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1

Sleep disruption alters nocturnal ACTH and cortisol secretory patterns.  

PubMed

Recent studies have provided evidence that nocturnal cortisol secretion is coupled to ultradian rhythms of sleep. The present study was designed to specify how exogenous and sleep-related endogenous factors influence nocturnal adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol secretion. We compared the influences of (1) temporary sleep deprivation, (2) arousals continuously induced during sleep and, (3) undisturbed sleep (baseline) on pituitary-adrenocortical activity in 10 healthy men. Sleep deprivation (DS) and continuous arousals during sleep (AS) were introduced at the beginning of the second rapid eye movement (REM) sleep period which is an epoch close to the first significant nocturnal rise in plasma cortisol. Compared with the baseline nights, plasma cortisol significantly increased immediately after continuous arousals were started or the subject was awakened and remained awake. Despite this exogenously provoked first cortisol peak, average cortisol release during DS and AS was no higher than during undisturbed sleep. The arousal-induced cortisol burst was followed by a temporary inhibition of cortisol secretion, suggesting that once the subject is aroused (i.e., in stage 1 sleep or awake), the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system becomes highly sensitive to negative feedback inhibition. Spontaneously occurring endogenous cortisol peaks of comparable size during undisturbed sleep did not exhibit such a temporary inhibition of cortisol secretion. We hypothesize that sleep attenuates negative feedback inhibition within the HPA system, whereas wakefulness (or stage 1 sleep) reflects increased feedback sensitivity of this system. PMID:1647222

Späth-Schwalbe, E; Gofferje, M; Kern, W; Born, J; Fehm, H L

1991-03-15

2

Sleep interrupted: nocturnal care disturbances following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Sleep is an essential biologic and physiologic process that is vital for maintaining or achieving optimal health outcomes. Care requirements in hospitalized patients frequently result in nocturnal disruptions that impact sleep quality. This exploratory, retrospective study aimed to identify and quantify nocturnal care disruptions in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A total of 1,642 nocturnal care interactions occurred during 160 patient nights of data collection. An average of 41 nocturnal care interactions occurred per patient. Most occurred from 12-12:59 am and 4-4:59 am. Most patients (73%) had sleep disturbance recorded in their chart by nurses, but physicians documented sleep disturbances for only 28% of patients. Care practices may be modifiable to promote sleep in the hospital setting. PMID:24080050

Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Patel, Purvi; Stainthorpe, Megan

2013-10-01

3

Sleep efficiency and nocturnal hemodynamic dipping in young, normotensive adults.  

PubMed

Blunted dipping of nocturnal systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and heart rate (HR) are independent risk factors for hypertension and all-cause mortality. While several epidemiological studies report a significant association between short sleep duration and hypertension, associations between sleep efficiency and the nocturnal drop of SAP remain controversial. Moreover, relations between sleep efficiency and HR diurnal patterns have been overlooked. We hypothesized that low sleep efficiency (<85%) would be associated with blunted nocturnal SAP and HR dipping. Twenty-two normotensive subjects (13 men, 9 women; age: 18-28 yr) wore an actigraphy watch for 7 days and nights, and an ambulatory blood pressure monitor for 24 h on a nonactigraph night. There were no differences in age, sex, body mass index, mean sleep time, number of awakenings, or 24-h blood pressure between the low (n = 12) and high (n = 10) sleep efficiency groups. However, the low sleep efficiency subjects demonstrated a blunted dip of nocturnal SAP (10 ± 1% vs. 14 ± 1%, P = 0.04) and HR (12 ± 3% vs. 21 ± 3%, P = 0.03) compared with the high sleep efficiency group. The low sleep efficiency group also demonstrated a higher mean nocturnal HR (63 ± 2 vs. 55 ± 2 beats/min; P = 0.02). These findings support growing evidence that sleep efficiency, independent of total sleep time, may be an important cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:25031228

Ross, Amanda J; Yang, Huan; Larson, Robert A; Carter, Jason R

2014-10-01

4

Pathology of the brain and the structure of nocturnal sleep  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electropolygraphic comparison series of the nocturnal sleep of 126 patients with neurological disorders and 10 persons who were normally healthy is reported. Perturbations in sleep duration are noted in various neurological disorders, with alteration in the length of sleep, however, insignificant. In narcolepsy, stage perturbation is noted.

Veyn, A. M.

1973-01-01

5

Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: Sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with and without diurnal naps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effective sleep/wake schedules for space operations must balance severe time constraints with allocating sufficient time for sleep in order to sustain high levels of neurobehavioral performance. Developing such schedules requires knowledge about the relationship between scheduled "time in bed" (TIB) and actual physiological sleep obtained. A ground-based laboratory study in N=93 healthy adult subjects was conducted to investigate physiological sleep obtained in a range of restricted sleep schedules. Eighteen different conditions with restricted nocturnal anchor sleep, with and without diurnal naps, were examined in a response surface mapping paradigm. Sleep efficiency was found to be a function of total TIB per 24 h regardless of how the sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap sleep periods. The amounts of sleep stages 1+2 and REM showed more complex relationships with the durations of the anchor and nap sleep periods, while slow-wave sleep was essentially preserved among the different conditions of the experiment. The results of the study indicated that when sleep was chronically restricted, sleep duration was largely unaffected by whether the sleep was placed nocturnally or split between nocturnal anchor sleep periods and daytime naps. Having thus assessed that split-sleep schedules are feasible in terms of obtaining physiological sleep, further research will reveal whether these schedules and the associated variations in the distribution of sleep stages may be advantageous in mitigating neurobehavioral performance impairment in the face of limited time for sleep.

Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Dinges, David F.

2007-02-01

6

Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study.  

PubMed

Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart®) system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men) with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat) was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001). After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample. PMID:25252161

Cintra, Fatima Dumas; Leite, Renata Pimentel; Storti, Luciana Julio; Bittencourt, Lia Azeredo; Poyares, Dalva; Castro, Laura de Siqueira; Tufik, Sergio; Paola, Angelo de

2014-11-01

7

Nocturnal Autonomic Balance and Sleep in PTSD and Resilience.  

PubMed

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with heightened nocturnal autonomic nervous system (ANS) arousal and sleep disturbances. It has been suggested that relationships between sleep and nocturnal ANS activity are influenced by insomnia; however, investigation of this relationship has been limited in PTSD. This study examined nocturnal ANS activity and its relationship to sleep in PTSD and resilience. Physically healthy young adult African Americans with current PTSD (n = 20) or who had never had PTSD despite exposure to a high-impact traumatic event (resilient, n = 18) were monitored with ambulatory electrocardiograms and actigraphy for 24-hr periods. Frequency-domain heart-rate variability measures, that is, low-frequency to high-frequency ratios (LF/HF), which index sympathetic nervous system activity, and normalized HF (nHF), which indexes parasympathetic nervous system activity were examined. Normalized HF during the time-in-bed period was lower for those with PTSD than those with resilience (p = .041). Total sleep time was strongly correlated with time-in-bed LF/HF (r = -.72) and nHF (r = .75) in the resilient group, but these were not correlated in the PTSD group. The results suggest elevated nocturnal ANS arousal and dissociation between ANS activity and total sleep time in PTSD. PMID:25403523

Kobayashi, Ihori; Lavela, Joseph; Mellman, Thomas A

2014-12-01

8

Nocturnal sleep and daytime alertness of aircrew after transmeridian flights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nocturnal sleep and daytime alertness of aircrew were studied by electroencephalography and the multiple sleep latency test. After a transmeridian flight from London To San Francisco, sleep onset was faster and, although there was increased wakefulness during the second half of the night, sleep duration and efficiency over the whole night were not changed. The progressive decrease in sleep latencies observed normally in the multiple sleep latency test during the morning continued throughout the day after arrival. Of the 13 subjects, 12 took a nap of around 1-h duration in the afternoon preceding the return flight. These naps would have been encouraged by the drowsiness at this time and facilitated by the departure of the aircraft being scheduled during the early evening. An early evening departure had the further advantage that the circadian increase in vigilance expected during the early part of the day would occur during the latter part of the return flight.

Nicholson, Anthony N.; Pascoe, Peta A.; Spencer, Michael B.; Stone, Barbara M.; Green, Roger L.

1986-01-01

9

Sleep in the nocturnal primate, Aotus trivirgatus.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurement of the cycles of wakefulness and stages of sleep in owl monkeys during 24-hr periods divided into half dark and half light segments. Recordings of electrophysiological activity were used. Reversal of the sequence of light and dark served to test the influence of environmental lighting on the sleep-wakefulness cycles. The sleep patterns of owl monkeys expressed in percentage of rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) were compared with those of a closely related New World monkey species, Saimiri Sciureus.

Perachio, A. A.

1971-01-01

10

Nocturnal seizures and the effects of anticonvulsants on sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epilepsy is a common condition that affects up to 1% of the population. Patients with epilepsy are particularly sensitive\\u000a to the adverse effects of sleep disruption. Failure to recognize and treat sleep disturbances can lead to worsening of attention,\\u000a cognitive functioning, and quality of life, and can increase seizures. Anticonvulsant agents have the potential to either\\u000a improve or worsen sleep

Carl W. Bazil

2008-01-01

11

BRAIN-BEHAVIOR ADAPTATIONS TO SLEEP LOSS IN THE NOCTURNALLY MIGRATING SWAINSON’S THRUSH (CATHARUS USTULATUS).  

E-print Network

??Many typically diurnal songbirds experience dramatic sleep loss during the migratory seasons because of their nocturnal flights. However, nocturnally migrating songbirds continue to function normally… (more)

Fuchs, Thomas

2006-01-01

12

Differential sleep-promoting effects of five sleep substances nocturnally infused in unrestrained rats.  

PubMed Central

Sleep-inducing and sleep-maintaining effects of five different putative sleep substances were compared by the same nocturnal 10-hr intracerebroventricular infusion technique in otherwise saline-infused, freely moving male rats. Delta-sleep-inducing peptide (2.5 nmol), which induces electroencephalogram delta (slow)-wave patterns, was rapidly effective in increasing both slow-wave sleep and paradoxical sleep but the effects were not long-lasting. Muramyl dipeptide (2 nmol) induced excessive slow-wave sleep in the middle of the infusion period, accompanying a simultaneous elevation of brain temperature. However, paradoxical sleep was not affected. Component B of sleep-promoting substance (2 brainstem equivalents), a partially purified extract from rats deprived of sleep for 24-hr, was markedly effective in inducing and maintaining both kinds of sleep. Prostaglandin D2 (0.36 nmol) was more effective in enhancing sleep at the later period of the infusion period. Uridine (10 pmol) caused a mild but long-lasting increase in sleep, especially in paradoxical sleep. Thus, each substance exhibited compound-specific sleep-modulating properties. PMID:6592612

Inoué, S; Honda, K; Komoda, Y; Uchizono, K; Ueno, R; Hayaishi, O

1984-01-01

13

Comparing the Effects of Nocturnal Sleep and Daytime Napping on Declarative Memory Consolidation  

PubMed Central

Nocturnal sleep and daytime napping facilitate memory consolidation for semantically related and unrelated word pairs. We contrasted forgetting of both kinds of materials across a 12-hour interval involving either nocturnal sleep or daytime wakefulness (experiment 1) and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2). Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen’s d?=?0.71 and 0.68) than for related ones (Cohen’s d?=?0.58 and 0.15). While the size of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping effects was similar for unrelated word pairs, for related pairs, the effect of nocturnal sleep was more prominent. Together, these findings suggest that sleep preferentially facilitates offline memory processing of materials that are more susceptible to forgetting. PMID:25229457

Lo, June C.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Groeger, John A.

2014-01-01

14

Electronic Devices May Disrupt Teen Sleep  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Electronic Devices May Disrupt Teen Sleep, Study Reports Kids using computers and phones ... Preidt Tuesday, February 3, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Page Teen Health TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Spending ...

15

Alpha activity and cardiac correlates: three types of relationships during nocturnal sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We examined simultaneously alpha activity and cardiac changes during nocturnal sleep, in order to differentiate non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, REM sleep, and intra-sleep awakening.Methods: Ten male subjects displaying occasionally spontaneous intra-sleep awakenings underwent EEG and cardiac recordings during one experimental night. The heart rate and heart rate variability were calculated over 5 min periods. Heart rate variability was

J Ehrhart; M Toussaint; C Simon; C Gronfier; R Luthringer; G Brandenberger

2000-01-01

16

On the Influence of Freight Trains on Humans: A Laboratory Investigation of the Impact of Nocturnal Low Frequency Vibration and Noise on Sleep and Heart Rate  

PubMed Central

Background A substantial increase in transportation of goods on railway may be hindered by public fear of increased vibration and noise leading to annoyance and sleep disturbance. As the majority of freight trains run during night time, the impact upon sleep is expected to be the most serious adverse effect. The impact of nocturnal vibration on sleep is an area currently lacking in knowledge. We experimentally investigated sleep disturbance with the aim to ascertain the impact of increasing vibration amplitude. Methodology/Principal Findings The impacts of various amplitudes of horizontal vibrations on sleep disturbance and heart rate were investigated in a laboratory study. Cardiac accelerations were assessed using a combination of polysomnography and ECG recordings. Sleep was assessed subjectively using questionnaires. Twelve young, healthy subjects slept for six nights in the sleep laboratory, with one habituation night, one control night and four nights with a variation of vibration exposures whilst maintaining the same noise exposure. With increasing vibration amplitude, we found a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude of heart rate as well as a reduction in sleep quality and increase in sleep disturbance. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that nocturnal vibration has a negative impact on sleep and that the impact increases with greater vibration amplitude. Sleep disturbance has short- and long-term health consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to define levels that protect residents against sleep disruptive vibrations that may arise from night time railway freight traffic. PMID:23409055

Smith, Michael G.; Croy, Ilona; Ögren, Mikael; Persson Waye, Kerstin

2013-01-01

17

Sleep Disturbances and Nocturnal Agitation Behaviors in Older Adults with Dementia  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To examine nighttime sleep patterns of persons with dementia showing nocturnal agitation behaviors and to determine whether restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with nocturnal agitation behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: General community. Participants: 59 participants with geriatrician-diagnosed dementia. Participants ages ranged from 66 to 88 years (mean age 79.1; SD 6.0). Mean Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 20.1 (SD 6.6). MMSE was used to measure baseline cognitive function and not for the diagnosis of dementia. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Sleep was measured by 2 nights of in-home, attended, portable polysomnography (PSG). Nocturnal agitation was measured over 3 additional nights using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory modified for direct observations. Two experts independently and via consensus identified probable RLS. Total sleep time in participants was 5.6 h (SD 1.8 h). Mean periodic limb movements in sleep index (PLMI) was 15.29, and a high percentage (49%) had moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. Probable RLS was present in 24% of participants. Those with more severe cognitive impairment had longer sleep latency. Severe cognitive impairment, low apnea hypopnea index (AHI), and probable RLS were associated with nocturnal agitation behaviors (R2 = 0.35, F3,55 = 9.40, P < 0.001). Conclusions: It appears that probable RLS is associated with nocturnal agitation behaviors in persons with dementia, while OSA and PLMS are not. Further investigation is warranted to determine if treatment of RLS impacts nocturnal agitation behaviors in persons with dementia. Citation: Rose KM; Beck C; Tsai PF; Liem PH; Davila DG; Kleban M; Gooneratne NS; Kalra G; Richards KC. Sleep disturbances and nocturnal agitation behaviors in older adults with dementia. SLEEP 2011;34(6):779-786. PMID:21629366

Rose, Karen M.; Beck, Cornelia; Tsai, Pao-Feng; Liem, Pham H.; Davila, David G.; Kleban, Morton; Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Kalra, Gurpreet; Richards, Kathy Culpepper

2011-01-01

18

Effects of exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure in prehypertensives  

PubMed Central

Background During nocturnal sleep, blood pressure (BP) “dips” compared to diurnal BP, reducing stress on the cardiovascular system. Both the hypotensive response elicited by acute aerobic exercise and sleep quality can impact this dipping response. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise timing on circadian BP changes and sleep architecture. Materials and methods Twenty prehypertensive subjects completed the study. During four test sessions, participants first completed a graded exercise test to exhaustion and then performed 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 7 am (7A), 1 pm (1P), and 7 pm (7P) in a random, counterbalanced order at 65% of the heart rate obtained at peak oxygen uptake. An ambulatory cuff was used to monitor BP responses during 24 hours following exercise, and an ambulatory sleep-monitoring headband was worn during sleep following each session. Results Aerobic exercise at 7A invoked a greater dip in nocturnal systolic BP than exercise at 1P or 7P, although the greatest dip in nocturnal diastolic BP occurred following 7P. Compared to 1P, 7A also invoked greater time spent in deep sleep. Conclusion These data indicate that early morning may be the most beneficial time to engage in aerobic exercise to enhance nocturnal BP changes and quality of sleep. PMID:25540588

Fairbrother, Kimberly; Cartner, Ben; Alley, Jessica R; Curry, Chelsea D; Dickinson, David L; Morris, David M; Collier, Scott R

2014-01-01

19

Postoperative sleep disruptions: a potential catalyst of acute pain?  

PubMed

Despite the substantial advances in the understanding of pain mechanisms and management, postoperative pain relief remains an important health care issue. Surgical patients also frequently report postoperative sleep complaints. Major sleep alterations in the postoperative period include sleep fragmentation, reduced total sleep time, and loss of time spent in slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Clinical and experimental studies show that sleep disturbances may exacerbate pain, whereas pain and opioid treatments disturb sleep. Surgical stress appears to be a major contributor to both sleep disruptions and altered pain perception. However, pain and the use of opioid analgesics could worsen sleep alterations, whereas sleep disruptions may contribute to intensify pain. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between postoperative sleep and pain. Although the sleep-pain interaction has been addressed from both ends, this review focuses on the impact of sleep disruptions on pain perception. A better understanding of the effect of postoperative sleep disruptions on pain perception would help in selecting patients at risk for more severe pain and may facilitate the development of more effective and safer pain management programs. PMID:24074687

Chouchou, Florian; Khoury, Samar; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles J

2014-06-01

20

Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. Results : In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Conclusion : Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups. PMID:25352924

Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

2014-01-01

21

Restricted energy intake affects nocturnal body temperature and sleep pafterns13  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in nocturnal body temperature, sleep patterns, and blood variables with energy restriction (3347 kJ\\/d) were studied in nine overweight (body mass index 26.1 ± 2.8) premenopausal women aged 20-36 y. Variables were measured both 2 wk before and in the final 2 wk of 4-wk dieting. Data collected 28 d apart were compared to attenuate menstrual cycle differences. Subjects

Amanda Karklin; Helen S Driver; Rochelle Buffenstein

22

Relationships among nocturnal jaw muscle activities, decreased esophageal pH, and sleep positions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among nocturnal jaw muscle activities, decreased esophageal pH, and sleep positions. Twelve adult volunteers, including 4 bruxism patients, participated in this study. Portable pH monitoring, electromyography of the temporal muscle, and audio-video recordings were conducted during the night in the subjects' homes. Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes were observed

Shouichi Miyawaki; Yuko Tanimoto; Yoshiko Araki; Akira Katayama; Mikako Imai; Teruko Takano-Yamamoto

2004-01-01

23

Tablets and E-Readers May Disrupt Your Sleep  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Tablets and E-readers May Disrupt Your Sleep Light from these ... HealthDay News) -- People who receive a tablet or e-book reader for the holidays might wind up ...

24

Pediatric sleep and epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep disorders are common in childhood. The prevalence of childhood sleep disorders is higher in chronic neurologic disorders,\\u000a specifically epilepsy. Sleep needs, requirements, and structure are different in children compared with adults. These variables\\u000a are disrupted severely in patients with epilepsy. Electroencephalogram abnormalities, nocturnal seizures, and medications\\u000a may contribute further to sleep problems and affect daytime functioning. These sleep disturbances

Alcibiades J. Rodriguez

2007-01-01

25

Teledyne Sleep Sentry: evaluation in pediatric patients for detection of nocturnal hypoglycemia.  

PubMed

Twenty-four insulin-dependent diabetic pediatric subjects were studied for 1444 nights for detection of nocturnal hypoglycemia with the Teledyne Sleep Sentry (Teledyne Avionics, Charlottesville, Virginia): a wristwatch-like unit that measures absolute changes in skin temperature and decreases in galvanic skin resistance, indicators of hypoglycemia. The device detected 42 of 46 recognized hypoglycemic episodes. One hundred fifty alarms were sounded without evidence of hypoglycemia, probably due to night sweating. Twenty-five percent of the subjects experienced unacceptable cutaneous reactions, presumably due to metallic iontophoresis. PMID:6653316

Hansen, K A; Duck, S C

1983-01-01

26

Sleep Disruption in Young Foster Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the current study, sleep actigraphy and parent-report measures were used to investigate differences in sleeping behavior\\u000a among four groups of 3- to 7-year-olds (N = 79): children in regular foster care (n = 15); children receiving a therapeutic intervention in foster care (n = 17); low income community children (n = 18); and upper middle income community children (n = 29). The children in therapeutic foster care exhibited longer

Jennifer R. TininenkoPhilip; Philip A. Fisher; Jacqueline Bruce; Katherine C. Pears

2010-01-01

27

Effects of Filtering Visual Short Wavelengths During Nocturnal Shiftwork on Sleep and Performance  

PubMed Central

Circadian phase resetting is sensitive to visual short wavelengths (450–480?nm). Selectively filtering this range of wavelengths may reduce circadian misalignment and sleep impairment during irregular light-dark schedules associated with shiftwork. We examined the effects of filtering short wavelengths (<480?nm) during night shifts on sleep and performance in nine nurses (five females and four males; mean age?±?SD: 31.3?±?4.6 yrs). Participants were randomized to receive filtered light (intervention) or standard indoor light (baseline) on night shifts. Nighttime sleep after two night shifts and daytime sleep in between two night shifts was assessed by polysomnography (PSG). In addition, salivary melatonin levels and alertness were assessed every 2?h on the first night shift of each study period and on the middle night of a run of three night shifts in each study period. Sleep and performance under baseline and intervention conditions were compared with daytime performance on the seventh day shift, and nighttime sleep following the seventh daytime shift (comparator). On the baseline night PSG, total sleep time (TST) (p?sleep efficiency (p?=?0.01) were significantly decreased and intervening wake times (wake after sleep onset [WASO]) (p?=?0.04) were significantly increased in relation to the comparator night sleep. In contrast, under intervention, TST was increased by a mean of 40?min compared with baseline, WASO was reduced and sleep efficiency was increased to levels similar to the comparator night. Daytime sleep was significantly impaired under both baseline and intervention conditions. Salivary melatonin levels were significantly higher on the first (p?sleep are adversely affected in rotating-shift workers and that filtering short wavelengths may be an approach to reduce sleep disruption and improve performance in rotating-shift workers. (Author correspondence: casper@lunenfeld.ca) PMID:23834705

Rahman, Shadab A.; Shapiro, Colin M.; Wang, Flora; Ainlay, Hailey; Kazmi, Syeda; Brown, Theodore J.

2013-01-01

28

Nocturnal oximetry for the diagnosis of the sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome: a method to reduce the number of polysomnographies?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUNDPolysomnography (PSG) is currently the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of the sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS). Nocturnal oximetry (NO) has been used with contradictory results. A prospective study was performed to determine the accuracy of NO as a diagnostic tool and to evaluate the reduction in the number of PSGs if the diagnosis of SAHS had been established by

Eusebi Chiner; Jaime Signes-Costa; Juan Manuel Arriero; Juan Marco; Isabel Fuentes; Antonia Sergado

1999-01-01

29

Effect of non-invasive mechanical ventilation on sleep and nocturnal ventilation in patients with chronic respiratory failure  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND—Chronic respiratory failure (CRF) is associated with nocturnal hypoventilation. Due to the interaction of sleep and breathing, sleep quality is reduced during nocturnal hypoventilation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NMV), usually performed overnight, relieves symptoms of hypoventilation and improves daytime blood gas tensions in patients with CRF. The time course of the long term effect of NMV on sleep and breathing during both spontaneous ventilation (withdrawing the intervention) and NMV was investigated in patients with CRF due to thoracic restriction.?METHODS—Fifteen consecutive patients (13 women) of mean (SD) age 57.9 (12.0) years with CRF due to thoracic restriction were included in the study. During the one year observation period four polysomnographic studies were performed: three during spontaneous breathing without NMV—before initiation of NMV (T0) and after withdrawing NMV for one night at six months (T6) and 12 months (T12-)—and the fourth during NMV after 12 months (T12+). Daytime blood gas tensions and lung function were also measured.?RESULTS—Spontaneous ventilation (in terms of mean oxygen saturation) progressively improved (from T0 to T12-) during both REM sleep (24.8%, 95% CI 12.9 to 36.9) and NREM sleep (21.5%, 95% CI 12.4to 30.6). Sleep quality during spontaneous ventilation also improved in terms of increased total sleep time (26.8%, 95% CI 11.6 to 42.0) and sleep efficiency (17.5%, 95% CI 5.4 to 29.6) and decreased awakenings (54.0%, 95% CI 70.3 to 37.7). Accordingly, REM and NREM sleep stages 3 and 4 significantly improved. However, the most significant improvements in both nocturnal ventilation and sleep quality were seen during NMV at 12months.?CONCLUSIONS—After long term NMV both spontaneous ventilation during sleep and sleep quality in patients with CRF due to thoracic restriction showed evidence of progressive improvement compared with baseline after withdrawal of NMV for a single night at six and 12 months. However, the greatest improvements in nocturnal ventilation and sleep were achieved during NMV at 12months.?? PMID:10722771

Schonhofer, B.; Kohler, D.

2000-01-01

30

Mistimed sleep disrupts circadian regulation of the human transcriptome.  

PubMed

Circadian organization of the mammalian transcriptome is achieved by rhythmic recruitment of key modifiers of chromatin structure and transcriptional and translational processes. These rhythmic processes, together with posttranslational modification, constitute circadian oscillators in the brain and peripheral tissues, which drive rhythms in physiology and behavior, including the sleep-wake cycle. In humans, sleep is normally timed to occur during the biological night, when body temperature is low and melatonin is synthesized. Desynchrony of sleep-wake timing and other circadian rhythms, such as occurs in shift work and jet lag, is associated with disruption of rhythmicity in physiology and endocrinology. However, to what extent mistimed sleep affects the molecular regulators of circadian rhythmicity remains to be established. Here, we show that mistimed sleep leads to a reduction of rhythmic transcripts in the human blood transcriptome from 6.4% at baseline to 1.0% during forced desynchrony of sleep and centrally driven circadian rhythms. Transcripts affected are key regulators of gene expression, including those associated with chromatin modification (methylases and acetylases), transcription (RNA polymerase II), translation (ribosomal proteins, initiation, and elongation factors), temperature-regulated transcription (cold inducible RNA-binding proteins), and core clock genes including CLOCK and ARNTL (BMAL1). We also estimated the separate contribution of sleep and circadian rhythmicity and found that the sleep-wake cycle coordinates the timing of transcription and translation in particular. The data show that mistimed sleep affects molecular processes at the core of circadian rhythm generation and imply that appropriate timing of sleep contributes significantly to the overall temporal organization of the human transcriptome. PMID:24449876

Archer, Simon N; Laing, Emma E; Möller-Levet, Carla S; van der Veen, Daan R; Bucca, Giselda; Lazar, Alpar S; Santhi, Nayantara; Slak, Ana; Kabiljo, Renata; von Schantz, Malcolm; Smith, Colin P; Dijk, Derk-Jan

2014-02-11

31

Mistimed sleep disrupts circadian regulation of the human transcriptome  

PubMed Central

Circadian organization of the mammalian transcriptome is achieved by rhythmic recruitment of key modifiers of chromatin structure and transcriptional and translational processes. These rhythmic processes, together with posttranslational modification, constitute circadian oscillators in the brain and peripheral tissues, which drive rhythms in physiology and behavior, including the sleep–wake cycle. In humans, sleep is normally timed to occur during the biological night, when body temperature is low and melatonin is synthesized. Desynchrony of sleep–wake timing and other circadian rhythms, such as occurs in shift work and jet lag, is associated with disruption of rhythmicity in physiology and endocrinology. However, to what extent mistimed sleep affects the molecular regulators of circadian rhythmicity remains to be established. Here, we show that mistimed sleep leads to a reduction of rhythmic transcripts in the human blood transcriptome from 6.4% at baseline to 1.0% during forced desynchrony of sleep and centrally driven circadian rhythms. Transcripts affected are key regulators of gene expression, including those associated with chromatin modification (methylases and acetylases), transcription (RNA polymerase II), translation (ribosomal proteins, initiation, and elongation factors), temperature-regulated transcription (cold inducible RNA-binding proteins), and core clock genes including CLOCK and ARNTL (BMAL1). We also estimated the separate contribution of sleep and circadian rhythmicity and found that the sleep–wake cycle coordinates the timing of transcription and translation in particular. The data show that mistimed sleep affects molecular processes at the core of circadian rhythm generation and imply that appropriate timing of sleep contributes significantly to the overall temporal organization of the human transcriptome. PMID:24449876

Archer, Simon N.; Laing, Emma E.; Möller-Levet, Carla S.; van der Veen, Daan R.; Bucca, Giselda; Lazar, Alpar S.; Santhi, Nayantara; Slak, Ana; Kabiljo, Renata; von Schantz, Malcolm; Smith, Colin P.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

2014-01-01

32

Safe enough to sleep: sleep disruptions associated with trauma, posttraumatic stress, and anxiety in children and adolescents.  

PubMed

Sleep disturbance is an essential symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder, and recent evidence suggests that disrupted sleep may play an important role in the development of posttraumatic stress disorder following traumatic stress. The authors review several aspects of sleep as it relates to posttraumatic stress disorder. First, there is an association between traumatic stress and different components of disrupted sleep in children and adolescents. Second, sleep disruption appears to be a core feature of other pediatric anxiety disorders, and the authors consider if this preexisting sleep vulnerability may explain in part why preexisting anxiety disorders are a risk factor for developing posttraumatic stress disorder following a traumatic event. Third, the authors consider attachment theory and the social context of trauma and sleep disruption. This article concludes with a consideration of the therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:19836694

Charuvastra, Anthony; Cloitre, Marylene

2009-10-01

33

SLEEP, SLEEP DISORDERED BREATHING, AND NOCTURNAL HYPOVENTILATION IN CHILDREN WITH NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES  

PubMed Central

I. SUMMARY Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is now well recognized in children with neuromuscular diseases (NMD) and may lead to significant morbidity and increased mortality. Predisposing factors to SDB in children with NMD include reduced ventilatory responses, reduced activity of respiratory muscles during sleep and poor lung mechanics due to the underlying neuro-muscular disorder. SDB may present long before signs of respiratory failure emerge. When untreated, SDB may contribute to significant cardiovascular morbidities, neuro-cognitive deficits and premature death. One of the problems in detecting SDB in patients with NMD is the lack of correlation between lung function testing and daytime gas exchange. Polysomnography is the preferred method to evaluate for SDB in children with NMD. When the diagnosis of SDB is confirmed, treatment by non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is usually recommended. However, other modalities of mechanical ventilation do exist and may be indicated in combination with or without other supportive measures. PMID:20113988

Arens, Raanan; Muzumdar, Hiren

2009-01-01

34

Sleep Disruptions and Emotional Insecurity Are Pathways of Risk for Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Sleep problems are prevalent in American children. A critical need is to identify sources and processes related to sleep disruptions and their sequelae. We examined a model linking parental marital conflict and children's emotional insecurity, sleep disruptions, and their adjustment and academic problems. Method: One hundred and…

El-Sheikh, Mona; Buckhalt, Joseph A.; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy

2007-01-01

35

Effect of ??-9Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol on Nocturnal Sleep and Early-Morning Behavior in Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of cannabis extracts on nocturnal sleep, early- morning performance, memory, and sleepiness were studied in 8 healthy volunteers (4 males, 4 females; 21 to 34 years). The study was double-blind and placebo-controlled with a 4-way crossover design. The 4 treatments were placebo, 15 mg D-9-tetrahydrocan- nabinol (THC), 5 mg THC combined with 5 mg cannabidiol (CBD), and 15

Anthony N. Nicholson; Claire Turner; Barbara M. Stone; Philip J. Robson

2004-01-01

36

Effect of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on nocturnal sleep and early-morning behavior in young adults.  

PubMed

The effects of cannabis extracts on nocturnal sleep, early-morning performance, memory, and sleepiness were studied in 8 healthy volunteers (4 males, 4 females; 21 to 34 years). The study was double-blind and placebo-controlled with a 4-way crossover design. The 4 treatments were placebo, 15 mg Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 5 mg THC combined with 5 mg cannabidiol (CBD), and 15 mg THC combined with 15 mg CBD. These were formulated in 50:50 ethanol to propylene glycol and administered using an oromucosal spray during a 30-minute period from 10 pm. The electroencephalogram was recorded during the sleep period (11 pm to 7 am). Performance, sleep latency, and subjective assessments of sleepiness and mood were measured from 8:30 am (10 hours after drug administration). There were no effects of 15 mg THC on nocturnal sleep. With the concomitant administration of the drugs (5 mg THC and 5 mg CBD to 15 mg THC and 15 mg CBD), there was a decrease in stage 3 sleep, and with the higher dose combination, wakefulness was increased. The next day, with 15 mg THC, memory was impaired, sleep latency was reduced, and the subjects reported increased sleepiness and changes in mood. With the lower dose combination, reaction time was faster on the digit recall task, and with the higher dose combination, subjects reported increased sleepiness and changes in mood. Fifteen milligrams THC would appear to be sedative, while 15 mg CBD appears to have alerting properties as it increased awake activity during sleep and counteracted the residual sedative activity of 15 mg THC. PMID:15118485

Nicholson, Anthony N; Turner, Claire; Stone, Barbara M; Robson, Philip J

2004-06-01

37

Sleep disorders in multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

Sleep disorders are pervasive in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) although clinically underrecognized by most physicians. The most common sleep disorders seen in patients with MS include insomnia, nocturnal movement disorders, sleep-disordered breathing, narcolepsy, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. Factors that influence the quality of sleep in this patient population include pain, nocturia, depression, medication effect, location of lesions, and disease severity. Disrupted sleep has the potential to cause daytime somnolence, increased fatigue, and nonrefreshing sleep, and it may be associated with dangerous respiratory events. Awareness and treatment of these conditions is vital to improving health and quality of life in patients with MS. PMID:15798938

Fleming, W Elon; Pollak, Charles P

2005-03-01

38

Preventing intensive care unit delirium: a patient-centered approach to reducing sleep disruption.  

PubMed

Delirium in the intensive care unit is a disorder with multifactorial causes and is associated with poor outcomes. Sleep-wake disturbance is a common experience for patients with delirium. Care processes that disrupt sleep can lead to sleep deprivation, contributing to delirium. Patient-centered care is a concept that considers what is best for each individual. How can clinicians use a patient-centered approach to alter processes to decrease patient disruptions and improve sleep and rest? Could timing of blood draws and soothing music work to promote sleep? PMID:21983504

Stuck, Amy; Clark, Mary Jo; Connelly, Cynthia D

2011-01-01

39

Are Nocturnal Breathing, Sleep, and Cognitive Performance Impaired at Moderate Altitude (1,630-2,590 m)?  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Newcomers at high altitude (> 3,000 m) experience periodic breathing, sleep disturbances, and impaired cognitive performance. Whether similar adverse effects occur at lower elevations is uncertain, although numerous lowlanders travel to moderate altitude for professional or recreational activities. We evaluated the hypothesis that nocturnal breathing, sleep, and cognitive performance of lowlanders are impaired at moderate altitude. Design: Randomized crossover trial. Setting: University hospital at 490 m, Swiss mountain villages at 1,630 m and 2,590 m. Participants: Fifty-one healthy men, median (quartiles) age 24 y (20-28 y), living below 800 m. Interventions: Studies at Zurich (490 m) and during 4 consecutive days at 1,630 m and 2,590 m, respectively, 2 days each. The order of altitude exposure was randomized. Polysomnography, psychomotor vigilance tests (PVT), the number back test, several other tests of cognitive performance, and questionnaires were evaluated. Measurements and Results: The median (quartiles) apnea-hypopnea index at 490 m was 4.6/h (2.3; 7.9), values at 1,630 and 2,590 m, day 1 and 2, respectively, were 7.0/h (4.1; 12.6), 5.4/h (3.5; 10.5), 13.1/h (6.7; 32.1), and 8.0/h (4.4; 23.1); corresponding values of mean nocturnal oxygen saturation were 96% (95; 96), 94% (93; 95), 94% (93; 95), 90% (89; 91), 91% (90; 92), P < 0.05 versus 490 m, all instances. Slow wave sleep on the first night at 2,590 m was 21% (18; 25) versus 24% (20; 27) at 490 m (P < 0.05). Psychomotor vigilance and various other measures of cognitive performance did not change significantly. Conclusions: Healthy men acutely exposed during 4 days to hypoxemia at 1,630 m and 2,590 m reveal a considerable amount of periodic breathing and sleep disturbances. However, no significant effects on psychomotor reaction speed or cognitive performance were observed. Clinical Trials Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01130948. Citation: Latshang TD; Lo Cascio CM; Stöwhas AC; Grimm M; Stadelmann K; Tesler N; Achermann P; Huber R; Kohler M; Bloch KE. Are nocturnal breathing, sleep, and cognitive performance impaired at moderate altitude (1,630-2,590 m)? SLEEP 2013;36(12):1969-1976. PMID:24293773

Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Lo Cascio, Christian M.; Stöwhas, Anne-Christin; Grimm, Mirjam; Stadelmann, Katrin; Tesler, Noemi; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E.

2013-01-01

40

Sleep Disruption Medical Intervention Forecasting (SDMIF) Module for the Integrated Medical Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) assesses the risk, including likelihood and impact of occurrence, of all credible in-flight medical conditions. Fatigue due to sleep disruption is a condition that could lead to operational errors, potentially resulting in loss of mission or crew. Pharmacological consumables are mitigation strategies used to manage the risks associated with sleep deficits. The likelihood of medical intervention due to sleep disruption was estimated with a well validated sleep model and a Monte Carlo computer simulation in an effort to optimize the quantity of consumables. METHODS: The key components of the model are the mission parameter program, the calculation of sleep intensity and the diagnosis and decision module. The mission parameter program was used to create simulated daily sleep/wake schedules for an ISS increment. The hypothetical schedules included critical events such as dockings and extravehicular activities and included actual sleep time and sleep quality. The schedules were used as inputs to the Sleep, Activity, Fatigue and Task Effectiveness (SAFTE) Model (IBR Inc., Baltimore MD), which calculated sleep intensity. Sleep data from an ISS study was used to relate calculated sleep intensity to the probability of sleep medication use, using a generalized linear model for binomial regression. A human yes/no decision process using a binomial random number was also factored into sleep medication use probability. RESULTS: These probability calculations were repeated 5000 times resulting in an estimate of the most likely amount of sleep aids used during an ISS mission and a 95% confidence interval. CONCLUSIONS: These results were transferred to the parent IMM for further weighting and integration with other medical conditions, to help inform operational decisions. This model is a potential planning tool for ensuring adequate sleep during sleep disrupted periods of a mission.

Lewandowski, Beth; Brooker, John; Mallis, Melissa; Hursh, Steve; Caldwell, Lynn; Myers, Jerry

2011-01-01

41

Study of nocturnal sleep and the carryover effects of triazolam and brotizolam using neurophysiological and subjective methods.  

PubMed

In the present study, the effects of short-acting benzodiazepines on nocturnal sleep and the carryover effects of these drugs were studied. The study involved 10 young, healthy male subjects who had given their written informed consent to participate. Either a placebo (PLA), 0.125 mg triazolam (TRZ), 0.25 mg TRZ or 0.25 mg brotizolam (BRZ) was administered to the subjects in a double-blind crossover design by randomized allocation with a single oral administration at 23.00 h. A polysomnography (PSG) was recorded for each subject from 23.00 to 07.00 h the following day. Then, the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) and Kwansei Gakuin Sleepiness Scale (KSS) were checked between 07.55 and 08.00 h, and the sleep latency test (SLT) was performed between 08.00 and 08.20 h. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were then recorded with an oddball paradigm; the reaction time (RT) was measured simultaneously. According to the PSG, treatment with 0.25 mg TRZ resulted in a statistically significant increase in the percentage of stage 2 sleep (p < 0.05) and a reduction in the percentage of rapid eye movement sleep (p < 0.05) compared with PLA. None of the drugs had any effect on the percentage of slow-wave sleep compared with PLA. With regard to carryover effects, although none of the drugs had any effect on SSS, KSS, RT or ERPs, BRZ did cause a statistically significant decrease in sleep latency (p < 0.05) compared with PLA. TRZ (0.125 and 0.25 mg) and 0.25 mg BRZ exerted different effects on SLT. We suggest that these different effects are attributable to differences in the half-life of these hypnotics. PMID:12759560

Suzuki, Hideaki; Yamadera, Hiroshi; Asayama, Kentaro; Kudo, Yoshihisa; Ito, Takao; Tamura, Yoshiatsu; Endo, Shunkichi

2003-01-01

42

Amygdala opioid receptors mediate the electroacupuncture-induced deterioration of sleep disruptions in epilepsy rats  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical and experimental evidence demonstrates that sleep and epilepsy reciprocally affect each other. Previous studies indicated that epilepsy alters sleep homeostasis; in contrast, sleep disturbance deteriorates epilepsy. If a therapy possesses both epilepsy suppression and sleep improvement, it would be the priority choice for seizure control. Effects of acupuncture of Feng-Chi (GB20) acupoints on epilepsy suppression and insomnia treatment have been documented in the ancient Chinese literature, Lingshu Jing (Classic of the Miraculous Pivot). Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of bilateral Feng-Chi acupoints on sleep disruptions in rats with focal epilepsy. Results Our result indicates that administration of pilocarpine into the left central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) induced focal epilepsy and decreased both rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. High-frequency (100 Hz) EA stimulation of bilateral Feng-Chi acupoints, in which a 30-min EA stimulation was performed before the dark period of the light:dark cycle in three consecutive days, further deteriorated pilocarpine-induced sleep disruptions. The EA-induced exacerbation of sleep disruption was blocked by microinjection of naloxone, ?- (naloxonazine), ?- (nor-binaltorphimine) or ?-receptor antagonists (natrindole) into the CeA, suggesting the involvement of amygdaloid opioid receptors. Conclusion The present study suggests that high-frequency (100 Hz) EA stimulation of bilateral Feng-Chi acupoints exhibits no benefit in improving pilocarpine-induced sleep disruptions; in contrast, EA further deteriorated sleep disturbances. Opioid receptors in the CeA mediated EA-induced exacerbation of sleep disruptions in epileptic rats. PMID:24215575

2013-01-01

43

Pediatric Pulmonology 42:374379 (2007) Nocturnal Body Position in Sleeping Children With  

E-print Network

with OSAS are more likely to sleep prone, suggesting that this position may promote upper airway patency upper airway obstruc- tion during sleep, and affects approximately 1­3% of children.1 With and Without Obstructive Sleep Apnea Ehab Dayyat, MD,1 Muna M.A. Maarafeya, MD,1,2 Oscar Sans Capdevila, MD,1

44

Self-reported nocturnal sleep duration is associated with next-day resting state functional connectivity.  

PubMed

Sleep deprivation affects cerebral metabolism and reduces the functional connectivity among various regions of the brain, potentially explaining some of the associated mood and emotional changes often observed. Prior neuroimaging studies have only examined the effects of sleep deprivation or partial sleep restriction on functional connectivity, but none have studied how such connectivity is associated with normal variations in self-reported sleep duration the night before the scan. We examined the relationship between sleep duration and resting state functional connectivity among healthy volunteers who slept at home according to their own schedules. Thirty-nine healthy individuals aged 18-45 (21 females) completed a questionnaire asking about their recent sleep habits and entries in their sleep diary for the previous night, followed by resting state functional MRI at 3 T. Participants reported sleeping between 5.0 and 8.5 h the night before the scan (M=7.0, SD=0.9). Seed regions were placed in the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex nodes of the default mode network, regions previously implicated in sleep deprivation. Longer self-reported sleep duration was associated with significantly enhanced functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate, as well as greater anticorrelations with parietal, occipital, and lateral prefrontal regions. Findings suggest that even normal variations in sleep duration measured by self-report are related to the strength of functional connectivity within select nodes of the default mode network and its anticorrelated network. PMID:22872066

Killgore, William D S; Schwab, Zachary J; Weiner, Melissa R

2012-09-12

45

Actigraphy-Measured Sleep Disruption as a Predictor of Survival among Women with Advanced Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: Poor sleep, prevalent among cancer survivors, is associated with disrupted hormonal circadian rhythms and poor quality of life. Using a prospective research design, this study aimed to clarify the relationship between objective measures of sleep efficiency and sleep disruption with survival among women with advanced breast cancer. Method: We examined sleep quality and duration via wrist-worn actigraphy and sleep diaries for 3 days among 97 women in whom advanced breast cancer was diagnosed (age = 54.6 ± 9.8 years). Sleep efficiency was operationalized using actigraphy as the ratio of total sleep time to total sleep time plus wake after sleep onset. Results: As hypothesized, better sleep efficiency was found to predict a significant reduction in overall mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94–0.98; P < 0.001) at median 6 y follow-up. This relationship remained significant (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91–0.97; P < 0.001) even after adjusting for other known prognostic factors (age, estrogen receptor status, cancer treatment, metastatic spread, cortisol levels, and depression). Secondary hypotheses were also supported (after adjusting for baseline prognostic factors) showing that less wake after sleep onset (HR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.25–0.67; P < 0.001), fewer wake episodes, (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.88–0.98; P = 0.007); and shorter wake episode duration (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.14–0.58; P < 0.001) also contributed to reductions in overall mortality. Conclusions: These findings show that better sleep efficiency and less sleep disruption are significant independent prognostic factors in women with advanced breast cancer. Further research is needed to determine whether treating sleep disruption with cognitive behavioral and/or pharmacologic therapy could improve survival in women with advanced breast cancer. Citation: Palesh O, Aldridge-Gerry A, Zeitzer JM, Koopman C, Neri E, Giese-Davis J, Jo B, Kraemer H, Nouriani B, Spiegel D. Actigraphy-measured sleep disruption as a predictor of survival among women with advanced breast cancer. SLEEP 2014;37(5):837-842. PMID:24790261

Palesh, Oxana; Aldridge-Gerry, Arianna; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Koopman, Cheryl; Neri, Eric; Giese-Davis, Janine; Jo, Booil; Kraemer, Helena; Nouriani, Bita; Spiegel, David

2014-01-01

46

Advanced heart failure and nocturnal hypoxaemia due to central sleep apnoea are associated with increased serum erythropoietin  

PubMed Central

Aims Central sleep apnoea (CSA) and increased serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentration have each been associated with adverse prognosis in heart failure (HF) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between nocturnal hypoxaemia due to CSA and the serum EPO concentration in patients with HF. Methods and results Heart failure subjects (n = 33) and healthy controls (n = 18) underwent polysomnography (PSG) for diagnosis of CSA and identification and quantification of hypoxaemia. Blood collection for measurement of EPO was performed immediately post-PSG. For the analysis, HF subjects were dichotomized into subgroups defined by the presence or absence of CSA and by HF severity. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the relationships of hypoxaemia and advanced HF to EPO concentration. Mean EPO concentration was 62% higher for HF subjects with CSA than for healthy controls (P = 0.004). The magnitude of nocturnal hypoxaemia was significantly and positively related to EPO concentration (r = 0.45, P = 0.02). Advanced HF was also significantly and positively related to EPO concentration (r = 0.43, P = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, the presence of combined nocturnal hypoxaemia and advanced HF yielded greater correlation to EPO concentration than either factor alone (r = 0.57, P = 0.04 and P = 0.05, respectively). Linear regression demonstrated that the combination of New York Heart Association Class and CSA was strongly associated with EPO concentration (P < 0.0001). Conclusion In non-anaemic HF patients, advanced HF and hypoxaemia due to CSA may each be independently associated with increased serum EPO concentration. PMID:20335353

Calvin, Andrew D.; Somers, Virend K.; Steensma, David P.; Rio Perez, Jose A.; van der Walt, Christelle; Fitz-Gibbon, Jennifer M.; Scott, Christopher G.; Olson, Lyle J.

2010-01-01

47

Effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea: CHF-HOT study.  

PubMed

It was previously reported that nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) significantly improved not only sleep disordered breathing (SDB), but also quality of life (QOL) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in two trials. To strengthen the statistical reliability of the above efficacies of HOT and to assess the effects of 12-week nocturnal HOT on suppression of ventricular arrhythmias, we combined the two trials and undertook a post hoc analysis. Ninety-seven patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and central sleep apnea were assigned to receive HOT (45 patients) or not (52 patients). HOT resulted in greater reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (-11.4 ± 11.0 vs. -0.2 ± 7.6 events/h, p < 0.01), which is associated with greater improvement in the Specific Activity Scale (0.8 ± 1.2 vs. 0.0 ± 0.6, p < 0.01), New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class (p < 0.01), and LVEF (p = 0.06). Median number of premature ventricular contraction (PVC) at baseline was 17 beats per hour in both the HOT and the control groups. Overall improvements of PVCs were not different either in the HOT group or in the control. However, in 12 patients with NYHA >III and AHI >20 events/h, PVC was significantly improved by HOT with a marked reduction in AHI and a substantial increase in LVEF. In conclusion, among patients with CHF and CSA, HOT improves SDB, QOL, and cardiac function. The effectiveness of HOT for ventricular arrhythmias was not observed in the overall analysis, but only in a limited number of patients with severe CHF and SDB. To clarify the effects of HOT on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with CHF and SDB, a further study is needed. PMID:25348726

Nakao, Yoko M; Ueshima, Kenji; Yasuno, Shinji; Sasayama, Shigetake

2014-10-28

48

Non-apnoeic REM sleep induced nocturnal oxygen desaturation treated by nasal continuous positive airway pressure.  

