this model in studying the pathophysiological basis of PD sleep disturbances and preclinical therapeutics for PD related sleep disorders including RBD. PMID:25610706

  13. Polysomnographic Features of Sleep Disturbances and REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in the Unilateral 6-OHDA Lesioned Hemiparkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Timothy P.; Venkiteswaran, Kala; Fang, Jidong; Subramanian, Thyagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Sleep pattern disruption, specifically REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is a major nonmotor cause of disability in PD. Understanding the pathophysiology of these sleep pattern disturbances is critical to find effective treatments. 24-hour polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard for sleep studies, has never been used to test sleep dysfunction in the standard 6-OHDA lesioned hemiparkinsonian (HP) rat PD model. In this study, we recorded 24-hour PSG from normal and HP rats. Recordings were scored into wake, rapid eye movement (REM), and non-REM (NREM). We then examined EEG to identify REM periods and EMG to check muscle activity during REM. Normal rats showed higher wakefulness (70–80%) during the dark phase and lower wakefulness (20%) during the light phase. HP rats showed 30–50% sleep in both phases, less modulation and synchronization to the light schedule (P < 0.0001), and more long run lengths of wakefulness (P < 0.05). HP rats also had more REM epochs with muscle activity than control rats (P < 0.05). Our findings that the sleep architecture in the HP rat resembles that of PD patients demonstrate the value of this model in studying the pathophysiological basis of PD sleep disturbances and preclinical therapeutics for PD related sleep disorders including RBD. PMID:25610706

  14. Sleep-related autonomic overactivity in a general elderly population and its relationship to cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Crawford-Achour, Emilie; Roche, Frédéric; Pichot, Vincent; Celle, Sébastien; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Chouchou, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in cardiac autonomic activity during sleep is a common feature of sleep disorders. Diurnal sympathetic overactivity is a possible consequence and could contribute to future cardiovascular complications. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between cardiac autonomic activity during sleep and diurnal autonomic cardiovascular control. In a large cohort (n = 1011) of subjects aged 65 years old (±0.4) free of cardiac and cerebrovascular events and of sleep-related breathing disorders, we evaluated (cross-sectional study) the prevalence of unexpected alteration in sleep-related autonomic overactivity according to the presence of a cyclical nocturnal heart rate variability [quantified using the relative power spectral density of the very low-frequency band of the heart rate increment (VLFi %) from ECG Holter monitoring]. We tested its relationship with diurnal ambulatory blood pressure and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS). An abnormal cardiac autonomic activity during sleep was retained in 34.4 % of this population according to a VLFi % >4. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the severity of the autonomic alteration was mainly correlated after adjustment with lower sBRS (p = 0.01; OR: 0.94; 95 % CI: 0.90-0.98). Diurnal baroreflex control alteration is associated with sleep-related autonomic overactivity elderly. Such alteration may contribute to the increased incidence of cardiovascular complications in sleep disorders. PMID:25150588

  15. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Becchetti, Andrea; Aracri, Patrizia; Meneghini, Simone; Brusco, Simone; Amadeo, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the ?4?2(*) subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na(+)-dependent K(+) channel), DEPD5 (Disheveled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5), and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone). Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex. PMID:25717303

  16. Effect of a single oral dose of rabeprazole on nocturnal acid breakthrough and nocturnal alkaline amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin-Yan; Niu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xue-Qin; Zhu, You-Ling; Gong, Jun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of rabeprazole (RAB) on nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB) and nocturnal alkaline amplitude (NAKA) and to compare it with omeprazole (OME) and pantoprazole (PAN). METHODS: By an open comparative study, forty patients with active peptic ulcer were randomly assigned to receive one of the three PPIs (proton pump inhibitor) with a single oral dose. They were divided into RAB group (10 mg), OME group (20 mg) and PAN group (40 mg). Twenty healthy volunteers were enrolled to the control group (without taking any drug). Intragastric pH monitoring was then performed 1 h before and 24 h after the dose was given. RESULTS: No clinically undesirable signs and symptoms possibly attributed to the administration of RAB or OME and PAN were recognizable throughout the study period. All subjects completed the study according to the protocol. All data were processed by a computer using the Student t test or t’ test followed by an analysis of covariance. P < 0.05 was considered to have statistical significance. The intragastric pH of NAB was significantly higher in RAB group (1.84 ± 0.55) than in either OME group (1.15 ± 0.31) or PAN group (1.10 ± 0.30) (both P < 0.01). RAB produced a longer sustaining time (4.65 ± 1.22 h) on NAKA than OME (3.22 ± 1.89 h) (P < 0.05), PAN (3.15 ± 1.92 h) (P < 0.05), and the sustaining time of NAKA in RAB group was longer than that in the healthy control group (P < 0.01) too. In addition, RAB produced a much higher pH on NAKA (6.41 ± 0.45) in comparison with PAN (6.01 ± 0.92) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: A single oral dose of 10 mg RAB may increase the pH of NAB and shorten the sustaining time of NAB, and it may increase the pH of NAKA as well as prolong the sustaining time of NAKA. PMID:14606102

