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Sample records for noise dominated signals

  1. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  2. Digital Filter Separates Signal From Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Variance of signal-estimation error minimized. Mathematical technique extracts best estimates of signal component from periodic digital samples of signal plus noise. Technique combines Kalman- and smoothingfilter algorithms to minimize mean-square estimation error based on past, present, and predicted samples of signal plus noise. Technique useful in image analysis and other applications involving processing of noisy signals.

  3. Adaptive Noise Suppression Using Digital Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; Nelson, Richard

    1996-01-01

    A signal to noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to eliminate noise from noise corrupted speech signals. The algorithm determines the signal to noise ratio and adjusts the spectral subtraction proportion appropriately. After spectra subtraction low amplitude signals are squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both eh noise corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoice frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Applications include the emergency egress vehicle and the crawler transporter.

  4. Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated subtraction of noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated subtraction technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.

  5. Image Compression in Signal-Dependent Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnaz, Rubeena; Walkup, John F.; Krile, Thomas F.

    1999-09-01

    The performance of an image compression scheme is affected by the presence of noise, and the achievable compression may be reduced significantly. We investigated the effects of specific signal-dependent-noise (SDN) sources, such as film-grain and speckle noise, on image compression, using JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) standard image compression. For the improvement of compression ratios noisy images are preprocessed for noise suppression before compression is applied. Two approaches are employed for noise suppression. In one approach an estimator designed specifically for the SDN model is used. In an alternate approach, the noise is first transformed into signal-independent noise (SIN) and then an estimator designed for SIN is employed. The performances of these two schemes are compared. The compression results achieved for noiseless, noisy, and restored images are also presented.

  6. Orbiter CCTV video signal noise analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, R. M.; Blanke, L. R.; Pannett, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The amount of steady state and transient noise which will couple to orbiter CCTV video signal wiring is predicted. The primary emphasis is on the interim system, however, some predictions are made concerning the operational system wiring in the cabin area. Noise sources considered are RF fields from on board transmitters, precipitation static, induced lightning currents, and induced noise from adjacent wiring. The most significant source is noise coupled to video circuits from associated circuits in common connectors. Video signal crosstalk is the primary cause of steady state interference, and mechanically switched control functions cause the largest induced transients.

  7. Removal of noise from noise-degraded speech signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-06-01

    Techniques for the removal of noise from noise-degraded speech signals were reviewed and evaluation with special emphasis on live radio and telephone communications and the extraction of information from similar noisy recordings. The related area on the development of speech-enhancement devices for hearing-impaired people was reviewed. Evaluation techniques were reviewed to determine their suitability, particularly for the assessment of changes in the performance of workers who might use noise-reduction equipments on a daily basis in the applications cited above. The main conclusion was that noise-reduction methods may be useful in improving the performance of human operators who extract information from noisy speech material despite a lack of improvement found in using conventional closed-response intelligibility tests to assess those methods.

  8. Local thresholding de-noise speech signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haitao

    2013-07-01

    De-noise speech signal if it is noisy. Construct a wavelet according to Daubechies' method, and derive a wavelet packet from the constructed scaling and wavelet functions. Decompose the noisy speech signal by wavelet packet. Develop algorithms to detect beginning and ending point of speech. Construct polynomial function for local thresholding. Apply different strategies to de-noise and compress the decomposed terminal nodes coefficients. Reconstruct the wavelet packet tree. Re-build audio file using reconstructed data and compare the effectiveness of different strategies.

  9. Dominant Glint Based Prey Localization in Horseshoe Bats: A Possible Strategy for Noise Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Reijniers, Jonas; Firzlaff, Uwe; Peremans, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Rhinolophidae or Horseshoe bats emit long and narrowband calls. Fluttering insect prey generates echoes in which amplitude and frequency shifts are present, i.e. glints. These glints are reliable cues about the presence of prey and also encode certain properties of the prey. In this paper, we propose that these glints, i.e. the dominant glints, are also reliable signals upon which to base prey localization. In contrast to the spectral cues used by many other bats, the localization cues in Rhinolophidae are most likely provided by self-induced amplitude modulations generated by pinnae movement. Amplitude variations in the echo not introduced by the moving pinnae can be considered as noise interfering with the localization process. The amplitude of the dominant glints is very stable. Therefore, these parts of the echoes contain very little noise. However, using only the dominant glints potentially comes at a cost. Depending on the flutter rate of the insect, a limited number of dominant glints will be present in each echo giving the bat a limited number of sample points on which to base localization. We evaluate the feasibility of a strategy under which Rhinolophidae use only dominant glints. We use a computational model of the echolocation task faced by Rhinolophidae. Our model includes the spatial filtering of the echoes by the morphology of the sonar apparatus of Rhinolophus rouxii as well as the amplitude modulations introduced by pinnae movements. Using this model, we evaluate whether the dominant glints provide Rhinolophidae with enough information to perform localization. Our simulations show that Rhinolophidae can use dominant glints in the echoes as carriers for self-induced amplitude modulations serving as localization cues. In particular, it is shown that the reduction in noise achieved by using only the dominant glints outweighs the information loss that occurs by sampling the echo. PMID:22144876

  10. Signal processing and electronic noise in LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaitan, D.

    2016-03-01

    The electronics of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, the 10-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), consists of low-noise dual-gain amplifiers and a 100-MHz, 14-bit data acquisition system for the TPC PMTs. Pre-prototypes of the analog amplifiers and the 32-channel digitizers were tested extensively with simulated pulses that are similar to the prompt scintillation light and the electroluminescence signals expected in LZ. These studies are used to characterize the noise and to measure the linearity of the system. By increasing the amplitude of the test signals, the effect of saturating the amplifier and the digitizers was studied. The RMS ADC noise of the digitizer channels was measured to be 1.19± 0.01 ADCC. When a high-energy channel of the amplifier is connected to the digitizer, the measured noise remained virtually unchanged, while the noise added by a low-energy channel was estimated to be 0.38 ± 0.02 ADCC (46 ± 2 μV). A test facility is under construction to study saturation, mitigate noise and measure the performance of the LZ electronics and data acquisition chain.

  11. Measuring signal-to-noise ratio automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, L. A.; Johnston, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Automated method of measuring signal-to-noise ratio in digital communication channels is more precise and 100 times faster than previous methods used. Method based on bit-error-rate (B&R) measurement can be used with cable, microwave radio, or optical links.

  12. Correlation Between Eddy Current Signal Noise and Peened Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, S. E.; Hentscher, S. R.; Raithel, D. C.; Nakagawa, N.

    2007-03-01

    For advanced uses of eddy current (EC) NDE models in, e.g., model-assisted POD, there is a need to understand the origin of EC noise sources so that noise estimations can be made for a given set of inspection conditions, in addition to defect signal predictions. This paper focuses on the material-oriented noise sources that exhibit some universality when isolated from electrical and mechanical noises. Specifically, we report on experimental measurements that show explicit correlations between surface roughness and EC noise as seen in post-peen EC measurements of shot-peened roughness specimens. The samples are 3″-by-3″ Inconel 718 and Ti-6A1-4V blocks, pre-polished and shot-peened at Almen intensities ranging from a low of 4N to as high as 16A, created by smaller (˜350 μm) and larger (˜1 mm) diameter zirconium oxide shots. Strong correlations are observed between the Almen intensities and the measured surface roughness. The EC noise correlates equally strongly with the Almen intensities for the superalloy specimens. The correlation for the Ti-alloy samples is only apparent at higher intensities, while being weak for lower intensities, indicating the grain noise dominance for smoother surfaces.

  13. Correlation Between Eddy Current Signal Noise and Peened Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, S. E.; Hentscher, S. R.; Raithel, D. C.; Nakagawa, N.

    2007-03-21

    For advanced uses of eddy current (EC) NDE models in, e.g., model-assisted POD, there is a need to understand the origin of EC noise sources so that noise estimations can be made for a given set of inspection conditions, in addition to defect signal predictions. This paper focuses on the material-oriented noise sources that exhibit some universality when isolated from electrical and mechanical noises. Specifically, we report on experimental measurements that show explicit correlations between surface roughness and EC noise as seen in post-peen EC measurements of shot-peened roughness specimens. The samples are 3''-by-3'' Inconel 718 and Ti-6A1-4V blocks, pre-polished and shot-peened at Almen intensities ranging from a low of 4N to as high as 16A, created by smaller ({approx}350 {mu}m) and larger ({approx}1 mm) diameter zirconium oxide shots. Strong correlations are observed between the Almen intensities and the measured surface roughness. The EC noise correlates equally strongly with the Almen intensities for the superalloy specimens. The correlation for the Ti-alloy samples is only apparent at higher intensities, while being weak for lower intensities, indicating the grain noise dominance for smoother surfaces.

  14. Two algorithms for compressing noise like signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaian, Sos S.; Cherukuri, Ravindranath; Akopian, David

    2005-05-01

    Compression is a technique that is used to encode data so that the data needs less storage/memory space. Compression of random data is vital in case where data where we need preserve data that has low redundancy and whose power spectrum is close to noise. In case of noisy signals that are used in various data hiding schemes the data has low redundancy and low energy spectrum. Therefore, upon compressing with lossy compression algorithms the low energy spectrum might get lost. Since the LSB plane data has low redundancy, lossless compression algorithms like Run length, Huffman coding, Arithmetic coding are in effective in providing a good compression ratio. These problems motivated in developing a new class of compression algorithms for compressing noisy signals. In this paper, we introduce a two new compression technique that compresses the random data like noise with reference to know pseudo noise sequence generated using a key. In addition, we developed a representation model for digital media using the pseudo noise signals. For simulation, we have made comparison between our methods and existing compression techniques like Run length that shows the Run length cannot compress when data is random but the proposed algorithms can compress. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms can be extended to all kinds of random data used in various applications.

  15. Identifying Potential Noise Sources within Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Victoria; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    We test a new algorithm for its ability to detect sources of noise within random background. The goal of these tests is to better understand how to identify sources within acoustic signals while simultaneously determining the strengths and weaknesses of the algorithm in question. Unlike previously published algorithms, the antenna method does not pinpoint events by looking for the most energetic portions of a signal. The algorithm searches for the ideal lag combinations between three signals by taking excerpts of possible events. The excerpt with the lowest calculated minimum distance between possible events is how the algorithm identifies sources. At the minimum distance, the events are close in time and frequency. This method can be compared to the cross correlation and denoising methods to better understand its effectiveness. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL, as well as the Syracuse University MAE department.

  16. Signal to Noise Ratio Characterization of Coherent Doppler Lidar Backscattered Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazim, Sameh; Santoro, David; Arend, Mark; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2016-06-01

    An eye-safe coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system for wind measurement was developed and tested at the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York (CCNY). The system employs a 1542 nm fiber laser to leverage components' availability and affordability of the telecommunication industry. A balanced detector with a bandwidth extending from dc to 125 MHz is used to eliminate the common mode relative intensity noise (RIN). The system is shot noise limited i.e., the dominant component of received signals' noise is the shot noise. Wind velocity can be measured under nominal aerosol loading and atmospheric turbulence conditions for ranges up to 3 km while pointing vertically with 0.08 m/s precision.

  17. Denoising signals corrupted by chaotic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunath, G.; Sivaji Ganesh, S.; Anand, G. V.

    2010-12-01

    We consider the problem of signal estimation where the observed time series is modeled as yi=xi+si with {xi} being an orbit of a chaotic self-map on a compact subset of Rd and {si} a sequence in Rd converging to zero. This model is motivated by experimental results in the literature where the ocean ambient noise and the ocean clutter are found to be chaotic. Making use of observations up to time n, we propose an estimate of si for i

  18. Optimal Correlation Filters for Images with Signal-Dependent Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Walkup, John F.

    1994-01-01

    We address the design of optimal correlation filters for pattern detection and recognition in the presence of signal-dependent image noise sources. The particular examples considered are film-grain noise and speckle. Two basic approaches are investigated: (1) deriving the optimal matched filters for the signal-dependent noise models and comparing their performances with those derived for traditional signal-independent noise models and (2) first nonlinearly transforming the signal-dependent noise to signal-independent noise followed by the use of a classical filter matched to the transformed signal. We present both theoretical and computer simulation results that demonstrate the generally superior performance of the second approach in terms of the correlation peak signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Analyses and Measures of GPR Signal with Superimposed Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicarella, Simone; Ferrara, Vincenzo; D'Atanasio, Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Pajewski, Lara; Pavoncello, Settimio; Prontera, Santo; Tedeschi, Nicola; Zambotti, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The influence of EM noises and environmental hard conditions on the GPR surveys has been examined analytically [1]. In the case of pulse radar GPR, many unwanted signals as stationary clutter, non-stationary clutter, random noise, and time jitter, influence the measurement signal. When GPR is motionless, stationary clutter is the most dominant signal component due to the reflections of static objects different from the investigated target, and to the direct antenna coupling. Moving objects like e.g. persons and vehicles, and the swaying of tree crown, produce non-stationary clutter. Device internal noise and narrowband jamming are e.g. two potential sources of random noises. Finally, trigger instabilities generate random jitter. In order to estimate the effective influence of these noise signal components, we organized some experimental setup of measurement. At first, we evaluated for the case of a GPR basic detection, simpler image processing of radargram. In the future, we foresee experimental measurements for detection of the Doppler frequency changes induced by movements of targets (like physiological movements of survivors under debris). We obtain image processing of radargram by using of GSSI SIR® 2000 GPR system together with the UWB UHF GPR-antenna (SUB-ECHO HBD 300, a model manufactured by Radarteam company). Our work includes both characterization of GPR signal without (or almost without) a superimposed noise, and the effect of jamming originated from the coexistence of a different radio signal. For characterizing GPR signal, we organized a measurement setup that includes the following instruments: mod. FSP 30 spectrum analyser by Rohde & Schwarz which operates in the frequency range 9 KHz - 30 GHz, mod. Sucoflex 104 cable by Huber Suhner (10 MHz - 18 GHz), and HL050 antenna by Rohde & Schwarz (bandwidth: from 850 MHz to 26.5 GHz). The next analysis of superimposed jamming will examine two different signal sources: by a cellular phone and by a

  20. Noise reduction by dynamic signal preemphasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Takegoshi, K.

    2011-02-01

    In this work we propose an approach to reduce the digitization noise for a given dynamic range, i.e., the number of bits, of an analog to digital converter used in an NMR receiver. In this approach, the receiver gain is dynamically increased so that the free induction decay is recorded in such an emphasized way that the decaying signal is digitized using as many number of bits as possible, and at the stage of data processing, the original signal profile is restored by applying the apodization that compensates the effect of the preemphasis. This approach, which we call APodization after Receiver gain InCrement during Ongoing sequence with Time (APRICOT), is performed in a solid-state system containing a pair of 13C spins, one of which is fully isotopically labeled and the other is naturally abundant. It is demonstrated that the exceedingly smaller peak buried in the digitization noise in the conventional approach can be revealed by employing APRICOT.

  1. Signal processing of aircraft flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed analysis of signal processing concerns for measuring aircraft flyover noise is presented. Development of a de-Dopplerization scheme for both corrected time history and spectral data is discussed along with an analysis of motion effects on measured spectra. A computer code was written to implement the de-Dopplerization scheme. Input to the code is the aircraft position data and the pressure time histories. To facilitate ensemble averaging, a level uniform flyover is considered in the study, but the code can accept more general flight profiles. The effects of spectral smearing and its removal are discussed. Using test data acquired from an XV-15 tilt-rotor flyover, comparisons are made between the measured and corrected spectra. Frequency shifts are accurately accounted for by the de-Dopplerization procedure. It is shown that by correcting for spherical spreading and Doppler amplitude, along with frequency, can give some idea about noise source directivity. The analysis indicated that smearing increases with frequency and is more severe on approach than recession.

  2. Signal processing of aircraft flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of signal processing concerns for measuring aircraft flyover noise is presented. Development of a de-Dopplerization scheme for both corrected time history and spectral data is discussed along with an analysis of motion effects on measured spectra. A computer code was written to implement the de-Dopplerization scheme. Input to the code is the aircraft position data and the pressure time histories. To facilitate ensemble averaging, a uniform level flyover is considered but the code can accept more general flight profiles. The effects of spectral smearing and its removal is discussed. Using data acquired from XV-15 tilt rotor flyover test comparisons are made showing the measured and corrected spectra. Frequency shifts are accurately accounted for by the method. It is shown that correcting for spherical spreading, Doppler amplitude, and frequency can give some idea about source directivity. The analysis indicated that smearing increases with frequency and is more severe on approach than recession.

  3. Multiplexing of discrete chaotic signals in presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Nithin; Vaidya, Prabhakar G.

    2009-09-01

    Multiplexing of discrete chaotic signals in presence of noise is investigated. The existing methods are based on chaotic synchronization, which is susceptible to noise, precision limitations, and requires more iterates. Furthermore, most of these methods fail for multiplexing more than two discrete chaotic signals. We propose novel methods to multiplex multiple discrete chaotic signals based on the principle of symbolic sequence invariance in presence of noise and finite precision implementation of finding the initial condition of an arbitrarily long symbolic sequence of a chaotic map. Our methods work for single precision and as less as 35 iterates. For two signals, our method is robust up to 50% noise level.

  4. Transducer Signal Noise Analysis for Sensor Authentication

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Svoboda; Mark J. Schanfein

    2012-07-01

    The abstract is being passed through STIMS for submision to the conference. International safeguards organizations charged with promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy employ unattended and remote monitoring systems supplemented with onsite inspections to ensure nuclear materials are not diverted for weaponization purposes. These systems are left unattended for periods of several months between inspections. During these periods physical security means are the main deterrent used to detect intentional monitoring system tampering. The information gathering components are locked in secure and sealed rooms. The sensor components (i.e. neutron and gamma detectors) are located throughout the plant in unsecure areas where sensor tampering could take place during the periods between inspections. Sensor tampering could allow the diversion of nuclear materials from the accepted and intended use to uses not consistent with the peaceful use of nuclear energy. A method and an apparatus is presented that address the detection of sensor tampering during the periods between inspections. It was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the IAEA. The method is based on the detailed analysis of the sensor noise floor after the sensor signal is removed. The apparatus consists of a 2.1” x 2.6” electronic circuit board containing all signal conditioning and processing components and a laptop computer running an application that acquires and stores the analysis results between inspection periods. The sensors do not require any modification and are remotely located in their normal high radiation zones. The apparatus interfaces with the sensor signal conductors using a simple pass through connector at the normal sensor electronics interface package located in the already secure and sealed rooms. The apparatus does not require hardening against the effects of radiation due to its location. Presented is the apparatus design

  5. Adaptive noise cancelling of multichannel magnetic resonance sounding signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, E.; Auken, E.; Larsen, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive noise cancelling of multichannel magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) signals is investigated. An analysis of the noise sources affecting MRS signals show that the applicability of adaptive noise cancelling is primarily limited to cancel powerline harmonics. The problems of handling spikes in MRS signals are discussed and an efficient algorithm for spike detection is presented. The optimum parameters for multichannel adaptive noise cancelling are identified through simulations with synthetic signals added to noise-only recordings from an MRS instrument. We discuss the design and the efficiency of different stacking methods. The results from multichannel adaptive noise cancelling are compared to time-domain multichannel Wiener filtering. Our results show that within the experimental uncertainty the two methods give identical results.

  6. Robust stochastic resonance: Signal detection and adaptation in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2001-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) occurs when noise improves a system performance measure such as a spectral signal-to-noise ratio or a cross-correlation measure. All SR studies have assumed that the forcing noise has finite variance. Most have further assumed that the noise is Gaussian. We show that SR still occurs for the more general case of impulsive or infinite-variance noise. The SR effect fades as the noise grows more impulsive. We study this fading effect on the family of symmetric α-stable bell curves that includes the Gaussian bell curve as a special case. These bell curves have thicker tails as the parameter α falls from 2 (the Gaussian case) to 1 (the Cauchy case) to even lower values. Thicker tails create more frequent and more violent noise impulses. The main feedback and feedforward models in the SR literature show this fading SR effect for periodic forcing signals when we plot either the signal-to-noise ratio or a signal correlation measure against the dispersion of the α-stable noise. Linear regression shows that an exponential law γopt(α)=cAα describes this relation between the impulsive index α and the SR-optimal noise dispersion γopt. The results show that SR is robust against noise ``outliers.'' So SR may be more widespread in nature than previously believed. Such robustness also favors the use of SR in engineering systems. We further show that an adaptive system can learn the optimal noise dispersion for two standard SR models (the quartic bistable model and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model) for the signal-to-noise ratio performance measure. This also favors practical applications of SR and suggests that evolution may have tuned the noise-sensitive parameters of biological systems.

  7. Biologically-based signal processing system applied to noise removal for signal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    2004-07-13

    The method and system described herein use a biologically-based signal processing system for noise removal for signal extraction. A wavelet transform may be used in conjunction with a neural network to imitate a biological system. The neural network may be trained using ideal data derived from physical principles or noiseless signals to determine to remove noise from the signal.

  8. Signal type and signal-to-noise ratio interact to affect cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Grush, Leslie D

    2016-08-01

    Use of speech signals and background noise is emerging in cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) studies; however, the interaction between signal type and noise level remains unclear. Two experiments determined the interaction between signal type and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on CAEPs. Three signals (syllable /ba/, 1000-Hz tone, and the /ba/ envelope with 1000-Hz fine structure) with varying SNRs were used in two experiments, demonstrating signal-by-SNR interactions due to both envelope and spectral characteristics. When using real-world stimuli such as speech to evoke CAEPs, temporal and spectral complexity leads to differences with traditional tonal stimuli, especially when presented in background noise. PMID:27586784

  9. Estimating the signal-to-noise ratio of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.

    1988-01-01

    To make the best use of narrowband airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, an investigator needs to know the ratio of signal to random variability or noise (signal-to-noise ratio or SNR). The signal is land cover dependent and varies with both wavelength and atmospheric absorption; random noise comprises sensor noise and intrapixel variability (i.e., variability within a pixel). The three existing methods for estimating the SNR are inadequate, since typical laboratory methods inflate while dark current and image methods deflate the SNR. A new procedure is proposed called the geostatistical method. It is based on the removal of periodic noise by notch filtering in the frequency domain and the isolation of sensor noise and intrapixel variability using the semi-variogram. This procedure was applied easily and successfully to five sets of AVIRIS data from the 1987 flying season and could be applied to remotely sensed data from broadband sensors.

  10. Quantum issues in optical communication. [noise reduction in signal reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Various approaches to the problem of controlling quantum noise, the dominant noise in an optical communications system, are discussed. It is shown that, no matter which way the problem is approached, there always remain uncertainties. These uncertainties exist because, to date, only very few communication problems have been solved in their full quantum form.

  11. Parallel feedback active noise control of MRI acoustic noise with signal decomposition using hybrid RLS-NLMS adaptive algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anshuman; Krishna Vemuri, Sri Hari; Panahi, Issa

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a cost-effective adaptive feedback Active Noise Control (FANC) method for controlling functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) acoustic noise by decomposing it into dominant periodic components and residual random components. Periodicity of fMRI acoustic noise is exploited by using linear prediction (LP) filtering to achieve signal decomposition. A hybrid combination of adaptive filters-Recursive Least Squares (RLS) and Normalized Least Mean Squares (NLMS) are then used to effectively control each component separately. Performance of the proposed FANC system is analyzed and Noise attenuation levels (NAL) up to 32.27 dB obtained by simulation are presented which confirm the effectiveness of the proposed FANC method. PMID:25570676

  12. Algorithm for astronomical, point source, signal to noise ratio calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R.; Schroeder, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to simulate the expected signal to noise ratios as a function of observation time in the charge coupled device detector plane of an optical telescope located outside the Earth's atmosphere for a signal star, and an optional secondary star, embedded in a uniform cosmic background. By choosing the appropriate input values, the expected point source signal to noise ratio can be computed for the Hubble Space Telescope using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera science instrument.

  13. Optimum combining of residual carrier array signals in correlated noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R.; Suen, P. H.; Tan, H. H.

    1996-01-01

    An array feed combining system for the recovery of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss due to antenna reflector deformation has been implemented and is currently being evaluated on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory 34-m DSS-13 antenna. The current signal-combining system operates under the assumption that the white Gaussian noise processes in the received signals from different array elements are mutually uncorrelated. However, experimental data at DSS 13 indicate that these noise processes are indeed mutually correlated. The objective of this work is to develop a signal-combining system optimized to account for the mutual correlations between these noise processes. The set of optimum combining weight coefficients that maximizes the combined signal SNR in the correlated noises environment is determined. These optimum weights depend on unknown signal and noise covariance parameters. A maximum-likelihood approach is developed to estimate these unknown parameters to obtain estimates of the optimum weight coefficients based on residual carrier signal samples. The actual combined signal SNR using the estimated weight coefficients is derived and shown to converge to the maximum achievable SNR as the number of signal samples increases. These results are also verified by simulation. A numerical example shows a significant improvement in SNR performance can be obtained, especially when the amount of correlation increases.

  14. Phase-Noise and Amplitude-Noise Measurement of Low-Power Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubiola, Enrico; Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the phase fluctuation between a pair of low-power microwave signals, the signals must be amplified before detection. In such cases the phase noise of the amplifier pair is the main cause of 1/f background noise of the instrument. this article proposes a scheme that makes amplification possible while rejecting the close in 1/f (flicker) noise of the two amplifiers. Noise rejection, which relies upon the understanding of the amplifier noise mechanism does not require averaging. Therefore, our scheme can also be the detector of a closed loop noise reduction system. the first prototype, compared to a traditional saturated mixer system under the same condition, show a 24 dB noise reduction of the 1/f region.

  15. Signal-to-noise ratios in coherent soft limiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Expressions for the output signal-to-noise power ratio of a bandpass soft limiter followed by a coherent detection device are presented and discussed. It is found that a significant improvement in the output signal-to-noise ratio at low input SNRs can be achieved by such soft limiters as compared to hard limiters. This indicates that the soft limiter may be of some use in the area of threshold extension. Approximation methods for determining output signal-to-noise spectral densities are also presented.

  16. Nonlinear interaction between pulse and noise signals in nondispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbatov, S. N.; Demin, I. Iu.; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, N. V.

    1986-10-01

    The evolution of a perturbation which initially represents the sum of a regular pulsed signal and stationary noise is investigated by using the nonlinear Burgers equation. The effect of a decrease in the pulse front velocity and its broadening due to turbulent viscosity is identified. An abrupt increase in noise dispersion in the discontinuity region and a decrease in noise dispersion at the trailing edge of a pulse are also noted. Results of a numerical simulation are presented.

  17. Ultra-Low Phase Noise Microwaves from Optical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jennifer A.

    Continuous-wave lasers locked to high-finesse optical reference cavities are oscillators that produce ˜500 THz optical signals with unprecedented stability. Indeed, sub-femtosecond fractional frequency instability at one second averaging can now be achieved. A self-referenced femtosecond laser frequency comb (FLFC) is used as a frequency divider to provide a phase-coherent link between optical and microwave domains, dividing the frequency down to the gigahertz range while also transferring the stability of the original signal. Photodetectors then convert the optical pulses into electronic signals. The resultant 10 GHz microwave signals have ultra-low phase noise below -100 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset, surpassing that of traditional microwave oscillators. This new approach offers significant improvement for many applications that rely on stable microwave signals, and may even create new measurement technologies otherwise unachievable with current signal sources. In reality, fundamental and technical sources of noise in each stage of the optical-to-microwave generation process limit the ultimate achievable stability of the signal. Optical reference cavities are limited by environmental effects and thermal fluctuations, and FLFC dividers suffer from intrinsic timing jitter, amplitude noise, and limited stabilization servo bandwidth. However, it is the seemingly straightforward photodetection of optical pulses that proves to be the limiting factor in the ultimate noise floor of these signals. In this thesis, I describe the noise limitations of each part of the optical-to-microwave scheme, particularly focusing on the noise limitations of photodetection. I will give a basic representation of these photodetection noise phenomena in terms of the physical behavior of optically-generated electrons in semiconductor photodiodes. The two main photodetection noise phenomena---shot noise and amplitude-to-phase conversion---will be thoroughly characterized in the context of generation

  18. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  19. Novel dominant negative Smad antagonists to TGFbeta signaling.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne; Chen, Hui; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2007-07-01

    We previously identified a critical serine/threonine residue within the linker domain of Smad2/3, phosphorylated by the kinase GRK2 which plays a critical role in regulating Smad signaling. To define the mechanism by which GRK2-mediated phosphorylation modifies Smad2/3 behavior at the molecular level, we generated mutant Smads where the GRK2 phosphorylation site was replaced with an aspartic acid (D) to mimic the properties of a phospho-residue or an alanine (A) as a control. Interestingly, overexpression of either the D or A mutant inhibits TGFbeta signaling, but through two distinct mechanisms. The D mutant is properly localized and released from the plasma membrane upon ligand stimulation, but fails to interact with the type I receptor kinase. The A mutant properly interacts with and is phosphorylated by the type I receptor, translocates to the nucleus and homodimerizes with wild-type R-Smads, but it fails to form a heterocomplex with Smad4. As a result, both mutants act as antagonists of endogenous TGFbeta signaling through divergent mechanisms. The D mutant acts by blocking endogenous R-Smads phosphorylation and the A mutant acts by preventing endogenous R-Smad/Smad4 heterocomplexes. Thus, mutation of the GRK2 phosphorylation site within the Smad generates dominant negative Smads that efficiently inhibit TGFbeta responses. PMID:17360157

  20. Empirical mode decomposition of the ECG signal for noise removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Jesmin; Bhuiyan, Sharif; Murphy, Gregory; Alam, Mohammad

    2011-04-01

    Electrocardiography is a diagnostic procedure for the detection and diagnosis of heart abnormalities. The electrocardiogram (ECG) signal contains important information that is utilized by physicians for the diagnosis and analysis of heart diseases. So good quality ECG signal plays a vital role for the interpretation and identification of pathological, anatomical and physiological aspects of the whole cardiac muscle. However, the ECG signals are corrupted by noise which severely limit the utility of the recorded ECG signal for medical evaluation. The most common noise presents in the ECG signal is the high frequency noise caused by the forces acting on the electrodes. In this paper, we propose a new ECG denoising method based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The proposed method is able to enhance the ECG signal upon removing the noise with minimum signal distortion. Simulation is done on the MIT-BIH database to verify the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. Experiments show that the presented method offers very good results to remove noise from the ECG signal.

  1. Stimulus configuration determines the detectability of motion signals in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; McKee, S. P.; Grzywacz, N. M.

    2000-01-01

    We measured the detectability of moving signal dots in dynamic noise to determine whether local motion signals are preferentially combined along an axis parallel to the direction of motion. Observers were asked to detect a signal composed of three dots moving in a linear trajectory among dynamic noise dots. The signal dots were collinear and equally spaced in a configuration that was either parallel to or perpendicular to their trajectory. The probability of detecting the signal was measured as a function of noise density, over a range of signal dot spacings from 0.5 degrees to 5.0 degrees. At any given noise density, the signal in the parallel configuration was more detectable than that in the perpendicular configuration. Our four observers could tolerate 1.5-2.5 times more noise in the parallel configuration. This improvement is not due merely to temporal summation between consecutive dots in the parallel trajectory. Temporal summation functions measured on our observers indicate that the benefit from spatial coincidence of the dots lasts for no more than 50 ms, whereas the increased detectability of the parallel configuration is observed up to the largest temporal separations tested (210 ms). These results demonstrate that dots arranged parallel to the signal trajectory are more easily detected than those arranged perpendicularly. Moreover, this enhancement points to the existence of visual mechanisms that preferentially organize motion information parallel to the direction of motion.

  2. Extraction of low frequency signals from cross-correlations of the infrasonic ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landès, Matthieu; Shapiro, Nikolaï; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Cross-correlation of ambient noise are widely used in seismology for imaging and monitoring purposes. The underlying result is the possibility to extract the Green Function between two locations on the Earth by correlating the noise recorded at these two points during long period of time. However, the applicability of this approach in atmospheric infrasound is not yet well established. We present cross-correlations of the infrasonic dataset of the USArray for the year 2012 filtered between 3 and 330 seconds. All cross-correlations were computed daily with a moving window of 3 hours. Only the amplitude normalization has been applied. We observe clear signals on the stacked cross-correlations for inter-station distances smaller than 400 km. The dominant period of this signal is around 60-100 s and its propagation velocity is approximately 320 m/s. We then use the daily cross-correlations to get information on the location of corresponding noise sources. Daily cross-correlations are asymmetric and show seasonal variations. These observations are due to the inhomogeneous noise sources distribution that can be inferred from a beamforming analysis. Our results show the seasonal variations of the back-azimuth of dominant infrasound noise sources generating this low frequency signal. This is a new opportunity to characterize the composition of the infrasonic ambient noise and to promote the application of passive approaches in atmospheric infrasound.

  3. Light field reconstruction robust to signal dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kun; Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    Capturing four dimensional light field data sequentially using a coded aperture camera is an effective approach but suffers from low signal noise ratio. Although multiplexing can help raise the acquisition quality, noise is still a big issue especially for fast acquisition. To address this problem, this paper proposes a noise robust light field reconstruction method. Firstly, scene dependent noise model is studied and incorporated into the light field reconstruction framework. Then, we derive an optimization algorithm for the final reconstruction. We build a prototype by hacking an off-the-shelf camera for data capturing and prove the concept. The effectiveness of this method is validated with experiments on the real captured data.

  4. Chaotic signal reconstruction with application to noise radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lidong; Hu, Jinfeng; He, Zishu; Han, Chunlin; Li, Huiyong; Li, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Chaotic signals are potentially attractive in engineering applications, most of which require an accurate estimation of the actual chaotic signal from a noisy background. In this article, we present an improved symbolic dynamics-based method (ISDM) for accurate estimating the initial condition of chaotic signal corrupted by noise. Then, a new method, called piecewise estimation method (PEM), for chaotic signal reconstruction based on ISDM is proposed. The reconstruction performance using PEM is much better than that using the existing initial condition estimation methods. Next, PEM is applied in a noncoherent reception noise radar scheme and an improved noncoherent reception scheme is given. The simulation results show that the improved noncoherent scheme has better correlation performance and range resolution especially at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs).

  5. Noise Estimation in Electroencephalogram Signal by Using Volterra Series Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Malihe; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The Volterra model is widely used for nonlinearity identification in practical applications. In this paper, we employed Volterra model to find the nonlinearity relation between electroencephalogram (EEG) signal and the noise that is a novel approach to estimate noise in EEG signal. We show that by employing this method. We can considerably improve the signal to noise ratio by the ratio of at least 1.54. An important issue in implementing Volterra model is its computation complexity, especially when the degree of nonlinearity is increased. Hence, in many applications it is urgent to reduce the complexity of computation. In this paper, we use the property of EEG signal and propose a new and good approximation of delayed input signal to its adjacent samples in order to reduce the computation of finding Volterra series coefficients. The computation complexity is reduced by the ratio of at least 1/3 when the filter memory is 3. PMID:26284176

  6. Separating Decision and Encoding Noise in Signal Detection Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Carlos Alexander; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Dosher, Barbara Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop an extension to the Signal Detection Theory (SDT) framework to separately estimate internal noise arising from representational and decision processes. Our approach constrains SDT models with decision noise by combining a multi-pass external noise paradigm with confidence rating responses. In a simulation study we present evidence that representation and decision noise can be separately estimated over a range of representative underlying representational and decision noise level configurations. These results also hold across a number of decision rules and show resilience to rule miss-specification. The new theoretical framework is applied to a visual detection confidence-rating task with three and five response categories. This study compliments and extends the recent efforts of researchers (Benjamin, Diaz, & Wee, 2009; Mueller & Weidemann, 2008; Rosner & Kochanski, 2009, Kellen, Klauer, & Singmann, 2012) to separate and quantify underlying sources of response variability in signal detection tasks. PMID:26120907

  7. Adaptive whitening of ambient ocean noise with narrowband signal preservation.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Luke J; Stevenson, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Passive underwater listening devices are often deployed to listen for narrowband signals of interest in time-varying background ocean noise. Such tonals are generated mechanically by ships, submarines, and machines, or acoustically by aquatic wildlife. Quantization of the sensor data for storage or low bit-rate transmission adds white noise which can overwhelm weak narrowband signals if the background noise is sufficiently colored. Whitening the background noise prior to quantization can reduce the detrimental effects, but the whitening process must preserve any tonals in the signal for maximum effectiveness. Existing adaptive whitening techniques make no effort to avoid suppressing tonals in the whitening process, while existing spectral separation methods fail to whiten background noise. The proposed methods perform adaptive whitening of background ambient noise while preserving narrowband tones at their original signal-to-noise ratios. The proposed methods are shown to outperform combinations of existing partial solutions both subjectively and by evaluating the objective criteria introduced. The stability and convergence properties of the proposed algorithms match or surpass those of existing well-known adaptive algorithms. PMID:27369136

  8. Signal processing of jet noise from flyover test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Wilson, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Narrow-band spectra characterizing jet noise are constructed from flyover acoustic measurements. Radar and c-band tracking systems provided the aircraft position histories which enabled directivity and smear angles from the aircraft to each microphone to be computed. These angles are based on source emission time and thus give some idea about the directivity of the radiated sound field due to jet noise. Simulated spectra are included in the paper to demonstrate spectral broadening due to smear angle. The acoustic data described in the study has application to community noise analysis, noise source characterization and validation of prediction models. Both broadband-shock noise and turbulent mixing noise are observed in the spectra. A detailed description of the signal processing procedures is provided.

  9. Effects of noise suppression on intelligibility: dependency on signal-to-noise ratios.

    PubMed

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Brookes, Mike; Huckvale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The effects on speech intelligibility of three different noise reduction algorithms (spectral subtraction, minimal mean squared error spectral estimation, and subspace analysis) were evaluated in two types of noise (car and babble) over a 12 dB range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Results from these listening experiments showed that most algorithms deteriorated intelligibility scores. Modeling of the results with a logit-shaped psychometric function showed that the degradation in intelligibility scores was largely congruent with a constant shift in SNR, although some additional degradation was observed at two SNRs, suggesting a limited interaction between the effects of noise suppression and SNR. PMID:22280614

  10. Reducing Noise by Repetition: Introduction to Signal Averaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Umer; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes theory and experiments, taken from biophysics and physiological measurements, to illustrate the technique of signal averaging. In the process, students are introduced to the basic concepts of signal processing, such as digital filtering, Fourier transformation, baseline correction, pink and Gaussian noise, and the cross- and…

  11. Signal Detection with Criterion Noise: Applications to Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2009-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the theory of signal detection is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This article challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the noisy decision theory of signal detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of…

  12. Detection of continuous-time quaternion signals in additive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Moreno, Jesús; Ruiz-Molina, Juan Carlos; Oya, Antonia; Quesada-Rubio, José M.

    2012-12-01

    Different kinds of quaternion signal detection problems in continuous-time by using a widely linear processing are dealt with. The suggested solutions are based on an extension of the Karhunen-Loève expansion to the quaternion domain which provides uncorrelated scalar real-valued random coefficients. This expansion presents the notable advantage of transforming the original four-dimensional eigen problem to a one-dimensional problem. Firstly, we address the problem of detecting a quaternion deterministic signal in quaternion Gaussian noise and a version of Pitcher's Theorem is given. Also the particular case of a general quaternion Wiener noise is studied and an extension of the Cameron-Martin formula is presented. Finally, the problem of detecting a quaternion random signal in quaternion white Gaussian noise is tackled. In such a case, it is shown that the detector depends on the quaternion widely linear estimator of the signal.

  13. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-02-22

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks.

  14. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  15. Detection of noise-corrupted sinusoidal signals with Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of exploiting the speed and low noise features of Josephson junctions for detecting sinusoidal signals masked by Gaussian noise. We show that the escape time from the static locked state of a Josephson junction is very sensitive to a small periodic signal embedded in the noise, and therefore the analysis of the escape times can be employed to reveal the presence of the sinusoidal component. We propose and characterize two detection strategies: in the first, the initial phase is supposedly unknown (incoherent strategy), while in the second, the signal phase remains unknown but is fixed (coherent strategy). Our proposals are both suboptimal, with the linear filter being the optimal detection strategy, but they present some remarkable features, such as resonant activation, that make detection through Josephson junctions appealing in some special cases.

  16. A Signal-to-Noise Standard for Pulsed EPR

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S; Quine, Richard W.; Mitchell, Deborah; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Weber, Ralph T.

    2010-01-01

    A 2 mm diameter by 10 mm long cylinder of fused SiO2 (quartz) γ-irradiated to 1 kGy with 60Co contains about 2×1016 spins/cm3. It is proposed as a standard for monitoring signal-to-noise (S/N) performance of X-band pulsed EPR spectrometers. This sample yields S/N of about 25 on modern spin echo spectrometers, which permits measurement of both signal and noise under the same conditions with an 8-bit digitizer. PMID:20451433

  17. Multipath noise reduction spread spectrum signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The concepts of early-prompt delay tracking, multipath correction of early-prompt delay tracking from correlation shape, and carrier phase multipath correction are addressed. In early-prompt delay tracking, since multipath is always delayed with respect to the direct signals, the system derives phase and pseudorange observables from earlier correlation lags. In multipath correction of early-prompt delay tracking from correlation shape, the system looks for relative variations of amplitude across the code correlation function that do not match the predicted multipath-free code cross-correlation shape. The system then uses deviations from the multipath-free shape to infer the magnitude of multipath, and to generate corrections pseudorange observables. In carrier phase multipath correction, the system looks for variations of phase among plural early and prompt lags. The system uses the measured phase variations, along with the general principle that the multipath errors are larger for later lags, to infer the presence of multipath, and to generate corrections for carrier-phase observables.

  18. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  19. Noise properties of microwave signals synthesized with femtosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Eugene N; McFerran, John J; Diddams, Scott A; Hollberg, Leo

    2007-04-01

    We discuss various aspects of high resolution measurements of phase fluctuations at microwave frequencies. This includes methods to achieve thermal noise limited sensitivity, along with the improved immunity to oscillator amplitude noise. A few prototype measurement systems were developed to measure phase fluctuations of microwave signals extracted from the optical pulse trains generated by femtosecond lasers. This enabled first reliable measurements of the excess phase noise associated with optical-to-microwave frequency division. The spectral density of the excess phase noise was found to be -140 dBc/Hz at 100 Hz offset from the 10 GHz carrier which was almost 40 dB better than that of a high quality microwave synthesizer. PMID:17441583

  20. Threshold detection in generalized non-additive signals and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, D., LLNL

    1997-12-22

    The classical theory of optimum (binary-on-off) threshold detection for additive signals and generalized (i.e. nongaussian) noise is extended to the canonical nonadditive threshold situation. In the important (and usual) applications where the noise is sampled independently, a canonical threshold optimum theory is outlined here, which is found formally to parallel the earlier additive theory, including the critical properties of locally optimum Bayes detection algorithms, which are asymptotically normal and optimum as well. The important Class A clutter model provides an explicit example of optimal threshold envelope detection, for the non-additive cases of signal and noise. Various extensions are noted in the concluding section, as are selected references.

  1. Separating signal and noise in vibrotactile devices for the deaf.

    PubMed

    Richardson, B L

    1990-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews a series of experiments demonstrating that a sound-to-touch transform of signal and noise may be perceptually separated by providing tactile cues for sound localization. Following this, three experiments are reported in which it is shown that such stereotactile cues are available if two vibrotactile devices (Minifonators, produced by Siemens Co. Ltd.), are used instead of one. With this system, subjects were able to attend to a target signal (male voice) in white noise and when a female voice was presented simultaneously. This ability depended upon a sufficient spatial separation of the target and noise in acoustic space. These findings appear to have applications in the design of tactile hearing aids and cochlear implants when used in noisy environments or when more than one sound is present. PMID:2350619

  2. Reconstructing signals from noisy data with unknown signal and noise covariance.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Niels; Robbers, Georg; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2011-10-01

    We derive a method to reconstruct Gaussian signals from linear measurements with Gaussian noise. This new algorithm is intended for applications in astrophysics and other sciences. The starting point of our considerations is the principle of minimum Gibbs free energy, which was previously used to derive a signal reconstruction algorithm handling uncertainties in the signal covariance. We extend this algorithm to simultaneously uncertain noise and signal covariances using the same principles in the derivation. The resulting equations are general enough to be applied in many different contexts. We demonstrate the performance of the algorithm by applying it to specific example situations and compare it to algorithms not allowing for uncertainties in the noise covariance. The results show that the method we suggest performs very well under a variety of circumstances and is indeed qualitatively superior to the other methods in cases where uncertainty in the noise covariance is present. PMID:22181098

  3. The effects of noise on speech and warning signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Alice H.

    1989-06-01

    To assess the effects of noise on speech communication it is necessary to examine certain characteristics of the speech signal. Speech level can be measured by a variety of methods, none of which has yet been standardized, and it should be kept in mind that vocal effort increases with background noise level and with different types of activity. Noise and filtering commonly degrade the speech signal, especially as it is transmitted through communications systems. Intelligibility is also adversely affected by distance, reverberation, and monaural listening. Communication systems currently in use may cause strain and delays on the part of the listener, but there are many possibilities for improvement. Individuals who need to communicate in noise may be subject to voice disorders. Shouted speech becomes progressively less intelligible at high voice levels, but improvements can be realized when talkers use clear speech. Tolerable listening levels are lower for negative than for positive S/Ns, and comfortable listening levels should be at a S/N of at least 5 dB, and preferably above 10 dB. Popular methods to predict speech intelligibility in noise include the Articulation Index, Speech Interference Level, Speech Transmission Index, and the sound level meter's A-weighting network. This report describes these methods, discussing certain advantages and disadvantages of each, and shows their interrelations.

  4. Saturation by Noise and CW Signals in SIS Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    2002-03-01

    In ALMA Memo 321, Plambeck points out that saturation (gain compression) is likely to be a significant factor limiting the calibration accuracy of ALMA observations. In this paper, saturation by broadband noise and CW signals is analyzed for representative SIS receivers operating at different frequencies. Many SIS mixers in current use are expected to exhibit a significant degree of gain compression when connected to a room-temperature source. Previous analyses of saturation in SIS mixers have applied only to CW signals. To analyze saturation by noise, the statistics of the output voltage are derived from those of the input signal. A single constant, applicable to all SIS mixers, is determined experimentally by fitting the predicted CW gain compression curve to measured data.

  5. Stochastic model for detection of signals in noise.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2009-11-01

    Fifty years ago Birdsall, Tanner, and colleagues made rapid progress in developing signal detection theory into a powerful psychophysical tool. One of their major insights was the utility of adding external noise to the signals of interest. These methods have been enhanced in recent years by the addition of multipass and classification-image methods for opening up the black box. There remain a number of as yet unresolved issues. In particular, Birdsall developed a theorem that large amounts of external input noise can linearize nonlinear systems, and Tanner conjectured, with mathematical backup, that what had been previously thought of as a nonlinear system could actually be a linear system with uncertainty. Recent findings, both experimental and theoretical, have validated Birdsall's theorem and Tanner's conjecture. However, there have also been experimental and theoretical findings with the opposite outcome. In this paper we present new data and simulations in an attempt to sort out these issues. Our simulations and experiments plus data from others show that Birdsall's theorem is quite robust. We argue that uncertainty can serve as an explanation for violations of Birdsall's linearization by noise and also for reports of stochastic resonance. In addition, we modify present models to better handle detection of signals with both noise and pedestal backgrounds. PMID:19884912

  6. Digital Signal Processing System for Active Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, William W.; Tucker, Jerry

    2002-12-01

    Over the years there has been a need to improve the comfort of passengers in flight. One avenue for increasing comfort is to reduce cabin noise that is attributed to the engine and the vibration of fuselage panels that radiate sound. High frequency noise can be abated using sound absorbing material. Though, for low frequency noise the sound absorption material would have to very thick, thereby reducing the cabin size. To reduce these low frequency disturbances, active noise control systems (ANC) is being developed that utilizes feedback for cancellation of the disturbance. The active noise control system must be small in size, be a low power device, and operate in real-time. It must also be numerically stable i.e. insensitive to temperature and pressure variations. The ANC system will be a module that consists of digital signal processor (DSP), analog-digital and digital-analog converters, power converters, an actuator and sensors. The DSP will implement the feedback control algorithm that controls the actuators. This module will be attached to panels on the inside of the fuselage for actively eliminating resonant modes of the structure caused by turbulent flow across the fuselage Skin. A hardware prototype of the ANC system must be able to eliminate broadband noise consisting of a bandwidth between 100 Hz and 1500 Hz, which requires a sample rate of 5000 Hz. The analog/digital converters output accuracy is 16 bits with a 2's-compliment format and a very short acquisition time. This will also yield the appropriate dynamic range. Similar specifications are required of the digital/analog converter. The processor section of the system integrates a digital signal processor (TI TMS320C33) with analog/digital (Burr-Brown ADS8320) and digital/analog signal (DAC853 1) converters. The converters with associated power conditioning circuitry and test points reside on a daughter board that sits on top of a Spectrum Digital evaluation module. This will have the ability to test

  7. Signal processing method and system for noise removal and signal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren

    2009-04-14

    A signal processing method and system combining smooth level wavelet pre-processing together with artificial neural networks all in the wavelet domain for signal denoising and extraction. Upon receiving a signal corrupted with noise, an n-level decomposition of the signal is performed using a discrete wavelet transform to produce a smooth component and a rough component for each decomposition level. The n.sup.th level smooth component is then inputted into a corresponding neural network pre-trained to filter out noise in that component by pattern recognition in the wavelet domain. Additional rough components, beginning at the highest level, may also be retained and inputted into corresponding neural networks pre-trained to filter out noise in those components also by pattern recognition in the wavelet domain. In any case, an inverse discrete wavelet transform is performed on the combined output from all the neural networks to recover a clean signal back in the time domain.

  8. Trichotomous noise controlled signal amplification in a generalized Verhulst model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankin, Romi; Soika, Erkki; Lumi, Neeme

    2014-10-01

    The long-time limit of the probability distribution and statistical moments for a population size are studied by means of a stochastic growth model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacity of a population is modeled by a multiplicative three-level Markovian noise and by a time periodic deterministic component. Exact expressions for the moments of the population size have been calculated. It is shown that an interplay of a small periodic forcing and colored noise can cause large oscillations of the mean population size. The conditions for the appearance of such a phenomenon are found and illustrated by graphs. Implications of the results on models of symbiotic metapopulations are also discussed. Particularly, it is demonstrated that the effect of noise-generated amplification of an input signal gets more pronounced as the intensity of symbiotic interaction increases.