PubMed Central

Non-apnoeic oxygen desaturation related to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in a patient with hypothyroidism, obesity, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure was improved by treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure of 10 cm H2O. PMID:2669226

Sériès, F; Cormier, Y; La Forge, J

1989-01-01

49

Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia predicts prevalent hypertension in the European Sleep Apnoea Database cohort study.  

PubMed

Systemic hypertension is associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) but the pathophysiological mechanisms are incompletely understood. A collaborative European network of 24 sleep centres established a European Sleep Apnoea Database to evaluate cardiovascular morbidity associated with OSAS. 11 911 adults referred with suspected OSAS between March 2007 and September 2013 underwent overnight sleep studies, either cardiorespiratory polygraphy or polysomnography. We compared the predictive value of the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) and 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) for prevalent hypertension, adjusting for relevant covariates including age, smoking, obesity, dyslipidaemia and diabetes. Among patients (70% male, mean±sd age 52±12 years), 78% had AHI>5 events·h(-1) and 41% systemic hypertension. Both AHI and ODI independently related to prevalent hypertension after adjustment for relevant covariates (p<0.0001 for linear trend across quartiles (Q) of severity for both variables). However, in multiple regression analysis with both ODI and AHI in the model, ODI was, whereas AHI was not, independently associated with prevalent hypertension: odds ratios (95% CI) for Q4 versus Q1 regarding ODI were 2.01 (1.61-2.51) and regarding AHI were 0.92 (0.74-1.15) (p<0.0001 and p=0.3054, respectively). This cross sectional study suggests that chronic intermittent hypoxia plays an important role in OSAS-related hypertension. PMID:25102963

Tkacova, Ruzena; McNicholas, Walter T; Javorsky, Martin; Fietze, Ingo; Sliwinski, Pawel; Parati, Gianfranco; Grote, Ludger; Hedner, Jan

2014-10-01

50

Development of nocturnal respiratory disturbance in untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.  

PubMed

Patient histories suggest that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a progressive condition. To investigate whether this could be shown in data from sleep recordings, 42 patients with OSAS were retrospectively studied. All had undergone a screening recording of respiration movements and oximetry at least 6 months (average, 16 months) prior to a diagnostic polysomnogram including these parameters. No treatment was given in the meantime. In the first recording, mean oxygen desaturation index (ODI, average number of desaturations of > 4 percent per sleeping hour) was 10; periodic, obstructive respiration movements occurred during (average) 36 percent of total estimated sleeping time, and mean nadir SaO2 was 85 percent. In the second recording, mean ODI was 21 (significant change, p = 0.0002), periodic respiration time was 61 percent, and nadir SaO2 was 80 percent (p = 0.0001, respectively). In 26 of 42 patients (62 percent), ODI had increased by > 50 percent. Increases in ODIs and periodic breathing were significantly correlated to increases in body weight. There were, however, exceptional patients with considerable increases in respiratory disturbance despite weight loss. The greatest changes were found in the patients who had the highest apnea indices in the polysomnograms. Early treatment may therefore be justified, since a borderline case may change to severe OSAS in 1 to 2 years' time. Follow-up recordings of untreated patients are important. PMID:8339616

Svanborg, E; Larsson, H

1993-08-01

51

Sleep Loss and the Inflammatory Response in Mice Under Chronic Environmental Circadian Disruption  

PubMed Central

Shift work and trans-time zone travel lead to insufficient sleep and numerous pathologies. Here, we examined sleep/wake dynamics during chronic exposure to environmental circadian disruption (ECD), and if chronic partial sleep loss associated with ECD influences the induction of shift-related inflammatory disorder. Sleep and wakefulness were telemetrically recorded across three months of ECD, in which the dark-phase of a light-dark cycle was advanced weekly by 6 h. A three month regimen of ECD caused a temporary reorganization of sleep (NREM and REM) and wake processes across each week, resulting in an approximately 10% net loss of sleep each week relative to baseline levels. A separate group of mice were subjected to ECD or a regimen of imposed wakefulness (IW) aimed to mimic sleep amounts under ECD for one month. Fos-immunoreactivity (IR) was quantified in sleep-wake regulatory areas: the nucleus accumbens (NAc), basal forebrain (BF), and medial preoptic area (MnPO). To assess the inflammatory response, trunk blood was treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent release of IL-6 was measured. Fos-IR was greatest in the NAc, BF, and MnPO of mice subjected to IW. The inflammatory response to LPS was elevated in mice subjected to ECD, but not mice subjected to IW. Thus, the net sleep loss that occurs under ECD is not associated with a pathological immune response. PMID:23696854

Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Natarajan, Divya; Delisser, Patrick; Davidson, Alec J.; Paul, Ketema N.

2013-01-01

52

Association between Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin Level and Obstructive Sleep Apnea or Nocturnal Intermittent Hypoxia  

PubMed Central

Background Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and a novel lipocalin, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (Ngal), have been reported to be closely linked with cardiovascular disease and loss of kidney function through chronic inflammation. However, the relationship between OSA and Ngal has never been investigated. Objectives To evaluate the relationship between Ngal and OSA in clinical practice. Methods In 102 patients, polysomnography was performed to diagnose OSA and plasma Ngal levels were measured. The correlations between Ngal levels and OSA severity and other clinical variables were evaluated. Of the 46 patients who began treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), Ngal levels were reevaluated after three months of treatment in 25 patients. Results The Ngal level correlated significantly with OSA severity as determined by the apnea hypopnea index (r?=?0.24, p?=?0.01) and 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) (r?=?0.26, p?=?0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that the Ngal level was associated with 4%ODI independently of other clinical variables. Compliance was good in 13 of the 25 patients who used CPAP. Although the OSA (4%ODI: 33.1±16.7 to 1.1±1.9/h, p<0.01) had significantly improved in those with good compliance, the Ngal levels were not significantly changed (60.5±18.1 before CPAP vs 64.2±13.9 ng/ml after CPAP, p?=?0.27). Conclusions Plasma Ngal levels were positively associated with the severity of OSA. However, the contribution rate of OSA to systemic Ngal secretion was small and changes in Ngal levels appeared to be influenced largely by other confounding factors. Therefore, it does not seem reasonable to use the Ngal level as a specific biomarker of OSA in clinical practice. PMID:23342100

Murase, Kimihiko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Yoshimura, Chikara; Aihara, Kensaku; Chihara, Yuichi; Azuma, Masanori; Harada, Yuka; Toyama, Yoshiro; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Hitomi, Takefumi; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

2013-01-01

53

Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex: reversal by antipsychotic drugs  

E-print Network

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex: reversal by antipsychotic drugs by Roberto Frau et al. KU ScholarWorks is a service provided by the KU Libraries’ Office... prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex: reversal by antipsychotic drugs. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology 11:947-955. Published version: http://www.dx.doi.org/10.1017/ S1461145708008900 Terms of Use: http://www2.ku...

Frau, Roberto; Orrù , Marco; Puligheddu, Monica; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Mereu, Giampaolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Bortolato, Marco

2008-11-01

54

Estimating the Need for Medical Intervention due to Sleep Disruption on the International Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During ISS and shuttle missions, difficulties with sleep affect more than half of all US crews. Mitigation strategies to help astronauts cope with the challenges of disrupted sleep patterns can negatively impact both mission planning and vehicle design. The methods for addressing known detrimental impacts for some mission scenarios may have a substantial impact on vehicle specific consumable mass or volume or on the mission timeline. As part of the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) task, NASA Glenn Research Center is leading the development of a Monte Carlo based forecasting tool designed to determine the consumables required to address risks related to sleep disruption. The model currently focuses on the International Space Station and uses an algorithm that assembles representative mission schedules and feeds this into a well validated model that predicts relative levels of performance, and need for sleep (SAFTE Model, IBR Inc). Correlation of the resulting output to self-diagnosed needs for hypnotics, stimulants, and other pharmaceutical countermeasures, allows prediction of pharmaceutical use and the uncertainty of the specified prediction. This paper outlines a conceptual model for determining a rate of pharmaceutical utilization that can be used in the IMM model for comparison and optimization of mitigation methods with respect to all other significant medical needs and interventions.

Myers, Jerry G.; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Brooker, John E.; Hurst, S. R.; Mallis, Melissa M.; Caldwell, J. Lynn

2008-01-01

55

Disruption of Endocrine Rhythms in Sleeping Sickness With Preserved Relationship Between Hormonal Pulsatility and the REM-NREM Sleep Cycles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), sleep and wake episodes are sporadically distributed throughout the day and the night. To determine whether these sleep disturbances affect the 24-h hormone profiles and the normal relationships between hormone pulsatility and sleep stages, poly-graphic sleep recordings and concomitant hormone profiles were obtained in 6 African patients with sleeping sickness and in 5 healthy

G. Brandenberger; A. Buguet; K. Spiegel; A. Stanghellini; G. Muanga; P. Bogui; M. Dumas

1996-01-01

56

Bruxism and nocturnal groaning.  

PubMed

Sleep bruxism (SB) is a sleep-related movement disorder, characterized by tooth grinding and/or clenching. The causes of SB range from psychosocial factors to an excessive sleep arousal response. Some studies showed that SB episodes during sleep are under the influences of transient activity of the brainstem arousal. Nocturnal groaning (NG) is a parasomnia characterized by an expiratory monotonous vocalization occurring during sleep, especially in REM sleep and during the second half of the night. The pathogenesis of NG remains still unclear and many hypotheses arose, ranging from the persistence of a vestigial ventilatory pattern rather than an expiratory upper airways' obstruction. Sleep microstructure fluctuation might modulate the NG, since the end of the NG episode usually is synchronized with a cortical arousal and an autonomic activation. Further studies should clarify the pathophysiology of SB and NG, especially when the two phenomena are associated. PMID:22205592

Ferini-Strambi, L; Pozzi, P; Manconi, M; Zucconi, M; Oldani, A

2011-12-01

57

Changes in sleep disruption in the treatment of co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders.  

PubMed

Sleep disruption appears not only to reflect a symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but also a unique vulnerability for its development and maintenance. Studies examining the impact of psychosocial treatments for PTSD on sleep symptoms are few and no studies to date of which we are aware have examined this question in samples with co-occurring substance use disorders. The current study is a secondary analysis of a large clinical trial comparing 2 psychological treatments for co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorders. Women (N = 353) completed measures of PTSD at baseline, end of treatment, and 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. Results indicated that the prevalence of insomnia, but not nightmares, decreased during treatment, and that 63.8% of participants reported at least 1 clinical-level sleep symptom at the end of treatment. Improvement in sleep symptoms during treatment was associated with better overall PTSD outcomes over time, ?(2) (1) = 33.81, p < .001. These results extend the existing literature to suggest that residual sleep disruption following PTSD treatment is common in women with co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorders. Research on the benefits of adding sleep-specific intervention for those with residual sleep disruption in this population may be a promising future direction. PMID:24473926

McHugh, R Kathryn; Hu, Mei-Chen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Hilario, E Yvette; Weiss, Roger D; Hien, Denise A

2014-02-01

58

Differential activation of immune factors in neurons and glia contribute to individual differences in resilience/vulnerability to sleep disruption.  

PubMed

Individuals frequently find themselves confronted with a variety of challenges that threaten their wellbeing. While some individuals face these challenges efficiently and thrive (resilient) others are unable to cope and may suffer persistent consequences (vulnerable). Resilience/vulnerability to sleep disruption may contribute to the vulnerability of individuals exposed to challenging conditions. With that in mind we exploited individual differences in a fly's ability to form short-term memory (STM) following 3 different types of sleep disruption to identify the underlying genes. Our analysis showed that in each category of flies examined, there are individuals that form STM in the face of sleep loss (resilient) while other individuals show dramatic declines in cognitive behavior (vulnerable). Molecular genetic studies revealed that Antimicrobial Peptides, factors important for innate immunity, were candidates for conferring resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation. Specifically, Metchnikowin (Mtk), drosocin (dro) and Attacin (Att) transcript levels seemed to be differentially increased by sleep deprivation in glia (Mtk), neurons (dro) or primarily in the head fat body (Att). Follow-up genetic studies confirmed that expressing Mtk in glia but not neurons, and expressing dro in neurons but not glia, disrupted memory while modulating sleep in opposite directions. These data indicate that various factors within glia or neurons can contribute to individual differences in resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation. PMID:25451614

Dissel, Stephane; Seugnet, Laurent; Thimgan, Matthew S; Silverman, Neal; Angadi, Veena; Thacher, Pamela V; Burnham, Melissa M; Shaw, Paul J

2014-10-30

59

Changes of sleep architecture, spectral composition of sleep EEG, the nocturnal secretion of cortisol, ACTH, GH, prolactin, melatonin, ghrelin, and leptin, and the DEX-CRH test in depressed patients during treatment with mirtazapine.  

PubMed

The noradrenergic and specific serotoninergic antidepressant mirtazapine improves sleep, modulates hormone secretion including blunting of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) activity, and may prompt increased appetite and weight gain. The simultaneous investigation of sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) and hormone secretion during antidepressive treatment helps to further elucidate these effects. We examined sleep EEG (for later conventional and quantitative analyses) and the nocturnal concentrations of cortisol, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), growth hormone (GH), prolactin, melatonin and the key factors of energy balance, ghrelin, and leptin before and after 28 days of treatment of depressed patients (seven women, three men, mean age 39.9+/-4.2 years) with mirtazapine. In addition, a sleep EEG was recorded at day 2 and the dexamethasone-corticotropin-releasing hormone (DEX-CRH) test was performed to assess HPA activity at days -3 and 26. Psychometry and mirtazapine plasma concentrations were measured weekly. Already at day 2, sleep continuity was improved. This effect persisted at day 28, when slow-wave sleep, low-delta, theta and alpha activity, leptin and (0300-0700) melatonin increased, and cortisol and ghrelin decreased. ACTH and prolactin remained unchanged. The first two specimens of GH collected after the start of quantitative EEG analysis were reduced at day 28. The DEX-CRH test showed, at day 26, a blunting of the overshoot of ACTH and cortisol found at day -3. The Hamilton Depression score decreased from 32.1+/-7.3 to 15.5+/-6.7 between days -1 and 28. A weight gain of approximately 3 kg was observed. This unique profile of changes is compatible with the action of mirtazapine at 5-HT-2 receptors, at presynaptic adrenergic alpha 2 receptors, at the HPA system, and on ghrelin and leptin. PMID:16237393

Schmid, Dagmar A; Wichniak, Adam; Uhr, Manfred; Ising, Marcus; Brunner, Hans; Held, Katja; Weikel, Jutta C; Sonntag, Annette; Steiger, Axel

2006-04-01

60

Alterations in Pain Responses in Treated and Untreated Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome: Associations with Sleep Disruption  

PubMed Central

Objective There has been recent interest in characterizing potential abnormalities of pain processing in patients with sleep disorders such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). The aim of this study was to evaluate psychophysical responses to noxious heat and pressure stimuli in both treated and untreated RLS patients, compared to matched controls. Methods This study is a cross-sectional group comparison of RLS patients with matched controls. A total of 31 patients (15 treated, 16 untreated) with a confirmed diagnosis of RLS were compared to 18 controls with no history of RLS or related sleep disorders. Results RLS patients (both treated and untreated) demonstrated reduced pain thresholds and reported greater clinical pain relative to controls. Moreover, RLS patients demonstrated enhanced temporal summation of heat pain (p< .05), which may reflect aberrant central nervous system facilitation of pain transmission. Both treated and untreated RLS patients reported disrupted sleep relative to controls, and mediation analyses suggested that the reduced pain thresholds in RLS were attributable to sleep disturbance. However, the effect of RLS on the magnitude of temporal summation of heat pain was independent of sleep disturbance. Conclusions These findings suggest that central nervous system pain processing may be amplified in RLS, perhaps partially as a consequence of sleep disruption. RLS patients, even those whose symptoms are managed pharmacologically, may be at elevated long-term risk for the development or maintenance of persistent pain conditions. Further studies in larger samples could help to improve the prospects for pain management in RLS patients. PMID:21570347

Edwards, Robert R; Quartana, Phillip J.; Allen, Richard P; Greenbaum, Seth; Earley, Christopher J; Smith, Michael T

2011-01-01

61

Children's Sleep and Autonomic Function: Low Sleep Quality Has an Impact on Heart Rate Variability  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality in children have been associated with concentration, problem behavior, and emotional instability, but recently also with disrupted autonomic nervous function, which predicts cardiovascular health. Heart rate variability (HRV) was used as noninvasive indicator of autonomic function to examine the influence of sleep. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal observational study on the effect of sleep on HRV Participants: Belgian children (5-11 years) of the ChiBS study in 2010 (N = 334) and 2011 (N = 293). Interventions: N/A. Methods: Sleep duration was reported and in a subgroup sleep quality (efficiency, latency, awakenings) was measured with accelerometry. High-frequency (HF) power and autonomic balance (LF/HF) were calculated on supine 5-minute HRV measurements. Stress was measured by emotion and problem behavior questionnaires. Sleep duration and quality were used as HRV predictors in corrected cross-sectional and longitudinal regressions. Stress was tested as mediator (intermediate pathway) or moderator (interaction) in sleep-HRV associations. Results: In both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, long sleep latency could predict lower HF (parasympathetic activity), while nocturnal awakenings, sleep latency, low sleep efficiency, and low corrected sleep duration were related to higher LF/HF (sympathetic/parasympathetic balance). Parental reported sleep duration was not associated with HRV. The significances remained after correction for stress. Stress was not a mediator, but a moderator (enhancer) in the relationship between sleep quality and HRV. Conclusions: Low sleep quality but not parent-reported low sleep duration leads to an unhealthier heart rate variability pattern (sympathetic over parasympathetic dominance). This stresses the importance of good sleep quality for cardiovascular health in children. Citation: Michels N; Clays E; De Buyzere M; Vanaelst B; De Henauw S; Sioen I. Children's sleep and autonomic function: low sleep quality has an impact on heart rate variability. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1939-1946. PMID:24293769

Michels, Nathalie; Clays, Els; De Buyzere, Marc; Vanaelst, Barbara; De Henauw, Stefaan; Sioen, Isabelle

2013-01-01

62

Little Effect of Ordinary Antihypertensive Therapy on Nocturnal High Blood Pressure in Patients with Sleep Disordered Breathing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antihypertensive effects of four different antihypertensive medications (?-blocking agent, atenolol 50 mg; calcium-antagonist, isradipine SRO [slow release] 2.5 mg; diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ] 25 mg; and angiotension converting enzyme-inhibitor, spirapril 6 mg) on obese patients with sleep disordered breathing and hypertension were compared by the ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM).Eighteen patients were randomized in a double-blind, crossover fashion to receive

Lisa H Pelttari; Eino K Hietanen; Tiina T Salo; Matti J Kataja; Ilkka M Kantola

1998-01-01

63

Computer assisted detection of REM and non-REM sleep for analysis of nocturnal hypoxaemia in patients with ventilatory impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer-assisted method for the evaluation of sleep and breathing in patients showing chronic ventilatory impairment is\\u000a described and validated. Signals of body and respiratory movements (static charge sensitive bed), air-flow (thermistors),\\u000a oxygen saturation (SaO2), electro-oculography (EOG), and electromyography (EMG) were recorded overnight and analysed. Using\\u000a the compressed output graphs of the data and a rapid scoring procedure, stages of

T. Salmi; P. E. Brander

1994-01-01

64

Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD: implications for treatment.  

PubMed

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals with ADHD with typically developing controls is most concordant for associations of ADHD with: hypopnea/apnea and peripheral limb movements in sleep or nocturnal motricity in polysomnographic studies; increased sleep onset latency and shorter sleep time in actigraphic studies; and bedtime resistance, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian-rhythm sleep disorders). Psychostimulant medications are associated with disrupted or disturbed sleep, but also 'paradoxically' calm some patients with ADHD for sleep by alleviating their symptoms. Long-acting formulations may have insufficient duration of action, leading to symptom rebound at bedtime. Current guidelines recommend assessment of sleep disturbance during evaluation of ADHD, and before initiation of pharmacotherapy, with healthy sleep practices the first-line option for addressing sleep problems. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the relationships between ADHD and sleep, and presents a conceptual model of the modes of interaction: ADHD may cause sleep problems as an intrinsic feature of the disorder; sleep problems may cause or mimic ADHD; ADHD and sleep problems may interact, with reciprocal causation and possible involvement of comorbidity; and ADHD and sleep problems may share a common underlying neurological etiology. PMID:25127644

Hvolby, Allan

2014-08-17

65

Nocturnal Enuresis: Basic Facts and New Horizons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nocturnal enuresis in children is quite seldom due to psychological factors. Instead, it is caused by a hereditary delay in maturation of the somatic mechanisms (reduction of nocturnal urine production, relaxation of the bladder during sleeping hours, and a normal arousal to a full bladder) which prevent the child from wetting the bed. Doctors treating bedwetting children have often used

Kelm Hjälmås

1998-01-01

66

The influence of sleep disruption and pain perception on indicators of quality of life in individuals living with dementia at home.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study evaluated the influence of sleep quality and pain perceptions on different dimensions of quality of life in community-dwelling persons with dementia. Evaluations of pain were collected using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), sleep disruption using Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) items, and quality of life indicators using the DemQOL-Proxy in 88 persons with dementia and their family caregivers. Lower overall quality of life was associated with the presence of pain and symptoms of sleep disruption when controlling for mental status, age, and number of health conditions. Pain and sleep symptoms were differentially associated with different aspects of QoL. As symptoms negatively impact quality of life but are modifiable, better clinical procedures are needed to prevent and also identify and treat symptoms of pain and sleep disturbance in community-dwelling persons with dementia. PMID:25193739

Hodgson, Nancy; Gitlin, Laura N; Huang, Jin

2014-01-01

67

Nocturnal hypoxia and Neuropsychological variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypoxia is a well known cause of brain dysfunction. Neuropsychological impairments have been observed in normal subjects experiencing hypoxia iatrogenically as well as in patients with chronic lung disease. Recent investigations have demonstrated significant nocturnal hypoxia in subjects with sleep-disordered breathing. In the present study, heavy-snoring males, a group known to experience frequent episodes of sleep-disordered breathing received neuropsychological testing

David T. R. Berry; Wilse B. Webb; A. Jay Block; Russell M. Bauer; Daniel A. Switzer

1986-01-01

68

Relationships between sleep, physical activity and human health  

PubMed Central

Although sleep and exercise may seem to be mediated by completely different physiological mechanisms, there is growing evidence for clinically important relationships between these two behaviors. It is known that passive body heating facilitates the nocturnal sleep of healthy elderly people with insomnia. This finding supports the hypothesis that changes in body temperature trigger somnogenic brain areas to initiate sleep. Nevertheless, little is known about how the core and distal thermoregulatory responses to exercise fit into this hypothesis. Such knowledge could also help in reducing sleep problems associated with nocturnal shiftwork. It is difficult to incorporate physical activity into a shiftworker's lifestyle, since it is already disrupted in terms of family commitments and eating habits. A multi-research strategy is needed to identify what the optimal amounts and timing of physical activity are for reducing shiftwork-related sleep problems. The relationships between sleep, exercise and diet are also important, given the recently reported associations between short sleep length and obesity. The cardiovascular safety of exercise timing should also be considered, since recent data suggest that the reactivity of blood pressure to a change in general physical activity is highest during the morning. This time is associated with an increased risk in general of a sudden cardiac event, but more research work is needed to separate the influences of light, posture and exercise per se on the haemodynamic responses to sleep and physical activity following sleep taken at night and during the day as a nap. PMID:17067643

Atkinson, Greg; Davenne, Damien

2009-01-01

69

[Nocturnal monitoring of home non-invasive ventilation: Contribution of simple tools such as pulse-oximetry, capnography, built-in ventilator software and autonomic markers of sleep fragmentation].  

PubMed

Complex respiratory events, which may have a detrimental effect on both quality of sleep and control of nocturnal hypoventilation, occur during sleep in patients treated by non-invasive ventilation (NIV). Among these events are patient-ventilator asynchrony, increases in upper airway resistance with or without increased respiratory drive, and leaks. Detection of these events is important in order to select the most appropriate ventilator settings and interface. Simple tools can provide important information when monitoring NIV. Pulse-oximetry is important to ensure that an adequate SpO2 is provided, and to detect either prolonged or short and recurrent desaturations. However, the specificity of pulse-oximetry tracings under NIV is low. Transcutaneous capnography discriminates between hypoxemia related to V/Q mismatch and hypoventilation, documents correction of nocturnal hypoventilation, and may detect ventilator-induced hyperventilation, a possible cause for central apnea/hypopnea and glottic closure. Data provided by ventilator software helps the clinician by estimating ventilation, tidal volume, leaks, rate of inspiratory or expiratory triggering by the patient, although further validation of these signals by independent studies is indicated. Finally, autonomic markers of sympathetic tone using signals such as pulse wave amplitude of the pulse-oximetry signal can provide reliable information of sleep fragmentation. PMID:24602678

Janssens, J-P; Borel, J-C; Pépin, J-L

2014-02-01

70

The Impact of Sleep Disruption on Executive Function in Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The high prevalence of sleep disorders, particularly obstructive sleep apnea, is well established in children with Down syndrome. However, only a few studies have focused on older children and young adults in this population. Given the presence of sleep disorders and the early emergence of Alzheimer's disease, more work is needed to examine the…

Chen, C.-C.; Spano, G.; Edgin, J. O.

2013-01-01

71

Sleep  

MedlinePLUS

... cama potencialmente peligrosa Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infants sleep with potentially unsafe bedding 20 Years of Protecting Infants During Sleep All related news Home Accessibility Contact Disclaimer Privacy ...

72

Nightwatch: Sleep Disruption of Caregivers of Children With Asthma in Detroit  

PubMed Central

Caregiving for ill loved ones can affect sleep quality and quantity. Insufficient sleep has been associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes, and it is known to affect work performance and ability to accomplish necessary tasks. While some research has looked at the sleep of caregivers of loved ones with chronic illness and found that they experience poorer sleep, little is known about the impact of caring for a child with asthma on the caregiver’s sleep and the ways in which their sleep may be affected. Community Action Against Asthma, a community-based participatory research partnership, conducted interviews with semistructured and open-ended questions with 40 caregivers of children with asthma who live in Detroit. Findings showed that caregivers regularly experience poor quality sleep because of sleeping lightly in order to listen for the child’s symptoms, wake multiple times to check on the child because of worry, and provide care for child when he or she experiences symptoms in the middle of the night. Results of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale indicate that 12.5% of caregivers received a score of 16 or more, the score on the scale used to indicate likely presence of a sleep disorder, and 42.5% had a score of 10 or more, indicating excessive sleepiness. Sleep disturbance in caregivers is an underrecognized consequence of childhood asthma, with implications for providers caring for children with asthma. PMID:25419470

Cheezum, Rebecca R.; Parker, Edith A.; Sampson, Natalie R.; Lewis, Toby C.; O’Toole, Ashley; Patton, Jean; Robins, Thomas G.; Keirns, Carla C.

2014-01-01

73

Longitudinal Change in Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness in Postpartum Women  

PubMed Central

Sleep disruption strongly influences daytime functioning; resultant sleepiness is recognised as a contributing risk-factor for individuals performing critical and dangerous tasks. While the relationship between sleep and sleepiness has been heavily investigated in the vulnerable sub-populations of shift workers and patients with sleep disorders, postpartum women have been comparatively overlooked. Thirty-three healthy, postpartum women recorded every episode of sleep and wake each day during postpartum weeks 6, 12 and 18. Although repeated measures analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the amount of nocturnal sleep and frequency of night-time wakings, there was a significant reduction in sleep disruption, due to fewer minutes of wake after sleep onset. Subjective sleepiness was measured each day using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale; at the two earlier time points this was significantly correlated with sleep quality but not to sleep quantity. Epworth Sleepiness Scores significantly reduced over time; however, during week 18 over 50% of participants were still experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score ?12). Results have implications for health care providers and policy makers. Health care providers designing interventions to address sleepiness in new mothers should take into account the dynamic changes to sleep and sleepiness during this initial postpartum period. Policy makers developing regulations for parental leave entitlements should take into consideration the high prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness experienced by new mothers, ensuring enough opportunity for daytime sleepiness to diminish to a manageable level prior to reengagement in the workforce. PMID:25078950

Filtness, Ashleigh J.; MacKenzie, Janelle; Armstrong, Kerry

2014-01-01

74

REM Sleep Phase Preference in the Crepuscular Octodon degus Assessed by Selective REM Sleep Deprivation  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To determine rapid eye movement (REM) sleep phase preference in a crepuscular mammal (Octodon degus) by challenging the specific REM sleep homeostatic response during the diurnal and nocturnal anticrepuscular rest phases. Design: We have investigated REM sleep rebound, recovery, and documented REM sleep propensity measures during and after diurnal and nocturnal selective REM sleep deprivations. Subjects: Nine male wild-captured O. degus prepared for polysomnographic recordings Interventions: Animals were recorded during four consecutive baseline and two separate diurnal or nocturnal deprivation days, under a 12:12 light-dark schedule. Three-h selective REM sleep deprivations were performed, starting at midday (zeitgeber time 6) or midnight (zeitgeber time 18). Measurements and Results: Diurnal and nocturnal REM sleep deprivations provoked equivalent amounts of REM sleep debt, but a consistent REM sleep rebound was found only after nocturnal deprivation. The nocturnal rebound was characterized by a complete recovery of REM sleep associated with an augment in REM/total sleep time ratio and enhancement in REM sleep episode consolidation. Conclusions: Our results support the notion that the circadian system actively promotes REM sleep. We propose that the sleep-wake cycle of O. degus is modulated by a chorus of circadian oscillators with a bimodal crepuscular modulation of arousal and a unimodal promotion of nocturnal REM sleep. Citation: Ocampo-Garcés A; Hernández F; Palacios AG. REM sleep phase preference in the crepuscular Octodon degus assessed by selective REM sleep deprivation. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1247-1256. PMID:23904685

Ocampo-Garcés, Adrián; Hernández, Felipe; Palacios, Adrian G.

2013-01-01

75

Randomized controlled trial of pharmacological replacement of melatonin for sleep disruption in individuals with tetraplegia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the effectiveness of a melatonin agonist for treating sleep disturbances in individuals with tetraplegia. Design Placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover, randomized control trial. Setting At home. Participants Eight individuals with tetraplegia, having an absence of endogenous melatonin production and the presence of a sleep disorder. Interventions Three weeks of 8 mg of ramelteon (melatonin agonist) and 3 weeks of placebo (crossover, randomized order) with 2 weeks of baseline prior to and 2 weeks of washout between active conditions. Outcome Change in objective and subjective sleep. Measures Wrist actigraphy, post-sleep questionnaire, Stanford sleepiness scale, SF-36. Results We observed no consistent changes in either subjective or objective measures of sleep, including subjective sleep latency (P = 0.55, Friedman test), number of awakenings (P = 0.17, Friedman test), subjective total sleep time (P = 0.45, Friedman test), subjective morning alertness (P = 0.35, Friedman test), objective wake after sleep onset (P = 0.70, Friedman test), or objective sleep efficiency (P = 0.78, Friedman test). There were significant increases in both objective total sleep time (P < 0.05, Friedman test), subjective time in bed (P < 0.05, Friedman test), and subjective sleep quality (P < 0.05, Friedman test), although these occurred in both arms. There were no significant changes in any of the nine SF-36 subscale scores (Friedman test, Ps >Bonferroni adjusted ? of 0.005). Conclusion In this pilot study, we were unable to show effectiveness of pharmacological replacement of melatonin for the treatment of self-reported sleep problems in individuals with tetraplegia. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00507546. PMID:24090266

Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Ku, Ban; Ota, Doug; Kiratli, B. Jenny

2014-01-01

76

Pain Disrupts Sleep in Children and Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both chronic pain and sleep problems are common for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Although one study has revealed a relationship between having a medical condition and sleep problems in this population, the role of pain was not examined independently. Thus, the goal of this study was to clarify the specific role…

Breau, Lynn M.; Camfield, Carol S.

2011-01-01

77

Sleep Disruption as a Correlate to Cognitive and Adaptive Behavior Problems in Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sleep problems associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been well documented, but less is known about the effects of sleep problems on day-time cognitive and adaptive performance in this population. Children diagnosed with autism or pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) (N = 335) from 1 to 10 years of age…

Taylor, Matthew A.; Schreck, Kimberly A.; Mulick, James A.

2012-01-01

78

Sleep disruption as a correlate to cognitive and adaptive behavior problems in autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

Sleep problems associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been well documented, but less is known about the effects of sleep problems on day-time cognitive and adaptive performance in this population. Children diagnosed with autism or pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) (N = 335) from 1 to 10 years of age (M = 5.5 years) were evaluated for the relationships of Behavioral Evaluation of Disorders of Sleep (BEDS; Schreck, 1998) scores to measures of intelligence and adaptive behavior. Results suggested that children who slept fewer hours per night had lower overall intelligence, verbal skills, overall adaptive functioning, daily living skills, socialization skills, and motor development. Children who slept fewer hours at night with waking during the night had more communication problems. Breathing related sleep problems and fewer hours of sleep related most often to problems with perceptual tasks. The results indicate that quality of sleep--especially sleep duration--may be related to problems with day-time cognitive and adaptive functioning in children with autism and PDD-NOS. However, future research must be conducted to further understand these relationships. PMID:22522199

Taylor, Matthew A; Schreck, Kimberly A; Mulick, James A

2012-01-01

79

Nocturnal Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over time, human beings have blazed their way into the night with fire and artificial light, but we are not true creatures of the night. This Topic in Depth explores the world of nocturnal animals. From Island Discovery & Training, the first site allows visitors to listen to the sounds of several nocturnal animals. After guessing who made the sound, visitors can link to information pages for all but one of the mystery animals (1). Next is an information sheet (2) from BioMedia that answers the question: How Do Animals See In the Dark? The third site, from Enchanted Learning, provides coloring sheets and brief profiles for many nocturnal animals including the Amur Tiger, Badger, Crocodile, and Kinkajou-just to name a few (3). From the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in Vermont, the fourth website contains a six-page lesson plan (for students in grades one to eight) emphasizing different senses; and the roles and adaptations of nocturnal species (4). The fifth site, from Science News Online, contains an article addressing research on the ecological impact of artificial nighttime light on nocturnal animals (5). From Wild Asia, the next site contains an article by travel writer and environmental educator David Bowden, that describes his experience watching a marine turtle lay her eggs on Malaysia's Turtle Island (6). The seventh site, from PBS-Nova Online, briefly describes the work of zoologists who study nocturnal and burrowing animals of the Kalahari (7). From this site visitors can also link to a section that discusses how several different animals see at night. The final site, from the University of Utah-John Moran Eye Center, contains information about the role of photoreceptors in vision (8). This Photoreceptors section is part of a comprehensive electronic tutorial regarding neural organization of the mammalian retina.

80

Sleeping soundly should come easy after a hard day at school or work. But, for many of us, nighttime slumber is disrupted by thoughts of our "to-do" list, worries about our studies or workload, or interruptions  

E-print Network

an occasional or persistent sleep disturbance known as insomnia. According to modest estimates, at least 20-30 million Americans suffer from insomnia. Dangers of Sleep Deprivation The term "insomnia" describes trouble falling asleep, disrupted sleep or waking up too early. There are three types of insomnia: 1) transient

Leistikow, Bruce N.

81

Sleep and neurocognitive functioning in children with eczema.  

PubMed

Sleep disruption in childhood is associated with clearly defined deficits in neurocognition and behaviour. Childhood eczema is also a potent cause of sleep disruption though it is unknown whether it too results in neurocognitive deficits. To test this hypothesis, neurocognitive (WISC-IV), parental-reported sleep quality (Sleep Disturbance Scale of Children (SDSC)) and overnight polysomnographic (PSG) data were collected in 21 children with eczema and 20 healthy controls (age range 6-16 years). Children with eczema had worse sleep quality on both PSG (notably increased nocturnal wakefulness, a higher number of stage shifts and a longer latency to REM onset) and parental report. In addition, they demonstrated significant neurocognitive deficits (especially verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning and to a lesser extent working memory) with a composite Full Scale IQ 16 points lower than controls. Parental reported sleep problems but not PSG parameters were correlated with reduced neurocognitive performance. However, hierarchical regression analyses revealed that eczema status was predictive while sleep fragmentation (parental or PSG) was not predictive of neurocognitive performance. As this is the first study to systematically examine neurocognitive functioning in children with eczema and given the finding of significant deficits it merits replication especially given the prevalence of the condition. The unanswered question is whether these cognitive deficits normalise with effective eczema treatment and if this is mediated by improvements in sleep architecture. PMID:23353660

Camfferman, Danny; Kennedy, J Declan; Gold, Michael; Simpson, Carol; Lushington, Kurt

2013-08-01

82

[Sleep psychiatry].  

PubMed

Sleep disorders are serious issues in modern society. There has been marked scientific interest in sleep for a century, with the discoveries of the electrical activity of the brain (EEG), sleep-wake system, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and circadian rhythm system. Additionally, the advent of video-polysomnography in clinical research has revealed some of the consequences of disrupted sleep and sleep deprivation in psychiatric disorders. Decades of clinical research have demonstrated that sleep disorders are intimately tied to not only physical disease (e. g., lifestyle-related disease) but psychiatric illness. According to The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2005), sleep disorders are classified into 8 major categories: 1) insomnia, 2) sleep-related breathing disorders, 3) hypersomnias of central origin, 4) circadian rhythm sleep disorders, 5) parasomnias, 6) sleep-related movement disorders, 7) isolated symptoms, and 8) other sleep disorders. Several sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleepwalking, REM sleep behavior disorder, and narcolepsy, may be comorbid or possibly mimic numerous psychiatric disorders, and can even occur due to psychiatric pharmacotherapy. Moreover, sleep disorders may exacerbate underlying psychiatric disorders when left untreated. Therefore, psychiatrists should pay attention to the intimate relationship between sleep disorders and psychiatric symptoms. Sleep psychiatry is an academic field focusing on interrelations between sleep medicine and psychiatry. This mini-review summarizes recent findings in sleep psychiatry. Future research on the bidirectional relation between sleep disturbance and psychiatric symptoms will shed light on the pathophysiological view of psychiatric disorders and sleep disorders. PMID:24050022

Chiba, Shigeru

2013-01-01

83

Dual-Tasking Alleviated Sleep Deprivation Disruption in Visuomotor Tracking: An fMRI Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effects of dual-responding on tracking performance after 49-h of sleep deprivation (SD) were evaluated behaviorally and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Continuous visuomotor tracking was performed simultaneously with an intermittent color-matching visual detection task in which a pair of color-matched stimuli constituted a…

Gazes, Yunglin; Rakitin, Brian C.; Steffener, Jason; Habeck, Christian; Butterfield, Brady; Basner, Robert C.; Ghez, Claude; Stern, Yaakov

2012-01-01

84

Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in mucopolysaccharidosis.  

PubMed

Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is an epileptic syndrome that is primarily characterized by seizures with motor signs occurring almost exclusively during sleep. We describe 2 children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) who were referred for significant sleep disturbance. Long term video-EEG monitoring (LT-VEEGM) demonstrated sleep-related hypermotor seizures consistent with NFLE. No case of sleep-related hypermotor seizures has ever been reported to date in MPS. However, differential diagnosis with parasomnias has been previously discussed. The high frequency of frontal lobe seizures causes sleep fragmentation, which may result in sleep disturbances observed in at least a small percentage of MPS patients. We suggest monitoring individuals with MPS using periodic LT-VEEGM, particularly when sleep disorder is present. Moreover, our cases confirm that NFLE in lysosomal storage diseases may occur, and this finding extends the etiologic spectrum of NFLE. PMID:24447995

Bonanni, Paolo; Volzone, Anna; Randazzo, Giovanna; Antoniazzi, Lisa; Rampazzo, Angelica; Scarpa, Maurizio; Nobili, Lino

2014-10-01

85

Sleep disorders in psychiatry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep is an active state that is critical for our physical, mental, and emotional well-being. Sleep is also important for optimal cognitive functioning, and sleep disruption results in functional impairment. Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder in psychiatry. At any given time, 50% of adults are affected with 1 or more sleep problems such as difficulty in falling or

Jorge Alberto Costa e Silva

2006-01-01

86

Accumulated deep sleep is a powerful predictor of LH pulse onset in pubertal children.  

PubMed

Context: During puberty, reactivation of the reproductive axis occurs during sleep with LH pulses specifically tied to deep sleep. This association suggests that deep sleep may stimulate LH secretion, but there have been no interventional studies to determine the characteristics of deep sleep required for LH pulse initiation. Objective: To determine the effect of deep sleep fragmentation on LH secretion in pubertal children. Design and Setting: Studies were performed in a Clinical Research Center. Subjects: Fourteen healthy pubertal children (11.3-14.1 years). Interventions: Subjects were randomized to two overnight studies with polysomnography and frequent blood sampling, with or without deep sleep disruption via auditory stimuli. Results: An average of 68.1 ±10.7 (± SE) auditory stimuli were delivered to interrupt deep sleep during the disruption night, limiting deep sleep to only brief episodes (average length disrupted 1.3±0.2 min vs normal 7.1±0.8 min, p<0.001), and increasing the number of transitions between NREM, REM, and wake (disrupted 274.5±33.4 vs. normal 131.2±8.1, p=0.001). There were no differences in mean LH (normal: 3.2±0.4 vs. disrupted: 3.2±0.5 IU/L), LH pulse frequency (0.6±0.06 vs. 0.6±0.07 pulses/hr), or LH pulse amplitude (2.8±0.4 vs 2.8±0.4 IU/L) between the two nights. Poisson process modeling demonstrated that the accumulation of deep sleep in the 20 min before an LH pulse, whether consolidated or fragmented, was a significant predictor of LH pulse onset (p<0.001). Conclusion: In pubertal children, nocturnal LH augmentation and pulse patterning are resistant to deep sleep fragmentation. These data suggest that, even when fragmented, deep sleep is strongly related to activation of the GnRH pulse generator. PMID:25490277

Shaw, Nd; Butler, Jp; Nemati, S; Kangarloo, T; Ghassemi, M; Malhotra, A; Hall, Je

2014-12-01

87

Sleep & Memory/Research Sleep-dependent learning and motor-skill complexity  

E-print Network

to those achieved follow- ing nocturnal sleep. This report, however, described a correlation with REM sleepSleep & Memory/Research Sleep-dependent learning and motor-skill complexity Kenichi Kuriyama,1,2 Robert Stickgold,1 and Matthew P. Walker1,3,4 1 Center for Sleep and Cognition, Department of Psychiatry

Walker, Matthew P.

88

Development and Evaluation of a Sleep Education Program for Older Adults with Dementia Living in Adult Family Homes  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate the feasibility of implementing a Sleep Education Program (SEP) for improving sleep in adult family home (AFH) residents with dementia, and the relative efficacy of SEP compared to usual care control in a pilot randomized controlled trial. Participants Thirty-seven AFH staff-caregivers and 47 residents with co-morbid dementia and sleep disturbances. Intervention SEP consisted of four training sessions with staff-caregivers to develop and implement individualized resident behavioral sleep plans. Measurements Treatment fidelity to the SEP was assessed following the NIH Behavior Change Consortium model utilizing trainer observations and staff-caregiver reports. Resident sleep was assessed by wrist actigraphy at baseline, 1-month post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Caregiver reports of resident daytime sleepiness, depression, and disruptive behaviors were also collected. Results Each key area of treatment fidelity (SEP delivery, receipt, enactment) was identified, measured, and yielded significant outcomes. Staff-caregivers learned how to identify sleep scheduling, daily activity, and environmental factors that could contribute to nocturnal disturbances, and developed and implemented strategies for modifying these factors. SEP decreased the frequency and disturbance level of target resident nocturnal behaviors, and improved actigraphically-measured sleep percent and total sleep time over the 6-month follow-up period compared to the control condition. Conclusion Results suggest behavioral interventions to improve sleep are feasible to implement in adult family homes, and merit further investigation as a promising intervention for use with AFH residents with dementia. PMID:22367233

McCurry, Susan M.; LaFazia, David M.; Pike, Kenneth C.; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Teri, Linda

2012-01-01

89

The sleep-wake cycle and motor activity, but not temperature, are disrupted over the light-dark cycle in mice genetically depleted of serotonin.  

PubMed

We examined the role that serotonin has in the modulation of sleep and wakefulness across a 12-h:12-h light-dark cycle and determined whether temperature and motor activity are directly responsible for potential disruptions to arousal state. Telemetry transmitters were implanted in 24 wild-type mice (Tph2(+/+)) and 24 mice with a null mutation for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2(-/-)). After surgery, electroencephalography, core body temperature, and motor activity were recorded for 24 h. Temperature for a given arousal state (quiet and active wake, non-rapid eye movement, and paradoxical sleep) was similar in the Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice across the light-dark cycle. The percentage of time spent in active wakefulness, along with motor activity, was decreased in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice at the start and end of the dark cycle. This difference persisted into the light cycle. In contrast, the time spent in a given arousal state was similar at the remaining time points. Despite this similarity, periods of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and wakefulness were less consolidated in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice throughout the light-dark cycle. We conclude that the depletion of serotonin does not disrupt the diurnal variation in the sleep-wake cycle, motor activity, and temperature. However, serotonin may suppress photic and nonphotic inputs that manifest at light-dark transitions and serve to shorten the ultraradian duration of wakefulness and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Finally, alterations in the sleep-wake cycle following depletion of serotonin are unrelated to disruptions in the modulation of temperature. PMID:25394829

Solarewicz, Julia Z; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

2015-01-01

90

Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition and induces psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans.  

PubMed

Translational biomarkers, such as prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, are playing an increasingly important role in the development of antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia and related conditions. However, attempts to reliably induce a PPI deficit by psychotomimetic drugs have not been successful, leaving an unmet need for a cross-species psychosis model sensitive to this widely studied surrogate treatment target. Sleep deprivation (SD) might be such a model as it has previously been shown to induce PPI deficits in rats, which could be selectively prevented with antipsychotic but not anxiolytic or antidepressant compounds. Here, in a first proof-of-concept study we tested whether SD induces a deficit in PPI and an increase in psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans. In two counterbalanced sessions, acoustic PPI and self-reported psychosis-like symptoms (Psychotomimetic States Inventory) were measured in 24 healthy human volunteers after a normal night's sleep and after a night of total SD. SD decreased PPI (p = 0.001) without affecting the magnitude or habituation of the startle response (all p > 0.13). SD also induced perceptual distortions, cognitive disorganization, and anhedonia (all p < 0.02). Thus, extending previous rodent work, we conclude that SD, in combination with the PPI biomarker, might be a promising translational surrogate model for psychosis as this method represents a possibility to partially and reversibly mimic the pathogenesis of psychotic states. PMID:24990933

Petrovsky, Nadine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Hill, Antje; Frenzel, Leonie; Meyhöfer, Inga; Wagner, Michael; Backhaus, Jutta; Kumari, Veena

2014-07-01

91

Review of Disrupted Sleep Patterns in Smith-Magenis Syndrome and Normal Melatonin Secretion in a Patient with an Atypical Interstitial 17p11.2 Deletion  

PubMed Central

Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and behavior problems, including abnormal sleep patterns. It is most commonly due to a 3.5 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 17 band p11.2. Secretion of melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, is the body’s signal for nighttime darkness. Published reports of 24-hour melatonin secretion patterns in two independent SMS cohorts (US & France) document an inverted endogenous melatonin pattern in virtually all cases (96%), suggesting that this finding is pathognomic for the syndrome. We report on a woman with SMS due to an atypical large proximal deletion (?6Mb; cen<->TNFRSFproteinB) of chromosome band (17)(p11.1p11.2) who presents with typical sleep disturbances but a normal pattern of melatonin secretion. We further describe a melatonin light suppression test in this patient. This is the second reported patient with a normal endogenous melatonin rhythm in SMS associated with an atypical large deletion. These two patients are significant because they suggest that the sleep disturbances in SMS cannot be solely attributed to the abnormal diurnal melatonin secretion versus the normal nocturnal pattern. PMID:19530184

Boudreau, Eilis A.; Johnson, Kyle P.; Jackman, Angela R.; Blancato, Jan; Huizing, Marjan; Bendavid, Claude; Jones, MaryPat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.; Lewy, Alfred J.; Smith, Ann C. M.; Magenis, R. Ellen

2009-01-01

92

Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.  

PubMed

We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:1621022

Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

1992-06-01

93

EFFECT OF SHIP NOISE ON SLEEP  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of a steady sound level of 65 dB(A) from a diesel ship engine on nocturnal sleep were studied using polygraphic and subjective sleep parameters. Three healthy men, aged 29 to 33 years, participated in the experiment. Sleep polygrams and the sound level in a sleep laboratory were recorded for each subject for five exposure nights and five control

Y. Tamura; T. Kawada; Y. Sasazawa

1997-01-01

94

Sleep disorders in the elderly  

MedlinePLUS

Sleep disorders in the elderly involve any disrupted sleep pattern, such as problems falling or staying asleep, too ... for medical causes and determine which type of sleep disorder is causing the problem.

95

Research on sleep, circadian rhythms and aging - Applications to manned spaceflight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Disorders of sleep and circadian rhythmicity are characteristic of both advancing age and manned spaceflight. Sleep fragmentation, reduced nocturnal sleep tendency and sleep efficiency, reduced daytime alertness, and increased daytime napping are common to both of these conditions. Recent research on the pathophysiology and treatment of disrupted sleep in older people has led to a better understanding of how the human circadian pacemaker regulates the timing of the daily sleep-wake cycle and how it responds to the periodic changes in the light-dark cycle to which we are ordinarily exposed. These findings have led to new treatments for some of the sleep disorders common to older individuals, using carefully timed exposure to bright light and darkness to manipulate the phase and/or amplitude of the circadian timing system. These insights and treatment approaches have direct applications in the design of countermeasures allowing astronauts to overcome some of the challenges which manned spaceflight poses for the human circadian timing system. We have conducted an operational feasibility study on the use of scheduled exposure to bright light and darkness prior to launch in order to facilitate adaptation of the circadian system of a NASA Space Shuttle crew to the altered sleep-wake schedule required for their mission. The results of this study illustrate how an understanding of the properties of the human circadian timing system and the consequences of circadian disruption can be applied to manned spaceflight.