  17. Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Van Cauter, Eve; Spiegel, Karine; Tasali, Esra; Leproult, Rachel

    2008-09-01

    Reduced sleep duration and quality appear to be endemic in modern society. Curtailment of the bedtime period to minimum tolerability is thought to be efficient and harmless by many. It has been known for several decades that sleep is a major modulator of hormonal release, glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. In particular, slow wave sleep (SWS), thought to be the most restorative sleep stage, is associated with decreased heart rate, blood pressure, sympathetic nervous activity and cerebral glucose utilization, compared with wakefulness. During SWS, the anabolic growth hormone is released while the stress hormone cortisol is inhibited. In recent years, laboratory and epidemiologic evidence have converged to indicate that sleep loss may be a novel risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. The increased risk of obesity is possibly linked to the effect of sleep loss on hormones that play a major role in the central control of appetite and energy expenditure, such as leptin and ghrelin. Reduced leptin and increased ghrelin levels correlate with increases in subjective hunger when individuals are sleep restricted rather than well rested. Given the evidence, sleep curtailment appears to be an important, yet modifiable, risk factor for the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity. The marked decrease in average sleep duration in the last 50 years coinciding with the increased prevalence of obesity, together with the observed adverse effects of recurrent partial sleep deprivation on metabolism and hormonal processes, may have important implications for public health. PMID:18929315

  18. Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Van Cauter, Eve; Spiegel, Karine; Tasali, Esra; Leproult, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Reduced sleep duration and quality appear to be endemic in modern society. Curtailment of the bedtime period to minimum tolerability is thought to be efficient and harmless by many. It has been known for several decades that sleep is a major modulator of hormonal release, glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. In particular, slow wave sleep (SWS), thought to be the most restorative sleep stage, is associated with decreased heart rate, blood pressure, sympathetic nervous activity and cerebral glucose utilization, compared with wakefulness. During SWS, the anabolic growth hormone is released while the stress hormone cortisol is inhibited. In recent years, laboratory and epidemiologic evidence have converged to indicate that sleep loss may be a novel risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. The increased risk of obesity is possibly linked to the effect of sleep loss on hormones that play a major role in the central control of appetite and energy expenditure, such as leptin and ghrelin. Reduced leptin and increased ghrelin levels correlate with increases in subjective hunger when individuals are sleep restricted rather than well rested. Given the evidence, sleep curtailment appears to be an important, yet modifiable, risk factor for the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity. The marked decrease in average sleep duration in the last 50 years coinciding with the increased prevalence of obesity, together with the observed adverse effects of recurrent partial sleep deprivation on metabolism and hormonal processes, may have important implications for public health. PMID:18929315

  19. Sleep disturbances in patients with Alzheimer's disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, M V; Borson, S