  9. Optimized Signal-To Ratio with Shot Noise Limited Detection in Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moester, M. J. B.; Ariese, F.; de Boer, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    We describe our set-up for Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy with shot noise limited detection for a broad window of biologically relevant laser powers. This set-up is used to demonstrate that the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SRS with shot noise limited detection is achieved with a time-averaged laser power ratio of 1:2 of the unmodulated and modulated beam. In SRS, two different coloured laser beams are incident on a sample. If the energy difference between them matches a molecular vibration of a molecule, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other. By applying amplitude modulation to one of the beams, the modulation transfer to the other beam can be measured. The efficiency of this process is a direct measure for the number of molecules of interest in the focal volume. Combined with laser scanning microscopy, this technique allows for fast and sensitive imaging with sub-micrometre resolution. Recent technological advances have resulted in an improvement of the sensitivity of SRS applications, but few show shot noise limited detection. The dominant noise source in this SRS microscope is the shot noise of the unmodulated, detected beam. Under the assumption that photodamage is linear with the total laser power, the optimal SNR shifts away from equal beam powers, where the most signal is generated, to a 1:2 power ratio. Under these conditions the SNR is maximized and the total laser power that could induce photodamage is minimized. Compared to using a 1:1 laser power ratio, we show improved image quality and a signal-to-noise ratio improvement of 8 % in polystyrene beads and C. Elegans worms. Including a non-linear damage mechanism in the analysis, we find that the optimal power ratio converges to a 1:1 ratio with increasing order of the non-linear damage mechanism.

  10. Influence of optical gaps on signal and noise properties of luminescent screen x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas

    2004-05-01

    X-ray detection with luminescent screens requires optical signal transfer as an intermediate step between x-ray detection and conversion to an electronic signal. Luminescent screens may be granular (phosphor screens), structured (e.g. CsI) or transparent (scintillators). The optical signal is imaged with lenses, fibre optics, electron optics or by proximity focussing to an electronic detector. Poor focussing or poor optical contact may degrade the signal and noise transfer characteristics, i.e. modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The case when x-rays are detected with granular luminescent screens, imaged onto flat panel electronic detectors is considered here. The detector assembly often requires layers of glue or protective thin films creating optical gaps, in which light is spread, hence spatial resolution is degraded. The noise spectrum is not necessarily changed the same way. Its exact shape depends on the dominant noise sources in a given detector configuration under the specific operating conditions: The noise of the primary x-ray quanta, noise aliasing and direct x-ray detection by the electronic detection layer are the main contributions in this investigation. Especially at high spatial frequencies small optical gaps in conjunction with white quantum noise from direct x-ray absorption of the electronic imager degrade DQE: A gap of 40 μm between luminescent screen and detector reduces the DQE by 33% at the Nyquist frequency. This was demonstrated with an a-Si imager of 143-μm pixel size and a Lanex Fine luminescent screen operated at 100 kV.

  11. Usage of microplasma signal noise for solar cells diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanek, Jiri; Koktavy, Pavel; Kubickova, Kristyna; Sadovsky, Petr; Raska, Michal

    2007-06-01

    This work deals with the usage of micro-plasmas signal noise for solar cells diagnostic. When high electric field is applied to PN junction with some technological imperfections it produces in tiny areas of enhanced impact ionization called micro-plasmas which could lead to deterioration in quality or destruction of PN junction. On this account it is possible to use methods which indicate presence of micro-plasma in junction and enable quality and quantitative description of tested cells.

  12. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  13. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  14. Signal-to-noise-optimal scaling of heterogenous population codes.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Similarity measures for neuronal population responses that are based on scalar products can be little informative if the neurons have different firing statistics. Based on signal-to-noise optimality, this paper derives positive weighting factors for the individual neurons' response rates in a heterogeneous neuronal population. The weights only depend on empirical statistics. If firing follows Poisson statistics, the weights can be interpreted as mutual information per spike. The scaling is shown to improve linear separability and clustering as compared to unscaled inputs. PMID:23984844

  15. Signal to Noise Analysis of iRadar sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzke, A; Top, P

    2009-09-10

    This document follows my process of testing; comparing; and contrasting several iRadars signal to noise ratios for both HH and VV polarization. A brief introduction is given explaining the basics of iRadar technology and what data I was collecting. The process section explains the steps I took to collect my data along with any procedures I followed. The analysis section compares and contrasts five different radars and the two different polarizations. The analysis also details the radars viewing limitations and area. Finally, the report delves into the effects of two radars interfering with each other. A conclusion goes over the success and findings of the project.

  16. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving signal-to-noise ratio in Kerr microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lian, J; Xu, X J; Li, X; Li, P; Li, M M; Wang, Y; Liu, Y X

    2016-03-01

    The magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. Optimization of Kerr microscopy will improve the detecting sensitivity and provide high-quality domain images. In this work, we provide a method to optimize the polarizer azimuth in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in longitudinal Kerr microscopy with the generalized magneto optical ellipsometry. Detailed analysis of the MOKE signal and the noise components are provided to study the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth combinations. Results show that, for a fixed polarizer angle 1°, the laser intensity noise and the shot noise, which vary with the input laser power, have a similar amplitude and decline with the analyzer azimuth increasing. When the analyzer is set at the extinction place, the Johnson noise plays a dominate role in the total noise. Then, the S/N values are calculated to find the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth. Results show that the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth combination for Permalloy is (18.35°, 68.35°) under an incident angle of 45°. After that, the S/N of 200 nm Permalloy at different analyzer angles with the polarizer azimuth set at 18.35° is measured to verify the validity of the simulation results. At last, the S/N at different incident angles is calculated. Results show that the optimum incident angle of 200 nm Permalloy film to improve the S/N is 70.35° under the polarizer and analyzer angles set at the optimal combinations (18.35°, 68.35°). PMID:26974636

  17. Estimation and detection of signals in multiplicative noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    We define a class of detection-estimation problems on matrix Lie groups in which the observation noise is multiplicative in nature. By examining the differential versions of the hypotheses, which are bilinear, we are able to derive the relevant likelihood ratio formula and the associated optimal estimation equations for the signal given the observations and the assumption that the signal is present. These estimation equations are of interest in their own right, in that they represent a finite-dimensional optimal solution to a nonlinear estimation problem and consist of a Kalman-Bucy filter along with the on-line computation of the solution of the associated Riccati equation, which is driven by the observations. The usefulness of these results is illustrated via an example concerning the detection of an actuator failure in a rigid-body rotational control system.

  18. Hierarchical organization of noise generates spontaneous signal in Paramecium cell.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Shunsuke; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2011-08-21

    In many cellular processes, spontaneous activities are often the basis for their functioning. Paramecium cells change their swimming direction under a homogeneous environment, which is induced by a spontaneous signal generation in the membrane electric potential. For such a spontaneous activity, a theoretical model has been proposed by Oosawa (2007) [Biosystems 88, 191-201.], in which intracellular noise is hierarchically organized from thermal fluctuations to spike-like large fluctuations, which induces a signal to change spontaneously the swimming direction. Our analysis of the model shows that the system is a kind of excitable media, in which a spike is induced by a stochastic fluctuation. We show conditions of channels properties to have a spike train. PMID:21620864

  19. Estimation and detection of signals in multiplicative noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1973-01-01

    A class of detection-estimation problems on matrix Lie groups is defined in which the observation noise is multiplicative in nature. By examining the differential versions of the hypotheses, which are bilinear in nature, it is possible to derive the relevant likelihood ratio formula and the associated optimal estimation equations for the signal given the observations and the assumption that the signal is present. These estimation equations are of interest in their own right, in that they represent a finite dimensional optimal solution to a nonlinear estimation problem and can be viewed as consisting of a Kalman-Bucy filter along with the on-line computation of the solution of the associated Riccati equation, which is driven by the observations. The usefulness of these results is illustrated via an example concerning the detection of an actuator failure in a rigid body rotational control system.

  20. Signal detection with criterion noise: Applications to recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2010-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the Theory of Signal Detection (TSD) is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This paper challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the Noisy Decision Theory of Signal Detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of discrimination that incorporate criterion variability are derived, and the model's relationship with extant models of decision-making in discrimination tasks is examined. An experiment that evaluates recognition memory for ensembles of word stimuli reveals that criterion noise is not trivial in magnitude and contributes substantially to variance in the slope of the isosensitivity function. We discuss how ND-TSD can help explain a number of current and historical puzzles in recognition memory, including the inconsistent relationship between manipulations of learning and the slope of the isosensitivity function, the lack of invariance of the slope with manipulations of bias or payoffs, the effects of aging on the decision-making process in recognition, and the nature of responding in Remember/Know decision tasks. ND-TSD poses novel and theoretically meaningful constraints on theories of recognition and decision-making more generally, and provides a mechanism for rapprochement between theories of decision-making that employ deterministic response rules and those that postulate probabilistic response rules. PMID:19159149

  1. Imaging signal-to-noise ratio of synthetic aperture ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of the Poisson photocurrent statistics in the photon-limited heterodyne detection, in this paper, the signal-to-noise ratios in the receiver in the time domain and on the focused 1-D image and 2-D image in the space domain are derived for both the down-looking and side-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladars using PIN or APD photodiodes. The major shot noises in the down-looking SAIL and the side-looking SAIL are, respectively, from the dark current of photodiode and the local beam current. It is found that the ratio of 1-D image SNR to receiver SNR is proportional to the number of resolution elements in the cross direction of travel and the ratio of 2-D image SNR to 1-D image SNR is proportional to the number of resolution elements in the travel direction. And the sensitivity, the effect of Fourier transform of sampled signal, and the influence of time response of detection circuit are discussed, too. The study will help to correctly design a SAIL system.

  2. Signal-Induced Noise Effects in a Photon Counting System for Stratospheric Ozone Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    A significant source of error in making atmospheric differential absorption lidar ozone measurements is the saturation of the photomultiplier tube by the strong, near field light return. Some time after the near field light signal is gone, the photomultiplier tube gate is opened and a noise signal, called signal-induced noise, is observed. Research reported here gives experimental results from measurement of photomultiplier signal-induced noise. Results show that signal-induced noise has several decaying exponential signals, suggesting that electrons are slowly emitted from different surfaces internal to the photomultiplier tube.

  3. Optimal signal constellation design for ultra-high-speed optical transport in the presence of nonlinear phase noise.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2014-12-29

    In this paper, we first describe an optimal signal constellation design algorithm suitable for the coherent optical channels dominated by the linear phase noise. Then, we modify this algorithm to be suitable for the nonlinear phase noise dominated channels. In optimization procedure, the proposed algorithm uses the cumulative log-likelihood function instead of the Euclidian distance. Further, an LDPC coded modulation scheme is proposed to be used in combination with signal constellations obtained by proposed algorithm. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the LDPC-coded modulation schemes employing the new constellation sets, obtained by our new signal constellation design algorithm, outperform corresponding QAM constellations significantly in terms of transmission distance and have better nonlinearity tolerance. PMID:25607183

  4. Noise-to-signal transition of a Brownian particle in the cubic potential: I. general theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Radim; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The noise-to-signal transitions are very interesting processes in physics, as they might transform environmental noise to useful mechanical effects. We theoretically analyze stochastic noise-to-signal transition of overdamped Brownian motion of a particle in the cubic potential. The particle reaches thermal equilibrium with its environment in the quadratic potential which is suddenly swapped to the cubic potential. We predict a simultaneous increase of both the displacement and signal-to-noise ratio in the cubic potential for the position linearly powered by the temperature of the particle environment. The short-time analysis and numerical simulations fully confirm different dynamical regimes of this noise-to-signal transition.

  5. The Lombard effect in male ultrasonic frogs: Regulating antiphonal signal frequency and amplitude in noise.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic communication in noisy environments presents a significant challenge for vocal animals because noise can interfere with animal acoustic signals by decreasing signal-to-noise ratios and masking signals. Birds and mammals increase call intensity or frequency as noise levels increase, but it is unclear to what extend this behavior is shared by frogs. Concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have evolved the capacity to produce various calls containing ultrasonic harmonics and to communicate beside noisy streams. However, it is largely unclear how frogs regulate vocalization in response to increasing noise levels. We exposed male frogs to various levels of noise with playback of conspecific female courtship calls and recorded antiphonal signals and spontaneous short calls. Males were capable of rapidly adjusting fundamental frequency and amplitude of antiphonal signals as noise levels increased. The increment in fundamental frequency and amplitude was approximately 0.5 kHz and 3 dB with every 10 dB increase in noise level, indicating the presence of noise-dependent signal characteristics. Males showed the noise-tolerant adaption in response to female calls in noise level from 40 to 90 dB SPL. The results suggest that the noise-dependent signal characteristics in O. tormota have evolved as a strategy to cope with varying torrent noise. PMID:27345957

  6. The Lombard effect in male ultrasonic frogs: Regulating antiphonal signal frequency and amplitude in noise

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic communication in noisy environments presents a significant challenge for vocal animals because noise can interfere with animal acoustic signals by decreasing signal-to-noise ratios and masking signals. Birds and mammals increase call intensity or frequency as noise levels increase, but it is unclear to what extend this behavior is shared by frogs. Concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have evolved the capacity to produce various calls containing ultrasonic harmonics and to communicate beside noisy streams. However, it is largely unclear how frogs regulate vocalization in response to increasing noise levels. We exposed male frogs to various levels of noise with playback of conspecific female courtship calls and recorded antiphonal signals and spontaneous short calls. Males were capable of rapidly adjusting fundamental frequency and amplitude of antiphonal signals as noise levels increased. The increment in fundamental frequency and amplitude was approximately 0.5 kHz and 3 dB with every 10 dB increase in noise level, indicating the presence of noise-dependent signal characteristics. Males showed the noise-tolerant adaption in response to female calls in noise level from 40 to 90 dB SPL. The results suggest that the noise-dependent signal characteristics in O. tormota have evolved as a strategy to cope with varying torrent noise. PMID:27345957

  7. Improving signal-to-noise performance for DNA translocation in solid-state nanopores at MHz bandwidths.

    PubMed

    Balan, Adrian; Machielse, Bartholomeus; Niedzwiecki, David; Lin, Jianxun; Ong, Peijie; Engelke, Rebecca; Shepard, Kenneth L; Drndić, Marija

    2014-12-10

    DNA sequencing using solid-state nanopores is, in part, impeded by the relatively high noise and low bandwidth of the current state-of-the-art translocation measurements. In this Letter, we measure the ion current noise through sub 10 nm thick Si3N4 nanopores at bandwidths up to 1 MHz. At these bandwidths, the input-referred current noise is dominated by the amplifier's voltage noise acting across the total capacitance at the amplifier input. By reducing the nanopore chip capacitance to the 1-5 pF range by adding thick insulating layers to the chip surface, we are able to transition to a regime in which input-referred current noise (∼ 117-150 pArms at 1 MHz in 1 M KCl solution) is dominated by the effects of the input capacitance of the amplifier itself. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) reported here range from 15 to 20 at 1 MHz for dsDNA translocations through nanopores with diameters from 4 to 8 nm with applied voltages from 200 to 800 mV. Further advances in bandwidth and SNR will require new amplifier designs that reduce both input capacitance and input-referred amplifier noise. PMID:25418589

  8. Signal preserving and seismic random noise attenuation by Hurst exponent based time-frequency peak filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Yue; Lin, Hongbo; Yang, Baojun

    2015-11-01

    Attenuating random noise is of great significance in seismic data processing. In recent years, time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) has been successfully applied to seismic random noise attenuation field. However, a fixed window length (WL) is used in the conventional TFPF. Since a short WL in the TFPF is used to preserve signals while a long WL can eliminate random noise effectively, signal preserving and noise attenuation cannot be balanced by a fixed WL especially when the signal-to-noise ratio of the noisy seismic record is low. Thus, we need to divide a noisy signal into signal and noise segments before the filtering. Then a short WL is used to the signal segments to preserve signals and a long WL is chosen for noise segments to eliminate random noise. In this paper, we test the smoothness of signals and random noise in time using the Hurst exponent which is a statistic for representing smoothness characteristics of signals. The time-series of signals with higher smoothness which lead to larger Hurst exponent values, however random noise is a random series in time without fixed waveforms and thus its smoothness is low, so the signal and noise segments can be divided by the Hurst exponent values. After the segmentation, we can adopt different filtering WLs in the TFPF for different segments to make a trade-off between signal preserving and random noise attenuation. Synthetic and real data experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can remove random noise from seismic record and preserve reflection events effectively.

  9. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  10. Measuring the signal-to-noise ratio of a neuron

    PubMed Central

    Czanner, Gabriela; Sarma, Sridevi V.; Ba, Demba; Eden, Uri T.; Wu, Wei; Eskandar, Emad; Lim, Hubert H.; Temereanca, Simona; Suzuki, Wendy A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a commonly used measure of fidelity in physical systems, is defined as the ratio of the squared amplitude or variance of a signal relative to the variance of the noise. This definition is not appropriate for neural systems in which spiking activity is more accurately represented as point processes. We show that the SNR estimates a ratio of expected prediction errors and extend the standard definition to one appropriate for single neurons by representing neural spiking activity using point process generalized linear models (PP-GLM). We estimate the prediction errors using the residual deviances from the PP-GLM fits. Because the deviance is an approximate χ2 random variable, we compute a bias-corrected SNR estimate appropriate for single-neuron analysis and use the bootstrap to assess its uncertainty. In the analyses of four systems neuroscience experiments, we show that the SNRs are −10 dB to −3 dB for guinea pig auditory cortex neurons, −18 dB to −7 dB for rat thalamic neurons, −28 dB to −14 dB for monkey hippocampal neurons, and −29 dB to −20 dB for human subthalamic neurons. The new SNR definition makes explicit in the measure commonly used for physical systems the often-quoted observation that single neurons have low SNRs. The neuron’s spiking history is frequently a more informative covariate for predicting spiking propensity than the applied stimulus. Our new SNR definition extends to any GLM system in which the factors modulating the response can be expressed as separate components of a likelihood function. PMID:25995363

  11. Periodic variations in the signal-to-noise ratios of signals received from the ICE spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeau, T.

    1986-01-01

    Data from the ICE probe to comet Giacobini-Zinner are analyzed to determine the effects of spacecraft rotation upon the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the two channels of data. In addition, long-term variations from sources other than rotations are considered. Results include a pronounced SNR variation over a period of three seconds (one rotation) and a lesser effect over a two minute period (possibly due to the receiving antenna conscan).

  12. Demonstration of improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Thomson scattering signal obtained by using a multi-pass optical cavity on the Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2.

    PubMed

    Togashi, H; Ejiri, A; Hiratsuka, J; Nakamura, K; Takase, Y; Yamaguchi, T; Furui, H; Imamura, K; Inada, T; Kakuda, H; Nakanishi, A; Oosako, T; Shinya, T; Sonehara, M; Tsuda, S; Tsujii, N; Wakatsuki, T; Hasegawa, M; Nagashima, Y; Narihara, K; Yamada, I; Tojo, H

    2014-11-01

    The multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) scheme enables obtaining many photons by accumulating multiple TS signals. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the accumulation number. In this study, we performed multi-pass TS measurements for ohmically heated plasmas, and the relationship between SNR and the accumulation number was investigated. As a result, improvement of SNR in this experiment indicated similar tendency to that calculated for the background noise dominant situation. PMID:25430259

  13. Demonstration of improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Thomson scattering signal obtained by using a multi-pass optical cavity on the Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2

    SciTech Connect

    Togashi, H. Ejiri, A.; Nakamura, K.; Takase, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Furui, H.; Imamura, K.; Inada, T.; Nakanishi, A.; Oosako, T.; Shinya, T.; Tsuda, S.; Tsujii, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kakuda, H.; Sonehara, M.; Wakatsuki, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Narihara, K.; and others

    2014-11-15

    The multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) scheme enables obtaining many photons by accumulating multiple TS signals. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the accumulation number. In this study, we performed multi-pass TS measurements for ohmically heated plasmas, and the relationship between SNR and the accumulation number was investigated. As a result, improvement of SNR in this experiment indicated similar tendency to that calculated for the background noise dominant situation.

  14. A genetically encoded, high-signal-to-noise maltose sensor

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Jonathan S; Schreiter, Eric R; Echevarría, Ileabett M; Looger, Loren L

    2011-01-01

    We describe the generation of a family of high-signal-to-noise single-wavelength genetically encoded indicators for maltose. This was achieved by insertion of circularly permuted fluorescent proteins into a bacterial periplasmic binding protein (PBP), Escherichia coli maltodextrin-binding protein, resulting in a four-color family of maltose indicators. The sensors were iteratively optimized to have sufficient brightness and maltose-dependent fluorescence increases for imaging, under both one- and two-photon illumination. We demonstrate that maltose affinity of the sensors can be tuned in a fashion largely independent of the fluorescent readout mechanism. Using literature mutations, the binding specificity could be altered to moderate sucrose preference, but with a significant loss of affinity. We use the soluble sensors in individual E. coli bacteria to observe rapid maltose transport across the plasma membrane, and membrane fusion versions of the sensors on mammalian cells to visualize the addition of maltose to extracellular media. The PBP superfamily includes scaffolds specific for a number of analytes whose visualization would be critical to the reverse engineering of complex systems such as neural networks, biosynthetic pathways, and signal transduction cascades. We expect the methodology outlined here to be useful in the development of indicators for many such analytes. PMID:21989929

  15. A genetically encoded, high-signal-to-noise maltose sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, Jonathan S.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Echevarría, Ileabett M.; Looger, Loren L.

    2012-10-23

    We describe the generation of a family of high-signal-to-noise single-wavelength genetically encoded indicators for maltose. This was achieved by insertion of circularly permuted fluorescent proteins into a bacterial periplasmic binding protein (PBP), Escherichia coli maltodextrin-binding protein, resulting in a four-color family of maltose indicators. The sensors were iteratively optimized to have sufficient brightness and maltose-dependent fluorescence increases for imaging, under both one- and two-photon illumination. We demonstrate that maltose affinity of the sensors can be tuned in a fashion largely independent of the fluorescent readout mechanism. Using literature mutations, the binding specificity could be altered to moderate sucrose preference, but with a significant loss of affinity. We use the soluble sensors in individual E. coli bacteria to observe rapid maltose transport across the plasma membrane, and membrane fusion versions of the sensors on mammalian cells to visualize the addition of maltose to extracellular media. The PBP superfamily includes scaffolds specific for a number of analytes whose visualization would be critical to the reverse engineering of complex systems such as neural networks, biosynthetic pathways, and signal transduction cascades. We expect the methodology outlined here to be useful in the development of indicators for many such analytes.

  16. Image restoration by Wiener filtering in the presence of signal-dependent noise.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Ichioka, Y; Suzuki, T

    1977-09-01

    An optimum filter to restore the degraded image due to blurring and the signal-dependent noise is obtained on the basis of the theory of Wiener filtering. Computer simulations of image restoration using signal-dependent noise models are carried out. It becomes clear that the optimum filter, which makes use of a priori information on the signal-dependent nature of the noise and the spectral density of the signal and the noise showing significant spatial correlation, is potentially advantageous. PMID:20168967

  17. Signal-to-Noise Characteristics of Solar MG II Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, P. C.; Floyd, L. E.

    1999-05-01

    Knowledge of the variations in solar ultraviolet irradiances is essential to understanding both the Sun and the behavior of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Since the solar ultraviolet radiation is absorbed by the atmosphere, the requisite measurements must be done from space. Reliable, approximately daily measurements of solar ultraviolet irradiances have been made since November 1978 by a variety of instruments (Numbus-7 SBUV, NOAA-9 and NOAA-11 SBUV/2, UARS SUSIM and SOLSTICE, and ERS-2 GOME). To overcome differences in spectral coverage and resolution and the challenges involved in the long-term calibrations of the instruments, a solar index suitable for use as a proxy for the solar ultraviolet (i.e., 100-400 nm) irradiances has been sought. The most popular indices for this purpose are the several Mg II indices based upon the Mg II k and h doublet near 280 nm; starting with the core-to-wing index developed by Heath and Schlesinger (J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8672, 1986) for the Nimbus-7 SBUV, they are calculated by taking the ratio of adjacent parts of the Mg II feature: one originating in the upper chromosphere that exhibits solar ultraviolet variations and the other, in the upper photosphere which is insensitive to solar variations. Because the ratio is of irradiances at nearby wavelengths, the Mg II indices mostly are not affected by temporal and spectral variations in the instrument responses. While there is an ongoing effort to combine the available Mg II indices into a single 20-year time series (i.e., Viereck and Puga, J. Geophys. Res., in press), we are investigating an alternate approach. We report here on the first step in that study: the characterization of the signal and noise properties of the several Mg II indices available. We use Fourier analysis to determine the amplitudes of a common signal (the 27-day variations) and of the high-frequency, day-to-day errors. Ultimately, the corresponding signal-to-noise ratios may be used to derive statistical

  18. Red dominates black: agonistic signalling among head morphs in the colour polymorphic Gouldian finch

    PubMed Central

    Pryke, Sarah R; Griffith, Simon C

    2005-01-01

    Recent sexual selection studies on the evolution of bird colouration have mainly focused on signals with a high level of condition-dependent variation, with much less attention given to colour traits whose expression is genetically controlled. Here, we experimentally tested the relative importance of a genetic colour polymorphism in determining male dominance in the Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae), a species displaying three completely discrete but naturally co-occurring genetically inherited phenotypes; yellow-, red- (carotenoid) and black-headed (melanin) morphs. First, in staged dominance contests between unfamiliar birds of different head morphs, red-headed males dominated black-headed males, both of which dominated the yellow-headed birds. Second, within morphs, the intensity and size of the strongly ultraviolet-blue collar determined the outcome of these contests, and among the red-headed males, redder males dominated less chromatic birds. Lastly, when the dominance signal of red-headed birds was experimentally destabilized (i.e. blackened or reddened), naturally red-headed morphs continued to dominate both the black-and yellow-headed morphs. Together, these results suggest that intrinsic dominance-related behavioural differences between the three colour morphs, which are likely to influence the relative fitness of each morph, contribute to the complex selective patterns maintaining these three discrete phenotypes in relatively stable frequencies in wild populations. PMID:16627280

  19. Ultrasonic correlator versus signal averager as a signal to noise enhancement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Pietsch, Benjamin E.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of thick and attenuating materials is hampered by the reduce amplitudes of the propagated waves to a degree that the noise is too high to enable meaningful interpretation of the data. In order to overcome the low signal to noise ratio (S/N), a correlation technique has been developed. In this method, a continuous pseudo-random pattern generated digitally is transmitted and detected by piezoelectric transducers. A correlation is performed in the instrument between the received signal and a variable delayed image of the transmitted one. The result is shown to be proportional to the impulse response of the investigated material, analogous to a signal received from a pulsed system, with an improved S/N ratio. The degree of S/N enhancement depends on the sweep rate. The correlator is described, and it is compared to the method of enhancing S/N ratio by averaging the signals. The similarities and differences between the two are highlighted and the potential advantage of the correlator system is explained.

  20. CMOS image sensor noise reduction method for image signal processor in digital cameras and camera phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Youngjin; Lee, SeongDeok; Choe, Wonhee; Kim, Chang-Yong

    2007-02-01

    Digital images captured from CMOS image sensors suffer Gaussian noise and impulsive noise. To efficiently reduce the noise in Image Signal Processor (ISP), we analyze noise feature for imaging pipeline of ISP where noise reduction algorithm is performed. The Gaussian noise reduction and impulsive noise reduction method are proposed for proper ISP implementation in Bayer domain. The proposed method takes advantage of the analyzed noise feature to calculate noise reduction filter coefficients. Thus, noise is adaptively reduced according to the scene environment. Since noise is amplified and characteristic of noise varies while the image sensor signal undergoes several image processing steps, it is better to remove noise in earlier stage on imaging pipeline of ISP. Thus, noise reduction is carried out in Bayer domain on imaging pipeline of ISP. The method is tested on imaging pipeline of ISP and images captured from Samsung 2M CMOS image sensor test module. The experimental results show that the proposed method removes noise while effectively preserves edges.

  1. Advanced study of video signal processing in low signal to noise environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, F.

    1973-01-01

    Conventional analytical techniques used to determine and optimize phase-lock loop (PLL) characteristics are most often based on a model which is valid only if the intermediate frequency (IF) filter bandwidth is large compared to the PLL bandwidth and the phase error is small. An improved model (called the quasi-linear model) is developed which takes into account small IF filter bandwidths and nonlinear effects associated with large phase errors. By comparison of theoretical and experimental results it is demonstrated that the quasi-linear model accurately predicts PLL characteristics. This is true even for small IF filter bandwidths and large phase errors where the conventional model is invalid. The theoretical and experimental results are used to draw conclusions concerning threshold, multiplier output variance, phase error variance, output signal-to-noise ratio, and signal distortion. The relationship between these characteristics and IF filter bandwidth, modulating signal spectrum, and rms deviation is also determined.

  2. Estimation of signal and noise for a whole-body photon counting research CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Zhicong; Kappler, Steffen; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-03-01

    Photon-counting CT (PCCT) may yield potential value for many clinical applications due to its relative immunity to electronic noise, increased geometric efficiency relative to current scintillating detectors, and the ability to resolve energy information about the detected photons. However, there are a large number of parameters that require optimization, particularly the energy thresholds configuration. Fast and accurate estimation of signal and noise in PCCT can benefit the optimization of acquisition parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. Based on the acquisition parameters and detector response of our research PCCT system, we derived mathematical models for both signal and noise. The signal model took the tube spectrum, beam filtration, object attenuation, water beam hardening, and detector response into account. The noise model considered the relationship between noise and radiation dose, as well as the propagation of noise as threshold data are subtracted to yield energy bin data. To determine the absolute noise value, a noise look-up table (LUT) was acquired using a limited number of calibration scans. The noise estimation algorithm then used the noise LUT to estimate noise for scans with a variety of combination of energy thresholds, dose levels, and object attenuation. Validation of the estimation algorithms was performed on our whole-body research PCCT system using semianthropomorphic water phantoms and solutions of calcium and iodine. The algorithms achieved accurate estimation of signal and noise for a variety of scanning parameter combinations. The proposed method can be used to optimize energy thresholds configuration for many clinical applications of PCCT.

  3. Noise-benefit forbidden-interval theorems for threshold signal detectors based on cross correlations.

    PubMed

    Mitaim, Sanya; Kosko, Bart

    2014-11-01

    We show that the main forbidden interval theorems of stochastic resonance hold for a correlation performance measure. Earlier theorems held only for performance measures based on mutual information or the probability of error detection. Forbidden interval theorems ensure that a threshold signal detector benefits from deliberately added noise if the average noise does not lie in an interval that depends on the threshold value. We first show that this result holds for correlation for all finite-variance noise and for all forms of infinite-variance stable noise. A second forbidden-interval theorem gives necessary and sufficient conditions for a local noise benefit in a bipolar signal system when the noise comes from a location-scale family. A third theorem gives a general condition for a local noise benefit for arbitrary signals with finite second moments and for location-scale noise. This result also extends forbidden intervals to forbidden bands of parameters. A fourth theorem gives necessary and sufficient conditions for a local noise benefit when both the independent signal and noise are normal. A final theorem derives necessary and sufficient conditions for forbidden bands when using arrays of threshold detectors for arbitrary signals and location-scale noise. PMID:25493756

  4. Microstrip electrode readout noise for load-dominated long shaping-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Kelsey; Cunnington, Taylor; Crosby, Sean; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Martinez-McKinney, Forest; Mistry, Khilesh; Schumm, Bruce A.; Spencer, Edwin; Taylor, Aaron; Wilder, Max

    2013-11-01

    In cases such as that of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), for which the beam-delivery and detector-occupancy characteristics permit a long shaping-time readout of the microstrip sensors, it is possible to envision long (∼1 meter) daisy-chained ‘ladders’ of fine-pitch sensors read out by a single front-end amplifier. In this study, a long shaping-time (∼2 μsec) front-end amplifier has been used to measure readout noise as a function of detector load. Comparing measured noise to that expected from lumped and distributed models of the load network, it is seen that network effects significantly mitigate the amount of readout noise contributed by the detector load. Further reduction in noise is demonstrated for the case that the sensor load is read out from its center rather than its end.

  5. Microwave oscillator with reduced phase noise by negative feedback incorporating microwave signals with suppressed carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Saunders, J.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillator configurations which reduce the effect of 1/f noise sources for both direct feedback and stabilized local oscillator (STALO) circuits are developed and analyzed. By appropriate use of carrier suppression, a small signal is generated which suffers no loss of loop phase information or signal-to-noise ratio. This small signal can be amplified without degradation by multiplicative amplifier noise, and can be detected without saturation of the detector. Together with recent advances in microwave resonator Qs, these circuit improvements will make possible lower phase noise than can be presently achieved without the use of cryogenic devices.

  6. Study of signal-to-noise ratio in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    Mammography techniques have recently advanced from those using analog systems (the screen-film system) to those using digital systems; for example, computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs) are nowadays used in mammography. Further, phase contrast mammography (PCM)-a digital technique by which images with a magnification of 1.75× can be obtained-is now available in the market. We studied the effect of the air gap in PCM and evaluated the effectiveness of an antiscatter x-ray grid in conventional mammography (CM) by measuring the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and relative signal-to-noise ratio (rSNR) and comparing them between PCM and the digital CM. The results indicated that the SFRs for the CM images obtained with a grid were the lowest and that these ratios were almost the same as those for the PCM images. In contrast, the rSNRs for the PCM images were the highest, which means that the scattering of x-rays was sufficiently reduced by the air gap without the loss of primary x-rays.

  7. Micro-Doppler lidar signals and noise mechanisms: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatt, Philip; Henderson, Sammy W.; Thomson, J. Alex L.; Bruns, Dale L.

    2000-09-01

    Lidar remote sensing of micro-Doppler signals is important for a large number of civilian and military applications. The single most important performance metric of these sensors is their velocity measurement precision. The velocity precision of a micro-Doppler lidar is limited by any one of various noise sources, which include shot-noise, local-oscillator frequency noise, speckle decorrelation noise, refractive turbulence advection noise and pointing jitter. In this paper, we present a theory, which describes these noise sources and their wavelength dependence. For example, it will be shown that the turbulence advection noise is wavelength independent while speckle decorrelation noise is proportional to the illumination wavelength and that the noise sources are, to a first-order, independent of the interrogation waveform classification (i.e., pulsed or CW). The results from recent field measurements using a doublet-pulse lidar will be compared with theory.

  8. Eye dominance predicts fMRI signals in human retinotopic cortex.

    PubMed

    Mendola, Janine D; Conner, Ian P

    2007-02-27

    There have been many attempts to define eye dominance in normal subjects, but limited consensus exists, and relevant physiological data is scarce. In this study, we consider two different behavioral methods for assignment of eye dominance, and how well they predict fMRI signals evoked by monocular stimulation. Sighting eye dominance was assessed with two standard tests, the Porta Test, and a 'hole in hand' variation of the Miles Test. Acuity dominance was tested with a standard eye chart and with a computerized test of grating acuity. We found limited agreement between the sighting and acuity methods for assigning dominance in our individual subjects. We then compared the fMRI response generated by dominant eye stimulation to that generated by non-dominant eye, according to both methods, in 7 normal subjects. The stimulus consisted of a high contrast hemifield stimulus alternating with no stimulus in a blocked paradigm. In separate scans, we used standard techniques to label the borders of visual areas V1, V2, V3, VP, V4v, V3A, and MT. These regions of interest (ROIs) were used to analyze each visual area separately. We found that percent change in fMRI BOLD signal was stronger for the dominant eye as defined by the acuity method, and this effect was significant for areas located in the ventral occipital territory (V1v, V2v, VP, V4v). In contrast, assigning dominance based on sighting produced no significant interocular BOLD differences. We conclude that interocular BOLD differences in normal subjects exist, and may be predicted by acuity measures. PMID:17194544

  9. Linking the sender to the receiver: vocal adjustments by bats to maintain signal detection in noise

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jinhong; Goerlitz, Holger R.; Brumm, Henrik; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Short-term adjustments of signal characteristics allow animals to maintain reliable communication in noise. Noise-dependent vocal plasticity often involves simultaneous changes in multiple parameters. Here, we quantified for the first time the relative contributions of signal amplitude, duration, and redundancy for improving signal detectability in noise. To this end, we used a combination of behavioural experiments on pale spear-nosed bats (Phyllostomus discolor) and signal detection models. In response to increasing noise levels, all bats raised the amplitude of their echolocation calls by 1.8–7.9 dB (the Lombard effect). Bats also increased signal duration by 13%–85%, corresponding to an increase in detectability of 1.0–5.3 dB. Finally, in some noise conditions, bats increased signal redundancy by producing more call groups. Assuming optimal cognitive integration, this could result in a further detectability improvement by up to 4 dB. Our data show that while the main improvement in signal detectability was due to the Lombard effect, increasing signal duration and redundancy can also contribute markedly to improving signal detectability. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the observed adjustments of signal parameters in noise are matched to how these parameters are processed in the receiver’s sensory system, thereby facilitating signal transmission in fluctuating environments. PMID:26692325

  10. Emotional content of an image attracts attention more than visually salient features in various signal-to-noise ratio conditions.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Joanna; Kuniecki, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Emotional images are processed in a prioritized manner, attracting attention almost immediately. In the present study we used eye tracking to reveal what type of features within neutral, positive, and negative images attract early visual attention: semantics, visual saliency, or their interaction. Semantic regions of interest were selected by observers, while visual saliency was determined using the Graph-Based Visual Saliency model. Images were transformed by adding pink noise in several proportions to be presented in a sequence of increasing and decreasing clarity. Locations of the first two fixations were analyzed. The results showed dominance of semantic features over visual saliency in attracting attention. This dominance was linearly related to the signal-to-noise ratio. Semantic regions were fixated more often in emotional images than in neutral ones, if signal-to-noise ratio was high enough to allow participants to comprehend the gist of a scene. Visual saliency on its own did not attract attention above chance, even in the case of pure noise images. Regions both visually salient and semantically relevant attracted a similar amount of fixation compared to semantic regions alone, or even more in the case of neutral pictures. Results provide evidence for fast and robust detection of semantically relevant features. PMID:25294641

  11. Noise affects the shape of female preference functions for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The shape of female mate preference functions influences the speed and direction of sexual signal evolution. However, the expression of female preferences is modulated by interactions between environmental conditions and the female's sensory processing system. Noise is an especially relevant environmental condition because it interferes directly with the neural processing of signals. Although noise is therefore likely a significant force in the evolution of communication systems, little is known about its effects on preference function shape. In the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus, female preferences for male calling song characteristics are likely to be affected by noise because its auditory system is sensitive to fine temporal details of songs. We measured female preference functions for variation in male song characteristics in several levels of masking noise and found strong effects of noise on preference function shape. The overall responsiveness to signals in noise generally decreased. Preference strength increased for some signal characteristics and decreased for others, largely corresponding to expectations based on neurophysiological studies of acoustic signal processing. These results suggest that different signal characteristics will be favored under different noise conditions, and thus that signal evolution may proceed differently depending on the extent and temporal patterning of environmental noise. PMID:25546134

  12. Estimation of signal-to-noise - A new procedure applied to AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.

    1989-01-01

    To make the best use of narrowband airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, an investigator needs to know the ratio of signal to random variability or noise (signal-to-noise ratio or SNR). The signal is land cover dependent and varies with both wavelength and atmospheric absorption; random noise comprises sensor noise and intrapixel variability (i.e., variability within a pixel). The three existing methods for estimating the SNR are inadequate, since typical laboratory methods inflate while dark current and image methods deflate the SNR. A new procedure is proposed called the geostatistical method. It is based on the removal of periodic noise by notch filtering in the frequency domain and the isolation of sensor noise and intrapixel variability using the semi-variogram. This procedure was applied easily and successfully to five sets of AVIRIS data from the 1987 flying season and could be applied to remotely sensed data from broadband sensors.

  13. Batch-Form Solutions to Optimal Input Signal Recovery in the Presence of Noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ping; Phan, Minh Q.; Ketcham, Stephen A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper studies the problem of optimally recovering the input signals to a linear time-invariant system in the presence of input and measurement noises. The emphasis is on batch-form solutions which are suitable for short-duration large-domain signal propagation applications. The system, the input and measurement noise covariances, the noise-corrupted output signals are assumed known, and we seek to recover the input signals that enter the system prior to being corrupted by input noise. The input signal recovery is optimal in the sense that the optimal Kalman filter residual is correctly recovered from the given information. Various solution techniques are considered and a weighted least-squares solution is found to be the simplest and most practical in short-duration signal recovery applications.

  14. Design of thermal-noise-harnessing single-electron circuit for efficient signal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Ryo; Oya, Takahide

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new single-electron (SE) circuit that can improve the signal propagation speed by harnessing thermal noise efficiently. Generally, an SE circuit has some weaknesses. It is very sensitive to thermal noise and it takes a long time for signal propagation. To solve these problems, we focus on a unique function at an output terminal (an axon) of a neuron that can improve the signal propagation speed because of its distinctive structure. It is expected that a new high-speed SE circuit can be realized by mimicking the structure of the neuron. Here, we indicate the possibility of improving the signal propagation speed by harnessing the thermal noise in one-dimensional neuromorphic single-electron oscillators. Moreover, we designed a two-dimensional neuromorphic single-electron oscillator as an advanced circuit and confirmed its tolerance to thermal noise. Our study will be useful for constructing novel devices that actively use noise energy in the future.

  15. Signal processing for the detection of multiple imperfection echoes drowned in the structural noise.

    PubMed

    Drai, R; Benammar, A; Benchaala, A

    2004-04-01

    In this work, we propose to develop algorithms based on the split spectrum processing method associated with the multi-steps method based on "Group delay moving entropy" (GDME) allowing detecting and locating multiple imperfection echoes drowned in the structural noise of materials. In fact, GDME is based on the fact that defect echoes have a constant group delay while the noise has a random group delay. The investigation is performed with 4 known defect echoes with different characteristics (position, center frequency and bandwidth). The defect echo frequency is varied around the frequency of the input signal in order to evaluate, by signal to noise ratio calculation, the robustness of the detection method. The grain noise signal is generated first, by a simple clutter model which consider the noise, in the time domain, as the superimposed of signal coming from backscaterers in the medium and second, experimentally by a material with coarse grains. PMID:15047392

  16. Powerline noise elimination in biomedical signals via blind source separation and wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Akwei-Sekyere, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The distortion of biomedical signals by powerline noise from recording biomedical devices has the potential to reduce the quality and convolute the interpretations of the data. Usually, powerline noise in biomedical recordings are extinguished via band-stop filters. However, due to the instability of biomedical signals, the distribution of signals filtered out may not be centered at 50/60 Hz. As a result, self-correction methods are needed to optimize the performance of these filters. Since powerline noise is additive in nature, it is intuitive to model powerline noise in a raw recording and subtract it from the raw data in order to obtain a relatively clean signal. This paper proposes a method that utilizes this approach by decomposing the recorded signal and extracting powerline noise via blind source separation and wavelet analysis. The performance of this algorithm was compared with that of a 4th order band-stop Butterworth filter, empirical mode decomposition, independent component analysis and, a combination of empirical mode decomposition with independent component analysis. The proposed method was able to expel sinusoidal signals within powerline noise frequency range with higher fidelity in comparison with the mentioned techniques, especially at low signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:26157639

  17. Powerline noise elimination in biomedical signals via blind source separation and wavelet analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The distortion of biomedical signals by powerline noise from recording biomedical devices has the potential to reduce the quality and convolute the interpretations of the data. Usually, powerline noise in biomedical recordings are extinguished via band-stop filters. However, due to the instability of biomedical signals, the distribution of signals filtered out may not be centered at 50/60 Hz. As a result, self-correction methods are needed to optimize the performance of these filters. Since powerline noise is additive in nature, it is intuitive to model powerline noise in a raw recording and subtract it from the raw data in order to obtain a relatively clean signal. This paper proposes a method that utilizes this approach by decomposing the recorded signal and extracting powerline noise via blind source separation and wavelet analysis. The performance of this algorithm was compared with that of a 4th order band-stop Butterworth filter, empirical mode decomposition, independent component analysis and, a combination of empirical mode decomposition with independent component analysis. The proposed method was able to expel sinusoidal signals within powerline noise frequency range with higher fidelity in comparison with the mentioned techniques, especially at low signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:26157639

  18. Diversity detection in non-Gaussian noise employing the generalized approach to signal processing in noise with fading diversity channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzlukov, Vyacheslav

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of M-ary signal detection based on the generalized approach to signal processing (GASP) in noise over a single-input multiple-output (SIMO) channel affected by frequency-dispersive Rayleigh distributed fading and corrupted by additive non-Gaussian noise modeled as spherically invariant random process. We derive both the optimum generalized detector (GD) structure based on GASP and a suboptimal reduced-complexity GD applying the low energy coherence approach jointly with the GASP in noise. Both GD structures are independent of the actual noise statistics. We also carry out a performance analysis of both GDs and compare with the conventional receivers. The performance analysis is carried out with reference to the case that the channel is affected by a frequency-selective fading and for a binary frequency-shift keying (BFSK) signaling format. The results obtained through both a Chernoff-bounding technique and Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the adoption of diversity also represents a suitable means to restore performance in the presence of dispersive fading and impulsive non-Gaussian noise. It is also shown that the suboptimal GD incurs a limited loss with respect to the optimum GD and this loss is less in comparison with the conventional receiver.

  19. Unipolar pulse and bipolar noise testing of wideband signal noise conditioner (MC476-0132-0034)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Information is presented on performance characteristics of the shuttle orbiter wideband signal conditioner when subjected to special types of input signals. Design analysis of the signal flow path through the signal conditioning amplifier was performed followed by acutal testing of the amplifier with various signal inputs. Results indicate that the signal conditioner should perform acceptably if the shuttle orbiter flight vibration signal levels are in accord with preflight predictions.

  20. Low noise signal-to-noise ratio enhancing readout circuit for current-mediated active pixel sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ottaviani, Tony; Karim, Karim S.; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic digital fluoroscopic applications continuously expose patients to low doses of x-ray radiation, posing a challenge to both the digital imaging pixel and readout electronics when amplifying small signal x-ray inputs. Traditional switch-based amorphous silicon imaging solutions, for instance, have produced poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) at low exposure levels owing to noise sources from the pixel readout circuitry. Current-mediated amorphous silicon pixels are an improvement over conventional pixel amplifiers with an enhanced SNR across the same low-exposure range, but whose output also becomes nonlinear with increasing dosage. A low-noise SNR enhancing readout circuit has been developed that enhances the charge gain of the current-mediated active pixel sensor (C-APS). The solution takes advantage of the current-mediated approach, primarily integrating the signal input at the desired frequency necessary for large-area imaging, while adding minimal noise to the signal readout. Experimental data indicates that the readout circuit can detect pixel outputs over a large bandwidth suitable for real-time digital diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopy. Results from hardware testing indicate that the minimum achievable C-APS output current that can be discerned at the digital fluoroscopic output from the enhanced SNR readout circuit is 0.341 nA. The results serve to highlight the applicability of amorphous silicon current-mediated pixel amplifiers for large-area flat panel x-ray imagers.

  1. Simultaneous seismic random noise attenuation and signal preservation by optimal spatiotemporal TFPF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hongbo; Li, Yue; Ma, Haitao; Xu, Liping

    2016-05-01

    The time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) algorithm has been successfully applied to seismic random noise attenuation. However, the time-frequency peak filtering with fixed-type spatiotemporal filtering trajectories fails to preserve reflected signals in seismic events which have complex geometric structure. An optimal spatiotemporal TFPF (OST-TFPF) is proposed here combining the Shapiro-Francia (S-F) statistic to reduce random noise and preserve seismic signals simultaneously. In the novel algorithm, the S-F statistic is first calculated for seismic data to detect seismic events based on the fact that the non-Gaussian seismic signals lead to smaller values of the S-F statistic comparing to seismic random noise which is general Gaussian. Then, optimal spatiotemporal filtering trajectory can be constructed based on the S-F statistic to coincide with the shape of each event. Finally, the optimal spatiotemporal TFPF de-noises seismic data along the optimal trajectories. Since the resampled signals along the trajectories matching the geometric structures of seismic events become more linear compared to signals in time, the OST-TFPF gives better signal estimation while attenuating random noise. Synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that the optimal spatiotemporal TFPF is effective in the denoising and signal-preserving of the seismic data with low signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the OST-TFPF also obtains good performance in preservation of seismic event with complex geometric structure.

  2. Information retrieval and cross-correlation function analysis of random noise radar signal through dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejos, Ana Vazques; Dawood, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    In this contribution we examine the propagation of an ultrawideband (UWB) random noise signal through dispersive media such as soil, vegetation, and water, using Fourier-based analysis. For such media, the propagated signal undergoes medium-specific impairments which degrade the received signal in a different way than the non-dispersive propagation media. Theoretically, larger penetration depths into a dispersive medium can be achieved by identifying and detecting the precursors, thereby offering significantly better signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced imaging. For a random noise signal, well defined precursors in term of peak-amplitude don't occur. The phenomenon must therefore be studied in terms of energy evolution. Additionally, the distortion undergone by the UWB random noise signal through a dispersive medium can introduce frequency-dependent uncertainty or noise in the received signal. This leads to larger degradation of the cross-correlation function (CCF), mainly in terms of sidelobe levels and main peak deformation, and consequently making the information retrieval difficult. We would further analyze one method to restore the shape and carrier frequency of the input UWB random noise signal, thereby, improving the CCF estimation.

  3. Listen, follow me: Dynamic vocal signals of dominance predict emergent social rank in humans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joey T; Tracy, Jessica L; Ho, Simon; Henrich, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Similar to the nonverbal signals shown by many nonhuman animals during aggressive conflicts, humans display a broad range of behavioral signals to advertise and augment their apparent size, strength, and fighting prowess when competing for social dominance. Favored by natural selection, these signals communicate the displayer's capacity and willingness to inflict harm, and increase responders' likelihood of detecting and establishing a rank asymmetry, and thus avoiding costly physical conflicts. Included among this suite of adaptations are vocal changes, which occur in a wide range of nonhuman animals (e.g., chimpanzees, rhesus monkeys) prior to aggression, but have not been systematically examined in humans. The present research tests whether and how humans use vocal pitch modulations to communicate information about their intention to dominate or submit. Results from Study 1 demonstrate that in the context of face-to-face group interactions, individuals spontaneously alter their vocal pitch in a manner consistent with rank signaling. Raising one's pitch early in the course of an interaction predicted lower emergent rank, whereas deepening one's pitch predicted higher emergent rank. Results from Study 2 provide causal evidence that these vocal shifts influence perceptions of rank and formidability. Together, findings suggest that humans use transient vocal changes to track, signal, and coordinate status relationships. PMID:27019023

  4. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  5. Optical Correlation of Images With Signal-Dependent Noise Using Constrained-Modulation Filter Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1995-01-01

    Images with signal-dependent noise present challenges beyond those of images with additive white or colored signal-independent noise in terms of designing the optimal 4-f correlation filter that maximizes correlation-peak signal-to-noise ratio, or combinations of correlation-peak metrics. Determining the proper design becomes more difficult when the filter is to be implemented on a constrained-modulation spatial light modulator device. The design issues involved for updatable optical filters for images with signal-dependent film-grain noise and speckle noise are examined. It is shown that although design of the optimal linear filter in the Fourier domain is impossible for images with signal-dependent noise, proper nonlinear preprocessing of the images allows the application of previously developed design rules for optimal filters to be implemented on constrained-modulation devices. Thus the nonlinear preprocessing becomes necessary for correlation in optical systems with current spatial light modulator technology. These results are illustrated with computer simulations of images with signal-dependent noise correlated with binary-phase-only filters and ternary-phase-amplitude filters.