Czeisler, Charles A.; Chiasera, August J.; Duffy, Jeanne F.

1991-01-01

96

Delay in the Recovery of Normal Sleep-Wake Cycle after Disruption of the Light-Dark Cycle in Mice: A Bipolar Disorder-Prone Animal Model?  

PubMed Central

Objective Disruption of the circadian rhythm is known as a provoking factor for manic episodes. Individual differences exist in the recovery rate from disruption in the general population. To develop a screening method to detect individuals vulnerable to bipolar disorder, the authors observed the relationship between the recovery of the normal sleep-wake cycle after switching the light-dark (LD) cycle and quinpirole-induced hyperactivity in mice. Methods Sixteen male mice (age of 5 weeks, weight 28-29 gm) were subjected to a circadian rhythm disruption protocol. Sleep-wake behaviors were checked every 5 min for a total duration of 15 days, i.e., 2 days of baseline observations, 3 days of LD cycle changes, and 10 days of recovery. During the dark cycle on the 16th experimental day, their general locomotor activities were measured in an open field for 120 minutes after an injection of quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.). Results The individual differences in the recovery rate of the baseline sleep-wake cycle were noted after 3 days of switching the LD cycle. Fifty percent (n=8) of the mice returned to the baseline cycle within 6 days after normalizing the LD cycle (early recovery group). The locomotor activities of mice that failed to recover within 6 days (delayed recovery group) were significantly higher (mean rank=12.25) than those of the early recovery group (mean rank=4.75, u=62.0, p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Conclusion Given that the quinpirole-induced hyperactivity is an animal model of bipolar disorder, our results suggest individuals who have difficulties in recovery from circadian rhythm disruption may be vulnerable to bipolar disorder. PMID:25395982

Jung, Sun Hwa; Moon, Eunsoo; Chung, Young In; Lee, Byung Dae; Lee, Young Min; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Jeong, Hee Jeong

2014-01-01

97

The relevance of dopaminergic level in nocturnal disability in Parkinson's disease: implications of continuous dopaminergic stimulation at night to treat the symptoms.  

PubMed

Sleep problems are an under-emphasized cause of disability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Difficult sleep maintenance (light and fragmented sleep) and difficulties in initiating sleep are often the earliest and the most frequent symptoms observed in PD patients. In fluctuating patients, nocturnal akinesia, dystonia, painful cramps, and parasomnias may aggravate nocturnal problems. Treatment of sleep problems can be complex and challenging for the physicians. Dopaminergic treatment may improve some of the nocturnal symptoms in PD. In this paper, the effect of drugs and technique that ensure a more continuous delivery of dopaminergic drugs on sleep problems in PD is reviewed. PMID:24990308

Stocchi, Fabrizio; Stirpe, Paola

2014-08-01

98

Nocturnal aircraft noise effects.  

PubMed

Noise protection associated with the construction and extension of airports in the Federal Republic of Germany has been regulated by the law for protection against aircraft noise since 1971. This legislation is due for revision because of different aspects. One aspect is the growth of air traffic which has led many airports to the limits of their capacity and in search of new ways of adaptation to the increasing demand for flight services. Another aspect is the increasing concern of the population about noise effects which has to be addressed by better protection against the effects of aircraft noise. The framework conditions of policy in terms of society as a whole, its health and economic environment need to be put into effect by political action. Science can contribute to this goal by performing noise effects research and by providing recommendations to the political body. However, it remains controversial, what measures are necessary or adequate to assure effective protection of the population against aircraft noise. This is particularly true for the protection of rest and sleep at night. The problem of finding a common basis for adequate recommendations is associated with (1) the low number of primary studies, which also exhibited highly variable results and assessments, (2) the handling of acoustic or psycho-acoustic dimensions for quantifying psychological or physiological reactions, and (3) the conception of how far preventive measures have to go to prove effective. With this in mind, the DLR Institute for Aerospace Medicine is conducting a large-scale, multi-stage study for investigating the acute effects of nocturnal aircraft noise on human sleep. This enterprise is implemented in the framework of the HGF/DLR project "Quiet Air Traffic" for developing sustainable assessment criteria for human-specific effects of aircraft noise at night. PMID:15070533

Basner, M; Samel, A

2004-01-01

99

The A to Zzzz's of Exercise: Treating Sleep Disruptions with Exercise Prescriptions For PostMenopausal Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

When it comes to improving overall health, few activities are cited as frequently as exercising regularly and getting enough sleep. These activities are not only important in their own right, but now appear to be connected. Research in recent years has uncovered exercise’s ability to help people fall asleep faster and stay in deeper stages of sleep longer, revealing that

Amy Oprean

2009-01-01

100

Interactions between sleep and epilepsy.  

PubMed

Sleep is one of the best-documented factors influencing the expression of seizures and interictal discharges. Janz studied the relation between seizures and the sleep/wake cycle and divided the epilepsies into three categories: nocturnal, awakening, and diffuse. Since then, the effect of sleep on the ictal and interictal manifestations of epilepsy has been studied extensively. Many seizures are activated by sleep or arousal from sleep. Interictal discharges are also seen more commonly during sleep, with the greatest activation seen during nonrapid eye movement sleep. Sleep not only increases the frequency of epileptiform abnormalities, but also may alter their morphology and distribution. Sleep deprivation also facilitates both epileptiform abnormalities and seizures. Seizures, on the other hand, also impact sleep. Epileptic patients demonstrate multiple sleep abnormalities, including an increased sleep latency, fragmented sleep, increased awakenings and stage shifts, and an increase in stages 1 and 2 of nonrapid eye movement sleep. These disturbances may in turn be modulated by antiepileptic treatment. This review summarizes the interactions between sleep and epilepsy, including the timing of seizures during the sleep/wake cycle, the influence of sleep on various seizure disorders, the effects of sleep deprivation, and the changes in sleep patterns caused by seizures and their treatment. PMID:11435803

Méndez, M; Radtke, R A

2001-03-01

101

DELIRIUM: IS SLEEP IMPORTANT?  

PubMed Central

Delirium and poor sleep quality are common and often co-exist in hospitalized patients. A link between these disorders has been hypothesized but whether this link is a cause and effect relationship or simply an association resulting from shared mechanisms is yet to be determined. Potential shared mechanisms include: abnormalities of neurotransmitters, tissue ischemia, inflammation, and sedative exposure. Sedatives, while decreasing sleep latency, often cause a decrease in slow wave sleep and stage REM sleep and therefore may not provide the same restorative properties as natural sleep. Mechanical ventilation, an important cause of sleep disruption in ICU patients, may lead to sleep disruption not only from the discomfort of the endotracheal tube but also as a result of ineffective respiratory efforts and by inducing central apnea events if not properly adjusted for the patient’s physiologic needs. When possible, efforts should be made to optimize the patient-ventilator interaction to minimize sleep disruptions. PMID:23040286

Watson, Paula L.; Ceriana, Piero; Fanfulla, Francesco

2012-01-01

102

Disrupted Sleep and Delayed Recovery from Chronic Peripheral Neuropathy are Distinct Phenotypes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background Sleep apnea, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and obesity are features of metabolic syndrome associated with decreased restorative sleep and increased pain. These traits are relevant for anesthesiology because they confer increased risks of a negative anesthetic outcome. This study tested the one-tailed hypothesis that rats bred for low intrinsic aerobic capacity have enhanced nociception and disordered sleep. Methods Rats were from a breeding strategy that selected for low aerobic capacity runners (LCR) and high aerobic capacity runners (HCR). Four different phenotypes were quantified. Rats (n=12) underwent von Frey sensory testing, thermal nociceptive testing (n=12), electrographic recordings of sleep and wakefulness (n=16), and thermal nociceptive testing before and for six weeks after a unilateral chronic neuropathy of the sciatic nerve (n=14). Results Paw withdrawal latency to a thermal nociceptive stimulus was significantly (P<0.01) less in LCR than HCR rats. There were significant differences in sleep. LCR rats spent significantly (P<0.01) more time awake (18%) and less time in non-rapid eye movement sleep (?19%) than HCR rats. Non-rapid eye movement sleep episodes were of shorter duration (?34%) in LCR than HCR rats. Rapid eye movement sleep of LCR rats was significantly more fragmented than Rapid eye movement sleep of HCR rats. LCR rats required two weeks longer than HCR rats to recover from peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions Rodents with low aerobic capacity exhibit features homologous to human metabolic syndrome. This rodent model offers a novel tool for characterizing the mechanisms through which low aerobic function and obesity might confer increased risks for anesthesia. PMID:20938334

Muncey, Aaron R.; Saulles, Adam R.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

2010-01-01

103

Neuroimmunologic aspects of sleep and sleep loss  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complex and intimate interactions between the sleep and immune systems have been the focus of study for several years. Immune factors, particularly the interleukins, regulate sleep and in turn are altered by sleep and sleep deprivation. The sleep-wake cycle likewise regulates normal functioning of the immune system. Although a large number of studies have focused on the relationship between the immune system and sleep, relatively few studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on immune parameters. Studies of sleep deprivation's effects are important for several reasons. First, in the 21st century, various societal pressures require humans to work longer and sleep less. Sleep deprivation is becoming an occupational hazard in many industries. Second, to garner a greater understanding of the regulatory effects of sleep on the immune system, one must understand the consequences of sleep deprivation on the immune system. Significant detrimental effects on immune functioning can be seen after a few days of total sleep deprivation or even several days of partial sleep deprivation. Interestingly, not all of the changes in immune physiology that occur as a result of sleep deprivation appear to be negative. Numerous medical disorders involving the immune system are associated with changes in the sleep-wake physiology--either being caused by sleep dysfunction or being exacerbated by sleep disruption. These disorders include infectious diseases, fibromyalgia, cancers, and major depressive disorder. In this article, we will describe the relationships between sleep physiology and the immune system, in states of health and disease. Interspersed will be proposals for future research that may illuminate the clinical relevance of the relationships between sleeping, sleep loss and immune function in humans. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

Rogers, N. L.; Szuba, M. P.; Staab, J. P.; Evans, D. L.; Dinges, D. F.

2001-01-01

104

Is Nocturnal Panic a Distinct Disease Category? Comparison of Clinical Characteristics among Patients with Primary Nocturnal Panic, Daytime Panic, and Coexistence of Nocturnal and Daytime Panic  

PubMed Central

Objective: Many patients with panic disorder (PD) experience nocturnal panic attacks. We investigated the differences in demographic variables and symptom characteristics as well as response to treatment among patients with primary day panic (DP), primary nocturnal panic (NP), and the coexistence of DP and NP (DP/NP), and discuss whether NP is a distinct disease category. Method: One hundred one consecutive untreated patients with PD were enrolled and subsequently divided into the NP, DP, and DP/NP groups. The presence of 13 panic attack symptom items as well as scores on the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were compared among the groups. After 3 months of regular treatment, PDSS scores were assessed again to evaluate treatment response. Results: Nocturnal panic attacks of the participants were mostly reported to occur in the first tertile of nocturnal sleep. The number of males, onset age, and presence of choking sensation were significantly higher, and the PDSS score was significantly lower in the NP group compared with the other groups. The DP/NP group showed the highest PDSS score, and participants in this group were prescribed the highest doses of medication among all groups. Only diagnostic sub-category was significantly associated with treatment response. The total score for PDSS and PSQI correlated significantly only in the NP group. Conclusions: DP/NP could be a severe form of PD, while primary NP could be a relatively mild subcategory that may partially share common pathophysiology with adult type night terror. Citation: Nakamura M; Sugiura T; Nishida S; Komada Y; Inoue Y. Is nocturnal panic a distinct disease category? Comparison of clinical characteristics among patients with primary nocturnal panic, daytime panic, and coexistence of nocturnal and daytime panic. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(5):461-467. PMID:23674937

Nakamura, Masaki; Sugiura, Tatsuki; Nishida, Shingo; Komada, Yoko; Inoue, Yuichi

2013-01-01

105

Sleep and Sleep Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death in the US. Numerous studies have demonstrated that sleep disturbances are common in COPD patients, with more prominent complaints in patients with more severe disease and with increasing age. Sleep disturbances may occur due to the effects of breathing abnormalities on sleep and sleep disruption. However, other

Nancy Collop

2010-01-01

106

The association of quality of life with potentially remediable disruptions of circadian sleep/activity rhythms in patients with advanced lung cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Cancer patients routinely develop symptoms consistent with profound circadian disruption, which causes circadian disruption diminished quality of life. This study was initiated to determine the relationship between the severity of potentially remediable cancer-associated circadian disruption and quality of life among patients with advanced lung cancer. Methods We concurrently investigated the relationship between the circadian rhythms of 84 advanced lung cancer patients and their quality of life outcomes as measured by the EORTC QLQ C30 and Ferrans and Powers QLI. The robustness and stability of activity/sleep circadian daily rhythms were measured by actigraphy. Fifty three of the patients in the study were starting their definitive therapy following diagnosis and thirty one patients were beginning second-line therapy. Among the patients who failed prior therapy, the median time between completing definitive therapy and baseline actigraphy was 4.3 months, (interquartile range 2.1 to 9.8 months). Results We found that circadian disruption is universal and severe among these patients compared to non-cancer-bearing individuals. We found that each of these patient's EORTC QLQ C30 domain scores revealed a compromised capacity to perform the routine activities of daily life. The severity of several, but not all, EORTC QLQ C30 symptom items correlate strongly with the degree of individual circadian disruption. In addition, the scores of all four Ferrans/Powers QLI domains correlate strongly with the degree of circadian disruption. Although Ferrans/Powers QLI domain scores show that cancer and its treatment spared these patients' emotional and psychological health, the QLI Health/Function domain score revealed high levels of patients' dissatisfaction with their health which is much worse when circadian disruption is severe. Circadian disruption selectively affects specific Quality of Life domains, such as the Ferrans/Powers Health/Function domain, and not others, such as EORTC QLQ C30 Physical Domain. Conclusions These data suggest the testable possibility that behavioral, hormonal and/or light-based strategies to improve circadian organization may help patients suffering from advanced lung cancer to feel and function better. PMID:21605390

2011-01-01

107

Sleep and Epilepsy: Strange Bedfellows No More  

PubMed Central

Ancient philosophers and theologians believed that altered consciousness freed the mind to prophesy the future, equating sleep with seizures. Only recently has the bidirectional influences of epilepsy and sleep upon one another received more substantive analysis. This article reviews the complex and increasingly recognized interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy. NREM sleep differentially activates interictal epileptiform discharges during slow wave (N3) sleep, while ictal seizure events occur more frequently during light NREM stages N1 and N2. The most commonly encountered types of sleep-related epilepsies (those with preferential occurrence during sleep or following arousal) include frontal and temporal lobe partial epilepsies in adults, and benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (benign rolandic epilepsy) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in children and adolescents. Comorbid sleep disorders are frequent in patients with epilepsy, particularly obstructive sleep apnea in refractory epilepsy patients which may aggravate seizure burden, while treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure often improves seizure frequency. Distinguishing nocturnal events such as NREM parasomnias (confusional arousals, sleep walking, and night terrors), REM parasomnias including REM sleep behavior disorder, and nocturnal seizures if frequently difficult and benefits from careful history taking and video-EEG-polysomnography in selected cases. Differentiating nocturnal seizures from primary sleep disorders is essential for determining appropriate therapy, and recognizing co-existent sleep disorders in patients with epilepsy may improve their seizure burden and quality of life. PMID:23539488

St. Louis, Erik K.

2012-01-01

108

Sleep Disorders in Atypical Parkinsonism.  

PubMed

Sleep disorders are commonly seen in atypical parkinsonism, with particular disorders occurring more frequently in specific parkinsonian disorders. Multiple systems atrophy (MSA) is a synucleinopathy often associated with nocturnal stridor which is a serious, but treatable condition highly specific to MSA. In addition, this disorder is strongly associated with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is also seen in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). RBD is far less prevalent in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), which is a tauopathy. Insomnia and impaired sleep architecture are the most common sleep abnormalities seen in PSP. Corticobasilar degeneration (CBD) is also a tauopathy, but has far fewer sleep complaints associated with it than PSP. In this manuscript we review the spectrum of sleep dysfunction across the atypical parkinsonian disorders, emphasize the importance of evaluating for sleep disorders in patients with parkinsonian symptoms, and point to sleep characteristics that can provide diagnostic clues to the underlying parkinsonian disorder. PMID:24955381

Abbott, Sabra M; Videnovic, Aleksandar

2014-06-01

109

Role of adenosine and wake-promoting basal forebrain in insomnia and associated sleep disruptions caused by ethanol dependence  

PubMed Central

Insomnia is a severe symptom of alcohol withdrawal; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is yet unknown. We hypothesized that chronic ethanol exposure will impair BF adenosinergic mechanism resulting in insomnia-like symptoms. We performed a series of experiments in Sprague-Dawley rats to test our hypothesis. We used Majchrowicz’s chronic binge ethanol protocol to induce ethanol dependency. Our first experiment verified the effects of ethanol withdrawal on sleep-wakefulness. Significant increase in wakefulness was observed during ethanol withdrawal. Next, we examined c-Fos expression (marker of neuronal activation) in BF wake-promoting neurons during ethanol withdrawal. There was a significant increase in the number of BF wake-promoting neurons with c-Fos immunoreactivity. Our third experiment examined the effects of ethanol withdrawal on sleep deprivation induced increase in BF adenosine levels. Sleep deprivation did not increase BF adenosine levels in ethanol dependent rats. Our last experiment examined the effects of ethanol withdrawal on equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) and A1 receptor (A1R) expression in the BF. There was a significant reduction in the A1R and ENT1 expression in the BF of ethanol dependent rats. Based on these results, we suggest that insomnia observed during ethanol withdrawal is caused due to impaired adenosinergic mechanism in the BF. PMID:20807311

Sharma, Rishi; Engemann, Samuel; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M.

2010-01-01

110

Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria  

MedlinePLUS

About Bone Marrow Failure Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) PNH is a rare and serious blood disease that causes red blood cells to break apart. Doctors call this breaking apart " hemolysis ". It ...

111

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND NOCTURNAL CARDIAC AUTONOMIC ACTIVITY IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the present study was to explore the association between Parkinson’s disease (PD) clinical characteristics and cardiac autonomic control across sleep stages. Methods Frequency-domain heart rate variability (HRV) measures were estimated in 18 PD patients undergoing a night of polysomnography. Results Significant relationships were found between PD severity and nocturnal HRV indices. The associations were restricted to rapid eye movement (R) sleep. Conclusions The progressive nocturnal cardiac autonomic impairment occurring with more severe PD can be subclinical emerging only during conditions requiring active modulation of physiological functions such as R-sleep. PMID:23141523

Covassin, Naima; Neikrug, Ariel B.; Liu, Lianqi; Maglione, Jeanne; Natarajan, Loki; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Loredo, Jose S.; Palmer, Barton W.; Redwine, Laura S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

2012-01-01

112

Sleep Problems, Sleepiness and Daytime Behavior in Preschool-Age Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Sleep problems are a common complaint of parents of preschool children. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders have even more disrupted sleep than typically developing children. Although disrupted nighttime sleep has been reported to affect daytime behavior, the pathway from sleep disruption to sleep problems, to impairments in…

Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Tang, Karen; Liu, Jingyi; Anders, Thomas F.

2009-01-01

113

Assessment Of Noise-induced Sleep Fragility In Two Age Ranges By Means Of Polysomnographic Microstructure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The microstructure of sleep, which translates the short-lived fluctuations of the arousal level, is a commonly neglected feature in polysomnographic studies. Specifically arranged microstructural EEG events may provide important information on the dynamic characteristics of the sleep process. CAP (cyclic alternating pattern) and non-CAP are complementary modalities in which arousal-related "phasic" EEG phenomena are organized in non-REM sleep, and they correspond to opposite conditions of unstable and stable sleep depth, respectively. Thus, arousal instability can be measured by the CAP rate, the percentage ratio of total CAP time to total non-REM sleep time. The CAP rate, an age-related physiological variable that increases in several pathological conditions, is highly sensitive to acoustic perturbation. In the present study, two groups of healthy subjects without complaints about sleep, belonging to different age ranges (six young adults, three males and three females, between 20 and 30 years, and six middle-aged individuals, three males and three females, between 40 and 55 years) slept, after adaptation to the sleep laboratory, in a random sequence for two non-consecutive nights either under silent baseline (27·3 dB(A) Lcq) or noise-disturbed (continuous 55 dB(A) white noise) conditions. Age-related and noise-related effects on traditional sleep parameters and on the CAP rate were statistically evaluated by a split-plot test. Compared to young adults, the middle-aged individuals showed a significant reduction of total sleep time, stage 2 and REM sleep and significantly higher values of nocturnal awakenings and the CAP rate. The noisy nights were characterized by similar alterations. The disruptive effects of acoustic perturbation were greater on the more fragile sleep architecture of the older group. The increased fragility of sleep associated with aging probably reflects the decreased capacity of the sleeping brain to maintain steady states of vigilance. Total non-REM sleep described by traditional parameters was statistically unaffected during the disturbed nights, but the perturbing effects of noise on non-REM sleep stability and continuity were revealed by a significant increase in the CAP rate. The perspectives for a wide-ranging exploitation of this sleep parameter are discussed.

Terzano, M. G.; Parrino, L.; Spaggiari, M. C.; Buccino, G. P.; Fioriti, G.; Depoortere, H.

1993-04-01

114

[Idiopathic nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy--an unusual epilepsy syndrome].  

PubMed

This paper provides an overview of the development of conceptions about nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy syndrome and describes the electro-clinical characteristics, the identity of the genetic and sporadic variant, and the relationship of the EEG and clinical signs with NREM sleep specific features. The differential diagnostic difficulties and open questions on the pathomechanism are emphasized especially in relation with the lack of epileptiform EEG signs, circumscribed seizure onset zone and cognitive deficits. The relationship of frontal automatisms and NREM parasomnias are also discussed in relation of the place of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy among other epilepsies. PMID:17987731

Halász, Péter; Szucs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna

2007-09-30

115

Associations of PM10 with Sleep and Sleep-disordered Breathing in Adults from Seven U.S. Urban Areas  

PubMed Central

Rationale: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), the recurrent episodic disruption of normal breathing during sleep, affects as much as 17% of U.S. adults, and may be more prevalent in poor urban environments. SDB and air pollution have been linked to increased cardiovascular diseases and mortality, but the association between pollution and SDB is poorly understood. Objectives: We used data from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS), a U.S. multicenter cohort study assessing cardiovascular and other consequences of SDB, to examine whether particulate air matter less than 10 ?m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) was associated with SDB among persons 39 years of age and older. Methods: Using baseline data from SHHS urban sites, outcomes included the following: the respiratory disturbance index (RDI); percentage of sleep time at less than 90% O2 saturation; and sleep efficiency, measured by overnight in-home polysomnography. We applied a fixed-effect model containing a city effect, controlling for potential predictors. In all models we included both the 365-day moving averages of PM10 and temperature (long-term effects) and the differences between the daily measures of these two predictors and their 365-day average (short-term effects). Measurements and Main Results: In summer, increases in RDI or percentage of sleep time at less than 90% O2 saturation, and decreases in sleep efficiency, were all associated with increases in short-term variation in PM10. Over all seasons, we found that increased RDI was associated with an 11.5% (95% confidence interval: 1.96, 22.01) increase per interquartile range increase (25.5°F) in temperature. Conclusions: Reduction in air pollution exposure may decrease the severity of SDB and nocturnal hypoxemia and may improve cardiac risk. PMID:20508218

Zanobetti, Antonella; Redline, Susan; Schwartz, Joel; Rosen, Dennis; Patel, Sanjay; O'Connor, George T.; Lebowitz, Michael; Coull, Brent A.; Gold, Diane R.

2010-01-01

116

Daytime micro-naps in a nocturnal migrant: an EEG analysis  

PubMed Central

Many species of typically diurnal songbirds experience sleep loss during the migratory seasons owing to their nocturnal migrations. However, despite substantial loss of sleep, nocturnally migrating songbirds continue to function normally with no observable effect on their behaviour. It is unclear if and how avian migrants compensate for sleep loss. Recent behavioural evidence suggests that some species may compensate for lost night-time sleep with short, uni- and bilateral ‘micro-naps’ during the day. We provide electrophysiological evidence that short episodes of sleep-like daytime behaviour (approx. 12?s) are accompanied by sleep-like changes in brain activity in an avian migrant. Furthermore, we present evidence that part of this physiological brain response manifests itself as unihemispheric sleep, a state during which one brain hemisphere is asleep while the other hemisphere remains essentially awake. Episodes of daytime sleep may represent a potent adaptation to the challenges of avian migration and offer a plausible explanation for the resilience to sleep loss in nocturnal migrants. PMID:18990656

Fuchs, T.; Maury, D.; Moore, F.R.; Bingman, V.P.

2008-01-01

117

Effect of Ship Noise on Sleep  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of a steady sound level of 65 dB(A) from a diesel ship engine on nocturnal sleep were studied using polygraphic and subjective sleep parameters. Three healthy men, aged 29 to 33 years, participated in the experiment. Sleep polygrams and the sound level in a sleep laboratory were recorded for each subject for five exposure nights and five control nights. The following morning, the subjects answered a self-rating sleep questionnaire (called the OSA) and underwent simple reaction time tests. The percentage of S2, SREM latency and the REM interval increased, while %SREM decreased during the noise-exposed nights as compared with corresponding values on the control nights. Other parameters of sleep EEG were unchanged. Five scale scores for OSA, sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling and sleep initiation deteriorated significantly on the noise-exposed nights as compared with the control nights. Canonical discriminant analysis was conducted using 19 sleep parameters. The standard partial regression coefficients of %SREM, %S2 and %S1 were somewhat higher than other parameters. It was suggested that exposure to the 65 dB(A) ship noise exerted adverse effects on nocturnal sleep, subjectively and in part polygraphically (REM sleep and shallow sleep).

Tamura, Y.; Kawada, T.; Sasazawa, Y.

1997-08-01

118

Nocturnal intermittent hemodialysis.  

PubMed

Preemptive renal transplantation is the method of choice for end stage renal disease in childhood and adolescence. However, without preemptive transplantation, waiting time for kidney transplantation might exceed several years. The poor quality of life and the extremely high morbidity and mortality rates of dialysis patients have led to the development of intensified hemodialysis programs in which the modes of dialysis (short daily, nocturnal intermittent or daily nocturnal) are different. Such programs have been shown to significantly improve several uremia-associated parameters, such as blood pressure, phosphate control, anemia and growth retardation, in both adult and pediatric (children and adolescents) patients and lead to a reduction in medications, including phosphate binders, erythropoietin and antihypertensive agents. Fluid limitations and dietary restrictions can also be lifted. With respect to psychosocial rehabilitation and quality of life, nocturnal intermittent dialysis programs provide a reasonable compromise of all forms of intensified programs. Experiences and practical approaches of our own in-center nocturnal intermittent hemodialysis program in the light of the recent publications are described in this review. PMID:25103600

Thumfart, Julia; Müller, Dominik

2014-08-01

119

Pathophysiology of Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essential feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in chil- dren is increased upper airway resistance during sleep. Airway narrowing may be due to craniofacial abnormalities and\\/or soft tissue hypertrophy. The resultant breathing patterns during sleep are highly variable, but include obstructive cycling, in- creased respiratory effort, flow limitation, tachypnea, and\\/or gas exchange abnormalities. Consequently, sleep disruption occurs, ranging from

Eliot S. Katz; Carolyn M. D'Ambrosio

2008-01-01

120

Parasomnias and nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE): lights and shadows--controversial points in the differential diagnosis.  

PubMed

Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is characterized by seizures with complex, often bizarre, violent behaviour arising only or mainly during sleep. These unusual seizures and their occurrence during sleep are often accompanied by normal EEG tracings and neuroradiological findings, making it difficult to distinguish NFLE seizures from other non-epileptic nocturnal paroxysmal events, namely parasomnias. NFLE was described for the first time in 1981, but, as its epileptic origin was controversial, the condition was called nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia. Even though many aspects of parasomnias and NFLE have been clarified in the last two decades, the problem of differential diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians. This paper discusses some controversial points still under debate. The difficulties in distinguishing nocturnal epileptic seizures from parasomnias reflect just one aspect of the intriguing issue of the pathophysiological relationships between all types of paroxysmal motor behaviours during sleep. PMID:22136895

Bisulli, Francesca; Vignatelli, Luca; Provini, Federica; Leta, Chiara; Lugaresi, Elio; Tinuper, Paolo

2011-12-01

121

Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*  

PubMed Central

Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

2013-01-01

122

Circadian and melatonin disruption by exposure to light at night drives intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major impediment to successful treatment of breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical evidence links resistance to antiestrogen drugs in breast cancer cells with the overexpression and/or activation of various pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian rhythms by night shift work or disturbed sleep-wake cycles may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer and other diseases. Moreover, light exposure at night (LEN) suppresses the nocturnal production of melatonin that inhibits breast cancer growth. In this study, we used a rat model of estrogen receptor (ER?(+)) MCF-7 tumor xenografts to demonstrate how altering light/dark cycles with dim LEN (dLEN) speed the development of breast tumors, increasing their metabolism and growth and conferring an intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy. These characteristics were not observed in animals in which the circadian melatonin rhythm was not disrupted, or in animals subjected to dLEN if they received nocturnal melatonin replacement. Strikingly, our results also showed that melatonin acted both as a tumor metabolic inhibitor and a circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to tamoxifen and tumor regression. Together, our findings show how dLEN-mediated disturbances in nocturnal melatonin production can render tumors insensitive to tamoxifen. PMID:25062775

Dauchy, Robert T; Xiang, Shulin; Mao, Lulu; Brimer, Samantha; Wren, Melissa A; Yuan, Lin; Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Hauch, Adam; Frasch, Tripp; Rowan, Brian G; Blask, David E; Hill, Steven M

2014-08-01

123

Comparison of Subjective and Objective Assessments of Sleep in Healthy Older Subjects Without Sleep Complaints  

PubMed Central

Summary Older adults have reduced sleep quality compared to younger adults when sleeping at habitual times, and greater sleep disruption when their sleep is at adverse times. The purpose of this analysis was to investigate how subjective measures of sleep relate to objectively-recorded sleep in older subjects scheduled to sleep at all times of day. We analyzed data from 24 healthy older (55–74 years) subjects who took part in a 32-day inpatient study where polysomnography (PSG) was recorded each night and subjective sleep was assessed after each scheduled wake time. The study included baseline nights and a forced desynchrony (FD) protocol when the subjects lived on a 20-hr rest-activity schedule. Our post-sleep questionnaire both included quantitative and qualitative questions about the prior sleep. Under baseline and FD conditions, objective and subjective sleep latency were correlated, subjective sleep duration was related to slow wave sleep and wake after sleep onset, subjective sleep quality was related to Stage 1 and 2 sleep, and sleepiness and refreshment at wake time were related to duration of premature awakening. During FD, most measures of objective and subjective sleep varied with circadian phase, and many additional correlations between objective and subjective sleep were present. Our findings show that when sleeping at habitual times, these healthy older subjects did not perceive their generally poor sleep quality, but under FD conditions where sleep quality changed from day-to-day their subjective sleep ratings were more associated with their objective sleep. PMID:19645969

O’Donnell, Deirdre; Silva, Edward J.; Munch, Mirjam; Ronda, Joseph M.; Wang, Wei; Duffy, Jeanne F.

2010-01-01

124

Sleep and respiration in microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sleep studies conducted during the STS-90 Neurolab mission are explored. The relationship between sleep, melatonin, and circadian phase is reviewed. The study contained both sleep and awake components. The objectives of the sleep component were to test five hypotheses: that circadian rhythms of core body temperature and urinary melatonin are synchronized to required sleep-wake schedules, that spaceflight results in substantial disruption of sleep, that the pattern of chest and abdominal wall motion alters during the different sleep stages in microgravity, that arterial oxygen saturation is reduced during some stages of sleep in microgravity, and that pre-sleep administration of melatonin during microgravity results in improved sleep quality. The awake component tested three hypotheses: that ventilatory response to carbon dioxide is increased during exposure to microgravity and that this exacerbates sleep disruption, that ventilatory response to hypoxia is increased by exposure to microgravity, and that the improved sleep resulting from the pre-sleep administration of melatonin enhances next day cognition when compared to placebo.

Prisk, G. K.

1998-01-01

125

Obstructive sleep apnea is more common than central sleep apnea in methadone maintenance patients with subjective sleep complaints  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesOpioid-dependent patients treated with methadone have subjective sleep complaints and disrupted sleep on polysomnography (PSG). Previous studies of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in this population have focused on central sleep apnea (CSA). Our objectives were to: (1) characterize obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and CSA in patients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for opioid dependence; (2) examine factors associated with SDB in

Katherine M. Sharkey; Megan E. Kurth; Bradley J. Anderson; Richard P. Corso; Richard P. Millman; Michael D. Stein

2010-01-01

126

Prolonged sleep fragmentation of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide  

PubMed Central

Background Sleep disruption is a frequent occurrence in modern society. Whereas many studies have focused on the consequences of total sleep deprivation, few have investigated the condition of sleep disruption. New Method We disrupted sleep of mice during the light period for 9 consecutive days using an intermittently-rotating disc. Results Electroencephalogram (EEG) data demonstrated that non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was severely fragmented and REM sleep was essentially abolished during the 12 h light period. During the dark period, when sleep was not disrupted, neither NREM sleep nor REM sleep times differed from control values. Analysis of the EEG revealed a trend for increased power in the peak frequency of the NREM EEG spectra during the dark period. The fragmentation protocol was not overly stressful as body weights and water consumption remained unchanged, and plasma corticosterone did not differ between mice subjected to 3 or 9 days of sleep disruption and home cage controls. However, mice subjected to 9 days of sleep disruption by this method responded to lipopolysaccharide with an exacerbated febrile response. Comparison with existing methods Existing methods to disrupt sleep of laboratory rodents often subject the animal to excessive locomotion, vibration, or sudden movements. This method does not suffer from any of these confounds. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prolonged sleep disruption of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide. This device provides a method to determine mechanisms by which chronic insufficient sleep contributes to the etiology of many pathologies, particularly those with an inflammatory component. PMID:23872243

Ringgold, Kristyn M.; Barf, R. Paulien; George, Amrita; Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

2013-01-01

127

Choking at Night: A Case of Opercular Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy  

PubMed Central

Frontal lobe seizures have a tendency to occur in sleep and in most cases occur exclusively in sleep; these individuals are said to have nocturnal frontal lobe (NFLE). NFLE can be difficult to distinguish clinically from various other sleep disorders, particularly parasomnias, which also present with paroxysmal motor activity in sleep. Interictal and ictal EEG findings are frequently unremarkable or nonspecific in both parasomnias and NFLE making the diagnosis even more difficult. Nocturnal epilepsy should be suspected in patients with paroxysmal events at night characterized by high frequency, repetition, extrapyramidal features, and marked stereotypy of attacks. Here we present a 13-year-old female who was extensively worked up for choking episodes at night. On repeat video EEG she was found to have frontal opercular seizures. Once on Carbamazepine, her seizures completely resolved. PMID:24383033

Rathore, Geetanjali; Larsen, Paul; Parakh, Manish; Fernandez, Cristina

2013-01-01

128

Treating nocturnal enuresis in children in primary care.  

PubMed

Nocturnal enuresis is defined as involuntary wetting while asleep at least twice a week in children over the age of five. Primary nocturnal enuresis describes those children who have always been wet. Secondary nocturnal enuresis is defined as a relapse after a child has been completely dry for at least six months. Up to the age of nine years, nocturnal enuresis is twice as common in boys than girls but thereafter there is no sex difference in prevalence. At the age of five, 2% of children wet every night, and 1% are still wetting every night in their late teens. Bedwetting is not primarily caused by an underlying psychological disorder However, psychological problems and life events can exacerbate or precipitate bedwetting in susceptible children who have a genetic basis for their condition. The three systems approach to the management of the condition addresses: poor arousal from sleep, nocturnal polyuria and bladder dysfunction. Bedwetting is occasionally caused by underlying medical conditions; primarily urological, neurological, or metabolic. It can also be associated with obstructive sleep apnoea. However, these causes are uncommon in primary enuresis. A basic history and examination should exclude these conditions. If the bedwetting has started in the past few days or weeks, systemic illness should be considered e.g. UTI, diabetes mellitus. With secondary enuresis, symptoms or signs of medical and psychological conditions or life events may be elicited as possible causes, and may need separate treatment. Alarm treatment should be considered in any child over seven. The alarm takes several weeks to be effective and needs commitment from both child and carers. Desmopressin may be used as first-line treatment if rapid onset and/or short-term improvement is the priority of treatment or an alarm is inappropriate or undesirable. PMID:21776914

Bottomley, Gordon

2011-06-01

129

Experimental Pain and Opioid Analgesia in Volunteers at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea  

PubMed Central

Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. Methods After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml), an ?-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. Results Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA) were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO2, P?=?0.0440; IGFBP-1, P?=?0.0013). Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1?, P?=?0.0218; TNF-?, P?=?0.0276). Conclusions Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1) was associated with hypoalgesia and increased potency to opioid analgesia; other pro-inflammatory mediators also predicted an enhanced opioid potency. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00672737. PMID:23382975

Doufas, Anthony G.; Tian, Lu; Padrez, Kevin A.; Suwanprathes, Puntarica; Cardell, James A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Panousis, Periklis

2013-01-01

130

Behavioral Treatment for Nocturnal Enuresis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nocturnal enuresis is one of the most prevalent and distressing of all childhood problems. The treatment of nocturnal enuresis has shifted in the past few decades from a strictly psychopathological perspective to a biobehavioral perspective. Although the primary clinical features of this disorder are medical/organic, there is currently strong…

Friman, Patrick C.; Jones, Kevin M.

2005-01-01

131

Sickle Cell Anemia: Iron Availability and Nocturnal Oximetry  

PubMed Central

Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that low iron availability, measured as transferrin saturation, is associated with low nocturnal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2) in children with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA; hemoglobin SS). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of Tanzanian children with SCA who were not receiving regular blood transfusions. Thirty-two children (16 boys) with SCA (mean age 8.0, range 3.6-15.3 years) underwent motion-resistant nocturnal oximetry (Masimo Radical) and had steady state serum transferrin saturation and hematological indices assessed. Results: Higher transferrin saturation, adjusted for age and ?-thalassemia deletion, was associated with lower nocturnal mean SpO2 (p = 0.013, r2 = 0.41), number of SpO2 dips/h > 3% from baseline (p = 0.008, r2 = 0.19) and with min/h with SpO2 < 90% (p = 0.026 r2 = 0.16). Transferrin saturation < 16% (indicative of iron deficiency) was associated with a 2.2% higher nocturnal mean SpO2. Conclusions: Contrary to our hypothesis, higher iron availability, assessed by transferrin saturation, is associated with nocturnal chronic and intermittent hemoglobin oxygen desaturation in SCA. Whether these associations are causal and are driven by hypoxia-inducible factor and hepcidin-mediated upregulation of demand for iron warrants further investigation. Citation: Cox SE; L'Esperance V; Makani J; Soka D; Prentice AM; Hill CM; Kirkham FJ. Sickle cell anemia: iron availability and nocturnal oximetry. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(5):541-545. PMID:23066366

Cox, Sharon E.; L'Esperance, Veline; Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratius; Prentice, Andrew M.; Hill, Catherine M.; Kirkham, Fenella J.

2012-01-01

132

Sleep disturbances in eating disorders: a review.  

PubMed

Psychiatric disorders are frequently associated with disturbances of sleep and circadian rhythms. This review focus on the relationship between sleep disturbances and eating disorders. In the first part are discussed the presence of sleep disorders among patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, the macrostructure and microstructure of theirs sleep, the differences between the various subtypes in ED patients, the dreams of eating disordered patients and their recurrent contents. In the second part, there are treated sleep disturbances in binge eating disorder and other eating disorders not otherwise specified, such as nocturnal (night) eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder. In the third part, there are presented data concerning the neurobiological and neuroendocrinological correlates between feeding, metabolism, weight restoration and the processes regulating sleep. In conclusion, possible future investigations are proposed. PMID:22262340

Cinosi, E; Di Iorio, G; Acciavatti, T; Cornelio, M; Vellante, F; De Risio, L; Martinotti, G

2011-01-01

133

Effects of Salmeterol on Sleeping Oxygen Saturation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Sleep is associated with important adverse effects in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), such as disturbed sleep quality and gas exchange, including hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The effects of inhaled long-acting ?2-agonist therapy (LABA) on these disturbances are unclear. Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of inhaled salmeterol on nocturnal sleeping arterial oxygen

Silke Ryan; Liam S. Doherty; Clare Rock; Geraldine M. Nolan; Walter T. McNicholas

2010-01-01

134

Sleep Related Breathing Disorders in Adults with Down Syndrome.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated sleep-related breathing disorders in six adults with Down syndrome. Five were found to have respiratory events justifying the diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome. Results suggest that the nocturnal respiratory pattern of adults with Down syndrome depends on several pathogenetic factors such as age, severity of upper airway…

Resta, Onofrio; Barbaro, Maria Pia Foschino; Giliberti, Tiziana; Caratozzolo, Gennaro; Cagnazzo, Maria Grazia; Scarpelli, Franco; Nocerino, Maria Cristina

2003-01-01

135

A new model of chronic intermittent hypoxia in humans: effect on ventilation, sleep, and blood pressure  

PubMed Central

Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repetitive nocturnal upper airway obstructions that are associated with sleep disruption and cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) The cyclic oscillations in O2 saturation are thought to contribute to cardiovascular and other morbidity, but animal and patient studies of the pathogenic link between CIH and these diseases have been complicated by species differences and by the effects of confounding factors such as obesity, hypertension, and impaired glucose metabolism. To minimize these limitations, we set up a model of nocturnal CIH in healthy humans. We delivered O2 for 15 s every 2 min during sleep while subjects breathed 13% O2 in a hypoxic tent to create 30 cycles/h of cyclic desaturation-reoxygenation [saturation of peripheral O2 (SpO2) range: 95–85%]. We exposed subjects overnight for 8–9 h/day for 2 wk (10 subjects) and 4 wk (8 subjects). CIH exposure induced respiratory disturbances (central apnea hypopnea index: 3.0 ± 1.9 to 31.1 ± 9.6 events/h of sleep at 2 wk). Exposure to CIH for 14 days induced an increase in slopes of hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses (1.5 ± 0.6 to 3.1 ± 1.2 l·min?1·% drop in SpO2 and 2.2 ± 1.0 to 3.3 ± 0.9 l·min?1·mmHg CO2?1, respectively), consistent with hypoxic acclimatization. Waking normoxic arterial pressure increased significantly at 2 wk at systolic (114 ± 2 to 122 ± 2 mmHg) and for diastolic at 4 wk (71 ± 1.3 to 74 ± 1.7 mmHg). We propose this model as a new technique to study the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of CIH in human volunteers. PMID:19228987

Tamisier, R.; Gilmartin, G. S.; Launois, S. H.; Pépin, J. L.; Nespoulet, H.; Thomas, R.; Lévy, P.; Weiss, J. W.

2009-01-01

136

Ambulatory polysomnography for the assessment of sleep bruxism.  

PubMed

Ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) is introduced as a new method for assessing sleep bruxism. Nocturnal recordings of masseter electromyography (EMG), electro-encephalography, electro-oculography, electrocardiography, thoracic effort and body position allow for the detection of typical nocturnal masseter activity as well as the determination of sleep stages. Twelve patients with a clinical diagnosis of bruxism were assessed with the ambulatory PSG, all of them fulfilled diagnostic PSG criteria according to Kato et al. (Dent Clin North Am. 2001; 45: 657-684). Per hour of sleep patients showed 34.2 (+/-10.6) EMG bursts and 5.6 (+/-1.3) sleep bruxism episodes. Because of the ability to determine sleep stages and the application in the home environment the ambulatory PSG represents a cost-saving alternative to sleep laboratory investigations that might be especially useful in field studies and clinical application. PMID:18699968

Doering, S; Boeckmann, J A; Hugger, S; Young, P

2008-08-01

137

[Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)].  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is an acquired hematopoietic stem cell disorder. The most common clinical manifestations of PNH include intravascular hemolysis, venous thrombosis, and bone marrow failure. Hematopoietic stems cells with mutant PIG-A are present in normal marrow, but they are not noticed because they have no advantage under normal circumstances. In the setting of immune-mediated bone marrow injury, such as that seen in aplastic anemia, PIG-A mutant cells are selected because they have a survival advantage based on deficiency of one or more GPI-anchored proteins. Expansion of the PIG-A-mutant clones occurs when other events that enhance the growth properties of the cells work together with the effects of the PIG-A mutation to enhance further the growth properties of the mutant cells. PMID:18330025

Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

2008-03-01

138

Nocturnal enuresis among primary school children.  

PubMed

To determine the prevalence and personal and family risk factors for nocturnal enuresis (NE) among primary school children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered, three-part structured questionnaire involving 832 school children aged 6 - 15 years between 2007 and 2008. We assessed participants' socio-demographic factors, family characteristics and factors related to the presence of NE. The mean age of the children was 11.5 (±2.7) years. The overall prevalence of NE was 28.6%, with a predominance of girls, and the prevalence decreased with increasing age (P <0.001). Factors likely to be associated with NE were pattern of sleeping (P <0.001), stressful social and psychological events (P <0.01), positive family history of enuresis (P <0.001), large family size (P >0.002) and a higher number of siblings (P = 0.01). Our findings reveal a high prevalence of NE among children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, with a higher prevalence in girls than in boys compared with the other studies. Sleep pattern, stressful life events, family history of NE, large family size and more children in the household may act as a risk factor for NE. PMID:24231492

Aljefri, Hasan Mohamed; Basurreh, Omer Abdullah; Yunus, Faisel; Bawazir, Amen Ahmed

2013-11-01

139

Tuned in Parenting and Infant Sleep Patterns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on infant sleep behaviour that is of concern to mothers of young infants, and disruptive to families. It reports on the incidence of sleep problems in dyads that self-referred to a specialist clinic, and the relationship between the mother's sensitive responsiveness and infant sleep patterns in a sample of 65 Australian infants.…

Priddis, Lynn E.

2009-01-01

140

Agreement rates for sleep/wake judgments obtained via accelerometer and sleep diary: a comparison.  

PubMed

Agreement rates for waking and sleeping obtained via sleep diary and accelerometer were evaluated, to compare the two methods. Sleep/wake data for consecutive days and nights were surveyed in 119 healthy university students. Accelerometer sleep/wake judgments obeyed the standard algorithm. Agreement rates for waking and sleeping according to accelerometer versus sleep diary, respectively, were calculated. Sleep diary data were set as a baseline. Seventy-six subjects (63.9%), 22 to 32 years of age, presented perfect data for the analysis. The mean sleep times, in minutes, judged by sleep diary and by accelerometer, were 482.3 and 629.6, respectively. The mean percentages and standard deviations of agreement on wake and sleep were 77.5% (SD = 10.2) and 86.1% (SD = 6.2), respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between the agreement rates for wake and sleep (r = -.482, p < .01). The accelerometer showed some measurement failure during waking, presumably because of the decrease in body movement. Sleep diary data during daytime appear to be more valid for detecting a sleep/wake cycle than are accelerometer data. In contrast, nocturnal sleep diary data might be supplemented by the use of an accelerometer as long as participants do not have insomnia. PMID:19001393

Kawada, Tomoyuki

2008-11-01

141

Effect of L-Dopa on the Sleep of Man  

Microsoft Academic Search

NORMAL sleep in man consists of two alternating phases which may be distinguished by electroencephalographic (EEG), electromyographic, electro-occulographic, autonomic and psychologic criteria1-3. The initial period of nocturnal sleep is characterized by EEG spindles and slow waves, partial preservation of muscle tone, and regularity of pulse and respiratory rates. After about 90 min, this non-rapid eye movement (NREM) phase of sleep

Richard J. Wyatt; Thomas N. Chase; Jimmy Scott; Frederick Snyder

1970-01-01

142

CONTROL OF SLEEP AND WAKEFULNESS  

PubMed Central

This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, resulting in large-amplitude, slow EEG oscillations. Local, activity-dependent factors modulate the amplitude and frequency of cortical slow oscillations. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep results in conservation of brain energy and facilitates memory consolidation through the modulation of synaptic weights. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep results from the interaction of brain stem cholinergic, aminergic, and GABAergic neurons which control the activity of glutamatergic reticular formation neurons leading to REM sleep phenomena such as muscle atonia, REMs, dreaming, and cortical activation. Strong activation of limbic regions during REM sleep suggests a role in regulation of emotion. Genetic studies suggest that brain mechanisms controlling waking and NREM sleep are strongly conserved throughout evolution, underscoring their enormous importance for brain function. Sleep disruption interferes with the normal restorative functions of NREM and REM sleep, resulting in disruptions of breathing and cardiovascular function, changes in emotional reactivity, and cognitive impairments in attention, memory, and decision making. PMID:22811426

Brown, Ritchie E.; Basheer, Radhika; McKenna, James T.; Strecker, Robert E.; McCarley, Robert W.