    2001-01-01

    Older adults represent an ever-growing proportion of the population of the industrialised nations, with a corresponding increase in the numbers of patients with dementing disorders. A common complaint in both normal aging and the dementias is that of significant sleep disturbance. The major causes of sleep disruption in aging and dementia include: (i) physiological changes that arise as part of normal, 'nonpathological' aging; (ii) sleep problems due to one of many physical or mental health conditions and their treatments; (iii) primary sleep disorders; (iv) poor 'sleep hygiene', that is, sleep-related practices and habits; and (v) some combination of these factors. Disrupted sleep in patients with dementia is a significant cause of stress for caregivers and frequently leads to institutionalisation of patients. It should be a target of clinical management when the goal is sustained home care, and when it is associated with disturbances of mood or behaviour. While the neuropathology of dementia can directly disrupt sleep, sleep disturbances in patients with dementia often have multiple causes that require systematic evaluation. Thorough assessment of associated psychopathology, day-time behaviour, medical disorders, medications, pain and environmental conditions is needed for optimal management. Differential diagnosis of a sleep problem in dementia is the basis of rational pharmacotherapy. However, patients with dementia are likely to be more sensitive than elderly persons without dementia to adverse cognitive and motor effects of drugs prescribed for sleep. Clinicians need to: (i) evaluate sleep outcomes when treating medical, psychiatric and behavioural disorders in older adults; (ii) be alert to emerging behavioural and environmental approaches to treatment; (iii) combine nonpharmacological strategies with drug therapies, when required, for added value; and (iv) avoid use of multiple psychotropic medications unless they prove essential to the adequate management of sleep disturbances. PMID:11602004

  20. Sleep and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Mark R.; Krueger, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Many pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are somnogenic, while many anti-inflammatory molecules inhibit sleep. Sleep loss increases the production/release of these sleep regulatory pro-inflammatory molecules. Further, sleep changes occurring during various pathologies are mediated by these inflammatory substances in response to pathogen recognition and subsequent inflammatory cellular pathways. This review summarizes information and concepts regarding inflammatory mechanisms of the innate immune system that mediate sleep. Further, we discuss sleep-immune interactions in regards to sleep in general, pathologies, and sleep as a local phenomenon including the central role that extracellular ATP plays in the initiation of sleep. PMID:21196401

  1. Sleep locally, act globally.

    PubMed

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Lima, Steven L; Lesku, John A

    2012-10-01

    In most animals, sleep is considered a global brain and behavioral state. However, recent intracortical recordings have shown that aspects of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and wakefulness can occur simultaneously in different parts of the cortex in mammals, including humans. Paradoxically, however, NREM sleep still manifests as a global behavioral shutdown. In this review, the authors examine this paradox from an evolutionary perspective. On the basis of strategic modeling, they suggest that in animals with brains composed of heavily interconnected and functionally interdependent units, a global regulator of sleep maintains the behavioral shutdown that defines sleep and thereby ensures that local use-dependent functions are performed in a safe and efficient manner. This novel perspective has implications for understanding deficits in human cognitive performance resulting from sleep deprivation, sleep disorders such as sleepwalking, changes in consciousness that occur during sleep, and the function of sleep itself. PMID:22572533

  2. Patterns of sleep behaviour.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the electroencephalogram as the critical measurement procedure for sleep research, and survey of major findings that have emerged in the last decade on the presence of sleep within the twenty-four-hour cycle. Specifically, intrasleep processes, frequency of stage changes, sequence of stage events, sleep stage amounts, temporal patterns of sleep, and stability of intrasleep pattern in both man and lower animals are reviewed, along with some circadian aspects of sleep, temporal factors, and number of sleep episodes. It is felt that it is particularly critical to take the presence of sleep into account whenever performance is considered. When it is recognized that responsive performance is extremely limited during sleep, it is easy to visualize the extent to which performance is controlled by sleep itself.

  3. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Kanuther N, Harrington J, Lee-Chiong T. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Clin Chest Med . 2010;31:319-325. Zee PC, Vitello MV. Circadian rhythm sleep disorder: irregular sleep wake rhythm. Sleep Med ...

  4. Are You Getting Enough Sleep?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Are you getting enough sleep? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Sleep is ... sleep guidelines for different age groups. How much sleep do you need? Newborns 16-18 hours Preschool- ...