  6. NIRSpec detectors: noise properties and the effect of signal dependent inter-pixel crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Giovanna; Sirianni, Marco; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Lindler, Don; Boeker, Torsten; Ferruit, Pierre; De Marchi, Guido; Stuhlinger, Martin; Jensen, Peter; Strada, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    NIRSpec (Near Infrared Spectrograph) is one of the four science instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and its focal plane consists of two HAWAII-2RG sensors operating in the wavelength range 0.6-5.0μm. As part of characterizing NIRSpec, we studied the noise properties of these detectors under dark and illuminated conditions. Under dark conditions, and as already known, 1/f noise in the detector system produces somewhat more noise than can be accounted for by a simple model that includes white read noise and shot noise on integrated charge. More surprisingly, at high flux, we observe significantly lower total noise levels than expected. We show this effect to be due to pixel-to-pixel correlations introduced by signal dependent inter-pixel crosstalk, with an inter-pixel coupling factor, α, that ranges from ~ 0.01 for zero signal to ~ 0.03 close to saturation.

  7. Estimation of signal and noise for a whole-body photon counting research CT system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Zhicong; Kappler, Stephen; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Photon-counting CT (PCCT) may yield potential value for many clinical applications due to its relative immunity to electronic noise, increased geometric efficiency relative to current scintillating detectors, and the ability to resolve energy information about the detected photons. However, there are a large number of parameters that require optimization, particularly the energy thresholds configurations. Fast and accurate estimation of signal and noise in PCCT can benefit the optimization of acquisition parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. Based on the acquisition parameters and detector response of our research PCCT system, we derived mathematical models for both signal and noise. The signal model took the tube spectrum, beam filtration, object attenuation, water beam hardening, and detector response into account. The noise model considered the relationship between noise and radiation dose, as well as the propagation of noise as threshold data are subtracted to yield energy bin data. To determine the absolute noise value, a noise look-up table (LUT) was acquired using a limited number of calibration scans. The noise estimation algorithm then used the noise LUT to estimate noise for scans with a variety of combination of energy thresholds, dose levels, and object attenuation. Validation of the estimation algorithms was performed on our whole-body research PCCT system using semi-anthropomorphic water phantoms and solutions of calcium and iodine. The algorithms achieved accurate estimation of signal and noise for a variety of scanning parameter combinations. The proposed method can be used to optimize energy thresholds configuration for many clinical applications of PCCT. PMID:27346908

  8. Random wavelet transforms, algebraic geometric coding, and their applications in signal compression and de-noising

    SciTech Connect

    Bieleck, T.; Song, L.M.; Yau, S.S.T.; Kwong, M.K.

    1995-07-01

    The concepts of random wavelet transforms and discrete random wavelet transforms are introduced. It is shown that these transforms can lead to simultaneous compression and de-noising of signals that have been corrupted with fractional noises. Potential applications of algebraic geometric coding theory to encode the ensuing data are also discussed.

  9. Effect of second order signal-noise interactions in nonlinearity compensated optical transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Mohammad A Z; McCarthy, Mary; Sánchez, Christian; Ellis, Andrew

    2016-04-15

    In this Letter, we theoretically and numerically analyze the performance of coherent optical transmission systems that deploy inline or transceiver based nonlinearity compensation techniques. For systems where signal-signal nonlinear interactions are fully compensated, we find that beyond the performance peak the signal-to-noise ratio degradation has a slope of 3  dBSNR/dBPower suggesting a quartic rather than quadratic dependence on signal power. This is directly related to the fact that signals in a given span will interact not only with linear amplified spontaneous emission noise, but also with the nonlinear four-wave mixing products generated from signal-noise interaction in previous (hitherto) uncompensated spans. The performance of optical systems employing different nonlinearity compensation schemes were numerically simulated and compared against analytical predictions, showing a good agreement within a 0.4 dB margin of error. PMID:27082361

  10. Roundoff noise analysis for digital signal power processors using Welch's power spectrum estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, Chong-Yung; Long, David; Li, Fuk-Kwok

    1987-01-01

    The noise due to finite-word-length effects is analyzed for digital-signal power processors using Welch's power-spectrum estimation technique to measure the power of Gaussian random signals over a frequency band of interest. The input of the digital signal processor contains a finite-length time interval in which the true Gaussian signal is contaminated by Gaussian noise. The roundoff noise-to-signal ratio in the measurement of the signal power is derived, and computer simulations which validate the analytical results are presented. These results can be used in tradeoff studies of hardware design, such as the number of bits required at each processing stage. The results presented in this paper are currently being used in the design of a digital Doppler processor (Chi et al., 1986) for a radar scatterometer.

  11. Dominant Enhancers of Egfr in Drosophila Melanogaster: Genetic Links between the Notch and Egfr Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Price, J. V.; Savenye, E. D.; Lum, D.; Breitkreutz, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key component of a complex signaling pathway that participates in multiple developmental processes. We have performed an F(1) screen for mutations that cause dominant enhancement of wing vein phenotypes associated with mutations in Egfr. With this screen, we have recovered mutations in Hairless (H), vein, groucho (gro), and three apparently novel loci. All of the E(Egfr)s we have identified show dominant interactions in transheterozygous combinations with each other and with alleles of N or Su(H), suggesting that they are involved in cross-talk between the N and EGFR signaling pathways. Further examination of the phenotypic interactions between Egfr, H, and gro revealed that reductions in Egfr activity enhanced both the bristle loss associated with H mutations, and the bristle hyperplasia and ocellar hypertrophy associated with gro mutations. Double mutant combinations of Egfr and gro hypomorphic alleles led to the formation of ectopic compound eyes in a dosage sensitive manner. Our findings suggest that these E(Egfr)s represent links between the Egfr and Notch signaling pathways, and that Egfr activity can either promote or suppress Notch signaling, depending on its developmental context. PMID:9383058

  12. Signal to noise ratio of free space homodyne coherent optical communication after adaptive optics compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Mei, Haiping; Deng, Ke; Kang, Li; Zhu, Wenyue; Yao, Zhoushi

    2015-12-01

    Designing and evaluating the adaptive optics system for coherent optical communication link through atmosphere requires to distinguish the effects of the residual wavefront and disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Based on the new definition of coherent efficiency, a formula of signal to noise ratio for describing the performance of coherent optical communication link after wavefront compensation is derived in the form of amplitude non-uniformity and wavefront error separated. A beam quality metric is deduced mathematically to evaluate the effect of disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Experimental results show that the amplitude fluctuation on the receiver aperture may reduce the signal to noise ratio about 24% on average when Fried coherent length r0=16 cm.

  13. Signal-to-noise ratio of the bispectral analysis of speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi

    1988-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of an atmospheric phase screen, based on a Kolmogorov spectrum of phase fluctuations, were performed. Speckle patterns produced from the phase screens were used to derive statistical properties of power spectra and bispectra of speckle interferograms. The bispectral modulation transfer function and its signal-to-noise ratio at high light levels are presented. The results confirm the validity of a heuristic treatment based on an interferometric picture of speckle pattern formation in deriving the attenuation factor and the signal-to-noise ratio of the bispectral modulation tranfer function in the mid-spatial-frequency range. The derived modulation tranfer function is also interpreted in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio at low light levels. A general expression of the signal-to-noise ratio of the bispectrum is derived as a function of the transfer functions of the telescope, the number of speckles, and the mean photon counts in the mid-spatial-frequency range.

  14. Optical-fiber pulse rate multiplier for ultralow phase-noise signal generation.

    PubMed

    Haboucha, A; Zhang, W; Li, T; Lours, M; Luiten, A N; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G

    2011-09-15

    In this Letter we report on an all optical-fiber approach to the synthesis of ultralow-noise microwave signals by photodetection of femtosecond laser pulses. We use a cascade of Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometers to realize stable and efficient repetition rate multiplication. This technique increases the signal level of the photodetected microwave signal by close to 18 dB. That in turn allows us to demonstrate a residual phase-noise level of -118 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz and -160 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from a 12 GHz signal. The residual noise floor of the fiber multiplier and photodetection system alone is around -164 dBc/Hz at the same offset frequency, which is very close to the fundamental shot-noise floor. PMID:21931422

  15. Signal to Noise Ratios of Pulsed and Sinewave Modulated Direct Detection Lidar for IPDA Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratios have been derived for IPDA lidar using a direct detection receiver for both pulsed and sinewave laser modulation techniques, and the results and laboratory measurements are presented

  16. The Combined Effect of Periodic Signals and Noise on the Dilution of Precision of GNSS Station Velocity Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Anna; Olivares, German; Teferle, Felix Norman; Bogusz, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Station velocity uncertainties determined from a series of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position estimates depend on both the deterministic and stochastic models applied to the time series. While the deterministic model generally includes parameters for a linear and several periodic terms the stochastic model is a representation of the noise character of the time series in form of a power-law process. For both of these models the optimal model may vary from one time series to another while the models also depend, to some degree, on each other. In the past various power-law processes have been shown to fit the time series and the sources for the apparent temporally-correlated noise were attributed to, for example, mismodelling of satellites orbits, antenna phase centre variations, troposphere, Earth Orientation Parameters, mass loading effects and monument instabilities. Blewitt and Lavallée (2002) demonstrated how improperly modelled seasonal signals affected the estimates of station velocity uncertainties. However, in their study they assumed that the time series followed a white noise process with no consideration of additional temporally-correlated noise. Bos et al. (2010) empirically showed for a small number of stations that the noise character was much more important for the reliable estimation of station velocity uncertainties than the seasonal signals. In this presentation we pick up from Blewitt and Lavallée (2002) and Bos et al. (2010), and have derived formulas for the computation of the General Dilution of Precision (GDP) under presence of periodic signals and temporally-correlated noise in the time series. We show, based on simulated and real time series from globally distributed IGS (International GNSS Service) stations processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), that periodic signals dominate the effect on the velocity uncertainties at short time scales while for those beyond four years, the type of noise becomes much more

  17. A reconstruction algorithm based on sparse representation for Raman signal processing under high background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Xu, Y.; Que, J.; He, H.; Wang, X.; Tang, M.

    2016-02-01

    Background noise is one of the main interference sources of the Raman spectroscopy measurement and imaging technique. In this paper, a sparse representation based algorithm is presented to process the Raman signals under high background noise. In contrast with the existing de-noising methods, the proposed method reconstructs the pure Raman signals by estimating the Raman peak information. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is its high anti-noise capacity and low pure Raman signal reduction contributed by its reconstruction principle. Meanwhile, the Batch-OMP algorithm is applied to accelerate the training of the sparse representation. Therefore, it is very suitable to be adopted in the Raman measurement or imaging instruments to observe fast dynamic processes where the scanning time has to be shortened and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the raw tested signal is reduced. In the simulation and experiment, the de-noising result obtained by the proposed algorithm was better than the traditional Savitzky-Golay (S-G) filter and the fixed-threshold wavelet de-noising algorithm.

  18. Subtle noise structures as control signals in high-order biocognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic stochastic structural property related to noise 'color' may act as a control signal for large-scale cognitive biological phenomena that recruit simpler cognitive modules into temporary, dynamic working coalitions. Subtle noise characteristics, in addition to magnitude measures, can thus convey essential system control information that evolutionary process may have exapted as a tool for the regulation of biological phenomena, supplementing molecular signals.

  19. Quantum detection of coherent-state signals in the presence of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Lau, C. W.

    2003-01-01

    A general method for solving an important class of quantum detection problems will be presented and evaluated. The quantum theory for detecting pure states for communications purposes has been developed over two decades ago, however the mixed state problem representing signal plus noise states has received little attention due to its great complexity. Here we develop a practical model for solving the mixed-state problem using a discrete approximation to the coherent-state representation of signal plus noise density operators.

  20. Algorithm for astronomical, extended source, signal-to-noise radio calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to simulate the expected signal-to-noise ratio as a function of observation time in the charge coupled device detector plane of an optical telescope located outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended, uniform astronomical source embedded in a uniform cosmic background. By choosing the appropriate input values, the expected extended source signal-to-noise ratios can be computed for the Hubble Space Telescope using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera science instrument.

  1. Low-noise preamplifier based on PMT and its signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Li-hua; Wang, Hai-yang; Wang, Wen-xuan; Cui, Yi-ping; Hang, Jian-jun; Sha, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Through the establishment of the noise model for photomultiplier, estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of the photomultiplier tube, using the principle of photoelectric detection technology, combined with the needs of practical applications; select the appropriate photoelectric multiplier tube, from the two aspects of the dynamic design and static design to ensure the correct output signal of the photomultiplier tube. The low noise preamplifier will amplify the output signal of photomultiplier tube without noise as soon as possible. This article describes the design principles of the photomultiplier tube selection and application. From the op-amp selection, multistage amplifier circuit design, circuit noise estimation, PCB board layout line and shielding, proposed a practical circuit design of 10MHz band width; and matters needing attention and its signal processing method. The simulation results show that the signal amplifying circuit designed, this circuit design can be very well amplifying and processing the output signal of the photomultiplier tube. To verify the theory of articles derived from circuit simulation to the actual test. Simulation results show that the signal amplifying circuit design, this form of circuit design can be very good enlarged and processing the output signal of the photomultiplier tube. From the actual test, the test results show that the accuracy and practicality of the simulation results.

  2. Electromagnetic Signals and Earthquakes 2.0: Increasing Signals and Reducing Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunson, J. C.; Bleier, T.; Heraud, J. A.; Muller, S.; Lindholm, C.; Christman, L.; King, R.; Lemon, J.

    2013-12-01

    QuakeFinder has an international network of 150+ Magnetometers and air conductivity instruments located in California, Peru, Chile, Taiwan, and Greece. Since 2000, QuakeFinder has been collecting electromagnetic data and applying simple algorithms to identify and characterize electromagnetic signals that occur in the few weeks prior to earthquakes greater than M4.5. In this presentation, we show refinements to several aspects of our signal identification techniques that enhance detection of pre-earthquake patterns. Our magnetometers have been improved to show longer pulses, and we are now using second generation algorithms that have been refined to detect the proper shape of the earthquake-generated pulses and to allow individual site adjustments. Independent lightning strike data has also now been included to mask out lightning based on amplitude and distance from a given instrument site. Direction of arrival (Azimuth) algorithms have been added to identify patterns of pulse clustering that occur prior to nearby earthquakes. Likewise, positive and negative air ion concentration detection has been improved by building better enclosures, using stainless screens to eliminate insects and some dirt sources, conformal coating PC boards to reduce moisture contamination, and filtering out contaminated data segments based on relative humidity measurements at each site. Infra Red data from the western GOES satellite has been time-filtered, cloud-filtered, and compared to 3 year averages of each pixel's output (by seasonal month) to arrive at a relevant comparison baseline for each night's temperature/cooling slope. All these efforts have helped improve the detection of multiple, nearly simultaneous, electromagnetic signals due to earthquake preparation processes, while reducing false positive indications due to environmental noise sources.

  3. Signal from noise: Insights into volcanic system processes from ambient noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, Sara

    This first section of dissertation concerns the imaging of the crust and upper most mantle structure of the mid-Miocene volcanic provinces of the Northwestern United States using ambient noise tomography. Chapter 1 introduces the complex tectonic history of the northwestern United States and describes the development of volcanism from the ignimbrite sweep that occurred with the extension of the Basin and Range province, initiation and evolution of the mid-Miocene volcanism of the Steens/Columbia River flood basalts, and mirror-image volcanic tracks of the High Lava Plains, Oregon and Yellowstone-Snake River Plains. Chapter 2 describes in detail the concepts and methods for determining the 3D shear velocity structure in the crust and uppermost mantle from ambient noise correlations. Chapter 3 contains the text and supplementary materials of Hanson-Hedgecock et al. [2012] published in the Geophysical Research Letters that describes the application of the ambient noise methods to the imaging of the Western United States. The second section of this work discusses the results of measuring velocity changes associated with three episodes of increased eruptive activity at Tungurahua in 2010 using ambient noise correlations. The third section of this work discusses the results of using the H/V ratio to measure the level of equipartition of the ambient noise wavefield at Tungurahua in 2010.

  4. Impact of noise in holography with extended references in the low signal regime.

    PubMed

    Boutu, W; Gauthier, D; Ge, X; Cassin, R; Ducousso, M; Gonzalez, A I; Iwan, B; Samaan, J; Wang, F; Kovačev, M; Merdji, H

    2016-03-21

    Signal-to-noise ratio is a key factor in lensless imaging, particularly for low diffraction signal experiments in the single shot regime. We present our recent study of the noise impact on holography with extended references. Experimental data have been measured in single shot acquisition using an intense coherent soft X-ray high harmonic source. The impact of hardware and software noise under various detection conditions is discussed. A final comparison between single shot and multi-shot regimes is given. PMID:27136823

  5. Photonic microwave quadrature filter with low phase imbalance and high signal-to-noise ratio performance.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Chan, Erwin H W; Wang, Xudong; Feng, Xinhuan; Guan, Bai-ou

    2015-10-15

    A photonic microwave quadrature filter is presented. It has a very simple structure, very low phase imbalance, and high signal-to-noise ratio performance. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate a photonic microwave quadrature filter with a 3 dB operating frequency range of 10.5-26.5 GHz, an amplitude and phase imbalance of less than ±0.3  dB and ±0.15°, and a signal-to-noise ratio of more than 121 dB in a 1 Hz noise bandwidth. PMID:26469589

  6. Quantum noise in differential-type gravitational-wave interferometer and signal recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, A.; Kawamura, S.; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2008-07-01

    In the sensitivity of laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors, there exists the standard quantum limit (SQL), derived from Heisenberg's uncertainty relation. The SQL can be overcome using the quantum correlation between shot noise and radiation-pressure noise. One of the methods to overcome SQL, signal recycling, is considered so far only in a recombined-type interferometer such as Advanced-LIGO, LCGT, and GEO600. In this paper, we investigated quantum noise and signal recycling in a differential-type interferometer. We also applied it to a real detector and compared the sensivity with a recombined type.

  7. Characterization of transient noise in Advanced LIGO relevant to gravitational wave signal GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adamo, M.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterji, S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    On 14 September 2015, a gravitational wave signal from a coalescing black hole binary system was observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors. This paper describes the transient noise backgrounds used to determine the significance of the event (designated GW150914) and presents the results of investigations into potential correlated or uncorrelated sources of transient noise in the detectors around the time of the event. The detectors were operating nominally at the time of GW150914. We have ruled out environmental influences and non-Gaussian instrument noise at either LIGO detector as the cause of the observed gravitational wave signal.

  8. Image informative maps for component-wise estimating parameters of signal-dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uss, Mykhail L.; Vozel, Benoit; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Chehdi, Kacem

    2013-01-01

    We deal with the problem of blind parameter estimation of signal-dependent noise from mono-component image data. Multispectral or color images can be processed in a component-wise manner. The main results obtained rest on the assumption that the image texture and noise parameters estimation problems are interdependent. A two-dimensional fractal Brownian motion (fBm) model is used for locally describing image texture. A polynomial model is assumed for the purpose of describing the signal-dependent noise variance dependence on image intensity. Using the maximum likelihood approach, estimates of both fBm-model and noise parameters are obtained. It is demonstrated that Fisher information (FI) on noise parameters contained in an image is distributed nonuniformly over intensity coordinates (an image intensity range). It is also shown how to find the most informative intensities and the corresponding image areas for a given noisy image. The proposed estimator benefits from these detected areas to improve the estimation accuracy of signal-dependent noise parameters. Finally, the potential estimation accuracy (Cramér-Rao Lower Bound, or CRLB) of noise parameters is derived, providing confidence intervals of these estimates for a given image. In the experiment, the proposed and existing state-of-the-art noise variance estimators are compared for a large image database using CRLB-based statistical efficiency criteria.

  9. Noise reduction of FBG sensor signal by using a wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yo-Han; Song, Minho

    2011-05-01

    We constructed a FBG (fiber Bragg grating) sensor system based on a fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer. A fiber-optic laser source is used as a strong light source to attain high signal-to-noise ratio. However the unstable output power and coherence noises of the fiber laser made it hard to separate the FBG signals from the interference signals of the fiber coils. To reduce noises and extract FBG sensor signals, we used a Gaussian curve-fitting and a wavelet transform. The wavelet transform is a useful tool for analyzing and denoising output signals. The feasibility of the wavelet transform denoising process is presented with the preliminary experimental results, which showed much better accuracy than the case with only the Gaussian curve-fitting algorithm.

  10. Modeling and estimation of signal-dependent noise in hyperspectral imagery.

    PubMed

    Meola, Joseph; Eismann, Michael T; Moses, Randolph L; Ash, Joshua N

    2011-07-20

    The majority of hyperspectral data exploitation algorithms are developed using statistical models for the data that include sensor noise. Hyperspectral data collected using charge-coupled devices or other photon detectors have sensor noise that is directly dependent on the amplitude of the signal collected. However, this signal dependence is often ignored. Additionally, the statistics of the noise can vary spatially and spectrally as a result of camera characteristics and the calibration process applied to the data. Here, we examine the expected noise characteristics of both raw and calibrated visible/near-infrared hyperspectral data and provide a method for estimating the noise statistics using calibration data or directly from the imagery if calibration data is unavailable. PMID:21772364

  11. Does fin coloration signal social status in a dominance hierarchy of the livebearing fish Xiphophorus variatus?

    PubMed

    Culumber, Zachary W; Monks, Scott

    2014-09-01

    In each population of the livebearing fish Xiphophorus variatus, only a small portion of the adult males develop bright yellow-red (YR) coloration on the dorsal and caudal fins. Here we characterized the dominance hierarchy in X. variatus and tested whether YR coloration is related to a male's position in the hierarchy and can therefore serve as a reliable cue to rival males. Populations varied considerably in the frequency of YR males. Across all populations, males with YR coloration were significantly larger than the rest of the males in the population. Observations of aggressive interactions among males in small groups in the laboratory revealed a sized-based dominance hierarchy with YR males at the top. Aggression was more common among males of a similar size and fighting increased as male body size differences decreased. However, despite the reliability of YR coloration as a signal of dominance status, males at lower social ranks did not avoid aggression with YR males and YR males did not experience fewer aggressive attacks compared to non-YR males. Our findings demonstrate that fin coloration is a reliable cue of a male's social status but rival males appear to not use this information to avoid potentially costly interactions with dominant males, suggesting that YR fin coloration has not evolved as a cue in agonistic interactions. PMID:25151939

  12. Detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to quantify the impact of eccentricity in the detection of single resolvable binaries in the pulsar timing array band. We present ready-to-use expressions to compute the increase/loss in signal-to-noise ratio of eccentric single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low/high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays. Building upon the work of Phinney (arXiv:astro-ph/0108028) and Enoki and Nagashima [Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 241 (2007)], we present an analytical framework that enables the construction of rapid spectra for a stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric sources. We confirm previous findings which indicate that, relative to a population of quasicircular binaries, the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays. We quantify this effect in terms of signal-to-noise ratios in a pulsar timing array.

  13. Biomedical image and signal de-noising using dual tree complex wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizi, F. Yousefi; Noubari, H. Ahmadi; Setarehdan, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    Dual tree complex wavelet transform(DTCWT) is a form of discrete wavelet transform, which generates complex coefficients by using a dual tree of wavelet filters to obtain their real and imaginary parts. The purposes of de-noising are reducing noise level and improving signal to noise ratio (SNR) without distorting the signal or image. This paper proposes a method for removing white Gaussian noise from ECG signals and biomedical images. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is very valuable in a large scope of de-noising problems. However, it has limitations such as oscillations of the coefficients at a singularity, lack of directional selectivity in higher dimensions, aliasing and consequent shift variance. The complex wavelet transform CWT strategy that we focus on in this paper is Kingsbury's and Selesnick's dual tree CWT (DTCWT) which outperforms the critically decimated DWT in a range of applications, such as de-noising. Each complex wavelet is oriented along one of six possible directions, and the magnitude of each complex wavelet has a smooth bell-shape. In the final part of this paper, we present biomedical image and signal de-noising by the means of thresholding magnitude of the wavelet coefficients.

  14. Noise reduction in Doppler ultrasound signals using an adaptive decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Le; Gao, Yali; Chen, Jianhua; Shi, Xinling

    2007-07-01

    A novel de-noising method for improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of Doppler ultrasound blood flow signals, called the matching pursuit method, has been proposed. Using this method, the Doppler ultrasound signal was first decomposed into a linear expansion of waveforms, called time-frequency atoms, which were selected from a redundant dictionary named Gabor functions. Subsequently, a decay parameter-based algorithm was employed to determine the decomposition times. Finally, the de-noised Doppler signal was reconstructed using the selected components. The SNR improvements, the amount of the lost component in the original signal and the maximum frequency estimation precision with simulated Doppler blood flow signals, have been used to evaluate a performance comparison, based on the wavelet, the wavelet packets and the matching pursuit de-noising algorithms. From the simulation and clinical experiment results, it was concluded that the performance of the matching pursuit approach was better than those of the DWT and the WPs methods for the Doppler ultrasound signal de-noising. PMID:16996774

  15. Signal Scaling Improves the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Measurements with Segmented 2D-Selective Radiofrequency Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Busch, Martin G.; Larson, Peder E. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Segmented 2D-selective radiofrequency excitations can be used to acquire irregularly shaped target regions, e.g., in single-voxel MR spectroscopy, without involving excessive radiofrequency pulse durations. However, segments covering only outer k-space regions nominally use reduced B1 amplitudes (i.e., smaller flip angles) and yield lower signal contributions, which decreases the efficiency of the measurement. The purpose of this study was to show that applying the full flip angle for all segments and scaling down the acquired signal appropriately (signal scaling) retains the desired signal amplitude but reduces the noise level accordingly and, thus, increases the signal-to-noise ratio. Methods The principles and improvements of signal scaling were demonstrated with MR imaging and spectroscopy experiments at 3 T for a single-line segmentation of a blipped-planar trajectory. Results The observed signal-to-noise ration gain depended on the 2D-selective radiofrequency excitation’s resolution, field-of-excitation, and its excitation profile and was between 40 and 500% for typical acquisition parameters. Conclusion Signal scaling can further improve the performance of measurements with segmented 2D-selective radiofrequency excitations, e.g., for MR spectroscopy of anatomically defined voxels. PMID:23440633

  16. Hardware Design and Implementation of a Wavelet De-Noising Procedure for Medical Signal Preprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Chen, Yuan-Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) based de-noising with its applications into the noise reduction for medical signal preprocessing is introduced. This work focuses on the hardware realization of a real-time wavelet de-noising procedure. The proposed de-noising circuit mainly consists of three modules: a DWT, a thresholding, and an inverse DWT (IDWT) modular circuits. We also proposed a novel adaptive thresholding scheme and incorporated it into our wavelet de-noising procedure. Performance was then evaluated on both the architectural designs of the software and. In addition, the de-noising circuit was also implemented by downloading the Verilog codes to a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based platform so that its ability in noise reduction may be further validated in actual practice. Simulation experiment results produced by applying a set of simulated noise-contaminated electrocardiogram (ECG) signals into the de-noising circuit showed that the circuit could not only desirably meet the requirement of real-time processing, but also achieve satisfactory performance for noise reduction, while the sharp features of the ECG signals can be well preserved. The proposed de-noising circuit was further synthesized using the Synopsys Design Compiler with an Artisan Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC, Hsinchu, Taiwan) 40 nm standard cell library. The integrated circuit (IC) synthesis simulation results showed that the proposed design can achieve a clock frequency of 200 MHz and the power consumption was only 17.4 mW, when operated at 200 MHz. PMID:26501290

  17. Hardware design and implementation of a wavelet de-noising procedure for medical signal preprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Chen, Yuan-Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) based de-noising with its applications into the noise reduction for medical signal preprocessing is introduced. This work focuses on the hardware realization of a real-time wavelet de-noising procedure. The proposed de-noising circuit mainly consists of three modules: a DWT, a thresholding, and an inverse DWT (IDWT) modular circuits. We also proposed a novel adaptive thresholding scheme and incorporated it into our wavelet de-noising procedure. Performance was then evaluated on both the architectural designs of the software and. In addition, the de-noising circuit was also implemented by downloading the Verilog codes to a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based platform so that its ability in noise reduction may be further validated in actual practice. Simulation experiment results produced by applying a set of simulated noise-contaminated electrocardiogram (ECG) signals into the de-noising circuit showed that the circuit could not only desirably meet the requirement of real-time processing, but also achieve satisfactory performance for noise reduction, while the sharp features of the ECG signals can be well preserved. The proposed de-noising circuit was further synthesized using the Synopsys Design Compiler with an Artisan Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC, Hsinchu, Taiwan) 40 nm standard cell library. The integrated circuit (IC) synthesis simulation results showed that the proposed design can achieve a clock frequency of 200 MHz and the power consumption was only 17.4 mW, when operated at 200 MHz. PMID:26501290

  18. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Alagramam, Kumar N.; Stepanyan, Ruben; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Chen, Daniel H.-C.; Davis, Rickie R.

    2015-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4–8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control) or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b, Cacna1g, and Pla2g6, related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway. PMID:25387536

  19. The Effect of White Nonstationary and Colored Nonstationary Noise on Signal Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mauricio; Benacquista, Matthew; Stroeer, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effect of non-stationary noise on the detection of signals on unevenly sampled data. Initial frequency estimation is obtained from a Lomb-Scargle periodogram; which is followed by a global multi-start optimization, as working on a dense local Nelder-Mead iterator for parameter estimates. It has been found that a varying white noise level has no effect on the required relative signal-to-noise ratio for detection in the proposed algorithm, though affecting the absolute amplitude strength of the signal recording. Further analysis has been done on realistic colored noise. Different whitening routines have been incorporated to the proposed algorithm. Detection efficiency is compared for these different routines.

  20. The Effect of Non-stationary Noise on Drifting Signal Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mauricio; Benacquista, M.; Stroeer, A.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effect of non-stationary noise in the detection of drifting signals on unevenly sampled data. Initial frequency estimation is obtained from a Lomb-Scargle periodogram; which is followed by a global multi-start optimization, as working on a dense local Nelder-Mead iterator for parameter estimates. It has been found that a varying white noise level has no effect on the required relative signal-to-noise ratio for detection in the proposed algorithm, though affecting the absolute amplitude strength of the signal recording. Future work includes the addition of colored noise to this analysis. We plan to investigate how this work can be applied to gravitational wave data analysis, for example LISA or LIGO. This work is funded by NASA URC Grant NASA NNX09AV06A, ARCC grant NSF AST0750913 and CREST grant NSF HRD0734800.

  1. Influence of Color Noise on Processing of Optical Signals by Swarm Intellect Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimullin, D. Z.; Sibgatullin, M. E.; Kamalova, D. I.; Salakhov, M. Kh.

    2015-09-01

    An approach based on stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied for the mathematical processing of spectral profiles with noise. To test the algorithm's stability with respect to noise, we used the noises with different values of the Hurst index which characterizes noise component from the point of view of prevalence of low-frequency or high-frequency component in it. The Hurst index varied from 0.1 to 0.9. An influence of color noise with level from 1 to 10% on processing of optical signals by particle swarm optimization algorithm was analyzed. This method is shown to be stable with respect to noise with the level of 10% if it's the Hurst index does not exceed the value of 0.5.

  2. Design of phase-only, binary phase-only, and complex ternary matched filters with increased signal-to-noise ratios for colored noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, B. V. K. V.; Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is provided for treating nonwhite additive noise in determining regions of support for phase-only filters, binary phase-only filters, and complex ternary matched filters. It is analytically shown to be optimal in the signal-to-noise ratio sense. It extends earlier research that assumed white noise.

  3. Chemical Signals of Synthetic Disaccharide Derivatives Dominate Rhamnolipids at Controlling Multiple Bacterial Activities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nischal; Shetye, Gauri S; Zheng, Hewen; Sun, Jiayue; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2016-01-01

    Microbes secrete molecules that modify their environment. Here, we demonstrate a class of synthetic disaccharide derivatives (DSDs) that mimics and dominates the activity of naturally secreted rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The DSDs exhibit the dual function of activating and inhibiting the swarming motility through a concentration-dependent activity reversal that is characteristic of signaling molecules. Whereas DSDs tethered with a saturated farnesyl group exhibit inhibition of both biofilm formation and swarming motility, with higher activities than rhamnolipids, a saturated farnesyl tethered with a sulfonate group only inhibits swarming motility but promote biofilm formation. These results identified important structural elements for controlling swarming motility, biofilm formation, and bacterial adhesion and suggest an effective chemical approach to control intertwined signaling processes that are important for biofilm formation and motilities. PMID:26511780

  4. Quantum minimax receiver for ternary coherent state signal in the presence of thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kentaro

    2013-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the minimax strategy in quantum signal detection theory. First we show a numerical calculation method for finding a solution to the quantum minimax decision problem in the case that the average probability of decision errors is used as the quality function of a quantum communication system. To verify the numerical calculation method, ternary coherent state signal is considered in the absence of thermal noise. After that, the error probability of the quantum minimax receiver for the ternary coherent state signal in the pressure of thermal noise is computed by using this numerical calculation method.

  5. A New Method for Reduction of Photomultiplier Signal-Induced Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koble, Andrea; DeYoung, Russell

    2000-01-01

    For lidar measurements of ozone, photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector signal-induced noise represents a fundamental problem that complicates the extraction of information from lidar data. A new method is developed to significantly reduce signal-induced noise in lidar receiver PMT detectors. The electron optics of the lidar photomultiplier detector is modified to filter the source of signal-induced noise. A mesh electrode external to the PMT is utilized to control photoemission and disorient electron trajectories from the photocathode to the first dynode. Experiments were taken both with simulated and actual lidar return signals at Langley Research Center. Results show at least 40 percent more accurate ozone number density values with a mesh voltage of 60 V applied than with no voltage applied.

  6. Parameter-Induced Stochastic Resonance of Weak Periodic Signal Excitation with α Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Kou, Jie; Jiao, Shang-Bin

    In view of the nonlinear bistable system, this paper studied the parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomenon of low-frequency weak signal excitation under α stable noise environment, and explored the action laws of the α stable noise distribution parameters α, β, μ, σ and the bistable system parameters a, b on stochastic resonance effect. The results show that in different α stable noise, adjusting the bistable system parameters can induce stochastic resonance; Moreover, when a(or b) is fixed, the intervals of b(or a) which can induce stochastic resonance are multiple and don't change with any α stable distribution parameter. Further, by combining with the parameter compensation method for researching on high-frequency weak signal, the same action laws as the low-frequency signal are got. The conclusions are significant for using parameter-induced stochastic resonance principle in weak signal detection in the abnormal diffusion dynamical system.

  7. Signal-to-noise ratio for the wide field-planetary camera of the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios for the Wide Field Camera and Planetary Camera of the Space Telescope were calculated as a function of integration time. Models of the optical systems and CCD detector arrays were used with a 27th visual magnitude point source and a 25th visual magnitude per arc-sq. second extended source. A 23rd visual magnitude per arc-sq. second background was assumed. The models predicted signal-to-noise ratios of 10 within 4 hours for the point source centered on a signal pixel. Signal-to-noise ratios approaching 10 are estimated for approximately 0.25 x 0.25 arc-second areas within the extended source after 10 hours integration.

  8. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-10-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  9. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer R.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-01-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  10. Investigation of target and ground clutter reflections on the correlation between transmitted and received noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allebach, Joshua M.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Himed, Braham

    2016-05-01

    The use of noise waveforms for radar has been popular for many years; however, not much work has been done to extend their use to long range applications. To understand the practicality of using noise for this work, the correlation values between transmitted and received signals were investigated as well as the ratio of reflected to transmitted power. This was done for both ground clutter and simple shapes representing targets of interest. Reflections from these different surfaces are dependent on the frequency of operation, polarization, angle of incidence, and target material. To act as a direct comparison to the noise waveform, a chirp signal was also reflected from these surfaces and correlated with the originally transmitted signal. For terrain, it was found that the noise offers similar correlation patterns as the chirp waveform but slightly larger reflected power for certain cases. Additionally, noise waveforms have decreased correlation values compared to chirp waveforms at low angles. For the simple shaped targets, the noise and chirp signals had similar correlation patterns, values, and power ratios.

  11. The curious case of HD 41248. A pair of static signals buried behind red noise

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, J. S.; Tuomi, M.

    2014-10-20

    Gaining a better understanding of the effects of stellar-induced radial velocity noise is critical for the future of exoplanet studies since the discovery of the lowest-mass planets using this method will require us to go below the intrinsic stellar noise limit. An interesting test case in this respect is that of the southern solar analog HD 41248. The radial velocity time series of this star has been proposed to contain either a pair of signals with periods of around 18 and 25 days, which could be due to a pair of resonant super-Earths, or a single and varying 25 day signal that could arise due to a complex interplay between differential rotation and modulated activity. In this work, we build up more evidence for the former scenario, showing that the signals are still clearly significant, even after more than 10 yr of observations, and they likely do not change in period, amplitude, or phase as a function of time, the hallmarks of static Doppler signals. We show that over the last two observing seasons, this star was more intrinsically active and the noise reddened, highlighting why better noise models are needed to find the lowest amplitude signals, in particular, models that consider noise correlations. This analysis shows that there is still sufficient evidence for the existence of two super-Earths on the edge of, or locked into, a 7:5 mean motion resonance orbiting HD 41248.

  12. Quantum noise in differential-type gravitational-wave interferometer and signal recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Sakagami, Masa-Aki; Kawamura, Seiji

    2007-08-01

    There exists the standard quantum limit (SQL), derived from Heisenberg’s uncertainty relation, in the sensitivity of laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. However, in the context of a full quantum-mechanical approach, SQL can be overcome using the correlation of shot noise and radiation-pressure noise. So far, signal recycling, which is one of the methods to overcome SQL, is considered only in a recombined-type interferometer such as Advanced LIGO, LCGT, and GEO600. In this paper, we investigated quantum noise and the possibility of signal recycling in a differential-type interferometer. As a result, we found that signal recycling is possible and creates at most three dips in the sensitivity curve of the detector due to two coupled resonators. The additional third dip makes it possible to decrease quantum noise at low frequencies, keeping the moderate sensitivity at high frequencies. Then, taking advantage of the third dip and comparing the sensitivity of a differential-type interferometer with that of a next-generation Japanese GW interferometer, LCGT, we found that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of inspiral binary is improved by a factor of ≈1.43 for neutron star binary, ≈2.28 for 50M⊙ black hole binary, and ≈2.94 for 100M⊙ black hole binary. We also found that power recycling to increase laser power is possible in our signal-recycling configuration of a detector.

  13. Measurement and analysis of signal to noise ratio for image intensifier tube, 18mm microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaofeng; Shi, Feng; Feng, Hanliang; Liu, Rong; Yin, Lei; He, Yingping

    2011-08-01

    Output signal to noise ratio is an important technical index for evaluating detectability of microchannel plate image intensifier tube, and the characteristic for detecting of microchannel plate image intensifier tube restricts the detectability of the night vision system. It has been proved in theory and in practice that the value of output signal to noise ratio of image intensifier tube equipped for night vision system decides the farthest distance and imaging definition of system which used under low light level in square root way. In this article, method and device for measuring the output signal to noise ratio of 18mm microchannel plate image intensifier tube has been introduced in detail. Output signal to noise ratio values of several 18mm microchannel plate image intensifier tube selected have been measured. Contacting to work condition of image intensifier tube, relationship between voltage of cathode, microchannel plate, screen and output signal to noise ratio of 18mm microchannel plate image intensifier tube bas been studied, which is available for other image intensifier tube.

  14. Fault Reactivation Analysis Using Microearthquake Clustering Based on Signal-to-Noise Weighted Waveform Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, Michael; Groos, Jörn C.; Ritter, Joachim R. R.

    2016-04-01

    The cluster formation of about 2000 induced microearthquakes (mostly M L < 2) is studied using a waveform similarity technique based on cross-correlation and a subsequent equivalence class approach. All events were detected within two separated but neighbouring seismic volumes close to the geothermal powerplants near Landau and Insheim in the Upper Rhine Graben, SW Germany between 2006 and 2013. Besides different sensors, sampling rates and individual data gaps, mainly low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the recordings at most station sites provide a complication for the determination of a precise waveform similarity analysis of the microseismic events in this area. To include a large number of events for such an analysis, a newly developed weighting approach was implemented in the waveform similarity analysis which directly considers the individual SNRs across the whole seismic network. The application to both seismic volumes leads to event clusters with high waveform similarities within short (seconds to hours) and long (months to years) time periods covering two magnitude ranges. The estimated relative hypocenter locations are spatially concentrated for each single cluster and mirror the orientations of mapped faults as well as interpreted rupture planes determined from fault plane solutions. Depending on the waveform cross-correlation coefficient threshold, clusters can be resolved in space to as little as one dominant wavelength. The interpretation of these observations implies recurring fault reactivations by fluid injection with very similar faulting mechanisms during different time periods between 2006 and 2013.

  15. Fault Reactivation Analysis Using Microearthquake Clustering Based on Signal-to-Noise Weighted Waveform Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, Michael; Groos, Jörn C.; Ritter, Joachim R. R.

    2016-07-01

    The cluster formation of about 2000 induced microearthquakes (mostly M L < 2) is studied using a waveform similarity technique based on cross-correlation and a subsequent equivalence class approach. All events were detected within two separated but neighbouring seismic volumes close to the geothermal powerplants near Landau and Insheim in the Upper Rhine Graben, SW Germany between 2006 and 2013. Besides different sensors, sampling rates and individual data gaps, mainly low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the recordings at most station sites provide a complication for the determination of a precise waveform similarity analysis of the microseismic events in this area. To include a large number of events for such an analysis, a newly developed weighting approach was implemented in the waveform similarity analysis which directly considers the individual SNRs across the whole seismic network. The application to both seismic volumes leads to event clusters with high waveform similarities within short (seconds to hours) and long (months to years) time periods covering two magnitude ranges. The estimated relative hypocenter locations are spatially concentrated for each single cluster and mirror the orientations of mapped faults as well as interpreted rupture planes determined from fault plane solutions. Depending on the waveform cross-correlation coefficient threshold, clusters can be resolved in space to as little as one dominant wavelength. The interpretation of these observations implies recurring fault reactivations by fluid injection with very similar faulting mechanisms during different time periods between 2006 and 2013.

  16. Development of an ultra low noise, miniature signal conditioning device for vestibular evoked response recordings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inner ear evoked potentials are small amplitude (<1 μVpk) signals that require a low noise signal acquisition protocol for successful extraction; an existing such technique is Electrocochleography (ECOG). A novel variant of ECOG called Electrovestibulography (EVestG) is currently investigated by our group, which captures vestibular responses to a whole body tilt. The objective is to design and implement a bio-signal amplifier optimized for ECOG and EVestG, which will be superior in noise performance compared to low noise, general purpose devices available commercially. Method A high gain configuration is required (>85 dB) for such small signal recordings; thus, background power line interference (PLI) can have adverse effects. Active electrode shielding and driven-right-leg circuitry optimized for EVestG/ECOG recordings were investigated for PLI suppression. A parallel pre-amplifier design approach was investigated to realize low voltage, and current noise figures for the bio-signal amplifier. Results In comparison to the currently used device, PLI is significantly suppressed by the designed prototype (by >20 dB in specific test scenarios), and the prototype amplifier generated noise was measured to be 4.8 nV/Hz @ 1 kHz (0.45 μVRMS with bandwidth 10 Hz-10 kHz), which is lower than the currently used device generated noise of 7.8 nV/Hz @ 1 kHz (0.76 μVRMS). A low noise (<1 nV/Hz) radio frequency interference filter was realized to minimize noise contribution from the pre-amplifier, while maintaining the required bandwidth in high impedance measurements. Validation of the prototype device was conducted for actual ECOG recordings on humans that showed an increase (p < 0.05) of ~5 dB in Signal-to-Noise ratio (SNR), and for EVestG recordings using a synthetic ear model that showed a ~4% improvement (p < 0.01) over the currently used amplifier. Conclusion This paper presents the design and evaluation of an ultra-low noise and miniaturized bio-signal

  17. The behavior of quantization spectra as a function of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    An expression for the spectrum of quantization error in a discrete-time system whose input is a sinusoid plus white Gaussian noise is derived. This quantization spectrum consists of two components: a white-noise floor and spurious harmonics. The dithering effect of the input Gaussian noise in both components of the spectrum is considered. Quantitative results in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) example show the behavior of spurious harmonics as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results have strong implications for digital reception and signal analysis systems. At low SNRs, spurious harmonics decay exponentially on a log-log scale, and the resulting spectrum is white. As the SNR increases, the spurious harmonics figure prominently in the output spectrum. A useful expression is given that roughly bounds the magnitude of a spurious harmonic as a function of the SNR.

  18. Differential Effects of Noise and Music Signals on the Behavior of Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANDO, Y.

    2001-03-01

    A theory based on the model of how the auditory-brain system perceive primary sensations is used to explain the differential effects of noise and music signals on the sleep of babies and on the performance of mental tasks by children. In a previous study by Ando and Hattori, [1], it was found that sleeping babies (2-4 months old) whose mothers had begun living in a noisy area before conception or during the first five months of pregnancy did not react to daily aircraft noise but did react to music. In another previous study by Ando et al.[2], the percentage of the pupils in "V-type relaxation" state during an adding task in a quiet living area was much greater when pupils heard music than when they heard noise. These phenomena are explained here by the difference between the temporal factors extracted from the running autocorrelation function of the noise and music signals.

  19. Image signal-to-noise ratio estimation using adaptive slope nearest-neighbourhood model.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Teh, V

    2015-12-01

    A new technique based on nearest neighbourhood method is proposed. In this paper, considering the noise as Gaussian additive white noise, new technique single-image-based estimator is proposed. The performance of this new technique such as adaptive slope nearest neighbourhood is compared with three of the existing method which are original nearest neighbourhood (simple method), first-order interpolation method and shape-preserving piecewise cubic hermite autoregressive moving average. In a few cases involving images with different brightness and edges, this adaptive slope nearest neighbourhood is found to deliver an optimum solution for signal-to-noise ratio estimation problems. For different values of noise variance, the adaptive slope nearest neighbourhood has highest accuracy and less percentage estimation error. Being more robust with white noise, the new proposed technique estimator has efficiency that is significantly greater than those of the three methods. PMID:26292081

  20. Improving signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging based on spatial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Zou, Yunhao; Dai, Huidong; Gu, Guohua

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, compressive imaging based on spatial correlation (CISC), which uses second-order correlation with the measurement matrix, is introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging (CI). Numerical simulations and experiments are performed as well. Referred to the results, it can be seen that CISC performs much better than CI in three common noise environments. This provides the great opportunity to pave the way for real applications.

  1. Improving signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging based on spatial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Zou, Yunhao; Dai, Huidong; Gu, Guohua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, compressive imaging based on spatial correlation (CISC), which uses second-order correlation with the measurement matrix, is introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging (CI). Numerical simulations and experiments are performed as well. Referred to the results, it can be seen that CISC performs much better than CI in three common noise environments. This provides the great opportunity to pave the way for real applications.

  2. Laboratory calibration of an underwater sound receiver in the reverberation field of a noise signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. E.; Chernikov, I. V.

    2015-11-01

    When performing calibrations, it is expedient to measure the set of detailed frequency responses of an underwater sound receiver so that it can receive particular characteristics adequate to the tasks and conditions of using it according to its intended use. We demonstrate the possibility of using the reverberation field of a noise signal for this in conjunction with processing by complex moving weighted averaging. The paper presents the results of calibrating underwater sound receivers in the noise reverberation field of a laboratory tank.

  3. Numerical discussion of a new method for amplitude estimation in noise-corrupted waveform signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gland, F.

    A seemingly promising algorithm, whose purpose is to estimate the constant amplitude of a waveform signal, corrupted by both additive noise and phase-noise is presented. Principally comparisons with other algorithms, based on numerical simulations, are reported. It should be emphasized that this method (which appears to belong to the general class of maximum likelihood estimators) is highly efficient, even when the phase-noise is large. It is also more expensive, in terms of computational time, while there seems to be reasonable hope for an improvement in this direction.

  4. On Observer Internal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    1986-06-01

    Human observers behave as if they have two sources of intrinsic variability, commonly referred to as internal noise. One component (here referred to as "constant") is independent of the external noise level but does depend on mean display luminance. The other component (referred to as "induced") is directly proportional to the external noise level and dominates when the display noise is easily visible. The induced internal noise is predicted by two models - one based on intrinsic signal parameter jitter and the other on a zone of indecision. Spectral density is the appropriate measure for internal noise.

  5. A microwave photonic generator of chaotic and noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Kondrashov, A. V.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-04-01

    The transition to chaos in a microwave photonic generator has been experimentally studied for the first time, and the generated broadband chaotic microwave signal has been analyzed. The generator represented a ring circuit with the microwave tract containing a low-pass filter and a microwave amplifier. The optical tract comprised a fiber delay line. The possibility of generating chaotic oscillations with uniform spectral power density in a 3-8 GHz range is demonstrated.

  6. 1/f Noise decomposition in random telegraph signals using the wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principato, Fabio; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-07-01

    By using the continuous wavelet transform with Haar basis the second-order properties of the wavelet coefficients are derived for the random telegraph signal (RTS) and for the 1/f noise which is obtained by summation of many RTSs. The correlation structure of the Haar wavelet coefficients for these processes is found. For the wavelet spectrum of the 1/f noise some characteristics related to the distribution of the relaxation times of the RTS are derived. A statistical test based on the characterization of the time evolution of the scalogram is developed, which allows to detect non-stationarity in the times τ's which compose the 1/f process and to identify the time scales of the relaxation times where the non-stationarity is localized. The proposed method allows to distinguish noise signals with 1/f power spectral density generated by RTSs, and thus gives informations on the origin of this type of 1/f noise which cannot be obtained using the Fourier transform or other methods based on second-order statistical analysis. The reported treatment is applied to both simulated and experimental signals. The present analysis is based on the McWhorter [ 1/f Noise and germanium surface properties, in: R.H. Kingstone (Ed.), Semiconductor Surface Physics, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, PA, 1957, pp. 207-228] model of low frequency electric noise, and the obtained results are expected to prove especially useful for semiconductor devices.