2013-01-01

143

Support Vector Machines for Automated Recognition of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome From ECG Recordings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity as well as excessive daytime sleepiness and poor quality of life. In this study, we apply a machine learning technique [support vector machines (SVMs)] for automated recognition of OSAS types from their nocturnal ECG recordings. A total of 125 sets of nocturnal ECG recordings acquired from normal subjects (OSAS- )

Ahsan H. Khandoker; Marimuthu Palaniswami; Chandan K. Karmakar

2009-01-01

144

Nocturnal plasma melatonin levels after flunitrazepam administration in healthy subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polysomnographic sleep patterns and melatonin secretion were investigated in 5 young (age 25.6±1.1 years) and 5 middle-aged (age 49.4±5.4 years) healthy male subjects after intravenous administration of 1 mg flunitrazepam and placebo in a randomized, double-blind and cross-over setting. The area under the curve (AUC) of total nocturnal melatonin plasma concentration decreased 23.3±11.5% in young subjects (P?0.05) and 39.3±5.2% in

Göran Hajak; Andrea Rodenbeck; Borwin Bandelow; Susanne Friedrichs; Gerald Huether; Eckart Rüther

1996-01-01

145

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare bone marrow failure disorder that manifests with hemolytic anemia, thrombosis, and peripheral blood cytopenias. The absence of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, CD55 and CD59, leads to uncontrolled complement activation that accounts for hemolysis and other PNH manifestations. GPI anchor protein deficiency is almost always due to somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA), a gene involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis; however, alternative mutations that cause PNH have recently been discovered. In addition, hypomorphic germ-line PIGA mutations that do not cause PNH have been shown to be responsible for a condition known as multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 2. Eculizumab, a first-in-class monoclonal antibody that inhibits terminal complement, is the treatment of choice for patients with severe manifestations of PNH. Bone marrow transplantation remains the only cure for PNH but should be reserved for patients with suboptimal response to eculizumab. PMID:25237200

Brodsky, Robert A

2014-10-30

146

[Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria].  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder of hematopoietic stem cells. PNH is related to a somatic mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIG-A), X-linked gene, responsible for a deficiency in glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-AP). The lack of one of the GPI-AP complement regulatory proteins (CD59) leads to haemolysis. The disease is diagnosed with haemolytic anemia, marrow failure or episodes of venous thrombosis. The diagnosis is based on flow cytometry, which allowed direct quantification of the GPI-AP-deficient cells. From earlier descriptions, the clinical polymorphism of PNH has been recognized by two presentations; one form, predominantly haemolytic without overt marrow failure, referred to classic PNH and the other one, with marrow failure, was often described as the aplastic anemia PNH syndrome (AA-PNH). Thromboses remain a major life threatening complication affecting outcomes in both disease subcategories. Thrombotic events are characterized by involvement of unusual sites (hepatic, mesenteric, cerebral, dermal veins). In classic PNH, recent studies have focused on inhibiting the complement cascade with encouraging clinical results using eculizumab, a C5-inhibitor humanized monoclonal antibody. Concerning the AA-PNH syndrome, bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the reference treatment in young patients with a sibling donor. Immunosuppressive therapy remains an important treatment modality in this subcategory for patients without a donor or ineligible for BMT. Recurrent thrombotic events remains even now associated with bad prognosis, whatever the form of the disease. PMID:19303177

Peffault de Latour, R; Amoura, Z; Socié, G

2010-03-01

147

Circadian and Ultradian Variations of Leptin in Normal Man under Continuous Enteral Nutrition: Relationship to Sleep and Body Temperature  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the influence of circadian rhythmicity and sleep on the 24-h leptin diurnal variations, plasma leptin levels were mea- sured at 10-min intervals over 24 h in seven normal subjects, once during nocturnal sleep, and once after an 8-h shift of sleep. The subjects were submitted to constant conditions (continuous enteral nutrition and bed rest in controlled chambers). Body

C. SIMON; C. GRONFIER; J. L. SCHLIENGER; G. BRANDENBERGER

2010-01-01

148

Efficacy and Safety of Flexible Dose Fesoterodine in Men and Women with Overactive Bladder Symptoms Including Nocturnal Urinary Urgency  

PubMed Central

Purpose Awakening from sleep to urinate is the hallmark of nocturia, a condition that impacts several facets of health related quality of life and for which current therapy is suboptimal. Given the paucity of prospective data on antimuscarinics for the management of nocturia, we investigated the efficacy and safety of flexible dose fesoterodine for the treatment of nocturnal urgency in subjects with nocturia and overactive bladder. Materials and Methods Subjects with 2 to 8 nocturnal urgency episodes per 24 hours began a 2-week, single-blind, placebo run-in followed by 1:1 randomization to 12 weeks of double-blind treatment with fesoterodine (4 mg daily for 4 weeks with an optional increase to 8 mg) or placebo using predefined criteria for nocturnal urgency episodes, nocturnal urine volume voided and total 24-hour urine volume voided. The primary end point was change from baseline to week 12 in the mean number of micturition related nocturnal urgency episodes per 24 hours. Results Overall 963 subjects were randomized from 2,990 screened, and 82% of subjects treated with fesoterodine and 84% of those treated with placebo completed the study. Significant improvements in the primary end point (?1.28 vs ?1.07), in nocturnal micturitions per 24 hours (?1.02 vs ?0.85) and in nocturnal frequency urgency sum (?4.01 vs ?3.42) were observed with fesoterodine vs placebo (all p ?0.01). Health related quality of life measures (overactive bladder questionnaire Symptom Bother ?20.1 vs ?16.5, sleep 22.3 vs 19.9 and other domains; all p <0.05) were improved with fesoterodine. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first prospective study to assess antimuscarinic efficacy for reducing nocturnal urgency. Flexible dose fesoterodine significantly reduced nocturnal urgency episodes vs placebo in subjects with overactive bladder. PMID:23159276

Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Jumadilova, Zhanna; Johnson, Theodore M.; FitzGerald, Mary P.; Carlsson, Martin; Martire, Diane L.; Malhotra, Atul

2013-01-01

149

Adult obstructive sleep apnoea  

PubMed Central

Obstructive sleep apnoea is an increasingly common disorder of repeated upper airway collapse during sleep, which leads to oxygen desaturation and disrupted sleep. Symptoms include snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleepiness. Pathogenesis varies; predisposing factors include small upper airway lumen, unstable respiratory control, low arousal threshold, small lung volume, and dysfunctional upper airway dilator muscles. Risk factors include obesity, male sex, age, menopause, fluid retention, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and smoking. Obstructive sleep apnoea causes sleepiness, road traffic accidents, and probably systemic hypertension. It has also been linked to myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and diabetes mellitus though not definitively. Continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice, with adherence of 60–70%. Bi-level positive airway pressure or adaptive servo-ventilation can be used for patients who are intolerant to continuous positive airway pressure. Other treatments include dental devices, surgery, and weight loss. PMID:23910433

Jordan, Amy S.; McSharry, David G.; Malhotra, Atul

2013-01-01

150

Multi-Modal Treatment of Nocturnal Enuresis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article reports a multimodal treatment of nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior in a mildly mentally retarded woman. Behavioral treatment and removal of caffeine from the subject's diet eliminated both nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior. (Author/DB)

Mohr, Caroline; Sharpley, Christopher F.

1988-01-01

151

Genetics Home Reference: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria  

MedlinePLUS

... have been treated for another blood disease called aplastic anemia may develop paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. How common is ... definitions help with understanding paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria? anemia ; aplastic anemia ; apoptosis ; autoimmune ; bacteria ; blood clotting ; bone marrow ; cancer ; ...

152

Sleep-Related Declarative Memory Consolidation and Verbal Replay during Sleep Talking in Patients with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine if sleep talkers with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) would utter during REM sleep sentences learned before sleep, and to evaluate their verbal memory consolidation during sleep. Methods Eighteen patients with RBD and 10 controls performed two verbal memory tasks (16 words from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test and a 220-263 word long modified Story Recall Test) in the evening, followed by nocturnal video-polysomnography and morning recall (night-time consolidation). In 9 patients with RBD, daytime consolidation (morning learning/recall, evening recall) was also evaluated with the modified Story Recall Test in a cross-over order. Two RBD patients with dementia were studied separately. Sleep talking was recorded using video-polysomnography, and the utterances were compared to the studied texts by two external judges. Results Sleep-related verbal memory consolidation was maintained in patients with RBD (+24±36% words) as in controls (+9±18%, p=0.3). The two demented patients with RBD also exhibited excellent nighttime consolidation. The post-sleep performance was unrelated to the sleep measures (including continuity, stages, fragmentation and apnea-hypopnea index). Daytime consolidation (-9±19%) was worse than night-time consolidation (+29±45%, p=0.03) in the subgroup of 9 patients with RBD. Eleven patients with RBD spoke during REM sleep and pronounced a median of 20 words, which represented 0.0003% of sleep with spoken language. A single patient uttered a sentence that was judged to be semantically (but not literally) related to the text learned before sleep. Conclusion Verbal declarative memory normally consolidates during sleep in patients with RBD. The incorporation of learned material within REM sleep-associated sleep talking in one patient (unbeknownst to himself) at the semantic level suggests a replay at a highly cognitive creative level. PMID:24349492

Uguccioni, Ginevra; Pallanca, Olivier; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Dodet, Pauline; Herlin, Bastien; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

2013-01-01

153

Nocturnal oxygen saturation profiles of healthy term infants  

PubMed Central

Objective Pulse oximetry is used extensively in hospital and home settings to measure arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). Interpretation of the trend and range of SpO2 values observed in infants is currently limited by a lack of reference ranges using current devices, and may be augmented by development of cumulative frequency (CF) reference-curves. This study aims to provide reference oxygen saturation values from a prospective longitudinal cohort of healthy infants. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Sleep-laboratory. Patients 34 healthy term infants were enrolled, and studied at 2?weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24?months of age (N=30, 25, 27, 26, 20, respectively). Interventions Full overnight polysomnography, including 2?s averaging pulse oximetry (Masimo Radical). Main outcome measurements Summary SpO2 statistics (mean, median, 5th and 10th percentiles) and SpO2 CF plots were calculated for each recording. CF reference-curves were then generated for each study age. Analyses were repeated with sleep-state stratifications and inclusion of manual artefact removal. Results Median nocturnal SpO2 values ranged between 98% and 99% over the first 2?years of life and the CF reference-curves shift right by 1% between 2?weeks and 3?months. CF reference-curves did not change with manual artefact removal during sleep and did not vary between rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM sleep. Manual artefact removal did significantly change summary statistics and CF reference-curves during wake. Conclusions SpO2 CF curves provide an intuitive visual tool for evaluating whether an individual's nocturnal SpO2 distribution falls within the range of healthy age-matched infants, thereby complementing summary statistics in the interpretation of extended oximetry recordings in infants. PMID:25063836

Terrill, Philip Ian; Dakin, Carolyn; Hughes, Ian; Yuill, Maggie; Parsley, Chloe

2015-01-01

154

Coprophagy-related interspecific nocturnal interactions between Japanese macaques ( Macaca fuscata yakui ) and sika deer ( Cervus nippon yakushimae )  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of sympatric large animals on the sleeping behavior of primates in the wild is still largely unknown. In this\\u000a study, we observed behaviors of wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) at their sleeping sites, using a highly sensitive video camera. We found evidence of nocturnal interspecific interactions,\\u000a such as agonistic interactions, between Japanese macaques and sika deer (Cervus

Mari Nishikawa; Koji Mochida

2010-01-01

155

Sleep Team  

MedlinePLUS

... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment ... Tips Healthy Sleep Habits Sleep Disorders by Category Insomnias Insomnia Child Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

156

Nocturnal hypoxaemia in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome: a cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objective of the study was to find the prevalence of sleep-related disturbances in patients of Eisenmenger syndrome. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Tertiary care referral centre in North India. Participants The study included 25 patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (mean age 25.2±9.6?years, 18 men) and 12 patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease with pulmonary stenosis physiology (mean age 20.5±8.5?years, 8 men) as controls. Interventions All the patients underwent an overnight comprehensive polysomnogram study and pulmonary function testing. Main outcome measure Oxygen desaturation index, which is the number of oxygen drops per hour. Results The patients and controls had significant nocturnal hypoxaemia in the absence of apnoea and hypopnoea. The mean oxygen drop index in Eisenmenger syndrome group was 9.0±6.2 and in the control group was 8.0±5.9 (p=0.63). The apnoea–hypopnoea index was 3.37±5.0 in the Eisenmenger syndrome group and was 2.1±3.6 in the control group. Patients with >10 oxygen drops per hour had significantly higher haemoglobin (17.2±1.3% vs 14.4±1.5%, p<0.001) than those with oxygen drops less than 10. Conclusions Eisenmenger syndrome patients have significant nocturnal hypoxaemia unrelated to hypopnoea and apnoea. Nocturnal desaturation occurred more frequently in patients with greater haemoglobin values. PMID:23482988

Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Juneja, Rajnish; Bardolei, Neil; Sharma, Ajay; Shukla, Garima; Bhatia, Manvir; Kalaivani, Mani; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Bahl, Vinay K; Guleria, Randeep

2013-01-01

157

Cold and hunger induce diurnality in a nocturnal mammal  

PubMed Central

The mammalian circadian system synchronizes daily timing of activity and rest with the environmental light–dark cycle. Although the underlying molecular oscillatory mechanism is well studied, factors that influence phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns (temporal niche switching, chronotype) are presently unknown. Molecular evidence suggests that metabolism may influence the circadian molecular clock, but evidence at the level of the organism is lacking. Here we show that a metabolic challenge by cold and hunger induces diurnality in otherwise nocturnal mice. Lowering ambient temperature changes the phase of circadian light–dark entrainment in mice by increasing daytime and decreasing nighttime activity. This effect is further enhanced by simulated food shortage, which identifies metabolic balance as the underlying common factor influencing circadian organization. Clock gene expression analysis shows that the underlying neuronal mechanism is downstream from or parallel to the main circadian pacemaker (the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) and that the behavioral phenotype is accompanied by phase adjustment of peripheral tissues. These findings indicate that nocturnal mammals can display considerable plasticity in circadian organization and may adopt a diurnal phenotype when energetically challenged. Our previously defined circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis proposes that such circadian plasticity, which naturally occurs in nocturnal mammals, reflects adaptive maintenance of energy balance. Quantification of energy expenditure shows that diurnality under natural conditions reduces thermoregulatory costs in small burrowing mammals like mice. Metabolic feedback on circadian organization thus provides functional benefits by reducing energy expenditure. Our findings may help to clarify relationships between sleep–wake patterns and metabolic phenotypes in humans. PMID:25288753

van der Vinne, Vincent; Riede, Sjaak J.; Gorter, Jenke A.; Eijer, Willem G.; Sellix, Michael T.; Menaker, Michael; Daan, Serge; Pilorz, Violetta; Hut, Roelof A.

2014-01-01

158

Sleep Environments and Sleep Durations in a Sample of Low-Income Preschool Children  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Sleep duration is commonly studied in children, but less is known about the potential impact of adverse sleep environments, particularly at preschool ages. We examined the frequency of suboptimal sleep environments and tested for associations with sleep duration or nocturnal sleep time among low-income preschool children. Methods: Parents of Head Start preschoolers in Michigan (Detroit and greater Lansing) completed questionnaires on children's sleep schedules and sleep environments. Respondents indicated how often their children slept in a place “too bright,” “too loud,” “too cold,” or “too hot” on a scale of 1 = never to 5 = always. A suboptimal sleep environment (SSE) was defined when one or more of these conditions were reported for ? 1-2 nights/week. Weeknight sleep duration or reported time that the child went to sleep was regressed on SSE as an explanatory variable, with adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, gender, maternal education, and average daily nap duration. Results: Among 133 preschool children, mean age was 4.1 ± 0.5 (SD), 48% were male, 39% were white, and 52% were black; 34% of parents had ? a high school degree. Parents reported that 26 (20%) of the children slept in a SSE ? 1-2 nights per week. In regression models, SSE was associated with 27 minutes shorter sleep duration (? = -0.45, SE = 0.22, p = 0.044) and 22 minutes later time child “fell asleep” (? = 0.37, SE = 0.19, p = 0.048) on weeknights. Conclusions: Among these Head Start preschool children, environmental challenges to adequate sleep are not uncommon, and they may have consequences. Clinician or preschool assessment of sleep environments may open opportunities to improve sleep at early ages. Citation: Wilson KE; Miller AL; Lumeng JC; Chervin RD. Sleep environments and sleep durations in a sample of low-income preschool children. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(3):299-305. PMID:24634628

Wilson, Katherine E.; Miller, Alison L.; Lumeng, Julie C.; Chervin, Ronald D.

2014-01-01

159

45 8 kg/m2; 21 males, BMI 44 11 kg/m2) underwent nocturnal oxymetry recording,  

E-print Network

45 ± 8 kg/m2; 21 males, BMI 44 ± 11 kg/m2) underwent nocturnal oxymetry recording, pulmonary BMI. Group 1 (15 F/17 M) consisted of OB with NOD > 15% of recorded sleep time NOD. As compared with group B, subjects in group A had sig- nificantly higher BMI (p

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

160

Triazolam improves sleep but fails to alter pain in TMD patients.  

PubMed

Patients with chronic orofacial pain often report disturbances in sleep, leading to the hypothesis that nocturnal motor hyperactivity of the muscles of mastication may contribute to the nociceptive process. This hypothesis was tested in a controlled study to evaluate the relationship between sleep stages, patient self-report of pain in the orofacial region, and nocturnal masticatory muscle activity. Twenty subjects participating in a two-period, within-subject, crossover study received triazolam or placebo for 4 nights. Sleep, pain, and mandibular range of motion were assessed at baseline, following the first period, and again following the second period; a 3-day washout period separated the two treatments. Subjective report of sleep quality was significantly improved following triazolam in comparison to placebo as measured by category scales for sleep quality, restfulness, and sleep compared to usual. The amount of time spent in stage-2 sleep was also significantly increased by triazolam. No improvement was seen in pain as measured by palpation with an algometer, in scales for sensory intensity and the affective component of pain, or in daily pain diaries. Mean facial muscle electromyographic activity for 30-second epochs averaged over the entire period of sleep did not reveal any differences in muscle activity across the three conditions. These data indicate that improvements in sleep quality and alterations in sleep architecture do not affect nocturnal facial muscle activity or subsequent pain report in temporomandibular patients, thereby failing to support the hypothesized relationship between sleep disturbances and chronic orofacial pain. PMID:9656889

DeNucci, D J; Sobiski, C; Dionne, R A

1998-01-01

161

Slow Wave Sleep and Long Duration Spaceflight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While ground research has clearly shown that preserving adequate quantities of sleep is essential for optimal health and performance, changes in the progression, order and /or duration of specific stages of sleep is also associated with deleterious outcomes. As seen in Figure 1, in healthy individuals, REM and Non-REM sleep alternate cyclically, with stages of Non-REM sleep structured chronologically. In the early parts of the night, for instance, Non-REM stages 3 and 4 (Slow Wave Sleep, or SWS) last longer while REM sleep spans shorter; as night progresses, the length of SWS is reduced as REM sleep lengthens. This process allows for SWS to establish precedence , with increases in SWS seen when recovering from sleep deprivation. SWS is indeed regarded as the most restorative portion of sleep. During SWS, physiological activities such as hormone secretion, muscle recovery, and immune responses are underway, while neurological processes required for long term learning and memory consolidation, also occur. The structure and duration of specific sleep stages may vary independent of total sleep duration, and changes in the structure and duration have been shown to be associated with deleterious outcomes. Individuals with narcolepsy enter sleep through REM as opposed to stage 1 of NREM. Disrupting slow wave sleep for several consecutive nights without reducing total sleep duration or sleep efficiency is associated with decreased pain threshold, increased discomfort, fatigue, and the inflammatory flare response in skin. Depression has been shown to be associated with a reduction of slow wave sleep and increased REM sleep. Given research that shows deleterious outcomes are associated with changes in sleep structure, it is essential to characterize and mitigate not only total sleep duration, but also changes in sleep stages.

Whitmire, Alexandra; Orr, Martin; Arias, Diana; Rueger, Melanie; Johnston, Smith; Leveton, Lauren

2012-01-01

162

Sleep and social status in captive gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada).  

PubMed

Sleep was investigated in 10 captive gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada), belonging to two harem groups by continuous infrared video recording (n = 4 males, n = 3 females, n = 3 juveniles). The aim was to investigate the relation between sleep and social status. Social status was assessed during daytime activities, when the two harem groups interacted. Three behavioral states (waking, transitional sleep and relaxed sleep) as well as sleep fragmentation were scored based on movements and body posture. The individuals belonging to each of the harem groups spent most of the night huddled closely together within a sleeping cluster. Sleep was considerably fragmented in all adult and sub-adult individuals. No relation was found between sleep latency or sleep fragmentation and social rank. Total sleep time was 11.4 +/- 0.5 h per night (n = 10) and was negatively correlated with age. In the four males sleep duration was unrelated to their social rank, whereas both within the females and the juveniles it increased with decreasing rank. The amount of relaxed sleep was lower in the dominant males and the dominant females compared to the corresponding low-ranking ones. In contrast, dominant males had the highest amount of transitional sleep, while in the females no rank-association was evident. These results indicate that the high-ranking geladas engaging less in a relaxed sleeping posture may be maintaining a larger degree of alertness that would enable them to react quickly to nocturnal dangers. PMID:14659565

Noser, Rahel; Gygax, Lorenz; Tobler, Irene

2003-12-17

163

Cytotoxic chemotherapy increases sleep and sleep fragmentation in non-tumor-bearing mice.  

PubMed

Sleep disruption ranks among the most common complaints of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Because of the complex interactions among cancer, treatment regimens, and life-history traits, studies to establish a causal link between chemotherapy and sleep disruption are uncommon. To investigate how chemotherapy acutely influences sleep, adult female c57bl/6 mice were ovariectomized and implanted with wireless biotelemetry units. EEG/EMG biopotentials were collected over the course of 3days pre- and post-injection of 13.5mg/kg doxorubicin and 135mg/kg cyclophosphamide or the vehicle. We predicted that cyclophosphamide+doxorubicin would disrupt sleep and increase central proinflammatory cytokine expression in brain areas that govern vigilance states (i.e., hypothalamus and brainstem). The results largely support these predictions; a single chemotherapy injection increased NREM and REM sleep during subsequent active (dark) phases; this induced sleep was fragmented and of low quality. Mice displayed marked increases in low theta (5-7Hz) to high theta (7-10Hz) ratios following chemotherapy treatment, indicating elevated sleep propensity. The effect was strongest during the first dark phase following injection, but mice displayed disrupted sleep for the entire 3-day duration of post-injection sleep recording. Vigilance state timing was not influenced by treatment, suggesting that acute chemotherapy administration alters sleep homeostasis without altering sleep timing. qPCR analysis revealed that disrupted sleep was accompanied by increased IL-6 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. Together, these data implicate neuroinflammation as a potential contributor to sleep disruption after chemotherapy. PMID:25449581

Borniger, Jeremy C; Gaudier-Diaz, Monica M; Zhang, Ning; Nelson, Randy J; DeVries, A Courtney

2014-11-13

164

Paroxysmal Nocturnal Haemoglobinuria in Indians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) was diagnosed in 11 patients attending the haematology clinic of a private community hospital in Hyderabad, India over a 3-year period. Compared to PNH occurring in Caucasians, the patients were younger, and showed a marked male preponderance; severe thrombocytopenia, haemorrhagic complications from thrombocytopenia and infectious complications were not seen. Thrombotic complications were common. Fever during periods

Prasad Rao Koduri; Swarnalatha Gowrishankar

1992-01-01

165

Nocturnal eating syndrome: a case report with therapeutic response to dexfenfluramine.  

PubMed

A woman with nocturnal eating syndrome responsive to dexfenfluramine (DXF) is reported. Eating consisted of nightly ingestion of large amounts of high-calorie meals and often sloppy meal consumption or preparation. Amnesia for the episodes was total. Anorexigenic medications produced partial control of her daytime carbohydrate craving and no nocturnal eating change. DXF stopped her eating behavior completely. Nocturnal eating herein meets all 4 DSM-III-R diagnostic criteria for binge eating disorder. 5-HT role in neural process controlling sleep-wakefulness (SW) has been widely shown. A 5-HT agonist like DXF could determine changes in the SW processes producing the therapeutic outcome reported herein. However, a specific DXF effect on the behavioral control of carbohydrate ingestion can not be dismissed. PMID:7610330

Mancini, M C; Alóe, F

1994-01-01

166

National Sleep Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

... sleep is necessary for children, adults, and even infants. More Healthy Sleep Tips Take charge of your sleep with these ... Fears Sleep and Teens Stress and Insomnia Sleep, Infants and Parents Sleep and Parasomnias National Sleep Foundation Contact Us Media ...

167

The relationship between morning hypertension and sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of abnormal diurnal blood pressure (BP) profiles in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in relation to the data of a sleep study. Total 103 patients newly diagnosed with OSAS underwent overnight polysomnography and 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements. Patients without morning or nocturnal hypertension (control group), patients with morning hypertension but not nocturnal hypertension (surge-type group), and patients with both morning and nocturnal hypertension (sustained-type group) were compared. Morning hypertension was present in 54 patients (16 surge-type and 38 sustained-type). The apnea-hypopnea index and sleep efficiency were higher and lower, respectively, in the sustained-type group than in the other groups. Slow-wave sleep incidence was significantly lower in the sustained-type and surge-type groups than in the control group. These results suggest that approximately half the OSAS patients displayed morning hypertension, the sustained-type being more common than the surge-type. Poor sleep quality plays an important role in the pathogenesis of morning hypertension in both the sustained- and the surge-type group. PMID:23530964

Sasaki, Nobuo; Ozono, Ryoji; Yamauchi, Ryo; Teramen, Kazushi; Edahiro, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kiyomi; Seto, Ayako; Kihara, Yasuki

2013-01-01

168

Restless Nocturnal Eating: A Common Feature of Willis-Ekbom Syndrome (RLS)  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To determine the frequency of nocturnal eating (NE) and sleep related eating disorder (SRED) in restless legs syndrome (RLS) versus psychophysiological insomnia (INS), and the relationship of these conditions with dopaminergic and sedative-hypnotic medications. Design: Prospective case series. Setting: Sleep disorders center. Patients: Newly diagnosed RLS or INS. Intervention: RLS or INS pharmacotherapy with systematic follow up interview for NE/SRED. Measurements and Results: Patients presenting with RLS (n = 88) or INS (n = 42) were queried for the presence of NE and SRED. RLS patients described nocturnal eating (61%) and SRED (36%) more frequently than INS patients (12% and 0%; both p < 0.0001). These findings were not due to arousal frequency, as INS patients were more likely to have prolonged nightly awakenings (93%) than RLS patients (64%; p = 0.003). Among patients on sedative-hypnotics, amnestic SRED and sleepwalking were more common in the setting of RLS (80%) than INS (8%; p < 0.0001). Further, NE and SRED in RLS were not secondary to dopaminergic therapy, as RLS patients demonstrated a substantial drop (68% to 34%; p = 0.0026) in the frequency of NE after dopamine agents were initiated, and there were no cases of dopaminergic agents inducing novel NE or SRED. Conclusion: NE is common in RLS and not due to frequent nocturnal awakenings or dopaminergic agents. Amnestic SRED occurs predominantly in the setting of RLS mistreatment with sedating agents. In light of previous reports, these findings suggest that nocturnal eating is a non-motor manifestation of RLS with several clinical implications discussed here. Citation: Howell MJ; Schenck CH. Restless nocturnal eating: a common feature of Willis-Ekbom Syndrome (RLS). J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(4):413-419. PMID:22893772

Howell, Michael J.; Schenck, Carlos H.

2012-01-01

169

Light-at-night, circadian disruption and breast cancer: assessment of existing evidence  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer incidence is increasing globally for largely unknown reasons. The possibility that a portion of the breast cancer burden might be explained by the introduction and increasing use of electricity to light the night was suggested >20 years ago. Methods The theory is based on nocturnal light-induced disruption of circadian rhythms, notably reduction of melatonin synthesis. It has formed the basis for a series of predictions including that non-day shift work would increase risk, blind women would be at lower risk, long sleep duration would lower risk and community nighttime light level would co-distribute with breast cancer incidence on the population level. Results Accumulation of epidemiological evidence has accelerated in recent years, reflected in an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of shift work as a probable human carcinogen (2A). There is also a strong rodent model in support of the light-at-night (LAN) idea. Conclusion If a consensus eventually emerges that LAN does increase risk, then the mechanisms for the effect are important to elucidate for intervention and mitigation. The basic understanding of phototransduction for the circadian system, and of the molecular genetics of circadian rhythm generation are both advancing rapidly, and will provide for the development of lighting technologies at home and at work that minimize circadian disruption, while maintaining visual efficiency and aesthetics. In the interim, there are strategies now available to reduce the potential for circadian disruption, which include extending the daily dark period, appreciate nocturnal awakening in the dark, using dim red light for nighttime necessities, and unless recommended by a physician, not taking melatonin tablets. PMID:19380369

Stevens, Richard G

2009-01-01

170

Nocturnal Hypoxemia and Periodic Limb Movement Predict Mortality in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives: Sleep disorders, including sleep-disordered breathing and periodic limb movements during sleep, are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading causes of death in patients with ESRD. This study investigated the association between sleep disorders and mortality in patients with ESRD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Thirty patients on maintenance hemodialysis, who were clinically stable for >2 months, underwent overnight polysomnography to evaluate sleep parameters. Results: All patients were followed for a median of 48 months (range: 14 to 62 months), and 14 of them died during the follow-up period. Among the sleep parameters, the percent of sleep time with arterial oxygen saturation <90% (T <90%), mean arterial oxygen saturation, and periodic limb movement index score were associated with significant increases in the risk of death. However, associations of the apnea–hypopnea index or oxygen desaturation index with mortality were NS. The hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for death per one SD increment in the log-transformed T <90% and periodic limb movement index score were 2.10 (1.06 to 4.15) and 2.48 (1.11 to 5.52), respectively, after adjusting for age. Conclusions: We found that nocturnal hypoxemia and periodic limb movement during sleep, rather than apnea itself, were associated with an increased risk for death in patients with ESRD. However, conclusions from this study should be drawn with caution, because they are limited by the small sample size. PMID:20507958

Lee, Jung Hie; Baek, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Seong Jae; Lee, Jeong Jin

2010-01-01

171

Sleep Reduces False Memory in Healthy Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of post-learning sleep and sleep architecture on false memory in healthy older adults. Design: Balanced, crossover design. False memory was induced using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm and assessed following nocturnal sleep and following a period of daytime wakefulness. Post-learning sleep structure was evaluated using polysomnography (PSG). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy older adults from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study (mean age ± standard deviation = 66.6 ± 4.1 y; 7 males). Measurements and Results: At encoding, participants studied lists of words that were semantically related to non-presented critical lures. At retrieval, they made “remember”/“know” and “new” judgments. Compared to wakefulness, post-learning sleep was associated with reduced “remember” responses, but not “know” responses to critical lures. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the veridical recognition of studied words, false recognition of unrelated distractors, discriminability, or response bias between the sleep and the wake conditions. More post-learning slow wave sleep was associated with greater reduction in false memory. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, sleep facilitates the reduction in false memory without affecting veridical memory. This benefit correlates with the amount of slow wave sleep in the post-learning sleep episode. Citation: Lo JC; Sim SK; Chee MW. Sleep reduces false memory in healthy older adults. SLEEP 2014;37(4):665-671. PMID:24744453

Lo, June C.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.

2014-01-01

172

Hypertension and sleep: overview of a tight relationship.  

PubMed

Autonomic cardiovascular control changes across sleep stages. Thus, blood pressure (BP), heart rate and peripheral vascular resistance progressively decrease in non-rapid eye movement sleep. Any deterioration in sleep quality or quantity may be associated with an increase in nocturnal BP which could participate in the development or poor control of hypertension. In the present report, sleep problems/disorders, which impact either the quality or quantity of sleep, are reviewed for their interaction with BP regulation and their potential association with prevalent or incident hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, sleep duration/deprivation, insomnia, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy are successively reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is clearly associated with the development of hypertension that is only slightly reduced by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Shorter and longer sleep durations are associated with prevalent or incident hypertension but age, gender, environmental exposures and ethnic differences are clear confounders. Insomnia with objective short sleep duration, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy may impact BP control, needing additional studies to establish their impact in the development of permanent hypertension. Addressing sleep disorders or sleep habits seems a relevant issue when considering the risk of developing hypertension or the control of pre-existent hypertension. Combined sleep problems may have potential synergistic deleterious effects. PMID:24846771

Pepin, Jean-Louis; Borel, Anne-Laure; Tamisier, Renaud; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Levy, Patrick; Dauvilliers, Yves

2014-12-01

173

Effects of Light Interruption on Sleep and Viability of Drosophila melanogaster  

PubMed Central

Light is a very important regulator of the daily sleep rhythm. Here, we investigate the influence of nocturnal light stimulation on Drosophila sleep. Results showed that total daytime sleep was reduced due to a decrease in daytime sleep episode duration caused by discontinuous light stimulation, but sleep was not strongly impacted at nighttime although the discontinuous light stimulation occurred during the scotophase. During a subsequent recovery period without light interruption, the sleep quality of nighttime sleep was improved and of daytime sleep reduced, indicating flies have a persistent response to nocturnal light stimulation. Further studies showed that the discontinuous light stimulation damped the daily rhythm of a circadian light-sensitive protein cryptochrome both at the mRNA and protein levels, which subsequently caused disappearance of circadian rhythm of the core oscillator timeless and decrease of TIMLESS protein at nighttime. These data indicate that the nocturnal light interruption plays an important role in sleep through core proteins CRYTOCHROME and TIMLESS, Moreover, interruption of sleep further impacted reproduction and viability. PMID:25148297

Liu, Zhenxing; Zhao, Zhangwu

2014-01-01

174

Sleep, sleep apnea, and epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Sleep disorders occur commonly in patients with epilepsy, and can be responsible for symptoms of daytime somnolence and also\\u000a can contribute to the intractability of epilepsy. The most important aspect of treating sleep disorders, especially sleep\\u000a apnea, is the recognition of the problem. In a busy clinical practice, symptoms of sleep disorders are frequently overlooked\\u000a or mistaken. Whenever sleep

Carl W. Bazil

2004-01-01

175

Epileptic motor behaviors during sleep: Anatomo-electro-clinical features  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep-related complex motor seizures have long been considered pathognomonic features of Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy (NFLE). In recent years, these manifestations have also been reported to have a temporal or insular origin. We describe 40 drug-resistant epileptic patients with complex motor seizures during sleep, submitted to presurgical stereo-EEG (SEEG) evaluation and seizure-free after surgical resection of the epileptogenic zone. In

P. Proserpio; M. Cossu; S. Francione; F. Gozzo; G. Lo Russo; R. Mai; A. Moscato; M. Schiariti; I. Sartori; L. Tassi; L. Nobili

176

REM sleep behavior disorder in a patient with pontine stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently seen in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. It can also be seen in brainstem lesions involving the pons. However, RBD in patients with a pure pontine infarction has been rarely reported. A 68-year-old man had a two-month history of violent behavior during sleep. His nocturnal behavior was screaming, thrashing of arms,

Zhang Xi; Wang Luning

2009-01-01

177

[Eculizumab in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria].  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a rare acquired clonal of the hematopoietic stem cell due to acquired mutation of the PIG-A gene. This results in the lack of two GPI-anchored membrane proteins involved in the inhibition of complement attack, thus explaining red cells hemolysis. The development of an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab) had profoundly modified the treatment of the the hemolytic form of the disease. PMID:20035691

Socié, Gérard; Varoqueaux, Nathalie; Peffault de Latour, Régis

2009-12-01

178

Active nocturnal space cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A nocturnal evaporative cooling system appropriate for retrofitting to an active solar heated house was designed and installed at the Sonoma State University Solar/Energy Center. The system was operated during the summer and early fall of 1980, and tests were conducted to evaluate its performance. Two simple variations in the system design were compared: an indirect evaporative cooling configuration and a direct evaporative cooling configuration. The first used an evaporative air cooler, a heat exchanger and a pump to remove heat from water in a storage tank; the second used a fan blowing across the surface of the water in the storage tank to evaporatively cool the water. Test results suggested that the direct evaporative cooling configuration operated at a higher coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high operating temperature differentials and that the indirect configuration operated at a higher COP at relatively low operating temperature differentials. A computer simulation indicated that the nocturnal evaporative cooling system in the indirect cooling configuration offered good potential for use in the hot central valleys of California. An economic analysis compared the cooling system in the indirect configuration to a refrigeration air conditioner of similar capacity. Rate structure implications as well as life cycle costs were examined. Calculations based on current electric rates showed that the nocturnal cooling system, slightly modified from the prototype design, was less costly.

Livingston, J.; Ablett, K.; Cinciarelli, K.; Dennis, A.; Leker, B.; Livingston, P.; McBride, T.; Treppa, D.; Norwick, S.A.

1981-04-30

179

Sleep and Quality of Life in Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disordered sleep affects daytime health and behavioral functioning in a variety of neurologic and psychiatric conditions.\\u000a Sleep disorders lead to a multitude of secondary behavioral effects that affect both the individual and the family (1). Daytime\\u000a sleepiness resulting from disrupted sleep often manifests itself in typically developing children as hyperactivity, inattention,\\u000a and aggression (2). Those with autism, a spectrum of

Beth A. Malow; Susan G. McGrew

180

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACID SUPPLEMENTATION AND SLEEP  

E-print Network

of cortisol on sleep has focused on its contribution to sleep disruption. Waking at night has been associated with spikes in the release of cortisol (Follenius, Brandenberger, et al, 1992; Spath-Schwalbe, Gofferje, et al, 1991). Research has also confirmed...

Prohaska, Jennifer A.

2008-10-24

181

[Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children].  

PubMed

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in school-aged children. Tonsillar and/or adenoids hypertrophy is the most common etiology of OSA in children. OSA has been associated with sleep quality disturbance (frequent arousals) and nocturnal gas-exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia and sometimes hypercapnia), complicated with a large array of negative health outcomes. The clinical symptoms are not able to distinguish primary snoring from OSA. Polysomnography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing, but the demand is increasing for this highly technical sleep test. So, some other simpler diagnostic methods are available, as respiratory polygraphy, but need to be validated in children. Treatment of OSA in children must be based on a mutlidisciplinary approach with pediatricians, ENT surgeons and orthodontists. PMID:23870386

Aubertin, G

2013-08-01

182

Transcutaneous carbon dioxide profile during sleep reveals metabolic risk factors in post-menopausal females.  

PubMed

The risks of metabolic syndrome and sleep-disordered breathing increase around the time of the menopause. We have previously shown that features of the nocturnal transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO2) profile are associated with metabolic variables such as cholesterol, glycosylated haemoglobin A1C (GHbA1C) and blood pressure in patients with sleep apnoea. In the present study, we investigated whether these metabolic variables can be predicted using noninvasive TcCO2 measurements during sleep in generally healthy post-menopausal females. 22 post-menopausal females underwent an overnight polygraphic sleep study that involved the continuous monitoring of arterial oxygen saturation (S(a,O2)) and TcCO2. Body composition, GHbA1C, plasma cholesterol and blood pressure were measured prior to the sleep study. Nocturnal TcCO2 features were the most important predictors of lipoprotein cholesterols, triglycerides and blood pressure levels. A longer sleep period and higher TcCO2 levels were linked with lower GHbA1C, and fragmented sleep with lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Neither nocturnal S(a,O2) indices nor the apnoea/hypopnoea index had a predictive power. The results suggest that nocturnal TcCO2 events revealed metabolic risk factors already present in healthy post-menopausal females. PMID:19574334

Aittokallio, J; Saaresranta, T; Virkki, A; Karppinen, N; Heinonen, O J; Aittokallio, T; Polo, O

2009-11-01

183

The Association Between Sleep Duration and Weight in Treatment-Seeking Preschoolers with Obesity1  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the association between nocturnal sleep duration and weight and caloric intake outcomes among preschool-aged children who are obese and enrolled in a family-based weight management program. Methods Forty-one preschool-aged children who were obese (BMI ?95th percentile) and enrolled in a weight management program completed pre- and posttreatment assessments of body mass, caloric intake, and sleep. Separate linear regression analyses examined the relationship between nocturnal sleep duration and posttreatment body mass index relative to ageand sex-linked norms (BMIz) and caloric intake. Results After controlling for pretreatment BMIz, longer posttreatment nocturnal sleep was significantly associated with lower posttreatment BMIz (?=-0.21, p=0.02) and explained a significant proportion of unique variance in posttreatment BMIz (?R2=0.04). Similarly, after controlling for pretreatment caloric intake, longer nocturnal sleep duration at posttreatment was significantly associated with lower caloric intake at posttreatment (?=-0.45, p=0.003) and explained a significant proportion of unique variance in posttreatment caloric intake (?R2=0.19). Conclusions These findings extend the literature on the sleep and weight relationship and suggest that adequate sleep may be an important element in interventions for preschoolers with obesity. PMID:22841032

Clifford, Lisa M.; Beebe, Dean W.; Simon, Stacey L.; Kuhl, Elizabeth S.; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Rausch, Joseph R.; Stark, Lori J.

2012-01-01

184

Sleep and the Time Course of Motor Skill Learning Matthew P. Walker,1  

E-print Network

of sleep, and that selective disruption of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep prevents this overnightResearch Sleep and the Time Course of Motor Skill Learning Matthew P. Walker,1 Tiffany Brakefield 02115, USA Growing evidence suggests that sleep plays an important role in the process of procedural

Walker, Matthew P.

185

Sleep Disorders  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For something as critical to our well being as good sleep, human beings suffer from an amazing number of sleeping disorders. The following Web sites explore just a few of these disorders, starting with a brief introduction to the normal stages of sleep from the Sleep Disorders Center of Central Texas (1). Next, the University of Waterloo offers a fascinating look at sleep paralysis, which many researchers consider the "likely source of beliefs concerning not only alien abductions, but all manner of beliefs in alternative realities and otherworldly creatures" (2). The third site (3), provided by the National Women's Health Information Center, is an easy-to-read source for information about insomnia. Likewise, the American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA) offers an in-depth information packet on snoring and sleep apnea, as well as the ASAA newsletter and other resources (4). The next Web site (5 ) comes from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and offers an introduction to the phenomenon of narcolepsy, including treatment, prognosis, and related research. Restless legs syndrome may not be as immediately familiar as some of the other sleep disorders addressed above, but a visit to the homepage of the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation (6) should answer any questions about this "creepy-crawly" sensation in the limbs that occurs during sleep or other inactive periods. Of course, you don't have to have a bona fide sleeping disorder to suffer from sleep deprivation. Visitors to the next Web site from Loughborough University's Sleep Research Centre will find detailed information on how sleep deprivation affects brain function (7). Not surprisingly, the news isn't good. Finally, the Sleep Foundation offers How's Your Sleep, an online quiz designed to help users learn more about what may be affecting their sleep (8).

Sohmer, Rachel.

2003-01-01

186

Is sleep-related verbal memory consolidation impaired in sleepwalkers?  

PubMed

In order to evaluate verbal memory consolidation during sleep in subjects experiencing sleepwalking or sleep terror, 19 patients experiencing sleepwalking/sleep terror and 19 controls performed two verbal memory tasks (16-word list from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test, and a 220- and 263-word modified story recall test) in the evening, followed by nocturnal video polysomnography (n = 29) and morning recall (night-time consolidation after 14 h, n = 38). The following morning, they were given a daytime learning task using the modified story recall test in reverse order, followed by an evening recall test after 9 h of wakefulness (daytime consolidation, n = 38). The patients experiencing sleepwalking/sleep terror exhibited more frequent awakenings during slow-wave sleep and longer wakefulness after sleep onset than the controls. Despite this reduction in sleep quality among sleepwalking/sleep terror patients, they improved their scores on the verbal tests the morning after sleep compared with the previous evening (+16 ± 33%) equally well as the controls (+2 ± 13%). The performance of both groups worsened during the daytime in the absence of sleep (-16 ± 15% for the sleepwalking/sleep terror group and -14 ± 11% for the control group). There was no significant correlation between the rate of memory consolidation and any of the sleep measures. Seven patients experiencing sleepwalking also sleep-talked during slow-wave sleep, but their sentences were unrelated to the tests or the list of words learned during the evening. In conclusion, the alteration of slow-wave sleep during sleepwalking/sleep terror does not noticeably impact on sleep-related verbal memory consolidation. PMID:25212397

Uguccioni, Ginevra; Pallanca, Olivier; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

2014-09-12

187

Sleep disordered breathing in interstitial lung disease: A review  

PubMed Central

Patients with interstitial lung disease commonly exhibit abnormal sleep architecture and increased sleep fragmentation on polysomnography. Fatigue is a frequent complaint, and it is likely that poor sleep quality is a significant contributor. A number of studies have shown that sleep disordered breathing is prevalent in this population, particularly in the idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis subgroup. The factors that predispose these patients to obstructive sleep apnoea are not well understood, however it is believed that reduced caudal traction on the upper airway can enhance collapsibility. Ventilatory control system instability may also be an important factor, particularly in those with increased chemo-responsiveness, and in hypoxic conditions. Transient, repetitive nocturnal oxygen desaturation is frequently observed in interstitial lung disease, both with and without associated obstructive apnoeas. There is increasing evidence that sleep-desaturation is associated with increased mortality, and may be important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in this population. PMID:25516856

Troy, Lauren K; Corte, Tamera J

2014-01-01

188

Sleep-Wake Pattern Following Gunshot Suprachiasmatic Damage  

PubMed Central

Background: The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) plays a critical role in maintaining melatonin and sleep-wake cycles. Methods/Patient: We report a case of 38-year-old woman who, after gunshot wound to the right temple, developed a sleep complaint of multiple nocturnal awakenings and several naps throughout the day. Results: Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral optic nerve and optic chiasm damage. Diagnostic polysomnography and actigraphy revealed an irregular sleep wake rhythm. Conclusions: We speculate concurrent damage of the SCN and optic nerves bilaterally resulted in the posttraumatic irregular sleep-wake rhythm. Citation: DelRosso LM; Hoque R; James S; Gonzalez-Toledo E; Chesson AL. Sleep-wake pattern following gunshot suprachiasmatic damage. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(4):443-445. PMID:24733992

DelRosso, Lourdes M.; Hoque, Romy; James, Stephanie; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo; Chesson, Andrew L.

2014-01-01

189

Sleep Patterns  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about sleep rhythms (on page 21 of the PDF), learners will collect data about their own sleep cycles and use a fraction wheel to examine their data. This lesson guide includes background information, information about astronauts' sleep in space, setup and management tips, extensions and a handout.

2012-05-10

190

Effect of Withania somnifera on Sleep-Wake Cycle in Sleep-Disturbed Rats: Possible GABAergic Mechanism  

PubMed Central

Sleep deprivation disrupts significantly sleep pattern and cause poor quality of sleep. The aim the present study was to explore role of Withania somniferra root extract in sleep-disturbed rats. Male wistar rats (n=5-6/group) were sleep deprived for 24 h using grid suspended over water method. Withania somniferra extract (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 30 min before actual recording (EEG and EMG) recording and electrophysiological recordings are further classified as- sleep latency, slow wave sleep, paradoxical sleep, total sleep, wakefulness. One day (24 h) sleep deprivation delayed latency sleep, reduced duration of slow wave sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, total sleep time and increased total waking as compared to animals placed on saw dust (P<0.05). Pretreatment with Withania somniferra extract (100 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.5 mg/kg) significantly improved electrophysiological parameters, which was further reversed by picrotoxin (2 mg/kg) and potentiated by muscimol (0.05 mg/kg). Flumazenil (2 mg/kg) did not produce any significant effect on the sleep parameters of Withania somnifera root extract. Present study suggests the involvement of GABAergic mechanism in the sleep promoting effect of Withania somniferra in sleep-disturbed state. PMID:21369449

Kumar, A.; Kalonia, H.

2008-01-01

191

Sleep and Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep disturbances in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are both widespread and wide-ranging. Emerging early in the disease process,\\u000a sometimes prior to the onset of motor symptoms, sleep disruption results from the degeneration of the basal ganglia that is\\u000a the hallmark of the disease, as well as changes in brain stem sleep centres. Accordingly, sleep problems consist of motor\\u000a symptoms such as

Daisy L. Whitehead; Rosalind Mitchell-Hay; Prashant Reddy; Sharon Muzerengi; K. Ray Chaudhuri

192

Review of rapid eye movement behavior sleep disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectrum of rapid eye movement behavior disorders (RBD) spans various age groups, with the greatest prevalence in elderly\\u000a men. Major diagnostic features include harmful or potentially harmful sleep behaviors that disrupt sleep continuity and dream\\u000a enactment during rapid eye movement sleep. In RBD patients, the polysomnogram during rapid eye movement sleep demonstrates\\u000a excessive augmentation of chin electromyogram or excessive

Vivien C. Abad; Christian Guilleminault

2004-01-01

193

Sleep Deprivation in Critical Illness: Its Role in Physical and Psychological Recovery  

PubMed Central

Critically ill patients frequently experience poor sleep, characterized by frequent disruptions, loss of circadian rhythms, and a paucity of time spent in restorative sleep stages. Factors that are associated with sleep disruption in the intensive care unit (ICU) include patient-ventilator dysynchrony, medications, patient care interactions, and environmental noise and light. As the field of critical care increasingly focuses on patients' physical and psychological outcomes following critical illness, understanding the potential contribution of ICU-related sleep disruption on patient recovery is an important area of investigation. This review article summarizes the literature regarding sleep architecture and measurement in the critically ill, causes of ICU sleep fragmentation, and potential implications of ICU-related sleep disruption on patients' recovery from critical illness. With this background information, strategies to optimize sleep in the ICU are also discussed. PMID:21220271

Kamdar, Biren B.; Needham, Dale M.; Collop, Nancy A.

2012-01-01

194

Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

2014-01-01

195

Sleep patterns in Parkinson's disease patients with visual hallucinations.  