  5. Diurnal and nocturnal activity budgets of zoo elephants in an outdoor facility.

    PubMed

    Horback, Kristina M; Miller, Lance J; Andrews, Jeff R M; Kuczaj, Stan A

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the activity budgets of 15 African elephants (1 bull, 6 cows, 2 male juveniles, 2 female juveniles, and 4 male calves) living at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Onsite behavioral data (n?=?600?hr) were collected for approximately 12 weeks from 0400 to 0830 and 1100 to 2400 during the 2010 and 2011 summer season. Foraging was the most common behavior state during the day followed by resting, and walking. During the evening hours, the elephants spent majority of their time foraging, resting, and sleeping. The average rate of self-maintenance behavior events (dust, wallow, etc.) increased from 0600 to 0700, 1100 to 1500, and from 1700 to 1900. Positive social behavior events (touch other, play, etc.) remained high from 0500 to 2300, with peaks at 0600, 1300, 1500, and 1900. Negative social events occurred at low rates throughout the day and night, with peaks at 0600, 1900, and 2200. The majority of positive behavior events during the daylight and nighttime hours involved the mother-calf pairs. Furthermore, the calves and juveniles initiated approximately 60% of all social events during the daytime and 57% of all social interactions at night. The results of this study demonstrate the differences between diurnal and nocturnal activity budgets of a multi-age and sex elephant herd in a zoological facility, which highlights the importance of managing elephants to meet their 24?hr behavioral needs. PMID:25113850

  6. Parental beliefs about nocturnal enuresis causes, treatments, and the need to seek professional medical care

    PubMed Central

    Schlomer, Bruce; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana; Copp, Hillary

    2015-01-01

    Objective To better understand parental beliefs regarding the etiology and treatment of nocturnal enuresis (NE). Methods A self-administered survey queried parental NE beliefs including perceived etiologies and home behavioral treatments. We assessed for associations between demographic characteristics and propensity to seek medical care for NE. Results Of 216 respondents, 78% were female. The most common causes for NE reported were: deep sleeper (56%), unknown (39%), and laziness (26%). Popular home behavioral therapies included: void prior to sleep (77%) and limiting fluid intake at night (71%). Few reported they would use a bedwetting alarm (6%). Fifty-five percent reported they would seek medical care for NE and 28% reported awareness of effective treatments. On multivariable analysis, females (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.04–5.0) and those with graduate level education (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.5–15.7) were more likely to seek medical care for their child with NE. Conclusions General parental knowledge of the causes and effective treatments for NE is lacking. Only 55% reported they would seek medical care for their child with NE and only 28% reported awareness of effective treatments. Counseling should focus on dispelling common misconceptions about causes and treatments of NE and focus on proven effective treatments. PMID:23608323

  7. Effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy on heart function in SDB patients undergoing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Fumitaka; Furumatsu, Yoshiyuki; Yurugi, Takatomi; Amari, Yoshifumi; Iida, Takeshi; Uehara, Mitsuru; Fukunaga, Megumu

    2015-06-01

    There is a close relationship between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and heart failure. We performed home oxygen therapy (HOT) in patients with SAS undergoing dialysis, and investigated its effects on the heart function. The subjects were 10 SDB patients on dialysis. On retiring at night, oxygen was transnasally administered at 1.0 L/min. The human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), total protein, Alb, cholesterol and phosphorus levels were measured before the start of oxygen therapy and after 6 weeks. The mean SpO2 increased from 93.5% [91.5, 97.0] to 96.3% [94.8, 97.4] (median [interquartile range]) (p = 0.015). The hANP (p = 0.0039), BNP (p = 0.0098) and serum Alb (p = 0.015) levels significantly improved. There were no significant changes in the cholesterol, phosphorus or total protein levels. These results suggest that nocturnal oxygen therapy improves indices of heart failure, contributing to the prevention and treatment of heart failure in dialysis patients with SDB. PMID:26181646

  8. Reduction of nocturnal slow-wave activity affects daytime vigilance lapses and memory encoding but not reaction time or implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Altena, Ellemarije; Vis, José C; Koene, Teddy; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2011-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation in healthy subjects has a profound effect on the performance on tasks measuring sustained attention or vigilance. We here report how a selective disruption of deep sleep only, that is, selective slow-wave activity (SWA) reduction, affects the performance of healthy well-sleeping subjects on several tasks: a "simple" and a "complex" vigilance task, a declarative learning task, and an implicit learning task despite unchanged duration of sleep. We used automated electroencephalogram (EEG) dependent acoustic feedback aimed at selective interference with-and reduction of-SWA. In a within-subject repeated measures crossover design, performance on the tasks was assessed in 13 elderly adults without sleep complaints after either SWA-reduction or after normal sleep. The number of vigilance lapses increased as a result of SWA reduction, irrespective of the type of vigilance task. Recognition on the declarative memory task was also affected by SWA reduction, associated with a decreased activation of the right hippocampus on encoding (measured with fMRI) suggesting a weaker memory trace. SWA reduction, however, did not affect reaction time on either of the vigilance tasks or implicit memory task performance. These findings suggest a specific role of slow oscillations in the subsequent daytime ability to maintain sustained attention and to encode novel declarative information but not to maintain response speed or to build implicit memories. Of particular interest is that selective SWA reduction can mimic some of the effects of total sleep deprivation, while not affecting sleep duration. PMID:21854967