  7. Identifying early-warning signals of critical transitions with strong noise by dynamical network markers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Pei; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    Identifying early-warning signals of a critical transition for a complex system is difficult, especially when the target system is constantly perturbed by big noise, which makes the traditional methods fail due to the strong fluctuations of the observed data. In this work, we show that the critical transition is not traditional state-transition but probability distribution-transition when the noise is not sufficiently small, which, however, is a ubiquitous case in real systems. We present a model-free computational method to detect the warning signals before such transitions. The key idea behind is a strategy: “making big noise smaller” by a distribution-embedding scheme, which transforms the data from the observed state-variables with big noise to their distribution-variables with small noise, and thus makes the traditional criteria effective because of the significantly reduced fluctuations. Specifically, increasing the dimension of the observed data by moment expansion that changes the system from state-dynamics to probability distribution-dynamics, we derive new data in a higher-dimensional space but with much smaller noise. Then, we develop a criterion based on the dynamical network marker (DNM) to signal the impending critical transition using the transformed higher-dimensional data. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in biological, ecological and financial systems. PMID:26647650

  8. Cellular Signaling Networks Function as Generalized Wiener-Kolmogorov Filters to Suppress Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-10-01

    Cellular signaling involves the transmission of environmental information through cascades of stochastic biochemical reactions, inevitably introducing noise that compromises signal fidelity. Each stage of the cascade often takes the form of a kinase-phosphatase push-pull network, a basic unit of signaling pathways whose malfunction is linked with a host of cancers. We show that this ubiquitous enzymatic network motif effectively behaves as a Wiener-Kolmogorov optimal noise filter. Using concepts from umbral calculus, we generalize the linear Wiener-Kolmogorov theory, originally introduced in the context of communication and control engineering, to take nonlinear signal transduction and discrete molecule populations into account. This allows us to derive rigorous constraints for efficient noise reduction in this biochemical system. Our mathematical formalism yields bounds on filter performance in cases important to cellular function—such as ultrasensitive response to stimuli. We highlight features of the system relevant for optimizing filter efficiency, encoded in a single, measurable, dimensionless parameter. Our theory, which describes noise control in a large class of signal transduction networks, is also useful both for the design of synthetic biochemical signaling pathways and the manipulation of pathways through experimental probes such as oscillatory input.

  9. Possible breakthrough: Significant improvement of signal to noise ratio by stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, L.B.

    1996-06-01

    The {ital simplest} {ital stochastic} {ital resonator} {ital is} {ital used}, {ital a} {ital level} {ital crossing} {ital detector} (LCD), to investigate key properties of stochastic resonance (SR). It is pointed out that successful signal processing and biological applications of SR require to work in the {ital large} {ital signal} {ital limit} (nonlinear transfer limit) which requires a completely new approach: {ital wide} {ital band} {ital input} {ital signal} and a {ital new}, {ital generalised} {ital definition} {ital of} {ital output} {ital noise}. The new way of approach is illustrated by a new arrangement. The arrangement employs a special LCD, white input noise and a special, large, subthreshold wide band signal. {ital First} {ital time} {ital in} {ital the} {ital history} {ital of} {ital SR} (for a wide band input noise), the {ital signal} {ital to} {ital noise} {ital ratio} {ital becomes} {ital much} {ital higher} {ital at} {ital the} {ital output} of a stochastic resonator than {ital at} {ital its} {ital input}. In that way, SR is proven to have a potential to improve signal transfer. Note, that the new arrangement seems to have resemblance to {ital neurone} {ital models}, therefore, it has a potential also for biological applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Cross-synaptic synchrony and transmission of signal and noise across the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Hoon, Mrinalini; Briggman, Kevin L; Wong, Rachel O; Rieke, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Cross-synaptic synchrony--correlations in transmitter release across output synapses of a single neuron--is a key determinant of how signal and noise traverse neural circuits. The anatomical connectivity between rod bipolar and A17 amacrine cells in the mammalian retina, specifically that neighboring A17s often receive input from many of the same rod bipolar cells, provides a rare technical opportunity to measure cross-synaptic synchrony under physiological conditions. This approach reveals that synchronization of rod bipolar cell synapses is near perfect in the dark and decreases with increasing light level. Strong synaptic synchronization in the dark minimizes intrinsic synaptic noise and allows rod bipolar cells to faithfully transmit upstream signal and noise to downstream neurons. Desynchronization in steady light lowers the sensitivity of the rod bipolar output to upstream voltage fluctuations. This work reveals how cross-synaptic synchrony shapes retinal responses to physiological light inputs and, more generally, signaling in complex neural networks. PMID:25180102

  11. COS FUV Flat Fields and Signal-to-Noise Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Massa, D.; Beland, S.; France, K.; Penton, S. V.; Sahnow, D.; McPhate, J.

    2010-07-01

    The COS FUV channel employs a detector comprised of two microchannel plate (MCP) segments with cross delay line anodes. The detector shows several types of non-uniformities due to the hexagonal and moire patterns in the MCPs, dead spots, gain variations, and shadows from the wire grid installed in front of the MCPs to increase quantum efficiency. These features induce fixed-pattern noise in FUV spectra. The effects of these artifacts can be reduced by dividing the data by a flat field and combining exposures taken at different grating settings. A spectral iterative technique, similar to that used for GHRS and FOS, shows that S/N > 100 can be achieved in extracted spectra. Although flat field observations were obtained during SMOV using white dwarfs, a two dimensional flat field of sufficient quality for standard CALCOS processing was not achieved. Other methodologies are being explored for flat field correction and are expected to be installed in CALCOS to improve the S/N of data incrementally. As an initial step, CALCOS currently ignores grid wire regions when creating a summed spectrum from exposures taken at different FP-POS positions. Average one-dimensional flats generated through spectral iteration have been investigated to correct individual exposures and show promise as an alternate flat fielding methodology. These may require separate flat fields for different cross-dispersion locations. An important result is that the flat fields and flux calibrations used by CALCOS are dependent on each other and should be derived together.

  12. Effects of signal salience and noise on performance and stress in an abbreviated vigil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, William Stokely

    Vigilance or sustained attention tasks traditionally require observers to detect predetermined signals that occur unpredictably over periods of 30 min to several hours (Warm, 1984). These tasks are taxing and have been useful in revealing the effects of stress agents, such as infectious disease and drugs, on human performance (Alluisi, 1969; Damos & Parker, 1994; Warm, 1993). However, their long duration has been an inconvenience. Recently, Temple and his associates (Temple et al., 2000) developed an abbreviated 12-min vigilance task that duplicates many of the findings with longer duration vigils. The present study was designed to explore further the similarity of the abbreviated task to long-duration vigils by investigating the effects of signal salience and jet-aircraft engine noise on performance, operator stress, and coping strategies. Forty-eight observers (24 males and 24 females) were assigned at random to each of four conditions resulting from the factorial combination of signal salience (high and low contrast signals) and background noise (quiet and jet-aircraft noise). As is the case with long-duration vigils (Warm, 1993), signal detection in the abbreviated task was poorer for low salience than for high salience signals. In addition, stress scores, as indexed by the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire (Matthews, Joiner, Gilliland, Campbell, & Falconer, 1999), were elevated in the low as compared to the high salience condition. Unlike longer vigils, however, (Becker, Warm, Dember, & Hancock, 1996), signal detection in the abbreviated task was superior in the presence of aircraft noise than in quiet. Noise also attenuated the stress of the vigil, a result that is counter to previous findings regarding the effects of noise in a variety of other scenarios (Clark, 1984). Examination of observers' coping responses, as assessed by the Coping Inventory for Task Situations (Matthews & Campbell, 1998), indicated that problem-focused coping was the overwhelming

  13. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  14. Utilising temporal signal features in adverse noise conditions: Detection, estimation, and the reassigned spectrogram.

    PubMed

    Mill, Robert W; Brown, Guy J

    2016-02-01

    Visual displays in passive sonar based on the Fourier spectrogram are underpinned by detection models that rely on signal and noise power statistics. Time-frequency representations specialised for sparse signals achieve a sharper signal representation, either by reassigning signal energy based on temporal structure or by conveying temporal structure directly. However, temporal representations involve nonlinear transformations that make it difficult to reason about how they respond to additive noise. This article analyses the effect of noise on temporal fine structure measurements such as zero crossings and instantaneous frequency. Detectors that rely on zero crossing intervals, intervals and peak amplitudes, and instantaneous frequency measurements are developed, and evaluated for the detection of a sinusoid in Gaussian noise, using the power detector as a baseline. Detectors that rely on fine structure outperform the power detector under certain circumstances; and detectors that rely on both fine structure and power measurements are superior. Reassigned spectrograms assume that the statistics used to reassign energy are reliable, but the derivation of the fine structure detectors indicates the opposite. The article closes by proposing and demonstrating the concept of a doubly reassigned spectrogram, wherein temporal measurements are reassigned according to a statistical model of the noise background. PMID:26936571

  15. A high signal-to-noise ratio toroidal electron spectrometer for the SEM.

    PubMed

    Hoang, H Q; Osterberg, M; Khursheed, A

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a high signal-to-noise ratio electron energy spectrometer attachment for the scanning electron microscope (SEM), designed to measure changes in specimen surface potential from secondary electrons and extract specimen atomic number information from backscattered electrons. Experimental results are presented, which demonstrate that the spectrometer can in principle detect specimen voltage changes well into the sub-mV range, and distinguish close atomic numbers by a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 20. The spectrometer has applications for quantitatively mapping specimen surface voltage and atomic number variations on the nano-scale. PMID:21740873

  16. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  17. Host Responses to Melioidosis and Tuberculosis Are Both Dominated by Interferon-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Schreiber, M. Fernanda; Bautista, Ruben; Maude, Rapeephan R.; Dunachie, Susanna; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dougan, Gordon; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) is a common cause of community-acquired sepsis in Northeast Thailand and northern Australia. B. pseudomallei is a soil saprophyte endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The clinical presentation of melioidosis may mimic tuberculosis (both cause chronic suppurative lesions unresponsive to conventional antibiotics and both commonly affect the lungs). The two diseases have overlapping risk profiles (e.g., diabetes, corticosteroid use), and both B. pseudomallei and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are intracellular pathogens. There are however important differences: the majority of melioidosis cases are acute, not chronic, and present with severe sepsis and a mortality rate that approaches 50% despite appropriate antimicrobial therapy. By contrast, tuberculosis is characteristically a chronic illness with mortality <2% with appropriate antimicrobial chemotherapy. We examined the gene expression profiles of total peripheral leukocytes in two cohorts of patients, one with acute melioidosis (30 patients and 30 controls) and another with tuberculosis (20 patients and 24 controls). Interferon-mediated responses dominate the host response to both infections, and both type 1 and type 2 interferon responses are important. An 86-gene signature previously thought to be specific for tuberculosis is also found in melioidosis. We conclude that the host responses to melioidosis and to tuberculosis are similar: both are dominated by interferon-signalling pathways and this similarity means gene expression signatures from whole blood do not distinguish between these two diseases. PMID:23383015

  18. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  19. Spectral characteristics of high-latitude raw 40 MHz cosmic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Chris M.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic noise at 40 MHz is measured at Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E) using a relative ionospheric opacity meter ("riometer"). A riometer is normally used to determine the degree to which cosmic noise is absorbed by the intervening ionosphere, giving an indication of ionisation of the atmosphere at altitudes lower than generally monitored by other instruments. The usual course is to determine a "quiet-day" variation, this representing the galactic noise signal itself in the absence of absorption; the current signal is then subtracted from this to arrive at absorption expressed in decibels (dB). By a variety of means and assumptions, it is thereafter possible to estimate electron density profiles in the very lowest reaches of the ionosphere. Here however, the entire signal, i.e. including the cosmic noise itself, will be examined and spectral characteristics identified. It will be seen that distinct spectral subranges are evident which can, in turn, be identified with non-Gaussian processes characterised by generalised Hurst exponents, α. Considering all periods greater than 1 h, α ≈ 24, an indication of fractional Brownian motion, whereas for periods greater than 1 day α ≈ 0.9 - approximately pink noise and just in the domain of fractional Gaussian noise. The results are compared with other physical processes, suggesting that absorption of cosmic noise is characterised by a generalised Hurst exponent ≈ 1.24 and thus non-persistent fractional Brownian motion, whereas generation of cosmic noise is characterised by a generalised Hurst exponent ≈ 1. The technique unfortunately did not result in clear physical understanding of the ionospheric phenomena, and thus, in this respect, the application was not successful; the analysis could, however, be used as a tool for instrument validation.

  20. Spectral characteristics of high latitude raw 40 MHz cosmic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic noise at 40 MHz is measured at Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E) using a relative ionospheric opacity meter ("riometer"). A riometer is normally used to determine the degree to which cosmic noise is absorbed by the intervening ionosphere, giving an indication of ionization of the atmosphere at altitudes lower than generally monitored by other instruments. The usual course is to determine a "quiet-day" variation, this representing the galactic noise signal itself in the absence of absorption; the current signal is then subtracted from this to arrive at absorption expressed in dB. By a variety of means and assumptions, it is thereafter possible to estimate electron density profiles in the very lowest reaches of the ionosphere. Here however, the entire signal, i.e. including the cosmic noise itself will be examined and spectral characteristics identified. It will be seen that distinct spectral subranges are evident which can, in turn be identified with non-Gaussian processes characterized by generalized Hurst exponents, α. Considering all periods greater than 1 h, α ≈ 1.24 - an indication of fractional Brownian motion, whereas for periods greater than 1 day α ≈ 0.9 - approximately pink noise and just in the domain of fractional Gaussian noise. The results are compared with other physical processes suggesting that absorption of cosmic noise is characterized by a generalized Hurst exponent ≈ 1.24 and thus non-persistent fractional Brownian motion, whereas generation of cosmic noise is characterized by a generalized Hurst exponent ≈ 1.

  1. Analysis of weak signal detection based on tri-stable system under Levy noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Fang, He; Ying-Ying, Cui; Tian-Qi, Zhang; Gang, Zhang; Ying, Song

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic resonance system is an effective method to extract weak signal. However, system output is directly influenced by system parameters. Aiming at this, the Levy noise is combined with a tri-stable stochastic resonance system. The average signal-to-noise ratio gain is regarded as an index to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. The characteristics of tri-stable stochastic resonance under Levy noise is analyzed in depth. First, the method of generating Levy noise, the effect of tri-stable system parameters on the potential function and corresponding potential force are presented in detail. Then, the effects of tri-stable system parameters w, a, b, and Levy noise intensity amplification factor D on the resonant output can be explored with different Levy noises. Finally, the tri-stable stochastic resonance system is applied to the bearing fault detection. Simulation results show that the stochastic resonance phenomenon can be induced by tuning the system parameters w, a, and b under different distributions of Levy noise, then the weak signal can be detected. The parameter intervals which can induce stochastic resonances are approximately equal. Moreover, by adjusting the intensity amplification factor D of Levy noise, the stochastic resonances can happen similarly. In bearing fault detection, the detection effect of the tri-stable stochastic resonance system is superior to the bistable stochastic resonance system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371164), the Chongqing Municipal Distinguished Youth Foundation, China (Grant No. CSTC2011jjjq40002), and the Research Project of Chongqing Municipal Educational Commission, China (Grant No. KJ130524).

  2. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Gyuseong

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was {approximately}400 MHz and the noise charge {approximately}1000 electrons at a 1 {mu}sec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of {approximately}0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  3. Signal-noise separation based on self-similarity testing in 1D-timeseries data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Philippe A.

    2015-08-01

    The continuous improvement of the resolution delivered by modern instrumentation is a cost-intensive part of any new space- or ground-based observatory. Typically, scientists later reduce the resolution of the obtained raw-data, for example in the spatial, spectral, or temporal domain, in order to suppress the effects of noise in the measurements. In practice, only simple methods are used that just smear out the noise, instead of trying to remove it, so that the noise can nomore be seen. In high-precision 1D-timeseries data, this usually results in an unwanted quality-loss and corruption of power spectra at selected frequency ranges. Novel methods exist that are based on non-local averaging, which would conserve much of the initial resolution, but these methods are so far focusing on 2D or 3D data. We present here a method specialized for 1D-timeseries, e.g. as obtained by magnetic field measurements from the recently launched MMS satellites. To identify the noise, we use a self-similarity testing and non-local averaging method in order to separate different types of noise and signals, like the instrument noise, non-correlated fluctuations in the signal from heliospheric sources, and correlated fluctuations such as harmonic waves or shock fronts. In power spectra of test data, we are able to restore significant parts of a previously know signal from a noisy measurement. This method also works for high frequencies, where the background noise may have a larger contribution to the spectral power than the signal itself. We offer an easy-to-use software tools set, which enables scientists to use this novel technique on their own noisy data. This allows to use the maximum possible capacity of the instrumental hardware and helps to enhance the quality of the obtained scientific results.

  4. Noise cancelling of MRS signals combining model-based removal of powerline harmonics and multichannel Wiener filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jakob Juul; Dalgaard, Esben; Auken, Esben

    2014-02-01

    The fidelity of magnetic resonance sounding signals is often severely degraded by noise, primarily electrical interference from powerline harmonics and short electromagnetic discharges. In many circumstances, the noise originates from multiple sources. We show that noise cancelling can be improved if the multiple origins of noise are taken into account. In particular, a method is developed where powerline harmonics are efficiently removed through a model-based approach. Subsequently, standard multichannel Wiener filtering can be used to provide a further noise reduction. The performance of the method depends on the distribution of noise on the particular site of measurement. Simulations on synthetic signals embedded in real noise recordings show that the combined approach can improve the signal-to-noise ratio with an accompanying improvement in retrieval of model parameters.

  5. The high speed low noise multi-data processing signal process circuit research of remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Jiang, Haibin; Dong, Wang

    2013-08-01

    The high speed, low noise and integration characteristic are the main technology and the main development directions on the signal process circuit of the image sensor, especially in high resolution remote sensing. With these developments, the high noise limiting circuits, high speed data transfer system and the integrated design of the signal process circuit become more and more important. Therefore the requirement of the circuit system simulation is more and more important during the system design and PCB board design process. A CCD signal process circuit system which has the high speed, low noise and several selectable operate modes function was designed and certificated in this paper, during the CCD signal process circuit system design, simulation was made which include the signal integrity and the power integrity. The important devices such as FPGA and the DDR2 device were simulated, using the power integrity simulation the sensitive power planes of the FPGA on the PCB was modified to make the circuit operate more stabilize on a higher frequency. The main clock path and the high speed data path of the PCB board were simulated with the signal integrity. All the simulation works make the signal process circuit system's image's SNR value get higher and make the circuit system could operate well on higher frequency. In the board testing process, the PCB time diagrams were listed on the testing chapter and the wave's parameter meets the request. The real time diagram and the simulated result of the PCB board was listed respectively. The CCD signal process circuit system's images' SNR (Signal Noise Ratio) value, the 14bit AFE slew rate and the data transfer frequency is listed in the paper respective.

  6. Coastal storms and shoreline change: signal or noise?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenster, Michael S.; Dolan, Robert; Morton, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    A linear regression (studentized) residual analysis was used to identify potential shoreline position outliers and to investigate the effect of the outliers on shoreline rate-of-change values for transects along the Outer Banks, North Carolina. Results from this analysis showed that, over a 134 year period, storm-influenced data contribute statistically significant information to the long-term signal. Consequently, storm-influenced data points do not appear to be temporal outliers and thus, do not need to be excluded from a long-term analysis of shoreline changes. Furthermore, projections of the upper and lower confidence intervals (CIs) for the regression line to the year 2010 (24 year extrapolation) showed that including or excluding outliers had minimal effects on shoreline position predictions.

  7. Recursive ideal observer detection of known M-ary signals in multiplicative and additive Gaussian noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the recursive algorithms necessary for real-time digital detection of M-ary known signals that are subject to independent multiplicative and additive Gaussian noises. The motivating application is minimum probability of error detection of digital data-link messages aboard civil aircraft in the earth reflection multipath environment. For each known signal, the detector contains one Kalman filter and one probability computer. The filters estimate the multipath disturbance. The estimates and the received signal drive the probability computers. Outputs of all the computers are compared in amplitude to give the signal decision. The practicality and usefulness of the detector are extensively discussed.

  8. Role of cysteinyl leukotriene signaling in a mouse model of noise-induced cochlear injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Sub; Kang, Seo-Jun; Seo, Mi-Kyoung; Jou, Ilo; Woo, Hyun Goo; Park, Sang Myun

    2014-07-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common types of sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of leukotriene receptors and their respective changes in the cochlea after hazardous noise exposure. We found that the expression of cysteinyl leukotriene type 1 receptor (CysLTR1) was increased until 3 d after noise exposure and enhanced CysLTR1 expression was mainly observed in the spiral ligament and the organ of Corti. Expression of 5-lipoxygenase was increased similar to that of CysLTR1, and there was an accompanying elevation of CysLT concentration. Posttreatment with leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), montelukast, for 4 consecutive days after noise exposure significantly decreased the permanent threshold shift and also reduced the hair cell death in the cochlea. Using RNA-sequencing, we found that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) was up-regulated after noise exposure, and it was significantly inhibited by montelukast. Posttreatment with a MMP-3 inhibitor also protected the hair cells and reduced the permanent threshold shift. These findings suggest that acoustic injury up-regulated CysLT signaling in the cochlea and cochlear injury could be attenuated by LTRA through regulation of MMP-3 expression. This study provides mechanistic insights into the role of CysLTs signaling in noise-induced hearing loss and the therapeutic benefit of LTRA. PMID:24958862

  9. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of reconstructed digital holograms by using light spatial noise portrait of camera's photosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-01-01

    Digital holography is technique which includes recording of interference pattern with digital photosensor, processing of obtained holographic data and reconstruction of object wavefront. Increase of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of reconstructed digital holograms is especially important in such fields as image encryption, pattern recognition, static and dynamic display of 3D scenes, and etc. In this paper compensation of photosensor light spatial noise portrait (LSNP) for increase of SNR of reconstructed digital holograms is proposed. To verify the proposed method, numerical experiments with computer generated Fresnel holograms with resolution equal to 512×512 elements were performed. Simulation of shots registration with digital camera Canon EOS 400D was performed. It is shown that solo use of the averaging over frames method allows to increase SNR only up to 4 times, and further increase of SNR is limited by spatial noise. Application of the LSNP compensation method in conjunction with the averaging over frames method allows for 10 times SNR increase. This value was obtained for LSNP measured with 20 % error. In case of using more accurate LSNP, SNR can be increased up to 20 times.

  10. Real Time Phase Noise Meter Based on a Digital Signal Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrisani, Leopoldo; D'Arco, Mauro; Greenhall, Charles A.; Schiano Lo Morille, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    A digital signal-processing meter for phase noise measurement on sinusoidal signals is dealt with. It enlists a special hardware architecture, made up of a core digital signal processor connected to a data acquisition board, and takes advantage of a quadrature demodulation-based measurement scheme, already proposed by the authors. Thanks to an efficient measurement process and an optimized implementation of its fundamental stages, the proposed meter succeeds in exploiting all hardware resources in such an effective way as to gain high performance and real-time operation. For input frequencies up to some hundreds of kilohertz, the meter is capable both of updating phase noise power spectrum while seamlessly capturing the analyzed signal into its memory, and granting as good frequency resolution as few units of hertz.

  11. Effects of ship noise on the detectability of communication signals in the Lusitanian toadfish.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Raquel O; Amorim, M Clara P; Ladich, Friedrich

    2007-06-01

    Underwater noise pollution is an increasing environmental problem which might affect communication, behaviour, fitness and consequently species' survival. The most common anthropogenic noises in aquatic habitats derive from shipping. In the present study we investigated the implications of noise pollution from a ship on the sound detectability, namely of conspecific vocalizations in the Lusitanian toadfish, Halobatrachus didactylus. Ambient and ferry-boat noises were recorded in the Tagus River estuary (Portugal), as well as toadfish sounds, and their sound pressure levels determined. Hearing sensitivities were measured under quiet lab conditions and in the presence of these masking noises at levels encountered in the field, using the auditory evoked potentials (AEP) recording technique. The Lusitanian toadfish is a hearing generalist, with best hearing sensitivity at low frequencies between 50 and 200 Hz (below 100 dB re. 1 microPa). Under ambient noise conditions, hearing was only slightly masked at lower frequencies. In the presence of ship noise, auditory thresholds increased considerably, by up to 36 dB, at most frequencies tested. This is mainly because the main energies of ferry-boat noise were within the most sensitive hearing range of this species. Comparisons between masked audiograms and sound spectra of the toadfish's mating and agonistic vocalizations revealed that ship noise decreased the ability to detect conspecific acoustic signals. This study provides the first evidence that fishes' auditory sensitivity can be impaired by ship noise and that acoustic communication, which is essential during agonistic encounters and mate attraction, might be restricted in coastal environments altered by human activity. PMID:17562883

  12. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described.

  13. An optimal linear filter for the reduction of noise superimposed to the EEG signal.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, F; Cerutti, S

    1983-10-01

    In the present paper a procedure for the reduction of super-imposed noise on EEG tracings is described, which makes use of linear digital filtering and identification methods. In particular, an optimal filter (a Kalman filter) has been developed which is intended to capture the disturbances of the electromyographic noise on the basis of an a priori modelling which considers a series of impulses with a temporal occurrence according to a Poisson distribution as a noise generating mechanism. The experimental results refer to the EEG tracings recorded from 20 patients in normal resting conditions: the procedure consists of a preprocessing phase (which uses also a low-pass FIR digital filter), followed by the implementation of the identification and the Kalman filter. The performance of the filters is satisfactory also from the clinical standpoint, obtaining a marked reduction of noise without distorting the useful information contained in the signal. Furthermore, when using the introduced method, the EEG signal generating mechanism is accordingly parametrized as AR/ARMA models, thus obtaining an extremely sensitive feature extraction with interesting and not yet completely studied pathophysiological meanings. The above procedure may find a general application in the field of noise reduction and the better enhancement of information contained in the wide set of biological signals. PMID:6632838

  14. Impact of neural noise on a sensory-motor pathway signaling impending collision

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Noise is a major concern in circuits processing electrical signals, including neural circuits. There are many factors that influence how noise propagates through neural circuits, and there are few systems in which noise levels have been studied throughout a processing pathway. We recorded intracellularly from multiple stages of a sensory-motor pathway in the locust that detects approaching objects. We found that responses are more variable and that signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) are lower further from the sensory periphery. SNRs remain low even with the use of stimuli for which the pathway is most selective and for which the neuron representing its final sensory level must integrate many synaptic inputs. Modeling of this neuron shows that variability in the strength of individual synaptic inputs within a large population has little effect on the variability of the spiking output. In contrast, jitter in the timing of individual inputs and spontaneous variability is important for shaping the responses to preferred stimuli. These results suggest that neural noise is inherent to the processing of visual stimuli signaling impending collision and contributes to shaping neural responses along this sensory-motor pathway. PMID:22114160

  15. Variability in surface ECG morphology: signal or noise?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Using data collected from canine models of acute myocardial ischemia, we investigated two issues of major relevance to electrocardiographic signal averaging: ECG epoch alignment, and the spectral characteristics of the beat-to-beat variability in ECG morphology. With initial digitization rates of 1 kHz, an iterative a posteriori matched filtering alignment scheme, and linear interpolation, we demonstrated that there is sufficient information in the body surface ECG to merit alignment to a precision of 0.1 msecs. Applying this technique to align QRS complexes and atrial pacing artifacts independently, we demonstrated that the conduction delay from atrial stimulus to ventricular activation may be so variable as to preclude using atrial pacing as an alignment mechanism, and that this variability in conduction time be modulated at the frequency of respiration and at a much lower frequency (0.02-0.03Hz). Using a multidimensional spectral technique, we investigated the beat-to-beat variability in ECG morphology, demonstrating that the frequency spectrum of ECG morphological variation reveals a readily discernable modulation at the frequency of respiration. In addition, this technique detects a subtle beat-to-beat alternation in surface ECG morphology which accompanies transient coronary artery occlusion. We conclude that physiologically important information may be stored in the variability in the surface electrocardiogram, and that this information is lost by conventional averaging techniques.

  16. Analysis of the dominant vibration frequencies of rail bridges for structure-borne noise using a power flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    The use of concrete bridges in urban rail transit systems has raised many concerns regarding low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-borne noise due to the vibration of bridges when subjected to moving trains. Understanding the mechanism that determines the dominant frequencies of bridge vibrations is essential for both vibration and noise reduction. This paper presents a general procedure based on the force method to obtain the power flows within a coupled vehicle-track-bridge system, the point mobility of the system and the dynamic interaction forces connecting various components. The general coupling system consists of multi-rigid-bodies for the vehicles, infinite Euler beams representing the rails, two-dimensional or three-dimensional elements of the concrete bridges, and spring-dashpot pairs to model the wheel-rail contacts, the vehicle suspensions, the rail pads and the bridge bearings. The dynamic interaction of the coupled system is solved in the frequency domain by assuming the combined wheel-rail roughness moves forward relative to the stationary vehicles. The proposed procedure is first applied to a rail on discrete supports and then to a real urban rail transit U-shaped concrete bridge. The computed results show that the wheel-rail contact forces, the power flows to the rail/bridge subsystem and the accelerations of the bridge are primarily dominated by the contents around the natural frequency of a single wheel adhered to the elastically supported rail. If the ath node of the mth spring-dashpot pair and the bth node of the nth spring-dashpot pair are connected to the same rigid body, then δmnab(ω) can be expressed as δmnab(ω)=-{(}/{Mlω}, where Ml is the mass of the lth rigid body. If the ath node of the mth spring-dashpot pair and the bth node of the nth spring-dashpot pair are connected to the same infinite rail, δmnab(ω) can be expressed as [8] δmnab(ω)=-j{((e-je)}/{4EIk}, where xm and xn are the x-coordinates of the mth and nth spring

  17. When signal meets noise: immunity of the frog ear to interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Mario; Gormaz, Juan Pablo; Narins, Peter M.

    2009-07-01

    Sound stimulates the tympanic membrane (TM) of anuran amphibians through multiple, poorly understood pathways. It is conceivable that interactions between the internal and external inputs to the TM contribute to the nonlinear effects that noise is known to produce at higher levels of the auditory pathway. To explore this issue, we conducted measurements of TM vibration in response to tones in the presence of noise in the frog Eupsophus calcaratus. Laser vibrometry revealed that the power spectra ( n = 16) of the TM velocity in response to pure tones at a constant level of 80 dB sound-pressure level (SPL) had a maximum centered at an average frequency of 2,344 Hz (range 1,700-2,990 Hz) and a maximum velocity of 61.1 dB re 1 µm/s (range 42.9-66.6 dB re 1 µm/s). These TM-vibration velocity response profiles in the presence of increasing levels of 4-kHz band-pass noise were unaltered up to noise levels of 90 dB SPL. For the relatively low spectral densities of the noise used, the TM remains in its linear range. Such vibration patterns facilitate the detection of tonal signals in noise at the tympanic membrane and may underlie the remarkable vocal responsiveness maintained by males of E. calcaratus under noise interference.

  18. Comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-11-15

    We present a theoretical comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging. We first calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of each process in terms of its controllable experimental conditions. We show that a key distinction is that a thermal ghost image always resides on top of a large background; the fluctuations in this background constitutes an intrinsic noise source for thermal ghost imaging. In contrast, there is a negligible intrinsic background to a quantum ghost image. However, for practical reasons involving achievable illumination levels, acquisition times for thermal ghost images are often much shorter than those for quantum ghost images. We provide quantitative predictions for the conditions under which each process provides superior performance. Our conclusion is that each process can provide useful functionality, although under complementary conditions.

  19. Signal enhancement in protein NMR using the spin-noise tuning optimum.

    PubMed

    Nausner, Martin; Goger, Michael; Bendet-Taicher, Eli; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Jerschow, Alexej; Müller, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    We have assessed the potential of an alternative probe tuning strategy based on the spin-noise response for application in common high-resolution multi-dimensional biomolecular NMR experiments with water signal suppression on aqueous and salty samples. The method requires the adjustment of the optimal tuning condition, which may be offset by several 100 kHz from the conventional tuning settings using the noise response of the water protons as an indicator. Although the radio frequency-pulse durations are typically longer under such conditions, signal-to-noise gains of up to 22% were achieved. At salt concentrations up to 100 mM a substantial sensitivity gain was observed. PMID:20924647

  20. Relationship between signal fidelity, hearing loss and working memory for digital noise suppression

    PubMed Central

    Arehart, Kathryn; Souza, Pamela; Kates, James; Lunner, Thomas; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality. Design The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean= 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise. Results The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well-predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listener’s intelligibility scores

  1. Noise smoothing for structural vibration test signals using an improved wavelet thresholding technique.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ting-Hua; Li, Hong-Nan; Zhao, Xiao-Yan

    2012-01-01

    In structural vibration tests, one of the main factors which disturb the reliability and accuracy of the results are the noise signals encountered. To overcome this deficiency, this paper presents a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) approach to denoise the measured signals. The denoising performance of DWT is discussed by several processing parameters, including the type of wavelet, decomposition level, thresholding method, and threshold selection rules. To overcome the disadvantages of the traditional hard- and soft-thresholding methods, an improved thresholding technique called the sigmoid function-based thresholding scheme is presented. The procedure is validated by using four benchmarks signals with three degrees of degradation as well as a real measured signal obtained from a three-story reinforced concrete scale model shaking table experiment. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by computing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) after denoising. Results reveal that the proposed method offers superior performance than the traditional methods no matter whether the signals have heavy or light noises embedded. PMID:23112652

  2. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  3. Visual Motherese? Signal-to-Noise Ratios in Toddler-Directed Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wass, Sam V.; Smith, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger brains are noisier information processing systems; this means that information for younger individuals has to allow clearer differentiation between those aspects that are required for the processing task in hand (the "signal") and those that are not (the "noise"). We compared toddler-directed and adult-directed TV…

  4. Localization and de-noising seismic signals on SASW measurement by wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestani, Alireza; S. Kolbadi, S. Mahdi; Heshmati, Ali Akbar

    2013-11-01

    SASW method is a nondestructive in situ testing method that is used to determine the dynamic properties of soil sites and pavement systems. Phase information and dispersion characteristics of a wave propagating through these systems have a significant role in the processing of recorded data. Inversion of the dispersive phase data provides information on the variation of shear-wave velocity with depth. However, in the case of sanded residual soil, it is not easy to produce the reliable phase spectrum curve. Due to natural noises and other human intervention in surface wave date generation deal with to reliable phase spectrum curve for sanded residual soil turn into the complex issue for geological scientist. In this paper, a time-frequency analysis based on complex Gaussian Derivative wavelet was applied to detect and localize all the events that are not identifiable by conventional signal processing methods. Then, the performance of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) in noise reduction of these recorded seismic signals was evaluated. Furthermore, in particular the influence of the decomposition level choice was investigated on efficiency of this process. This method is developed by various wavelet thresholding techniques which provide many options for controllable de-noising at each level of signal decomposition. Also, it obviates the need for high computation time compare with continuous wavelet transform. According to the results, the proposed method is powerful to visualize the interested spectrum range of seismic signals and to de-noise at low level decomposition.

  5. Acceptance Noise Level: Effects of the Speech Signal, Babble, and Listener Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Azcona, Gabrielly; Buten, Lupe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The acceptable noise level (ANL) measure has gained much research/clinical interest in recent years. The present study examined how the characteristics of the speech signal and the babble used in the measure may affect the ANL in listeners with different native languages. Method: Fifteen English monolingual, 16 Russian-English bilingual,…

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio analysis and evaluation of the Hadamard imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, D. J.; Katzberg, S. J.; Spiers, R. B., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio performance of the Hadamard imaging technique is analyzed and an experimental evaluation of a laboratory Hadamard imager is presented. A comparison between the performances of Hadamard and conventional imaging techniques shows that the Hadamard technique is superior only when the imaging objective lens is required to have an effective F (focus) number of about 2 or slower.

  7. Signal Analysis of Helicopter Blade-Vortex-Interaction Acoustic Noise Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Dai, Renshou

    1998-01-01

    Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) produces annoying high-intensity impulsive noise. NASA Ames collected several sets of BVI noise data during in-flight and wind tunnel tests. The goal of this work is to extract the essential features of the BVI signals from the in-flight data and examine the feasibility of extracting those features from BVI noise recorded inside a large wind tunnel. BVI noise generating mechanisms and BVI radiation patterns an are considered and a simple mathematical-physical model is presented. It allows the construction of simple synthetic BVI events that are comparable to free flight data. The boundary effects of the wind tunnel floor and ceiling are identified and more complex synthetic BVI events are constructed to account for features observed in the wind tunnel data. It is demonstrated that improved recording of BVI events can be attained by changing the geometry of the rotor hub, floor, ceiling and microphone. The Euclidean distance measure is used to align BVI events from each blade and improved BVI signals are obtained by time-domain averaging the aligned data. The differences between BVI events for individual blades are then apparent. Removal of wind tunnel background noise by optimal Wiener-filtering is shown to be effective provided representative noise-only data have been recorded. Elimination of wind tunnel reflections by cepstral and optimal filtering deconvolution is examined. It is seen that the cepstral method is not applicable but that a pragmatic optimal filtering approach gives encouraging results. Recommendations for further work include: altering measurement geometry, real-time data observation and evaluation, examining reflection signals (particularly those from the ceiling) and performing further analysis of expected BVI signals for flight conditions of interest so that microphone placement can be optimized for each condition.

  8. Method for experimental determination of the contribution of individual sources to total noise. [using bandpass filter for signal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubichev, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    Multiple noise sources generating signals in a mechanical device are analyzed by considering the medium transmitting the sound as linear, and by using a band filter with bandpass for synchronous detection and signal transformation.

  9. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by stochastic resonance in sigmoid function threshold systems, demonstrated using a CMOS inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Michihito

    2010-05-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has become a well-known phenomenon that can enhance weak periodic signals with the help of noise. SR is an interesting phenomenon when applied to signal processing. Although it has been proven that SR does not always improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), in a strongly nonlinear system such as simple threshold system, SR does in fact improve SNR for noisy pulsed signals at appropriate noise strength. However, even in such cases, when noise is weak, the SNR is degraded. Since the noise strength cannot be known in advance, it is difficult to apply SR to real signal processing. In this paper, we focused on the shape of the threshold at which SR did not degrade the SNR when noise was weak. To achieve output change when noise was weak, we numerically analyzed a sigmoid function threshold system. When the slope around the threshold was appropriate, SNR did not degrade when noise was weak and instead was improved at suitable noise strength. We also demonstrated SNR improvement for noisy pulsed voltages using a CMOS inverter, a very common threshold device. The input-output property of a CMOS inverter resembles the sigmoid function. By inputting the noisy signal voltage to a CMOS inverter, we measured the input and output voltages and analyzed the SNRs. The results showed that SNR was effectively improved over a wide range of noise strengths.

  10. Signal-to-noise issues in measuring nitrous oxide fluxes by the eddy covariance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicholas; Levy, Peter; Langford, Ben; Skiba, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Recently-developed fast-response gas analysers capable of measuring atmospheric N2O with high precision (< 50 ppt) at a rate of 10 Hz are becoming more widely available. These instruments are capable of measuring N2O fluxes using the eddy covariance method, with significantly less effort and uncertainty than previous instruments have allowed. However, there are still many issues to overcome in order to obtain accurate and reliable flux data. The signal-to-noise ratio of N2O measured using these instruments is still two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of CO2. The low signal-to-noise ratio can lead to systematic uncertainties, in the eddy covariance method, the most significant being in the calculation of the time lag between gas analyser and anemometer by maximisation of covariance (Langford et al., 2015). When signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low, as it is with many N2O measurements, the maximisation of covariance method can systematically overestimate fluxes. However, if constant time lags are assumed, then fluxes will be underestimated. This presents a major issue for N2O eddy covariance measurements. In this presentation we will focus on the signal to noise ratio for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL). Eddy covariance flux measurements from multiple agricultural sites across the UK were investigated for potential uncertainties. Our presentation highlights some of these uncertainties when analysing eddy covariance data and offers suggestions as to how these issues may be minimised. Langford, B., Acton, W., Ammann, C., Valach, A. and Nemitz, E.: Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection, Atmos Meas Tech, 8(10), 4197-4213, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4197-2015, 2015.

  11. The effect of signal noise on the remote sensing of Foliar biochemical concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Geoffrey M.; Curran, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral measurements made using an imaging spectrometer contain systematic and random noise, while the former can be corrected the latter remains a source of error in the remotely sensed signal. A number of investigators have tried to determine the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the instrument, or the resultant imagery. However, the level of noise at which spectra are too noisy to be useful is not usually determined. The first attempt was by Goetz and Calvin, who suggested that the depth of the absorption feature should be at least an order of magnitude greater than the noise and more recently Dekker suggested a SNR of around 600:1 was required in visible/near infrared wavelengths to measure a 1/gl change in chlorophyll a concentration water. The wide range of applications of imaging spectroscopy make it difficult to set SNR specifications as they are dependent on a number of factors, one of the most important being reflectance of a particular target. For example, the SNR of imagery for vegetated targets is relatively low simply because vegetation has a relatively low level of reflectance. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is being used to estimate the concentration of biochemicals within vegetation canopies. This paper reports a study undertaken to identify first, wavebands that were highly correlated with foliar biochemical concentration and second, to determine how sensitive these correlations were to sensor noise.

  12. Relation between signal-noise-ratio of UV image intensifier and voltage of MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Qiu, Yafeng; Wu, Xinglin

    A system of signal-to-noise ration (SNR)tester for LLL image intensifier is reconstructed . To realize SNR tester for UV image intensifier,the signal processing module and measurement software of the tester are reconstructed.The system of UV optical path is used. Based on photoemission mechanism of photocathode, noise factor of photocathode is concerned with quantum yield. In a range,noise factor of micro-channel plate(MCP) is decreased with the increase in gain. For a fixed size micro channel,the gain of MCP is increased as the voltage of MCP rises. The analyzed results show that when the voltage of MCP is in the range of -700V~-850V,the noise factor is monotonically decreased,when it exceed -850V, MCP is saturated. Although gain has continued to increase, noise factor is in the state of saturation. Experiment platform is builded according to SNR tester principle diagram of UV image intensifier.The results are given and analyzed. The conclusion is proved that the effect of voltage of MCP on the SNR of UV image intensifier is compatible with the analysis of theory.

  13. Effect on signal-to-noise ratio of splitting the continuous contacts of cuff electrodes into smaller recording areas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cuff electrodes have been widely used chronically in different clinical applications. This neural interface has been dominantly used for nerve stimulation while interfering noise is the major issue when employed for recording purposes. Advancements have been made in rejecting extra-neural interference by using continuous ring contacts in tripolar topologies. Ring contacts provide an average of the neural activity, and thus reduce the information retrieved. Splitting these contacts into smaller recording areas could potentially increase the information content. In this study, we investigate the impact of such discretization on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). The effect of contacts positioning and an additional short circuited pair of electrodes were also addressed. Methods Different recording configurations using ring, dot, and a mixed of both contacts were studied in vitro in a frog model. An interfering signal was induced in the medium to simulate myoelectric noise. The experimental setup was design in such a way that the only difference between recordings was the configuration used. The inter-session experimental differences were taken care of by a common configuration that allowed normalization between electrode designs. Results It was found that splitting all contacts into small recording areas had negative effects on noise rejection. However, if this is only applied to the central contact creating a mixed tripole configuration, a considerable and statistically significant improvement was observed. Moreover, the signal to noise ratio was equal or larger than what can be achieved with the best known configuration, namely the short circuited tripole. This suggests that for recording purposes, any tripole topology would benefit from splitting the central contact into one or more discrete contacts. Conclusions Our results showed that a mixed tripole configuration performs better than the configuration including only ring contacts. Therefore, splitting

  14. Secretory protein traffic. Chromogranin A contains a dominant targeting signal for the regulated pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, R J; Xi, X P; Wu, H J; Helman, L J; Petz, L N

    1993-01-01

    Secretory proteins are targeted into either constitutive (secreted upon synthesis) or regulated (stored in vesicles and released in response to a secretagogue) pathways. To investigate mechanisms of protein targeting into catecholamine storage vesicles (CSV), we stably expressed human chromogranin A (CgA), the major soluble protein in human CSV, in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line. Chromaffin cell secretagogues (0.1 mM nicotinic cholinergic agonist, 55 mM K+, or 2 mM Ba++) caused cosecretion of human CgA and catecholamines from human CgA-expressing cells. Sucrose gradients colocalized human CgA and catecholamines to subcellular particles of the same buoyant density. Chimeric proteins, in which human CgA (either full-length [457 amino acids] or truncated [amino-terminal 226 amino acids]) was fused in-frame to the ordinarily nonsecreted protein chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), were expressed transiently in PC-12 cells. Both constructs directed CAT activity into regulated secretory vesicles, as judged by secretagogue-stimulated release. These data demonstrate that human CgA expressed in PC-12 cells is targeted to regulated secretory vesicles. In addition, human CgA can divert an ordinarily non-secreted protein into the regulated secretory pathway, consistent with the operation of a dominant targeting signal for the regulated pathway within the peptide sequence of CgA. Images PMID:8394383

  15. Removing DC offset and de-noising for inspecting signal based on mathematical morphology filter processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianning; Sun, Jun; Ni, Jun

    2008-12-01

    A new signal processing method based on the theory of mathematical morphology filter for Removing DC offset and noise pollution about the on-site sampled data is proposed. Conclusion that the ratio of the signal numerical frequency to length of flat structuring element determines the attenuation magnitude of signal and the principia of length of flat structuring element has been found, by analyzing inhesion meaning of base operation of mathematical morphology and then making up combination morphological filter with Maragos type of open-close and close-open. This method possesses following advantages: high calculation speed, easy implementation of hardware and better use value. The arithmetic is simulated with Matlab software and then transplanted to DSP hardware platform and practiced in on-site. It is proved that the proposed method can deal with the sampled data corrupted by on-site noise and the DC of set efficiently. Also, the processed results can meet the requirement in real time well.

  16. Pulsed laser noise analysis and pump-probe signal detection with a data acquisition card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werley, Christopher A.; Teo, Stephanie M.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2011-12-01

    A photodiode and data acquisition card whose sampling clock is synchronized to the repetition rate of a laser are used to measure the energy of each laser pulse. Simple analysis of the data yields the noise spectrum from very low frequencies up to half the repetition rate and quantifies the pulse energy distribution. When two photodiodes for balanced detection are used in combination with an optical modulator, the technique is capable of detecting very weak pump-probe signals (ΔI/I0 ˜ 10-5 at 1 kHz), with a sensitivity that is competitive with a lock-in amplifier. Detection with the data acquisition card is versatile and offers many advantages including full quantification of noise during each stage of signal processing, arbitrary digital filtering in silico after data collection is complete, direct readout of percent signal modulation, and easy adaptation for fast scanning of delay between pump and probe.

  17. Signal analysis of voltage noise in welding arcs. [gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elis, E.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welds were made on low alloy steel plates to which intentional defects (discontinuities) were imposed. Disruption of shielding gas, welding over surface films, and tack welds produce changes in what is otherwise a relatively uniform voltage signal. The arc voltage was 15 volts + or - 2 volts with 300 mV ripple noise from the power supply. Changes in this steady noise voltage varied from 50 mV to less than one millivolt depending on the severity and the type of change experienced. In some instances the changes were easily detected by analysis of the signal in real time, while in other cases the signal had to transformed to the frequency domain in order to detect the changes. Discontinuities as small as 1.5 mm in length were detected. The ultimate sensitivity and reproducibility of the technique is still being investigated.

  18. Signal-to-noise ratio of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode single-photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2014-08-01

    Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) use the avalanche mechanism of semiconductors to amplify signals in individual pixels. With proper thresholding, a pixel will be either "on" (avalanching) or "off." This discrete detection scheme eliminates read noise, which makes these devices capable of counting single photons. Using these detectors for imaging applications requires a well-developed and comprehensive expression for the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper derives the expected SNR of a GM-APD detector in gated operation based on gate length, number of samples, signal flux, dark count rate, photon detection efficiency, and afterpulsing probability. To verify the theoretical results, carrier-level Monte Carlo simulation results are compared to the derived equations and found to be in good agreement.

  19. Fisher information versus signal-to-noise ratio for a split detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knee, George C.; Munro, William J.

    2015-07-01

    We study the problem of estimating the magnitude of a Gaussian beam displacement using a two-pixel or "split" detector. We calculate the maximum likelihood estimator and compute its asymptotic mean-squared error via the Fisher information. Although the signal-to-noise ratio is known to be simply related to the Fisher information under idealized detection, we find the two measures of precision differ markedly for a split detector. We show that a greater signal-to-noise ratio "before" the detector leads to a greater information penalty, unless adaptive realignment is used. We find that with an initially balanced split detector, tuning the normalized difference in counts to 0.884753 ... gives the highest posterior Fisher information, which provides an improvement by at least a factor of about 2.5 over operating in the usual linear regime. We discuss the implications for weak-value amplification, a popular probabilistic signal amplification technique.

  20. Copula filtration of spoken language signals on the background of acoustic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchenko, Lilia V.; Sinitsyn, Rustem B.

    2010-09-01

    This paper is devoted to the filtration of acoustic signals on the background of acoustic noise. Signal filtering is done with the help of a nonlinear analogue of a correlation function - a copula. The copula is estimated with the help of kernel estimates of the cumulative distribution function. At the second stage we suggest a new procedure of adaptive filtering. The silence and sound intervals are detected before the filtration with the help of nonparametric algorithm. The results are confirmed by experimental processing of spoken language signals.

  1. Pseudo-noise test set for communication system evaluation. [test signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, G. R.; Salter, W. E.; Weathers, G. D.; Gussow, S. S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A test set for communications systems is described which includes a pseudo noise sequence generator providing a test signal that is fed to a pair of signal channels. The first channel includes a spectrum shaping filter and a conditioning amplifier. The second channel includes a variable delay circuit, a spectrum shaping filter matched to the first filter, and an amplifier. The output of the first channel was applied to the system under test. The output of the system and the output of the second channel are compared to determine the degree of distortion suffered by the test signal due to the communications system.