PubMed

Visual hallucinations (VHs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be a frequent and disturbing complication of the disease with 33% of PD patients undergoing long-term treatment experiencing VHs during the course of their illness. One line of evidence that is emerging as a possible risk factor in the occurrence of VHs is the sleep-wake cycle and sleep behavior in patients with PD. This study compared sleep patterns in a group of visually hallucinating Parkinson's patients with a group of nonhallucinating PD patients and an age-matched control group. Nocturnal sleep was assessed by actigraphy and diaries, while daytime sleepiness and function were assessed by a battery of self-rating sleep questionnaires. Compared with the control group both patient groups had more sleep-related problems and significantly altered sleep patterns, as measured by both actigraphy and sleep questionnaires. Patients who hallucinated however slept less than nonhallucinating patients and also had increased awakenings after sleep onset, reduced sleep efficiency, and increased daytime sleepiness. We propose that VHs in some PD patients may be a symptom of poor sleep and prolonged daytime sleepiness, suggesting that arousal may play a role in the genesis of the hallucination phenomenon. PMID:20615061

Barnes, Jim; Connelly, Vince; Wiggs, Luci; Boubert, Laura; Maravic, Ksenija

2010-08-01

196

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in children.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), an acquired hematologic disorder characterized by intravascular hemolysis, nocturnal hemoglobinuria, thrombotic events, serious infections, and bone marrow failure, is very rare in children. PNH is caused by a somatic mutation of the phosphatidylinositol glycan (GPI) complementation class A (PIGA) gene, followed by a survival advantage of the PNH clone, which results in a deficiency of GPI-anchored proteins on hematopoietic cells. Currently, immunophenotypic GPI-linked anchor protein analysis has replaced the acid Ham and sucrose lysis test, as it provides a reliable diagnostic tool for this disease. The presence of PNH clones should be considered in every child with an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome, for example (hypoplastic) myelodysplastic syndrome and aplastic anemia, and/or unexpected serious thrombosis. Treatment of PNH in children is dependent on the clinical presentation. In cases of severe bone marrow failure, stem cell transplantation should be seriously considered as a therapeutic option even if no matched sibling donor is available. This article reviews the reported cases of PNH in children using the recently published guidelines for classification, diagnostics, and treatment. PMID:17291133

van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

2007-01-01

197

Sleep deprivation blunts the night time increase in aldosterone release in humans.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sleep deprivation on the 24-h profile of aldosterone and its consequences on renal function. Aldosterone and its main hormonal regulatory factors, ACTH (evaluated by cortisol measurement) and the renin-angiotensin system [RAS, evaluated by plasma renin activity (PRA) measurement] were determined every 10 min for 24 h in eight healthy subjects in the supine position, once with nocturnal sleep and once during total 24-h sleep deprivation. Plasma Na(+) and K(+) were measured every 10 min in four of these subjects. In an additional group of 13 subjects under enteral nutrition, diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis were measured once during the sleep period (23.00--07.00 h) and once during a 23.00--07.00 hours sleep deprivation period. During sleep deprivation, aldosterone displayed lower plasma levels and pulse amplitude in the 23.00--07.00-hour period than during sleep. Similarly, PRA showed reduced levels and lower pulse frequency and amplitude. Plasma cortisol levels were slightly enhanced during sleep deprivation. Overnight profiles of plasma K(+) and Na(+) were not affected. Diuresis and kaliuresis were not influenced by sleep deprivation. In contrast, natriuresis significantly increased during sleep deprivation. This study demonstrates that sleep deprivation modifies the 24-h aldosterone profile by preventing the nocturnal increase in aldosterone release and leads to altered overnight hydromineral balance. PMID:11285052

Charloux, A; Gronfier, C; Chapotot, F; Ehrhart, J; Piquard, F; Brandenberger, G

2001-03-01

198

Prolonged Sleep under Stone Age Conditions  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: We report on a unique experiment designed to investigate the impact of prehistoric living conditions on sleep-wake behavior. Methods: A group of five healthy adults were assessed during life in a Stone Age-like settlement over two months. Results: The most notable finding was that nocturnal time in bed and estimated sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, markedly increased during the experimental period compared to the periods prior to and following the experiment. These increases were primarily driven by a phase-advance shift of sleep onset. Subjective assessments of health and functioning did not reveal any relevant changes across the study. Conclusions: Our observations provide further evidence for the long-held belief that the absence of modern living conditions is associated with an earlier sleep phase and prolonged sleep duration. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 723. Citation: Piosczyk H, Landmann N, Holz J, Feige B, Riemann D, Nissen C, Voderholzer U. Prolonged sleep under Stone Age conditions. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):719-722. PMID:25024647

Piosczyk, Hannah; Landmann, Nina; Holz, Johannes; Feige, Bernd; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph; Voderholzer, Ulrich

2014-01-01

199

Mammalian sleep  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

Staunton, Hugh

2005-05-01

200

Pathophysiology of Sleep Apnea  

PubMed Central

Sleep-induced apnea and disordered breathing refers to intermittent, cyclical cessations or reductions of airflow, with or without obstructions of the upper airway (OSA). In the presence of an anatomically compromised, collapsible airway, the sleep-induced loss of compensatory tonic input to the upper airway dilator muscle motor neurons leads to collapse of the pharyngeal airway. In turn, the ability of the sleeping subject to compensate for this airway obstruction will determine the degree of cycling of these events. Several of the classic neurotransmitters and a growing list of neuromodulators have now been identified that contribute to neurochemical regulation of pharyngeal motor neuron activity and airway patency. Limited progress has been made in developing pharmacotherapies with acceptable specificity for the treatment of sleep-induced airway obstruction. We review three types of major long-term sequelae to severe OSA that have been assessed in humans through use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and in animal models via long-term intermittent hypoxemia (IH): 1) cardiovascular. The evidence is strongest to support daytime systemic hypertension as a consequence of severe OSA, with less conclusive effects on pulmonary hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, and cardiac arrhythmias. The underlying mechanisms mediating hypertension include enhanced chemoreceptor sensitivity causing excessive daytime sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, combined with overproduction of superoxide ion and inflammatory effects on resistance vessels. 2) Insulin sensitivity and homeostasis of glucose regulation are negatively impacted by both intermittent hypoxemia and sleep disruption, but whether these influences of OSA are sufficient, independent of obesity, to contribute significantly to the “metabolic syndrome” remains unsettled. 3) Neurocognitive effects include daytime sleepiness and impaired memory and concentration. These effects reflect hypoxic-induced “neural injury.” We discuss future research into understanding the pathophysiology of sleep apnea as a basis for uncovering newer forms of treatment of both the ventilatory disorder and its multiple sequelae. PMID:20086074

Veasey, Sigrid C.; Morgan, Barbara J.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.

2010-01-01

201

Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency  

MedlinePLUS

... rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM. Non-REM sleep includes what is commonly known as deep sleep or slow wave sleep. Dreaming typically occurs during REM sleep. Generally, non-REM and REM sleep occur in ...

202

Sleep Apnea Detection  

MedlinePLUS

... Sleep Apnea Detection Ages & Stages Listen Sleep Apnea Detection Article Body Sleep apnea is a common problem ... Prevent SIDS Infant Sleep Training is Effective and Safe, Study Finds Healthy Children Radio: Safe Sleep for ...

203

Sleeping With One Eye Open: Marital Abuse as an Antecedent of Poor Sleep  

PubMed Central

In a diverse community sample of 241 married couples, we examined received psychological abuse (PA) as a longitudinal predictor of men's and women's sleep. Participants reported on marital functioning and mental health during three assessments (T1, T2, T3) and sleep problems during two assessments (T2, T3), with 1-year lags between waves. Growth curve analyses revealed that for both spouses, higher initial levels of PA and increases in PA over time predicted greater sleep disturbances at T3. For husbands and wives, anxiety and depression mediated some of the associations between PA and sleep problems. For wives, moderation effects highlighted the importance of violence, anxiety, and depression in exacerbating sleep problems associated with PA. Results build on and contribute significantly to the scant literature implicating the importance of the marital relationship for sleep and suggest that simultaneous consideration of intrapersonal and interpersonal variables is critical when explicating sleep disruptions. PMID:21171765

Rauer, Amy J.; Kelly, Ryan J.; Buckhalt, Joseph A.; El-Sheikh, Mona

2011-01-01

204

Colour vision in diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths.  

PubMed

Diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera) have three spectral types of receptor sensitive to ultraviolet, blue and green light. As avid flower visitors and pollinators, they use olfactory and visual cues to find and recognise flowers. Moths of the diurnal species Macroglossum stellatarum and the nocturnal species Deilephila elpenor, Hyles lineata and Hyles gallii use and learn the colour of flowers. Nocturnal species can discriminate flowers at starlight intensities when humans and honeybees are colour-blind. M. stellatarum can use achromatic, intensity-related cues if colour cues are absent, and this is probably also true for D. elpenor. Both species can recognise colours even under a changed illumination colour. PMID:21680465

Kelber, Almut; Balkenius, Anna; Warrant, Eric J

2003-08-01

205

Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing in bicycling patrol officers.  

PubMed

A health assessment study was conducted in response to complaints of groin numbness in a bicycling police unit. Seventeen male cyclists were compared with 5 nonbiking men. The cyclists rode an average of 5.4 hours per day, and 91% indicated they experienced groin numbness on occasion. Each man wore the RigiScan Plus Rigidity Assessment System for one normal sleep session. Pressure measurements were also taken between the cyclist and the bicycle saddle. The percentage of sleep sessions that recorded an erectile event was significantly lower in the cyclists than it was in noncyclists (cyclists 27.1%; noncyclists 42.8%; P =.008). This duration percentage is negatively correlated with average hours a day that cyclists rode their bikes (r = -.41; P =.05), the number of days a week they rode (r = -.55; P =.009), and the average pressure exerted on the nose of the bike saddle (r = -.39; P =.08). The other measures of erectile quality (tumescence activity units [TAUs] and rigidity activity units [RAUs] of both the base and tip of the penis) were lower in the cyclists, but did not reach statistical significance. The number of hours cyclists rode during the day of RigiScan Plus assessment was negatively correlated with penis tip RAU (r = -.41; P =.04), and tip TAU (r = -.45; P =.04). These data suggest that prolonged bicycle riding may have negative effects on nocturnal erectile function and indicate a need for innovative bicycle saddle designs. PMID:12399541

Schrader, Steven M; Breitenstein, Michael J; Clark, John C; Lowe, Brian D; Turner, Terry W

2002-01-01

206

Sudden unexpected nocturnal deaths among Thai immigrant workers in Singapore. The possible role of toxigenic bacteria.  

PubMed

Sudden Unexpected Nocturnal Deaths (SUND) occur in young, apparently healthy immigrant workers from Thailand, the Philippines and Bangladesh living among ex-patriot labour forces in countries such as Singapore and Saudi Arabia. Several factors associated with these deaths are similar to those observed for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): sleep related and mainly nocturnal occurrence; no prodromal illnesses other than mild respiratory tract infection; exposure to cigarette smoke; absence of invasive microorganisms at autopsy. The hypotheses proposed to explain these deaths in adults are examined. Based on our studies of the role toxigenic bacteria might play in some cases of SIDS, we suggest a new approach to the investigation of SUND. PMID:8038113

Blackwell, C C; Busuttil, A; Weir, D M; Saadi, A T; Essery, S D

1994-01-01

207

NOCTURNAL FLIGHT CALL OF BICKNELL'S THRUSH  

Microsoft Academic Search

AnsraAcr. -Audio recordings of nocturnal flight calls of migrating birds along the east- central Florida coast in May have documented calls that sound similar to those from Gray- cheeked Thrushes (Cutharus minimus). Spectrographic comparison of these \\

WILLIAM R. EVANS

208

REM and NREM sleep as natural accompaniments of the evolution of warm-bloodedness.  

PubMed

Divergence of primitive sleep into REM and NREM states is thought to have occurred in the nocturnal Triassic ancestors of mammals as a natural accompaniment of the evolution of warm-bloodedness. As ambient temperatures during twilight portions of primitive sleep traversed these evolving ancestors' core temperature, mechanisms of thermoregulatory control that employ muscle contractions became superfluous. The resulting loss of need for such contractions during twilight sleep led to muscle atonia. With muscle tone absent, selection favored the persistence of the fast waves of nocturnal activity during twilight sleep. Stimulations by these waves reinforce motor circuits at the increasing temperatures of evolving warm-bloodedness without leading to sleep-disturbing muscle contractions. By these and related interlinked adaptations, twilight sleep evolved into REM sleep. The daytime period of sleep became NREM sleep. The evolution of NREM and REM sleep following this scenario has implications for sleep's maintenance processes for long-term memories. During NREM sleep, there is an unsynchronized, uncoordinated stimulation and reinforcement of individual distributed component circuits of consolidated memories by slow wave potentials, a process termed 'uncoordinated reinforcement'. The corresponding process during REM sleep is the coordinated stimulation and reinforcement of these circuits by fast wave potentials. This action temporally binds the individual component circuit outputs into fully formed memories, a process termed 'coordinated reinforcement'. Sequential uncoordinated and coordinated reinforcement, that is, NREM followed by REM sleep, emerges as the most effective mechanism of long-term memory maintenance in vertebrates. With the evolution of this two-stage mechanism of long-term memory maintenance, it became adaptive to partition sleep into several NREM-REM cycles, thereby achieving a more lengthy application of the cooperative sequential actions. PMID:12667495

Lee Kavanau, J

2002-12-01

209

Effect of cessation of late-night landing noise on sleep electrophysiology in the home  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simultaneous measurements of noise exposure and sleep electrophysiology were made in homes before and after cessation of nighttime aircraft landing noise. Six people were tested, all of whom had been exposed to intense aircraft noise for at least two years. Noise measurements indicated a large reduction in the hourly noise level during nighttime hours, but no charge during the daytime hours. Sleep measures indicated no dramatic changes in sleep patterns either immediately after a marked change in nocturnal noise exposure or approximately a month thereafter. No strong relationship was observed between noise level and sleep disturbances over the range from 60 to 90 db(A).

Pearsons, K. S.; Fidell, S.; Bennett, R. L.; Friedman, J.; Globus, G.

1974-01-01

210

Epilepsy and sleep-disordered breathing as false friends: a case report.  

PubMed

Because signs of nocturnal seizures can overlap with sleep respiratory events, clinicians can have difficulty distinguishing abnormal events related to sleep disorders from epileptic seizures. We describe the case of a 3-year-old child presenting with ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity associated with a particular form of atypical obstructive sleep apnea, characterized by increased respiratory rate, paradoxical breathing, desaturations, and tonic-dystonic posture associated with movement artifacts. Following cardiorespiratory polysomnography, the patient was initially misdiagnosed as having severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:24257432

Vitelli, Ottavio; Miano, Silvia; Tabarrini, Alessandra; Mazzotta, Anna Rita; Supino, Maria Chiara; Forlani, Martina; Villa, Maria Pia

2014-10-01

211

Slow wave sleep drives inhibition of pituitary-adrenal secretion in humans.  

PubMed

During the first half of nocturnal sleep, the secretory response of the pituitary-adrenal axis to either CRH or vasopressin (VP) administration is reduced. Two experiments were performed aiming (i) to investigate the impact of sleep on the response to a combined CRH/VP administration and (ii) to specify the onset of sleep associated pituitary-adrenal suppression and its relation to specific sleep stages. In experiment I, we compared the effect of simultaneous administration of VP (0.5 IU i.v., within 6 min) and CRH (50 micrograms bolus i.v., in the third min of VP infusion) on the secretion of ACTH, cortisol and GH in healthy men during the first nocturnal epoch of slow wave sleep (SWS) and during nocturnal wakefulness. The increase of ACTH and cortisol concentrations after combined VP/CRH administration was distinctly higher during wakefulness than sleep (P < 0.01). In experiment II, CRH (30 micrograms/h, after an initial bolus of 30 micrograms) was continuously infused in 7 healthy men on 2 nights. On one of the nights, the men were allowed to sleep (between 23.00 h and 05.00 h) after a 3-h period of wakefulness, on the other night they stayed awake throughout the experiment. In both conditions, CRH enhanced ACTH/cortisol plasma levels. Compared with concentrations during continuous wakefulness, sleep and in particular SWS was associated with a suppression of ACTH/cortisol levels (P < 0.05). The findings further support an inhibitory influence of early nocturnal sleep on pituitary-adrenal activity. The effect appears to be strongest during SWS and is probably mediated via hypothalamic secretion of a release inhibiting factor of ACTH. PMID:9229358

Bierwolf, C; Struve, K; Marshall, L; Born, J; Fehm, H L

1997-06-01

212

The emotional brain and sleep: an intimate relationship.  

PubMed

Research findings confirm our own experiences in life where daytime events and especially emotionally stressful events have an impact on sleep quality and well-being. Obviously, daytime emotional stress may have a differentiated effect on sleep by influencing sleep physiology and dream patterns, dream content and the emotion within a dream, although its exact role is still unclear. Other effects that have been found are the exaggerated startle response, decreased dream recall and elevated awakening thresholds from rapid eye movement (REM)-sleep, increased or decreased latency to REM-sleep, increased REM-density, REM-sleep duration and the occurrence of arousals in sleep as a marker of sleep disruption. However, not only do daytime events affect sleep, also the quality and amount of sleep influences the way we react to these events and may be an important determinant in general well-being. Sleep seems restorative in daily functioning, whereas deprivation of sleep makes us more sensitive to emotional and stressful stimuli and events in particular. The way sleep impacts next day mood/emotion is thought to be affected particularly via REM-sleep, where we observe a hyperlimbic and hypoactive dorsolateral prefrontal functioning in combination with a normal functioning of the medial prefrontal cortex, probably adaptive in coping with the continuous stream of emotional events we experience. PMID:20363166

Vandekerckhove, Marie; Cluydts, Raymond

2010-08-01

213

The Skylab sleep monitoring experiment - Methodology and initial results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sleep monitoring experiment permitted an objective evaluation of sleep characteristics during the first two manned Skylab flights. Hardware located onboard the spacecraft accomplished data acquisition, analysis, and preservation, thereby permitting near-real-time evaluation of sleep during the flights and more detailed postmission analysis. The crewman studied during the 28-Day Mission showed some decrease in total sleep time and an increase in the percentage of Stage 4 sleep, while the subject in the 59-Day Mission exhibited little change in total sleep time and a small decrease in Stage 4 and REM sleep. Some disruption of sleep characteristics was seen in the final days of both missions, and both subjects exhibited decreases in REM-onset latency in the immediate postflight period. The relatively minor changes seen were not of the type nor magnitude which might be expected to be associated with significant degradation of performance capability.

Frost, J. D., Jr.; Delucchi, M. R.; Shumate, W. H.; Booher, C. R.

1975-01-01

214

Migraine, arousal and sleep deprivation: comment on: “sleep quality, arousal and pain thresholds in migraineurs: a blinded controlled polysomnographic study”  

PubMed Central

We discuss the hypothesis proposed by Engstrom and coworkers that Migraineurs have a relative sleep deprivation, which lowers the pain threshold and predispose to attacks. Previous data indicate that Migraineurs have a reduction of Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP), an essential mechanism of NREM sleep regulation which allows to dump the effect of incoming disruptive stimuli, and to protect sleep. The modifications of CAP observed in Migraineurs are similar to those observed in patients with impaired arousal (narcolepsy) and after sleep deprivation. The impairment of this mechanism makes Migraineurs more vulnerable to stimuli triggering attacks during sleep, and represents part of a more general vulnerability to incoming stimuli. PMID:23758606

2013-01-01

215

[Sleep-related breathing disorders and (resulting) cardiovascular diseases].  

PubMed

Sleep-related breathing disorders occur in cardiology patients mostly as obstructive or central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. The prevalence and incidence are clearly increased in comparison to the general population. Depending on the underlying cardiac disease up to 75% of patients can have obstructive or central sleep apnea and up to 50% have indications for therapy according to the current guidelines. Obstructive sleep apnea is considered to be an independent and well treatable risk factor for the development and deterioration of many cardiovascular diseases. This review briefly describes examples of prevalence, pathophysiology and current study situation with respect to the association between sleep-related breathing disorders and arterial hypertension, atrial fibrillation, arteriosclerosis with coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Although the role of obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for the development of these diseases is well documented, central sleep apnea is less of a risk factor per se but is considered to mirror an underlying cardiac disease with then further negative consequences for this disease. It is not the sleep apnea per se but the subsequent cardiovascular diseases which limit the prognosis of these patients and therefore bring them into the focus of cardiology. Obstructive and central sleep apnea can be successfully and sustainably treated by various forms of nocturnal positive airway pressure therapy. Furthermore, there are several therapeutic procedures which are currently being tested and the significance will be investigated in the coming years. PMID:24477634

Oldenburg, O; Bitter, T; Fox, H; Horstkotte, D

2014-02-01

216

Sleep processes exert a predominant influence on the 24-h profile of heart rate variability.  

PubMed

Adverse cardiovascular events are known to exhibit 24-h variations with a peak incidence in the morning hours and a nonuniform distribution during the night. The authors examined whether these 24-h variations could be related to circadian or sleep-related changes in heart rate (HR) and in HR variability (HRV). To differentiate the effect of circadian and sleep-related influences, independent of posture and of meal ingestion, seven normal subjects were studied over 24 h, once with nocturnal sleep from 2300 to 0700 h and once after a night of sleep deprivation followed by 8 h of daytime sleep from 0700 to 1500 h. The subjects were submitted to constant conditions (continuous enteral nutrition and bed rest). HRV was calculated every 5 min using two indexes: the standard deviation of normal R-R intervals (SDNN) and the ratio of low-frequency to low-frequency plus high-frequency power. Sleep processes exerted a predominant influence on the 24-h profiles of HR and HRV, with lowest HRV levels during slow wave sleep, high levels during REM sleep and intrasleep awakenings, and abrupt increases in HR at each transition from deeper sleep to lighter sleep or awakenings. The circadian influence was smaller, except for SDNN, which displayed a nocturnal increase of 140% whether the subjects slept or not. This study demonstrates that 24-h variations in HR and HRV are little influenced by the circadian clock andare mainly sleep-stage dependent. The results suggest an important role for exogenous factors in the morning increase in cardiovascular events. During sleep, the sudden rises in HR at each transition from deeper sleep to lighter sleep or awakenings might precipitate the adverse cardiac events. PMID:12465887

Viola, Antoine U; Simon, Chantal; Ehrhart, Jean; Geny, Bernard; Piquard, François; Muzet, Alain; Brandenberger, Gabrielle

2002-12-01

217

Pathophysiology of depression: role of sleep and the melatonergic system.  

PubMed

Profound disturbances in sleep architecture occur in major depressive disorders (MDD) and in bipolar affective disorders. Reduction in slow wave sleep, decreased latency of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and abnormalities in the timing of REM/non-REM sleep cycles have all been documented in patients with MDD. It is thus evident that an understanding of the basic mechanisms of sleep regulation is essential for an analysis of the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which functions as the body's master circadian clock, plays a major role in the regulation of the sleep/wakefulness rhythm and interacts actively with the homeostatic processes that regulate sleep. The control of melatonin secretion by the SCN, the occurrence of high concentrations of melatonin receptors in the SCN, and the suppression of electrical activity in the SCN by melatonin all underscore the major influence which this neurohormone has in regulating the sleep/wake cycle. The transition from wakefulness to high sleep propensity is associated with the nocturnal rise of endogenous melatonin secretion. Various lines of evidence show that depressed patients exhibit disturbances in both the amplitude and shape of the melatonin secretion rhythm and that melatonin can improve the quality of sleep in these patients. The choice of a suitable antidepressant that improves sleep quality is thus important while treating a depressive disorder. The novel antidepressant agomelatine, which combines the properties of a 5-HT(2C) antagonist and a melatonergic MT(1)/MT(2) receptor agonist, has been found very effective for resetting the disturbed sleep/wake cycle and in improving the clinical status of MDD. Agomelatine has also been found useful in treating sleep problems and improving the clinical status of patients suffering from seasonal affective disorder. PMID:19181389

Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Trakht, Ilya; Spence, D Warren; Hardeland, Ruediger; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Cardinali, Daniel P

2009-02-28

218

Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and performance proficiency in both ground-based simulations and space mission studies, as described in the 2003 NASA Task Book, will be reviewed.

Mallis, M. M.; DeRoshia, C. W.

2005-01-01

219

Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Hypopnea Syndrome, Electrocardiogram, and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: We evaluated the impact of surgically-induced weight loss on Obstructive Sleep Apnea\\/Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS),\\u000a electrocardiographic changes, pulmonary arterial pressure and daytime sleepiness in morbidly obese patients. Methods: 16 women\\u000a and 13 men (n=29) underwent bariatric surgery in a 3-year period. The following tests were performed before and 1 year after\\u000a surgery: nocturnal polysomnography, daytime Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT),

Matilde Valencia-Flores; Arturo Orea; Miguel Herrera; Victoria Santiago; Verónica Rebollar; Violeta A. Castaño; Jorge Oseguera; Jorge Pedroza; Jorge Sumano; Montserrat Resendiz; Guillermo García-Ramos

2004-01-01

220

Nighttime sleep and daytime functioning correlates of the insomnia complaint in young adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nighttime and daytime correlates of the insomnia complaint (IC) were assessed in an in-class survey on a sample of 1238 first year university students (18.85±1.45 years) at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, Spain. Evidence was found that the likelihood of complaining of insomnia was increased by perceiving difficulties with initiating and maintaining sleep, reporting low quality of nocturnal sleep,

Julio Fernández-Mendoza; Antonio Vela-Bueno; Alexandros N. Vgontzas; Sara Olavarrieta-Bernardino; María José Ramos-Platón; Edward O. Bixler; Juan José De la Cruz-Troca

2009-01-01

221

Sleeping sickness  

MedlinePLUS

Human African trypanosomiasis ... Kirchoff LV. Agents of African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolan R, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 7th ...

222

Sleep Quiz  

MedlinePLUS

... turning the radio up will keep the drowsy driver awake. _____5. Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder marked ... turning the radio up may arouse a drowsy driver briefly, but this won't keep that person ...

223

Sleep disturbances and post-traumatic stress disorder; a perpetual circle?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Sleep facilitates the consolidation of fear extinction memory. Disrupted sleep has been proposed as a vulnerability factor for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Moreover, nightmares and insomnia are hallmark symptoms of PTSD, possibly interfering with fear extinction and compromising recovery. A perpetual circle may develop when sleep increases the risk for PTSD, and PTSD leads to an

S. van Liempt

2012-01-01

224

Vapor Rub, Petrolatum, and No Treatment for Children With Nocturnal Cough and Cold Symptoms  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine if a single application of a vapor rub (VR) or petrolatum is superior to no treatment for nocturnal cough, congestion, and sleep difficulty caused by upper respiratory tract infection. METHODS Surveys were administered to parents on 2 consecutive days—on the day of presentation when no medication had been given the previous evening, and the next day when VR ointment, petrolatum ointment, or no treatment had been applied to their child’s chest and neck before bedtime according to a partially double-blinded randomization scheme. RESULTS There were 138 children aged 2 to 11 years who completed the trial. Within each study group, symptoms were improved on the second night. Between treatment groups, significant differences in improvement were detected for outcomes related to cough, congestion, and sleep difficulty; VR consistently scored the best, and no treatment scored the worst. Pairwise comparisons demonstrated the superiority of VR over no treatment for all outcomes except rhinorrhea and over petrolatum for cough severity, child and parent sleep difficulty, and combined symptom score. Petrolatum was not significantly better than no treatment for any outcome. Irritant adverse effects were more common among VR-treated participants. CONCLUSIONS In a comparison of VR, petrolatum, and no treatment, parents rated VR most favorably for symptomatic relief of their child’s nocturnal cough, congestion, and sleep difficulty caused by upper respiratory tract infection. Despite mild irritant adverse effects, VR provided symptomatic relief for children and allowed them and their parents to have a more restful night than those in the other study groups. PMID:21059712

Paul, Ian M.; Beiler, Jessica S.; King, Tonya S.; Clapp, Edelveis R.; Vallati, Julie; Berlin, Cheston M.

2013-01-01

225

Sleep Disorders (PDQ)  

MedlinePLUS

... movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM): REM sleep, also known as "dream sleep," is the phase ... of a non-REM phase followed by a REM phase. Each cycle lasts about 90 minutes and is repeated 4 to 6 times during 7 to 8 hours of sleep. Sleep disorders affect normal sleep patterns. Normal sleep ...

226

Screening Sleep Disordered Breathing in Stroke Unit  

PubMed Central

In acute stroke, OSA has been found to impair rehabilitation and increase mortality but the effect of central apnea is more unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using limited ambulatory recording system (sleep mattress to evaluate nocturnal breathing and EOG-electrodes for sleep staging) in sleep disordered breathing (SDB) diagnostics in mild acute cerebral ischemia patients and to discover the prevalence of various SDB-patterns among these patients. 42 patients with mild ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack were studied. OSA was found in 22 patients (52.4%). Central apnea was found in two patients (4.8%) and sustained partial obstruction in only one patient (2.4%). Sleep staging with EOG-electrodes only yielded a similar outcome as scoring with standard rules. OSA was found to be common even after mild stroke. Its early diagnosis and treatment would be favourable in order to improve recovery and reduce mortality. Our results suggest that OSA can be assessed by a limited recording setting with EOG-electrodes, sleep mattress, and pulse oximetry. PMID:24991437

Väyrynen, Kirsi; Numminen, Heikki; Miettinen, Katja; Keso, Anna; Tenhunen, Mirja; Huhtala, Heini

2014-01-01

227

Ecology and Neurophysiology of Sleep in Two Wild Sloth Species  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Interspecific variation in sleep measured in captivity correlates with various physiological and environmental factors, including estimates of predation risk in the wild. However, it remains unclear whether prior comparative studies have been confounded by the captive recording environment. Herein we examine the effect of predation pressure on sleep in sloths living in the wild. Design: Comparison of two closely related sloth species, one exposed to predation and one free from predation. Setting: Panamanian mainland rainforest (predators present) and island mangrove (predators absent). Participants: Mainland (Bradypus variegatus, five males and four females) and island (Bradypus pygmaeus, six males) sloths. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded using a miniature data logger. Although both species spent between 9 and 10 h per day sleeping, the mainland sloths showed a preference for sleeping at night, whereas island sloths showed no preference for sleeping during the day or night. Standardized EEG activity during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed lower low-frequency power, and increased spindle and higher frequency power in island sloths when compared to mainland sloths. Conclusions: In sloths sleeping in the wild, predation pressure influenced the timing of sleep, but not the amount of time spent asleep. The preference for sleeping at night in mainland sloths may be a strategy to avoid detection by nocturnal cats. The pronounced differences in the NREM sleep EEG spectrum remain unexplained, but might be related to genetic or environmental factors. Citation: Voirin B; Scriba MF; Martinez-Gonzalez D; Vyssotski AL; Wikelski M; Rattenborg NC. Ecology and neurophysiology of sleep in two wild sloth species. SLEEP 2014;37(4):753-761. PMID:24899764

Voirin, Bryson; Scriba, Madeleine F.; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Wikelski, Martin; Rattenborg, Niels C.

2014-01-01

228

Effects of playing a computer game using a bright display on presleep physiological variables, sleep latency, slow wave sleep and REM sleep.  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies have shown that playing a computer game at night delays bedtime and shortens sleeping hours, but the effects on sleep architecture and quality have remained unclear. In the present study, the effects of playing a computer game and using a bright display on nocturnal sleep were examined in a laboratory. Seven male adults (24.7+/-5.6 years old) played exciting computer games with a bright display (game-BD) and a dark display (game-DD) and performed simple tasks with low mental load as a control condition in front of a BD (control-BD) and DD (control-DD) between 23:00 and 1:45 hours in randomized order and then went to bed at 2:00 hours and slept until 8:00 hours. Rectal temperature, electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rate and subjective sleepiness were recorded before sleep and a polysomnogram was recorded during sleep. Heart rate was significantly higher after playing games than after the control conditions, and it was also significantly higher after using the BD than after using the DD. Subjective sleepiness and relative theta power of EEG were significantly lower after playing games than after the control conditions. Sleep latency was significantly longer after playing games than after the control conditions. REM sleep was significantly shorter after the playing games than after the control conditions. No significant effects of either computer games or BD were found on slow-wave sleep. These results suggest that playing an exciting computer game affects sleep latency and REM sleep but that a bright display does not affect sleep variables. PMID:16120101

Higuchi, Shigekazu; Motohashi, Yutaka; Liu, Yang; Maeda, Akira

2005-09-01

229

Evidence from opsin genes rejects nocturnality in ancestral primates  

E-print Network

Evidence from opsin genes rejects nocturnality in ancestral primates Ying Tan* , Anne D. Yoder, 2005 It is firmly believed that ancestral primates were nocturnal, with nocturnality having been among lineages. These observations suggest that the ancestral primates were diurnal or cathemeral

Yoder, Anne

230

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: natural history, diagnosis, and emerging treatment options  

PubMed Central

Sleep apnea is an entity characterized by repetitive upper airway obstruction resulting in nocturnal hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. It is estimated that 2%–4% of the middle-aged population has sleep apnea with a predilection in men relative to women. Risk factors of sleep apnea include obesity, gender, age, menopause, familial factors, craniofacial abnormalities, and alcohol. Sleep apnea has been increasingly recognized as a major health burden associated with hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Increased airway collapsibility and derangement in ventilatory control responses are the major pathological features of this disorder. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold-standard method for diagnosis of sleep apnea and assessment of sleep apnea severity; however, portable sleep monitoring has a diagnostic role in the setting of high pretest probability sleep apnea in the absence of significant comorbidity. Positive pressure therapy is the mainstay therapy of sleep apnea. Other treatment modalities, such as upper airway surgery or oral appliances, may be used for the treatment of sleep apnea in select cases. In this review, we focus on describing the sleep apnea definition, risk factor profile, underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, associated adverse consequences, diagnostic modalities, and treatment strategies. PMID:23616712

Gharibeh, Tarek; Mehra, Reena

2010-01-01

231

Physiological changes, sleep, and morning mood in an isolated environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BACKGROUND: Previous isolation studies have shown increased 24-h urine volumes and body weight gains in subjects. This project examined those and other physiological variables in relationship to sleep motor activity, subjective sleep quality, mood, and complaints during confinement. METHODS: Six male and two female subjects lived for 7 d in the National Space Development Agency of Japan's isolation chamber, which simulates the interior of the Japanese Experiment Module. Each 24-h period included 6 h of sleep, 3 meals, and 20 min of exercise. Each morning, subjects completed Sleep Sensation and Complaint Index questionnaires. Catecholamine and creatinine excretion, urine volume, and body weight were measured on the 2 d before and 2 d after confinement, and sleep motor activity was measured during confinement. RESULTS: Confinement produced no significant change in body weight, urine volume, or questionnaire results. In contrast, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and sleep motor activity exhibited significant differences during confinement (p < 0.05). Higher nocturnal norepinephrine excretion correlated with higher sleep motor activity. CONCLUSION: The 24-h epinephrine values were slightly higher than normal throughout the experiment, but lower than for subjects working under time-stress. High sympathetic activity (as indicated by norepinephrine) may have interfered with sleep.

Kraft, Norbert O.; Inoue, Natsuhiko; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Murai, Tadashi; Sekiguchi, Chiharu; Orasanu, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

2002-01-01

232

Prevalence of Moderate or Severe Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Obese Persons with Obstructive Sleep Apnea  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated prior to gastric bypass surgery the prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) by Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography in 14 obese women and in 6 obese men, mean age 45 years, with a mean body mass index of 49 ± 5 kg\\/m2 who had nocturnal polysomnography for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiographic

Jasdeep Sidana; Wilbert S. Aronow; Gautham Ravipati; Brian Di Stante; John A. McClung; Robert N. Belkin; Stuart G. Lehrman

2005-01-01

233

Musculoskeletal Sensitization and Sleep: Chronic Muscle Pain Fragments Sleep of Mice without Altering Its Duration  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. Design: A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. Methods: We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Results: Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models. Citation: Sutton BC; Opp MR. Musculoskeletal sensitization and sleep: chronic muscle pain fragments sleep of mice without altering its duration. SLEEP 2014;37(3):505-513. PMID:24587573

Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

2014-01-01

234

Nocturnal penile tumescence monitoring with stamps in impotent diabetics.  

PubMed

The usefulness of nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) monitoring with stamps was evaluated in diabetic males with impotence. The stamps, which were similar in paper and size to Japanese 10-yen postage stamps, were wrapped around the penis before sleep and the stamp ring was checked for breakage the next morning. Clinical features of the subjects were investigated by penile blood pressure index (PBPI), neurological examinations, psychological tests, and hormonal measurements. Nineteen out of 37 patients with impotence had a breakage of the stamp rings on one or more of 3 nights. The patients with non-breakage of stamp rings had significantly more serious diabetic neuropathy (peripheral and autonomic), depressive tendency, loss of libido, and a higher prevalence of heavy smoking than those with breakage of the stamp rings. PBPI and hormonal findings showed no difference between the breakage and non-breakage patients. These results show that the diagnostic value of this method is nearly the same as that of NPT recording with a strain gauge. PMID:3359920

Takahashi, Y; Hirata, Y

1988-02-19

235

Does Abnormal Sleep Impair Memory Consolidation in Schizophrenia?  

PubMed Central

Although disturbed sleep is a prominent feature of schizophrenia, its relation to the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Sleep disturbances are well known to impair cognition in healthy individuals. Yet, in spite of its ubiquity in schizophrenia, abnormal sleep has generally been overlooked as a potential contributor to cognitive deficits. Amelioration of cognitive deficits is a current priority of the schizophrenia research community, but most efforts to define, characterize, and quantify cognitive deficits focus on cross-sectional measures. While this approach provides a valid snapshot of function, there is now overwhelming evidence that critical aspects of learning and memory consolidation happen offline, both over time and with sleep. Initial memory encoding is followed by a prolonged period of consolidation, integration, and reorganization, that continues over days or even years. Much of this evolution of memories is mediated by sleep. This article briefly reviews (i) what is known about abnormal sleep in schizophrenia, (ii) sleep-dependent memory consolidation in healthy individuals, (iii) recent findings of impaired sleep-dependent memory consolidation in schizophrenia, and (iv) implications of impaired sleep-dependent memory consolidation in schizophrenia. This literature suggests that abnormal sleep in schizophrenia disrupts attention and impairs sleep-dependent memory consolidation and task automation. We conclude that these sleep-dependent impairments may contribute substantially to generalized cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Understanding this contribution may open new avenues to ameliorating cognitive dysfunction and thereby improve outcome in schizophrenia. PMID:19750201

Manoach, Dara S.; Stickgold, Robert

2009-01-01

236

Effect of sleep deprivation on the human metabolome.  

PubMed

Sleep restriction and circadian clock disruption are associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The metabolic pathways involved in human sleep, however, have yet to be investigated with the use of a metabolomics approach. Here we have used untargeted and targeted liquid chromatography (LC)/MS metabolomics to examine the effect of acute sleep deprivation on plasma metabolite rhythms. Twelve healthy young male subjects remained in controlled laboratory conditions with respect to environmental light, sleep, meals, and posture during a 24-h wake/sleep cycle, followed by 24 h of wakefulness. Two-hourly plasma samples collected over the 48 h period were analyzed by LC/MS. Principal component analysis revealed a clear time of day variation with a significant cosine fit during the wake/sleep cycle and during 24 h of wakefulness in untargeted and targeted analysis. Of 171 metabolites quantified, daily rhythms were observed in the majority (n = 109), with 78 of these maintaining their rhythmicity during 24 h of wakefulness, most with reduced amplitude (n = 66). During sleep deprivation, 27 metabolites (tryptophan, serotonin, taurine, 8 acylcarnitines, 13 glycerophospholipids, and 3 sphingolipids) exhibited significantly increased levels compared with during sleep. The increased levels of serotonin, tryptophan, and taurine may explain the antidepressive effect of acute sleep deprivation and deserve further study. This report, to our knowledge the first of metabolic profiling during sleep and sleep deprivation and characterization of 24 h rhythms under these conditions, offers a novel view of human sleep/wake regulation. PMID:25002497

Davies, Sarah K; Ang, Joo Ern; Revell, Victoria L; Holmes, Ben; Mann, Anuska; Robertson, Francesca P; Cui, Nanyi; Middleton, Benita; Ackermann, Katrin; Kayser, Manfred; Thumser, Alfred E; Raynaud, Florence I; Skene, Debra J

2014-07-22

237

Effect of sleep deprivation on the human metabolome  

PubMed Central

Sleep restriction and circadian clock disruption are associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The metabolic pathways involved in human sleep, however, have yet to be investigated with the use of a metabolomics approach. Here we have used untargeted and targeted liquid chromatography (LC)/MS metabolomics to examine the effect of acute sleep deprivation on plasma metabolite rhythms. Twelve healthy young male subjects remained in controlled laboratory conditions with respect to environmental light, sleep, meals, and posture during a 24-h wake/sleep cycle, followed by 24 h of wakefulness. Two-hourly plasma samples collected over the 48 h period were analyzed by LC/MS. Principal component analysis revealed a clear time of day variation with a significant cosine fit during the wake/sleep cycle and during 24 h of wakefulness in untargeted and targeted analysis. Of 171 metabolites quantified, daily rhythms were observed in the majority (n = 109), with 78 of these maintaining their rhythmicity during 24 h of wakefulness, most with reduced amplitude (n = 66). During sleep deprivation, 27 metabolites (tryptophan, serotonin, taurine, 8 acylcarnitines, 13 glycerophospholipids, and 3 sphingolipids) exhibited significantly increased levels compared with during sleep. The increased levels of serotonin, tryptophan, and taurine may explain the antidepressive effect of acute sleep deprivation and deserve further study. This report, to our knowledge the first of metabolic profiling during sleep and sleep deprivation and characterization of 24 h rhythms under these conditions, offers a novel view of human sleep/wake regulation. PMID:25002497

Davies, Sarah K.; Ang, Joo Ern; Revell, Victoria L.; Holmes, Ben; Mann, Anuska; Robertson, Francesca P.; Cui, Nanyi; Middleton, Benita; Ackermann, Katrin; Kayser, Manfred; Thumser, Alfred E.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Skene, Debra J.

2014-01-01

238

Severe Nocturnal and Postexercise Hypoxia in Children and Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease  

PubMed Central

Hypoxia is a common feature in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) that is inconsistently associated with painful crises and acute chest syndrome. To assess the prevalence and risk factors of hypoxia, we recorded daytime, nocturnal, and postexercise pulse oximetry (SpO2) values in 39 SCD patients with a median age of 10.8 years. Median daytime SpO2 was 97% (range, 89%–100%), and 36% of patients had daytime hypoxia defined as SpO2<96%. Median nocturnal SpO2 was 94.7% (range, 87.7%–99.5%), 50% of patients had nocturnal hypoxia defined as SpO2?93%, and 11(37%) patients spent more than 10% of their total sleep time with SpO2<90%. Median postexercise SpO2 was 94% (range, 72%–100%) and 44.7% of patients had postexercise hypoxia defined as an SpO2 decrease ?3% after a 6-minute walk test. Among patients with normal daytime SpO2, 35% had nocturnal and 42% postexercise hypoxia. Compared to 9 patients without daytime, nocturnal, or postexercise hypoxia, 25 patients with hypoxia under at least one of these three conditions had greater anemia severity (P?=?0.01), lower HbF levels (P?=?0.04), and higher aspartate aminotransferase levels (P?=?0.03). Males predominated among patients with postexercise hypoxia (P?=?0.004). Hypoxia correlated neither with painful crises nor with acute chest syndrome. Of 32 evaluable patients, 6 (18.8%) had a tricuspid regurgitation velocity ?2.6 m/s, and this feature was associated with anemia (P?=?0.044). Median percentage of the predicted distance covered during a 6-minute walk test was 86% [46–120]; the distance was negatively associated with LDH (P?=?0.044) and with a past history of acute chest syndrome (P?=?0.009). In conclusion, severe episodes of nocturnal and postexercise hypoxia are common in children with SCD, even those with normal daytime SpO2. PMID:24878576

Halphen, Isabelle; Elie, Caroline; Brousse, Valentine; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Allali, Slimane; Bonnet, Damien; de Montalembert, Mariane

2014-01-01

239

Parasympathetic nervous system activity and children's sleep  

PubMed Central

Summary We examined indices of children's parasympathetic nervous system activity (PNS), including respiratory sinus arrhythmia during baseline (RSAB) and RSA reactivity (RSAR), to a laboratory challenge, and importantly the interaction between RSAB and RSAR as predictors of multiple parameters of children's sleep. Lower RSAR denotes increased vagal withdrawal (reductions in RSA between baseline and task) and higher RSAR represents decreased vagal withdrawal or augmentation (increases in RSA between baseline and task). A community sample of school-attending children (121 boys and 103 girls) participated [mean age = 10.41 years; standard deviation (SD) = 0.67]. Children's sleep parameters were examined through actigraphy for 7 consecutive nights. Findings demonstrate that RSAB and RSAR interact to predict multiple sleep quality parameters (activity, minutes awake after sleep onset and long wake episodes). The overall pattern of effects illustrates that children who exhibit more disrupted sleep (increased activity, more minutes awake after sleep onset and more frequent long wake episodes) are those with lower RSAB in conjunction with lower RSAR. This combination of low RSAB and low RSAR probably reflects increased autonomic nervous system arousal, which interferes with sleep. Results illustrate the importance of individual differences in physiological regulation indexed by interactions between PNS baseline activity and PNS reactivity for a better understanding of children's sleep quality. PMID:23217056

El-Sheikh, Mona; Erath, Stephen A.; Bagley, Erika J.

2014-01-01

240

Nocturnal foraging in the American White Pelican  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nocturnal foraging was examined in American White Pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) at the Dauphin River, about 50 km from a breeding colony on Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. From two to three times as many pelicans foraged at night as in the daytime, with foraging flocks being larger at night. In contrast, more pelicans were present at adjacent loafing sites during the

BLAIR F. MCMAHON; ROGER M. EVANS

1992-01-01

241

Nocturnal enuresis and upper airway obstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between nocturnal enuresis (NE) and upper airway obstruction (UAO) in pediatric population. Material and methods: This study presents the results of our experience with 321 children who underwent adenotonsillar surgery. Results: Among 321 children who were operated on, 111 (35%) had NE. Seventy-four of the 111 children who had

Ugur Çinar; Cetin Vural; Burak Çakir; Ebru Topuz; M. Ihsan Karaman; Suat Turgut

2001-01-01

242

Review: Laboratory Diagnosis of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an uncommon acquired stem cell disorder associated with periodic hemolytic events. This benign clonal disease is caused by abnormalities of the X- linked phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA) gene and is associated with cytopenias and thrombosis. Although the trilineage of bone marrow elements is affected, involvement of the red blood cell (RBC) line was recognized

Jonathan S Krauss

243

Stress-Induced Changes in Sleep in Rodents: Models and Mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Psychological stressors have a prominent effect on sleep in general, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in particular. Disruptions in sleep are a prominent feature, and potentially even the hallmark, of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Ross et al., 1989). Animal models are critical in understanding both the causes and potential treatments of psychiatric disorders. The current review describes a number of studies that have focused on the impact of stress on sleep in rodent models. The studies are also summarized in Table 1, summarizing the effects of stress in 4-hr blocks in both the light and dark phases. Although mild stress procedures have sometimes produced increases in REM sleep, more intense stressors appear to model the human condition by leading to disruptions in sleep, particularly REM sleep. We also discuss work conducted by our group and others looking at conditioning as a factor in the temporal extension of stress-related sleep disruptions. Finally, we attempt to describe the probable neural mechanisms of the sleep disruptions. A complete understanding of the neural correlates of stress-induced sleep alterations may lead to novel treatments for a variety of debilitating sleep disorders. PMID:17764741

Pawlyk, Aaron C.; Morrison, Adrian R.; Ross, Richard J.; Brennan, Francis X.

2008-01-01

244

Traffic noise-induced sleep disturbances and their correction by an anxiolytic sedative, OX-373.  

PubMed

In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the effect of nocturnal traffic noise and bedtime medication of a new benzodiazepine, OX-373, on objective and subjective sleep variables as well as on the quality of morning awakenings was investigated. 10 healthy subjects spent 17 nights in the sleep laboratory: 2 adaptation nights, 1 baseline night, 4 drug nights (20, 30, and 40 mg OX-373 and placebo) and 4 subsequent wash-out nights as well as 3 nights under traffic noise with placebo, 30 and 40 mg OX-373 and 3 subsequent wash-out nights. Nocturnal traffic noise with an intensity of 45-65 dB(A) induced sleep disturbances characterized by an increase in intermittent wakefulness and stage 1 and the number of nocturnal awakenings as well as by a decrease of spindle and REM sleep stages. Subjectively, a decrease of deep sleep and increase of light sleep and middle insomnia was reported. Upon awakening in the morning, mood was significantly deteriorated. The new benzodiazepine OX-373 attenuated the above-described traffic noise-induced changes and produced even oppositional alterations, such as a decrease in stage 1, number of awakenings and stage shifts while increasing stage 2. The drug alone decreased the number of awakenings and stage 1 and augmented stage 4 as compared with placebo, which was subjectively felt as an increase in deep sleep and as a decrease of light sleep, early and middle insomnia. In the morning, there were no signs of 'hangover', which was confirmed also by psychometry. Nor were there any clinically relevant alterations in blood pressure and pulse. Thus, our studies confirmed earlier pharmaco-EEG and psychometric investigations predicting OX-373 as well-tolerated anxiolytic sedative, and suggested further that traffic noise could eventually be utilized as an experimental provocative technique in order to induce a standardized sleep disturbance for early clinical drug evaluation of potentially hypnotic substances. PMID:6118840

Saletu, B; Grünberger, J

1981-01-01

245

Epidemiology of Sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

The epidemiology of sleep refers to the study of patterns of sleep and sleep disorders across the population. Under the broad\\u000a heading of the epidemiology of sleep, there are numerous specific questions to be asked about sleep hygiene practices, sleep\\u000a architecture, sleep duration, and any one of a set of disorders. This chapter focuses on what is known about patterns

Lauren Hale

246

"Trouble Sleeping?-Sleeping Disorders Overview"  

E-print Network

age Drugs and alcohol Female 81 Sleep Disorders (AASM) Many people are unaware of it Nowell PD, et. al"Trouble Sleeping?- Sleeping Disorders Overview" Deaf Health Talks October 15, 2009 #12;Supporters to treat sleeping problems http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_DO3lkYspzAM/SfVT_JxaT oI/AAAAAAAADNg/JZCstuUzyh8/s400

Goldman, Steven A.