  9. Slow-wave disruption enhances the accessibility of positive memory traces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmied, Jennifer R; Cheng, Philip; Kim, Hyang Sook; Casement, Melynda; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of slow-wave disruption on positive and negative word recognition in a sample of healthy control participants and those with major depressive disorder. Prior to sleep, participants learned a set of emotional and neutral words during an encoding task by responding whether or not the word described them. Following baseline sleep, participants underwent one night of selective slow-wave disruption by auditory stimuli. Accuracy and reaction time to a recognition word set, including both positive and negative words, was assessed in the morning. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between word valence and condition, with positive words recognized significantly faster than negative words after disruption, in only healthy control participants. There were no significant results in those with major depressive disorder, or with regard to accuracy. These results may add to the increasing body of literature suggesting a hedonic bias to positive stimuli following sleep disruption. PMID:26409320

  10. Primary Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Khoury, John; Doghramji, Karl

    2015-12-01

    Primary sleep disorders include those not attributable to another medical or psychiatric condition: insomnia disorder, hypersomnolence disorder, narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome, central sleep apnea syndrome, and the parasomnias. They are commonly encountered and are comorbid with many psychiatric disorders. It is important to recognize these disorders and be comfortable treating them or to know when to refer to a sleep disorders center and sleep specialist. Treatment of a comorbid sleep disorder can improve the overall quality of life, symptoms in mood disorders, and symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness, and decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26600103

  11. Sleep and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kathy P; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2002-10-01

    Sleep problems and symptoms of sleep disturbance are very prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF). Numerous contributing factors include sleep-related breathing disorders, increasing age, medications, anxiety and depression, and comorbidities. Thus, the cardiovascular nurse has an important role in the recognition and management of sleep-related problems in persons with HF. This article provides an overview of sleep disturbances in patients with HF, suggests evidence-based strategies for managing the sleep problems, and identifies pertinent areas for future nursing inquiry. PMID:12358091

  12. Childhood epilepsy and sleep.

    PubMed

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-08-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementation of epileptic patients with some of these sleep-related hormones may have a beneficial role in controlling epilepsy. PMID:25254184

  13. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementation of epileptic patients with some of these sleep-related hormones may have a beneficial role in controlling epilepsy. PMID:25254184

  14. Comparison of combined treatment with desmopressin plus oxybutynin and desmopressin plus tolterodine in treatment of children with primary nocturnal enuresis

    PubMed Central

    Azarfar, Anoush; Esmaeili, Mohammad; Naseri, Mitra; Ghane, Fatemeh; Ravanshad, Yalda; Vejdani, Marjan; Ghanei, Neda; Babaei-Heydarabadi, Akbar; Saffari, Seyed-Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nocturnal enuresis (enuresis) is one of the most common developmental problems of childhood, which has often a familial basis, causes mental and psychological damage to the child and disrupts family solace. Objectives: In this study, we compared therapeutic effects of combination therapy of desmopressin plus oxybutynin with desmopressin plus tolterodine, in the treatment of children with primary nocturnal enuresis. Patients and Methods: The present study is a clinical trial study, where 59 patients with primary nocturnal enuresis in the age range of 5 to 14 years old were selected from the visitors of nephrology clinic of Dr. Sheikh pediatrics hospital (Mashhad, Iran). Patients were divided into 2 treatment groups where the first group received combined therapy with desmopressin and oxybutynin, and the second group received combined therapy with desmopressin and tolterodine. Data was analyzed using SPSS 16 software and descriptive and analytical statistics (chi-square test). Results: The mean of age of patients in total was 2.55 ± 7.90 years. In the treatment group with desmopressin and oxybutynin, 26 of 30 patients (86.7%) achieved a complete remission and 4 patients (13.3%) still suffered from enuresis during a 3-month evaluation. The comparison of 2 groups, in terms of the outcome of the 3-month treatment, showed significant differences between the remission and recovery of 2 groups, where the recovery in the group with desmopressin plus tolterodine was higher than the group with desmopressin plus oxybutynin (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The results showed that combined treatment with desmopressin plus tolterodine performs better than desmopressin plus oxybutynin . PMID:26468479