  2. Noise Cancelling of Multichannel MRS Signals with a Time Dependent Harmonic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J.; Dalgaard, E.; Auken, E.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is a non-invasive geophysical technique applicable to groundwater investigations and provides a direct quantification of the subsurface water content from surface measurements. The technique is susceptible to electromagnetic noise and signal processing must be employed to retrieve the NMR signal from noisy measurements. The latest generation of MRS equipment is multichannel systems where a primary coil records the noisy NMR signal. Additional coils, physically displaced from the primary coil, synchronously measure the noise which is then subtracted from the primary coil with multichannel Wiener filtering. Unfortunately, this approach fails to take into account that noise can originate from several sources and as a result the noise cancelling is not always optimum. To remedy this problem it can be utilized that one of the major noise components in MRS signals is powerline harmonics, i.e. the noise is a sum of sinusoidal signals all harmonically related to the same fundamental powerline frequency. This implies that it is possible to create a model of the powerline harmonic noise that can be fitted to the MRS recordings and subtracted from these before employing multichannel Wiener filtering as we have recently demonstrated. A fundamental assumption in that work was that the powerline frequency and the amplitude and phase of each harmonic remained constant throughout a signal record of approximately 1 s duration. This assumption is often valid, but not always. In this study we present an extension of this method where the variations in the powerline signal are accounted for by a time dependent model. The signal records from each coil are divided into short overlapping segments, with a typical duration of 100 ms, and a harmonic model with time independent parameters is fitted to each segment. The fitting parameters from each segment are subsequently splined to a full harmonic model where all parameters; fundamental powerline frequency

  3. The effect of audibility, signal-to-noise ratio, and temporal speech cues on the benefit from fast-acting compression in modulated noise.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Henrik L; Olofsson, Ake; Hagerman, Björn

    2005-07-01

    The objective of the experiment was to investigate three aspects that might contribute to the benefit of fast-acting compression seen in normal-hearing listeners. Six normal-hearing listeners were tested with speech recognition in a fully modulated noise (FUM) either through a fast-acting compressor or through linear amplification. In the first experiment, three different presentation levels of the FUM noise (15, 30, and 45 dB SL) were tested. The second experiment manipulated the control signal of the compressor independently of the audio input signal at four signal-to-noise ratios (-15, 10, -5, and 0 dB). A signal correlated noise version of the speech signal was tested in the third experiment at three speech-to-noise ratios (-20, -15 and -10 dB). Results showed that performance was better with compression than with linear amplification through all of the tested conditions at least when the signal-to-noise ratio was negative. The results suggest that other aspects of the hearing impairment than those simulated here are involved in the degraded performance seen for some hearing-impaired listeners with fast-acting compression. PMID:16136792

  4. Estimating and improving the signal-to-noise ratio of time series by symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Graben, P

    2001-11-01

    We investigate the effect of symbolic encoding applied to times series consisting of some deterministic signal and additive noise, as well as time series given by a deterministic signal with randomly distributed initial conditions as a model of event-related brain potentials. We introduce an estimator of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the system by means of time averages of running complexity measures such as Shannon and Rényi entropies, and prove its asymptotical equivalence with the linear SNR in the case of Shannon entropies of symbol distributions. A SNR improvement factor is defined, exhibiting a maximum for intermediate values of noise amplitude in analogy to stochastic resonance phenomena. We demonstrate that the maximum of the SNR improvement factor can be shifted toward smaller noise amplitudes by using higher order Rényi entropies instead of the Shannon entropy. For a further improvement of the SNR, a half wave encoding of noisy time series is introduced. Finally, we discuss the effect of noisy phases on the linear SNR as well as on the SNR defined by symbolic dynamics. It is shown that longer symbol sequences yield an improvement of the latter. PMID:11735897

  5. Enhanced signal-to-noise ratios in frog hearing can be achieved through amplitude death

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    In the ear, hair cells transform mechanical stimuli into neuronal signals with great sensitivity, relying on certain active processes. Individual hair cell bundles of non-mammals such as frogs and turtles are known to show spontaneous oscillation. However, hair bundles in vivo must be quiet in the absence of stimuli, otherwise the signal is drowned in intrinsic noise. Thus, a certain mechanism is required in order to suppress intrinsic noise. Here, through a model study of elastically coupled hair bundles of bullfrog sacculi, we show that a low stimulus threshold and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved through the amplitude death phenomenon (the cessation of spontaneous oscillations by coupling). This phenomenon occurs only when the coupled hair bundles have inhomogeneous distribution, which is likely to be the case in biological systems. We show that the SNR has non-monotonic dependence on the mass of the overlying membrane, and find out that the SNR has maximum value in the region of amplitude death. The low threshold of stimulus through amplitude death may account for the experimentally observed high sensitivity of frog sacculi in detecting vibration. The hair bundles' amplitude death mechanism provides a smart engineering design for low-noise amplification. PMID:23883956

  6. Developmental hearing loss impairs signal detection in noise: putative central mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Jennifer D.; Voytenko, Sergiy V.; Galazyuk, Alexander V.; Rosen, Merri J.

    2014-01-01

    Listeners with hearing loss have difficulty processing sounds in noisy environments. This is most noticeable for speech perception, but is reflected in a basic auditory processing task: detecting a tonal signal in a noise background, i.e., simultaneous masking. It is unresolved whether the mechanisms underlying simultaneous masking arise from the auditory periphery or from the central auditory system. Poor detection in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is attributed to cochlear hair cell damage. However, hearing loss alters neural processing in the central auditory system. Additionally, both psychophysical and neurophysiological data from normally hearing and impaired listeners suggest that there are additional contributions to simultaneous masking that arise centrally. With SNHL, it is difficult to separate peripheral from central contributions to signal detection deficits. We have thus excluded peripheral contributions by using an animal model of early conductive hearing loss (CHL) that provides auditory deprivation but does not induce cochlear damage. When tested as adults, animals raised with CHL had increased thresholds for detecting tones in simultaneous noise. Furthermore, intracellular in vivo recordings in control animals revealed a cortical correlate of simultaneous masking: local cortical processing reduced tone-evoked responses in the presence of noise. This raises the possibility that altered cortical responses which occur with early CHL can influence even simple signal detection in noise. PMID:25249949

  7. Calculation of Shear Stiffness in Noise Dominated Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) Data Based on Principal Frequency Estimation

    PubMed Central

    McGee, K. P.; Lake, D.; Mariappan, Y; Hubmayr, R. D.; Manduca, A.; Ansell, K.; Ehman, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non invasive phase-contrast based method for quantifying the shear stiffness of biological tissues. Synchronous application of a shear wave source and motion encoding gradient waveforms within the MRE pulse sequence enable visualization of the propagating shear wave throughout the medium under investigation. Encoded shear wave induced displacements are then processed to calculate the local shear stiffness of each voxel. An important consideration in local shear stiffness estimates is that the algorithms employed typically calculate shear stiffness using relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) MRE images and have difficulties at extremely low SNR. A new method of estimating shear stiffness based on the principal spatial frequency of the shear wave displacement map is presented. Finite element simulations were performed to assess the relative insensitivity of this approach to decreases in SNR. Additionally, ex vivo experiments were conducted on normal rat lungs to assess the robustness of this approach in low SNR biological tissue. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation of shear stiffness by the principal frequency method is less sensitive to extremely low SNR than previously reported MRE inversion methods but at the expense of loss of spatial information within the region of interest from which the principal frequency estimate is derived. PMID:21701049

  8. Research on signal-to-noise ratio characteristics and image restoration for wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yijian; Zhao, Yuejin; Guo, Xiaohu; Dong, Liquan; Jia, Wei; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Ji; Liu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Wavefront coding, a technique of optical-digital hybrid image, can be used to extend the depth of the field. However, it sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of system at a certain degree, especially on focus situation. The on-focus modulation transfer function (MTF) of wavefront coding system is much lower than that of generally traditional optical system. And the noise will be amplified in the digital image processing. This paper analyzes characteristics of the SNR of the wavefront coding system in the frequency domain and calculates the rate of noise amplification in the digital processing. It also explains the influence of the image detector noise severely reducing the restored quality of images. In order to reduce noise amplification in the process of image restoration, we propose a modified wiener filter which is more suitable for restoration in consideration of noise suppression. The simulation experiment demonstrates that the modified wiener filter, compared with traditional wiener filter, has much better performance for wavefront coding system and the restored images having much higher SNR in the whole depth of the field.

  9. Optimum signal-to-noise ratio in off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dyroff, Christoph

    2011-04-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is investigated and compared to direct absorption spectroscopy using multipass absorption cells [tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)]. Applying measured noise characteristics of a near-IR tunable diode laser and detector, it is shown that the optimum SNR is not generally reached at the highest effective absorption path length. Simulations are used to determine the parameters for maximized SNR of OA-ICOS. PMID:21478999

  10. Objectively measuring signal detectability, contrast, blur and noise in medical images using channelized joint observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    To improve imaging systems and image processing techniques, objective image quality assessment is essential. Model observers adopting a task-based quality assessment strategy by estimating signal detectability measures, have shown to be quite successful to this end. At the same time, costly and time-consuming human observer experiments can be avoided. However, optimizing images in terms of signal detectability alone, still allows a lot of freedom in terms of the imaging parameters. More specifically, fixing the signal detectability defines a manifold in the imaging parameter space on which different "possible" solutions reside. In this article, we present measures that can be used to distinguish these possible solutions from each other, in terms of image quality factors such as signal blur, noise and signal contrast. Our approach is based on an extended channelized joint observer (CJO) that simultaneously estimates the signal amplitude, scale and detectability. As an application, we use this technique to design k-space trajectories for MRI acquisition. Our technique allows to compare the different spiral trajectories in terms of blur, noise and contrast, even when the signal detectability is estimated to be equal.

  11. Enhanced signal-to-noise ratio estimation for tropospheric lidar channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Barragan, Rubén; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    This works combines the fields of tropospheric lidar remote sensing and signal processing to come up with a robust signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimator apt for elastic and Raman channels. The estimator uses a combined low-pass / high-pass filtering scheme along with high-order statistics (kurtosis) to estimate the range-dependent signal and noise components with minimum distortion. While low-pass filtering is used to estimate the range-dependent signal level, high-pass filtering is used to estimate the noise component with minimum distortion. From this noise component estimate (a random realization) the noise level (e.g., variance) is computed as a function of range along with error bars. The minimum-distortion specification determines the optimal cut-off de-noising filter frequency and, in turn, the spatial resolution of the SNR estimation algorithm. The proposed SNR estimator has a much wider dynamic range of operation than well-known classic SNR estimation techniques, in which the SNR is directly computed from the mean and standard deviation of the measured noise-corrupted lidar signal along successive adjacent range intervals and where the spatial resolution is just a subjective input from the user's side. Aligned with ACTRIS (http://www.actris.net) WP on "optimization of the processing chain and Single-Calculus Chain (SCC)" the proposed topic is of application to assess lidar reception channel performance and confidence on the detected atmospheric morphology (e.g., cloud base and top, and location of aerosol layers). The SNR algorithm is tested against the classic SNR estimation approach using test-bed synthetic lidar data modelling the UPC multi-spectral lidar. Towards this end, the Nd:YAG UPC elastic-Raman lidar provides aerosol channels in the near-infrared (1064 nm), visible (532 nm), and ultra-violet (355 nm) as well as aerosol Raman and water-vapour channels with fairly varying SNR levels. The SNR estimator is also used to compare SNR levels between

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Random Noise-Limited Signal-to-Noise Ratio in MR-Based Electrical Properties Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bulumulla, Selaka; Hancu, Ileana

    2015-11-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging-based electrical properties tomography (MREPT), tissue electrical properties (EPs) are derived from the spatial variation of the transmit RF field (B1(+)). Here we derive theoretically the relationship between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the electrical properties obtained by MREPT and the SNR of the input B1(+) data, under the assumption that the latter is much greater than unity, and the noise in B1(+) at different voxels is statistically independent. It is shown that for a given B1(+) data, the SNR of both electrical conductivity and relative permittivity is proportional to the square of the linear dimension of the region of interest (ROI) over which the EPs are determined, and to the square root of the number of voxels in the ROI. The relationship also shows how the SNR varies with the main magnetic field (B0) strength. The predicted SNR is verified through numerical simulations on a cylindrical phantom with an analytically calculated B1(+) map, and is found to provide explanation of certain aspects of previous experimental results in the literature. Our SNR formula can be used to estimate minimum input data SNR and ROI size required to obtain tissue EP maps of desired quality. PMID:25955582

  13. Improving Displacement Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Low-Signal Radiation Force Elasticity Imaging Using Bayesian Techniques.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Douglas M; Walsh, Kristy M; Byram, Brett C

    2016-08-01

    Radiation force-based elasticity imaging is currently being investigated as a possible diagnostic modality for a number of clinical tasks, including liver fibrosis staging and the characterization of cardiovascular tissue. In this study, we evaluate the relationship between peak displacement magnitude and image quality and propose using a Bayesian estimator to overcome the challenge of obtaining viable data in low displacement signal environments. Displacement data quality were quantified for two common radiation force-based applications, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, which measures the displacement within the region of excitation, and shear wave elasticity imaging, which measures displacements outside the region of excitation. Performance as a function of peak displacement magnitude for acoustic radiation force impulse imaging was assessed in simulations and lesion phantoms by quantifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio for varying peak displacement magnitudes. Overall performance for shear wave elasticity imaging was assessed in ex vivo chicken breast samples by measuring the displacement SNR as a function of distance from the excitation source. The results show that for any given displacement magnitude level, the Bayesian estimator can increase the SNR by approximately 9 dB over normalized cross-correlation and the contrast-to-noise ratio by a factor of two. We conclude from the results that a Bayesian estimator may be useful for increasing data quality in SNR-limited imaging environments. PMID:27157861

  14. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nechaev, Dmitry I.; Milekhina, Olga N.; Supin, Alexander Ya.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels. PMID:26462066

  15. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise.

    PubMed

    Nechaev, Dmitry I; Milekhina, Olga N; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels. PMID:26462066

  16. Development of a signal processing technique for the objective rating of gear noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, G. W.; Singh, Rajendra

    A technique for signal processing is proposed that focuses on the content and concentration of energy in narrow-band frequency spectra to rate sources of gear noise. The nature of gear noise is examined, and the rating scheme for gear whine is developed based on measurements of sound pressure, sound power, and gearbox vibration acceleration and velocity levels. Spatially, spectrally, and temporally weighted averages are determined for a range of operating conditions. The weighted averages incorporate results from a range of operating conditions into indices that correlate with subjective response under certain conditions. The method is tested by applying it to single-mesh steady-state applications and multimesh nonsteady-state applications. The present method is shown to be more suitable for studying machinery noise than conventional PNL methods.

  17. Investigation of correlation characteristics for random array collaborative beamforming using noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David B.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Himed, Braham

    2016-05-01

    The performance of different random array geometries is analyzed and compared. Three phased array geometries are considered: linear arrays with non-uniform randomized spacing between elements, circular arrays with non-uniform element radii, and ad hoc sensor networks with elements located randomly within a circular area. For each of these array geometries, computer simulations modeled the transmission, reflection from an arbitrary target, and reception of signals. The effectiveness of each array's beamforming techniques was measured by taking the peak cross-correlation between the received signal and a time-delayed replica of the original transmitted signal. For each array type, the correlation performance was obtained for transmission and reception of both chirp waveforms and ultra-wideband noise signals. It was found that the non-uniform linear array generally produced the highest correlation between transmitted and reflected signals. The non-uniform circular and ad hoc arrays demonstrated the most consistent performance with respect to noise signal bandwidth. The effect of scan angle was found to have a significant impact on the correlation performance of the linear arrays, where the correlation performance declines as the scan angle moves away from broadside to the array.

  18. Improved signal-to-noise ratio of 10 GHz microwave signals generated with a mode-filtered femtosecond laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Diddams, S A; Kirchner, M; Fortier, T; Braje, D; Weiner, A M; Hollberg, L

    2009-03-01

    We use a Fabry-Perot cavity to optically filter the output of a Ti:sapphire frequency comb to integer multiples of the original 1 GHz mode spacing. This effectively increases the pulse repetition rate, which is useful for several applications. In the case of low-noise microwave signal generation, such filtering leads to improved linearity of the high-speed photodiodes that detect the mode-locked laser pulse train. The result is significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio at the 10 GHz harmonic with the potential for a shot-noise limited single sideband phase noise floor near -168 dBc/Hz. PMID:19259170

  19. Effect of signal to noise ratio on the speech perception ability of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Elahe; Ashayeri, Hassan; Jafari, Zahra; Zarrin Dast, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Speech perception ability depends on auditory and extra-auditory elements. The signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) is an extra-auditory element that has an effect on the ability to normally follow speech and maintain a conversation. Speech in noise perception difficulty is a common complaint of the elderly. In this study, the importance of SNR magnitude as an extra-auditory effect on speech perception in noise was examined in the elderly. Methods: The speech perception in noise test (SPIN) was conducted on 25 elderly participants who had bilateral low–mid frequency normal hearing thresholds at three SNRs in the presence of ipsilateral white noise. These participants were selected by available sampling method. Cognitive screening was done using the Persian Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) test. Results: Independent T- test, ANNOVA and Pearson Correlation Index were used for statistical analysis. There was a significant difference in word discrimination scores at silence and at three SNRs in both ears (p≤0.047). Moreover, there was a significant difference in word discrimination scores for paired SNRs (0 and +5, 0 and +10, and +5 and +10 (p≤0.04)). No significant correlation was found between age and word recognition scores at silence and at three SNRs in both ears (p≥0.386). Conclusion: Our results revealed that decreasing the signal level and increasing the competing noise considerably reduced the speech perception ability in normal hearing at low–mid thresholds in the elderly. These results support the critical role of SNRs for speech perception ability in the elderly. Furthermore, our results revealed that normal hearing elderly participants required compensatory strategies to maintain normal speech perception in challenging acoustic situations. PMID:27390712

  20. Effective methods for improving signal/noise ratio of seismic data collected from heavy noisy area

    SciTech Connect

    Chuankun, L. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Jiyuan depression which is the hydrocarbon-bearing area discovered earliest in North China. Terribly complicated seismic-geological condition and very heavy multitudinous noises result in very low signal/noise ratio of seismic data in this area, which severely obstructed hydrocarbon exploration in this area. Hence, research of seismic methods for this area has been made systematically. Reasonable seismic data acquisition parameters were determined by making detailed surface-layer analysis and overall field tests, and by designing expert system with the use of spectral analysis data and field operation data. Consequently, special field method (including deep shot hole, big array length, high stacking fold and high low-cut filtering) was adopted to improve raw seismic data obviously. Furthermore, good static correction, correct stack velocity and reasonable prestack two-dimensional filtering were used to remove seismic noise in data processing. The above methods can improve signal/noise ratio and result in qualified seismic data which favor structural and lithologic interpretations.

  1. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang; Xinmiao, Lu; Guangyi, Wang; Yongcai, Hu; Jiangtao, Xu

    2016-07-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61372156 and 61405053) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province of China (Grant No. LZ13F04001).

  2. Pixel-based CTE Correction Of ACS/WFC: Effects On Signal To Noise Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Roberto J.; Fruchter, A.; Anderson, J.; ACS Team

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) team at STScI has tested a new pixel-based empirical correction (Anderson & Bedin, PASP, 122, 1035) software for CTE effects that occur due to the high radiation environment of space. Here we present a study of how this algorithm changes the characteristics of the signal to noise ratio and photometry of point sources. In order to eliminate unknown variables we use simulated images where we can control the noise and CTE characteristics. We explore a parameter space that includes background, object brightness, and position on the chip. Overall we find that while the signal in a source is largely recovered, the noise in the background is amplified. This effect is more noticeable in low background levels and in regions far from the readout amplifiers. Extra care must be taken when measuring the sky background because the use of some common measurement schemes can introduce systematic effects in the photometry. We also show how a simple noise mitigation routine helps in reducing these effects, although they are not completely eliminated.

  3. Nonlinear Bayesian estimation of BOLD signal under non-Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ali Fahim; Younis, Muhammad Shahzad; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal has been a subject of study for over a decade in the neuroimaging community. Inspired from fluid dynamics, the hemodynamic model provides a plausible yet convincing interpretation of the BOLD signal by amalgamating effects of dynamic physiological changes in blood oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and volume. The nonautonomous, nonlinear set of differential equations of the hemodynamic model constitutes the process model while the weighted nonlinear sum of the physiological variables forms the measurement model. Plagued by various noise sources, the time series fMRI measurement data is mostly assumed to be affected by additive Gaussian noise. Though more feasible, the assumption may cause the designed filter to perform poorly if made to work under non-Gaussian environment. In this paper, we present a data assimilation scheme that assumes additive non-Gaussian noise, namely, the e-mixture noise, affecting the measurements. The proposed filter MAGSF and the celebrated EKF are put to test by performing joint optimal Bayesian filtering to estimate both the states and parameters governing the hemodynamic model under non-Gaussian environment. Analyses using both the synthetic and real data reveal superior performance of the MAGSF as compared to EKF. PMID:25691911

  4. Application of the Radon–FCL approach to seismic random noise suppression and signal preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanlei; Li, Yue; Liu, Yanping; Tian, Yanan; Wu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    The fractal conservation law (FCL) is a linear partial differential equation that is modified by an anti-diffusive term of lower order. The analysis indicated that this algorithm could eliminate high frequencies and preserve or amplify low/medium-frequencies. Thus, this method is quite suitable for the simultaneous noise suppression and enhancement or preservation of seismic signals. However, the conventional FCL filters seismic data only along the time direction, thereby ignoring the spatial coherence between neighbouring traces, which leads to the loss of directional information. Therefore, we consider the development of the conventional FCL into the time-space domain and propose a Radon–FCL approach. We applied a Radon transform to implement the FCL method in this article; performing FCL filtering in the Radon domain achieves a higher level of noise attenuation. Using this method, seismic reflection events can be recovered with the sacrifice of fewer frequency components while effectively attenuating more random noise than conventional FCL filtering. Experiments using both synthetic and common shot point data demonstrate the advantages of the Radon–FCL approach versus the conventional FCL method with regard to both random noise attenuation and seismic signal preservation.

  5. Signal-to-noise ratio for acoustic detection in the deep ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, T.

    1979-01-01

    A simple method is presented for studying the thermoacoustic wave generated by a heat pulse. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is then calculated for a typical hadronic-electromagnetic cascade in the deep ocean where low frequencies are masked by surface noise. It is found that a maximum useful range of about 16 km is found for typical conditions at 5 km depth. It is shown that in order to obtain useful signals with S/N greater than 100 at distances of 1 to 16 km, the cascade energy must be 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 18th eV. Finally, attention is given to further refinements of the theory of acoustic detection which remain to be investigated.

  6. Attention enhances stimulus representations in macaque visual cortex without affecting their signal-to-noise level

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of the attentional modulation of neuronal responses in visual cortex varies with stimulus contrast. Whether the strength of these attentional influences is similarly dependent on other stimulus properties is unknown. Here we report the effect of spatial attention on responses in the medial-temporal area (MT) of macaque visual cortex to moving random dots pattern of various motion coherences, i.e. signal-to-noise ratios. Our data show that allocating spatial attention causes a gain change in MT neurons. The magnitude of this attentional modulation is independent of the attended stimulus’ motion coherence, creating a multiplicative scaling of the neuron’s coherence-response function. This is consistent with the characteristics of gain models of attentional modulation and suggests that attention strengthens the neuronal representation of behaviorally relevant visual stimuli relative to unattended stimuli, but without affecting their signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:27283275

  7. A correlation polarimeter for noise-like signals. [optimum estimation of linearly polarized electromagnetic wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Optimum estimation (tracking) of the polarization plane of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave is determined when the signal is a narrow-band Gaussian random process with a polarization plane angle which is also a Gaussian random process. This model is compared to previous work and is applicable to space communication. The estimator performs a correlation operation similar to an amplitude-comparison monopulse angle tracker, giving the name correlation polarimeter. Under large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the estimator is causal. Performance of the causal correlation polarimeter is evaluated for arbitrary SNR. Optimum precorrelation filtering is determined. With low SNR, the performance of this system is far better than that of previously developed systems. Practical implementation is discussed. A scheme is given to reduce the effect of linearly polarized noise.

  8. Signal-to-noise ratio for temporal integrated drifting images: a model for perceived image sharpening.

    PubMed

    Power, G J; Sturtz, K E

    2000-12-10

    A formulation of signal-to-noise ratio is constructed that uses temporal integrated images from image sequences. Given a blurred image that drifts horizontally at various speeds and at various linear blurs, we prove that this formulation of the signal-to-noise ratio consistently increases with an increase in speed. This increase is shown to model the trends in the human vision system by which drifting blurred images are perceived with increased sharpness. The existing widely used objective quality techniques fail to model the perceptual increase in sharpness. This new formulation, along with other objective quality measures, is tested on several blurred drifting image sequences. The new formulation reflects the theoretically predicted increase in perceived sharpness. PMID:18354675

  9. Signal and Noise in the Perception of Facial Emotion Expressions: From Labs to Life.

    PubMed

    Hess, Ursula; Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Mauersberger, Heidi; Blaison, Christophe; Kessler, Carolin-Louisa

    2016-08-01

    Human interactions are replete with emotional exchanges, and hence, the ability to decode others' emotional expressions is of great importance. The present research distinguishes between the emotional signal (the intended emotion) and noise (perception of secondary emotions) in social emotion perception and investigates whether these predict the quality of social interactions. In three studies, participants completed laboratory-based assessments of emotion recognition ability and later reported their perceptions of naturally occurring social interactions. Overall, noise perception in the recognition task was associated with perceiving more negative emotions in others and perceiving interactions more negatively. Conversely, signal perception of facial emotion expressions was associated with higher quality in social interactions. These effects were moderated by relationship closeness in Greece but not in Germany. These findings suggest that emotion recognition as assessed in the laboratory is a valid predictor of social interaction quality. Thus, emotion recognition generalizes from the laboratory to everyday life. PMID:27277281

  10. Performance assessment of treating aliased signal as target-dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Bradley L.; Haefner, David P.

    2011-05-01

    The applicability of two theories that account for aliasing artifacts, introduced by spatial sampling, on target acquisition performance is addressed. Currently the Army's imager performance model, the Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric uses a parameterized model, based upon a fit to a number of perception experiments, called MTF squeeze. MTF squeeze applies an additional degradation to the TTP metric based upon the amount of spurious response in the final image. While this approach achieves satisfactory results for the data sets available, it is not clear that these results extend to a wider variety of operating conditions. Other models treat the artifacts arising from spurious response as a target-dependent noise. Modeling spurious response as noise allows proper treatment of sampling artifacts across a wider variety of systems and post-processing techniques. Perception experiments are used to assess the performance of both the MTF squeeze and aliasing as noise methods. The results demonstrate that modeling all of the aliased frequencies as a target-dependent noise leads to erroneous predictions; however, considering only aliased signals above the Nyquist rate as additive noise agrees with experimental observations.

  11. Fringe filtering technique based on local signal reconstruction using noise subspace inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2016-03-01

    A noise filtering technique is proposed to filter the fringe pattern recorded in the optical measurement set-up. A single fringe pattern carrying the information on the measurand is treated as a data matrix which can either be complex or real valued. In the first approach, the noise filtering is performed pixel-wise in a windowed data segment generated around each pixel. The singular value decomposition of an enhanced form of this data segment is performed to extract the signal component from a noisy background. This enhancement of matrix has an effect of noise subspace inflation which accommodates maximum amount of noise. In another computationally efficient approach, the data matrix is divided into number of small-sized blocks and filtering is performed block-wise based on the similar noise subspace inflation method. The proposed method has an important ability to identify the spatially varying fringe density and regions of phase discontinuities. The performance of the proposed method is validated with numerical and experimental results.

  12. Circuit for echo and noise suppression of accoustic signals transmitted through a drill string

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.; Scott, Douglas D.

    1993-01-01

    An electronic circuit for digitally processing analog electrical signals produced by at least one acoustic transducer is presented. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a novel digital time delay circuit is utilized which employs an array of First-in-First-out (FiFo) microchips. Also, a bandpass filter is used at the input to this circuit for isolating drill string noise and eliminating high frequency output.

  13. Signal-to-noise ratio of the bispectral analysis of speckle interferometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.

    Monte Carlo simulations of an atmospheric phase screen have been carried out based on a Kolmogorov spectrum of phase fluctuations. Speckle patterns produced from phase screens are used to derive statistical properties of power spectra and bispectra of speckle interferograms. The autor presents the bispectral modulation transfer function and the signal-to-noise ratio at high light levels and low light levels. The relative importance of the near axis and the mid frequency bispectrum is considered in relation to image recovery procedures.

  14. Signal, noise, and detective quantum efficiency of amorphous-silicon:hydrogen flat-panel imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey Harold

    Flat-panel imagers based upon the technology of thin-film amorphous silicon transistors and photodiodes are under investigation for a wide variety of medical imaging applications. This thesis presents quantitative empirical and theoretical investigations of the imaging performance of such imaging systems. Performance was evaluated in terms of imager signal size, spatial resolution, noise characteristics, and signal-to-noise ratio for a wide variety of imaging system configurations and exposure conditions relevant to medical imaging. A theoretical model based upon cascaded systems analysis allowed prediction of imager signal, noise, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and theoretical results were found to agree well with empirical measurements. The empirical and theoretical analyses yielded quantification of the performance of existing imager designs, allowed investigation of the potential performance of future flat-panel imaging systems, and provided a methodology for identifying optimal imager configurations for various applications and imaging tasks. There is every indication that flat-panel imagers could provide performance superior to that of existing clinical imaging technologies. For example, in general x-ray radiography, mammography, and radiotherapy portal imaging, such systems could provide DQE exceeding 60%, 80%, and 1.5%, respectively, approximately twice that of film-based systems. However, for applications involving very low exposures per image, e.g., real-time fluoroscopy, such systems may suffer from reduced signal-to-noise ratio. The analyses developed in this thesis provide an effective means of identifying strategies for improved imager performance and will facilitate the realization of optimized flat-panel imagers that physically achieve their maximum theoretical performance.

  15. Circuit for echo and noise suppression of acoustic signals transmitted through a drill string

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.; Scott, D.D.

    1993-12-28

    An electronic circuit for digitally processing analog electrical signals produced by at least one acoustic transducer is presented. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a novel digital time delay circuit is utilized which employs an array of First-in-First-out (FiFo) microchips. Also, a bandpass filter is used at the input to this circuit for isolating drill string noise and eliminating high frequency output. 20 figures.

  16. MERTIS: identifiability of spectral mineralogical features in dependence of the signal to noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproth, Carsten; Säuberlich, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The ESA deep-space mission BepiColombo to planet Mercury will contain the advanced infrared remote sensing instrument MERTIS (MErcury Radiometer and Thermal infrared Imaging Spectrometer). The mission has the goal to explore the planets inner and surface structure and its environment. With MERTIS, investigations of Mercury's surface layer within a spectral range of 7 μm to 14μm shall be conducted to specify and map Mercury's mineralogical composition with a spatial resolution of 500 m. Due to the limited mass and power budget, the used micro-bolometer detector array will only have a temperature-stabilization and will not be cooled. The performance of the instrument is estimated by the theoretical description of the signal to noise ratio and the optics including the Offner spectrometer. The expected signal to noise ratio will be in the order of 100 and is mainly dependent on the surface temperature and the wavelength. The derived theoretical models are used to execute simulations to compute the passage of the infrared radiation of a hypothetical mineralogical surface composition and surface temperature through the optical system of MERTIS. The resulting noisy spectra are used to determine spectral features of the minerals. So it is possible to evaluate the conditions which are necessary to achieve the scientific goals of MERTIS. The intent is to estimate the spectral positions of mineralogical features like the Christiansen feature. This will be difficult because of the low signal to noise ratio and the low contrast of real mineral spectra.

  17. Post-Stop-Signal Slowing: Strategies Dominate Reflexes and Implicit Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Patrick G.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Control adjustments are necessary to balance competing cognitive demands. One task that is well-suited to explore control adjustments is the stop-signal paradigm, in which subjects must balance initiation and inhibition. One common adjustment in the stop-signal paradigm is post-stop-signal slowing. Existing models of sequential adjustments in the…

  18. Effect of signal-temporal uncertainty in children and adults: Tone detection in noise or a random-frequency masker

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, Angela Yarnell; Leibold, Lori J.; Buss, Emily

    2013-01-01

    A cue indicating when in time to listen can improve adults' tone detection thresholds, particularly for conditions that produce substantial informational masking. The purpose of this study was to determine if 5- to 13-yr-old children likewise benefit from a light cue indicating when in time to listen for a masked pure-tone signal. Each listener was tested in one of two continuous maskers: Broadband noise (low informational masking) or a random-frequency, two-tone masker (high informational masking). Using a single-interval method of constant stimuli, detection thresholds were measured for two temporal conditions: (1) Temporally-defined, with the listening interval defined by a light cue, and (2) temporally-uncertain, with no light cue. Thresholds estimated from psychometric functions fitted to the data indicated that children and adults benefited to the same degree from the visual cue. Across listeners, the average benefit of a defined listening interval was 1.8 dB in the broadband noise and 8.6 dB in the random-frequency, two-tone masker. Thus, the benefit of knowing when in time to listen was more robust for conditions believed to be dominated by informational masking. An unexpected finding of this study was that children's thresholds were comparable to adults' in the random-frequency, two-tone masker. PMID:25669256

  19. Padé-Froissart exact signal-noise separation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, Dževad; Belkić, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is one of the key methods for studying the structure of matter on different levels (sub-nuclear, nuclear, atomic, molecular, cellular, etc). Its overall success critically depends upon reliable mathematical analysis and interpretation of the studied data. This is especially aided by parametric signal processing with the ensuing data quantification, which can yield the abundance or concentrations of the constituents in the examined matter. The sought reliability of signal processing rests upon the possibility of an accurate solution of the quantification problem alongside the unambiguous separation of true from false information in the spectrally analysed data. We presently demonstrate that the fast Padé transform (FPT), as the unique ratio of two polynomials for a given Maclaurin series, can yield exact signal-noise separation for a synthesized free induction decay curve built from 25 molecules. This is achieved by using the concept of Froissart doublets or pole-zero cancellations. Unphysical/spurious (noise or noise-like) resonances have coincident or near-coincident poles and zeros. They possess either zero- or near-zero-valued amplitudes. Such spectral structures never converge due to their instability against even the smallest perturbations. By contrast, upon convergence of the FPT, physical/genuine resonances are identified by their persistent stability against external perturbations, such as signal truncation or addition of random noise, etc. In practice, the computation is carried out by gradually and systematically increasing the common degree of the Padé numerator and denominator polynomials in the diagonal FPT. As this degree changes, the reconstructed parameters and spectra fluctuate until stabilization occurs. The polynomial degree at which this full stabilization is achieved represents the sought exact number of resonances. An illustrative set of results is reported in this work to show the exact separation of

  20. Basic approach to define signal-to-noise ratio for adjacent pixels for an uncooled microbolometer FPA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürüm, Ulas

    2013-09-01

    To define the ratio of the signal of the desired pixel and the noise of adjacent pixels, noise and signal sources are theoretically identified. While defining these values, atmospheric attenuation, losses at transmitting surfaces and wave characteristics of light are considered. For presentation purposes, a standard NATO target is chosen as source object. The model has been developed for a simple optical design which is intentionally left defective to better address effects of aberrations to signal to noise ratio of adjacent pixels especially caused by diffraction.

  1. Noise-to-signal transition of a Brownian particle in the cubic potential: II. optical trapping geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemánek, Pavel; Šiler, Martin; Brzobohatý, Oto; Jákl, Petr; Filip, Radim

    2016-06-01

    The noise-to-signal transitions belong to an exciting group of processes in physics. In Filip and Zemánek (2016, J. Opt. 18 065401) we theoretically analyse the stochastic noise-to-signal transition of overdamped Brownian motion of a particle in the cubic potential. In this part, we propose a feasible experimental setup for a proof-of-principle experiment that uses methods of optical trapping in shaped laser beams which provide cubic and quadratic potentials. Theoretical estimates and results from the numerical simulations indicate that the noise-to-signal transition can be observed under realistic experimental conditions.

  2. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: Measuring below the noise floor

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Roger M.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels. PMID:25786932

  3. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: measuring below the noise floor.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Roger M; Gallun, Frederick J; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels. PMID:25786932

  4. Background Noises Versus Intraseasonal Variation Signals: Small vs. Large Convective Cloud Objects From CERES Aqua Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    terms of the probability density functions of radiative and cloud physical properties, there are virtually no differences between the MJO phases for the small group, but there are significant differences for the large groups for both DC and CS types. These results suggest that the intreseasonal variation signals reside at the large cloud clusters while the small cloud clusters represent the background noises resulting from various types of the tropical waves with different wavenumbers and propagation speeds/directions.

  5. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  6. Enhancing scatterometry CD signal-to-noise ratio for 1x logic and memory challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, Derrick; Krishnan, Shankar; Wei, Lanhua; Shchegrov, Andrei V.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing transition from 2D to 3D structures in logic and memory has led to an increased adoption of scatterometry CD (SCD) for inline metrology. However, shrinking device dimensions in logic and high aspect ratios in memory represent primary challenges for SCD and require a significant breakthrough in improving signal-to-noise performance. We present a report on the new generation of SCD technology, enabled by a new laser-driven plasma source. The developed light source provides several key advantages over conventional arc lamps typically used in SCD applications. The plasma color temperature of the laser driven source is considerably higher than available with arc lamps resulting in >5X increase in radiance in the visible and >10X increase in radiance in the DUV when compared to sources on previous generation SCD tools while maintaining or improving source intensity noise. This high radiance across such a broad spectrum allows for the use of a single light source from 190-1700nm. When combined with other optical design changes, the higher source radiance enables reduction of measurement box size of our spectroscopic ellipsometer from 45×45um box to 25×25um box without compromising signal to noise ratio. The benefits for 1×nm SCD metrology of the additional photons across the DUV to IR spectrum have been found to be greater than the increase in source signal to noise ratio would suggest. Better light penetration in Si and poly-Si has resulted in improved sensitivity and correlation breaking for critical parameters in 1xnm FinFET and HAR flash memory structures.

  7. A Non-canonical Pathway from Cochlea to Brain Signals Tissue-damaging Noise

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Emma N.; Duggan, Anne; Madathany, Thomas; Hogan, Ann K.; Márquez, Freddie; Kumar, Gagan; Seal, Rebecca; Edwards, Robert; Liberman, M. Charles; García-Añoveros, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intense noise damages the cochlear organ of Corti, particularly the outer hair cells (OHCs)[1], however this epithelium is not innervated by nociceptors of somatosensory ganglia, which detect damage elsewhere in the body. The only sensory neurons innervating the organ of Corti originate from the spiral ganglion, roughly 95% of which innervate exclusively inner hair cells (IHCs)[2-4]. Upon sound stimulation, IHCs release glutamate to activate AMPA-type receptors on these myelinated type-I neurons, which carry the neuronal signals to the cochlear nucleus. The remaining spiral ganglion cells (type-IIs) are unmyelinated and contact OHCs[2-4]. Their function is unknown. Using immunoreactivity to cFos, we documented neuronal activation in the brainstem of Vglut3−/− mice, in which the canonical auditory pathway (activation of type-I afferents by glutamate released from inner hair cells) is silenced[5, 6]. In these deaf mice, we found responses to noxious noise, that damages hair cells, but not to innocuous noise, in neurons of the cochlear nucleus, but not in the vestibular or trigeminal nuclei. This response originates in the cochlea and not in other areas also stimulated by intense noise (middle ear and vestibule) as it was absent in CD1 mice with selective cochlear degeneration but normal vestibular and somatosensory function. These data imply the existence of an alternative neuronal pathway from cochlea to brainstem that is activated by tissue-damaging noise and does not require glutamate release from IHCs. This detection of noise-induced tissue damage, possibly by type-II cochlear afferents, represents a novel form of sensation we term auditory nociception. PMID:25639244

  8. A non-canonical pathway from cochlea to brain signals tissue-damaging noise.

    PubMed

    Flores, Emma N; Duggan, Anne; Madathany, Thomas; Hogan, Ann K; Márquez, Freddie G; Kumar, Gagan; Seal, Rebecca P; Edwards, Robert H; Liberman, M Charles; García-Añoveros, Jaime

    2015-03-01

    Intense noise damages the cochlear organ of Corti, particularly the outer hair cells (OHCs) [1]; however, this epithelium is not innervated by nociceptors of somatosensory ganglia, which detect damage elsewhere in the body. The only sensory neurons innervating the organ of Corti originate from the spiral ganglion, roughly 95% of which innervate exclusively inner hair cells (IHCs) [2-4]. Upon sound stimulation, IHCs release glutamate to activate AMPA-type receptors on these myelinated type-I neurons, which carry the neuronal signals to the cochlear nucleus. The remaining spiral ganglion cells (type IIs) are unmyelinated and contact OHCs [2-4]. Their function is unknown. Using immunoreactivity to cFos, we documented neuronal activation in the brainstem of Vglut3(-/-) mice, in which the canonical auditory pathway (activation of type-I afferents by glutamate released from inner hair cells) is silenced [5, 6]. In these deaf mice, we found responses to noxious noise, which damages hair cells, but not to innocuous noise, in neurons of the cochlear nucleus, but not in the vestibular or trigeminal nuclei. This response originates in the cochlea and not in other areas also stimulated by intense noise (middle ear and vestibule) as it was absent in CD1 mice with selective cochlear degeneration but normal vestibular and somatosensory function. These data imply the existence of an alternative neuronal pathway from cochlea to brainstem that is activated by tissue-damaging noise and does not require glutamate release from IHCs. This detection of noise-induced tissue damage, possibly by type-II cochlear afferents, represents a novel form of sensation that we term auditory nociception. PMID:25639244

  9. Noise modulation in retinoic acid signaling sharpens segmental boundaries of gene expression in the embryonic zebrafish hindbrain

    PubMed Central

    Sosnik, Julian; Zheng, Likun; Rackauckas, Christopher V; Digman, Michelle; Gratton, Enrico; Nie, Qing; Schilling, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Morphogen gradients induce sharply defined domains of gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner, yet how cells interpret these signals in the face of spatial and temporal noise remains unclear. Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and phasor analysis to measure endogenous retinoic acid (RA) directly in vivo, we have investigated the amplitude of noise in RA signaling, and how modulation of this noise affects patterning of hindbrain segments (rhombomeres) in the zebrafish embryo. We demonstrate that RA forms a noisy gradient during critical stages of hindbrain patterning and that cells use distinct intracellular binding proteins to attenuate noise in RA levels. Increasing noise disrupts sharpening of rhombomere boundaries and proper patterning of the hindbrain. These findings reveal novel cellular mechanisms of noise regulation, which are likely to play important roles in other aspects of physiology and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14034.001 PMID:27067377

  10. Comparison of Methods for Identifying Noise Sources in Far-Field Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Andrew; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Three different methods of extracting intermittent wave packets from unstructured background within complex time series signals were analyzed and compared. The algorithms are denoted ``cross correlation,'' ``denoising,'' and ``TFLE (Time-Frequency-Lag event)'' methods respectively. All three methods utilize Mexican Hat or Morlet wavelets for the transformation of time domain signals into time-frequency domain signals. Within the denoising and cross correlation algorithms, events are identified through comparison of high energy excerpts of each signal captured by individual far-field microphones, while the TFLE algorithm simply defines events by their contributions to positive correlation values. The goal of this analysis is to quantify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods. The results lend themselves to determining the validity of these methods as noise source identification algorithms to be used in jet noise characterization. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL; and by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering REU Program at SU.

  11. Influence of gate metal engineering on small-signal and noise behaviour of silicon nanowire MOSFET for low-noise amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neha; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the small-signal behaviour and RF noise performance of gate electrode workfunction engineered (GEWE) silicon nanowire (SiNW) MOSFET, and the results so obtained are simultaneously compared with SiNW and conventional MOSFET at THz frequency range. This work examines reflection and transmission coefficients, noise conductance, minimum noise figure and cross-correlation factor. Results reveal significant reduction in input/output reflection coefficient and an increase in forward/reverse transmission coefficient owing to improved transconductance in GEWE-SiNW in comparison with conventional counterparts. It is also observed that minimum noise figure and noise conductance of GEWE-SiNW is reduced by 17.4 and 31.2 %, respectively, in comparison with SiNW, thus fortifying its potential application for low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) at radio frequencies. Moreover, the efficacy of gate metal workfunction engineering is also studied and the results validate that tuning of workfunction difference results further improvement in device small-signal behaviour and noise performance.

  12. A Signal-Transformational Framework for Breaking the Noise Floor and Its Applications in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Cheng Guan; Özarslan, Evren; Basser, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    A long-standing problem in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the noise-induced bias in the magnitude signals. This problem is particularly pressing in diffusion MRI at high diffusion-weighting. In this paper, we present a three-stage scheme to solve this problem by transforming noisy nonCentral Chi signals to noisy Gaussian signals. A special case of nonCentral Chi distribution is the Rician distribution. In general, the Gaussian-distributed signals are of interest rather than the Gaussian-derived (e.g., Rayleigh, Rician, and nonCentral Chi) signals because the Gaussian-distributed signals are generally more amenable to statistical treatment through the principle of least squares. Monte Carlo simulations were used to validate the statistical properties of the proposed framework. This scheme opens up the possibility of investigating the low signal regime (or high diffusion-weighting regime in the case of diffusion MRI) that contains potentially important information about biophysical processes and structures of the brain. PMID:19138540

  13. Simulation of signal-to-noise ratio for the laser range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weiwei; Chen, Qianrong; Hao, Yongwang; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Wenpan

    2015-10-01

    The laser active imaging system is widely used in night vision, underwater imaging, three-dimension scene imaging and other civilian applications, and the system's detected range increase greatly comparing with the passive imaging system. In recent years, with rapid development of sensor and laser source technique, the laser range-gated imaging system is achieved based on high peak power pulsed laser and gated intensified CCD(ICCD), and it is well known for its properties such as high suppression of backscatter noise from fog and other obscurants, high resolution, long detection range and direct visualization. However, the performance of the laser range-gated imaging system is seriously affected by many factors, and the relationships between system's Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and influence factors are not further elaborated. In this paper, the simulation of SNR for the laser range-gated imaging system is studied. The principle of the laser range-gated imaging system is shown firstly, and the range equation is derived by means of deducing laser illuminating model according to the principle of laser radar and the characters of objects and the detectors. And then, the sources of noise are analyzed by accurately modeling all noise sources in the detection system, the model of SNR for laser range-gated imaging system is established. Finally, the relationships between SNR of system and influence factors such as gating time, laser pulse width and repetition frequency are discussed, and correspondingly the solutions are proposed.

  14. Immersive audiomotor game play enhances neural and perceptual salience of weak signals in noise

    PubMed Central

    Whitton, Jonathon P.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Polley, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    All sensory systems face the fundamental challenge of encoding weak signals in noisy backgrounds. Although discrimination abilities can improve with practice, these benefits rarely generalize to untrained stimulus dimensions. Inspired by recent findings that action video game training can impart a broader spectrum of benefits than traditional perceptual learning paradigms, we trained adult humans and mice in an immersive audio game that challenged them to forage for hidden auditory targets in a 2D soundscape. Both species learned to modulate their angular search vectors and target approach velocities based on real-time changes in the level of a weak tone embedded in broadband noise. In humans, mastery of this tone in noise task generalized to an improved ability to comprehend spoken sentences in speech babble noise. Neural plasticity in the auditory cortex of trained mice supported improved decoding of low-intensity sounds at the training frequency and an enhanced resistance to interference from background masking noise. These findings highlight the potential to improve the neural and perceptual salience of degraded sensory stimuli through immersive computerized games. PMID:24927596

  15. Immersive audiomotor game play enhances neural and perceptual salience of weak signals in noise.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Jonathon P; Hancock, Kenneth E; Polley, Daniel B

    2014-06-24

    All sensory systems face the fundamental challenge of encoding weak signals in noisy backgrounds. Although discrimination abilities can improve with practice, these benefits rarely generalize to untrained stimulus dimensions. Inspired by recent findings that action video game training can impart a broader spectrum of benefits than traditional perceptual learning paradigms, we trained adult humans and mice in an immersive audio game that challenged them to forage for hidden auditory targets in a 2D soundscape. Both species learned to modulate their angular search vectors and target approach velocities based on real-time changes in the level of a weak tone embedded in broadband noise. In humans, mastery of this tone in noise task generalized to an improved ability to comprehend spoken sentences in speech babble noise. Neural plasticity in the auditory cortex of trained mice supported improved decoding of low-intensity sounds at the training frequency and an enhanced resistance to interference from background masking noise. These findings highlight the potential to improve the neural and perceptual salience of degraded sensory stimuli through immersive computerized games. PMID:24927596

  16. Calculation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of infrared detection system based on MODTRAN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xue; Li, Chuang; Fan, Xuewu

    2013-09-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is an important parameter of infrared detection system. SNR of infrared detection system is determined by the target infrared radiation, atmospheric transmittance, background infrared radiation and the detector noise. The infrared radiation flux in the atmosphere is determined by the selective absorption of the gas molecules, the atmospheric environment, and the transmission distance of the radiation, etc, so the atmospheric transmittance and infrared radiance flux are intricate parameters. A radiometric model for the calculation of SNR of infrared detection system is developed and used to evaluate the effects of various parameters on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). An atmospheric modeling tool, MODTRAN, is used to model wavelength-dependent atmospheric transmission and sky background radiance. Then a new expression of SNR is deduced. Instead of using constants such as average atmospheric transmission and average wavelength in traditional method, it uses discrete values for atmospheric transmission and sky background radiance. The integrals in general expression of SNR are converted to summations. The accuracy of SNR obtained from the new method can be improved. By adopting atmospheric condition of the 1976 US standard, no clouds urban aerosols, fall-winter aerosol profiles, the typical spectrum characters of sky background radiance and transmittance are computed by MODTRON. Then the operating ranges corresponding to the threshold quantity of SNR are calculated with the new method. The calculated operating ranges are more close to the measured operating range than those calculated with the traditional method.

  17. Local Area Signal-to-Noise Ratio (LASNR) algorithm for Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, L; Fong, P; Glenn, S; Liebman, J

    2007-07-03

    Many automated image-based applications have need of finding small spots in a variably noisy image. For humans, it is relatively easy to distinguish objects from local surroundings no matter what else may be in the image. We attempt to capture this distinguishing capability computationally by calculating a measurement that estimates the strength of signal within an object versus the noise in its local neighborhood. First, we hypothesize various sizes for the object and corresponding background areas. Then, we compute the Local Area Signal to Noise Ratio (LASNR) at every pixel in the image, resulting in a new image with LASNR values for each pixel. All pixels exceeding a pre-selected LASNR value become seed pixels, or initiation points, and are grown to include the full area extent of the object. Since growing the seed is a separate operation from finding the seed, each object can be any size and shape. Thus, the overall process is a 2-stage segmentation method that first finds object seeds and then grows them to find the full extent of the object. This algorithm was designed, optimized and is in daily use for the accurate and rapid inspection of optics from a large laser system (National Ignition Facility (NIF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA), which includes images with background noise, ghost reflections, different illumination and other sources of variation.

  18. Laser phase induced intensity noise in fiber-optic signal processing and sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arie, Ady

    1991-03-01

    The effects of random phase fluctuations in laser output on the performance of optical systems was studied. The statistical nature of phase induced intensity noise (PIIN) was measured and analysed by studying its probability density function and the second and fourth moments of the optical field at the output of several multiple path systems. The properties of the semiconductor laser, including broad spectral linewidth and non-Lorentzian line shape were shown to have significant influence on the generated PIIN. The PIIN statistics was first studied via the probability density function (PDF) of the beat signal obtained from a two-beam interferometer fed by the laser. Two distinct operating regimes could be defined, according to the ratio between the interferometer delay and the laser coherence time. Analytical expressions were obtained for statistical averages of the PIIN at the output of a general multiple path system; they represent the variance and autocovariance, and the power spectral density of the PIIN at the system output. The non-Lorentzian lineshape of the semiconductor laser was taken into account and the results obtained were found to differ from the Lorentzian model predictions; power spectrum measurements by means of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer confirmed the theoretical model. Analysis of the PIIN for complex signal processing systems comprising several subsystems showed that the PIIN spectrum was determined by two mechanisms: noise generation and noise filtration.