247

"Trouble Sleeping?-Sleeping Disorders Overview"  

E-print Network

age Drugs and alcohol Female 81 Sleep Disorders (AASM) Many people are unaware of it Nowell PD, et. al"Trouble Sleeping?- Sleeping Disorders Overview" Deaf Health Talks December 8, 2011 #12;Supporters to treat sleeping problems http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_DO3lkYspzAM/SfVT_JxaT oI/AAAAAAAADNg/JZCstuUzyh8/s400

Goldman, Steven A.

248

Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a pathophysiological implication.

Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

2007-07-01

249

A HAT for sleep?: epigenetic regulation of sleep by Tip60 in Drosophila.  

PubMed

Sleep disturbances are common in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). Unfortunately, how AD is mechanistically linked with interference of the body's natural sleep rhythms remains unclear. Our recent findings provide insight into this question by demonstrating that sleep disruption associated with AD is driven by epigenetic changes mediated by the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) Tip60. In this study, we show that Tip60 functionally interacts with the AD associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) to regulate axonal growth of Drosophila small ventrolateral neuronal (sLNv) pacemaker cells, and their production of neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF) that stabilizes appropriate sleep-wake patterns in the fly. Loss of Tip60 HAT activity under APP neurodegenerative conditions causes decreased PDF production, retraction of the sLNv synaptic arbor required for PDF release and disruption of sleep-wake cycles in these flies. Remarkably, excess Tip60 in conjunction with APP fully rescues these sleep-wake disturbances by inducing overelaboration of the sLNv synaptic terminals and increasing PDF levels, supporting a neuroprotective role for Tip60 in these processes. Our studies highlight the importance of epigenetic based mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances in neurodegenerative diseases like AD. PMID:23572111

Pirooznia, Sheila K; Elefant, Felice

2013-01-01

250

Neuroimaging in sleep medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of neuroimaging techniques has made possible the characterization of cerebral function throughout the sleep-wake cycle in normal human subjects. Indeed, human brain activity during sleep is segregated within specific cortical and subcortical areas in relation to the sleep stage, sleep physiological events and previous waking activity. This approach has allowed sleep physiological theories developed from animal data to

Thien Thanh Dang-Vu; Martin Desseilles; Dominique Petit; Stéphanie Mazza; Jacques Montplaisir; Pierre Maquet

2007-01-01

251

Obstructive sleep apnea: awakening the hidden truth.  

PubMed

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common type of sleep apnea and is caused by obstruction of upper airway. Sleep apnea is clinically defined as frequent episodes of apnea, hypopnea and symptoms of functional impairment, which could be life-threatening and associated with extreme daytime hyper somnolence, dysfunction, discrements in health-related quality of life, automobile accidents, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Etiopathogenic factors that contribute to OSA include reduced upper-airway dilator muscle activity during sleep, upper-airway anatomical features, ventilatory control insufficiency, lung volume, and rostral fluid shifts. The presence of risk factors such as age, gender and obesity increases the incidence of OSA. The repetitive nocturnal hypoxemia experienced by patients with OSA is associated with activation of a number of neural, humoral, thrombotic, metabolic, and inflammatory disease mechanisms, all of which have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of various systemic diseases. This article summarizes the etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, associated systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and dental diseases with OSA and the influence of tongue on oropharyngeal airway in OSA patients. PMID:25511335

Viswanath, A; Ramamurthy, J; Dinesh, S P S; Srinivas, A

2015-01-01

252

Sleep difficulties are associated with increased symptoms of psychopathology.  

PubMed

Sleep problems often co-occur with psychopathological conditions and affective dysregulation. Individuals with mood disorders have significantly higher rates of sleep disturbances than healthy individuals, and among those with mood disorders, sleep problems are associated with lower rates of remission and response to treatment. Sleep disruption may itself be a risk factor for various forms of psychopathology, as experimental sleep deprivation has been found to lead to increased affective, cognitive, and somatic symptoms within healthy volunteers. However, little is known about the relationship between recurring sleep complaints in a naturalistic environment and symptoms of psychopathology among healthy individuals. In the present study, 49 healthy adults (21 males and 28 females) reported sleep quality and completed the Personality Assessment Inventory, a standardized self-report assessment of symptoms of psychopathology. Consistent with prior published findings during total sleep deprivation, individuals endorsing self-reported naturally occurring sleep problems showed higher scores on scales measuring somatic complaints, anxiety, and depression. Furthermore, the reported frequency of sleep disturbance was closely linked with the severity of self-reported symptoms. While causal directionality cannot be inferred, these findings support the notion that sleep and emotional functioning are closely linked. PMID:24496489

Tkachenko, Olga; Olson, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Preer, Lily A; Gogel, Hannah; Killgore, William D S

2014-05-01

253

Metabolic and glycemic sequelae of sleep disturbances in children and adults.  

PubMed

The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations. PMID:25398202

Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L; Mokhlesi, Babak

2015-01-01

254

Crew factors in flight operations. Part 4: Sleep and wakefulness in international aircrews  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Physiological recordings of sleep and wakefulness in operating international (B-747) flight crews were obtained. Crews spent their first layover (48 h) of a trip in a sleep laboratory where standardized EEG, electro-oculograph (EOC), and electromyograph (EMG) sleep recordings were carried out whenever volunteers chose to sleep. During periods of wakefulness they underwent multiple sleep latency tests every 2 h in order to assess daytime drowsiness. The same standardized recordings were carried out at a home-based laboratory before departure. Approximately four crews each participated in flights over 7 to 9 time zones on five routes. All participants were encouraged to use whatever sleep-wake strategies they thought would provide them with the most satisfactory crew rest. Overall, layover sleep quality was not seriously disturbed, but eastward flights produced greater sleep disruption. The contributors of individual factors and the usefulness of various sleep strategies are discussed in the individual laboratory reports and in an operational summary.

Graeber, R. C.

1986-01-01

255

Therapeutic Strategies for Sleep Apnea in Hypertension and Heart Failure  

PubMed Central

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) causes hypoxemia, negative intrathoracic pressure, and frequent arousal, contributing to increased cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is linked to hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and cardiac arrhythmias. Successful continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment has a beneficial effect on hypertension and improves the survival rate of patients with cardiovascular disease. Thus, long-term compliance with CPAP treatment may result in substantial blood pressure reduction in patients with resistant hypertension suffering from OSAS. Central sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes respiration occur in 30–50% of patients with heart failure (HF). Intermittent hypoxemia, nocturnal surges in sympathetic activity, and increased left ventricular preload and afterload due to negative intrathoracic pressure all lead to impaired cardiac function and poor life prognosis. SDB-related HF has been considered the potential therapeutic target. CPAP, nocturnal O2 therapy, and adaptive servoventilation minimize the effects of sleep apnea, thereby improving cardiac function, prognosis, and quality of life. Early diagnosis and treatment of SDB will yield better therapeutic outcomes for hypertension and HF. PMID:23509623

Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Yasuda, Yoshinari

2013-01-01

256

American Sleep Association  

MedlinePLUS

... Basic information on sleep – Symptoms of sleep disorders – Insomnia treatments – Information on good sleep health – Treatments of ... Dec/14 - 4:43 am Re: My chronic insomnia story 05/Dec/14 - 5:46 am Re: ...

257

Aging changes in sleep  

MedlinePLUS

... health condition is affecting your sleep. COMMON PROBLEMS Insomnia is one of the more common sleep problems ... an actual sleeping pill for relieving short-term insomnia. However, most health experts do not recommend these ...

258

Sleep disorders - overview  

MedlinePLUS

Sleep disorders are problems with sleeping, including trouble falling or staying asleep, falling asleep at the wrong times, ... low thyroid function Mononucleosis or other viral illnesses Narcolepsy and other sleep disorders Obesity, especially if it ...

259

Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

2015-01-01

260

Neighborhood Problems and Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping  

PubMed Central

Objective Living in adverse neighborhood conditions has been linked with greater prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to learn whether perceived neighborhood problems are related to attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping, a risk factor for CVD morbidity. Method A sample of 133 adults (71 male, 62 female; 80 White, 53 Black) underwent 24-hr ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The neighborhood problem scale (NPS) was used to assess neighborhood environmental stressors. Results Nocturnal dipping in systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure was reduced in individuals with higher NPS scores (p < .05). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that neighborhood problems explained 4%–6% of the variance in SBP, DBP, and MAP dipping (p < .05) even after adjusting for several theoretical confounders such as social status, age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), smoking, exercise, depression and discrimination. Conclusion Neighborhood problems may contribute to attenuated BP dipping beyond the effect of known risk factors. PMID:24245839

Euteneuer, Frank; Rief, Winfried; Mills, Paul J.; Pung, Meredith A.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

2014-01-01

261

Sleep-Wake Behavior in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Disturbances of the internal biological clock manifest as fatigue, poor concentration, and sleep disturbances—symptoms reminiscent of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and suggestive of a role for circadian rhythm disturbance in CFS. We examined circadian patterns of activity, sleep, and cortisol secretion in patients with CFS. Design: Case-control study, 5-day behavioral observation. Setting: Natural setting/home environment Participants: 15 patients with CFS and 15 healthy subjects of similar age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and activity levels. Interventions: N/A Measurements: Self-report questionnaires were used to obtain medical history and demographic information and to assess health behaviors, somatic and psychological symptoms, and sleep quality. An actiwatch accelerometer recorded activity and sleep patterns over 5 days with concurrent activity and symptom logs. Diurnal salivary cortisol secretion was measured. Additionally, overnight heart rate monitoring and pain sensitivity assessment was undertaken. Results: Ratings of symptoms, disability, sleep disturbance, and pain sensitivity were greater in patients with CFS. No between-group differences were found in the pattern or amount of sleep, activity, or cortisol secretion. Afternoon activity levels significantly increased evening fatigue in patients but not control subjects. Low nocturnal heart rate variability was identified as a biological correlate of unrefreshing sleep. Conclusions: We found no evidence of circadian rhythm disturbance in CFS. However, the role of autonomic activity in the experience of unrefreshing sleep warrants further assessment. The activity symptom-relationship modelled here is of clinical significance in the approach to activity and symptom management in the treatment of CFS. Citation: Rahman K; Burton A; Galbraith S; Lloyd A; Vollmer-Conna U. Sleep-wake behavior in chronic fatigue syndrome. SLEEP 2011;34(5):671-678. PMID:21532961

Rahman, Khairunnessa; Burton, Alexander; Galbraith, Sally; Lloyd, Andrew; Vollmer-Conna, Ute

2011-01-01

262

Nocturnal panic and recent life events.  

PubMed

Recent research has hypothesized an association between traumatic events and nocturnal panic (NP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the onset of nocturnal panic attacks is associated with a higher frequency of and/or greater severity of stressful or traumatic life events than that of patients with panic disorders (PDs) who experience daytime panic attacks (DPs) while awake. A secondary aim was to investigate whether NP is associated with specific life events at the onset of the disorder. Our sample comprised 129 subjects with PD (DSM-IV). We investigated the number and types of stressful life events that occurred in the year prior to PD onset using a semistructured interview. Of the sample, 28.7% had recurrent nocturnal panic attacks (NP group). Subjects with and without recurrent NP did not differ on any sociodemographic or clinical characteristic. Neither the number nor type of life event distinguished those with or without NP. The subgroup of patients with PD with recurrent NP appears to represent a variant of PD with a possible increased vulnerability to conditions of diminished arousal as a trigger of panic attacks. However, the hypothesis that this vulnerability might be determined by life events that occur in the period preceding PD onset was not supported by the findings of this study. PMID:16175567

Albert, Umberto; Maina, Giuseppe; Bergesio, Chiara; Bogetto, Filippo

2005-01-01

263

The Role of Sleep in Childhood Psychiatric Disorders  

PubMed Central

Although sleep problems often comprise core features of psychiatric disorders, inadequate attention has been paid to the complex, reciprocal relationships involved in the early regulation of sleep, emotion, and behavior. In this paper, we review the pediatric literature examining sleep in children with primary psychiatric disorders as well as evidence for the role of early sleep problems as a risk factor for the development of psychopathology. Based on these cumulative data, possible mechanisms and implications of early sleep disruption are considered. Finally, assessment recommendations for mental health clinicians working with children and adolescents are provided toward reducing the risk of and improving treatments for sleep disorders and psychopathology in children and adolescents. PMID:19960111

Alfano, Candice A.; Gamble, Amanda L.

2009-01-01

264

Sleep in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi): A semi-restrictive, non-invasive, polysomnographic study.  

PubMed

The normal sleep patterns of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) have not been described yet. The objective of this study was to characterize the electrophysiological patterns, sleeping postures, and sleep-wake cycle in semi-restricted spider monkeys. Continuous 24-hr polysomnographic (PSG) recordings, involving simultaneous recording of non-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG), electro-oculographic (EOG), and electromyographic (EMG) activities, were carried out in captive monkeys living in outdoor rainforest enclosures. Electrode placement was done according to the human international 10-20 system. Specific behaviors displayed by monkeys during the sleep-wake cycles were correlated with the PSG recordings. The nycthemeral distribution of the sleep-wake cycle was also calculated. The results show that electrophysiological N-REM sleep patterns in spider monkeys are similar to those observed in other primates, including human beings. Furthermore, a vertical semi-fetal posture was observed during N-REM and REM sleep phases. The amount of nocturnal sleep was significantly higher than that of the diurnal period, showing that the spider monkey is a diurnal primate. An outstanding finding was the absence of muscular atonia during the spider monkey's REM sleep, which suggests that arboreal primates have developed a neuromuscular mechanism specialized for sleeping in a vertical posture. Am. J. Primatol. 77:200-210, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25231936

Cruz-Aguilar, Manuel Alejandro; Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso; Jiménez-Anguiano, Anabel; Santillán-Doherty, Ana María; García-Orduña, Francisco; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

2015-02-01

265

Sleep deprivation of working adolescents--a hidden work hazard.  

PubMed

This manuscript discusses the sleep deprivation of adolescents and young workers and its impact on their work and learning. Several studies have shown that working adolescents wake up earlier, have a shorter nocturnal sleep duration and a higher level of sleepiness during wake time during the week than nonworking students do. These studies indicate that working students may have their learning ability negatively affected by being tired and sleepy. Therefore, on the basis of these results, the authors recommend that educational programs geared to sleep hygiene should be one of the priorities of the curriculum. At the same time, the workhours of teenagers should be shortened in order to allow them to work and study during daytime and to have enough time at night for leisure and rest. These recommendations would improve the quality of life of the population that already is or will soon be participating in the job market. PMID:16932831

Teixeira, Liliane R; Fischer, Frida M; Lowden, Arne

2006-08-01

266

Modeling aircraft noise induced sleep disturbance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the primary impacts of aircraft noise on a community is its disruption of sleep. Aircraft noise increases the time to fall asleep, the number of awakenings, and decreases the amount of rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Understanding these changes in sleep may be important as they could increase the risk for developing next-day effects such as sleepiness and reduced performance and long-term health effects such as cardiovascular disease. There are models that have been developed to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. However, most of these models only predict the percentage of the population that is awakened. Markov and nonlinear dynamic models have been developed to predict an individual's sleep structure during the night. However, both of these models have limitations. The Markov model only accounts for whether an aircraft event occurred not the noise level or other sound characteristics of the event that may affect the degree of disturbance. The nonlinear dynamic models were developed to describe normal sleep regulation and do not have a noise effects component. In addition, the nonlinear dynamic models have slow dynamics which make it difficult to predict short duration awakenings which occur both spontaneously and as a result of nighttime noise exposure. The purpose of this research was to examine these sleep structure models to determine how they could be altered to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. Different approaches for adding a noise level dependence to the Markov Model was explored and the modified model was validated by comparing predictions to behavioral awakening data. In order to determine how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic sleep models it was necessary to have a more detailed sleep stage classification than was available from visual scoring of sleep data. An automatic sleep stage classification algorithm was developed which extracts different features of polysomnography data including the occurrence of rapid eye movements, sleep spindles, and slow wave sleep. Using these features an approach for classifying sleep stages every one second during the night was developed. From observation of the results of the sleep stage classification, it was determined how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic model. Slow and fast REM activity are modeled separately and the activity in the gamma frequency band of the EEG signal is used to model both spontaneous and noise-induced awakenings. The nonlinear model predicts changes in sleep structure similar to those found by other researchers and reported in the sleep literature and similar to those found in obtained survey data. To compare sleep disturbance model predictions, flight operations data from US airports were obtained and sleep disturbance in communities was predicted for different operations scenarios using the modified Markov model, the nonlinear dynamic model, and other aircraft noise awakening models. Similarities and differences in model predictions were evaluated in order to determine if the use of the developed sleep structure model leads to improved predictions of the impact of nighttime noise on communities.

McGuire, Sarah M.

267

Sleep for cognitive enhancement  

PubMed Central

Sleep is essential for effective cognitive functioning. Loosing even a few hours of sleep can have detrimental effects on a wide variety of cognitive processes such as attention, language, reasoning, decision making, learning and memory. While sleep is necessary to ensure normal healthy cognitive functioning, it can also enhance performance beyond the boundaries of the normal condition. This article discusses the enhancing potential of sleep, mainly focusing on the domain of learning and memory. Sleep is known to facilitate the consolidation of memories learned before sleep as well as the acquisition of new memories to be learned after sleep. According to a widely held model this beneficial effect of sleep relies on the neuronal reactivation of memories during sleep that is associated with sleep-specific brain oscillations (slow oscillations, spindles, ripples) as well as a characteristic neurotransmitter milieu. Recent research indicates that memory processing during sleep can be boosted by (i) cueing memory reactivation during sleep; (ii) stimulating sleep-specific brain oscillations; and (iii) targeting specific neurotransmitter systems pharmacologically. Olfactory and auditory cues can be used, for example, to increase reactivation of associated memories during post-learning sleep. Intensifying neocortical slow oscillations (the hallmark of slow wave sleep (SWS)) by electrical or auditory stimulation and modulating specific neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline and glutamate likewise facilitates memory processing during sleep. With this evidence in mind, this article concludes by discussing different methodological caveats and ethical issues that should be considered when thinking about using sleep for cognitive enhancement in everyday applications. PMID:24765066

Diekelmann, Susanne

2014-01-01

268

Non-circadian direct effects of light on sleep and alertness: lessons from transgenic mouse models.  

PubMed

Light exerts a strong non-visual influence on human physiology and behavior. Additionally light is known to affect sleep indirectly through the phase shifting of circadian rhythms, and directly, promoting alertness in humans and sleep in nocturnal species. Little attention has been paid to the direct non-image-forming influence of light until recently with the discovery and emerging knowledge on melanopsin, a photopigment which is maximally sensitive to the blue spectrum of light and expressed in a subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Indeed, the development of transgenic mouse models targeting different phototransduction pathways has allowed researchers to decipher the mechanisms by which mammals adapt sleep to their light environment. This review summarizes the novel concepts and discrepancies from recent publications relating to the non-circadian effects of light on sleep and waking. Specifically, we discuss whether darkness, in addition to light, affects their quality. Furthermore, we seek to understand whether longer sustained periods of light exposure can influence sleep, if the direct photic regulation depends on time of day, and whether this affects the homeostatic sleep process. Moreover, the neural pathways by which light exerts a direct influence on sleep will be discussed including the respective role of rods/cones and melanopsin. Finally, we suggest that light weighs on the components of the flip-flop switch model to induce respectively sleep or waking, in nocturnal and diurnal animals. Taking these data into account we therefore propose a novel model of sleep regulation based on three processes; the direct photic regulation interacting with the circadian and homeostatic drives to determine the timing and quality of sleep and waking. An outlook of promising clinical and non-clinical applications of these findings will be considered as well as directions for future animal and human research. PMID:23602126

Hubbard, Jeffrey; Ruppert, Elisabeth; Gropp, Claire-Marie; Bourgin, Patrice

2013-12-01

269

Sleep Homeostasis and Models of Sleep Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the two-process model of sleep regulation, the timing and structure of sleep are determined by the interaction of a homeostatic and a circadian process. The original qualitative model was elaborated to quantitative versions that included the ultradian dynamics of sleep in relation to the non-REM-REM sleep cycle. The time course of EEG slow-wave activity, the major marker of

Alexander A. Borb; Peter Achermann

1999-01-01

270

Adolescents' Sleep Behaviors and Perceptions of Sleep  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Sleep duration affects the health of children and adolescents. Shorter sleep durations have been associated with poorer academic performance, unintentional injuries, and obesity in adolescents. This study extends our understanding of how adolescents perceive and deal with their sleep issues. Methods: General education classes were…

Noland, Heather; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph; Telljohann, Susan K.

2009-01-01

271

Phospholipase C-?4 Is Essential for the Progression of the Normal Sleep Sequence and Ultradian Body Temperature Rhythms in Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe sleep sequence: i) non-REM sleep, ii) REM sleep, and iii) wakefulness, is stable and widely preserved in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. It has been shown that this sequence is disrupted by sudden REM sleep onset during active wakefulness (i.e., narcolepsy) in orexin-deficient mutant animals. Phospholipase C (PLC) mediates the signaling of numerous metabotropic receptors, including orexin

Masayuki Ikeda; Moritoshi Hirono; Takashi Sugiyama; Takahiro Moriya; Masami Ikeda-Sagara; Naomi Eguchi; Yoshihiro Urade; Tohru Yoshioka

2009-01-01

272

Measuring sleep quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite being used commonly in sleep medicine, the term “sleep quality” has not been rigorously defined. The purpose of this article is to consider objective measures of the subjective “sleep quality” experience. In order to do so, it was necessary to choose a definition of “sleep quality” as a basis for discussion. We have chosen to employ the simple Likert-style

Andrew D. Krystal; Jack D. Edinger

2008-01-01

273

Infant sleep disturbance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinicians are commonly consulted by the parents of infants aged 6–24 months who are distressed by their infant's sleep disturbance. Infant sleep disturbance (ISD) presents as frequent night awakening, delays in sleep onset and co-sleeping that is not of the parents’ choice. Conflicting advice leaves parents unsure regarding management. Recent research has described treatment approaches as well as models describing

Karyn G France; Neville M Blampied; Jacqueline M. T Henderson

2003-01-01

274

Sleep and Infant Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human neonates spend the majority of their time sleeping. Despite the limited waking hours available for environmental exploration, the first few months of life are a time of rapid learning about the environment. The organization of neonate sleep differs qualitatively from adult sleep, and the unique characteristics of neonatal sleep may promote…

Tarullo, Amanda R.; Balsam, Peter D.; Fifer, William P.

2011-01-01

275

Limitations of split-night polysomnography for the diagnosis of nocturnal hypoventilation and titration of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.  

PubMed

Split-night polysomnography is performed at our centre in all patients with ALS who require assessment for nocturnal hypoventilation and their response to non-invasive ventilation. The purpose of this study was to determine how successful this practice has been, reflected by whether a complete assessment was achieved by a single split-night polysomnogram. We undertook a systematic, retrospective review of all consecutive split-night polysomnograms in ALS patients between 2005 and 2012. A total of 47 cases were reviewed. Forty-three percent of patients had an incomplete test, resulting in a recommendation to repeat the polysomnogram. Poor sleep efficiency and absence of REM sleep in the diagnostic portion of the study were strongly associated with incomplete studies. Clinical variables that reflect severity of ALS (FVC, PaCO2, ALSFRS-R) and use of REM-suppressing antidepressants or sedative-hypnotics were not associated with incomplete split-night polysomnogram. In conclusion, a single, split-night polysomnogram is frequently inconclusive for the assessment of nocturnal hypoventilation and complete titration of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in patients with ALS. Poor sleep efficiency and absence of REM sleep are the main limitations of split-night polysomnography in this patient population. PMID:25109404

Loewen, Andrea H S; Korngut, Lawrence; Rimmer, Karen; Damji, Omar; Turin, Tanvir C; Hanly, Patrick J

2014-12-01

276

Engineering sleep disorders: from classical CPAP devices toward new intelligent adaptive ventilatory therapy.  

PubMed

Among the most common sleep disorders are those related to disruptions in airflow (apnea) or reductions in the breath amplitude (hypopnea) with or without obstruction of the upper airway (UA). One of the most important sleep disorders is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This sleep-?disordered breathing, quantified by the apnea??hypopnea index (AHI), can produce a significant reduction of oxygen saturation and an abnormal elevation of carbon dioxide levels in the blood. Apnea and hypopnea episodes are associated with arousals and sleep fragmentation during the night and compensatory response of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:25437472

Jane, Raimon

2014-01-01

277

Contemporary Surgery for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been available in some form for greater than three decades. Early management for airway obstruction during sleep relied on tracheotomy which although life saving was not well accepted by patients. In the early eighties two new forms of treatment for OSAS were developed. Surgically a technique described as a uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) was used to treat the retropalatal region for snoring and sleep apnea. Concurrently sleep medicine developed a nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to manage nocturnal airway obstruction. Both of these measures were used to expand and stabilize the pharyngeal airway space during sleep. The goal for each technique was to limit or alleviate OSAS. Almost 30 yr later these two treatment modalities continue to be the mainstay of contemporary treatment. As expected, CPAP device technology improved over time along with durable goods. Surgery followed suit and additional techniques were developed to treat soft and bony structures of the entire upper airway (nose, palate and tongue base). This review will only focus on the contemporary surgical methods that have demonstrated relatively consistent positive clinical outcomes. Not all surgical and medical treatment modalities are successful or even partially successful for every patient. Advances in the treatment of OSAS are hindered by the fact that the primary etiology is still unknown. However, both medicine and surgery continue to improve diagnostic and treatment methods. Methods of diagnosis as well as treatment regimens should always include both medical and surgical collaborations so the health and quality of life of our patients can best be served. PMID:19784401

2009-01-01

278

Individuality and stability of nocturnal secretion patterns for eight hormones in healthy young men  

PubMed Central

The concentration of hormones in the bloodstream shows oscillations, reflecting the fact that endocrine physiology is structured over time. In many cases, these oscillations have an ultradian configuration that can be superimposed on a circadian rhythm. Secretion of hormones can be linked to the phases of sleep, as is the case with growth hormone (GH); can depend strongly on the circadian pacemaker, as in the case of cortisol; or be under the influence of both, as seen for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Thus, the temporal pattern of secretion of several hormones, and the resulting plasma concentration (also influenced by hormone tissue distribution and clearance), depends on impulses from biological clocks and is influenced by endogenous and exogenous masking factors. The extent of interindividual differences in the phenotypes of temporal patterns of hormone secretion is not well known. In this study, a series of eight hormones were measured over one night, and these measurements were repeated over another night. The study had two goals. The first was to explore the extent of inter individual differences in nocturnal and ultradian rhythms of these hormones. The second was to see how stable the individual patterns of nocturnal hormone secretion could be. Our results indicate that the temporal organization of hormone secretion into the blood is highly individual, and that these intraindividual patterns are conserved over time. This is relevant in view of the changes in secretion of several hormones that have been described in biological psychiatry research.

Schulz, Pierre; Curtin, François; Steimer, Thierry

2007-01-01

279

Sleep and breathing on the first night after adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea.  

PubMed

Adenotonsillectomy (T&A) has established effectiveness for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, more than 20% of children with OSA have respiratory compromise requiring medical intervention in the postoperative period. The reasons for this complication are not well-defined. We aimed to compare the nature and severity of sleep-disordered breathing in children with mild and severe OSA on the first night following adenotonsillectomy. Ten children were classified into groups of mild and severe OSA, based on preoperative testing. On the first night after T&A, they underwent polysomnography, including electroencephalograph, submental electromyography, bilateral electro-oculograms, monitoring of respiratory movements, heart rate, ECG, and oxygen saturation. Sleep-disordered breathing was assessed by the apnea-hypopnea index, the SaO(2) nadir, and the desaturation index, including dips in saturation below 90% (DI(90)). Sleep quality was assessed by sleep efficiency, time spent in each sleep state, and respiratory arousal index. Obstructive events occurred postoperatively in all children, but were more frequent in those with severe OSA preoperatively: the median (interquartile range) mixed/obstructive apnea/hypopnea indicies were 6.9 (2.2-9.8) events/hr and 21.5 (15.1-112.1) events/hr for the mild OSA group and the severe OSA group, respectively (P = 0.009). Obstructive events were the major cause of desaturation during sleep postoperatively. Sleep quality was severely disrupted in both groups, with reductions in both slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. In conclusion, despite removal of obstructing lymphoid tissue, upper airway obstruction occurred on the first postoperative night in children with OSA. This study is the first to demonstrate the mechanism of respiratory compromise after adenotonsillectomy, a common postoperative complication in children with severe OSA. PMID:15704184

Nixon, G M; Kermack, A S; McGregor, C D; Davis, G M; Manoukian, J J; Brown, K A; Brouillette, R T

2005-04-01

280

Ostriches Sleep like Platypuses  

PubMed Central

Mammals and birds engage in two distinct states of sleep, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. SWS is characterized by slow, high amplitude brain waves, while REM sleep is characterized by fast, low amplitude waves, known as activation, occurring with rapid eye movements and reduced muscle tone. However, monotremes (platypuses and echidnas), the most basal (or ‘ancient’) group of living mammals, show only a single sleep state that combines elements of SWS and REM sleep, suggesting that these states became temporally segregated in the common ancestor to marsupial and eutherian mammals. Whether sleep in basal birds resembles that of monotremes or other mammals and birds is unknown. Here, we provide the first description of brain activity during sleep in ostriches (Struthio camelus), a member of the most basal group of living birds. We found that the brain activity of sleeping ostriches is unique. Episodes of REM sleep were delineated by rapid eye movements, reduced muscle tone, and head movements, similar to those observed in other birds and mammals engaged in REM sleep; however, during REM sleep in ostriches, forebrain activity would flip between REM sleep-like activation and SWS-like slow waves, the latter reminiscent of sleep in the platypus. Moreover, the amount of REM sleep in ostriches is greater than in any other bird, just as in platypuses, which have more REM sleep than other mammals. These findings reveal a recurring sequence of steps in the evolution of sleep in which SWS and REM sleep arose from a single heterogeneous state that became temporally segregated into two distinct states. This common trajectory suggests that forebrain activation during REM sleep is an evolutionarily new feature, presumably involved in performing new sleep functions not found in more basal animals. PMID:21887239

Lesku, John A.; Meyer, Leith C. R.; Fuller, Andrea; Maloney, Shane K.; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

2011-01-01

281

Peer Reviewed Equipment and Techniques for Nocturnal Wildlife  

E-print Network

on the nocturnal behavior of wildlife. Night-vision technologies may provide ways to move beyond speculation reviewed 53 papers to examine image enhancement (i.e., night vision) and assess trends in nocturnal.) to evaluate equipment function and efficacy for wildlife studies. A third-generation night- vision scope

DeStefano, Stephen

282

DO WINTERING HARLEQUIN DUCKS FORAGE NOCTURNALLY AT HIGH LATITUDES?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attri- butes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence

Daniel J. Rizzolo; Daniel Esler; Daniel D. Roby; Robert L. Jarvis

2005-01-01

283

Evidence of sleep-facilitating effect on formation of novel semantic associations: An event-related potential (ERP) study.  

PubMed

Paired-associates learning of unrelated words can reflect the formation of a new association in the semantic network. Research results on the facilitating effect of sleep on unrelated word-pair associates learning remain contradictory. The behavioral measures used in previous studies may not have been sensitive enough to reflect the process of new word association during sleep. The present study used the N400 component of event-related potential (ERP) to further assess the facilitating effect of sleep on the formation of new semantic associations. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the Sleep group or the Wakefulness group. After paired-associates learning and pre-test, they underwent nocturnal sleep and sleep deprivation, respectively. A post-test was conducted after the subjects had one night of recovery sleep. ERPs were recorded during both test phases. Behavioral data showed significant differences in improvements in recognition and decreases in reaction time from pre-test to post-test between the Sleep and Wakefulness groups. The N400 peak amplitude attenuated significantly after sleep, but not after wakefulness. These results suggest that sleep has a facilitating effect on the formation of novel associations. Unexpectedly, slow wave sleep was negatively correlated with improvement in recognition during the post-test but was positively correlated with the number of word-pairs acquired during the learning phase. This may the result of a ceiling effect limiting the improvement achieved in subjects who learned better during the learning phase. PMID:25172481

Lin, Chun-Cheng; Yang, Chien-Ming

2014-12-01

284

Effects of daytime secondarily generalized epileptic seizures on sleep during the following night.  

PubMed

Nocturnal seizures may disturb sleep, but the effect of an epileptic seizure during daytime on sleep during the next night has been under investigated. In this proof-of-principle study, the sleep of 425 patients with epilepsy, who underwent long-term video-electroencephalography recordings, was analyzed. The sleep recordings were retrospectively divided into two groups: Seizure Free, no seizure occurred at least 24 h before the start of the night sleep recording, and Daytime Seizure, at least one (secondarily) generalized seizure occurred during the day before. In Daytime Seizure, longer time in bed and latency to first REM and more NREM II were seen as well as a decrease of deep sleep and REM sleep compared to Seizure Free. As many participants underwent long-term recordings over a period longer than 48 h, we had the opportunity to compare in individual patients the sleep architecture during nights with and without seizures on the day before the recording. Time in bed and WASO were longer, and sleep efficiency was less in the nights after a seizure on the day before the recording. These differences were statistically significant, but their clinical relevance is doubtful. PMID:23069696

Gutter, Therese; de Weerd, Al W

2012-10-01

285

Participatory research to design a novel telehealth system to support the night-time needs of people with dementia: NOCTURNAL.  

PubMed

Strategies to support people living with dementia are broad in scope, proposing both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions as part of the care pathway. Assistive technologies form part of this offering as both stand-alone devices to support particular tasks and the more complex offering of the "smart home" to underpin ambient assisted living. This paper presents a technology-based system, which expands on the smart home architecture, orientated to support people with daily living. The system, NOCTURNAL, was developed by working directly with people who had dementia, and their carers using qualitative research methods. The research focused primarily on the nighttime needs of people living with dementia in real home settings. Eight people with dementia had the final prototype system installed for a three month evaluation at home. Disturbed sleep patterns, night-time wandering were a focus of this research not only in terms of detection by commercially available technology but also exploring if automated music, light and visual personalized photographs would be soothing to participants during the hours of darkness. The NOCTURNAL platform and associated services was informed by strong user engagement of people with dementia and the service providers who care for them. NOCTURNAL emerged as a holistic service offering a personalised therapeutic aspect with interactive capabilities. PMID:24304507

Martin, Suzanne; Augusto, Juan Carlos; McCullagh, Paul; Carswell, William; Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Haiying; Wallace, Jonathan; Mulvenna, Maurice

2013-12-01

286

Neurobehavioral Dynamics Following Chronic Sleep Restriction: Dose-Response Effects of One Night for Recovery  

PubMed Central

Objective: Establish the dose-response relationship between increasing sleep durations in a single night and recovery of neurobehavioral functions following chronic sleep restriction. Design: Intent-to-treat design in which subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 recovery sleep doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h TIB) for 1 night following 5 nights of sleep restriction to 4 h TIB. Setting: Twelve consecutive days in a controlled laboratory environment. Participants: N = 159 healthy adults (aged 22-45 y), median = 29 y). Interventions: Following a week of home monitoring with actigraphy and 2 baseline nights of 10 h TIB, subjects were randomized to either sleep restriction to 4 h TIB per night for 5 nights followed by randomization to 1 of 6 nocturnal acute recovery sleep conditions (N = 142), or to a control condition involving 10 h TIB on all nights (N = 17). Measurements and Results: Primary neurobehavioral outcomes included lapses on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), subjective sleepiness from the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and physiological sleepiness from a modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Secondary outcomes included psychomotor and cognitive speed as measured by PVT fastest RTs and number correct on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), respectively, and subjective fatigue from the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The dynamics of neurobehavioral outcomes following acute recovery sleep were statistically modeled across the 0 h-10 h recovery sleep doses. While TST, stage 2, REM sleep and NREM slow wave energy (SWE) increased linearly across recovery sleep doses, best-fitting neurobehavioral recovery functions were exponential across recovery sleep doses for PVT and KSS outcomes, and linear for the MWT. Analyses based on return to baseline and on estimated intersection with control condition means revealed recovery was incomplete at the 10 h TIB (8.96 h TST) for PVT performance, KSS sleepiness, and POMS fatigue. Both TST and SWE were elevated above baseline at the maximum recovery dose of 10 h TIB. Conclusions: Neurobehavioral deficits induced by 5 nights of sleep restricted to 4 h improved monotonically as acute recovery sleep dose increased, but some deficits remained after 10 h TIB for recovery. Complete recovery from such sleep restriction may require a longer sleep period during 1 night, and/or multiple nights of recovery sleep. It appears that acute recovery from chronic sleep restriction occurs as a result of elevated sleep pressure evident in both increased SWE and TST. Citation: Banks S; Van Dongen HPA; Maislin G; Dinges DF. Neurobehavioral dynamics following chronic sleep restriction: dose-response effects of one night for recovery. SLEEP 2010;33(8):1013–1026. PMID:20815182

Banks, Siobhan; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F.

2010-01-01

287

Rethinking Sleep Analysis  

PubMed Central

Visual sleep scoring is the obligatory reference for sleep analysis. An essential step in sleep scoring is sleep staging. This technique was first described in 1937 and later adapted 3 times: first, in 1957, after the detection of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, when electrooculography (EOG) was added; second, in 1968, when sleep staging was standardized and electromyography (EMG) was added; and third, in 2007, to integrate accumulated knowledge from sleep science, adding arousals and respiratory, cardiac, and movement events. In spite of the dramatic changes that have taken place in recording and storing techniques, sleep staging has undergone surprisingly few changes. The argument of the present comment is that sleep staging was appropriate as long as sleep biosignals were recorded in the analog mode as curves on paper, whereas this staging may be insufficient for digitally recorded and stored sleep data. Limitations of sleep staging are critically discussed and alternative strategies of sleep analysis are emphasized. Citation: Schulz H. Rethinking sleep analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(2):99–103. PMID:18468306

Schulz, Hartmut

2008-01-01

288

Disruption of ripple-associated hippocampal activity during rest impairs spatial learning in the rat  

PubMed Central

The hippocampus plays a key role in the acquisition of new memories for places and events. Evidence suggests that the consolidation of these memories is enhanced during sleep. At the neuronal level, reactivation of awake experience in the hippocampus during sharp-wave ripple events, characteristic of slow-wave sleep, has been proposed as a neural mechanism for sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, a causal relation between sleep reactivation and memory consolidation has not been established. Here we show that disrupting neuronal activity during ripple events impairs spatial learning. We trained rats daily in two identical spatial navigation tasks followed each by a one-hour rest period. After one of the tasks, stimulation of hippocampal afferents selectively disrupted neuronal activity associated with ripple events without changing the sleep-wake structure. Rats learned the control task significantly faster than the task followed by rest stimulation, indicating that interfering with hippocampal processing during sleep led to decreased learning. PMID:19816984

Ego-Stengel, Valérie; Wilson, Matthew A.

2009-01-01

289

[Circadian rhythm disruption and human development].  

PubMed

Ontogenetic developments of rest-activity, sleep-wakefulness, temperature and several hormone rhythms in humans were reviewed. The reported effects of environment on these alterations were also summarized. Then, disorders or conditions which often encounter during early stage of life and reveal circadian rhythm disruptions were described. These disorders or conditions included severe brain damage, visual disturbance, developmental disorders(autistic spectrum disorder and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder), Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome, epilepsy, Yonaki, and inadequate sleep hygiene. Finally, it was emphasized that we should pay special attention on the development of youngsters who showed sleep disturbance during early stage of life with special reference to the later occurrence of developmental disorders. PMID:24437259

Kohyama, Jun

2013-12-01

290

Effects of methamphetamine self-administration on actigraphy-based sleep parameters in monkeys  

PubMed Central

Rationale Sleep disorders and substance abuse are highly comorbid. Although methamphetamine is a very commonly abused drug, to the best of our knowledge, no study has evaluated its effects on sleep during drug use and abstinence under well-controlled conditions in laboratory animals. Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the effects of methamphetamine self-administration on sleep-like measures in nonhuman primates. Methods Adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n=4) self-administered methamphetamine (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg/injection, i.v.) under a fixed-ratio 20 schedule of reinforcement (60-min sessions once a day, 5 days per week) for 5 weeks. Sleep-like measures were evaluated with Actiwatch monitors before, during, and after each period of drug self-administration. Results Both doses of methamphetamine reliably maintained self-administration. Methamphetamine (0.03 mg/kg) increased derived measures of latency to sleep onset and sleep fragmentation, and decreased sleep efficiency compared to abstinence, and higher methamphetamine intake predicted worse sleep quality. However, sleep normalized immediately after the discontinuation of methamphetamine self-administration. Conclusions Methamphetamine markedly disrupted sleep-like measures; however, methamphetamine self-administration did not disrupt sleep quality during subsequent periods of drug abstinence. PMID:23263461

Andersen, Monica L.; Diaz, Maylen P.; Murnane, Kevin S.; Howell, Leonard L.

2012-01-01

291

EEG measures index neural and cognitive recovery from sleep deprivation  

PubMed Central

Sleep deprivation impairs many cognitive abilities, but these impairments can be reversed following a certain quantity and quality of sleep. The ability to inhibit responding is particularly susceptible to disruption following prolonged wakefulness. How recovery sleep alters brain activity, leading to improved performance on a variety of cognitive tasks remains unclear. This issue was examined in the current study using spectral analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) data during sleep. These measures of sleep physiology were acquired after both normal sleep (NS) and recovery sleep (RS), and were related to measures of inhibitory control and concurrent brain activity. Subjects were nine young adults who underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging twice, after 9 hours of NS and after 10 hours of RS that followed 38 hours awake. A multiple regression model was used to examine differences between conditions in (1) EEG spectral power during sleep, (2) probability of successful inhibition in a go/no-go task, and (3) activation within a region of right prefrontal cortex during the task. Performance recovery, as indexed by reduced performance differences between conditions, was predicted by increased delta power and decreased sigma power in RS compared to NS. These EEG variables predicted most of the variance in inhibitory performance difference between conditions. Regressions also suggested that RS improved performance due to changes in brain function including prefrontal regions that resulted from delta rebound. We thus propose that slow waves, reflected in delta power during recovery sleep, act to restore brain function, thereby improving cognitive performance that entails response inhibition. PMID:20164352

Mander, Bryce A.; Reid, Kathryn J.; Baron, Kelly G; Tjoa, Tjoson; Parrish, Todd B.; Paller, Ken A.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Zee, Phyllis C.

2010-01-01

292

Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

2002-01-01

293

The effect of experimental sleep fragmentation on error monitoring.  

PubMed

Experimental sleep fragmentation (SF) is characterized by frequent brief arousals without reduced total sleep time and causes daytime sleepiness and impaired neurocognitive processes. This study explored the impact of SF on error monitoring. Thirteen adults underwent auditory stimuli-induced high-level (H) and low-level (L) SF nights. Flanker task performance and electroencephalogram data were collected in the morning following SF nights. Compared to LSF, HSF induced more arousals and stage N1 sleep, decreased slow wave sleep and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS), decreased subjective sleep quality, increased daytime sleepiness, and decreased amplitudes of P300 and error-related positivity (Pe). SF effects on N1 sleep were negatively correlated with SF effects on the Pe amplitude. Furthermore, as REMS was reduced by SF, post-error accuracy compensations were greatly reduced. In conclusion, attentional processes and error monitoring were impaired following one night of frequent sleep disruptions, even when total sleep time was not reduced. PMID:25541514

Ko, Cheng-Hung; Fang, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Ling-Ling; Hsieh, Shulan

2015-01-01

294

Things that go bump in the night: diagnosing sleep-related movement disorders without a sleep laboratory.  

PubMed

It is common for general physicians to experience diagnostic doubt and trepidation whenever faced with patients who exhibit abnormal nocturnal behaviours or excessive movements at night. There is also a perception that expensive and often poorly available overnight tests are usually required for diagnostic precision. In fact, the majority of conditions, whether they be parasomnias or, more rarely, nocturnal seizures, can be reliably diagnosed from a directed history, if available. Although the evidence base for treating parasomnias and sleep-related movement disorders remains minimal, accurate recognition is important for a variety of reasons. This review covers the diagnostic features of the full range of parasomnias and movement disorders that might present to a multidisciplinary adult sleep clinic. Throughout, it will be argued that the recognition of key or salient features obtained from a good history is the most important diagnostic tool. Indeed, when diagnostic doubt remains after a thorough sleep history, it is relatively rare for detailed tests to add much in the way of useful information. PMID:24995451

Reading, P

2014-01-01

295

Sleep locally, act globally.  

PubMed

In most animals, sleep is considered a global brain and behavioral state. However, recent intracortical recordings have shown that aspects of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and wakefulness can occur simultaneously in different parts of the cortex in mammals, including humans. Paradoxically, however, NREM sleep still manifests as a global behavioral shutdown. In this review, the authors examine this paradox from an evolutionary perspective. On the basis of strategic modeling, they suggest that in animals with brains composed of heavily interconnected and functionally interdependent units, a global regulator of sleep maintains the behavioral shutdown that defines sleep and thereby ensures that local use-dependent functions are performed in a safe and efficient manner. This novel perspective has implications for understanding deficits in human cognitive performance resulting from sleep deprivation, sleep disorders such as sleepwalking, changes in consciousness that occur during sleep, and the function of sleep itself. PMID:22572533

Rattenborg, Niels C; Lima, Steven L; Lesku, John A

2012-10-01

296

Patterns of sleep behaviour.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussion of the electroencephalogram as the critical measurement procedure for sleep research, and survey of major findings that have emerged in the last decade on the presence of sleep within the twenty-four-hour cycle. Specifically, intrasleep processes, frequency of stage changes, sequence of stage events, sleep stage amounts, temporal patterns of sleep, and stability of intrasleep pattern in both man and lower animals are reviewed, along with some circadian aspects of sleep, temporal factors, and number of sleep episodes. It is felt that it is particularly critical to take the presence of sleep into account whenever performance is considered. When it is recognized that responsive performance is extremely limited during sleep, it is easy to visualize the extent to which performance is controlled by sleep itself.

Webb, W. B.

1972-01-01

297

[Neurological sleep disorders].  

PubMed

Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances. PMID:25377291

Khatami, Ramin

2014-11-01

298

Sleep laboratory studies on single dose effects of suriclone.  

PubMed

1. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled sleep laboratory study single doses of suriclone, a new non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic binding to benzodiazepine receptors, were investigated with respect to sleep and awakening. 2. Sixteen healthy young volunteers spent 10 nights in the sleep laboratory: 1 adaptation night, 1 baseline night and 4 drug nights (placebo; 0.2 mg, 0.4 mg suriclone; 2 mg lorazepam as reference drug) and 4 subsequent wash-out nights (drug-interval: 1 week). Somnopolygraphic investigations (22.30 h to 06.00 h) were commenced 0.5 h after drug-intake. A self-rating scale for sleep and awakening quality as well as psychometric tests were completed in the morning. 3. Hypnotic effects were most pronounced after lorazepam in regard to total sleep time and sleep efficiency. After lorazepam as well as after 0.4 mg suriclone nocturnal awakenings decreased significantly as compared with placebo, which was reflected in an improved subjective sleep quality after both dosages. Suriclone 0.2 mg did not induce any alterations in all night sleep. 4. In the morning, well-being, drowsiness and reaction time performance deteriorated after lorazepam as compared with placebo but not after suriclone. The latter was significantly superior to lorazepam with respect to subjective awakening quality, well-being, emotional rapport, drowsiness and attention. 5. Blood pressure and pulse remained unchanged after all of the drugs. Critical flicker frequency and muscle strength decreased only after lorazepam as compared with placebo. PMID:1980201

Saletu, B; Frey, R; Grünberger, J; Krupka, M; Anderer, P; Musch, B

1990-11-01

299

Self Organized Criticality as a new paradigm of sleep regulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humans and animals often exhibit brief awakenings from sleep (arousals), which are traditionally viewed as random disruptions of sleep caused by external stimuli or pathologic perturbations. However, our recent findings show that arousals exhibit complex temporal organization and scale-invariant behavior, characterized by a power-law probability distribution for their durations, while sleep stage durations exhibit exponential behavior. The co-existence of both scale-invariant and exponential processes generated by a single regulatory mechanism has not been observed in physiological systems until now. Such co-existence resembles the dynamical features of non-equilibrium systems exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC). Our empirical analysis and modeling approaches based on modern concepts from statistical physics indicate that arousals are an integral part of sleep regulation and may be necessary to maintain and regulate healthy sleep by releasing accumulated excitations in the regulatory neuronal networks, following a SOC-type temporal organization.

Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

2012-02-01

300

International cooperative study of aircrew layover sleep Operational summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings of this cooperative study of layover sleep have direct implications for flight operations. In the consensus view of the principal investigators, these can be divided into their relevance for eastward or westward flight. Eastward flight produced more sleep disruption than westward. Different sleep and scheduling strategies are recommended for each flight direction, and the importance of individual crewmember factors is discussed in relation to age and circadian type. Despite the limitations of this study with regard to trip simplicity and the baseline data, the results for each airline are highly consistent and should be applicable to a wide range of long-haul crewmembers and carriers.

Graeber, R. Curtis; Dement, William C.; Nicholson, Anthony N.; Sasaki, Mitsuo; Wegmann, Hans M.

1986-01-01

301

Updates on Definition, Consequences, and Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea  

PubMed Central

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field. PMID:21628617

Park, John G.; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J.