  15. Dementia Behavioral and Psychiatric Symptoms: Effect on Caregiver’s Sleep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives To examine caregiver sleep quality, especially in relation to the daytime and nighttime behaviors and psychological symptoms exhibited by persons with dementia (PWDs). Background Caregivers of PWDs experience poorer sleep in comparison with noncaregivers, and poor sleep is related to negative health outcomes. The reasons for caregivers’ poor sleep are complex, and it is known that the nighttime behaviors of the PWD contribute to caregiver sleep disruption. However, the frequency of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia has hitherto not been sufficiently explored as a contributing factor to poor caregiver sleep. Design A nonexperimental cross-sectional design. Methods Eighty caregivers completed questionnaires on the frequency of behavioral and psychological symptoms of the PWD, the Dementia Severity Rating Scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression Scale. Results Poor sleep was reported with awakenings by the PWD occurring for more than half of the caregivers. The frequency of behaviors and symptoms did not make a unique contribution to the variance of caregivers’ global sleep. The frequency of behaviors, and specifically of agitation and apathy, contributed to the variance in subjective sleep quality, as defined by the caregivers’ appraisal of their sleep. Conclusions The findings demonstrate the relationship between (a) daytime and nighttime behaviors of PWDs and (b) their caregivers’ sleep quality, and emphasize the complexity of the factors that contribute to caregiver sleep quality. Relevance to clinical practice These findings suggest that nurses should be cognizant of the relationship between daytime behaviors of the PWD and the caregivers’ appraisal of their sleep, realizing that appraising one’s sleep as poor can be a contributing factor to perpetuating sleep problems. Interventions aimed at helping the caregiver manage the PWD’s agitation or the caregiver’s emotional response to PWD apathy may improve caregivers’ perception of their sleep. PMID:23445081

  16. A review of evidence for the link between sleep duration and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gangwisch, James E

    2014-10-01

    There are lines of evidence from experimental sleep deprivation studies, population-based epidemiological studies, and an interventional study that point to the potential efficacy of adequate quality sleep to prevent and treat hypertension. Experimental sleep restriction has been shown to raise blood pressure and heart rate. Insufficient sleep on a chronic basis can raise average 24-hour blood pressure and lead to structural adaptations that entrain the cardiovascular system to operate at an elevated blood pressure equilibrium and increase the risk for hypertension. Disruptions in the timing and duration of sleep could also disrupt circadian rhythmicity and autonomic balance, which can increase the prevalence of the nondipping pattern, disturb diurnal rhythm of cardiac output, and increase blood pressure variability. Short sleep duration has been found to be associated with higher blood pressure and hypertension in both cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological studies. The association appears stronger in middle-aged adults and in women. Experimental sleep extension has been shown to significantly reduce blood pressure in individuals with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension. The observed association between sleep duration and hypertension raises the hypothesis that interventions to extend sleep and improve sleep quality could serve as effective primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive measures for hypertension. PMID:24778107

  17. Classroom Control, Disruptive Students, Disruptive Colleagues

    E-print Network

    Howitt, Ivan

    Classroom Control, Disruptive Students, Disruptive Colleagues: Is Truth Stranger Than Fiction? Jeff taught instructor to respect others Classroom Control #12;Scenario #1 ·Instructor shared story about to take out a gun and shoot in the head?" #12;Questions 1. Why was instructor suspended? 2. Exercise