  19. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measures Efficacy of Biological Computing Devices and Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biological cells to perform computations has a broad range of important potential applications, including precision medical therapies, biosynthesis process control, and environmental sensing. Implementing predictable and effective computation, however, has been extremely difficult to date, due to a combination of poor composability of available parts and of insufficient characterization of parts and their interactions with the complex environment in which they operate. In this paper, the author argues that this situation can be improved by quantitative signal-to-noise analysis of the relationship between computational abstractions and the variation and uncertainty endemic in biological organisms. This analysis takes the form of a ΔSNRdB function for each computational device, which can be computed from measurements of a device’s input/output curve and expression noise. These functions can then be combined to predict how well a circuit will implement an intended computation, as well as evaluating the general suitability of biological devices for engineering computational circuits. Applying signal-to-noise analysis to current repressor libraries shows that no library is currently sufficient for general circuit engineering, but also indicates key targets to remedy this situation and vastly improve the range of computations that can be used effectively in the implementation of biological applications. PMID:26177070

  20. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measures Efficacy of Biological Computing Devices and Circuits.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biological cells to perform computations has a broad range of important potential applications, including precision medical therapies, biosynthesis process control, and environmental sensing. Implementing predictable and effective computation, however, has been extremely difficult to date, due to a combination of poor composability of available parts and of insufficient characterization of parts and their interactions with the complex environment in which they operate. In this paper, the author argues that this situation can be improved by quantitative signal-to-noise analysis of the relationship between computational abstractions and the variation and uncertainty endemic in biological organisms. This analysis takes the form of a ΔSNRdB function for each computational device, which can be computed from measurements of a device's input/output curve and expression noise. These functions can then be combined to predict how well a circuit will implement an intended computation, as well as evaluating the general suitability of biological devices for engineering computational circuits. Applying signal-to-noise analysis to current repressor libraries shows that no library is currently sufficient for general circuit engineering, but also indicates key targets to remedy this situation and vastly improve the range of computations that can be used effectively in the implementation of biological applications. PMID:26177070

  1. Filtering and thresholding the analytic signal envelope in order to improve peak and spike noise reduction in EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Melia, Umberto; Clariá, Francesc; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere

    2014-04-01

    To remove peak and spike artifacts in biological time series has represented a hard challenge in the last decades. Several methods have been implemented mainly based on adaptive filtering in order to solve this problem. This work presents an algorithm for removing peak and spike artifacts based on a threshold built on the analytic signal envelope. The algorithm was tested on simulated and real EEG signals that contain peak and spike artifacts with random amplitude and frequency occurrence. The performance of the filter was compared with commonly used adaptive filters. Three indexes were used for testing the performance of the filters: Correlation coefficient (ρ), mean of coherence function (C), and rate of absolute error (RAE). All these indexes were calculated between filtered signal and original signal without noise. It was found that the new proposed filter was able to reduce the amplitude of peak and spike artifacts with ρ>0.85, C>0.8, and RAE<0.5. These values were significantly better than the performance of LMS adaptive filter (ρ<0.85, C<0.6, and RAE>1). PMID:24365255

  2. Designing a Low-noise, High-resolution, and Portable Four Channel Acquisition System for Recording Surface Electromyographic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Pashaei, Akbar; Yazdchi, Mohammad Reza; Marateb, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    In current years, the application of biopotential signals has received a lot of attention in literature. One of these signals is an electromyogram (EMG) generated by active muscles. Surface EMG (sEMG) signal is recorded over the skin, as the representative of the muscle activity. Since its amplitude can be as low as 50 μV, it is sensitive to undesirable noise signals such as power-line interferences. This study aims at designing a battery-powered portable four-channel sEMG signal acquisition system. The performance of the proposed system was assessed in terms of the input voltage and current noise, noise distribution, synchronization and input noise level among different channels. The results indicated that the designed system had several inbuilt operational merits such as low referred to input noise (lower than 0.56 μV between 8 Hz and 1000 Hz), considerable elimination of power-line interference and satisfactory recorded signal quality in terms of signal-to-noise ratio. The muscle conduction velocity was also estimated using the proposed system on the brachial biceps muscle during isometric contraction. The estimated values were in then normal ranges. In addition, the system included a modular configuration to increase the number of recording channels up to 96. PMID:26951952

  3. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-08-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens. PMID:19654762

  4. VLSI implementation of a new LMS-based algorithm for noise removal in ECG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheeskumaran, S.; Sabrigiriraj, M.

    2016-06-01

    Least mean square (LMS)-based adaptive filters are widely deployed for removing artefacts in electrocardiogram (ECG) due to less number of computations. But they posses high mean square error (MSE) under noisy environment. The transform domain variable step-size LMS algorithm reduces the MSE at the cost of computational complexity. In this paper, a variable step-size delayed LMS adaptive filter is used to remove the artefacts from the ECG signal for improved feature extraction. The dedicated digital Signal processors provide fast processing, but they are not flexible. By using field programmable gate arrays, the pipelined architectures can be used to enhance the system performance. The pipelined architecture can enhance the operation efficiency of the adaptive filter and save the power consumption. This technique provides high signal-to-noise ratio and low MSE with reduced computational complexity; hence, it is a useful method for monitoring patients with heart-related problem.

  5. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens. PMID:19654762

  6. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  7. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  8. The Effect of Classroom Amplification on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Classrooms while Class Is in Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Jeffery B.; Blair, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the signal-to-noise ratios in classrooms while class was in session and students were interacting with the teacher and each other. Method: Measurements of noise and reverberation were collected for 5 different classrooms in 3 different schools while class was in session. Activities taking place…

  9. Double-maximum enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio gain via stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-08-01

    This paper studies the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of a parallel array of nonlinear elements that transmits a common input composed of a periodic signal and external noise. Aiming to further enhance the SNR gain, each element is injected with internal noise components or high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations. We report that the SNR gain exhibits two maxima at different values of the internal noise level or of the sinusoidal vibration amplitude. For the addition of internal noise to an array of threshold-based elements, the condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is analytically investigated in the limit of weak signals. Interestingly, when the internal noise components are replaced by high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations, the SNR gain displays the vibrational multiresonance phenomenon. In both considered cases, there are certain regions of the internal noise intensity or the sinusoidal vibration amplitude wherein the achieved maximal SNR gain can be considerably beyond unity for a weak signal buried in non-Gaussian external noise. Due to the easy implementation of sinusoidal vibration modulation, this approach is potentially useful for improving the output SNR in an array of nonlinear devices. PMID:25215715

  10. Signal-Induced Noise Effects in a Photon Counting System for Stratospheric Ozone Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Signal-induced noise (SIN) is a common effect resulting when a photomultiplier tube (PMT) is saturated, for a brief moment, with a high intensity light pulse. After the laser pulse is sent into the atmosphere a very large light return, from either the near-field or a cloud, causes the PMT to momentarily saturate. The PMT is gated off at this time so no signal is seen at the anode. When the PMT gate is turned on, the far-field light return from the atmosphere is observed. This signal is distorted, however because of the addition of SIN to the received light signal causing a slower than expected decay of the atmospheric signal return. We have characterized SIN responses to varying parameters of the incident light on the PMT. These varied parameters included incident wavelength, PMT voltage, incident intensity, and tube type. We found that only the amplitude of the SIN was effected by varying PMT voltages and light intensities. The amplitude increased linearly as input light intensity increased. Different incident wavelengths at the same intensity did not effect the amplitude or the temporal behavior of the SIN response. Finally, different PMT tubes with similar physical structures exhibited similar SIN responses although with different amplitudes. The different amplitudes can be attributed to the different gains and operating voltages of each tube. These results suggest that SIN is caused by photocathode electron dynamics such as charge accumulation on internal PMT surfaces. These surfaces then emit the electrons slowly resulting in a long decay noise signal. With the SIN responses characterized we can now try to develop a method to reduce or eliminate SIN in DIAL systems.

  11. Signal-to-noise ratio application to seismic marker analysis and fracture detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui-Qun; Gui, Zhi-Xian

    2014-03-01

    Seismic data with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) are useful in reservoir exploration. To obtain high SNR seismic data, significant effort is required to achieve noise attenuation in seismic data processing, which is costly in materials, and human and financial resources. We introduce a method for improving the SNR of seismic data. The SNR is calculated by using the frequency domain method. Furthermore, we optimize and discuss the critical parameters and calculation procedure. We applied the proposed method on real data and found that the SNR is high in the seismic marker and low in the fracture zone. Consequently, this can be used to extract detailed information about fracture zones that are inferred by structural analysis but not observed in conventional seismic data.

  12. Listening to the Deep: live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    André, M; van der Schaar, M; Zaugg, S; Houégnigan, L; Sánchez, A M; Castell, J V

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO (Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time long-term monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and standalone observatories. Here, we present the overall development of the project and the use of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) techniques to provide the scientific community with real-time data at large spatial and temporal scales. Special attention is given to the extraction and identification of high frequency cetacean echolocation signals given the relevance of detecting target species, e.g. beaked whales, in mitigation processes, e.g. during military exercises. PMID:21665016

  13. Advantages of a soft protective layer for good signal-to-noise ratio proton radiographs in high debris environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard-Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cobble, J.; Nelson, S. L.; Merwin, A.; Paudel, Y.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Williamson, K. M.; Kantsyrev, V. L.

    2011-12-01

    Proton radiography is a very powerful diagnostic but in some high debris environments it may be challenging to get a good signal-to-noise ratio radiograph to gain insights into the electric and magnetic field topology, and thus the basic physics. Such environments are produced for example on z-pinches and also on lasers such as the National Ignition Facility. We demonstrate here the feasibility of clean, very high signal-to-noise ratio proton radiographs in extremely hostile environments.

  14. Noise Making Genes in the Oxygen-18 Climate Signal of Tree-Ring Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, L.; Ellsworth, P.

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies showed that the δ18O values of the oxygen attached to the second carbon of the cellulose glucose moieties (δ18OC-2) adds biochemical noise to the 18O climate signal of cellulose. We expanded the above study to include tree ring sequences to see if this noise persists across time within an individual. The δ18OC-2 noise persists and the δ18O value of the cellulose derivative not having this "noisy" oxygen δ18OP-G is a superior predictor of plant water and relative humidity. We previously proposed that the isotopic noise may be generated by synthesis of polyols (sugar alcohols), since the isotopic noise was particularly strong in areas of plant water or temperature stress. It is well known that plants generate polyols, such as mannitol or inositol to protect membrane structure and build up osmotic pressure under stressful conditions. A survey of previously published leaf cellulose δ18O values shows that, indeed, polyol producing plants tend to have lower oxygen isotope ratios. A working hypothesis based on the reactions of the oxygen attached to the second carbon of the glucose moieties was developed and tested with genetically modified Arabidopsis thaliana var. Columbia. A A. thaliana line genetically modified by the insertion of a mannitol synthesis gene (Mannose 6-Phosphate Reductase) and another mutant line which cannot synthesize starch (lacking plastid Phosphoglucose Mutase) showed significantly lower δ18O values of stem cellulose compared to the wild type. The primary cause of this lower isotopic value of the whole cellulose molecule was lower δ18OC-2 values. These results are consistent with our working hypothesis.

  15. How is spatial context learning integrated over signal versus noise? A primacy effect in contextual cueing

    PubMed Central

    Jungé, Justin A.; Scholl, Brian J.; Chun, Marvin M.

    2008-01-01

    Over repeated exposure to particular visual search displays, subjects are able to implicitly extract regularities that then make search more efficient—a phenomenon known as contextual cueing. Here we explore how the learning involved in contextual cueing is formed, maintained, and updated over experience. During an initial training phase, a group of signal first subjects searched through a series of predictive displays (where distractor locations were perfectly correlated with the target location), followed with no overt break by a series of unpredictive displays (where repeated contexts were uncorrelated with target locations). A second noise first group of subjects encountered the unpredictive displays followed by the predictive displays. Despite the fact that both groups had the same overall exposure to signal and noise, only the signal first group demonstrated subsequent contextual cueing. This primacy effect indicates that initial experience can result in hypotheses about regularities in displays—or the lack thereof—which then become resistant to updating. The absence of regularities in early stages of training even blocked observers from learning predictive regularities later on. PMID:18725966

  16. Variation, Signal, and Noise in Cerebellar Sensory–Motor Processing for Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Javier F.; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    Neural responses are variable, yet motor performance can be quite precise. To ask how neural signal and noise are processed in the brain during sensory–motor behavior, we have evaluated the trial-by-trial variation of Purkinje cell (PC) activity in the floccular complex of the cerebellum, an intermediate stage in the neural circuit for smooth-pursuit eye movements. We find strong correlations between small trial-by-trial variations in the simple spike activity of individual PCs and the eye movements at the initiation of pursuit. The correlation is lower but still present during steady-state pursuit. Recordings from a few pairs of PCs verified the predictions of a model of the PC population, that there is a transition from highly covariant PC activity during movement initiation to more independent activity later on. Application to the data of a theoretical and computational analysis suggests that variation in pursuit initiation arises mostly from variation in visual motion signals that provide common inputs to the PC population. Variation in eye movement during steady-state pursuit can be attributed primarily to signal-dependent motor noise that arises downstream from PCs. PMID:17581971

  17. Balanced ionotropic receptor dynamics support signal estimation via voltage-dependent membrane noise.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Curtis M; Clarke, Stephen E; Nesse, William H; Longtin, Andre; Maler, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Encoding behaviorally relevant stimuli in a noisy background is critical for animals to survive in their natural environment. We identify core biophysical and synaptic mechanisms that permit the encoding of low-frequency signals in pyramidal neurons of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus, an animal that can accurately encode even miniscule amplitude modulations of its self-generated electric field. We demonstrate that slow NMDA receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are able to summate over many interspike intervals (ISIs) of the primary electrosensory afferents (EAs), effectively eliminating the baseline EA ISI correlations from the pyramidal cell input. Together with a dynamic balance of NMDA-R and GABA-A-R currents, this permits stimulus-evoked changes in EA spiking to be transmitted efficiently to target electrosensory lobe (ELL) pyramidal cells, for encoding low-frequency signals. Interestingly, AMPA-R activity is depressed and appears to play a negligible role in the generation of action potentials. Instead, we hypothesize that cell-intrinsic voltage-dependent membrane noise supports the encoding of perithreshold sensory input; this noise drives a significant proportion of pyramidal cell spikes. Together, these mechanisms may be sufficient for the ELL to encode signals near the threshold of behavioral detection. PMID:26561607

  18. Brain–computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, T. Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M.; McHenry, Monica A.; White, Jason P.; LaConte, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects’ whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:23901117

  19. Reduction of electronic delay in active noise control systems--a multirate signal processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lin, Yuanpei; Lai, Jienwen

    2002-02-01

    Electronic delay has been a critical problem in active noise control (ANC) systems. This is true whether a feedforward structure or a feedback structure is adopted. In particular, excessive delays would create a causality problem in a feedforward ANC system of a finite-length duct. This paper suggests a multirate signal-processing approach for minimizing the electronic delay in the control loop. In this approach, digital controllers are required in decimation and interpolation of discrete-time signals. The computation efficiency is further enhanced by a polyphase method, where the phases of low-pass finite impulse response (FIR) filters must be carefully designed to avoid unnecessary delays. Frequency domain optimization procedures based on H1, H2, and Hinfinity norms, respectively, are utilized in the FIR filter design. The proposed method was implemented by using a floating-point digital signal processor. Experimental results showed that the multirate approach remains effective for suppressing a broadband (200-600 Hz) noise in a duct with a minimum upstream measurement microphone placement of 20 cm. PMID:11863193

  20. Signal to Noise Ratio for Different Gridded Rainfall Products of Indian Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehra, P.; Shastri, H. K.; Ghosh, S.; Mishra, V.; Murtugudde, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Gridded rainfall datasets provide useful information of spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation over a region. For India, there are 3 gridded rainfall data products available from India Meteorological Department (IMD), Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and Asian Precipitation - Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration towards Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE), these compile precipitation information obtained through satellite based measurement and ground station based data. The gridded rainfall data from IMD is available at spatial resolution of 1°, 0.5° and 0.25° where as TRMM and APHRODITE is available at 0.25°. Here, we employ 7 years (1998-2004) of common time period amongst the 3 data products for the south-west monsoon season, i.e., the months June to September. We examine temporal mean and standard deviation of these 3 products to observe substantial variation amongst them at 1° resolution whereas for 0.25° resolution, all the data types are nearly identical. We determine the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the 3 products at 1° and 0.25° resolution based on noise separation technique adopting horizontal separation of the power spectrum generated with the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). A methodology is developed for threshold based separation of signal and noise from the power spectrum, treating the noise as white. The variance of signal to that of noise is computed to obtain SNR. Determination of SNR for different regions over the country shows the highest SNR with APHRODITE at 0.25° resolution. It is observed that the eastern part of India has the highest SNR in all cases considered whereas the northern and southern most Indian regions have lowest SNR. An incremental linear trend is observed among the SNR values and the spatial variance of corresponding region. Relationship between the computed SNR values and the interpolation method used with the dataset is analyzed. The SNR analysis provides an effective

  1. Directional microphone arrays: Reducing wind noise without killing your signal or filling up your disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, M. A.; Walker, K. T.; Dewolf, S.; Hedlin, M. A.; Shearer, P. M.; Berger, J.

    2008-12-01

    The bane of infrasound signal detection is the noise generated by the wind. While the physics of the noise is still a subject of investigation, it is clear that sampling pressure at many points over a length scale larger than the spatial coherence length of wind turbulence attenuates the noise. A dense array of microphones can exploit this approach, but this presents different challenges. Two mechanical wind filters using this approach are commonly employed by the nuclear monitoring community (rosette pipe and porous-hoses networks) and attach to a central microphone. To get large wind noise reduction and a low signal detection threshold in the frequency band of interest, these filters require large apertures. However, these wind filters with such large apertures have a poor omnidirectional instrument response for typical infrasound signals because the pressure signal propagates at the speed of sound through the pipes/hoses to the central microphone. A simple, but improved averaging approach would be to instantaneously sample a long length of the infrasound signal wavefront. Optical fiber infrasound sensors (OFIS) are an implementation of this idea. These sensors are compliant sealed tubes wrapped with two optical fibers that integrate pressure change instantaneously along the length of the tube with laser interferometery. Infrasound arrays typically consist of several microbarometers with wind filters separated by distances that provide predictable signal time separations, forming the basis for processing techniques that estimate the phase velocity direction. An analogous approach is to form an array of OFIS arms. The OFIS instrument response is a predictable function of the orientation of the arm with respect to the signal wavefront. An array of many OFIS arms with different azimuths permits at least one OFIS to record any signal without the signal attenuation inherent in equivalently-sized onmi-directional mechanical filters. OFIS arms that are wavefront

  2. Integration of verbal and nonverbal emotional signals in patients with schizophrenia: Decreased nonverbal dominance.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Bastian; Brück, Carolin; Jacob, Heike; Eberle, Mark; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2016-07-30

    In day-to-day social interaction, emotions are usually expressed by verbal (e.g. spoken words) and nonverbal signals (e.g. facial expressions, prosody). In case of conflicting signals nonverbal signals are perceived as being the more reliable source of information. Deficits in interpreting nonverbal signals - as described for patients with schizophrenic disorders - might interfere with the ability to integrate verbal and nonverbal social cues into a meaningful whole. The aim of this study was to examine how schizophrenic disorders influence the integration of verbal and nonverbal signals. For this purpose short video sequences were presented to 21 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls. Each sequence showed an actor speaking a short sentence with independently varying emotional connotations at the verbal and the nonverbal level. The participants rated the valence of the speaker's emotional state on a four-point scale (from very negative to very positive). The relative impact of nonverbal cues as compared to verbal cues on these ratings was evaluated. Both groups base their decisions primarily on nonverbal information. However, this effect is significantly less prominent in the patient group. Patients tend to base their decisions less on nonverbal signals and more on verbal information than healthy controls. PMID:27156031

  3. Distinguishing signal from noise: New techniques for gravitational wave data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Paul Thomas

    The principal problem of gravitational wave detection is distinguishing true gravitational wave signals from non-Gaussian noise artifacts. We describe two methods to deal with the problem of non-Gaussian noise in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO). Perturbed black holes (BH) are known to vibrate at determinable quasi-normal mode frequencies. These vibrational modes are strongly excited during the inspiral and merger of binary BH systems. We will develop a template based search for gravitational waves from black hole ringdowns: the final stage of binary merger. Past searches for gravitational waves developed ad hoc detection statistics in an attempt to separate the expected gravitational wave signals from noise. We show how using the output of a multi-variate statistical classifier trained to directly probe the high dimensional parameter space of gravitational waves can improve a search over more traditional means. We conclude by placing preliminary upper limits on the rate of ringdown producing binary BH mergers. LIGO data contains frequent, non-Gaussian, instrument artifacts or glitches. Current LIGO searches for un-modeled gravitational wave bursts are primarily limited by the presence of glitches in analyzed data. We describe the BayesWave algorithm, wherein we model gravitational wave signals and detector glitches simultaneously in the wavelet domain. Using bayesian model selection techniques and a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo, we are able determine whether data is consistent with the presence of gravitational waves, detector glitches, or both. We demonstrate BayesWave's utility as a data quality tool by fitting glitches non-Gaussian LIGO data. Finally, we discuss how BayesWave can be extended into a full-fledged search for gravitational wave bursts.

  4. Optimization of noise in non-integrated instrumentation amplifier for the amplification of very low electrophysiological [corrected] signals. Case of electro cardio graphic signals (ECG).

    PubMed

    Ngounou, Guy Merlin; Kom, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present an instrumentation amplifier with discrete elements and optimized noise for the amplification of very low signals. In amplifying signals of very weak amplitude, the noise can completely absorb these signals if the used amplifier does not present the optimal guarantee to minimize the noise. Based on related research and re-viewing of recent patents Journal of Medical Systems, 30:205-209, 2006, we suggest an approach of noise reduction in amplification much more thoroughly than re-viewing of recent patents and we deduce from it the general criteria necessary and essential to achieve this optimization. The comparison of these criteria with the provisions adopted in practice leads to the inadequacy of conventional amplifiers for effective noise reduction. The amplifier we propose is an instrumentation amplifier with active negative feedback and optimized noise for the amplification of signals with very low amplitude. The application of this method in the case of electro cardio graphic signals (ECG) provides simulation results fully in line with forecasts. PMID:25381049

  5. Heterodyne signal-to-noise ratios in acoustic mode scattering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the signal to noise ratio (SNR) obtained in heterodyne detection of radiation scattered from acoustic modes in crystalline solids and the scattered spectral density function is studied. It is shown that in addition to the information provided by the measured frequency shifts and line widths, measurement of the SNR provides a determination of the absolute elasto-optical (Pockel's) constants. Examples are given for cubic crystals, and acceptable SNR values are obtained for scattering from thermally excited phonons at 10.6 microns, with no external perturbation of the sample necessary. The results indicate the special advantages of the method for the study of semiconductors.

  6. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable. Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients. The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz-1 cm-1). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in deep

  7. Indirect estimation of signal-dependent noise with nonadaptive heterogeneous samples.

    PubMed

    Azzari, Lucio; Foi, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    We consider the estimation of signal-dependent noise from a single image. Unlike conventional algorithms that build a scatterplot of local mean-variance pairs from either small or adaptively selected homogeneous data samples, our proposed approach relies on arbitrarily large patches of heterogeneous data extracted at random from the image. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach through an extensive theoretical analysis based on mixture of Gaussian distributions. A prototype algorithm is also developed in order to validate the approach on simulated data as well as on real camera raw images. PMID:24808411

  8. Signal to Noise Studies on Thermographic Data with Fabricated Defects for Defense Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Rajic, Nik; Genest, Marc

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing international interest in thermal inspection systems for asset life assessment and management of defense platforms. The efficacy of flash thermography is generally enhanced by applying image processing algorithms to the observations of raw temperature. Improving the defect signal to noise ratio (SNR) is of primary interest to reduce false calls and allow for easier interpretation of a thermal inspection image. Several factors affecting defect SNR were studied such as data compression and reconstruction using principal component analysis and time window processing.

  9. Micro-plasma Luminescence And Signal Noise Used To Solar Cells Defects Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiri, Vanek; Pavel, Koktavy; Jan, Dolensky; Ales, Vesely; Zdenek, Chobola; Petr, Paracka

    2009-04-01

    This work deals with the usage of signal noise and micro-plasmas luminescence for solar cells diagnostic. When high electric field is applied to PN junction of solar cell with some technological imperfections it produces in tiny areas of enhanced impact ionization called micro-plasmas which could lead to deterioration in quality or destruction of PN junction. On this account it is possible to use methods which indicate presence of micro-plasma in junction and enable quality and quantitative description of tested cells.

  10. Signal to Noise Ratio Estimations for a Volcanic ASH Detection Lidar. Case Study: The Met Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoussis, George; Adam, Mariana; Avdikos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we calculate the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics) volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300), already operating under Met Office organization. The methodology for the accurate estimation is presented for day and nighttime conditions. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for both nighttime and daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and proves that such system is able to detect volcanic ash over a range of 20 km.

  11. Signal and noise in global warming detection. Final progress report, July 15, 1990--July 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    North, G.D.

    1995-05-19

    This research considers the mean squared error (MSE) incurred in estimating an idealized earth`s global average temperature with a finite network of point gauges distributed optimally over the globe. The construction of a linear smoothing filter is considered for estimating the forced part of a change in a climatological field such as the surface temperature. The filter is optimal in the sense that is suppresses the natural variability of noise relative to the forced part or signal to the maximum extent possible.

  12. Toddlers' comprehension of degraded signals: Noise-vocoded versus sine-wave analogs

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Rochelle S.; Chatterjee, Monita; Morini, Giovanna; Remez, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that development changes the ability to comprehend degraded speech. Preschool children showed greater difficulties perceiving noise-vocoded speech (a signal that integrates amplitude over broad frequency bands) than sine-wave speech (which maintains the spectral peaks without the spectrum envelope). In contrast, 27-month-old children in the present study could recognize speech with either type of degradation and performed slightly better with eight-channel vocoded speech than with sine-wave speech. This suggests that children's identification performance depends critically on the degree of degradation and that their success in recognizing unfamiliar speech encodings is encouraging overall. PMID:26428832

  13. Toddlers' comprehension of degraded signals: Noise-vocoded versus sine-wave analogs.

    PubMed

    Newman, Rochelle S; Chatterjee, Monita; Morini, Giovanna; Remez, Robert E

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that development changes the ability to comprehend degraded speech. Preschool children showed greater difficulties perceiving noise-vocoded speech (a signal that integrates amplitude over broad frequency bands) than sine-wave speech (which maintains the spectral peaks without the spectrum envelope). In contrast, 27-month-old children in the present study could recognize speech with either type of degradation and performed slightly better with eight-channel vocoded speech than with sine-wave speech. This suggests that children's identification performance depends critically on the degree of degradation and that their success in recognizing unfamiliar speech encodings is encouraging overall. PMID:26428832

  14. Differential, dominant activation and inhibition of Notch signalling and APP cleavage by truncations of PSEN1 in human disease.

    PubMed

    Newman, Morgan; Wilson, Lachlan; Verdile, Giuseppe; Lim, Anne; Khan, Imran; Moussavi Nik, Seyyed Hani; Pursglove, Sharon; Chapman, Gavin; Martins, Ralph N; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-02-01

    PRESENILIN1 (PSEN1) is the major locus for mutations causing familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) and is also mutated in Pick disease of brain, familial acne inversa and dilated cardiomyopathy. It is a critical facilitator of Notch signalling and many other signalling pathways and protein cleavage events including production of the Amyloidβ (Aβ) peptide from the AMYLOID BETA A4 PRECURSOR PROTEIN (APP). We previously reported that interference with splicing of transcripts of the zebrafish orthologue of PSEN1 creates dominant negative effects on Notch signalling. Here, we extend this work to show that various truncations of human PSEN1 (or zebrafish Psen1) protein have starkly differential effects on Notch signalling and cleavage of zebrafish Appa (a paralogue of human APP). Different truncations can suppress or stimulate Notch signalling but not Appa cleavage and vice versa. The G183V mutation possibly causing Pick disease causes production of aberrant transcripts truncating the open reading frame after exon 5 sequence. We show that the truncated protein potentially translated from these transcripts avidly incorporates into very stable Psen1-dependent higher molecular weight complexes and suppresses cleavage of Appa but not Notch signalling. In contrast, the truncated protein potentially produced by the P242LfsX11 acne inversa mutation has no effect on Appa cleavage but, unexpectedly, enhances Notch signalling. Our results suggest novel hypotheses for the pathological mechanisms underlying these diseases and illustrate the importance of investigating the function of dominant mutations at physiologically relevant expression levels and in the normally heterozygous state in which they cause human disease rather than in isolation from healthy alleles. PMID:24101600

  15. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nishikawa, T.; Goto, T.; Hitachi, K.; Sogawa, T.; Gotoh, H.

    2016-05-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise “booster” for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz).

  16. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, A.; Nishikawa, T.; Goto, T.; Hitachi, K.; Sogawa, T.; Gotoh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise “booster” for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz). PMID:27185040

  17. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, A; Nishikawa, T; Goto, T; Hitachi, K; Sogawa, T; Gotoh, H

    2016-01-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise "booster" for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz). PMID:27185040

  18. Efficiency of the cross-correlation statistic for gravitational wave stochastic background signals with non-Gaussian noise and heterogeneous detector sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellini, Lionel; Regimbau, Tania

    2015-11-01

    Under standard assumptions including stationary and serially uncorrelated Gaussian gravitational wave stochastic background signal and noise distributions, as well as homogenous detector sensitivities, the standard cross-correlation detection statistic is known to be optimal in the sense of minimizing the probability of a false dismissal at a fixed value of the probability of a false alarm. The focus of this paper is to analyze the comparative efficiency of this statistic, vs a simple alternative statistic obtained by cross-correlating the squared measurements, in situations that deviate from such standard assumptions. We find that differences in detector sensitivities have a large impact on the comparative efficiency of the cross-correlation detection statistic, which is dominated by the alternative statistic when these differences reach 1 order of magnitude. This effect holds even when both the signal and noise distributions are Gaussian. While the presence of non-Gaussian signals has no material impact for reasonable parameter values, the relative inefficiency of the cross-correlation statistic is less prominent for fat-tailed noise distributions, but it is magnified in case noise distributions have skewness parameters of opposite signs. Our results suggest that introducing an alternative detection statistic can lead to noticeable sensitivity gains when noise distributions are possibly non-Gaussian and/or when detector sensitivities exhibit substantial differences, a situation that is expected to hold in joint detections from Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, in particular in the early phases of development of the detectors, or in joint detections from Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope.

  19. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick T.; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C.; Mauget, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20th century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal. PMID:25898351

  20. Generalized methods and solvers for noise removal from piecewise constant signals. I. Background theory

    PubMed Central

    Little, Max A.; Jones, Nick S.

    2011-01-01

    Removing noise from piecewise constant (PWC) signals is a challenging signal processing problem arising in many practical contexts. For example, in exploration geosciences, noisy drill hole records need to be separated into stratigraphic zones, and in biophysics, jumps between molecular dwell states have to be extracted from noisy fluorescence microscopy signals. Many PWC denoising methods exist, including total variation regularization, mean shift clustering, stepwise jump placement, running medians, convex clustering shrinkage and bilateral filtering; conventional linear signal processing methods are fundamentally unsuited. This paper (part I, the first of two) shows that most of these methods are associated with a special case of a generalized functional, minimized to achieve PWC denoising. The minimizer can be obtained by diverse solver algorithms, including stepwise jump placement, convex programming, finite differences, iterated running medians, least angle regression, regularization path following and coordinate descent. In the second paper, part II, we introduce novel PWC denoising methods, and comparisons between these methods performed on synthetic and real signals, showing that the new understanding of the problem gained in part I leads to new methods that have a useful role to play. PMID:22003312

  1. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick T; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C; Mauget, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20(th) century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal. PMID:25898351

  2. Investigation of signal-to-noise ratio in frequency-domain multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yide; Khan, Aamir A; Vigil, Genevieve D; Howard, Scott S

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has enabled three-dimensional quantitative molecular microscopy in vivo. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and thus the imaging rate of MPM-FLIM, which is fundamentally limited by the shot noise and fluorescence saturation, has not been quantitatively studied yet. In this paper, we investigate the SNR performance of the frequency-domain (FD) MPM-FLIM with two figures of merit: the photon economy in the limit of shot noise, and the normalized SNR in the limit of saturation. The theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations find that two-photon FD-FLIM requires 50% fewer photons to achieve the same SNR as conventional one-photon FLIM. We also analytically show that the MPM-FD-FLIM can exploit the DC and higher harmonic components generated by nonlinear optical mixing of the excitation light to improve SNR, reducing the required number of photons by an additional 50%. Finally, the effect of fluorophore saturation on the experimental SNR performance is discussed. PMID:27409702

  3. Noise-driven signal transmission device using molecular dynamics of organic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Naoki; Umemura, Koichiro; Fujise, Shinya; Yazawa, Koji; Shimizu, Tadashi; Tansho, Masataka; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic threshold devices using a trap-filling transition (TFT) coupled with molecular dynamics in poly(3-alkylthiophene)s were fabricated as potential key devices for noise-driven bioinspired sensors and information processors. This article deals with variable-temperature direct current conductivity and alternating current impedance measurements for vertical-type device elements of Au/regioregular poly(3-decylthiophene) ((RR-P3DT) (thickness: 100 nm)/Au, which show multiple conducting states and quasi-stochastic transitions between these states. Noise measurements indicate the ω-2-type (if VVTFT) power spectral densities, where V and VTFT are an applied voltage and the voltage for TFT, respectively. The noise generation is due to the TFT associated with twist dynamics of π-conjugated polymers near the order-disorder phase transition (ODT). At 298 K, the quasi-stochastic behavior is more noticeable for RR-P3DT than poly(3-hexylthiophene). The quasi-stochastic property is employed to a stochastic one-directional signal transmitting device using optical-electric conversion. The dynamics of ODT for powder samples were also investigated by differential scanning calorimetry measurements and high-resolution solid-state C13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the correlation of the molecular structure and dynamics with electric properties was discussed.

  4. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection. PMID:26627804

  5. A consideration of the signal-to-noise ratio in phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2010-04-01

    Recently, with developments in medicine, digital systems such as computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detector (FPD) systems are being employed for mammography instead of analog systems such as the screen-film system. Phase-contrast mammography (PCM) is a commercially available digital system that uses images with a magnification of 1.75x. To study the effect of the air gap in PCM, we measured the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and calculated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in PCM, and compared it to that in conventional mammography (CM). Then, to extend the SNR to the spatial frequency domain, we calculated the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) used by the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum of the pixel value (NPSΔPV), gradient of the digital characteristic curve, and number of X-ray photons. The obtained results indicated that the SFR of the PCM was as low as that of the CM with a grid. When the exposure dose was constant, the SNR of the PCM was the highest in all systems. Moreover, the NEQ and DQE for the PCM were higher than those for the CM (G-) in the spatial frequency domain over 2.5 cycles/mm. These results showed that the number of scattered X-rays was reduced sufficiently by the air gap in the PCM and the NEQ and DQE for PCM were influenced by the presampled MTF in the high-spatial-frequency domain.

  6. Intrinsic low pass filtering improves signal-to-noise ratio in critical-point flexure biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ankit; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2014-08-25

    A flexure biosensor consists of a suspended beam and a fixed bottom electrode. The adsorption of the target biomolecules on the beam changes its stiffness and results in change of beam's deflection. It is now well established that the sensitivity of sensor is maximized close to the pull-in instability point, where effective stiffness of the beam vanishes. The question: “Do the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit-of-detection (LOD) also improve close to the instability point?”, however remains unanswered. In this article, we systematically analyze the noise response to evaluate SNR and establish LOD of critical-point flexure sensors. We find that a flexure sensor acts like an effective low pass filter close to the instability point due to its relatively small resonance frequency, and rejects high frequency noise, leading to improved SNR and LOD. We believe that our conclusions should establish the uniqueness and the technological relevance of critical-point biosensors.

  7. Subjective evaluation of the effect of noise and interference on frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.; Trenholm, R.

    1984-12-01

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellite systems including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. Also results of just-perceptible interference tests due to adjacent channel interferer at various intercarrier spacings and for different receive filter characteristics on the wanted signal path are presented. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting-satellite service.

  8. Method for the reduction of signal-induced noise in photomultiplier tubes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, C K; De Young, R J

    2000-04-20

    A new method to reduce photomultiplier tube detector signal-induced noise (SIN) in a lidar system is successfully demonstrated. A metal ring electrode placed external to the photomultiplier tube photocathode is pulsed during the intense near-field lidar return with a potential between 15 and 500 V, resulting in a significant reduction in SIN. The effect of the metal ring voltage on the decay time constant and the magnitude of a simulated lidar signal is presented. Optimal experimental conditions for the use of this device in lidar receivers, such that the lidar decay time constant is not affected, are determined. Mechanisms for this SIN suppression system are discussed in detail, and data were recorded to show that the voltage on the metal ring functions by altering the photomultiplier electron optics. PMID:18345096

  9. Spectral analysis of fundamental signal and noise performances in photoconductors for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Lim, Chang Hwy; Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the fundamental signal and noise performance limitations imposed by the stochastic nature of x-ray interactions in selected photoconductor materials, such as Si, a-Se, CdZnTe, HgI{sub 2}, PbI{sub 2}, PbO, and TlBr, for x-ray spectra typically used in mammography. Methods: It is shown how Monte Carlo simulations can be combined with a cascaded model to determine the absorbed energy distribution for each combination of photoconductor and x-ray spectrum. The model is used to determine the quantum efficiency, mean energy absorption per interaction, Swank noise factor, secondary quantum noise, and zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The quantum efficiency of materials with higher atomic number and density demonstrates a larger dependence on convertor thickness than those with lower atomic number and density with the exception of a-Se. The mean deposited energy increases with increasing average energy of the incident x-ray spectrum. HgI{sub 2}, PbI{sub 2}, and CdZnTe demonstrate the largest increase in deposited energy with increasing mass loading and a-Se and Si the smallest. The best DQE performances are achieved with PbO and TlBr. For mass loading greater than 100 mg cm{sup -2}, a-Se, HgI{sub 2}, and PbI{sub 2} provide similar DQE values to PbO and TlBr. Conclusions: The quantum absorption efficiency, average deposited energy per interacting x-ray, Swank noise factor, and detective quantum efficiency are tabulated by means of graphs which may help with the design and selection of materials for photoconductor-based mammography detectors. Neglecting the electrical characteristics of photoconductor materials and taking into account only x-ray interactions, it is concluded that PbO shows the strongest signal-to-noise ratio performance of the materials investigated in this study.

  10. Low noise level unmasks late potentials on signal-averaged electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Frances, Raul J

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Identification of late potentials requires the reduction of random noise by signal averaging. The importance of using a very low noise level (NL) as the end point of the averaging process in patients with ventricular tachycardia, the variation of results when a lower than standard NL was used and the modification of the sensitivity of the test when a very low NL was reached were evaluated. METHODS AND RESULTS: Signal-averaged electrocardiograms were recorded in 36 patients with ischemic heart disease and spontaneous or induced sustained or nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. Thirteen patients showed negative or indeterminate results on recordings with an NL of 0.3 μV. Eight patients (group 1) underwent a second recording with an NL of 0.1 μV. Eight normal volunteers constituted the control group (group 2). The total duration of the filtered QRS vector magnitude (QRSd), the root mean square voltage of the terminal 40 ms of the vector magnitude (RMS40) and the low amplitude signal duration under 40 μV in the terminal portion of the vector magnitude (LAS) modifications were evaluated. A significant difference (P<0.01) in these parameters was observed in group 1 (15.88%, 48.25% and 68.5%, respectively) when both recordings were compared. Tests were positive in all patients (100%) with NL reduction. In group 2, tests were negative in all patients (100%) at both NLs (0.3 μV and 0.1 μV). QRSd was 1.18% longer, RMS40 was 1.38% lower and LAS was 3.55% longer with NL reduction. CONCLUSION: Late potentials in patients with ischemic heart disease, ventricular tachycardia, and a negative or indeterminate signal-averaged electrocardiogram may be detected if the NL is reduced to 0.1 μV. Reduction of the NL increased the sensitivity of the test without modifying its specificity. PMID:20959882

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling is required for NMDA receptor-dependent ocular dominance plasticity and LTD in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sidorov, Michael S.; Kaplan, Eitan S.; Osterweil, Emily K.; Lindemann, Lothar; Bear, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    A feature of early postnatal neocortical development is a transient peak in signaling via metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). In visual cortex, this change coincides with increased sensitivity of excitatory synapses to monocular deprivation (MD). However, loss of visual responsiveness after MD occurs via mechanisms revealed by the study of long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, which in layer 4 is induced by acute activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) rather than mGluR5. Here we report that chronic postnatal down-regulation of mGluR5 signaling produces coordinated impairments in both NMDAR-dependent LTD in vitro and ocular dominance plasticity in vivo. The data suggest that ongoing mGluR5 signaling during a critical period of postnatal development establishes the biochemical conditions that are permissive for activity-dependent sculpting of excitatory synapses via the mechanism of NMDAR-dependent LTD. PMID:26417096

  12. Improving noise performance of the SQUID in presence of high resistive signal leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariyappa, N.; Parasakthi, C.; Sengottuvel, S.; Patel, Rajesh; Gireesan, K.; Radhakrishnan, T. S.; Janawadkar, M. P.; Sundar, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    We present the results of experiments carried out using high resistive electrical leads for routing the SQUID output signal from the sensor at low temperatures (4.2K) to the preamplifier at room temperature. This exercise was carried out as a part of the ongoing development of a whole head multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. The conflicting requirements are the need to minimize the heat leak into the cryostat that requires the use of high resistive manganin leads and the signal transport with low loss that requires the use of low resistive copper leads. The use of high resistive leads significantly reduces the modulation depth of the SQUID as seen at the preamplifier and adversely impacts the output noise as compared to the low resistive copper leads. However, our experiments show that the use of an intermediate cooled matching transformer helps in restoring the modulation depth seen at the preamplifier and results in a vastly reduced noise even when high resistive manganin wires are used.

  13. Spatial resolution, signal-to-noise and information capacity of linear imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Gureyev, Timur; Nesterets, Yakov; de Hoog, Frank

    2016-07-25

    A simple model for image formation in linear shift-invariant systems is considered, in which both the detected signal and the noise variance are varying slowly compared to the point-spread function of the system. It is shown that within the constraints of this model, the square of the signal-to-noise ratio is always proportional to the "volume" of the spatial resolution unit. In the case of Poisson statistics, the ratio of these two quantities divided by the incident density of the imaging particles (e.g. photons) represents a dimensionless invariant of the imaging system, which was previously termed the intrinsic imaging quality. The relationship of this invariant to the notion of information capacity of communication and imaging systems, which was previously considered by Shannon, Gabor and others, is investigated. The results are then applied to a simple generic model of quantitative imaging of weakly scattering objects, leading to an estimate of the upper limit for the amount of information about the sample that can be obtained in such experiments. It is shown that this limit depends only on the total number of imaging particles incident on the sample, the average scattering coefficient, the size of the sample and the number of spatial resolution units. PMID:27464167

  14. Measuring real-ear signal-to-noise ratio: application to directional hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Bell, Steven L; Creeke, Sarah A; Lutman, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    Due to individual characteristics such as head size, earmould type, and earmould venting, the directional benefit that an individual will obtain from a hearing aid cannot be predicted from average data. It is therefore desirable to measure real ear directional benefit. This paper demonstrates a method to measure real ear hearing aid directivity based on a general approach to measure the broadband output signal-to-noise ratio of a hearing aid. Errors arising from non-linearity were tested in simulation and found to be low for typical hearing aid compression ratios. Next, the efficacy of the method to estimate directional benefit was demonstrated on KEMAR. Finally the variability of directional benefit was explored in real-ears. Significant differences in signal-to-noise ratio between directional and omnidirectional microphone settings were demonstrated at most azimuths. Articulation-Index-weighted directional benefit varied by more than 7 dB across ears at some azimuths. Such individual variation in directional benefit has implications when fitting hearing aids: it should not be assumed that all users will receive similar directional benefit from the same hearing aid. PMID:20151932

  15. Evaluating signal-to-noise ratios, loudness, and related measures as indicators of airborne sound insulation.

    PubMed

    Park, H K; Bradley, J S

    2009-09-01

    Subjective ratings of the audibility, annoyance, and loudness of music and speech sounds transmitted through 20 different simulated walls were used to identify better single number ratings of airborne sound insulation. The first part of this research considered standard measures such as the sound transmission class the weighted sound reduction index (R(w)) and variations of these measures [H. K. Park and J. S. Bradley, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 208-219 (2009)]. This paper considers a number of other measures including signal-to-noise ratios related to the intelligibility of speech and measures related to the loudness of sounds. An exploration of the importance of the included frequencies showed that the optimum ranges of included frequencies were different for speech and music sounds. Measures related to speech intelligibility were useful indicators of responses to speech sounds but were not as successful for music sounds. A-weighted level differences, signal-to-noise ratios and an A-weighted sound transmission loss measure were good predictors of responses when the included frequencies were optimized for each type of sound. The addition of new spectrum adaptation terms to R(w) values were found to be the most practical approach for achieving more accurate predictions of subjective ratings of transmitted speech and music sounds. PMID:19739735

  16. [Research of spectrum signal-to-noise ratio of large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Li, Li-Bo; Pi, Hai-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The process of acquiring hyperspectral data cube of a Large Aperture Static Imaging Spectrometer (LASIS) includes several vital and essential steps, such as interferometer modulation, rectangular convolution sampling by pixels of detector and spectra retrieving. In this process, how to precisely evaluate the Signal-Noise Ratio (SNR) of spectra and how to wholly establish a related evaluation model were both generally very complicated. After a full consideration of the transmission process, utilizing the theory of rectangular convolution sampling and the spectral retrieving method regarding the computation of real part of the discrete Fourier transform of interferogram, formulas of both spectral signal and spectral noise were deduced theoretically, and then a evaluation model regarding the spectral SNR of LASIS was established. By using this model and other design factors of LASIS involving the wavenumber related optical transmittance, the interferometer beam splitter efficiency, the detector quantum efficiency and the main circuit noise, a simulation of spectral SNR was implemented. The simulation result was compared with the measurement result of the SNR of a LASIS instrument. The SNR lines and trends of the two match each other basically in single spectral band. The average deviation between them is proved to be 3.58%. This comparison result demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the evaluation model. This SNR evaluation model consisting of the main technical aspects of typical LASIS instrument from the input spectral radiation to the output spectrum data is possible to be applied widely in practical design and implement of LASIS, as well as may provide valuable reference on SNR calculation and evaluation for other imaging spectrometers. PMID:25208427

  17. Novel Evidence That Attributing Affectively Salient Signal to Random Noise Is Associated with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Catalan, Ana; Simons, Claudia J. P.; Bustamante, Sonia; Drukker, Marjan; Madrazo, Aranzazu; de Artaza, Maider Gonzalez; Gorostiza, Iñigo; van Os, Jim; Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    We wished to replicate evidence that an experimental paradigm of speech illusions is associated with psychotic experiences. Fifty-four patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) and 150 healthy subjects were examined in an experimental paradigm assessing the presence of speech illusion in neutral white noise. Socio-demographic, cognitive function and family history data were collected. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered in the patient group and the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R), and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) in the control group. Patients had a much higher rate of speech illusions (33.3% versus 8.7%, ORadjusted: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.3–11.5), which was only partly explained by differences in IQ (ORadjusted: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.4–8.3). Differences were particularly marked for signals in random noise that were perceived as affectively salient (ORadjusted: 9.7, 95% CI: 1.8–53.9). Speech illusion tended to be associated with positive symptoms in patients (ORadjusted: 3.3, 95% CI: 0.9–11.6), particularly affectively salient illusions (ORadjusted: 8.3, 95% CI: 0.7–100.3). In controls, speech illusions were not associated with positive schizotypy (ORadjusted: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.3–3.4) or self-reported psychotic experiences (ORadjusted: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.4–4.6). Experimental paradigms indexing the tendency to detect affectively salient signals in noise may be used to identify liability to psychosis. PMID:25020079

  18. Signal to Noise Ratio Analysis of the Data from the Pulsed Airborne CO2 Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring the CO2 column concentrations from space for the ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters to simultaneously measure the total column absorption by CO2 in 1570 nm band and O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band by periodically stepping the laser wavelength at predetermined wavelengths across the absorption lines. The reflected laser signals from the surface and clouds are collected by the receiver telescope and detected by a set of single photon counting detectors. We used pulsed lasers and time resolved photon detection to distinguish the surface echoes from cloud and aerosol backscattering and to measure the column height. . The total column absorption at a given wavelength is determined from the ratio of the received laser pulse energy to the transmitted energy. The column gas concentrations and the spectral line shape are determined from curve fitting of the column absorptions as a function of the wavelength. We have built an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 column measurement technique from the NASA Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar scans the laser wavelength across the CO2 absorption line in 20 steps. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse energy is 25 uJ, and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The backscatter photons are collected by a 20 cm telescope and detected by a near infrared photomultiplier tube. The detected photons are binned according to their arrival times with the use of a multichannel scaler. Several airborne measurements were conducted during October and December 2008, and August 2009 with many hours of CO2 column measurement data at the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption lines. The measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and some through thin clouds. We also made several improvements to the instrument for the later flights. Measurements from early flights showed the receiver signal and noise levels were

  19. Hierarchically Fourier-aggregated signals and generalized coherence of the noise in the GPS time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubushin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    A new method for joint analysis of big number of time series is presented. The method is based on using of Fourier-aggregated signals and it has a purpose to detect time intervals and frequency bands when there is a coherence between noise components of all time series. An aggregated signal (AS) is constructed in two stages. At the 1st stage, initial multidimensional time series is substituted by time series of the same dimensionality but composed of so-called canonical components. The canonical components accumulate signals that are common for all initial components and are free of local variations that are specific for individual scalar time series only. At the 2nd stage, the common signals are amplified by constructing a single scalar time series, their first principal component. Thus, an AS is the first principal component of canonical components. In the case when there is a monitoring system with big number of recording stations all stations are split into a number of clusters with moderate number (10-20) of stations within each clusters. For all clusters AS are calculated which could be called AS of the 1st order. The technique of the 1st order AS computing provides estimating in moving time window and gives a possibility to take into account gaps in registration. If the number of the 1st order aggregation clusters is still big they could be split into 2nd order aggregation clusters and the 1st order AS could be aggregated more into 2nd order AS. At any stage of aggregation a multiple spectral coherence measures could be calculated which present time-frequency diagrams for evolution of coherence between noise components of time series. The elaborated method was applied to daily 3-components GPS time series from the networks in the USA (4512 stations) and in Europe (2122 stations). The multiple coherence measure estimated for different combinations of AS of the 1st and 2nd orders inside regions of USA and Europe and between them extracted essential peaks of

  20. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier Pedersen, A.; Abari, C. F.; Mann, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2014-06-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2.