2011-01-01

302

Breastfeeding, Maternal Depressive Mood and Room Sharing as Predictors of Sleep Fragmentation in 12-Week-Old Infants: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sleep fragmentation in infancy can burden a family by disrupting the sleep of all its members. However, there has been no longitudinal prospective investigation of the determinants of infant sleep fragmentation. We undertook such an investigation. New mothers (N = 106) completed questionnaires and were administered structured telephone interviews…

Simard, Valerie; Lara-Carrasco, Jessica; Paquette, Tyna; Nielsen, Tore

2011-01-01

303

Polysomnographic Features of Sleep Disturbances and REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in the Unilateral 6-OHDA Lesioned Hemiparkinsonian Rat  

PubMed Central

Sleep pattern disruption, specifically REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is a major nonmotor cause of disability in PD. Understanding the pathophysiology of these sleep pattern disturbances is critical to find effective treatments. 24-hour polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard for sleep studies, has never been used to test sleep dysfunction in the standard 6-OHDA lesioned hemiparkinsonian (HP) rat PD model. In this study, we recorded 24-hour PSG from normal and HP rats. Recordings were scored into wake, rapid eye movement (REM), and non-REM (NREM). We then examined EEG to identify REM periods and EMG to check muscle activity during REM. Normal rats showed higher wakefulness (70–80%) during the dark phase and lower wakefulness (20%) during the light phase. HP rats showed 30–50% sleep in both phases, less modulation and synchronization to the light schedule (P < 0.0001), and more long run lengths of wakefulness (P < 0.05). HP rats also had more REM epochs with muscle activity than control rats (P < 0.05). Our findings that the sleep architecture in the HP rat resembles that of PD patients demonstrate the value of this model in studying the pathophysiological basis of PD sleep disturbances and preclinical therapeutics for PD related sleep disorders including RBD. PMID:25610706

Gilmour, Timothy P.; Venkiteswaran, Kala; Fang, Jidong; Subramanian, Thyagarajan

2014-01-01

304

Case-Control Study of Subjective and Objective Differences in Sleep Patterns in Older Adults with Insomnia Symptoms  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Older adults have high prevalence rates of insomnia symptoms, yet it is unclear if these insomnia symptoms are associated with objective impairments in sleep. We hypothesized that insomnia complaints in older adults would be associated with objective differences in sleep compared to those without insomnia complaints. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a cross-sectional study in which older adults with insomnia complaints (cases, n=100) were compared to older adults without insomnia complaints (controls, n=100) using dual-night in-lab nocturnal polysomnography, study questionnaires and seven days of at-home actigraphy and sleep diaries. Cases were noted to have reduced objective total sleep time compared to controls (25.8 minutes +/? 8.56, p=0.003). This was largely due to increased wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), and not increased sleep latency. When participants with sleep-related breathing disorder or periodic limb movement disorder were excluded, the polysomnography total sleep time difference became even larger. Cases also had reduced slow-wave sleep (5.10 +/? 1.38 vs 10.57 +/? 2.29 minutes, effect size ?0.29, p=0.04). When comparing self-reported sleep latency and sleep efficiency to objective polysomnographic findings, cases demonstrated low, but statistically significant correlations, while no such correlations were observed in controls. Cases tended to under-estimate their sleep efficiency by 1.6% (+/? 18.4%), while controls over-estimated their sleep efficiency by 12.4% (+/? 14.5%). In conclusion, we noted that older adults with insomnia complaints have significant differences in several objective sleep findings relative to controls, suggesting that insomnia complaints in older adults are associated with objective impairments in sleep. PMID:20887395

Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Pack, Frances; Staley, Beth; Schutte-Rodin, Sharon; Dinges, David F.; Pack, Allan I.

2010-01-01

305

Childhood epilepsy and sleep  

PubMed Central

Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementation of epileptic patients with some of these sleep-related hormones may have a beneficial role in controlling epilepsy. PMID:25254184

Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

2014-01-01

306

The effect of intermittent use of occlusal splint devices on sleep bruxism: a 4-week observation with a portable electromyographic recording device.  

PubMed

This randomised controlled study investigated the effect of intermittent use of occlusal splints on sleep bruxism compared with that of continuous use by measuring masseter muscle electromyographic activity using a portable electromyographic recording system. Twenty bruxers were randomly allocated to the continuous group and intermittent group. Subjects in the continuous group wore stabilisation splints during sleep for 29 nights continuously, whereas those in the intermittent group wore splints during sleep every other week, that is they used splints on the 1st-7th, 15th-21st and 29th nights. Electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during sleep was recorded for the following six time points: before (baseline), immediately after, and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after the insertion of a stabilisation splint. The number of nocturnal masseter electromyographic events, duration and the total activity of sleep bruxism were analysed. In the continuous group, nocturnal masseter electromyographic events were significantly reduced immediately and 1 week after the insertion of the stabilisation splint, and duration was reduced immediately after the insertion (P < 0·05, Dunnett's test), but no reduction was observed at 2, 3 and 4 weeks after insertion. In the intermittent group, nocturnal masseter electromyographic events and duration were significantly reduced immediately after and also 4 weeks after insertion of the stabilisation splint (P < 0·05, Dunnett's test). The obtained results of the present exploratory trial indicate that the intermittent use of stabilisation splints may reduce sleep bruxism activity for a longer period compared with that of continuous use. PMID:25363423

Matsumoto, H; Tsukiyama, Y; Kuwatsuru, R; Koyano, K

2014-11-01

307

Sleep physiology and sleep disorders in childhood  

PubMed Central

Sleep has long been considered as a passive phenomenon, but it is now clear that it is a period of intense brain activity involving higher cortical functions. Overall, sleep affects every aspect of a child’s development, particularly higher cognitive functions. Sleep concerns are ranked as the fifth leading concern of parents. Close to one third of all children suffer from sleep disorders, the prevalence of which is increased in certain pediatric populations, such as children with special needs, children with psychiatric or medical diagnoses and children with autism or pervasive developmental disorders. The paper reviews sleep physiology and the impact, classification, and management of sleep disorders in the pediatric age group. PMID:23616721

El Shakankiry, Hanan M

2011-01-01

308

Nocturnal life of young songbirds well before migration  

PubMed Central

In songbirds, nocturnal activity is believed to be a characteristic feature of migration. However, unlike experimental conditions where the onset of nocturnal restlessness is defined as a shift of activity leading up to the dark period, this behaviour has, until now, not been observed in natural conditions. Here we studied the nocturnal behaviour of radio-tagged juvenile Eurasian reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) during the pre-migratory period. The birds started nocturnal flights at the age of 38 days, whereas migration did not commence until they were at least 50 days old. The birds left their natal site by nocturnal flights and repeatedly returned to it. Such shuttle movements suggest the existence of a previously unknown period of nocturnal activity. Motivation to perform such night flights gradually increases with age. We relate the function of these nocturnal pre-migratory flights to the development of a stellar compass, necessary for detecting the compass direction towards winter quarters and for the formation of a navigational target, which will be used during return (spring) migration. PMID:16048767

Mukhin, Andrey; Kosarev, Vlad; Ktitorov, Pavel

2005-01-01

309

Sleep Disturbance and Neurobehavioral Performance among Postpartum Women  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Sleep disturbances cause neurobehavioral performance and daytime functioning impairments. Postpartum women experience high levels of sleep disturbance. Thus, the study objective was to describe and explore the relation between neurobehavioral performance and sleep among women during the early postpartum period. Design: Longitudinal field-based study. Participants: There were 70 primiparous women and nine nulliparous women in a control group. Interventions: None. Methods and Results: During their first 12 postpartum weeks, 70 primiparous women wore continuous wrist actigraphy to objectively monitor their sleep. Each morning they self-administered the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) to index their neurobehavioral performance. Nine nulliparous women in a control group underwent the same protocol for 12 continuous weeks. Postpartum PVT mean reciprocal (1/RT) reaction time did not differ from that of women in the control group at postpartum week 2, but then worsened over time. Postpartum slowest 10% 1/RT PVT reaction time was significantly worse than that of women in the control group at all weeks. Despite improvements in postpartum sleep, neurobehavioral performance continued to worsen from week 2 through the end of the study. Across the first 12 postpartum weeks, PVT measures were more frequently associated with percent sleep compared with total sleep time, highlighting the deleterious consequences of sleep disruption on maternal daytime functioning throughout the early postpartum period. Conclusions: Worsened maternal neurobehavioral performance across the first 12 postpartum weeks may have been influenced by the cumulative effects of sleep disturbance. These results can inform future work to identify the particular sleep profiles that could be primary intervention targets to improve daytime functioning among postpartum women, and indicate need for further research on the effectiveness of family leave policies. The time when postpartum women return to control-level daytime functioning is unknown. Citation: Insana SP; Williams KB; Montgomery-Downs HE. Sleep disturbance and neurobehavioral performance among postpartum women. SLEEP 2013;36(1):73–81. PMID:23288973

Insana, Salvatore P.; Williams, Kayla B.; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.

2013-01-01

310

Cardiovascular down-regulation in essential hypotension: relationships with autonomic control and sleep.  

PubMed

In this work, we aimed to clarify the autonomic involvement in the cardiovascular down-regulation in essential hypotension. The relationships between cardiovascular response and sleep quality were also examined. Thirteen female hypotensives and 13 female normotensives performed a stress task followed by polysomnography. Measures derived from blood pressure monitoring, impedance cardiography, and heart rate variability were collected. Hypotensives exhibited lower cardiovascular and autonomic activation than controls during the task. While a better sleep quality (i.e., higher sleep efficiency and lower nocturnal wakefulness) correlated with a reduced reactivity in normotensives, the opposite pattern occurred in hypotensives. The results suggest that a blunted response in both autonomic branches underlies the cardiovascular hypoactivation in hypotension. Further, good sleep seems to be associated with optimal levels of physiological reactivity. PMID:23654219

Covassin, Naima; de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Cellini, Nicola; Sarlo, Michela; Stegagno, Luciano

2013-08-01

311

Evaluation of sleep quality in patients with refractory seizures who undergo epilepsy surgery.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to evaluate excessive daytime sleepiness and subjective sleep quality in patients who undergo epilepsy surgery for treatment of refractory partial seizures. Forty-eight patients were enrolled in this research study. All of them were evaluated 2 days before and 3 months after the surgery. Two questionnaires were used to assess daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]). Global PSQI was high (mean=5.65 SD=3.71) before the surgical procedure (P<0.001). PSQI evaluation revealed higher and statistically significant scores in three components as well as in the global score, when analyzed by predominance of daytime or nocturnal seizures. ESS and PSQI scores were also analyzed by gender, antiepileptic drug class, age, and seizure frequency, with no significant differences. We concluded that patients with partial recurrent seizures of temporal origin have poor subjective sleep quality that improves significantly after epilepsy surgery. PMID:20004148

Carrion, Maria Julia Machline; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue; Martinez, Jose Victor Longo; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

2010-01-01

312

Cardio-Respiratory Coordination Increases during Sleep Apnea  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular diseases are the main source of morbidity and mortality in the United States with costs of more than $170 billion. Repetitive respiratory disorders during sleep are assumed to be a major cause of these diseases. Therefore, the understanding of the cardio-respiratory regulation during these events is of high public interest. One of the governing mechanisms is the mutual influence of the cardiac and respiratory oscillations on their respective onsets, the cardio-respiratory coordination (CRC). We analyze this mechanism based on nocturnal measurements of 27 males suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Here we find, by using an advanced analysis technique, the coordigram, not only that the occurrence of CRC is significantly more frequent during respiratory sleep disturbances than in normal respiration (p-value<10?51) but also more frequent after these events (p-value<10?15). Especially, the latter finding contradicts the common assumption that spontaneous CRC can only be observed in epochs of relaxed conditions, while our newly discovered epochs of CRC after disturbances are characterized by high autonomic stress. Our findings on the connection between CRC and the appearance of sleep-disordered events require a substantial extension of the current understanding of obstructive sleep apneas and hypopneas. PMID:24718564

Riedl, Maik; Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F.; Penzel, Thomas; Kurths, Juergen; Wessel, Niels

2014-01-01

313

Relationship between zolpidem concentrations and sleep parameters in pediatric burn patients.  

PubMed

Zolpidem is a short-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotic that is used to improve sleep architecture in patients with burn injuries. This study evaluated the relationship between zolpidem administration and sleep parameters in a cohort of children with severe burn injuries. Standard age-based zolpidem dosing practices were employed. Polysomnography data were recorded at 30-second intervals throughout the night. Serum concentrations of zolpidem were measured at 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 8 hours after administration of the first dose. The relationship between zolpidem concentrations and sleep parameters was evaluated using Markov mixed-effects pharmacodynamic models. Ten children received two doses of zolpidem at 22:00 and 02:00 hours. The median total amount of sleep was 361.0 (interquartile range [IQR]: 299.0-418.5) minutes; approximately 65% of the normal reference value for an 8-hour period. Slow-wave and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were also dramatically reduced (18-37% of normal). With two doses of zolpidem, stage 2 sleep was 99% of normal levels. Higher peak zolpidem concentrations were associated with increased stage 2 sleep (r = .54; P = .04). Despite this, a median of 120.0 (IQR: 99.5-143.5) transitions between nocturnal sleep stages were recorded, with a median of 55.5 (IQR: 36-75) night-time awakenings per patient. In pediatric burn patients, higher zolpidem serum concentrations were associated with restoration of stage 2 sleep to normal levels. Nonetheless, slow-wave and REM sleep were profoundly depressed with frequent transitions between sleep stages, suggesting that alternative hypnotic agents may be required to restore normal sleep architecture in severely burned children. PMID:25185933

Stockmann, Chris; Gottschlich, Michele M; Healy, Daniel; Khoury, Jane C; Mayes, Theresa; Sherwin, Catherine M T; Spigarelli, Michael G; Kagan, Richard J

2015-01-01

314

Decreased Connectivity between the Thalamus and the Neocortex during Human Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To determine whether thalamocortical signaling between the thalamus and the neocortex decreases from wakefulness to nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Design: Electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected simultaneously at 02:30 after 44 h of sleep deprivation. Setting: Clinical research hospital. Participants: There were six volunteers (mean age 24.2 y, one male) who yielded sufficient amounts of usable, artifact-free data. All were healthy, right-handed native English speakers who consumed less than 710 mL of caffeinated beverages per day. Psychiatric, neurological, circadian, and sleep disorders were ruled out by reviewing each patient's clinical history. A standard clinical nocturnal polysomnogram was negative for sleep disorders. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: A functional connectivity analysis was performed using the centromedian nucleus as the seed region. We determined the statistical significance of the difference between correlations obtained during wakefulness and during slow wave sleep. Neocortical regions displaying decreased thalamic connectivity were all heteromodal regions (e.g., medial frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate/precuneus), whereas there was a complete absence of neocortical regions displaying increased thalamic connectivity. Although more clusters of significant decreases were observed in stage 2 sleep, these results were similar to the results for slow wave sleep. Conclusions: Results of this study provide evidence of a functional deafferentation of the neocortex during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in humans. This deafferentation likely accounts for increased sensory awareness thresholds during NREM sleep. Decreased thalamocortical connectivity in regions such as the posterior cingulate/precuneus also are observed in coma and general anesthesia, suggesting that changes in thalamocortical connectivity may act as a universal “control switch” for changes in consciousness that are observed in coma, general anesthesia, and natural sleep. Citation: Picchioni D; Pixa ML; Fukunaga M; Carr WS; Horovitz SG; Braun AR; Duyn JH. Decreased connectivity between the thalamus and the neocortex during human nonrapid eye movement sleep. SLEEP 2014;37(2):387-397. PMID:24497667

Picchioni, Dante; Pixa, Morgan L.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Carr, Walter S.; Horovitz, Silvina G.; Braun, Allen R.; Duyn, Jeff H.

2014-01-01

315

Sleep Disturbances and Health-Related Quality of Life in Adults with Steady-State Bronchiectasis  

PubMed Central

Background Sleep disturbances are common in patients with chronic lung diseases, but little is known about the prevalence in patients with bronchiectasis. A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and determinants associated with sleep disturbances, and the correlation between sleep disturbances and quality of life (QoL) in adults with steady-state bronchiectasis. Methods One hundred and forty-four bronchiectasis patients and eighty healthy subjects were enrolled. Sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness, and QoL were measured by utilizing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), respectively. Demographic, clinical indices, radiology, spirometry, bacteriology, anxiety and depression were also assessed. Results Adults with steady-state bronchiectasis had a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances (PSQI>5) (57% vs. 29%, P<0.001), but not daytime sleepiness (ESS?10) (32% vs. 30%, P?=?0.76), compared with healthy subjects. In the multivariate model, determinants associated with sleep disturbances in bronchiectasis patients included depression (OR, 10.09; 95% CI, 3.46–29.37; P<0.001), nocturnal cough (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.13–3.18; P?=?0.016), aging (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01–1.07; P?=?0.009) and increased 24-hour sputum volume (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.22–3.33; P?=?0.006). Patients with sleep disturbances had more significantly impaired QoL affecting all domains than those without. Only 6.2% of patients reported using a sleep medication at least weekly. Conclusions In adults with steady-state bronchiectasis, sleep disturbances are more common than in healthy subjects and are related to poorer QoL. Determinants associated with sleep disturbances include depression, aging, nighttime cough and increased sputum volume. Assessment and intervention of sleep disturbances are warranted and may improve QoL. PMID:25036723

Lin, Zhiya; Tang, Yan; Lin, Zhimin; Li, Huimin; Gao, Yang; Luo, Qun; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Rongchang

2014-01-01

316

The effects on human sleep and circadian rhythms of 17 days of continuous bedrest in the absence of daylight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of a larger bedrest study involving various life science experiments, a study was conducted on the effects of 17 days of continuous bedrest and elimination of daylight on circadian rectal temperature rhythms, mood, alertness, and sleep (objective and diary) in eight healthy middle-aged men. Sleep was timed from 2300 to 0700 hours throughout. Three 72-hour measurement blocks were compared: ambulatory prebedrest, early bedrest (days 5-7), and late bedrest (days 15-17). Temperature rhythms showed reduced amplitude and later phases resulting from the bedrest conditions. This was associated with longer nocturnal sleep onset latencies and poorer subjectively rated sleep but with no reliable changes in any of the other sleep parameters. Daily changes in posture and/or exposure to daylight appear to be important determinants of a properly entrained circadian system.

Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Billy, B. D.; Kennedy, K. S.; Kupfer, D. J.

1997-01-01

317

[Clinical progress of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria].  

PubMed

Through the applications of high-sensitivity flow cytometry of FLAER and the treatment of eculizumab, it is necessary to understand of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) from a new point of view. The results of studies demonstrate that treatment with eculizumab alters the natural history of PNH by virtually eradicating thromboembolic complications, inhibiting of intravascular hemolysis and reducing or eliminating transfusion requirements. Eculizumab treatment may also reduce disease-related mortality. This review focuses on the studies to define the relationship between PNH and bone marrow failure syndromes and to characterize the long-term outcome of patients with PNH treated with eculizumab. New therapeutic strategies aimed at controlling extravascular and intravascular hemolysis are discussed. PMID:24370061

Gong, Ya-Wen; He, Guang-Sheng

2013-12-01

318

Immune pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

Somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene is the initial event in the pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), but the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to clonal expansion remain unclear. The intricate association of PNH with immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes, including aplastic anemia (AA), suggests an immunologic selection process for the glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-deficient hematopoietic clone. The mechanism for the growth advantage of PNH cells may be related to the nature of the antigens targeted by the immune response or to the function of immunomodulatory GPI-anchored proteins on the surface of the hematopoietic target cells. Alternative theories of PNH evolution may include intrinsic properties of the mutated cells, but the experimental evidence is largely lacking. Elucidation of the pathogenesis of PNH may provide key information about the causes of idiopathic AA and help understand the regulation of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. PMID:16926131

Tiu, Ramon; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw

2006-08-01

319

Plume dispersion in a nocturnal drainage wind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of tracer experiments were conducted under nocturnal drainage wind conditions in a complex terrain setting in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado. Concurrent meteorological information including profiles of wind and temperature as well as gross turbulence fluctuations from fixed 2-m stations provided the basis to test plume growth and dilution prescriptions for this moderately complex site. Plume parameters exhibited slightly greater diffusion than would be indicated by simple stability-based prediction methods or the gross turbulence indicators. Two terrain-related mechanisms appear to contribute to the development of the plume. A meandering component immediately downwind of the confluence of two valleys gives the appearance of an abnormally wide time-integrated plume. Further downstream the mean wind direction stabilizes and the plume dimension reflects diffusive spread due to small-scale turbulence.

Barr, Sumner; Kyle, Thomas G.; Clements, William E.; Sedlacek, William

320

An Unidentified Monster in the Bed – Assessing Nocturnal Asthma in Children  

PubMed Central

Nocturnal asthma (NA) is increasing in prevalence, affecting millions of people worldwide. In addition to being associated with increased mortality, NA is associated with a decreased quality of life. NA associated sleep disturbances and increased daytime sleepiness are especially important in children due to the accompanying behavioral and developmental difficulties. As diurnal spirometry is not a practical tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of NA, self or parental reports are used. Children underreport and underestimate their NA symptoms and parents are not fully aware of their child’s NA indicators. In addition, there is the lack of physician familiarity regarding the assessment and treatment of NA. Therefore, NA is chronically underreported. The development of a non-invasive, objective, home-based diagnostic tool is crucial in diagnosing and monitoring children with NA. The presence of wheeze during sleep has been successfully employed as a tool to measure NA in children. This review discusses the increasing prevalence of NA, current diagnostic tools and the consequences of undiagnosed NA in children. In conclusion, this paper suggests that an automated wheeze detective device is an objective and practical tool to aid the diagnosis and monitoring of NA. PMID:19753285

Ginsberg, Darrell

2009-01-01

321

Alterations in skin temperature and sleep in the fear of harm phenotype of pediatric bipolar disorder  

PubMed Central

In children diagnosed with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), disturbances in the quality of sleep and wakefulness are prominent. A novel phenotype of PBD called Fear of Harm (FOH) associated with separation anxiety and aggressive obsessions is associated with sleep onset insomnia, parasomnias (nightmares, night-terrors, enuresis), REM sleep-related problems, and morning sleep inertia. Children with FOH often experience thermal discomfort (e.g. feeling hot, excessive sweating) in neutral ambient temperature conditions, as well as no discomfort during exposure to the extreme cold, and alternate noticeably between being excessively hot in the evening and cold in the morning. We hypothesized that these sleep- and temperature-related symptoms were overt symptoms of an impaired ability to dissipate heat, particularly in the evening hours near the time of sleep onset. We measured sleep/wake variables using actigraphy, and nocturnal skin temperature variables using thermal patches and a wireless device, and compared these data between children with PBD/FOH and a control sample of healthy children. The results are suggestive of a thermoregulatory dysfunction that is associated with sleep onset difficulties. Further, they are consistent with our hypothesis that alterations in neural circuitry common to thermoregulation and emotion regulation underlie affective and behavioral symptoms of the FOH phenotype.

Murphy, Patricia J.; Frei, Mark G.; Papolos, Demitri

2014-01-01

322

Sleep and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... the wheel). Even once they make it to bed, more than 15% of adults in the United ... sleep. Sleeping Environment Get comfy. Make sure your bed and bedding are comfortable. Remove distractions. Get the ...

323

Sleep Disorders Treatment Survey  

E-print Network

examiner registered by the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners to be eligible to drive once diagnosed with a sleep disorder. Several treatments are offered to alleviate the symptoms of sleep disorders. The standard form of treatment requires...

Spann, Stephanie

2014-08-18

324

Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... high blood pressure, and can cause complications during surgery. You might have sleep apnea if you: Are ... have obstructive sleep apnea if you’re having surgery. Anesthesia also can cause the throat to relax ...

325

Sleep Characteristics of Family Caregivers of Individuals With a Primary Malignant Brain Tumor  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Objectives To describe the sleep characteristics of family caregivers of individuals with a primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT). Design Cross-sectional, correlational design using baseline data from a longitudinal study. Setting Neuro-oncology and neurosurgery clinics at an urban tertiary medical center in the United States. Sample 133 family caregivers recruited one to two months following diagnosis of family member’s PMBT. Methods Subjective and objective measures of sleep were obtained via self-report and the use of accelerometers (three nights). Main Research Variables Sleep characteristics including sleep latency, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, number of naps, number of arousals, sleep-wake cycle, and sleep quality. Findings Sleep latency in caregivers was, on average, 35 minutes (SD = 34.5)—more than twice as long as the norm of 15 minutes (t[113]) = 6.18, p < 0.01). Caregivers averaged a total sleep time of 5 hours and 57 minutes (SD = 84.6), significantly less than the recommended 7 hours (t[113] = ?8, p < 0.01), and were awake in the night 15% of the time, significantly more than the norm of 10% (t[111] = 5.84, p < 0.01). Caregivers aroused an average of 8.3 times during nocturnal sleep (SD = 3.5, range = 2–21), with about 32% reporting poor or very poor sleep quality. Conclusions Caregivers experienced sleep impairments that placed them at risk for poor mental and physical health, and may compromise their ability to continue in the caregiving role. Implications for Nursing Nurses need to assess sleep in caregivers of individuals with PMBT and implement interventions to improve sleep. Knowledge Translation Sleep deprivation is common in family caregivers during the early stages of care for individuals with a PMBT. A single-item sleep quality question could be an easy but valuable tool in assessing sleep disturbances in family caregivers of individuals with a PMBT. The health trajectory of family caregivers warrants further longitudinal study, in addition to the examination of the bidirectional relationship of health status of care recipients and their family caregiver. PMID:23448742

Pawl, Jean D.; Lee, Shih-Yu; Clark, Patricia C.; Sherwood, Paula R.

2013-01-01

326

Epilepsy and sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  A sleep history should be taken routinely in patients with epilepsy. Treatment of sleep disorders and improvement in sleep\\u000a hygiene may improve seizure control, daytime cognitive functioning, and quality of life. Patients with recurrent sleepiness\\u000a interfering with daily activities or an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score more than 10 should be considered for additional evaluation\\u000a by a sleep specialist. Treatment

Susan T. Herman; SANJAY SISODIYA

2006-01-01

327

Sleep Disorders and Fibromyalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disordered sleep is such a prominent symptom in fibromyalgia that the American College of Rheumatology included symptoms such\\u000a as waking unrefreshed, fatigue, tiredness, and insomnia in the 2010 diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia. Even though sleep\\u000a recording is not part of the routine evaluation, polysomnography may disclose primary sleep disorders in patients with fibromyalgia,\\u000a including obstructive sleep apnea and restless leg

Suely Roizenblatt; Nilton Salles Rosa Neto; Sergio Tufik

328

Pediatric Sleep Surgery  

PubMed Central

Adenotonsillectomy is the most common surgery performed for sleep disordered breathing with good outcomes. Children with obesity, craniofacial disorders, and neurologic impairment are at risk for persistent sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy. Techniques exist to address obstructive lesions of the palate, tongue base, or craniofacial skeleton in children with persistent sleep apnea. Children with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of peri-operative complications. PMID:24926473

Sulman, Cecille G.

2014-01-01

329

Effects of acute administration of brotizolam in subjects with disturbed sleep  

PubMed Central

1 Effects of ingestion of brotizolam (0.25 and 0.50 mg) over 1-3 days on polysomnographic measures of sleep were assessed in patients complaining of insomnia. 2 Brotizolam reduced latency to sleep, number of awakenings and wake during sleep, and increased total sleep time. It also increased stage 2 sleep and decreased slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. 3 Increasing the dose from 0.25 to 0.50 mg increased hypnotic efficacy, and there was a more consistent and reliable effect. 4 Discontinuation of brotizolam had minimal effects on sleep compared with placebo over the 3 nights after acute administration. 5 No side-effects or disruption of daytime function was found using questionnaires and objective tests of performance. PMID:6661383

Roehrs, T.; Zorick, F.; Koshorek, G. L.; Wittig, R.; Roth, T.

1983-01-01

330

[Effect of nootropic drugs on normal and disturbed sleep of the elderly: controlled studies with pyridoxilate and street noise].  

PubMed

The effect of the nootropic drug, piridoxilate on normal and on exogenously (by traffic noise) disturbed sleep and awakening quality was investigated in a double-blind placebo-controlled study. 10 elderly subjects with a mean age of 62 years spent 13 nights in the sleep laboratory: 2 adaptation nights, 1 baseline night, 3 drug nights (placebo, 300 and 600 mg piridoxilate), as well as 2 drug nights with nocturnal traffic noise (placebo and 600 mg piridoxilate) and the subsequent wash-out nights. Polysomnographic recordings (including EEG, EMG and EOG) were carried out between 10:30 p.m. and 6.00 a.m. Traffic noise was pre-recorded at a busy Viennese street and presented continuously by a loudspeaker with a sound pressure level at the ear of between 68 and 83 dB (A) [mean 75.6 dB (A)]. In the morning the subjects completed a sleep questionnaire for the subjective evaluation of their quality of sleep and awakening. Thereafter objective awakening quality was measured by a psychometric test battery. Piridoxilate did not induce any significant changes in objective and subjective sleep variables. Nocturnal traffic noise produced a decrease in total sleep time and sleep efficiency, an increase in wakefulness and drowsiness (stage 1), as well as a decrease in REM and deep sleep stages, the last-mentioned being of statistical significance. Subjectively, the elderly subjects reported a deterioration in sleep quality due to traffic noise, an increase in middle and late insomnia, as well as a deterioration in awakening quality (dizziness, tiredness, headaches). Piridoxilate did not ameliorate these sleep disturbances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6396969

Saletu, B; Grünberger, J; Lesch, O

1984-11-23

331

Systemic bacterial invasion induced by sleep deprivation.  

PubMed

Profound sleep disruption in humans is generally believed to cause health impairments. Through comparative research, specific physical effects and underlying mechanisms altered by sleep deprivation are being elucidated. Studies of sleep-deprived animals previously have shown a progressive, chronic negative energy balance and gradual deterioration of health, which culminate in fatal bloodstream infection without an infectious focus. The present study investigated the conditions antecedent to advanced morbidity in sleep-deprived rats by determining the time course and distribution of live microorganisms in body tissues that are normally sterile. The tissues cultured for microbial growth included the blood, four major organs, six regional lymph nodes, the intestine, and the skin. The principal finding was early infection of the mesenteric lymph nodes by bacteria presumably translocated from the intestine and bacterial migration to and transient infection of extraintestinal sites. Presence of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins in tissues constitutes a septic burden and chronic antigenic challenge for the host. Bacterial translocation and pathogenic sequelae provide mechanisms by which sleep deprivation appears to adversely affect health. PMID:10749778

Everson, C A; Toth, L A

2000-04-01

332

Behavioral sleep medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the knowledge base in sleep disorders medicine has broadened, a subspecialty that we will refer to as “behavioral sleep medicine” area is emerging. This article will define this subspecialty area, provide some historical context for its emergence, review issues related to specialty training and clinical practice, and suggest needs for future research.The term “behavioral sleep medicine” was selected because

Edward J Stepanski; Michael L Perlis

2000-01-01

333

Pediatric sleep pharmacology.  

PubMed

This article reviews common sleep disorders in children and pharmacologic options for them. Discussions of pediatric sleep pharmacology typically focus on treatment of insomnia. Although insomnia is a major concern in this population, other conditions of concern in children are presented, such as narcolepsy, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea. PMID:23040905

Pelayo, Rafael; Yuen, Kin

2012-10-01

334

Electrophysiological semeiology of sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The main characteristics of electroencephalograms, electro-oculograms and electromyograms in human sleep are described. This electrophysiological semeiology permits the identification of the different stages in normal sleep. In animals, sleep is generally less differentiated; the possibility of recording subcortical structures allows the observation of additional phenomena such as hippocampal theta, activity and PGO spikes. Evoked brain electrical activity is less

J. M. Gaillard

1980-01-01

335

Prevalence, putative mechanisms, and current management of sleep problems during chemotherapy for cancer  

PubMed Central

Sleep problems are highly prevalent in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This article reviews existing evidence on etiology, associated symptoms, and management of sleep problems associated with chemotherapy treatment during cancer. It also discusses limitations and methodological issues of current research. The existing literature suggests that subjectively and objectively measured sleep problems are the highest during the chemotherapy phase of cancer treatments. A possibly involved mechanism reviewed here includes the rise in the circulating proinflammatory cytokines and the associated disruption in circadian rhythm in the development and maintenance of sleep dysregulation in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Various approaches to the management of sleep problems during chemotherapy are discussed with behavioral intervention showing promise. Exercise, including yoga, also appear to be effective and safe at least for subclinical levels of sleep problems in cancer patients. Numerous challenges are associated with conducting research on sleep in cancer patients during chemotherapy treatments and they are discussed in this review. Dedicated intervention trials, methodologically sound and sufficiently powered, are needed to test current and novel treatments of sleep problems in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Optimal management of sleep problems in patients with cancer receiving treatment may improve not only the well-being of patients, but also their prognosis given the emerging experimental and clinical evidence suggesting that sleep disruption might adversely impact treatment and recovery from cancer. PMID:23486503

Palesh, Oxana; Peppone, Luke; Innominato, Pasquale F; Janelsins, Michelle; Jeong, Monica; Sprod, Lisa; Savard, Josee; Rotatori, Max; Kesler, Shelli; Telli, Melinda; Mustian, Karen

2012-01-01

336

Comorbidities of sleep disorders in childhood and adolescence: focus on migraine.  

PubMed

The correlation and/or comorbidity between sleep disorders and headache has been reported in numerous studies, but the exact nature of the association between headache, disordered sleep, and underlying mechanisms remains poorly understood. The bidirectional association between sleep and headache is mediated by a temporal link (headache occurs during sleep, after sleep, and in relationship with sleep stages), by a quantitative relationship (excess, lack, bad quality, short duration of sleep may trigger headache), and by a reciprocal connection (headache may cause sleep disruption and may be associated with several sleep disturbances). This association is most evident for primary headache disorders, especially in childhood. A congenital alteration of neurotransmitter pathways (serotoninergic and dopaminergic) might predispose individuals to both disorders, presenting as sleep-wake rhythm disorder in infancy or as headache disorder later in childhood, as result of this neurotransmitter imbalance. Clinicians should be aware that a complete clinical evaluation of childhood headache includes a careful sleep history, taking into account that the treatment of sleep disturbances could lead to an improvement of headache symptoms and vice versa. PMID:23788845

Dosi, Claudia; Riccioni, Assia; Della Corte, Martina; Novelli, Luana; Ferri, Raffaele; Bruni, Oliviero

2013-01-01

337

Comorbidities of sleep disorders in childhood and adolescence: focus on migraine  

PubMed Central

The correlation and/or comorbidity between sleep disorders and headache has been reported in numerous studies, but the exact nature of the association between headache, disordered sleep, and underlying mechanisms remains poorly understood. The bidirectional association between sleep and headache is mediated by a temporal link (headache occurs during sleep, after sleep, and in relationship with sleep stages), by a quantitative relationship (excess, lack, bad quality, short duration of sleep may trigger headache), and by a reciprocal connection (headache may cause sleep disruption and may be associated with several sleep disturbances). This association is most evident for primary headache disorders, especially in childhood. A congenital alteration of neurotransmitter pathways (serotoninergic and dopaminergic) might predispose individuals to both disorders, presenting as sleep–wake rhythm disorder in infancy or as headache disorder later in childhood, as result of this neurotransmitter imbalance. Clinicians should be aware that a complete clinical evaluation of childhood headache includes a careful sleep history, taking into account that the treatment of sleep disturbances could lead to an improvement of headache symptoms and vice versa. PMID:23788845

Dosi, Claudia; Riccioni, Assia; Corte, Martina della; Novelli, Luana; Ferri, Raffaele; Bruni, Oliviero

2013-01-01

338

Nocturnal colonization behavior of blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in southeastern Australia.  

PubMed

Worldwide research into nocturnal colonization by blowflies has produced many contradictory findings, prompting investigation specific to southeastern Australia. Initial experiments showed that blowfly colonization begins shortly after sunrise and continues until sunset; nocturnal colonization never occurred. Colonization peaks occurred at mid-morning, midday, and in the hours preceding sunset. In an additional experiment, wild blowflies were captured and placed in cages with colonization medium supplied nocturnally. Colonization occurred on four of five nights, and Calliphora augur (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) was the main species colonizing baits nocturnally. Results suggest that colonization is most likely to occur during warm weather and when flies are able to walk or crawl to bait. In particular, blowflies trapped within a confined space (such as a room or car) with warmer-than-ambient temperature may be stimulated to colonize nearby remains. Entomologists should consider these findings when estimating minimum postmortem interval under these environmental conditions. PMID:22994948

George, Kelly A; Archer, Melanie S; Toop, Tes

2013-01-01

339

Do wintering Harlequin Ducks forage nocturnally at high latitudes?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attributes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence of nocturnal dive-feeding. Signals from eight radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks never exhibited signal loss due to diving during a total of 780 minutes of nocturnal monitoring. In contrast, the same eight birds exhibited signal loss during 62 ?? 7% (SE) of 5-minute diurnal monitoring periods (total of 365 minutes of monitoring). Our results suggest that Harlequin Ducks in south-central Alaska face a stringent time constraint on daytime foraging during midwinter. Harlequin Ducks wintering at high latitudes, therefore, may be particularly sensitive to factors that increase foraging requirements or decrease foraging efficiency.

Rizzolo, D.J.; Esler, Daniel; Roby, D.D.; Jarvis, R.L.

2005-01-01

340

Susceptibility of Interstitial Continuous Glucose Monitor Performance to Sleeping Position  

PubMed Central

Background Developing a round-the-clock artificial pancreas requires accurate and stable continuous glucose monitoring. The most widely used continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) are percutaneous, with the sensor residing in the interstitial space. Inaccuracies in percutaneous CGM readings during periods of lying on the devices (e.g., in various sleeping positions) have been anecdotally reported but not systematically studied. Methods In order to assess the impact of sleep and sleep position on CGM performance, we conducted a study in human subjects in which we measured the variability of interstitial CGM data at night as a function of sleeping position. Commercially available sensors were placed for 4 days in the abdominal subcutaneous tissue in healthy, nondiabetic volunteers (four sensors per person, two per side). Nocturnal sleeping position was determined from video recordings and correlated to sensor data. Results We observed that, although the median of the four sensor readings was typically 70–110 mg/dl during sleep, individual sensors intermittently exhibited aberrant glucose readings (>25 mg/dl away from median) and that these aberrant readings were strongly correlated with subjects lying on the sensors. We expected and observed that most of these aberrant sleep-position-related CGM readings were sudden decreases in reported glucose values, presumably due to local blood-flow decreases caused by tissue compression. Curiously, in rare cases, the aberrant CGM readings were elevated values. Conclusions These findings highlight limitations in our understanding of interstitial fluid physiology in the subcutaneous space and have significant implications for the utilization of sensors in the construction of an artificial pancreas. PMID:23911167

Mensh, Brett D.; Wisniewski, Natalie A.; Neil, Brian M.; Burnett, Daniel R.

2013-01-01

341

Intrinsic connectivity network mapping in young children during natural sleep.  

PubMed

Structural and functional neuroimaging have substantively informed the pathophysiology of numerous adult neurological and psychiatric disorders. While structural neuroimaging is readily acquired in sedated young children, pediatric application of functional neuroimaging has been limited by the behavioral demands of in-scanner task performance. Here, we investigated whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquired during natural sleep and without experimental stimulation offers a viable strategy for studying young children. We targeted the lengthy epoch of non-rapid eye movement, stage 3 (NREM3) sleep typically observed at sleep onset in sleep-deprived children. Seven healthy, preschool-aged children (24-58 months) were studied, acquiring fMRI measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), with concurrent sleep-stage monitoring. ICN data (T2* fMRI) were reliably obtained during NREM3 sleep; CBF data (arterial spin labeled fMRI) were not reliably obtained, as scanner noises disrupted sleep. Applying independent component analysis (ICA) to T2* data, distinct ICNs were observed which corresponded closely with those reported in the adult literature. Notably, a network associated with orthography in adults was not observed, suggesting that ICNs exhibit a developmental trajectory. We conclude that resting-state fMRI obtained in sleep is a promising paradigm for neurophysiological investigations of young children. PMID:23727317

Manning, Janessa H; Courchesne, Eric; Fox, Peter T

2013-12-01

342

Intrinsic connectivity network mapping in young children during natural sleep  

PubMed Central

Structural and functional neuroimaging have substantively informed the pathophysiology of numerous adult neurological and psychiatric disorders. While structural neuroimaging is readily acquired in sedated young children, pediatric application of functional neuroimaging has been limited by the behavioral demands of in-scanner task performance. Here, we investigated whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquired during natural sleep and without experimental stimulation offers a viable strategy for studying young children. We targeted the lengthy epoch of non-Rapid Eye Movement, stage 3 (NREM3) sleep typically observed at sleep onset in sleep-deprived children. Seven healthy, preschool-aged children (24-58 months) were studied, acquiring fMRI measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), with concurrent sleep-stage monitoring. ICN data (T2* fMRI) were reliably obtained during NREM3 sleep; CBF data (arterial spin labeled fMRI) were not reliably obtained, as scanner noises disrupted sleep. Applying independent components analysis (ICA) to T2* data, distinct ICNs were observed which corresponded closely with those reported in the adult literature. Notably, a network associated with orthography in adults was not observed, suggesting that ICNs exhibit a developmental trajectory. We conclude that resting-state fMRI obtained in sleep is a promising paradigm for neurophysiological investigations of young children. PMID:23727317

Manning, Janessa H.; Courchesne, Eric; Fox, Peter T.

2013-01-01

343

Nocturnal cortisol and melatonin secretion in primary insomnia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated evening and nocturnal serum cortisol and melatonin concentrations in patients with primary insomnia to test if this clinical condition is accompanied by an increase of cortisol secretion and a simultaneous decrease of nocturnal melatonin production. Ten drug-free patients (4 males, 6 females) with primary insomnia (mean age±S.D.: 39.2±9.1 years) and 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls

Dieter Riemann; Torsten Klein; Andrea Rodenbeck; Bernd Feige; Andrea Horny; Ruth Hummel; Gesa Weske; Anam Al-Shajlawi; Ulrich Voderholzer

2002-01-01

344

Basics of Sleep Behavior  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Brain Information Service at the University of California Los Angeles provides this online textbook of sleep behavior. Its fourteen chapters discuss, among other concepts, the nature and development of sleep, types of sleep, chemistry and mechanics, dreams, and disorders. The site, arresting in its clarity and breadth, is illustrated with charts and diagrams, hyperlinked to a glossary that pops up in a separate browser window, and accompanied by a briefly annotated bibliography. BSB is part of the well known Sleep Home Pages, a site brimming with sleep information for the researcher and general user alike.

345

The coeruleus/subcoeruleus complex in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorders in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

In Parkinson's disease, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is an early non-dopaminergic syndrome with nocturnal violence and increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep that can precede Parkinsonism by several years. The neuronal origin of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Parkinson's disease is not precisely known; however, the locus subcoeruleus in the brainstem has been implicated as this structure blocks muscle tone during normal rapid eye movement sleep in animal models and can be damaged in Parkinson's disease. Here, we studied the integrity of the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus complex in patients with Parkinson's disease using combined neuromelanin-sensitive, structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging approaches. We compared 24 patients with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 12 patients without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent clinical examination and characterization of rapid eye movement sleep using video-polysomnography and multimodal imaging at 3 T. Using neuromelanin-sensitive imaging, reduced signal intensity was evident in the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus area in patients with Parkinson's disease that was more marked in patients with than those without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Reduced signal intensity correlated with the percentage of abnormally increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep. The results confirmed that this complex is affected in Parkinson's disease and showed a gradual relationship between damage to this structure, presumably the locus subcoeruleus, and abnormal muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep, which is the cardinal marker of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In longitudinal studies, the technique may also provide early markers of non-dopaminergic Parkinson's disease pathology to predict the occurrence of Parkinson's disease. PMID:23801736

García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Longo-Dos Santos, Clarisse; Ewenczyk, Claire; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Gallea, Cecile; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Pita Lobo, Patricia; Poupon, Cyril; Benali, Habib; Arnulf, Isabelle; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehericy, Stéphane

2013-07-01

346

Short term effect of a single dose of formoterol or tiotropium on the isolated nocturnal hypoxemia in stable COPD patients: a double blind randomized study.  

PubMed

Patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diurnal PaO2 > 60 mmHg may have transient oxygen desaturation during sleep. The effect of bronchodilators on nocturnal hypoxemia is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate if a single dose of Formoterol or Tiotropium, administered in the evening, could improve nocturnal hypoxemia in patients with stable middle/severe COPD. Thirty-seven patients (25 M/12 F; mean age 68.97 +/- 8.57, range 50-78; mean FEV1% of predicted 46.29 +/- 9.2) with PaO2 > 60 mmHg, but with significant oxygen desaturation during sleep and apnea/hypopnea index < or = 10 were selected. They randomly underwent three consecutive nocturnal pulsoxymetry: baseline and after taking placebo and 12 microg of Formoterol (20 pts) or 18 microg of Tiotropium (17 pts) in the evening. FEV1 and IC, measured after 1 h of taking bronchodilators, were significantly higher than placebo. The variation, with regards to baseline values, in mean heart rate and Lowest SpO2% measured after Tiotropium (-1.68 +/- 4.01 and 3.23 +/- 8.58 respectively) was higher (p < 0.05) than placebo (-0.108 +/- 2.85 and 0.29 +/- 7.05 respectively). Moreover, the trend time of SpO2% (measured by pulse-oximeter at each hour of total time registration) after Tiotropium was significantly higher than baseline or placebo (p < 0.01). Instead, the trend time of SpO2% after Formoterol, except for an initial transient hypoxemia fall, was similar to baseline condition and after placebo. Also the trend time of heart rate resulted significantly lower in the Tiotropium group, but higher in the Formoterol group. In conclusion, Formoterol does not seem to influence the nocturnal hypoxemia in stable COPD patients probably for the worsening V/Q ratio. On the contrary, a single dose of tiotropium seems to decrease the severity in the nocturnal desaturations in stable COPD patients probably due to the reduction in the nocturnal bronchial colinergic tone. PMID:18700693

Sposato, B; Franco, C

2008-01-01

347

The impact of prolonged violent video-gaming on adolescent sleep: an experimental study.  

PubMed

Video-gaming is an increasingly prevalent activity among children and adolescents that is known to influence several areas of emotional, cognitive and behavioural functioning. Currently there is insufficient experimental evidence about how extended video-game play may affect adolescents' sleep. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term impact of adolescents' prolonged exposure to violent video-gaming on sleep. Seventeen male adolescents (mean age = 16 ± 1 years) with no current sleep difficulties played a novel, fast-paced, violent video-game (50 or 150 min) before their usual bedtime on two different testing nights in a sleep laboratory. Objective (polysomnography-measured sleep and heart rate) and subjective (single-night sleep diary) measures were obtained to assess the arousing effects of prolonged gaming. Compared with regular gaming, prolonged gaming produced decreases in objective sleep efficiency (by 7 ± 2%, falling below 85%) and total sleep time (by 27 ± 12 min) that was contributed by a near-moderate reduction in rapid eye movement sleep (Cohen's d = 0.48). Subjective sleep-onset latency significantly increased by 17 ± 8 min, and there was a moderate reduction in self-reported sleep quality after prolonged gaming (Cohen's d = 0.53). Heart rate did not differ significantly between video-gaming conditions during pre-sleep game-play or the sleep-onset phase. Results provide evidence that prolonged video-gaming may cause clinically significant disruption to adolescent sleep, even when sleep after video-gaming is initiated at normal bedtime. However, physiological arousal may not necessarily be the mechanism by which technology use affects sleep. PMID:23137332

King, Daniel L; Gradisar, Michael; Drummond, Aaron; Lovato, Nicole; Wessel, Jason; Micic, Gorica; Douglas, Paul; Delfabbro, Paul

2013-04-01

348

American Academy of Sleep Medicine American Academy of Sleep Medicine  

E-print Network

© American Academy of Sleep Medicine American Academy of Sleep Medicine The following product has been developed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Copyright © 2003 American Academy of Sleep: (708) 492-0943 Visit Us at www.aasmnet.org #12;© American Academy of Sleep Medicine American Academy

Goldman, Steven A.

349

Sleep and Sleep Problems: From Birth to 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sleep is an important aspect of a child's early development and is essential to family well-being. During their first 3 years, infants and toddlers spend more than 50% of their lives sleeping. However, concerns about sleep and sleep problems are among the most common issues brought to the attention of pediatricians. Although sleep is one of the…

Du Mond, Courtney; Mindell, Jodi A.

2011-01-01

350

Sleep apnea and stroke.  

PubMed

Clinical evidence has established that sleep apnea is a risk factor for stroke. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of sleep apnea that may have preceded or developed as a result of the stroke. Well-established concurrent stroke risk factors for stroke like hypertension and atrial fibrillation respond favorably to the successful treatment of sleep apnea. The gold standard diagnosis of sleep apnea is obtained in the sleep laboratory, but unattended polysomnography is gaining acceptance. Positive airway pressure (PAP) (continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP] or bilevel positive airway pressure [BiPAP]) applications are the gold-standard treatment of sleep apnea. Suggestive evidence indicates that stroke occurrence or recurrence may be reduced with treatment of sleep apnea. PMID:25407131

Culebras, Antonio

2015-01-01

351

Sleep and moral awareness.  