  18. The association of testosterone, sleep, and sexual function in men and women.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Monica L; Alvarenga, Tathiana F; Mazaro-Costa, Renata; Hachul, Helena C; Tufik, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Testosterone has been the focus of several investigations and review studies in males, but few have addressed its effects on sleep and sexual function, despite evidence of its androgenic effects on circadian activity in both sexes. Studies have been conducted to understand how sleeping increases (and how waking decreases) testosterone levels and how this rhythm can be related to sexual function. This review addresses the inter-relationships among testosterone, sexual function and sleep, including sleep-disordered breathing in both sexes, specifically its effects related to sleep deprivation. In addition, hormonal changes in testosterone that occur in the gonadal and adrenal axis with obstructive sleep apnea and other conditions of chronic sleep deprivation, and which consequently affect sexual life, have also been explored. Nevertheless, hormone-associated sleep disruptions occur across a lifetime, particularly in women. The association between endogenous testosterone and sex, sleep and sleep disturbances is discussed, including the results of clinical trials as well as animal model studies. Evidence of possible pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this relationship is also described. Unraveling the associations of sex steroid hormone concentrations with sleep and sexual function may have clinical implications, as sleep loss reduces testosterone levels in males, and low sex steroid hormone concentrations have been associated with sexual dysfunction. PMID:21890115

  19. Assessing Sleep Architecture in Dementia Caregivers at Home Using an Ambulatory Polysomnographic System

    PubMed Central

    Fonareva, Irina; Amen, Alexandra M.; Zajdel, Daniel P.; Ellingson, Roger M.; Oken, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    Findings from previous research assessing sleep quality in caregivers are inconsistent due to differences in sleep assessment methods. This study evaluated sleep in dementia caregivers using a comprehensive sleep assessment utilizing an ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) device. Twenty caregivers and twenty non-caregivers rated their perceived sleep quality, stress, and depressive symptoms; provided samples of cortisol and inflammatory biomarkers; and completed an objective sleep assessment using a portable PSG device. Caregivers reported greater perceived stress than non-caregivers. Next, the groups had different sleep architecture: caregivers spent less proportion of their sleep in restorative sleep stages compared to non-caregivers. Further, levels of C-reactive protein and awakening salivary cortisol were greater in caregivers than in non-caregivers, and these measures were related to sleep quality. Our findings indicate that sleep disruption is a significant concomitant of caregiving and may affect caregiver’s health. Sleep quality of caregivers might be a useful target for a clinical intervention. PMID:21320949

  20. Effect of eszopiclone on sleep disturbances and daytime fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Attarian, Hrayr; Applebee, Garrick; Applebee, Angela; Wang, Bingxia; Clark, Melissa; McCormick, Becky; Salzman, Emma; Schuman, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of moderate-to-severe sleep problems is significantly higher among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) than in the general population. In 2002, we found a significant relationship between fatigue and disrupted sleep in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). The objectives of this study were to determine whether eszopiclone (Lunesta; Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc, Marlborough, MA) was superior to placebo in improving sleep among patients with MS-related fatigue and sleep complaints (primary end point); and to assess the impact of improved sleep on daytime fatigue and functioning (secondary end point). This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial lasting 7 weeks. Thirty ambulatory adults under age 65 years with RRMS, fatigue, and sleep disturbances were randomized to receive either eszopiclone or placebo. The outcome measures included subjective and objective changes in sleep-onset latency (SOL), total sleep time (TST), wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), sleep efficiency (SE), fatigue scales, and neuropsychological measures of daytime functioning. Compared with placebo, eszopiclone was superior only in increasing TST. Fatigue improved in both groups, but there was no statistically significant correlation between increased TST and improved fatigue, and no statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups. Thus, in this study, eszopiclone did not improve sleep sufficiently to improve fatigue in MS patients. This result may be due to the multifactorial nature of sleep disturbances and fatigue in people with MS. PMID:24453709

  1. Sleep and Infant Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tarullo, Amanda R.; Balsam, Peter D.; Fifer, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates spend the majority of their time sleeping. Despite the limited waking hours available for environmental exploration, the first few months of life are a time of rapid learning about the environment. The organization of neonate sleep differs qualitatively from adult sleep, and the unique characteristics of neonatal sleep may promote learning. Sleep contributes to infant learning in multiple ways. First, sleep facilitates neural maturation, thereby preparing infants to process and explore the environment in increasingly sophisticated ways. Second, sleep plays a role in memory consolidation of material presented while the infant was awake. Finally, emerging evidence indicates that infants process sensory stimuli and learn about contingencies in their environment even while asleep. As infants make the transition from reflexive to cortically mediated control, learned responses to physiological challenges during sleep may be critical adaptations to promote infant survival. PMID:21311602

  2. Do all animals sleep?

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jerome M

    2008-04-01

    Some animals never exhibit a state that meets