  1. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of thermal ghost imaging based on positive-negative intensity correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Chun; Sun, Ming-Jie; Wu, Ling-An

    2016-05-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal light is a topic in optical imaging that has aroused great interest in recent years. However, the imaging quality must be greatly improved before the technology can be transferred from the lab to engineering applications. By means of correspondence ghost imaging (CGI) with a pseudo-thermal light source and appropriate sorting of the intensity fluctuations of the signal and reference beams, we obtain the positive and negative Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity correlation characteristics of the optical field. Then, for ghost imaging of a transmissive binary object, we find that by subtracting the negative from the positive fluctuation frames of the presorted reference detector signals, the signal-to-noise ratio can be effectively increased, with almost all the background noise eliminated. Our results show that, compared with the generic CGI technique, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by nearly 60%.

  2. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayze, Gregg A.; Clark, Roger N.; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Chrien, Thomas G.; Gorelick, Noel S.

    2003-09-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectral identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  3. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, G.A.; Clark, R.N.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Chrien, T.H.; Gorelick, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectra identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  4. Techniques and software tools for estimating ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; McKillip, Matthew; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    2016-02-01

    At Iowa State University's Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (ISU CNDE), the use of models to simulate ultrasonic inspections has played a key role in R&D efforts for over 30 years. To this end a series of wave propagation models, flaw response models, and microstructural backscatter models have been developed to address inspection problems of interest. One use of the combined models is the estimation of signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) in circumstances where backscatter from the microstructure (grain noise) acts to mask sonic echoes from internal defects. Such S/N models have been used in the past to address questions of inspection optimization and reliability. Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at ISU, an effort was recently initiated to improve existing research-grade software by adding graphical user interface (GUI) to become user friendly tools for the rapid estimation of S/N for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based GUI for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signal and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The latter makes use of several models including: the Multi-Gaussian Beam Model for computing sonic fields radiated by commercial transducers; the Thompson-Gray Model for the response from an internal defect; the Independent Scatterer Model for backscattered grain noise; and the Stanke-Kino Unified Model for attenuation. The initial emphasis was on reformulating the research-grade code into a suitable modular form, adding the graphical user interface and performing computations rapidly and robustly. Thus the initial inspection problem being addressed is relatively simple. A normal-incidence pulse/echo immersion inspection is simulated for a curved metal component having a non-uniform microstructure, specifically an equiaxed, untextured microstructure in which the average

  5. Local improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio for diffractive optical elements designed by unidirectional optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Martin; Winfield, Richard J.

    2002-12-01

    We present a straightforward method to design multilevel phase-only diffractive optical elements with a locally improved signal-to-noise ratio in the reconstruction. The method is generally applicable to all unidirectional design schemes, such as direct search, simulated annealing, or genetic optimization. As the shape and the location of the desired low noise areas are supplied by a bit map file the method allows for the design of basically any two-dimensional low noise area. The improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio that may be achieved is considerable but also entails reduced diffraction efficiency. The suggested method is applied to different beam-splitter design examples. All examples are calculated with the scalar diffraction approximation in the far field.

  6. Dominance of local sensory signals over inter-segmental effects in a motor system: modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Tóth, Tibor I; Borgmann, Anke

    2011-12-01

    Recent experiments, reported in the accompanying paper, have supplied key data on the impact afferent excitation has on the activity of the levator–depressor motor system of an extremity in the stick insect. The main finding was that, stimulation of the campaniform sensillae of the partially amputated middle leg in an animal where all other but one front leg had been removed, had a dominating effect over that of the stepping ipsilateral front leg. In fact,the latter effect was minute compared to the former. In this article, we propose a local network that involves the neuronal part of the levator–depressor motor system and use it to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the generation of neuronal activity in the experiments. In particular, we show that by appropriately modulating the activity in the neurons of the central pattern generator of the levator–depressor motor system, we obtain activity patterns of the motoneurons in the model that closely resemble those found in extracellular recordings in the stick insect. In addition, our model predicts specific properties of these records which depend on the stimuli applied to the stick insect leg. We also discuss our results on the segmental mechanisms in the context of inter-segmental coordination. PMID:22290139

  7. Normal-hearing listener preferences of music as a function of signal-to-noise-ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jillian G.

    2005-04-01

    Optimal signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for speech discrimination are well-known, well-documented phenomena. Discrimination preferences and functions have been studied for both normal-hearing and hard-of-hearing populations, and information from these studies has provided clearer indices on additional factors affecting speech discrimination ability and SNR preferences. This knowledge lends itself to improvements in hearing aids and amplification devices, telephones, television and radio transmissions, and a wide arena of recorded media such as movies and music. This investigation was designed to identify the preferred signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of normal-hearing listeners in a musical setting. The signal was the singer's voice, and music was considered the background. Subjects listened to an unfamiliar ballad with a female singer, and rated seven different SBR treatments. When listening to melodic motifs with linguistic content, results indicated subjects preferred SBRs similar to those in conventional speech discrimination applications. However, unlike traditional speech discrimination studies, subjects did not prefer increased levels of SBR. Additionally, subjects had a much larger acceptable range of SBR in melodic motifs where the singer's voice was not intended to communicate via linguistic means, but by the pseudo-paralinguistic means of vocal timbre and harmonic arrangements. Results indicate further studies investigating perception of singing are warranted.

  8. Generalized methods and solvers for noise removal from piecewise constant signals. II. New methods

    PubMed Central

    Little, Max A.; Jones, Nick S.

    2011-01-01

    Removing noise from signals which are piecewise constant (PWC) is a challenging signal processing problem that arises in many practical scientific and engineering contexts. In the first paper (part I) of this series of two, we presented background theory building on results from the image processing community to show that the majority of these algorithms, and more proposed in the wider literature, are each associated with a special case of a generalized functional, that, when minimized, solves the PWC denoising problem. It shows how the minimizer can be obtained by a range of computational solver algorithms. In this second paper (part II), using this understanding developed in part I, we introduce several novel PWC denoising methods, which, for example, combine the global behaviour of mean shift clustering with the local smoothing of total variation diffusion, and show example solver algorithms for these new methods. Comparisons between these methods are performed on synthetic and real signals, revealing that our new methods have a useful role to play. Finally, overlaps between the generalized methods of these two papers and others such as wavelet shrinkage, hidden Markov models, and piecewise smooth filtering are touched on. PMID:22003313

  9. Development of output signal-to-noise ratio tester for microchannel plate and fluorescent screen component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinglin; Qiu, Yafeng; Zhou, Jin; Qian, Yunsheng

    The core components of Image intensifier is microchannel plate (MCP) and fluorescent screen component. The present paper deeply studies output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) characteristics of MCP and fluorescent screen component. A tester system using to the evaluation of characteristics of the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component, consists of a vacuum system, a surface electron source, mechanical mechanism components ,a high-voltage power supply system, a signal processing system, communication interfaces, a data acquisition and control system, computer system, and testing software. a hot cathode used as an electron source, generates a surface electron flow to provide the input signal. A photomultiplier tube is used to detection faceplate output brightness of the light spot. Then, the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is processed with a combination of methods of the hardware filter and digital filtering software. The output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is measured under different conditions, and the results are analyzed. This test system Provide a technical to promote the image intensifier research, and experience to testing other parameters or in other areas of research.

  10. Analysis of biomedical signals by flicker-noise spectroscopy: Identification of photosensitive epilepsy using magnetoencephalograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timashev, S. F.; Polyakov, Yu. S.; Yulmetyev, R. M.; Demin, S. A.; Panischev, O. Yu.; Shimojo, S.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2009-04-01

    The flicker-noise spectroscopy (FNS) approach is used to determine the dynamic characteristics of neuromagnetic responses by analyzing the magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals recorded as the response of a group of control human subjects and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) to equiluminant flickering stimuli of different color combinations. Parameters characterizing the analyzed stochastic biomedical signals for different frequency bands are identified. It is shown that the classification of the parameters of analyzed MEG responses with respect to different frequency bands makes it possible to separate the contribution of the chaotic component from the overall complex dynamics of the signals. It is demonstrated that the chaotic component can be adequately described by the anomalous diffusion approximation in the case of control subjects. On the other hand, the chaotic component for the patient is characterized by a large number of high-frequency resonances. This implies that healthy organisms can suppress the perturbations brought about by the flickering stimuli and reorganize themselves. The organisms affected by photosensitive epilepsy no longer have this ability. This result also gives a way to simulate the separate stages of the brain cortex activity in vivo. The examples illustrating the use of the “FNS device” for identifying even the slightest individual differences in the activity of human brains using their responses to external standard stimuli show a unique possibility to develop the “individual medicine” of the future.

  11. Noise-induced hearing loss: Neuropathic pain via Ntrk1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Dahar, Kimberly; Adler, Henry J; Dalian, Ding; Salvi, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Severe noise-induced damage to the inner ear leads to auditory nerve fiber degeneration thereby reducing the neural input to the cochlear nucleus (CN). Paradoxically, this leads to a significant increase in spontaneous activity in the CN which has been linked to tinnitus, hyperacusis and ear pain. The biological mechanisms that lead to an increased spontaneous activity are largely unknown, but could arise from changes in glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission or neuroinflammation. To test this hypothesis, we unilaterally exposed rats for 2h to a 126dB SPL narrow band noise centered at 12kHz. Hearing loss measured by auditory brainstem responses exceeded 55dB from 6 to 32kHz. The mRNA from the exposed CN was harvested at 14 or 28days post-exposure and qRT-PCR analysis was performed on 168 genes involved in neural inflammation, neuropathic pain and glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission. Expression levels of mRNA of Slc17a6 and Gabrg3, involved in excitation and inhibition respectively, were significantly increased at 28days post-exposure, suggesting a possible role in the CN spontaneous hyperactivity associated with tinnitus and hyperacusis. In the pain and inflammatory array, noise exposure upregulated mRNA expression levels of four pain/inflammatory genes, Tlr2, Oprd1, Kcnq3 and Ntrk1 and decreased mRNA expression levels of two more genes, Ccl12 and Il1β. Pain/inflammatory gene expression changes via Ntrk1 signaling may induce sterile inflammation, neuropathic pain, microglial activation and migration of nerve fibers from the trigeminal, cuneate and vestibular nuclei into the CN. These changes could contribute to somatic tinnitus, hyperacusis and otalgia. PMID:27473923

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation on SEM images using cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Kiani, M A; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2014-01-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay noise reduction filtering is designed to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. This approach is found to present better result when compared with two existing techniques: nearest neighbourhood and first-order interpolation. When applied to evaluate the quality of SEM images, noise can be eliminated efficiently with optimal choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time. PMID:24164248

  13. Measurement and study on signal-to-noise ratio of a spaceborne camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuheng; Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2011-11-01

    The developed spaceborne camera is an exclusive functional load of a micro satellite. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reflects its radiance response and is the parameter that directly associates with the quality of its acquired images. The SNR determination task of the spaceborne camera mainly consists of two parts: As is reported before firstly the spatial environment is simulated and the atmosphere transmission mode is built with MODTRAN to calculate and predict the SNR of the speceborne camera under aerial working condition. In this paper, the in-lab measuring experiment is carried out to measure the theoretical imaging performance of the camera before its aerial use. An integrating sphere is utilized to supply well-proportioned illumination, and a number of images are acquired by the spaceborne camera under different luminance conditions. The images are processed in use of certain algorithm and a special filter to extract the noise. The SNRs corresponding to different illumination conditions are calculated so that full-scale radiance response feature of the camera can be gained. The dynamic range is another parameter that characterizes the imaging capacity of a camera. The relationship between dynamic range and SNR of a camera is to be explored in this paper. Different dynamic configurations are set and the SNRs of different dynamic range configurations are tested, which experimentally reveals the dynamic range's influence on SNR.

  14. The impact of relative intensity noise on the signal in multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, Kai; Subhash, Hrebesh; Alexandrov, Sergey; Dsouza, Roshan; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin; Slepneva, Svetlana; Huyet, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) applies a unique low-cost solution to enhance the scanning depth of standard time domain OCT by inserting an partial mirror into the reference arm of the interferometric system. This novel approach achieves multiple reflections for different layers and depths of an sample with minimal effort of engineering and provides an excellent platform for low-cost OCT systems based on well understood production methods for micro-mechanical systems such as CD/DVD pick-up systems. The direct integration of a superluminescent light-emitting diode (SLED) is a preferable solution to reduce the form- factor of an MR-OCT system. Such direct integration exposes the light source to environmental conditions that can increase fluctuations in heat dissipation and vibrations and affect the noise characteristics of the output spectrum. This work describes the impact of relative intensity noise (RIN) on the quality of the interference signal of MR-OCT related to a variety of environmental conditions, such as temperature.

  15. Signal-to-noise based local decorrelation compensation for speckle interferometry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Molimard, Jerome; Cordero, Raul; Vautrin, Alain

    2008-07-01

    Speckle-based interferometric techniques allow assessing the whole-field deformation induced on a specimen due to the application of load. These high sensitivity optical techniques yield fringe images generated by subtracting speckle patterns captured while the specimen undergoes deformation. The quality of the fringes, and in turn the accuracy of the deformation measurements, strongly depends on the speckle correlation. Specimen rigid body motion leads to speckle decorrelation that, in general, cannot be effectively counteracted by applying a global translation to the involved speckle patterns. In this paper, we propose a recorrelation procedure based on the application of locally evaluated translations. The proposed procedure implies dividing the field into several regions, applying a local translation, and calculating, in every region, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Since the latter is a correlation indicator (the noise increases with the decorrelation) we argue that the proper translation is that which maximizes the locally evaluated SNR. The search of the proper local translations is, of course, an interactive process that can be facilitated by using a SNR optimization algorithm. The performance of the proposed recorrelation procedure was tested on two examples. First, the SNR optimization algorithm was applied to fringe images obtained by subtracting simulated speckle patterns. Next, it was applied to fringe images obtained by using a shearography optical setup from a specimen subjected to mechanical deformation. Our results show that the proposed SNR optimization method can significantly improve the reliability of measurements performed by using speckle-based techniques.

  16. A data-driven multidimensional signal-noise decomposition approach for GPR data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Sung; Jeng, Yih

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of applying a data-driven nonlinear filtering scheme in processing ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. The algorithm is based on the recently developed multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MDEEMD) method which provides a frame of developing a variety of approaches in data analysis. The GPR data processing is very challenging due to the large data volume, special format, and geometrical sensitive attributes which are very easily affected by various noises. Approaches which work in other fields of data processing may not be equally applicable to GPR data. Therefore, the MDEEMD has to be modified to fit the special needs in the GPR data processing. In this study, we first give a brief review of the MDEEMD, and then provide the detailed procedure of implementing a 2D GPR filter by exploiting the modified MDEEMD. A complete synthetic model study shows the details of algorithm implementation. To assess the performance of the proposed approach, models of various signal to noise (S/N) ratios are discussed, and the results of conventional filtering method are also provided for comparison. Two real GPR field examples and onsite excavations indicate that the proposed approach is feasible for practical use.

  17. Post-embedding tem signal-to-noise ratio of S-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the reactivity of purified S-100 antiserum in immuno-electron microscopy by counting the number of gold particles per microns 2 over inner ear tissues embedded in different media. Sections containing predominantly Schwann's cell cytoplasm and nucleus, afferent fiber axoplasm and myelin sheath of chick cochleae were reacted with anti-S-100 IgG, an antibody to a calcium binding protein of neuronal tissues, then labeled with anti-IgG-gold conjugate. This investigation was conducted because previously published procedures, unmodified, did not yield acceptable results. Preparation of all specimens was identical. Only the medium (PolyBed 812, Araldite or Spurr epoxies; and LR White, LR Gold or Lowicryl plastics) was changed. The medium was made the changing variable because antigens available in post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy are decreased by heat, either used and/or released during polymerization of the embedding medium. The results indicate that: (a) none of the embedding media above provided optimal signal-to-noise ratio for all parts of the nerve stained in the same section; (b) aggregation of gold particles over cells was highest in embedding media with high background labeling over areas devoid of tissue (noise); (c) aggregation occurred randomly throughout both cellular and acellular regions; and (d) particles aggregated less and were distributed more evenly in tissues from media yielding good ultrastructural integrity.

  18. Methods for Processing and Interpretation of AIS Signals Corrupted by Noise and Packet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poļevskis, J.; Krastiņš, M.; Korāts, G.; Skorodumovs, A.; Trokšs, J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors deal with the operation of Automatic Identification System (AIS) used in the marine traffic monitoring to broadcast messages containing information about the vessel: id, payload, size, speed, destination etc., meant primarily for avoidance of ship collisions. To extend the radius of AIS operation, it is envisaged to dispose its receivers on satellites. However, in space, due to a large coverage area, interfering factors are especially pronounced - such as packet collision, Doppler's shift and noise impact on AIS message receiving, pre-processing and decoding. To assess the quality of an AIS receiver's operation, a test was carried out in which, varying automatically frequency, amplitude, noise, and other parameters, the data on the ability of the receiver's ability to decode AIS signals are collected. In the work, both hardware- and software-based AIS decoders were tested. As a result, quite satisfactory statistics has been gathered - both on the common and the differing features of such decoders when operating in space. To obtain reliable data on the software-defined radio AIS receivers, further research is envisaged.

  19. [Analysis and experimental validation of signal-to-noise for limb imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Xue, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Shu-Rong; Li, Fu-Tian; Lin, Guang-Yu; Duan, Ming-Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Limb imaging spectrometer is an important new remote sensor for research and application. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is one of the key parameters to quantitatively evaluate the image quality and radiometric performance of an imaging spectrometer. The estimation and testing of SNR are very important for developing an imaging spectrometer. From the perspectives of radiative transmission and energy conversion, the SNR model is proposed, and the SNR equation of dispersive-type limb imaging spectrometer is derived, and the SNR values under several observing conditions for an limb imaging spectrometer prototype developed are theoretically evaluated based on atmospheric radiative transfer code MODTRAN 4.0. The results show that the SNR of the prototype under typical viewing geometry is not less than 8. As experimental validation, SNR testing was performed using an internally illuminated integrating sphere, and the experimental results have proved the correctness of this theoretical model. PMID:20707179

  20. Attitude determination for small satellites using GPS signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Daniel

    An embedded system for GPS-based attitude determination (AD) using signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements was developed for CubeSat applications. The design serves as an evaluation testbed for conducting ground based experiments using various computational methods and antenna types to determine the optimum AD accuracy. Raw GPS data is also stored to non-volatile memory for downloading and post analysis. Two low-power microcontrollers are used for processing and to display information on a graphic screen for real-time performance evaluations. A new parallel inter-processor communication protocol was developed that is faster and uses less power than existing standard protocols. A shorted annular patch (SAP) antenna was fabricated for the initial ground-based AD experiments with the testbed. Static AD estimations with RMS errors in the range of 2.5° to 4.8° were achieved over a range of off-zenith attitudes.

  1. Optimal Signal Filtration in Optical Sensors with Natural Squeezing of Vacuum Noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gusev, A. V.; Kulagin, V. V.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of optimal receiver is discussed for optical sensor measuring a small displacement of probe mass. Due to nonlinear interaction of the field and the mirror, a reflected wave is in squeezed state (natural squeezing), two quadratures of which are correlated and therefore one can increase signal-to-noise ratio and overcome the SQL. A measurement procedure realizing such correlation processing of two quadratures is clarified. The required combination of quadratures can be produced via mixing of pump field reflected from the mirror with local oscillator phase modulated field in duel-detector homodyne scheme. Such measurement procedure could be useful not only for resonant bar gravitational detector but for laser longbase interferometric detectors as well.

  2. Digital signal processing approaches for semiconductor phase noise tolerant coherent transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias Olmedo, Miguel; Pang, Xiaodan; Schatz, Richard; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We discuss about digital signal processing approaches that can enable coherent links based on semiconductor lasers. A state-of-the art analysis on different carrier-phase recovery (CPR) techniques is presented. We show that these techniques are based on the assumption of lorentzian linewidth, which does not hold for monolithically integrated semiconductor lasers. We investigate the impact of such lineshape on both 3 and 20 dB linewidth and experimentally conduct a systematic study for 56-GBaud DP-QPSK and 28-GBaud DP-16QAM systems using a decision directed phase look loop algorithm. We show how carrier induced frequency noise has no impact on linewidth but a significant impact on system performance; which rises the question on whether 3-dB linewidth should be used as performance estimator for semiconductor lasers.

  3. Multichannel ECG and Noise Modeling: Application to Maternal and Fetal ECG Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameni, Reza; Clifford, Gari D.; Jutten, Christian; Shamsollahi, Mohammad B.

    2007-12-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic model of the electrical activity of the heart is presented. The model is based on the single dipole model of the heart and is later related to the body surface potentials through a linear model which accounts for the temporal movements and rotations of the cardiac dipole, together with a realistic ECG noise model. The proposed model is also generalized to maternal and fetal ECG mixtures recorded from the abdomen of pregnant women in single and multiple pregnancies. The applicability of the model for the evaluation of signal processing algorithms is illustrated using independent component analysis. Considering the difficulties and limitations of recording long-term ECG data, especially from pregnant women, the model described in this paper may serve as an effective means of simulation and analysis of a wide range of ECGs, including adults and fetuses.

  4. Shuttle bit rate synchronizer. [signal to noise ratios and error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, D. C.; Fultz, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A shuttle bit rate synchronizer brassboard unit was designed, fabricated, and tested, which meets or exceeds the contractual specifications. The bit rate synchronizer operates at signal-to-noise ratios (in a bit rate bandwidth) down to -5 dB while exhibiting less than 0.6 dB bit error rate degradation. The mean acquisition time was measured to be less than 2 seconds. The synchronizer is designed around a digital data transition tracking loop whose phase and data detectors are integrate-and-dump filters matched to the Manchester encoded bits specified. It meets the reliability (no adjustments or tweaking) and versatility (multiple bit rates) of the shuttle S-band communication system through an implementation which is all digital after the initial stage of analog AGC and A/D conversion.

  5. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  6. Maintaining acoustic communication at a cocktail party: heterospecific masking noise improves signal detection through frequency separation

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, M. E.; Römer, H.; Hartbauer, M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We examined acoustic masking in a chirping katydid species of the Mecopoda elongata complex due to interference with a sympatric Mecopoda species where males produce continuous trills at high amplitudes. Frequency spectra of both calling songs range from 1 to 80 kHz; the chirper species has more energy in a narrow frequency band at 2 kHz and above 40 kHz. Behaviourally, chirper males successfully phase-locked their chirps to playbacks of conspecific chirps under masking conditions at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of −8 dB. After the 2 kHz band in the chirp had been equalised to the level in the masking trill, the breakdown of phase-locked synchrony occurred at a SNR of +7 dB. The remarkable receiver performance is partially mirrored in the selective response of a first-order auditory interneuron (TN1) to conspecific chirps under these masking conditions. However, the selective response is only maintained for a stimulus including the 2 kHz component, although this frequency band has no influence on the unmasked TN1 response. Remarkably, the addition of masking noise at 65 dB sound pressure level (SPL) to threshold response levels of TN1 for pure tones of 2 kHz enhanced the sensitivity of the response by 10 dB. Thus, the spectral dissimilarity between masker and signal at a rather low frequency appears to be of crucial importance for the ability of the chirping species to communicate under strong masking by the trilling species. We discuss the possible properties underlying the cellular/synaptic mechanisms of the ‘novelty detector’. PMID:24307713

  7. VLF station signals and radio noise intensity variations depending on solar activity registrated in Yakutsk during 2009-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakov, Alexey A.; Kozlov, Vladimir I.; Mullayarov, Viktor A.; Karimov, Rustam R.; Tarabukina, Lena D.; Mel'chinov, Viktor P.

    2015-11-01

    Diurnal variations of radio noise intensity (14.88 kHz) registered in Yakutsk in June 2009-2014 is 10 dB, March - 9 dB, September - 8.7 dB, December - 7.3 dB. Diurnal variations of intensity of radio station VLF signals, radio noise intensity and the number of lightning discharges in Yakutsk are compared. VLF noise variations in summer 5-10 UT defined local thunderstorm activity. The period 11-20 UT for receiving radio noise defined distant thunderstorm cells in Western Siberia, the territory between Hinggan, Buretsky and Stanovoy mountaines. Radio signals from these areas propagate in similar paths like signals Novosibirsk and Khabarovsk navaid stations. The attenuation variations from a solar activity minimum to the maximum are estimated. Taking into account the changes of propagation attenuation of 1.2 dB (signal Khabarovsk) from a minimum to a maximum of solar activity in July, the power of VLF radio noise at a minimum on 7.6 dB greater than at solar activity maximum.

  8. Attention-Dependent Modulation of Cortical Taste Circuits Revealed by Granger Causality with Signal-Dependent Noise

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiang; Ge, Tian; Grabenhorst, Fabian; Feng, Jianfeng; Rolls, Edmund T.

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention. PMID:24204221

  9. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  10. Investigation on the coloured noise in GPS-derived position with time-varying seasonal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Klos, Anna; Bos, Machiel Simon; Bogusz, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal signals in the GPS-derived time series arise from real geophysical signals related to tidal (residual) or non-tidal (loadings from atmosphere, ocean and continental hydrosphere, thermo elastic strain, etc.) effects and numerical artefacts including aliasing from mismodelling in short periods or repeatability of the GPS satellite constellation with respect to the Sun (draconitics). Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is a method for investigation of nonlinear dynamics, suitable to either stationary or non-stationary data series without prior knowledge about their character. The aim of SSA is to mathematically decompose the original time series into a sum of slowly varying trend, seasonal oscillations and noise. In this presentation we will explore the ability of SSA to subtract the time-varying seasonal signals in GPS-derived North-East-Up topocentric components and show properties of coloured noise from residua. For this purpose we used data from globally distributed IGS (International GNSS Service) permanent stations processed by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) in a PPP (Precise Point Positioning) mode. After introducing a threshold of 13 years, 264 stations left with a maximum length reaching 23 years. The data was initially pre-processed for outliers, offsets and gaps. The SSA was applied to pre-processed series to estimate the time-varying seasonal signals. We adopted a 3-years window as the optimal dimension of its size determined with the Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC) values. A Fisher-Snedecor test corrected for the presence of temporal correlation was used to determine the statistical significance of reconstructed components. This procedure showed that first four components describing annual and semi-annual signals, are significant at a 99.7% confidence level, which corresponds to 3-sigma criterion. We compared the non-parametric SSA approach with a commonly chosen parametric Least-Squares Estimation that assumes constant amplitudes and

  11. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  12. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  13. Seismic Identification of Hurricanes: Seeking the Signal Needle in the Noise Haystack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, C. W.; Stein, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    The short and incomplete observational record of North Atlantic hurricanes limits understanding of the link between rising sea surface temperatures and the frequency or intensity of those storms. North Atlantic hurricane records were based entirely on ship logs and land observations before aircraft reconnaissance started in 1944, and even then only limited areas were monitored. Hence the potential for sampling problems exists before satellite-based observation began in the mid-1960's, implying that an undercount in the historical record is likely. To address this issue, we are developing methodology to improve the record of the number of North Atlantic hurricanes through the analysis of their signals recorded on decades of historical seismograms. Microseisms--signals derived from natural sources not related to earthquakes, also known as ambient seismic noise--are generated by atmospheric energy and so have been used as a proxy for oceanic wave climate and an indication of decadal-scale climate variability. Microseisms should therefore be usable to detect historical hurricanes that may have gone unobserved. We use digital data from the HRV (Harvard, Massachusetts) and SJG (San Juan, Puerto Rico) seismic stations to study microseisms generated by well-characterized North Atlantic hurricanes. Although powerful hurricanes such as Andrew (August 1992) can easily be identified, doing so for storms of intensities less than category 3 is challenging. That is because the amplitude and frequency content of microseisms generated by hurricanes are controlled by factors beyond intensity alone. For weaker storms, additional variables--a storm's velocity over the ocean, hurricane-seismic station distance and velocity structure along the path between the two, ocean depth along that path, and the areal extent of the hurricane--become increasingly important. Hence although we are making progress, our present understanding of the ``transfer function" between hurricane intensity and

  14. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in static-mode down-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiyong; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yu; Cai, Guangyu; Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    The static-mode down-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) can keep the target and carrying-platform still during the collection process. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in static-mode down-looking SAIL is investigated. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved by increasing scanning time and sampling rate in static-mode down-looking SAIL. In the experiment, the targets are reconstructed in different scanning time and different sampling rate. As the increasing of the scanning time and sampling rate, the reconstructed images become clearer. These techniques have a great potential for applications in extensive synthetic aperture imaging ladar fields.

  15. A MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO ALGORITHM FOR ANALYSIS OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, J. B.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Huey, Greg; Gorski, K. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wandelt, B. D. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no

    2009-05-20

    We present a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for cosmic microwave background (CMB) analysis in the low signal-to-noise regime. This method builds on and complements the previously described CMB Gibbs sampler, and effectively solves the low signal-to-noise inefficiency problem of the direct Gibbs sampler. The new algorithm is a simple Metropolis-Hastings sampler with a general proposal rule for the power spectrum, C {sub l}, followed by a particular deterministic rescaling operation of the sky signal, s. The acceptance probability for this joint move depends on the sky map only through the difference of {chi}{sup 2} between the original and proposed sky sample, which is close to unity in the low signal-to-noise regime. The algorithm is completed by alternating this move with a standard Gibbs move. Together, these two proposals constitute a computationally efficient algorithm for mapping out the full joint CMB posterior, both in the high and low signal-to-noise regimes.

  16. Investigation of signal thresholding to reduce the effects of instrument noise of an EMCCD based micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorsak, Alexander R.; Bysani Krishnakumar, Sumukh; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    This project investigated the signal thresholding effectiveness at reducing the instrument noise of an electron multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) based micro-CT system at low x-ray exposure levels. Scans of a mouse spine and an iodine phantom were taken using an EMCCD detector coupled with a micro-CT system. An iodine filter of 4 mg/cm2 area density was placed in the beam. The output signal was thresholded using some multiple of the inherent background noise. For each threshold, 100, 200, and 300 frames were summed for each projection to evaluate the effect on the reconstructed image. The projection images from the scans were compared using line profiles and their SNR. Our results indicate that, as the threshold was increased, the line profiles of the projection images showed less statistical variation, but also lower signal levels, so that the SNR of the projection images decreased as the threshold increased. When the line profile of a projection image obtained using a signal threshold is compared with one obtained using energy integrating mode, the profile obtained using thresholding had less variation than that obtained using energy integration, which indicates less instrument noise. The SNR at the edges of the scan object is higher in the thresholded images when compared with the energy integrated projection images. We conclude that thresholding the output signal from an EMCCD detector at low x-ray exposure levels is an effective method to reduce the instrument noise of an EMCCD detector.

  17. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. On nanopore DNA sequencing by signal and noise analysis of ionic current.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chenyu; Zeng, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Zhen; Hjort, Klas; Scheicher, Ralph; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2016-05-27

    DNA sequencing, i.e., the process of determining the succession of nucleotides on a DNA strand, has become a standard aid in biomedical research and is expected to revolutionize medicine. With the capability of handling single DNA molecules, nanopore technology holds high promises to become speedier in sequencing at lower cost than what are achievable with the commercially available optics- or semiconductor-based massively parallelized technologies. Despite tremendous progress made with biological and solid-state nanopores, high error rates and large uncertainties persist with the sequencing results. Here, we employ a nano-disk model to quantitatively analyze the sequencing process by examining the variations of ionic current when a DNA strand translocates a nanopore. Our focus is placed on signal-boosting and noise-suppressing strategies in order to attain the single-nucleotide resolution. Apart from decreasing pore diameter and thickness, it is crucial to also reduce the translocation speed and facilitate a stepwise translocation. Our best-case scenario analysis points to severe challenges with employing plain nanopore technology, i.e., without recourse to any signal amplification strategy, in achieving sequencing with the desired single-nucleotide resolution. A conceptual approach based on strand synthesis in the nanopore of the translocating DNA from single-stranded to double-stranded is shown to yield a 10-fold signal amplification. Although it involves no advanced physics and is very simple in mathematics, this simple model captures the essence of nanopore sequencing and is useful in guiding the design and operation of nanopore sequencing. PMID:27095148

  19. On nanopore DNA sequencing by signal and noise analysis of ionic current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chenyu; Zeng, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Zhen; Hjort, Klas; Scheicher, Ralph; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequencing, i.e., the process of determining the succession of nucleotides on a DNA strand, has become a standard aid in biomedical research and is expected to revolutionize medicine. With the capability of handling single DNA molecules, nanopore technology holds high promises to become speedier in sequencing at lower cost than what are achievable with the commercially available optics- or semiconductor-based massively parallelized technologies. Despite tremendous progress made with biological and solid-state nanopores, high error rates and large uncertainties persist with the sequencing results. Here, we employ a nano-disk model to quantitatively analyze the sequencing process by examining the variations of ionic current when a DNA strand translocates a nanopore. Our focus is placed on signal-boosting and noise-suppressing strategies in order to attain the single-nucleotide resolution. Apart from decreasing pore diameter and thickness, it is crucial to also reduce the translocation speed and facilitate a stepwise translocation. Our best-case scenario analysis points to severe challenges with employing plain nanopore technology, i.e., without recourse to any signal amplification strategy, in achieving sequencing with the desired single-nucleotide resolution. A conceptual approach based on strand synthesis in the nanopore of the translocating DNA from single-stranded to double-stranded is shown to yield a 10-fold signal amplification. Although it involves no advanced physics and is very simple in mathematics, this simple model captures the essence of nanopore sequencing and is useful in guiding the design and operation of nanopore sequencing.

  20. The Effect of Vegetation on Soil Moisture Retrievals from GPS Signal-to-Noise Ratio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, C. C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.; Zavorotny, V.

    2012-12-01

    GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR) is a method of environmental monitoring that relates changes in ground-reflected (multipath) GPS signals to changes in surface soil moisture and vegetative state for an area of approximately 1000 m2 surrounding a GPS antenna. GPS-IR operates as a bi-static radar: L2C frequency signals transmitted by GPS satellites and subsequent reflections (multipath) are measured by antennas at permanent GPS stations. Changes in multipath signals are seen in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) interferograms, which are recorded by the GPS receiver. Results from previous field studies have shown that shallow soil moisture can be estimated from SNR phase for bare soil conditions or when vegetation is sparse. Vegetation surrounding a GPS antenna affects the phase shift, amplitude, and frequency/apparent reflector height of SNR oscillations. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify the vegetation conditions, for example vegetation height or water content, that preclude retrieval of soil moisture estimates using GPS-IR. We use both field data and an electrodynamic model that simulates SNR interferograms for variable soil and vegetation conditions to: 1. Determine how changes in vegetation height, biomass, and water content affect GPS phase, amplitude, and apparent reflector height and 2. Quantify the amount of vegetation that obscures the soil moisture signal in SNR data. We report results for rangeland and agricultural sites. At the rangeland sites, vegetation water content only varies between 0 and 0.6 kg/m2. Both observed and simulated SNR data from these sites show that apparent reflector height is nearly constant. Therefore, SNR interferograms are strongly affected by permittivity at the soil surface, and thus soil moisture can be retrieved. Even though reflector height does not change, SNR phase shift and amplitude are affected by fluctuations in rangeland vegetation and must be accounted for in soil moisture retrievals. At several agricultural

  1. Analysis of in-plane signal-to-noise ratio in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takanori; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Ida, Yoshihiro

    2008-03-01

    The purposes of this study are to analyze signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) changes for in-plane (axial plane) position and in-plane direction in X-ray computed tomography (CT) system and to verify those visual effects by using simulated small low-contrast disc objects. Three-models of multi detector-row CT were employed. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was obtained using a thin metal wire. Noise power spectrum (NPSs) was obtained using a cylindrical water phantom. The measurement positions were set to center and off-centered positions of 64mm, 128mm and 192mm. One-dimensional MTFs and NPSs for the x- and y-direction were calculated by means of a numerical slit scanning method. SNRs were then calculated from MTFs and NPSs. The simulated low-contrast disc objects with diameter of 2 to 10mm and contrast to background of 3.0%, 4.5% and 6.0% were superimposed on the water phantom images. Respective simulated objects in the images are then visually evaluated in degree of their recognition, and then the validity of the resultant SNRs are examined. Resultant in-plane SNRs differed between the center and peripheries and indicated a trend that the SNR values increase in accordance with distance from the center. The increasing degree differed between x- and y-direction, and also changed by the CT systems. These results suggested that the peripheries region has higher low-contrast detectability than the center. The properties derived in this study indicated that the depiction abilities at various in-plane positions are not uniform in clinical CT images, and detectability of the low contrast lesion may be influenced.

  2. Noise-induced cochlear F-actin depolymerization is mediated via ROCK2/p-ERM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Wang, Xianren; Chen, Jun; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has suggested that traumatic noise activates Rho-GTPase pathways in cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), resulting in cell death and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we investigated Rho effectors, Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), and the targets of ROCKs, the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, in the regulation of the cochlear actin cytoskeleton using adult CBA/J mice under conditions of noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) hearing loss, which result in changes to the F/G-actin ratio. The levels of cochlear ROCK2 and p-ERM decreased 1 h after either TTS- or PTS-noise exposure. In contrast, ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs decreased only after PTS-, not after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of the Rho pathway, resulted in significant reversal of the F/G-actin ratio changes caused by noise exposure and attenuated OHC death and NIHL. Conversely, the down-regulation of ROCK2 by pretreatment with ROCK2 siRNA reduced the expression of ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs, exacerbated TTS to PTS, and worsened OHC loss. Additionally, pretreatment with siRNA against radixin, an ERM protein, aggravated TTS to PTS. Our results indicate that a ROCK2-mediated ERM-phosphorylation signaling cascade modulates noise-induced hair cell loss and NIHL by targeting the cytoskeleton. PMID:25683353

  3. A Measure of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Microarray Samples and Studies Using Gene Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Venet, David; Detours, Vincent; Bersini, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of gene expression data can vary dramatically from platform to platform, study to study, and sample to sample. As reliable statistical analysis rests on reliable data, determining such quality is of the utmost importance. Quality measures to spot problematic samples exist, but they are platform-specific, and cannot be used to compare studies. Results As a proxy for quality, we propose a signal-to-noise ratio for microarray data, the “Signal-to-Noise Applied to Gene Expression Experiments”, or SNAGEE. SNAGEE is based on the consistency of gene-gene correlations. We applied SNAGEE to a compendium of 80 large datasets on 37 platforms, for a total of 24,380 samples, and assessed the signal-to-noise ratio of studies and samples. This allowed us to discover serious issues with three studies. We show that signal-to-noise ratios of both studies and samples are linked to the statistical significance of the biological results. Conclusions We showed that SNAGEE is an effective way to measure data quality for most types of gene expression studies, and that it often outperforms existing techniques. Furthermore, SNAGEE is platform-independent and does not require raw data files. The SNAGEE R package is available in BioConductor. PMID:23251415

  4. The InSight VBB Seismometer: From Signal and Noise to Internal Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U.; Mimoun, D.; de Raucourt, S.; Spiga, A.; Garcia, R.; Mocquet, A.; Panning, M.; Beucler, E.; Boschi, L.; Goetz, W.; Pike, T.; Johnson, C.; Weber, R.; Wieczorek, M.; Larmat, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Tromp, J.

    2012-04-01

    The InSight Mission is one of three NASA down-selected projects in competition for the 2010 Discovery AO. The goal of SEIS (a very-broad-band (VBB) seismometer), the mission's core instrument, is to determine the interior structure and seismic activity of the planet. If selected by NASA in mid 2012, the mission will be launched in 2016 and will operate on the Martian surface during two earth years after landing. We present modeling of both seismic amplitudes and seismic noise, in the later case by advance modeling of the interaction of the atmosphere with the Martian ground or seismic waves modeling fully taken into account the expected 3D structure of the crust, and use the later estimations to determine the detection threshold of the VBB seismometer. Both quakes and impacts are considered, and in the later case, impacts data and associated seismic responses of the Apollo seismic experiment are used to better model the seismic efficiency of the impacts and the associated source functions. For quakes, amplitudes of the core phases are estimated and discussed, as well as the dependence of signal amplitudes to attenuation and the associated importance of broad band seismology. As only one seismic station is available, structure in-version will be performed using: - Secondary seismic data which do not depend on the event location: e.g., free oscillation frequencies for the largest quakes constraining the interior down to 200 km and receiver functions constraining the crust-mantle discontinuity below the landing site ; - Seismic impact data from impacts post-located by a Mars orbiter; - Seismic data associated with events with more than 3 different wave arrival time determinations (for Vs in-version with constant Vp/Vs) or more than 4 (for full Vp, Vs inversions). We estimate that about 35 events will be detected with both P and S waves ( and for most R1-Lg surface waves) and about 10 with P, S and R1/R2/R3 surface waves and core phases (e.g., PcP, ScP) with high

  5. Synchronisation and desynchronisation of self-modulation oscillations in a ring chip laser under the action of a periodic signal and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Dudetskiy, V Yu; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N

    2014-09-30

    The effect of pump noise on the synchronisation of selfmodulation oscillations in a solid-state ring laser with periodic pump modulation is studied numerically and experimentally. It is found that, in contrast to desynchronisation that usually occurs under action of noise in the case of 1/1 synchronisation of self-oscillations by a periodic signal, the effect of noise on 1/2 synchronisation may be positive, namely, at a sufficiently low intensity, pump noise is favourable for synchronisation of self-oscillations, for narrowing of their spectrum, and for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. (lasers)

  6. [Discrimination of spectral patterns of sound signals in conditions of interfering noise].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    2007-06-01

    The method of probes with rippled spectra makes possible to measure the frequency resolving power (FRP) of human hearing using no frequency-selective masking techniques. This allows studying the influence of interfering noises on the FRP. In conditions of diotic presentation (parallel to both ears), FRP markedly decreases on- or low-frequency noise markedly decreases FRP. The dependence of this effect on sound intensity and noise-to-probe ratio is different for the on- and low-frequence noise, which indicates different mechanisms of action of these two kinds of interfering noise. However, in both cases, a loud enough interfering noise results in complete inability to discriminate the fine spectral pattern of the probe. On the contrary, in conditions of dichotic presentation (the probe to one ear and the noise to the other), the interfering noise does not influence FRP noticeably within a wide range of frequency relations of the probe and noise and noise-to-probe level ratios. Thus, almost entire dichotic release of influence of interfering noise on FRP takes place. This feature can be used for designing bearing aids. PMID:17850017

  7. Signals from the Noise: Image Stacking for Quasars in the FIRST Survey

    SciTech Connect

    White, R L; Helfand, D J; Becker, R H; Glikman, E; deVries, W

    2006-05-05

    We present a technique to explore the radio sky into the nanoJansky regime by employing image stacking using the FIRST radio sky survey. We begin with a discussion of the non-intuitive relationship between the mean and median values of a non-Gaussian distribution in which measurements of the members of the distribution are dominated by noise. Following a detailed examination of the systematic effects present in the 20 cm VLA snapshot images that comprise FIRST, we demonstrate that image stacking allows us to recover the average properties of source populations with flux densities a factor of 30 or more below the rms noise level. With the calibration described herein, mean estimates of radio flux density, luminosity, radio loudness, etc. are derivable for any undetected source class having arcsecond positional accuracy. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by exploring the radio properties of quasars found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compute the mean luminosities and radio-loudness parameters for 41,295 quasars in the SDSS DR3 catalog. There is a tight correlation between optical and radio luminosity, with the radio luminosity increasing as the 0.72 power of optical luminosity. This implies declining radio-loudness with optical luminosity, with the most luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -30) having on average ten times lower radio-to-optical ratios than the least luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -21). There is also a striking correlation between optical color and radio loudness: quasars that are either redder or bluer than the norm are brighter radio sources. Quasars having g-r {approx} 0.8 magnitudes redder than the SDSS composite spectrum are found to have radio-loudness ratios that are higher by a factor of 8. We examine the radio properties of the subsample of quasars with broad absorption lines, finding, surprisingly, that BAL quasars have higher mean radio flux densities at all redshifts, with the greatest disparity arising in the rare low

  8. Signals and Noise in Terrestrial Archives of Organic Carbon: examples from the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Baczynski, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Past climatic hyperthermals, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), provide imperfect but useful geological analogs to human-induced climate warming. Changes in terrestrial biota, hydrology, sedimentary processes, and climate patterns during past abrupt warming events provide valuable insights to the intensity of climate impacts on water and carbon cycles on land. Carbon isotope excursions (CIE) that accompany warming are often documented first in marine records, and then used to connect events from sea to land, and across diverse terrestrial environments. As a result, CIE are highly valuable chemostratigraphic signals, even though their records on land can be noisy. Isotopic records of organic carbon in terrestrial environments are widespread and preserved even when carbonate records are lacking. While readily measured, they are often less reliable, exhibiting both enhanced noise and attenuated signals relative to marine and inorganic records. Soil organic matter is subject to extensive carbon loss, selective preservation, and the inputs of refractory, allochthonous carbon. This is particularly true during the PETM, and new records and quantitative treatments lend insights to the relative influence of each. Patterns in preservation are not the only source of isotope variability in terrestrial organic carbon. Landscapes also experience strong heterogeneity in biomass production, transport, and deposition, all of which are sensitive to geographic and ecological patterns in water and carbon dynamics. Lipid biomarkers from ancient plants provide useful tools to recognize and circumvent this complexity. In particular, insights to ecological and climatic patterns can be gained from abundances and isotopic characteristics of taxon-specific compounds. Biomarkers also can help resolve the influence of marine organic carbon when terrestrial materials are deposited in coastal or marginal marine settings. This presentation will illustrate the challenges and

  9. Signal, noise, and resolution in correlated fluctuations from snapshot small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kirian, Richard A.; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang Xiaoyu; Doak, R. Bruce; Spence, John C. H.

    2011-07-15

    It has been suggested that the three-dimensional structure of one particle may be reconstructed using the scattering from many identical, randomly oriented copies ab initio, without modeling or a priori information. This may be possible if these particles are frozen in either space or time, so that the conventional two-dimensional small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) distribution contains fluctuations and is no longer isotropic. We consider the magnitude of the correlated fluctuation SAXS (CFSAXS) signal for typical x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) beam conditions and compare this against the errors derived with the inclusion of Poisson photon counting statistics. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is found to rapidly approach a limit independent of the number of particles contributing to each diffraction pattern, so that the addition of more particles to a ''single-particle-per-shot'' experiment may be of little value, apart from reducing solvent background. When the scattering power is significantly less than one photon per particle per Shannon pixel, the SNR grows in proportion to incident flux. We provide simulations for protein molecules in support of these analytical results, and discuss the effects of solvent background scatter. We consider the SNR dependence on resolution and particle size, and discuss the application of the method to glasses and liquids, and the implications of more powerful XFELs, smaller focused beams, and higher pulse repetition rates for this approach. We find that an accurate CFSAXS measurement may be acquired to subnanometer resolution for protein molecules if a 9-keV beam containing 10{sup 13} photons is focused to a {approx}100-nm spot diameter, provided that the effects of solvent background can be reduced sufficiently.

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement of silicon nanowires biosensor with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Gao, Anran; Zou, Nengli; Dai, Pengfei; Lu, Na; Li, Tie; Wang, Yuelin; Zhao, Jianlong; Mao, Hongju

    2013-09-11

    Herein, we describe a novel approach for rapid, label-free and specific DNA detection by applying rolling circle amplification (RCA) based on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) for the first time. Highly responsive SiNWs were fabricated with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible anisotropic self-stop etching technique which eliminated the need for hybrid method. The probe DNA was immobilized on the surface of SiNW, followed by sandwich hybridization with the perfectly matched target DNA and RCA primer that acted as a primer to hybridize the RCA template. The RCA reaction created a long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product and thus enhanced the electronic responses of SiNW significantly. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a figure-of-merit was analyzed to estimate the signal enhancement and possible detection limit. The nanosensor showed highly sensitive concentration-dependent conductance change in response to specific target DNA sequences. Because of the binding of an abundance of repeated sequences of RCA products, the SNR of >20 for 1 fM DNA detection was achieved, implying a detection floor of 50 aM. This RCA-based SiNW biosensor also discriminated perfectly matched target DNA from one-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity due to the substantially reduced nonspecific binding onto the SiNW surface through RCA. The combination of SiNW FET sensor with RCA will increase diagnostic capacity and the ability of laboratories to detect unexpected viruses, making it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related diseases. PMID:23937430

  11. Garonne River monitoring from Signal-to-Noise Ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Darrozes, José; Ramillien, Guillaume; Bonneton, Philippe; Bonneton, Natalie; Detandt, Guillaume; Roques, Manon; Orseau, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for water level monitoring through the last decades. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and a classical GNSS receiver. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, classical SNR analysis method used to estimate the variations of the reflecting surface height h(t) has a limited domain of validity due to its variation rate dh/dt(t) assumed to be negligible. In [1], authors solve this problem with a "dynamic SNR method" taking the dynamic of the surface into account to conjointly estimate h(t) and dh/dt(t) over areas characterized by high amplitudes of tides. If the performance of this dynamic SNR method is already well-established for ocean monitoring [1], it was not validated in continental areas (i.e., river monitoring). We carried out a field study during 3 days in August and September, 2015, using a GNSS antenna to measure the water level variations in the Garonne River (France) in Podensac located 140 km downstream of the estuary mouth. In this site, the semi-diurnal tide amplitude reaches ~5 m. The antenna was located ~10 m above the water surface, and reflections of the GNSS electromagnetic waves on the Garonne River occur until 140 m from the antenna. Both classical SNR method and dynamic SNR method are tested and results are compared. [1] N. Roussel, G. Ramillien, F. Frappart, J. Darrozes, A. Gay, R. Biancale, N. Striebig, V. Hanquiez, X. Bertin, D. Allain : "Sea level monitoring and sea state estimate using a single geodetic receiver", Remote Sensing of Environment 171 (2015) 261-277.

  12. A de-noising algorithm based on wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting for ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanju; Li, Dongsheng; Yu, Mingmei; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic system (GREATEM) on an unmanned aircraft enjoys considerable prospecting depth, lateral resolution and detection efficiency, etc. In recent years it has become an important technical means of rapid resources exploration. However, GREATEM data are extremely vulnerable to stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise (sferics noise, aircraft engine noise and other human electromagnetic noises). These noises will cause degradation of the imaging quality for data interpretation. Based on the characteristics of the GREATEM data and major noises, we propose a de-noising algorithm utilizing wavelet threshold method and exponential adaptive window width-fitting. Firstly, the white noise is filtered in the measured data using the wavelet threshold method. Then, the data are segmented using data window whose step length is even logarithmic intervals. The data polluted by electromagnetic noise are identified within each window based on the discriminating principle of energy detection, and the attenuation characteristics of the data slope are extracted. Eventually, an exponential fitting algorithm is adopted to fit the attenuation curve of each window, and the data polluted by non-stationary electromagnetic noise are replaced with their fitting results. Thus the non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively removed. The proposed algorithm is verified by the synthetic and real GREATEM signals. The results show that in GREATEM signal, stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively filtered using the wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting algorithm, which enhances the imaging quality.