PubMed

The implications of sleep for morality are only starting to be explored. Extending the ethics literature, we contend that because bringing morality to conscious attention requires effort, a lack of sleep leads to low moral awareness. We test this prediction with three studies. A laboratory study with a manipulation of sleep across 90 participants judging a scenario for moral content indicates that a lack of sleep leads to low moral awareness. An archival study of Google Trends data across 6 years highlights a national dip in Web searches for moral topics (but not other topics) on the Monday after the Spring time change, which tends to deprive people of sleep. Finally, a diary study of 127 participants indicates that (within participants) nights with a lack of sleep are associated with low moral awareness the next day. Together, these three studies suggest that a lack of sleep leaves people less morally aware, with important implications for the recognition of morality in others. PMID:25159702

Barnes, Christopher M; Gunia, Brian C; Wagner, David T

2014-08-27

352

The Consolidation of Implicit Sequence Memory in Obstructive Sleep Apnea  

PubMed Central

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Syndrome is a relatively frequent sleep disorder characterized by disrupted sleep patterns. It is a well-established fact that sleep has beneficial effect on memory consolidation by enhancing neural plasticity. Implicit sequence learning is a prominent component of skill learning. However, the formation and consolidation of this fundamental learning mechanism remains poorly understood in OSA. In the present study we examined the consolidation of different aspects of implicit sequence learning in patients with OSA. We used the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task to measure general skill learning and sequence-specific learning. There were two sessions: a learning phase and a testing phase, separated by a 10-hour offline period with sleep. Our data showed differences in offline changes of general skill learning between the OSA and control group. The control group demonstrated offline improvement from evening to morning, while the OSA group did not. In contrast, we did not observe differences between the groups in offline changes in sequence-specific learning. Our findings suggest that disrupted sleep in OSA differently affects neural circuits involved in the consolidation of sequence learning. PMID:25329462

Malecek, Nick

2014-01-01

353

Sleep disturbances in long-term immigrants with chronic mountain sickness: A comparison with healthy immigrants at high altitude.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine sleep disturbances in patients with chronic mountain sickness (CMS). The sleep of 14 patients with CMS and 11 healthy controls with or without sleep disorders (control N: without sleep disorders; control D: with sleep disorders) was studied by polysomnography. Hypopnea was the sleep disorder most commonly suffered by CMS patients and control D subjects. No major differences were observed in sleep structure between CMS and control groups, with the exception of shorter rapid eye movement latency in controls and increased deep non-rapid eye movement in the control N group. Periodic breathing was observed in only two study participants, one each in the CMS and control D groups. The level of saturated oxygen was significantly lower in the CMS group during sleep than the control groups (P<0.05). CMS scores were positively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index, and negatively correlated with saturated oxygen levels. These results demonstrate that sleep disorders and nocturnal hypoxia are important in the development of CMS. PMID:25462013

Guan, Wei; Ga, Qin; Li, Rong; Bai, Zhen-Zhong; Wuren, Tana; Wang, Jin; Yang, Ying-Zhong; Li, Yu-Hong; Ge, Ri-Li

2015-01-15

354

The nature of sleep in 10 bedridden elderly patients with disorders of consciousness in a Japanese hospital.  

PubMed

No previous study has satisfactorily clarified the nature of sleep in elderly bedridden people with disorders of consciousness (DOC). The objective of the present study was to clarify the sleep states of 10 elderly bedridden patients with DOC in a Japanese hospital to facilitate provision of evidence-based nursing care and appropriate adjustment of patients' environments. Nocturnal polysomnography recordings were analyzed according to the standard scoring criteria, and the patients' sleep stages and quality were investigated. Of the 10 patients, 9 showed slow wave sleep (SWS), 4 showed very high values for sleep efficiency (96-100%), and in 3 of these patients, the percentage of SWS was ? 20%. Furthermore, three of these four patients had 200 or more changes in sleep stage. Although the mechanism is unknown, the amount of SWS combined with the value of sleep efficiency suggests that the quality of sleep is poor in elderly bedridden patients with DOC. Further study is needed to determine better indicators of good sleep in this population. PMID:25504946

Matsumoto, Masaru; Sugama, Junko; Nemoto, Tetsu; Kurita, Toshiharu; Matsuo, Junko; Dai, Misako; Ueta, Miyuki; Okuwa, Mayumi; Nakatani, Toshio; Tabata, Keiko; Sanada, Hiromi

2015-01-01

355

Exploring sleep-wake experiences of mothers during maintenance therapy for their child's acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

A qualitative study was designed to explore sleep-wake experience of mothers of children in maintenance treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Interviews were conducted with 20 participants using open-ended, semi-structured questions and were transcribed verbatim. Two main themes emerged: "It's a whole new cancer world" and "I don't remember what it's like to have sleep." Mothers experience difficulty sleeping during their children's treatment, and expressed several serious issues. Although the mothers were able to employ various mechanisms to address sleep deprivation and disruption, interventions such as social support, journaling, spiritual guidance, and/or self-talk may be most beneficial. PMID:24486174

Neu, Madalynn; Matthews, Ellyn; King, Nancy A

2014-01-01

356

Use of cluster analysis to describe desaturator phenotypes in COPD: correlations between pulmonary function tests and nocturnal oxygen desaturation  

PubMed Central

Background Significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression exists within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) inadequately describes this heterogeneity, a clear alternative has not emerged. This article discusses and refines the concept of phenotyping desaturators in COPD and shows a possible pattern which could be used as a framework for future research. Recent findings COPD is a complex condition with pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. We suggest that COPD phenotypes should be associated with clinically meaningful outcomes. The innovation of COPD phenotyping is defined as COPD desaturators. Sleep-related hypoxemia and hypercapnia are well recognized in COPD and the development of systemic inflammation during sleep. These sleep-related changes predispose to nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary hypertension, and possibly death, particularly during acute exacerbations. Conclusion A more focused definition makes possible a classification of patients into two distinct subgroups for both clinical and research purposes. Establishing a common language for future research will facilitate our understanding and management of such diseases. Even if different treatment strategies have different outcomes for these groups, we will have confirmation, or otherwise, of the clinical value of cluster analysis. This knowledge could lead to pharmacological treatment and other interventions directed to specific phenotypic groups. PMID:22135488

Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; De Nuccio, Francesco; Gaballo, Annarita; Nicolardi, Giuseppe

2011-01-01

357

Sleep-Wake Circadian Activity Rhythm Parameters and Fatigue in Oncology Patients Prior to the Initiation of Radiation Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the relationships between sleep parameters and fatigue in patients at the initiation of radiation therapy (RT). Objectives In a sample of patients at the initiation of RT, to describe values for nocturnal sleep/rest, daytime wake/activity, and circadian activity rhythm parameters measured using actigraphy and to evaluate the relationships between these objective parameters and subjective ratings of sleep disturbance and fatigue severity. Methods Patients (n=185) with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer completed self-report measures for sleep disturbance (i.e., Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, General Sleep Disturbance Scale) and fatigue (Lee Fatigue Scale) and wore wrist actigraphs for a total of 48 hours prior to beginning RT. Actigraphy data were analyzed using the Cole-Kripke algorithm. Spearman rank correlations were calculated between variables. Results Approximately 30% to 50% of patients experienced sleep disturbance depending on whether clinically significant cutoffs for the subjective or objective measures were used to calculate occurrence rates. In addition, these patients reported moderate levels of fatigue. Only a limited number of significant correlations were found between the subjective and objective measures of sleep disturbance. Significant positive correlations were found between the subjective, but not the objective measures of sleep disturbance and fatigue. Conclusions A significant percentage of oncology patients experience significant disturbances in sleep-wake circadian activity rhythms at the initiation of RT. The disturbances occur in both sleep initiation and sleep maintenance. Implications for Practice Patients need to be assessed at the initiation of RT for sleep disturbance and appropriate treatment initiated. PMID:21252646

Miaskowski, Christine; Lee, Kathryn; Dunn, Laura; Dodd, Marylin; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce; Wara, William; Swift, Patrick

2010-01-01

358

Neutrophil life span in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

We have studied neutrophil intravascular life span in six patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH); four had normal neutrophil counts when studied and two were neutropenic. Five patients had enough circulating neutrophils to isolate for tests in vitro. Lysis of labeled neutrophils was greatly increased, compared to that of normal volunteers, when these neutrophils were incubated with acidified fresh serum as a source of active complement plus serum containing antineutrophil antibodies (from three different sources). Despite the in vitro lesion, however, each of these patients had a normal neutrophil intravascular life span as measured by the 32P-diisopropylfluorophosphate technique. One neutropenic patient, who had a normal neutrophil life span, had a shift of cells from the circulating to marginated pool of sufficient degree to cause the neutropenia. A second (severely) neutropenic patient was found to have developed extreme marrow hypoplasia, also explaining the neutropenia. Thus, in contrast to the shortened red cell life span, we have been unable to find a shortened neutrophil life span in PNH. PMID:901939

Brubaker, L H; Essig, L J; Mengel, C E

1977-10-01

359

Laboratory tests for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare hematological disorder that is often suspected in a patient presenting with non-immune hemolytic anemia associated with pancytopenia or venous thrombosis. This disorder is a consequence of acquired somatic mutations in the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIG-A) gene in the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of patients. The presence of these mutations leads to production of blood cells with decreased glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface proteins, making red blood cells derived from the clone more sensitive to complement mediated hemolysis. The diagnosis of PNH may be difficult in some cases due a low proportion of PNH cells in the blood and occasionally due to difficulties in selecting the most appropriate diagnostic studies. The latest generation of tests allow for detection of very small populations of PNH cells, for following the natural course and response to therapy of the disease, and for helping to decide when to initiate therapy with monoclonal antibody targeting the terminal complement protein C5 (Eculizumab), anticoagulation, and in some cases allogeneic HSC transplant. In this article, we review the different diagnostic tests available to clinicians for PNH diagnosis. PMID:24127129

Preis, Meir; Lowrey, Christopher H

2014-03-01

360

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a red clot syndrome.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired, nonmalignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by hemolysis, diminished hematopoiesis, and thrombophilia. We describe a 65-year-old woman with known PNH and peripheral arterial disease who presented with critical limb ischemia and a nonhealing left foot ulcer. She underwent surgical bypass of a diffusely diseased left superficial femoral artery with autologous reversed saphenous vein graft. Her postoperative course was complicated by wound sepsis and PNH exacerbation with resultant graft thrombosis requiring an above-knee amputation. This case highlights several key concepts relevant to the management of vascular surgery patients with PNH: (1) their predisposition for arterial and venous thrombosis; (2) hypercoagulability despite standard anticoagulation regimens; (3) the role of eculizumab (a monoclonal antibody that inhibits complement activation used to treat PNH) in reducing thrombotic complications and hemolysis; and (4) complications associated with the immunosuppressive effects of eculizumab. We recommend careful monitoring of hemolysis and immunosuppression, aggressive anticoagulation, frequent graft surveillance, and early consultation with hematology. PMID:24200143

Crawford, Jeffrey D; Wong, Victor W; Deloughery, Thomas G; Mitchell, Erica L; Liem, Timothy K; Landry, Gregory J; Azarbal, Amir F; Moneta, Gregory L

2014-01-01

361

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: stem cells and clonality.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disease that manifests with intravascular hemolysis, bone marrow failure, thrombosis, and smooth muscle dystonias. The disease can arise de novo or in the setting of acquired aplastic anemia. All PNH patients to date have been shown to harbor PIG-A mutations; the product of this gene is required for the synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored proteins. In PNH patients, PIG-A mutations arise from a multipotent hematopoietic stem cell. Interestingly, PIG-A mutations can also be found in the peripheral blood of most healthy controls; however, these mutations arise from progenitor cells rather than multipotent hematopoietic stem cells and do not propagate the disease. The mechanism of whereby PNH stem cells achieve clonal dominance remains unclear. The leading hypotheses to explain clonal outgrowth in PNH are: 1) PNH cells evade immune attack possibly, because of an absent cell surface GPI-AP that is the target of the immune attack; 2) The PIG-A mutation confers an intrinsic resistance to apoptosis that becomes more conspicuous when the marrow is under immune attack; and 3) A second mutation occurs in the PNH clone to give it an intrinsic survival advantage. These hypotheses may not be mutually exclusive, since data in support of all three models have been generated. PMID:19074067

Brodsky, Robert A

2008-01-01

362

Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria: diagnostic tests, advantages, & limitations.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired clonal disorder of haematopoietic stem cells. The molecular defect in PNH is mutation in the phosphotidylinositol glycan complementation class A (PIGA gene) causing defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (Cell, 73, 1993, 703). The deficiency of these GPI-anchored proteins on the membranes of haematopoietic cells lead to the various clinical manifestations of PNH. Clinically PNH is classified into classic PNH, PNH in the setting of another specified bone marrow disorder and sub clinical PNH. Size of the PNH clone differs in these different subtypes. The management of PNH has been revolutionized by the advent of monoclonal antibody, eculizumab. Thus, today it is important to have sensitive tests to diagnose and monitor the clone size in patients of PNH. Before 1990, diagnosis of PNH was made using complement based tests. However in the last decade, flowcytometry has become the gold standard diagnostic test as it has increased sensitivity to detect small clones, ability to measure clone size and is not affected by blood transfusions. This review is aimed to focus mainly on the different methods available for the detection of PNH clone and the recent advances and recommendations for the flowcytometric diagnosis of PNH. PMID:19686268

Madkaikar, Manisha; Gupta, Maya; Jijina, Farah; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

2009-12-01

363

Behavioral and Electrophysiological Correlates of Sleep and Sleep Homeostasis.  

PubMed

The definition of what sleep sleep is depends on the method that is applied to record sleep. Behavioral and (electro)-physiological measures of sleep clearly overlap in mammals mammals and birds birds , but it is often unclear how these two relate in other vertebrates and invertebrates. Homeostatic regulation of sleep, where the amount of sleep depends on the amount of previous waking, can be observed in physiology and behavior in all animals this was tested in. In mammals and birds, sleep is generally subdivided into two states, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and REM sleep REM sleep . In mammals the combination of behavioral sleep and the changes in the slow-wave range of the NREM sleep electroencephalogram electroencephalogram (EEG) can explain and predict the occurrence and depth of sleep in great detail. For REM sleep this is far less clear. Finally, the discovery that slow-waves in the NREM sleep EEG are influenced locally on the cortex depending on prior waking behavior is an interesting new development that asks for an adaptation of the concept of homeostatic regulation homeostatic regulation of sleep. Incorporating local sleep into models of sleep regulation is needed to obtain a comprehensive picture. PMID:24142866

Deboer, Tom

2013-10-19

364

Sleep and cognitive problems in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder  

PubMed Central

Objectives Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by inattentive and impulsive behavior. Many ADHD patients reportedly have cognitive dysfunction and sleep problems, including longer sleep latency, lower sleep efficiency, and shorter total sleep time. The purpose of this study was to examine neurocognitive functions and nocturnal sleep parameters in patients with ADHD, using a cognitive function test and actigraphy. Methods Subjects included 37 male patients with ADHD and 32 controls (7–12 years of age). For each participant, we determined intelligence quotient (IQ) and administered the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT) and 72-hour actigraphy. The relationships between sleep parameters and cognitive functions were assessed. Results ADHD patients significantly differed from controls in several cognitive functions and sleep variables. In the MFFT, response error rate (P<0.001) and error counts (P=0.003) were significantly increased in ADHD patients compared with control children. MFFT response latency was significantly shorter in ADHD patients than in controls (P<0.001). In addition, sleep latency (P=0.01), wake after sleep onset (WASO) (P<0.001), and fragmentation index (P<0.001) were evaluated by actigraphy and found to be significantly increased in patients with ADHD compared with controls. However, no significant differences in total sleep time or sleep efficiency were observed. WASO and response error rates were positively correlated in patients with ADHD (rho =0.52, P=0.012). Furthermore, fragmentation index sleep variables were significantly positively correlated with response error (rho =0.44, P=0.008) and response latency rates (rho =0.4, P=0.018) in the MFFT. Reaction error rate was significantly associated with the fragmentation index (beta =0.94, P=0.024). Conclusion Patients with ADHD had more sleep problems, including significantly increased sleep latency, WASO, and fragmentation index, and poorer cognitive function, compared with controls. Some of these sleep problems, including WASO and the fragmentation index, were positively correlated with impulsivity, illustrated by the cognitive function tests in patients with ADHD. However, further studies with large sample sizes and the addition of polysomnography and determination of ADHD subtypes should be performed to confirm our results regarding sleep and cognitive problems in patients with ADHD. PMID:25258537

Lee, Hae Kook; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Na-Young; Park, Min-hyeon; Kim, Tae-Won; Seo, Ho-Jun; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Hong, Seung-Chul; Han, Jin-Hee

2014-01-01

365

The Impact of Parents' Sleep Quality and Hypoglycemia Worry on Diabetes Self-Efficacy.  

PubMed

Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality, possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships among parents' sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ? age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; one third of parents reported their overall sleep quality was "fairly bad" or "very bad." Hypoglycemia worry and parents' sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents' sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children's hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

2014-04-16

366

Influence of Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction and Exercise on Inflammation and Carcinogenesis in Mice  

PubMed Central

The effects of chronic moderate sleep restriction and exercise training on carcinogenesis were examined in adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasma (APC Min+/-) mice, a genetic strain which is predisposed to developing adenomatous polyposis. The mice were randomized to one of four 11 week treatments in a 2×2 design involving sleep restriction (by 4 h/day) vs. normal sleep and exercise training (1 h/day) vs. sedentary control. Wild-type control mice underwent identical experimental treatments. Compared with the wild-type mice, APC Min+/- mice had disrupted hematology and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production from peritoneal exudate cells. Among the APC Min+/- mice, consistent interactions of sleep loss and exercise were found for measures of polyp formation, inflammation, and hematology. Sleep loss had little effect on these variables under sedentary conditions, but sleep loss had clear detrimental effects under exercise conditions. Exercise training resulted in improvements in these measures under normal sleep conditions, but exercise tended to elicit no effect or to exacerbate the effects of sleep restriction. Significant correlations of inflammation with polyp burden were observed. Among wild-type mice, similar, but less consistent interactions of sleep restriction and exercise were found. These data suggest that the benefits of exercise on carcinogenesis and immune function were impaired by chronic moderate sleep restriction, and that harmful effects of sleep restriction were generally realized only in the presence of exercise. PMID:22433899

Zielinski, Mark R.; Davis, J. Mark; Fadel, James R.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.

2013-01-01

367

Sleep continuity and architecture: Associations with pain-inhibitory processes in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder  

PubMed Central

Recent research suggests bi-directional interactions between the experience of pain and the process of sleep; pain interferes with the ability to obtain sleep, and disrupted sleep contributes to enhanced pain perception. Our group recently reported, in a controlled experimental study, that sleep fragmentation among healthy adults resulted in subsequent decrements in endogenous pain inhibition. The present report follows up that observation by extending this line of research to a sample of patients experiencing persistent pain. Patients with chronic temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) pain were studied using polysomnography and psychophysical evaluation of pain responses. We assessed whether individual differences in sleep continuity and/or architecture were related to diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC), a measure of central nervous system pain inhibition. Among 53 TMD patients, higher sleep efficiency and longer total sleep time were positively associated with better functioning of DNIC (r=.42 ? .44, p< .01; p’s< .05 for the multivariate analyses). These results suggest the possibility that disrupted sleep may serve as a risk factor for inadequate pain-inhibitory processing and hint that aggressive efforts to treat sleep disturbance early in the course of a pain condition might be beneficial in reducing the severity or impact of clinical pain. PMID:19168380

Edwards, R.R.; Grace, E; Peterson, S.; Klick, B.; Haythornthwaite, J.A.; Smith, M.T.

2009-01-01

368

Sleep and energy balance: Interactive homeostatic systems.  

PubMed

For early humans, acquisition of food by hunting and/or gathering was a hunger-driven process requiring vigilance and (often) strenuous physical effort during daylight hours. To sustain such activities, hunter-gatherers also needed periodic rest and sleep-pursuits most effectively undertaken at night. In recent years, research has given us new insights into the physiologic underpinnings of these behaviors. Specifically, evidence has been uncovered indicating that the homeostatic regulation of food intake on the one hand and that of sleep on the other hand, are intertwined. Thus, carefully performed studies of eating behavior in rats indicate that duration of sleep after ingestion of a meal is closely correlated to the meal's energy content. In 1999, it was discovered that mice and dogs functionally deficient in the appetite-stimulating hormone, hypocretin-1, become narcoleptic, suggesting the existence of a "hard-wired" connection between regulation of hunger and satiety and regulation of sleep. Administered into the nucleus accumbens shell, hypocretin-1 induces feeding and locomotor activity in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus are responsive to metabolic cues capable of signaling nutritional status. The suprachiasmatic nucleus, the body's principal circadian clock, exchanges information with the hypocretin system about the light/dark cycle and the body's metabolic condition. Circadian Clock mutant mice exhibit an attenuated diurnal feeding rhythm and become hyperphagic and obese. Both disruption of the circadian cycle and sleep deprivation can affect energy balance and, over time, may bring about substantial changes in body composition. Although there is growing evidence that interleukin-6 and several other proinflammatory cytokines are "sleep factors" that also affect energy balance, any possible role they might have in coordinating sleep/wakefulness with food-motivated behavior awaits clarification. Yet, the evidence is increasingly strong that the neurophysiologic and metabolic mechanisms responsible for the control of food-seeking behavior and the control of sleep and wakefulness are coordinated so that hunger and vigilance are paired during the daylight hours, and satiety and sleep are paired during darkness. The hypothalamic neuronal system that links these mechanisms is predominantly, but not exclusively, hypocretinergic, and is responsive to the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian pacemaker and to certain metabolic signals of depletion and repletion. PMID:16979424

Vanitallie, Theodore B

2006-10-01

369

Sleep and Sex: What Can Go Wrong? A Review of the Literature on Sleep Related Disorders and Abnormal Sexual Behaviors and Experiences  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To formulate the first classification of sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences. Design: A computerized literature search was conducted, and other sources, such as textbooks, were searched. Results: Many categories of sleep related disorders were represented in the classification: parasomnias (confusional arousals/sleepwalking, with or without obstructive sleep apnea; REM sleep behavior disorder); sleep related seizures; Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS); severe chronic insomnia; restless legs syndrome; narcolepsy; sleep exacerbation of persistent sexual arousal syndrome; sleep related painful erections; sleep related dissociative disorders; nocturnal psychotic disorders; miscellaneous states. Kleine-Levin syndrome (78 cases) and parasomnias (31 cases) were most frequently reported. Parasomnias and sleep related seizures had overlapping and divergent clinical features. Thirty-one cases of parasomnias (25 males; mean age, 32 years) and 7 cases of sleep related seizures (4 males; mean age, 38 years) were identified. A full range of sleep related sexual behaviors with self and/or bed partners or others were reported, including masturbation, sexual vocalizations, fondling, sexual intercourse with climax, sexual assault/rape, ictal sexual hyperarousal, ictal orgasm, and ictal automatism. Adverse physical and/or psychosocial effects from the sleepsex were present in all parasomnia and sleep related seizure cases, but pleasurable effects were reported by 5 bed partners and by 3 patients with sleep related seizures. Forensic consequences were common, occurring in 35.5% (11/31) of parasomnia cases, with most (9/11) involving minors. All parasomnias cases reported amnesia for the sleepsex, in contrast to 28.6% (2/7) of sleep related seizure cases. Polysomnography (without penile tumescence monitoring), performed in 26 of 31 parasomnia cases, documented sexual moaning from slow wave sleep in 3 cases and sexual intercourse during stage 1 sleep/wakefulness in one case (with sex provoked by the bed partner). Confusional arousals (CAs) were diagnosed as the cause of “sleepsex” (“sexsomnia”) in 26 cases (with obstructive sleep apnea [OSA] comorbidity in 4 cases), and sleepwalking in 2 cases, totaling 90.3% (28/31) of cases being NREM sleep parasomnias. REM behavior disorder was the presumed cause in the other 3 cases. Bedtime clonazepam therapy was effective in 90% (9/10) of treated parasomnia cases; nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy was effective in controlling comorbid OSA and CAs in both treated cases. All five treated patients with sleep related sexual seizures responded to anticonvulsant therapy. The hypersexuality in KLS, which was twice as common in males compared to females, had no reported effective therapy. Conclusions: A broad range of sleep related disorders associated with abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences exists, with major clinical and forensic consequences. Citation: Schenck CH; Arnulf I; Mahowald MW et al. Sleep and sex: what can go wrong? A review of the literature on sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences. SLEEP 2007;30(6):683-702. PMID:17580590

Schenck, Carlos H.; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mahowald, Mark W.

2007-01-01

370

Sleep-dependent memory consolidation and accelerated forgetting  

PubMed Central

Accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) is a form of memory impairment in which learning and initial retention of information appear normal but subsequent forgetting is excessively rapid. ALF is most commonly associated with epilepsy and, in particular, a form of late-onset epilepsy called transient epileptic amnesia (TEA). ALF provides a novel opportunity to investigate post-encoding memory processes, such as consolidation. Sleep is implicated in the consolidation of memory in healthy people and a deficit in sleep-dependent memory consolidation has been proposed as an explanation for ALF. If this proposal were correct, then sleep would not benefit memory retention in people with ALF as much as in healthy people, and ALF might only be apparent when the retention interval contains sleep. To test this theory, we compared performance on a sleep-sensitive memory task over a night of sleep and a day of wakefulness. We found, contrary to the hypothesis, that sleep benefits memory retention in TEA patients with ALF and that this benefit is no smaller in magnitude than that seen in healthy controls. Indeed, the patients performed significantly more poorly than the controls only in the wake condition and not the sleep condition. Patients were matched to controls on learning rate, initial retention, and the effect of time of day on cognitive performance. These results indicate that ALF is not caused by a disruption of sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Instead, ALF may be due to an encoding abnormality that goes undetected on behavioural assessments of learning, or by a deficit in memory consolidation processes that are not sleep-dependent. PMID:24657478

Atherton, Kathryn E.; Nobre, Anna C.; Zeman, Adam Z.; Butler, Christopher R.

2014-01-01

371

Sleep On It: How Snoozing Strengthens Memories  

MedlinePLUS

... light sleep, deep sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, when dreaming often occurs. The cycles repeat about ... night of sleep may help with problem-solving. REM sleep also helps you process emotional memories, which can ...

372

Sleep Changes in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... on your side, stop drinking alcohol or using sleep medicines. Many people who have sleep apnea need to ... legs syndrome also have periodic limb movements during sleep. Medicine may help both of these problems. What can ...

373

Are You Getting Enough Sleep?  

MedlinePLUS

... an essential aspect of chronic disease prevention and health promotion. How much sleep is enough? Sleep needs vary ... Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. *Data from the National Institutes of Health Sleep ...

374

Experiential Versus Analytical Emotion Regulation and Sleep: Breaking the Link Between Negative Events and Sleep Disturbance  

E-print Network

of the differential effects of these two forms of emotion regulation on sleep are discussed. Keywords: sleep, REM-sleep awakenings from REM-sleep (dream sleep characterized by REM, but also low muscle tone and rapid, low- voltage waves), less % REM-sleep, % SWS sleep (slow wave sleep or deep sleep characterized by delta waves

Gross, James J.

375

Screening for Sleep Problems in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education: A Systematic Review of Screening and Assessment Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Behavioral insomnias of childhood (BIC) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) disorders cause disrupted and/or inefficient sleep. Left untreated in early childhood, both conditions increase the risk of compromised development, particularly in the areas of behavior, cognition, and growth. This systematic review determined whether and how current…

Bonuck, Karen A.; Hyden, Christel; Ury, Guenn; Barnett, Josephine; Ashkinaze, Hannah; Briggs, Rahil D.

2011-01-01

376

Sleep and vestibular adaptation: implications for function in microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Optimal human performance depends upon integrated sensorimotor and cognitive functions, both of which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to loss of sleep. Under the microgravity conditions of space flight, adaptation of both sensorimotor (especially vestibular) and cognitive functions (especially orientation) must occur quickly--and be maintained--despite any concurrent disruptions of sleep that may be caused by microgravity itself, or by the uncomfortable sleeping conditions of the spacecraft. It is the three-way interaction between sleep quality, general work efficiency, and sensorimotor integration that is the subject of this paper and the focus of new work in our laboratory. To record sleep under field conditions including microgravity, we utilize a novel system called the Nightcap that we have developed and extensively tested on normal and sleep-disordered subjects. To perturb the vestibular system in ground-based studies, we utilize a variety of experimental conditions including optokinetic stimulation and both minifying and reversing goggle paradigms that have been extensively studied in relation to plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Using these techniques we will test the hypothesis that vestibular adaptation both provokes and is enhanced by REM sleep under both ground-based and space conditions. In this paper we describe preliminary results of some of our studies.

Hobson, J. A.; Stickgold, R.; Pace-Schott, E. F.; Leslie, K. R.

1998-01-01

377

Disease and Degeneration of Aging Neural Systems that Integrate Sleep Drive and Circadian Oscillations  

PubMed Central

Sleep/wake and circadian rest-activity rhythms become irregular with age. Typical outcomes include fragmented sleep during the night, advanced sleep phase syndrome and increased daytime sleepiness. These changes lead to a reduction in the quality of life due to cognitive impairments and emotional stress. More importantly, severely disrupted sleep and circadian rhythms have been associated with an increase in disease susceptibility. Additionally, many of the same brain areas affected by neurodegenerative diseases include the sleep and wake promoting systems. Any advances in our knowledge of these sleep/wake and circadian networks are necessary to target neural areas or connections for therapy. This review will discuss research that uses molecular, behavioral, genetic and anatomical methods to further our understanding of the interaction of these systems. PMID:22028699

Singletary, Kristan G.; Naidoo, Nirinjini

2011-01-01

378

Acute effects of light on the brain and behavior of diurnal Arvicanthis niloticus and nocturnal Mus musculus.  

PubMed

Photic cues influence daily patterns of activity via two complementary mechanisms: (1) entraining the internal circadian clock and (2) directly increasing or decreasing activity, a phenomenon referred to as "masking". The direction of this masking response is dependent on the temporal niche an organism occupies, as nocturnal animals often decrease activity when exposed to light, while the opposite response is more likely to be seen in diurnal animals. Little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these differences. Here, we examined the masking effects of light on behavior and the activation of several brain regions by that light, in diurnal Arvicanthis niloticus (Nile grass rats) and nocturnal Mus musculus (mice). Each species displayed the expected behavioral response to a 1h pulse of light presented 2h after lights-off, with the diurnal grass rats and nocturnal mice increasing and decreasing their activity, respectively. In grass rats light induced an increase in cFOS in all retinorecipient areas examined, which included the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the ventral subparaventricular zone (vSPZ), intergeniculate leaflet (IGL), lateral habenula (LH), olivary pretectal nucleus (OPT) and the dorsal lateral geniculate (DLG). In mice, light led to an increase in cFOS in one of these regions (SCN), no change in others (vSPZ, IGL and LH) and a decrease in two (OPT and DLG). In addition, light increased cFOS expression in three arousal-related brain regions (the lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and locus coeruleus) and in one sleep-promoting region (the ventrolateral preoptic area) in grass rats. In mice, light had no effect on cFOS in these four regions. Taken together, these results highlight several brain regions whose responses to light suggest that they may play a role in masking, and that the possibility that they contribute to species-specific patterns of behavioral responses to light should be explored in future. PMID:25447482

Shuboni, Dorela D; Cramm, Shannon L; Yan, Lily; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Cavanaugh, Breyanna L; Nunez, Antonio A; Smale, Laura

2015-01-01

379

The Pittsburgh Sleep Diary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Increasingly, there is a need in both research and clinical practice to document and quantify sleep and waking behaviors in a comprehensive manner. The Pittsburgh Sleep Diary (PghSD) is an instrument with separate components to be completed at bedtime and waketime. Bedtime components relate to the events of the day preceding the sleep, waketime components to the sleep period just completed. Two-week PghSD data is presented from 234 different subjects, comprising 96 healthy young middle-aged controls, 37 older men, 44 older women, 29 young adult controls and 28 sleep disorders patients in order to demonstrate the usefulness, validity and reliability of various measures from the instrument. Comparisons are made with polysomnographic and actigraphic sleep measures, as well as personality and circadian type questionnaires. The instrument was shown to have sensitivity in detecting differences due to weekends, age, gender, personality and circadian type, and validity in agreeing with actigraphic estimates of sleep timing and quality. Over a 12-31 month delay, PghSD measures of both sleep timing and sleep quality showed correlations between 0.56 and 0.81 (n = 39, P < 0.001).

Monk, T. H.; Reynolds CF, 3. d.; Kupfer, D. J.; Buysse, D. J.; Coble, P. A.; Hayes, A. J.; Machen, M. A.; Petrie, S. R.; Ritenour, A. M.

1994-01-01

380

Nonepileptic paroxysmal sleep disorders.  

PubMed

Events occurring during nighttime sleep in children can be easily mislabeled, as witnesses are usually not immediately available. Even when observers are present, description of the events can be sketchy, as these individuals are frequently aroused from their own sleep. Errors of perception are thus common and can lead to diagnosis of epilepsy where other sleep-related conditions are present, sometimes initiating unnecessary therapeutic interventions, especially with antiepileptic drugs. Often not acknowledged, paroxysmal nonepileptic behavioral and motor episodes in sleep are encountered much more frequently than their epileptic counterpart. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) 2nd edition displays an extensive list of such conditions that can be readily mistaken for epilepsy. The most prevalent ones are reviewed, such as nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias, comprised of sleepwalking, confusional arousals and sleep terrors, periodic leg movements of sleep, repetitive movement disorders, benign neonatal myoclonus, and sleep starts. Apnea of prematurity is also briefly reviewed. Specific issues regarding management of these selected disorders, both for diagnostic consideration and for therapeutic intervention, are addressed. PMID:23622294

Frenette, Eric; Guilleminault, Christian

2013-01-01

381

[Sleep disorders in epilepsy].  

PubMed

The review of the literature on sleep disorders in epilepsy over the last two decades is presented. Paroxysmal phenomena of epileptic origin, nonepileptic paroxysms, antiepileptic drugs, polypragmasia and comorbid depression may affect sleep in epilepsy.Shortening of sleep time may cause seizures, hallucinations and depression because sleep plays an important role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the brain both in healthy people and in patients with epilepsy. According to the literature data, drugs (short treatment courses of hypnotics) or nonpharmacological methods should be used for treatment insomnia inpatients with epilepsy. PMID:25035888

Kotova, O V; Akarachkova, E S

2014-01-01

382

Nighttime sleep and daytime functioning correlates of the insomnia complaint in young adults.  

PubMed

The nighttime and daytime correlates of the insomnia complaint (IC) were assessed in an in-class survey on a sample of 1238 first year university students (18.85+/-1.45 years) at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, Spain. Evidence was found that the likelihood of complaining of insomnia was increased by perceiving difficulties with initiating and maintaining sleep, reporting low quality of nocturnal sleep, having a long sleep onset latency and having an evening circadian preference. The most strongly related daytime variables to IC being perceived difficulties in concentrating, feelings of irritability and fatigue, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. The data, in addition to confirm those of clinical studies on subjects complaining of insomnia, suggest that having an evening chronotype increases the vulnerability of adolescents and young adults to complain of insomnia. PMID:19328540

Fernández-Mendoza, Julio; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Olavarrieta-Bernardino, Sara; Ramos-Platón, María José; Bixler, Edward O; De la Cruz-Troca, Juan José

2009-10-01

383

Low-grade albuminuria in children with obstructive sleep apnea.  

PubMed

Small urinary protein loss (low-grade albuminuria or microalbuminuria) may reflect altered permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier. In the present study, it was hypothesized that children with obstructive sleep apnea have an increased risk of microalbuminuria compared with control subjects without sleep-disordered breathing. Albumin-to-creatinine ratio was measured in morning spot urine specimens collected from consecutive children with or without snoring who were referred for polysomnography. Three groups were studied: (i) control subjects (no snoring, apnea-hypopnea index < 1 episode h(-1) ; n = 31); (ii) mild obstructive sleep apnea (snoring, apnea-hypopnea index = 1-5 episodes h(-1) ; n = 71); and (iii) moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (snoring, apnea-hypopnea index > 5 episodes?h(-1) ; n = 27). Indications for polysomnography in control subjects included nightmares, somnambulism and morning headaches. An albumin-to-creatinine ratio > median value in the control group (1.85 mg of albumin per g of creatinine) was defined as elevated. Logistic regression analysis revealed that children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea, but not those with mild obstructive sleep apnea, had increased risk of elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio relative to controls (reference) after adjustment for age, gender and presence of obesity: odds ratio 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1-12.6); P = 0.04 and 1.5 (0.6-3.7); P > 0.05, respectively. Oxygen desaturation of hemoglobin and respiratory arousal indices were significant predictors of albumin-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.31, P = 0.01; and r = 0.43, P < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea are at significantly higher risk of increased low-grade excretion of albumin in the morning urine as compared with control subjects without obstructive sleep apnea. These findings may reflect altered permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier related to nocturnal hypoxemia and sympathetic activation which are induced by obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:23228180

Varlami, Vasiliki; Malakasioti, Georgia; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I; Theologi, Vasiliki; Theophanous, Eleni; Liakos, Nikolaos; Daskalopoulou, Euphemia; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Kaditis, Athanasios G

2013-06-01

384

Impaired prefrontal sleep spindle regulation of hippocampal-dependent learning in older adults.  

PubMed

A hallmark feature of cognitive aging is a decline in the ability to form new memories. Parallel to these cognitive impairments are marked disruptions in sleep physiology. Despite recent evidence in young adults establishing a role for sleep spindles in restoring hippocampal-dependent memory formation, the possibility that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related decline in hippocampal-dependent learning remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reduced prefrontal sleep spindles by over 40% in older adults statistically mediates the effects of old age on next day episodic learning, such that the degree of impaired episodic learning is explained by the extent of impoverished prefrontal sleep spindles. In addition, prefrontal spindles significantly predicted the magnitude of impaired next day hippocampal activation, thereby determining the influence of spindles on post-sleep learning capacity. These data support the hypothesis that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related cognitive decline in later life, the consequence of which has significant treatment intervention potential. PMID:23901074

Mander, Bryce A; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J; Walker, Matthew P

2014-12-01

385

Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation  

PubMed Central

Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed. PMID:24179461

Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

2013-01-01

386

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Depression  

PubMed Central

Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder associated with several medical conditions, increased risk of motor vehicle accidents, and overall healthcare expenditure. There is higher prevalence of depression in people with obstructive sleep apnea in both clinical and community samples. Many symptoms of depression and obstructive sleep apnea overlap causing under-diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in depressed patients. Sleep problems, including obstructive sleep apnea, are rarely assessed on a regular basis in patients with depressive disorders, but they may be responsible for antidepressant treatment failure. The mechanism of the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and depression is complex and remains unclear. Though some studies suggest a mutual relationship, the relationship remains unclear. Several possible pathophysiological mechanisms could explain how obstructive sleep apnea can cause or worsen depression. Increased knowledge of the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and depression might significantly improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcomes for both obstructive sleep apnea and depression. PMID:21922066

Ejaz, Shakir M.; Bhatia, Subhash; Hurwitz, Thomas D.

2011-01-01

387

The cooccurrence of interictal discharges and seizures in pediatric sleep-disordered breathing.  

PubMed

Studies in the literature data have shown that the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with epilepsy is high and that treatment for OSA leads to a reduction in the number of seizures; by contrast, few studies have demonstrated an increased prevalence of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) or epilepsy in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of the present study was to confirm the high prevalence of IEDs or epilepsy in a large sample of children with SDB and to collect follow-up data. Children were recruited prospectively and underwent their first video-polysomnography (video-PSG) for SDB in a teaching hospital sleep center. Of the 298 children who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for sleep-disordered breathing, 48 (16.1%) children were found to have IEDs, three of these 48 children were also found to have nocturnal seizures (two females diagnosed with rolandic epilepsy and a male diagnosed with frontal lobe epilepsy). Only 11 subjects underwent a second video-PSG after 6months; at the second video-PSG, the IEDs had disappeared in six subjects, who also displayed a reduced AHI and an increased mean overnight saturation. Thirty-eight of the 250 children without IEDs underwent a second video-PSG after 6months. Of these 250 children, four, who did not display any improvement in the respiratory parameters and were found to experience numerous stereotyped movements during sleep, were diagnosed with nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. Our study confirms the high prevalence of IEDs in children with SDB. Follow-up data indicate that they may recede over time, accompanied by an improvement of sleep respiratory parameters. PMID:24128933

Miano, Silvia; Tabarrini, Alessandra; Vitelli, Ottavio; Mazzotta, Annamaria; Del Pozzo, Marco; Rabasco, Jole; Barreto, Mario; Parisi, Pasquale; Ferretti, Alessandro; Villa, Maria Pia

2013-12-01

388

Sleep State Instabilities in Major Depressive Disorder: Detection and Quantification with Electrocardiogram-based Cardiopulmonary Coupling Analysis  

PubMed Central

Sleep disruption is an important aspect of major depressive disorder but lacks an objective and inexpensive means of assessment. We evaluated the utility of electrocardiogram (ECG)-based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis to quantify physiologic sleep stability in patients with major depression. Relative to controls, unmedicated depressed patients had a reduction in high-frequency coupling, an index of stable sleep, an increase in low-frequency coupling, an index of unstable sleep, and an increase in very-low-frequency coupling, an index of wakefulness/REM sleep. The medicated depressed group showed a restoration of stable sleep to a level comparable with that of the control group. ECG-based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis may provide a simple, cost-efficient point-of-care method to quantify sleep quality/stability and to objectively evaluate the severity of insomnia in patients with major depression. PMID:20624250

Yang, Albert. C.; Yang, Cheng-Hung; Hong, Chen-Jee; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Kuo, Chung-Hsun; Peng, Chung-Kang; Mietus, Joseph E.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Thomas, Robert J.

2010-01-01

389

DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL ROOST SITE FIDELITY OF DUNLIN (CALIDRIS ALPINA PACIFICA) AT HUMBOLDT BAY, CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

11 DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL ROOST SITE FIDELITY OF DUNLIN (CALIDRIS ALPINA PACIFICA) AT HUMBOLDT BAY and nocturnal use of high-tide roosts by radiotagged Dunlin (Calidris alpina pacifica) wintering (November, accepted 14 June 2006. Key words: Calidris alpina pacifica, Dunlin, nocturnal, pasture, roosts, site

Colwell, Mark

390

DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL ROOST SITE FIDELITY OF DUNLIN (CALIDRIS ALPINA PACIFICA) AT HUMBOLDT BAY, CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

677 DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL ROOST SITE FIDELITY OF DUNLIN (CALIDRIS ALPINA PACIFICA) AT HUMBOLDT BAY and nocturnal use of high-tide roosts by radiotagged Dunlin (Calidris alpina pacifica) wintering (November, accepted 14 June 2006. Key words: Calidris alpina pacifica, Dunlin, nocturnal, pasture, roosts, site

Colwell, Mark

391

Stroke Prognosis and Abnormal Nocturnal Blood Pressure Falls in Older Hypertensives  

Microsoft Academic Search

It remains uncertain whether abnormal dipping patterns of nocturnal blood pressure influence the prognosis for stroke. We studied stroke events in 575 older Japanese patients with sustained hypertension determined by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (without medication). They were subclassified by their nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall (97 extreme-dippers, with $20% nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall; 230 dippers, with $10% but

Kazuomi Kario; Thomas G. Pickering; Takefumi Matsuo; Satoshi Hoshide; Joseph E. Schwartz; Kazuyuki Shimada

392

Behavioral, Morphological and Physiological Correlates of Diurnal and Nocturnal Vision in Selected Wading Bird Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined in selected wading bird species if diurnal or nocturnal foraging and the use of visual or tactile feeding strategies could be correlated with retinal structure and function. The selected species were the Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax violaceus), a crepuscular and nocturnal forager, the Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias), a mainly crepuscular, but also diurnal and nocturnal feeder, the

L. M. Rojas; R. McNeil; T. Cabana; P. Lachapelle

1999-01-01

393

Propofol versus flunitrazepam for inducing and maintaining sleep in postoperative ICU patients  

PubMed Central

Context: Sleep deprivation is a common problem on intensive care units (ICUs) influencing not only cognition, but also cellular functions. An appropriate sleep-wake cycle should therefore be maintained to improve patients’ outcome. Multiple disruptive factors on ICUs necessitate the administration of sedating and sleep-promoting drugs for patients who are not analgo-sedated. Aims: The objective of the present study was to evaluate sleep quantity and sleep quality in ICU patients receiving either propofol or flunitrazepam. Settings and Design: Monocentric, randomized, double-blinded trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 66 ICU patients were enrolled in the study (flunitrazepam n = 32, propofol n = 34). Propofol was injected continuously (2 mg/kg/h), flunitrazepam as a bolus dose (0.015 mg/kg). Differences between groups were evaluated using a standardized sleep diary and the bispectral index (BIS). Statistical Analysis Used: Group comparisons were performed by Mann-Whitney U-Test. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Sleep quality and the frequency of awakenings were significantly better in the propofol group (Pg). In the same group lower BIS values were recorded (median BIS propofol 74.05, flunitrazepam 78.7 [P = 0.016]). BIS values had to be classified predominantly to slow-wave sleep under propofol and light sleep after administration of flunitrazepam. Sleep quality improved in the Pg with decreasing frequency of awakenings and in the flunitrazepam group with increasing sleep duration. Conclusions: Continuous low-dose injection of propofol for promoting and maintaining night sleep in ICU patients who are not analgo-sedated was superior to flunitrazepam regarding sleep quality and sleep structure. PMID:24872650

Engelmann, Cornelius; Wallenborn, Jan; Olthoff, Derk; Kaisers, Udo X.; Rüffert, Henrik

2014-01-01

394

Sleep Spindle Alterations in Patients with Malformations of Cortical Development  

PubMed Central

Malformations of cortical development are disorders of altered brain anatomy and architecture that arise from abnormalities in the usual processes of cerebral cortical development. Although they often lead to epilepsy, cognitive delay, and motor impairment, little is known about their effect on sleep. Since malformations may anatomically or functionally disrupt the cerebral circuits that mediate sleep spindles, we hypothesized that these disorders would be associated with abnormal spindle characteristics. We analyzed the density, maximum frequency, laterality and distribution of sleep spindles seen in routine and long-term electroencephalographic recordings performed in ten brain malformation subjects and ten matched controls. There were no significant differences in spindle density or maximum frequency between the two groups, but malformation subjects had a significantly lower proportion of bilateral spindles and a significantly higher proportion of anterior and diffuse spindles compared to controls. In addition, unilateral malformations appeared to be associated with a skewing of unilateral spindles toward the contralateral side. Our findings suggest that brain malformations disrupt the thalamocortical circuits responsible for sleep spindle generation, and support the need for further studies on the relationships between cortical maldevelopment and sleep. PMID:18667284

Selvitelli, Megan F.; Krishnamurthy, Kaarkuzhali B.; Herzog, Andrew G.; Schomer, Donald L.; Chang, Bernard S.

2009-01-01

395

Sleep & Memory/Review Memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep  

E-print Network

Sleep & Memory/Review Memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep Ken A. Paller1 and Joel L, Illinois 60208-2710, USA Do our memories remain static during sleep, or do they change? We argue here that memory change is not only a natural result of sleep cognition, but further, that such change constitutes

Paller, Ken

396

Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation in Healthy Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment.  

PubMed

Sleep quality and architecture as well as sleep's homeostatic and circadian controls change with healthy aging. Changes include reductions in slow-wave sleep's (SWS) percent and spectral power in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), number and amplitude of sleep spindles, rapid eye movement (REM) density and the amplitude of circadian rhythms, as well as a phase advance (moved earlier in time) of the brain's circadian clock. With mild cognitive impairment (MCI) there are further reductions of sleep quality, SWS, spindles, and percent REM, all of which further diminish, along with a profound disruption of circadian rhythmicity, with the conversion to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sleep disorders Sleep disorders may represent risk factors for dementias (e.g., REM Behavior Disorder presages Parkinson's disease) and sleep disorders are themselves extremely prevalent in neurodegenerative diseases. Working memory memory , formation of new episodic memories, and processing speed all decline with healthy aging whereas semantic, recognition, and emotional declarative memory are spared. In MCI, episodic and working memory further decline along with declines in semantic memory. In young adults, sleep-dependent memory consolidation (SDC) is widely observed for both declarative and procedural memory tasks. However, with healthy aging, although SDC for declarative memory is preserved, certain procedural tasks, such as motor-sequence learning, do not show SDC. In younger adults, fragmentation of sleep can reduce SDC, and a normative increase in sleep fragmentation may account for reduced SDC with healthy aging. Whereas sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and narcolepsy can impair SDC in the absence of neurodegenerative changes, the incidence of sleep disorders sleep disorders increases both with normal aging and, further, with neurodegenerative disease. Specific features of sleep architecture, such as sleep spindles and SWS are strongly linked to SDC. Diminution of these features with healthy aging and their further decline with MCI may account for concomitant declines in SDC. Notably these same sleep features further markedly decline, in concert with declining cognitive function, with the progression to AD. Therefore, progressive changes in sleep quality, architecture, and neural regulation may constitute a contributing factor to cognitive decline that is seen both with healthy aging and, to a much greater extent, with neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24652608

Pace-Schott, Edward F; Spencer, Rebecca M C

2014-03-21

397

Impact of Sleep and Its Disturbances on Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity  

PubMed Central

The daily rhythm of cortisol secretion is relatively stable and primarily under the influence of the circadian clock. Nevertheless, several other factors affect hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. Sleep has modest but clearly detectable modulatory effects on HPA axis activity. Sleep onset exerts an inhibitory effect on cortisol secretion while awakenings and sleep offset are accompanied by cortisol stimulation. During waking, an association between cortisol secretory bursts and indices of central arousal has also been detected. Abrupt shifts of the sleep period induce a profound disruption in the daily cortisol rhythm, while sleep deprivation and/or reduced sleep quality seem to result in a modest but functionally important activation of the axis. HPA hyperactivity is clearly associated with metabolic, cognitive and psychiatric disorders and could be involved in the well-documented associations between sleep disturbances and the risk of obesity, diabetes and cognitive dysfunction. Several clinical syndromes, such as insomnia, depression, Cushing's syndrome, sleep disordered breathing (SDB) display HPA hyperactivity, disturbed sleep, psychiatric and metabolic impairments. Further research to delineate the functional links between sleep and HPA axis activity is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology of these syndromes and to develop adequate strategies of prevention and treatment. PMID:20628523

Balbo, Marcella; Leproult, Rachel; Van Cauter, Eve

2010-01-01

398