  13. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation in digital computer simulation of lowpass and bandpass systems with applications to analog and digital communications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranter, W. H.; Turner, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are developed to estimate power gain, delay, signal-to-noise ratio, and mean square error in digital computer simulations of lowpass and bandpass systems. The techniques are applied to analog and digital communications. The signal-to-noise ratio estimates are shown to be maximum likelihood estimates in additive white Gaussian noise. The methods are seen to be especially useful for digital communication systems where the mapping from the signal-to-noise ratio to the error probability can be obtained. Simulation results show the techniques developed to be accurate and quite versatile in evaluating the performance of many systems through digital computer simulation.

  14. Optimization of speech in noise with three signal processing algorithms for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Bas A. M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Lyzenga, Johannes

    2002-05-01

    In this study a three-dimensional Simplex procedure was applied to optimize speech in noise by a combination of signal processing algorithms for different acoustic conditions and hearing losses. The algorithms used to span the three dimensions are noise reduction, spectral tilting, and spectral enhancement, respectively. Additionally, we studied the algorithms for their main effects and interaction effects within the optimization process. The subjects were asked to evaluate two consecutive, differently processed sentences on listening comfort. Three different noise types and two signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were used. Three groups of subjects participated: normal hearing, normal hearing with simulated impaired auditory filtering (by spectral smearing), and sensorineurally hearing-impaired subjects. For the normal-hearing group we applied S/N=0 dB. For the hearing-impaired and the simulated hearing-impaired subjects we applied S/N=5 dB. We will discuss the similarities and differences in the response patterns of the three groups. Also, the individual preferences will be related to the hearing capacity, and to the type of interfering noise. Finally, we will discuss differences in the perceptual features that are used to judge listening comfort of the fragments by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects.

  15. Signal-to-Noise Behavior for Matches to Gradient Direction Models of Corners in Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Manay, S

    2007-02-09

    Gradient direction models for corners of prescribed acuteness, leg length, and leg thickness are constructed by generating fields of unit vectors emanating from leg pixels that point normal to the edges. A novel FFT-based algorithm that quickly matches models of corners at all possible positions and orientations in the image to fields of gradient directions for image pixels is described. The signal strength of a corner is discussed in terms of the number of pixels along the edges of a corner in an image, while noise is characterized by the coherence of gradient directions along those edges. The detection-false alarm rate behavior of our corner detector is evaluated empirically by manually constructing maps of corner locations in typical overhead images, and then generating different ROC curves for matches to models of corners with different leg lengths and thicknesses. We then demonstrate how corners found with our detector can be used to quickly and automatically find families of polygons of arbitrary position, size and orientation in overhead images.

  16. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of single-pixel imaging using digital microscanning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P; Phillips, David B; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J

    2016-05-16

    Single-pixel cameras provide a means to perform imaging at wavelengths where pixelated detector arrays are expensive or limited. The image is reconstructed from measurements of the correlation between the scene and a series of masks. Although there has been much research in the field in recent years, the fact that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scales poorly with increasing resolution has been one of the main limitations prohibiting the uptake of such systems. Microscanning is a technique that provides a final higher resolution image by combining multiple images of a lower resolution. Each of these low resolution images is subject to a sub-pixel sized lateral displacement. In this work we apply a digital microscanning approach to an infrared single-pixel camera. Our approach requires no additional hardware, but is achieved simply by using a modified set of masks. Compared to the conventional Hadamard based single-pixel imaging scheme, our proposed framework improves the SNR of reconstructed images by ∼ 50 % for the same acquisition time. In addition, this strategy also provides access to a stream of low-resolution 'preview' images throughout each high-resolution acquisition. PMID:27409871

  17. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  18. Signal-to-noise ratio in the membrane potential of the owl's auditory coincidence detectors

    PubMed Central

    Funabiki, Kazuo; Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Kempter, Richard; Carr, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Owls use interaural time differences (ITDs) to locate a sound source. They compute ITD in a specialized neural circuit that consists of axonal delay lines from the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and coincidence detectors in the nucleus laminaris (NL). Recent physiological recordings have shown that tonal stimuli induce oscillatory membrane potentials in NL neurons (Funabiki K, Ashida G, Konishi M. J Neurosci 31: 15245–15256, 2011). The amplitude of these oscillations varies with ITD and is strongly correlated to the firing rate. The oscillation, termed the sound analog potential, has the same frequency as the stimulus tone and is presumed to originate from phase-locked synaptic inputs from NM fibers. To investigate how these oscillatory membrane potentials are generated, we applied recently developed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis techniques (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010) to the intracellular waveforms obtained in vivo. Our theoretical prediction of the band-limited SNRs agreed with experimental data for mid- to high-frequency (>2 kHz) NL neurons. For low-frequency (≤2 kHz) NL neurons, however, measured SNRs were lower than theoretical predictions. These results suggest that the number of independent NM fibers converging onto each NL neuron and/or the population-averaged degree of phase-locking of the NM fibers could be significantly smaller in the low-frequency NL region than estimated for higher best-frequency NL. PMID:22933726

  19. C IV LINE-WIDTH ANOMALIES: THE PERILS OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, K. D.; Vestergaard, M.; Pogge, R. W.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Assef, R. J.

    2013-09-20

    Comparison of six high-redshift quasar spectra obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope with previous observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey shows that failure to correctly identify absorption and other problems with accurate characterization of the C IV λ1549 emission line profile in low signal-to-noise (S/N) data can severely limit the reliability of single-epoch mass estimates based on the C IV emission line. We combine the analysis of these new high-quality data with a reanalysis of three other samples based on high-S/N spectra of the C IV emission line region. We find that a large scatter between the Hβ- and C IV-based masses remains even for this high-S/N sample when using the FWHM to characterize the broad-line region velocity dispersion and the standard virial assumption to calculate the mass. However, we demonstrate that using high-quality data and the line dispersion to characterize the C IV line width leads to a high level of consistency between C IV- and Hβ-based masses, with <0.3 dex of observed scatter and an estimated ∼0.2 dex intrinsic scatter, in the mass residuals.

  20. Visual motherese? Signal-to-noise ratios in toddler-directed television.

    PubMed

    Wass, Sam V; Smith, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Younger brains are noisier information processing systems; this means that information for younger individuals has to allow clearer differentiation between those aspects that are required for the processing task in hand (the 'signal') and those that are not (the 'noise'). We compared toddler-directed and adult-directed TV programmes (TotTV/ATV). We examined how low-level visual features (that previous research has suggested influence gaze allocation) relate to semantic information, namely the location of the character speaking in each frame. We show that this relationship differs between TotTV and ATV. First, we conducted Receiver Operator Characteristics analyses and found that feature congestion predicted speaking character location in TotTV but not ATV. Second, we used multiple analytical strategies to show that luminance differentials (flicker) predict face location more strongly in TotTV than ATV. Our results suggest that TotTV designers have intuited techniques for controlling toddler attention using low-level visual cues. The implications of these findings for structuring childhood learning experiences away from a screen are discussed. PMID:24702791

  1. Distinguishing noise from signal in patterns of genomic divergence in a highly polymorphic avian radiation.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Leonardo; Gronau, Ilan; Silveira, Luís Fábio; Siepel, Adam; Lovette, Irby J

    2015-08-01

    Recently diverged taxa provide the opportunity to search for the genetic basis of the phenotypes that distinguish them. Genomic scans aim to identify loci that are diverged with respect to an otherwise weakly differentiated genetic background. These loci are candidates for being past targets of selection because they behave differently from the rest of the genome that has either not yet differentiated or that may cross species barriers through introgressive hybridization. Here we use a reduced-representation genomic approach to explore divergence among six species of southern capuchino seedeaters, a group of recently radiated sympatric passerine birds in the genus Sporophila. For the first time in these taxa, we discovered a small proportion of markers that appeared differentiated among species. However, when assessing the significance of these signatures of divergence, we found that similar patterns can also be recovered from random grouping of individuals representing different species. A detailed demographic inference indicates that genetic differences among Sporophila species could be the consequence of neutral processes, which include a very large ancestral effective population size that accentuates the effects of incomplete lineage sorting. As these neutral phenomena can generate genomic scan patterns that mimic those of markers involved in speciation and phenotypic differentiation, they highlight the need for caution when ascertaining and interpreting differentiated markers between species, especially when large numbers of markers are surveyed. Our study provides new insights into the demography of the southern capuchino radiation and proposes controls to distinguish signal from noise in similar genomic scans. PMID:26175196

  2. The flat fielding and achievable signal-to-noise of the MAMA detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Lindler, Don J.; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) was designed to achieve a signal-to-noise (S/N) of at least 100:1 per resolution element. Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) observations during Servicing Mission Orbital Verification (SMOV) confirm that this specification can be met. From analysis of a single spectrum of GD153, with counting statistics of approximately 165 a S/N of approximately 125 is achieved per spectral resolution element in the far ultraviolet (FUV) over the spectral range of 1280A to 1455A. Co-adding spectra of GRW+7OD5824 to increase the counting statistics to approximately 300 yields a S/N of approximately 190 per spectral resolution element over the region extending from 1347A to 1480A in the FUV. In the near ultraviolet (NUV), a single spectrum of GRW+7OD5824 with counting statistics of approximately 200 yields a S/N of approximately 150 per spectral resolution element over the spectral region extending from 2167 to 2520A. Details of the flat field construction, the spectral extraction, and the definition of a spectral resolution element will be described in the text.

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio-based quality assessment method for ICESat/GLAS waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Li, Guicai; Pan, Feifei; Xi, Xiaohuan; Luo, Shezhou

    2014-10-01

    Data quality determines the accuracy of results associated with remote sensing data processing and applications. However, few effective studies have been carried out on quality assessment methods for the full-waveform light detecting and ranging data. Using the geoscience laser altimeter system (GLAS) waveform data as an example, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-based waveform quality assessment method is proposed to analyze the relationship between the SNR and its controlling factors, i.e., laser type, laser using time, topographic relief, and land cover type, and study the impacts of these factors on the quality of the GLAS waveform data. Results show that the SNR-based data quality assessment method can quantitatively and effectively assess the GLAS waveform data quality. The SNR linearly attenuates with the laser using time, and the attenuation rate varies with laser type. The topographic relief is inversely correlated with the SNR of the GLAS data. As the land cover structure (especially the vertical structure) becomes more complex, the SNR of the GLAS data decreases. It was found that land cover types in descending order of the SNR values are desert, farmland, water body, grassland, city, and forest.

  4. Optimizing the Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio of MRI Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ananda; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    An MRI detector is formed from a conducting strip separated by a dielectric substrate from a ground plane, and tuned to a quarter-wavelength. By distributing discrete tuning elements along the strip, the geometric design may be adjusted to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given application. Here a numerical electromagnetic (EM) method of moments (MoM) is applied to determine the length, width, substrate thickness, dielectric constant, and number of tuning elements that yield the best intrinsic SNR (ISNR) of the strip detector at 1.5 Tesla. The central question of how strip performance compares with that of a conventional optimized loop coil is also addressed. The numerical method is validated against the known ISNR performance of loop coils, and its ability to predict the tuning capacitances and performance of seven experimental strip detectors of varying length, width, substrate thickness, and dielectric constant. We find that strip detectors with low-dielectric constant, moderately thin-substrate, and length about 1.3 (±0.2) times the depth of interest perform best. The ISNR of strips is comparable to that of loops (i.e., higher close to the detector but lower at depth). The SNR improves with two inherently-decoupled strips, whose sensitivity profile is well-suited to parallel MRI. The findings are summarized as design “rules of thumb.” PMID:16724302

  5. Reproducibility of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in correlation with signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Setsu; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kohara, Nobuo; Senda, Michio

    2007-11-15

    An increased amount of myoinositol (mI) relative to creatine (Cr) by proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) measurement gives a useful aid for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous results of test-retest measurement of mI, however, have shown variability more than twice as large as for other metabolites. The aims of this study were to analyze test-retest variability of (1)H-MRS measurements in correlation with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Ten subjects clinically suspected of mild AD were examined twice (2-14 days apart) with (1)H-MRS measurements of voxels placed at anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. The percent differences between two measurements (%differences) of mI/Cr showed a significant linear trend to decrease as average SNR increased, but %differences of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr and choline (Cho)/Cr did not. The average of %differences was 10.5, 15.0 and 20.8 for NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr, respectively, indicating a prominent deterioration of mI/Cr measurement reproducibility, which decreased to 6.96, 15.4 and 9.87, respectively, when the analysis was limited to measurements with SNR over 25. The results indicate that MRS measurements with high SNR should be used to obtain reliable assessments of mI/Cr as accurate diagnostic indicator of AD in clinical MR examinations. PMID:17900878

  6. Coherent dual-comb spectroscopy at high signal-to-noise ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Newbury, N. R.

    2010-10-15

    Two coherent frequency combs are used to measure the full complex response of a sample in a configuration analogous to a dispersive Fourier transform spectrometer, infrared time domain spectrometer, or a multiheterodyne laser spectrometer. This dual-comb spectrometer retains the frequency accuracy and resolution of the reference underlying the stabilized combs. We discuss the specific design of our coherent dual-comb spectrometer and demonstrate the potential of this technique by measuring the overtone vibration of hydrogen cyanide, centered at 194 THz (1545 nm). We measure the fully normalized, complex response of the gas over a 9 THz bandwidth at 220 MHz frequency resolution yielding 41,000 resolution elements. The average spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the 9 THz bandwidth is 2500 for both the magnitude and phase of the measured spectral response and the peak SNR is 4000. This peak SNR corresponds to a fractional absorption sensitivity of 0.05% and a phase sensitivity of 250 microradians. As the spectral coverage of combs expands, coherent dual-comb spectroscopy could provide high-frequency accuracy and resolution measurements of a complex sample response across a range of spectral regions. Work of U. S. government, not subject to copyright.

  7. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  8. X-ray spectral optimization for mammography applications using signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jonathan Ernest

    2000-07-01

    A hypotheses that optimum exposure technique factors for mammography can be computed using uncorrected x-ray spectra measured with an inexpensive semiconductor detector is proven. A parametric model is developed, based upon the minimum signal-to-noise ratio required to perceive an object against background, to predict optimum exposure technique factors. Using published molybdenum- and rhodium-target x-ray spectra, the model predicts that aluminum-filtered molybdenum and rhodium spectra are optimum. The model is subsequently used to predict optimum exposure technique factors using uncorrected x- ray spectra from a GE Senographe DMR mammography unit measured with a cadmium zinc telluride detector and multichannel analyzer. The computed optimum exposure technique factors using uncorrected measured spectra and published spectra are comparable. The model is validated using the uncorrected measured spectra and a phantom containing objects mimicking microcalcifications and fibrous tissue structures. Entrance skin exposure and breast dose for aluminum-filtered spectra are well below those produced using currently popular k-edge filtered spectra. Aluminum-filtered spectra should be considered useful because (1)structures associated with breast cancer can be successfully imaged, and (2)the patient receives a greatly reduced dose.

  9. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Arjun; Fratto, Brian E.; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s) as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed. PMID:27399702

  10. Performance of signal-to-noise ratio estimation for scanning electron microscope using autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion model.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Lim, M S; Yeap, Z X

    2016-07-01

    A new technique to quantify signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is proposed. This technique is known as autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion (ACLDR) model. To test the performance of this technique, the SEM image is corrupted with noise. The autocorrelation function of the original image and the noisy image are formed. The signal spectrum based on the autocorrelation function of image is formed. ACLDR is then used as an SNR estimator to quantify the signal spectrum of noisy image. The SNR values of the original image and the quantified image are calculated. The ACLDR is then compared with the three existing techniques, which are nearest neighbourhood, first-order linear interpolation and nearest neighbourhood combined with first-order linear interpolation. It is shown that ACLDR model is able to achieve higher accuracy in SNR estimation. PMID:26871742

  11. Signal-to-Noise Enhancement of a Nanospring Redox-Based Sensor by Lock-in Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Bakharev, Pavel V.; McIlroy, David N.

    2015-01-01

    A significant improvement of the response characteristics of a redox chemical gas sensor (chemiresistor) constructed with a single ZnO coated silica nanospring has been achieved with the technique of lock-in signal amplification. The comparison of DC and analog lock-in amplifier (LIA) AC measurements of the electrical sensor response to toluene vapor, at the ppm level, has been conducted. When operated in the DC detection mode, the sensor exhibits a relatively high sensitivity to the analyte vapor, as well as a low detection limit at the 10 ppm level. However, at 10 ppm the signal-to-noise ratio is 5 dB, which is less than desirable. When operated in the analog LIA mode, the signal-to-noise ratio at 10 ppm increases by 30 dB and extends the detection limit to the ppb range. PMID:26053754

  12. An all digital phase locked loop for synchronization of a sinusoidal signal embedded in white Gaussian noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. P.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    An all digital phase locked loop which tracks the phase of the incoming sinusoidal signal once per carrier cycle is proposed. The different elements and their functions and the phase lock operation are explained in detail. The nonlinear difference equations which govern the operation of the digital loop when the incoming signal is embedded in white Gaussian noise are derived, and a suitable model is specified. The performance of the digital loop is considered for the synchronization of a sinusoidal signal. For this, the noise term is suitably modelled which allows specification of the output probabilities for the two level quantizer in the loop at any given phase error. The loop filter considered increases the probability of proper phase correction. The phase error states in modulo two-pi forms a finite state Markov chain which enables the calculation of steady state probabilities, RMS phase error, transient response and mean time for cycle skipping.

  13. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Verma, Arjun; Fratto, Brian E; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s) as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed. PMID:27399702

  14. Shifting Spike Times or Adding and Deleting Spikes-How Different Types of Noise Shape Signal Transmission in Neural Populations.

    PubMed

    Voronenko, Sergej O; Stannat, Wilhelm; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    We study a population of spiking neurons which are subject to independent noise processes and a strong common time-dependent input. We show that the response of output spikes to independent noise shapes information transmission of such populations even when information transmission properties of single neurons are left unchanged. In particular, we consider two Poisson models in which independent noise either (i) adds and deletes spikes (AD model) or (ii) shifts spike times (STS model). We show that in both models suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) can be observed, where the information transmitted by a neural population is increased with addition of independent noise. In the AD model, the presence of the SSR effect is robust and independent of the population size or the noise spectral statistics. In the STS model, the information transmission properties of the population are determined by the spectral statistics of the noise, leading to a strongly increased effect of SSR in some regimes, or an absence of SSR in others. Furthermore, we observe a high-pass filtering of information in the STS model that is absent in the AD model. We quantify information transmission by means of the lower bound on the mutual information rate and the spectral coherence function. To this end, we derive the signal-output cross-spectrum, the output power spectrum, and the cross-spectrum of two spike trains for both models analytically. PMID:26458900

  15. Signal vs. Noise: Obtaining a representative δ18O record in a low-accumulation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Thomas; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Single ice cores have been proven to be a key archive to reconstruct climate changes on glacial to interglacial time scales in temperature as well as in greenhouse gases and many other climate parameters. In contrast, for the Holocene climate evolution single ice cores are likely less reliable recorders. The small amplitude of Holocene climate changes, together with the goal to reconstruct high-temporal resolution records down to subannual timescales, poses a significant challenge to the interpretation of ice core signals, especially in low-accumulation regions as the Antarctic plateau. In order to learn about the representativity of single firn cores and to optimize future ice-core based climate reconstructions, we undertook an extensive study of replicate firn coring and surface snow sampling at Kohnen station on Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. For the first time - to our knowledge - two-dimensional images of the water isotope and density structure of the upper firn have been obtained from two 45 m long and 1.2 m deep firn trenches separated at a distance of 500 m, yielding a climate proxy archive spanning roughly the last five years. In this contribution, we present the results of the stable water isotope compositions obtained from the two firn trenches. Seasonal layering of the isotopes is following an absolute depth scale likely caused by an annual reorganization of the snow surface directly related to the local dune scale. Local surface winds cause highly variable isotopic signals of the surface snow, featuring a similar range as the seasonal cycle. However, even in deeper layers, strong perturbations of the isotopic stratigraphy are found, resulting in a low representativity of single firn cores. On the contrary, the mean trench profiles are highly correlated, giving a representative climate signal over a spatial scale of at least 500 m. The decorrelation length of the stratigraphic noise is ~10 m, yielding an estimate of an optimal sampling strategy for

  16. Analyzing low signal-to-noise FUSE spectra. Confirmation of Lyman continuum escape from Haro 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitet, E.; Bergvall, N.; Piskunov, N.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Galaxies are believed to be the main providers of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons during the early phases of the cosmic reionization. Little is known however, when it comes to escape fractions and the mechanisms behind the leakage. To learn more, one may look at local objects, but so far only one low-z galaxy has shown any signs of emitting LyC radiation. With data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), we previously found an absolute escape fraction of ionizing photons (fesc) of 4-10% for the blue compact galaxy Haro 11. However, using a revised version of the reduction pipeline on the same data set, Grimes and collaborators were unable to confirm this and derived an upper limit of fesc ≲ 2% . Aims: We attempt to determine whether Haro 11 is emitting ionizing radiation to a significant level or not. We also investigate the performance of the reduction pipeline for faint targets such as Haro 11, and introduce a new approach to the background subtraction. Methods: The final version of the reduction pipeline, CalFUSE v3.2, was applied to the same Haro 11 data set as the two previous authors used. At these faint flux levels, both FUSE and CalFUSE are pushed to their limits, and a detailed analysis was undertaken to monitor the performance of the pipeline. We show that non-simultaneous background estimates are insuffient when working with data of low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), and a new background model was developed based on a direct fit to the detector response. Results: We find that one has to be very careful when using CalFUSE v3.2 on low S/N data, and especially when dealing with sources where signal might originate from off-center regions. Applying the new background fit, a significant signal is detected in the LyC in both detector segments covering these wavelengths. Thus, the leakage is confirmed with a flux density of f900 = 4.0 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 Å-1 (S/N = 4.6), measured on the airglow free regions in the LyC for the night

  17. Laboratory Study of the Noticeability and Annoyance of Sounds of Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneddon, Matthew; Howe, Richard; Pearsons, Karl; Fidell, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a study of the noticeability and annoyance of intruding noises to test participants who were engaged in a distracting foreground task. Ten test participants read material of their own choosing while seated individually in front of a loudspeaker in an anechoic chamber. One of three specially constructed masking noise environments with limited dynamic range was heard at all times. A laboratory computer produced sounds of aircraft and ground vehicles as heard at varying distances at unpredictable intervals and carefully controlled levels. Test participants were instructed to click a computer mouse at any time that a noise distinct from the background noise environment came to their attention, and then to indicate their degree of annoyance with the noise that they had noticed. The results confirmed that both the noticeability of noise intrusions and their annoyance were closely related to their audibility.

  18. Unusually loud ambient noise in tidewater glacier fjords: a signal of ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettit, Erin C.; Lee, Kevin M.; Brann, Joel P.; Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Preston S.; O'Neel, Shad

    2015-01-01

    In glacierized fjords, the ice-ocean boundary is a physically and biologically dynamic environment that is sensitive to both glacier flow and ocean circulation. Ocean ambient noise offers insight into processes and change at the ice-ocean boundary. Here we characterize fjord ambient noise and show that the average noise levels are louder than nearly all measured natural oceanic environments (significantly louder than sea ice and non-glacierized fjords). Icy Bay, Alaska has an annual average sound pressure level of 120 dB (re 1 μPa) with a broad peak between 1000 and 3000 Hz. Bubble formation in the water column as glacier ice melts is the noise source, with variability driven by fjord circulation patterns. Measurements from two additional fjords, in Alaska and Antarctica, support that this unusually loud ambient noise in Icy Bay is representative of glacierized fjords. These high noise levels likely alter the behavior of marine mammals.

  19. Unusually loud ambient noise in tidewater glacier fjords: A signal of ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, Erin Christine; Lee, Kevin Michael; Brann, Joel Palmer; Nystuen, Jeffrey Aaron; Wilson, Preston Scot; O'Neel, Shad

    2015-04-01

    In glacierized fjords, the ice-ocean boundary is a physically and biologically dynamic environment that is sensitive to both glacier flow and ocean circulation. Ocean ambient noise offers insight into processes and change at the ice-ocean boundary. Here we characterize fjord ambient noise and show that the average noise levels are louder than nearly all measured natural oceanic environments (significantly louder than sea ice and nonglacierized fjords). Icy Bay, Alaska, has an annual average sound pressure level of 120 dB (referenced to 1 μPa) with a broad peak between 1000 and 3000 Hz. Bubble formation in the water column as glacier ice melts is the noise source, with variability driven by fjord circulation patterns. Measurements from two additional fjords, in Alaska and Antarctica, support that this unusually loud ambient noise in Icy Bay is representative of glacierized fjords. These high noise levels likely alter the behavior of marine mammals.

  20. High frequency (1-100 HZ) noise and signal recorded at different depths in a mine, northwest Adirondacks, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, Noël; Carter, Jerry A.; Pomeroy, Paul W.; Sutton, George H.; Chael, Eric P.; Leahy, Patrick J.

    Seismograms of noise recorded simultaneously at the surface and at two subsurface stations (335m and 945m below surface level) show that high frequency (1-100 Hz) background noise is reduced at the subsurface stations. Seismometers at all three stations are well coupled to hard crystalline bedrock. Most of the noise reduction occurs between the surface and 335m depth. Between 1 and 3 Hz, seismic noise correlates well with wind speed at all levels. Above 3 Hz, wind speed up to 8 m/sec does not influence high frequency noise levels at 335m or 945m depths. At the surface, however, high frequency noise is associated with wind speeds in excess of 2 m/s. A site resonance is characteristic of the surface spectra, but is not characteristic of the subsurface sites. Spectral signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, measured for S-waves from a regional earthquake (Δ = 530 km, mb = 4.1), are roughly equal from 1-10 Hz at all depths. Above 10 Hz, however, S/N is greater at the subsurface stations with S/N greater than 1 up to 30 Hz for the surface station, ≈ 50 Hz for the 335m station, and ≈ 70 Hz for the 945m station. Results indicate the advantage of employing high frequency sensors sufficiently below the surface to reduce the level of noise and to improve the S/N ratio in the high frequency range. Such an advantage could be critically important for nuclear test detection and discrimination.

  1. High frequency (1-100 Hz) noise and signal recorded at different depths in a mine, northwest Adirondacks, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Barstow, N.; Carter, J.A.; Pomeroy, P.W.; Sutton, G.H. ); Chael, E.P.; Leahy, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Seismograms of noise recorded simultaneously at the surface and at two subsurface stations (335m and 945m below surface level) show that high frequency (1-100 Hz) background noise is reduced at the subsurface stations. Seismometers at all three stations are well coupled to hard crystalline bedrock. Most of the noise reduction occurs between the surface and 335m depth. Between 1 and 3 Hz, seismic noise correlates well with wind speed at all levels. Above 3 Hz, wind speed up to 8 m/sec does not influence high frequency noise levels at 335m or 945m depths. At the surface, however, high frequency noise is associated with wind speeds in excess of 2 m/s. A site resonance is characteristic of the surface spectra, but is not characteristic of the subsurface sites. Spectral signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, measured for S-waves from a regional earthquake ({Delta} = 530 km, m{sub b} = 4.1), are roughly equal from 1-10 Hz at all depths. Above 10 Hz, however, S/N is greater at the subsurface stations with S/N greater than 1 up to 30 Hz for the surface station, {approx} 50 Hz for the 335m station, and {approx} 70 Hz for the 945m station. Results indicate the advantage of employing high frequency sensors sufficiently below the surface to reduce the level of noise and to improve the S/N ratio in the high frequency range. Such an advantage could be critically important for nuclear test detection and discrimination.

  2. Seafloor ground rotation observations: potential for improving signal-to-noise ratio on horizontal OBS components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Fabian; Wassermann, Joachim; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita; Schreiber, Ulrich; Igel, Heiner

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that the horizontal components of ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) records have a very poor signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio compared to the vertical components, the difference substantially exceeding that of terrestrial records. This is unfortunate as 1) OBS experiments are expensive and the main possibility to gather data in offshore areas, and 2) today we are more and more interested in modelling complete waveforms including all three components aiming at optimally constraining geophysical parameters for inverse problems for Earth's structure and seismic sources. Despite the fact that it is expected that tilting is the major cause of this high S/N - to our knowledge - this effect has never been directly observed. The reason is that (standard) instruments for the measurement of uncontaminated rotational ground motions with the required sensitivity still do not exist. Here, we report observations from an experiment we carried out in the North Sea, close to the island of Helgoland in the summer of 2014. A commercial fibre-optic gyro (usually used for navigation purposes) recording ground rotation rate with a sensitivity of approx. 10-7 rad/s was mounted on an OBS system together with a broadband seismometer. The system was lowered to the seafloor for about a week. To investigate a potential connection between rotational ground motions around the two horizontal axes (i.e., tilting) we calculate the coherence between the corresponding motion components (e.g., rotations around x-axis and translational motions along y-axis, and vice versa). We find very high correlations, on average exceeding 0.73 in the period interval 7-13 seconds. Correlations seem to increase with noise amplitude. Rotation rate amplitudes are in the range of 10-6 -10-5 rad/s. This clearly indicates that the horizontal translational components are severely contaminated by rotations around the horizontal axes. The ground rotation observations allow correcting for this effect thereby

  3. Analysis of signal to noise ratio for atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing on geostationary orbit with variations of solar incident angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Chun-guang; Yang, Wen-bo; Tian, Qing-jiu; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Zong-ming; Zhang, Han-mo

    2014-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) sensors on a geostationary orbit (GEO) have important potential value in atmospheric remote sensing, but the satellites orbit mode of it is quit different from sun-synchronous orbit satellites, which result in the significant diurnal and seasonal variations in radiation environment of earth observation and radiation signal of sensors, therefore, the effect to sensor radiometric performance, such as signal to noise ratio for atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing caused by variations of solar angle is significant in the performance design of sensors. The synthetic ultraviolet sensor is set at the geostationary orbit, 36000 km away from the sea level of the Equator with 8.75 degree field of view, and the subsatellite track point of which is located at 90 degrees east longitude and Equator. The Satellite scanning angles (SA) from 0 to 8.648 degree that cover the earth surface are selected corresponding to the 10 degrees equal interval view zenith angle, and the SA from 8.648 to 8.785 degree cover the earth lamb 100 km far away from earth tangent point. Based on the MODTRAN4 model, on normal atmospheric conditions, the distributions of the UV upwelling radiance from surface or limb viewing path of the earth could be simulated with the change of sun's right ascension. Moreover, the average signal to noise ratio to the atmospheric sounding is obtained in different UV spectra using the Sensor signal to noise ratio model. The results show that the thresholds range, tendency and shape of signal to noise ratio have a variety of features affected by variation of Sun hour angles and declinations. These result and conclusions could contribute to performance design of UV sensors on the geostationary orbit.

  4. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  5. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  6. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  7. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  8. Few-View Prereconstruction Guided Tube Current Modulation Strategy Based on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the Sinogram

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming; Xiao, Yongshun; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The radiation dose reduction without sacrificing the image quality as an important issue has raised the attention of CT manufacturers and different automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies have been adopted in their products. In this paper, we focus on the strategy of tube current modulation. It is deduced based on the signal-to-noise (SNR) of the sinogram. The main idea behind the proposed modulation strategy is to keep the SNR of the sinogram proximately invariable using the few-view reconstruction as a good reference because it directly affects the noise level of the reconstructions. The numerical experiment results demonstrate that, compared with constant tube current, the noise distribution is more uniform and the SNR and CNR of the reconstruction are better when the proposed strategy is applied. Furthermore it has the potential to distinguish the low-contrast target and to reduce the radiation dose. PMID:26089980

  9. Tone-in-noise detection using envelope cues: comparison of signal-processing-based and physiological models.

    PubMed

    Mao, Junwen; Carney, Laurel H

    2015-02-01

    Tone-in-noise detection tasks with reproducible noise maskers have been used to identify cues that listeners use to detect signals in noisy environments. Previous studies have shown that energy, envelope, and fine-structure cues are significantly correlated to listeners' performance for detection of a 500-Hz tone in noise. In this study, envelope cues were examined for both diotic and dichotic tone-in-noise detection using both stimulus-based signal processing and physiological models. For stimulus-based envelope cues, a modified envelope slope model was used for the diotic condition and the binaural slope of the interaural envelope difference model for the dichotic condition. Stimulus-based models do not include key nonlinear transformations in the auditory periphery such as compression, rate and dynamic range adaptation, and rate saturation, all of which affect the encoding of the stimulus envelope. For physiological envelope cues, stimuli were passed through models for the auditory nerve (AN), cochlear nucleus, and inferior colliculus (IC). The AN and cochlear nucleus models included appropriate modulation gain, another transformation of the stimulus envelope that is not typically included in stimulus-based models. A model IC cell was simulated with a linear band-pass modulation filter. The average discharge rate and response fluctuations of the model IC cell were compared to human performance. Previous studies have predicted a significant amount of the variance across reproducible noise maskers in listeners' detection using stimulus-based envelope cues. In this study, a physiological model that includes neural mechanisms that affect encoding of the stimulus envelope predicts a similar amount of the variance in listeners' performance across noise maskers. PMID:25266265

  10. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Gromann, Lukas B.; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  11. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Gromann, Lukas B; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  12. A HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO COMPOSITE SPECTRUM OF GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 A in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 A pixel and reaches a maximum of {approx}300 in the range 2500-3500 A. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Ly{alpha} line to {approx}5200 A, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Ly{alpha} line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  13. Integrated spectra extraction based on signal-to-noise optimization using integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Arribas, S.; Colina, L.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We explore the potential of a method to extract high signal-to-noise (S/N) integrated spectra of particular physical and/or morphological regions of a two-dimensional field using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) observations by applying an optimization procedure based on either continuum (stellar) or line (nebular) emission features. Methods: The optimization method is applied to a set of IFS VLT-VIMOS observations of (U)LIRG galaxies. We describe the advantages of the optimization by comparing the results with a fixed-aperture, single-spectrum case, and by implementing some statistical tests. Results: We demonstrate that the S/N of the IFS optimized integrated spectra is significantly higher than for the single-aperture unprocessed case. In some cases, the optimization based on the emission lines allows to characterize some of the source properties more reliably than with standard integration methods. We are able to clearly retrieve the weak continuum features, hence more precisely constrain the properties of the unresolved stellar population. The most suitable method for integrating spectra over (part of) the field-of-view ultimately depends on the science case, and may involve a trade off among the different variables (e.g. S/N, probe area, spatial resolution, etc.). we therefore provide an iterative user-friendly and versatile IDL algorithm that, in addition to the above-mentioned method, allows the user to spatially integrate spectra following more standard procedures. Our procedure is made available to the community as part of the PINGSoft IFS software package.

  14. A High Signal-to-noise Ratio Composite Spectrum of Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 Å in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 Å pixel and reaches a maximum of ~300 in the range 2500-3500 Å. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Lyα line to ~5200 Å, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Lyα line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  15. Signal and noise in vegetation patterns in drylands: distinguishing the baby from the bath water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Anthony; Wainwright, John; Stewart, Jill; Okin, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    Patterns, and particularly banded patterns, are widely reported in dryland vegetation, and have been the subject of considerable modelling effort. However, much of this modelling effort is predicated on a mathematical approach that is designed to produce patterns and relies on physical processes that are unreasonable. In consequence, whereas in nature dryland vegetation patterns are irregular, disjointed and discontinuous, those produced by such models tend to be regular, continuous and even. The question, therefore, arises "Is it the irregularity, disjointed and discontinuous character of these patterns that holds the key to their formation rather than any apparent, human-imposed semblance of regularity and continuity?" By focusing on this apparent patterning have such models rejected as noise the key to understanding the signal? Models that produce regular vegetation patterns, typically do so by imposing global rules (largely for the distribution of water). Is it not more likely that vegetation responds to the local supply of water, nutrients and propagules? Here, we present a model for the growth of vegetation in deserts that is predicated on the local conditions of input of water, nutrients and propagules and output, such as loss of biomass by herbivory. The approach represents our best quantitative understanding of how desert ecosystems work. Patterns emerge that show the irregularity and discontinuity seen in nature. By focusing on the process rather than the patterns per se our model has the ability to address specific questions of the role of such patterns in land degradation. Further, it has the potential to provide quantitative estimates of the response of the landscape to specific management strategies, as well as the identification of the key thresholds and tipping points that are so important to the management of drylands. In providing a way to understand and predict the vegetation patterns that may develop during desertification, the approach also

  16. Using an external gating signal to estimate noise in PET with an emphasis on tracer avid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtlein, C. R.; Beattie, B. J.; Bailey, D. L.; Akhurst, T. J.; Wang, W.; Gönen, M.; Kirov, A. S.; Humm, J. L.

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish and validate a methodology for estimating the standard deviation of voxels with large activity concentrations within a PET image using replicate imaging that is immediately available for use in the clinic. To do this, ensembles of voxels in the averaged replicate images were compared to the corresponding ensembles in images derived from summed sinograms. In addition, the replicate imaging noise estimate was compared to a noise estimate based on an ensemble of voxels within a region. To make this comparison two phantoms were used. The first phantom was a seven-chamber phantom constructed of 1 liter plastic bottles. Each chamber of this phantom was filled with a different activity concentration relative to the lowest activity concentration with ratios of 1:1, 1:1, 2:1, 2:1, 4:1, 8:1 and 16:1. The second phantom was a GE Well-Counter phantom. These phantoms were imaged and reconstructed on a GE DSTE PET/CT scanner with 2D and 3D reprojection filtered backprojection (FBP), and with 2D- and 3D-ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM). A series of tests were applied to the resulting images that showed that the region and replicate imaging methods for estimating standard deviation were equivalent for backprojection reconstructions. Furthermore, the noise properties of the FBP algorithms allowed scaling the replicate estimates of the standard deviation by a factor of 1/\\sqrt{N}, where N is the number of replicate images, to obtain the standard deviation of the full data image. This was not the case for OSEM image reconstruction. Due to nonlinearity of the OSEM algorithm, the noise is shown to be both position and activity concentration dependent in such a way that no simple scaling factor can be used to extrapolate noise as a function of counts. The use of the Well-Counter phantom contributed to the development of a heuristic extrapolation of the noise as a function of radius in FBP. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio

  17. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  18. A dominant mutation in the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain vicinity impairs phototropin1 signaling in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sulabha; Kharshiing, Eros; Srinivas, Ankanagari; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Nagatani, Akira; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Behera, Rajendra K; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-04-01

    In higher plants, blue light (BL) phototropism is primarily controlled by the phototropins, which are also involved in stomatal movement and chloroplast relocation. These photoresponses are mediated by two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Phot1 mediates responses with higher sensitivity than phot2, and phot2 specifically mediates chloroplast avoidance and dark positioning responses. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a Nonphototropic seedling1 (Nps1) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The mutant is impaired in low-fluence BL responses, including chloroplast accumulation and stomatal opening. Genetic analyses show that the mutant locus is dominant negative in nature. In dark-grown seedlings of the Nps1 mutant, phot1 protein accumulates at a highly reduced level relative to the wild type and lacks BL-induced autophosphorylation. The mutant harbors a single glycine-1484-to-alanine transition in the Hinge1 region of a phot1 homolog, resulting in an arginine-to-histidine substitution (R495H) in a highly conserved A'α helix proximal to the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain of the translated gene product. Significantly, the R495H substitution occurring in the Hinge1 region of PHOT1 abolishes its regulatory activity in Nps1 seedlings, thereby highlighting the functional significance of the A'α helix region in phototropic signaling of tomato. PMID:24515830

  19. Application of Noise Cancelling and Damage Detection Algorithms in NDE of Concrete Bridge Decks Using Impact Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Gang; Harichandran, Ronald S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2011-09-13

    Delamination is a commonly observed distress in concrete bridge decks. Among all the delamination detection methods, acoustic methods have the advantages of being fast and inexpensive. In traditional acoustic inspection methods, the inspector drags a chain along or hammers on the bridge deck and detects delamination from the 'hollowness' of the sounds. The signals are often contaminated by ambient traffic noise and the detection of delamination is highly subjective. This paper describes the performance of an impact-bases acoustic NDE method where the traffic noise was filtered by employing a noise cancelling algorithm and where subjectivity was eliminated by introducing feature extraction and pattern recognition algorithms. Different algorithms were compared and the best one was selected in each category. The comparison showed that the modified independent component analysis (ICA) algorithm was most effective in cancelling the traffic noise and features consisting of mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) had the best performance in terms of repeatability and separabillty. The condition of the bridge deck was then detected by a radial basis function (RBF) neural network. The performance of the system was evaluated using both experimental and field data. The results show that the selected algorithms increase the noise robustness of acoustic methods and perform satisfactorily if the training data is representative.

  20. Improving signal-to-noise ratio by use of a cross-shaped aperture in the holographic data storage system.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huarong; Yin, Songfeng; Tan, Qiaofeng; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2009-11-10

    A cross-shaped aperture is proposed to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the holographic data storage system (HDSS). Both simulated and experimental results show that higher SNR can be achieved by the cross-shaped aperture than traditional square or circular apertures with the same area. A maximum gain of 20% in SNR is obtained for the optimized cross-shaped aperture. The sensitivities to pixel misalignment and magnification error are also numerically compared. PMID:19904322

  1. Photoswitching Near-Infrared Fluorescence from Polymer Nanoparticles Catapults Signals over the Region of Noises and Interferences for Enhanced Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lv, Yanlin; Wan, Wei; Wang, Xuefei; Li, Alexander D Q; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    As a very sensitive technique, photoswitchable fluorescence not only gains ultrasensitivity but also imparts many novel and unexpected applications. Applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence have demonstrated low background noises, high tissue-penetrating ability, and an ability to reduce photodamage to live cells. Because of these desired features, NIR-fluorescent dyes have been the premium among fluorescent dyes, and probes with photoswitchable NIR fluorescence are even more desirable for enhanced signal quality in the emerging optical imaging modalities but rarely used because they are extremely challenging to design and construct. Using a spiropyran derivative functioning as both a photoswitch and a fluorophore to launch its periodically modulated red fluorescence excitation energy into a NIR acceptor, we fabricated core-shell polymer nanoparticles exhibiting a photoswitchable fluorescence signal within the biological window (∼700-1000 nm) with a peak maximum of 776 nm. Live cells constantly synthesize new molecules, including fluorescent molecules, and also endocytose exogenous particles, including fluorescent particles. Upon excitation at different wavelengths, these fluorescent species bring about background noises and interferences covering nearly the whole visible region and therefore render many intracellular targets unaddressable. The oscillating NIR fluorescence signal with an on/off ratio of up to 67 that the polymer nanoparticles display is beyond the typical background noises and interferences, thus producing superior sharpness, reliability, and signal-to-noise ratios in cellular imaging. Taking these salient features, we anticipate that these types of nanoparticles will be useful for in vivo imaging of biological tissue and other complex specimens, where two-photon activation and excitation are used in combination with NIR-fluorescence photoswitching. PMID:26859429

  2. Considerations on nonlinearity measurement with high signal-to-noise ratio for RF surface and bulk acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Ryosuke; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Kyoya, Haruki; Nakagawa, Ryo

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the measurement setup of non-linearity caused in radio frequency (RF) surface and bulk acoustic wave (SAW/BAW) devices with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is shown that when some important points are considered, the background level can be suppressed better than -135 dBm, and the non-linearity signals can be measured in high SNR. Finally, measured results are compared with those measured independently by Murata Manufacturing, and validity of the measurement is cross-checked.

  3. On signals faint and sparse: The ACICA algorithm for blind de-trending of exoplanetary transits with low signal-to-noise

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, I. P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has recently been shown to be a promising new path in data analysis and de-trending of exoplanetary time series signals. Such approaches do not require or assume any prior or auxiliary knowledge about the data or instrument in order to de-convolve the astrophysical light curve signal from instrument or stellar systematic noise. These methods are often known as 'blind-source separation' (BSS) algorithms. Unfortunately, all BSS methods suffer from an amplitude and sign ambiguity of their de-convolved components, which severely limits these methods in low signal-to-noise (S/N) observations where their scalings cannot be determined otherwise. Here we present a novel approach to calibrate ICA using sparse wavelet calibrators. The Amplitude Calibrated Independent Component Analysis (ACICA) allows for the direct retrieval of the independent components' scalings and the robust de-trending of low S/N data. Such an approach gives us an unique and unprecedented insight in the underlying morphology of a data set, which makes this method a powerful tool for exoplanetary data de-trending and signal diagnostics.

  4. Oncogenic signaling is dominant to cell of origin and dictates astrocytic or oligodendroglial tumor development from oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Nanna; Jiang, Yiwen; Xie, Yuan; Bolouri, Hamid; Kastemar, Marianne; Olofsson, Tommie; Holland, Eric C; Uhrbom, Lene

    2014-10-29

    Stem cells, believed to be the cellular origin of glioma, are able to generate gliomas, according to experimental studies. Here we investigated the potential and circumstances of more differentiated cells to generate glioma development. We and others have shown that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can also be the cell of origin for experimental oligodendroglial tumors. However, the question of whether OPCs have the capacity to initiate astrocytic gliomas remains unanswered. Astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors represent the two most common groups of glioma and have been considered as distinct disease groups with putatively different origins. Here we show that mouse OPCs can give rise to both types of glioma given the right circumstances. We analyzed tumors induced by K-RAS and AKT and compared them to oligodendroglial platelet-derived growth factor B-induced tumors in Ctv-a mice with targeted deletions of Cdkn2a (p16(Ink4a-/-), p19(Arf-/-), Cdkn2a(-/-)). Our results showed that glioma can originate from OPCs through overexpression of K-RAS and AKT when combined with p19(Arf) loss, and these tumors displayed an astrocytic histology and high expression of astrocytic markers. We argue that OPCs have the potential to develop both astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors given loss of p19(Arf), and that oncogenic signaling is dominant to cell of origin in determining glioma phenotype. Our mouse data are supported by the fact that human astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma display a high degree of overlap in global gene expression with no clear distinctions between the two diagnoses. PMID:25355217

  5. Sub-shot-noise-limit discrimination of on-off keyed coherent signals via a quantum receiver with a superconducting transition edge sensor.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Kenji; Fukuda, Daiji; Fujii, Go; Inoue, Shuichiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a sub-shot-noise-limit discrimination of on-off keyed coherent signals by an optimal displacement quantum receiver in which a superconducting transition edge sensor is installed. Use of a transition edge sensor and a fiber beam splitter realizes high total detection efficiency and high interference visibility of the receiver and the observed average error surpasses the shot-noise-limit in a wider range of the signal power. Our technique opens up a new technology for the sub-shot-noise-limit detection of coherent signals in optical communication channels. PMID:20588655

  6. Pump-phase-noise-free optical wavelength data exchange between QAM signals with 50-GHz channel-spacing using coherent DFB pump.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guo-Wei; Albuquerque, André; Puttnam, Benjamin J; Sakamoto, Takahide; Drummond, Miguel; Nogueira, Rogério; Kanno, Atsushi; Shinada, Satoshi; Wada, Naoya; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2016-02-22

    An important challenge for implementing optical signal processing functions such as wavelength conversion or wavelength data exchange (WDE) is to avoid the introduction of linear and nonlinear phase noise in the subsystem. This is particularly important for phase noise sensitive, high-order quadrature-amplitude modulation (QAM) signals. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical data exchange scheme through cascaded 2nd-order nonlinearities in periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguides using coherent pumping. The proposed coherent pumping scheme enables noise from the coherent pumps to be cancelled out in the swapped data after WDE, even with broad linewidth distributed feedback (DFB) pump lasers. Hence, this scheme allows phase noise tolerant processing functions, enabling the low-cost implementation of WDE for high-order QAM signals. We experimentally demonstrate WDEs between 10-Gbaud 4QAM (4QAM) signal and 12.5-Gbaud 4QAM (16QAM) signal with 3.5-MHz linewidth DFB pump lasers and 50-GHz channel spacing. Error-free operation is observed for the swapped QAM signals with coherent DFB pumping whilst use of free-running DFB pumps leads to visible error floors and unrecoverable phase errors. The phase noise cancellation in the coherent pump scheme is further confirmed by study of the recovered carrier phase of the converted signals. In addition to pump phase noise, the influence of crosstalk caused by the finite extinction ratio in WDE is also experimentally investigated for the swapped QAM signals. PMID:26907026

  7. Improving signal-to-noise in the direct imaging of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with MLOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Yang, Bin; Canovas, Hector; de Boer, Jozua; Casassus, Simon; Ménard, François; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of point and extended source detections around bright stars in direct imaging data.One of our innovations is that we insert simulated point sources into the science images, which we then try to recover with maximum S/N. This improves the S/N of real point sources elsewhere in the field. The algorithm, based on the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show with Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) data on HD 135344 B and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) data on several stars that the new algorithm can improve the S/N of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. On the other hand, while non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images that seem to increase the S/N of true sources by a factor >2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to redetect point sources found in previous epochs. These findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g., LOCI and principal component analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  8. Noise properties and signal-dependent interpixel crosstalk of the detectors of the Near-Infrared Spectrograph of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Giovanna; Sirianni, Marco; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Lindler, Don; Böker, Torsten; Ferruit, Pierre; De Marchi, Guido; Stuhlinger, Martin; Jensen, Peter; Strada, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is one of the four science instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope. Its focal plane consists of two HAWAII-2RG sensors operating in the wavelength range of 0.6 to 5.0 μm and, as part of characterizing NIRSpec, the noise properties of these detectors under dark and illuminated conditions were studied. Under dark conditions, and as already known, 1/f noise in the detector system causes somewhat higher noise levels than can be accounted for by a simple model that includes white read noise and shot noise on integrated charge. More surprisingly, for high levels of accumulated charge, significantly lower total noise than expected was observed. This effect is shown to be due to pixel-to-pixel correlations introduced by signal-dependent interpixel crosstalk, with an interpixel coupling factor, α, that ranges from ˜0.01 for zero signal to ˜0.03 close to saturation.

  9. [Comparison of Contrast to Noise Ratio and Signal Difference to Noise Ratio Based on QA and QC Guidelines in CR Mammography].

    PubMed

    Nagami, Akiko; Ishii, Mie; Ishii, Rie; Kodama, Sayaka; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-06-01

    The measurement methods of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) in digital mammography are different among several quality assurance (QA) guidelines, that is, the type of pixel value (PV), phantom shape, location of aluminum plate, and the size of region of interest (ROI) principally differ in data acquisition. We compared CNR (SDNR) obtained from three QA guidelines. They are the European Reference Organisation for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In EUREF and IEC, CNR was calculated using linearized pixel value (LPV). In IAEA, because the type of pixel value to use in SDNR was not specified, SDNR was calculated using PV and LPV, and CNR was calculated using LPV. Target/filter combinations are molybdenum/molybdenum (Mo/Mo) and molybdenum/rhodium (Mo/Rh). Applied various tube voltages are 25, 30, and 35 kV, and various phantom thicknesses are 20, 45, and 70 mm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The PV-SDNR of IAEA showed the largest value among the three methods, following LPV-CNR of IEC, LPV-CNR of EUREF at 20 mm PMMA thickness. In IAEA, SDNR changed by the kind of pixel value (PV or LPV). When CNR is calculated, every researcher should describe the type of guidelines, the kind of pixel value, and formula for calculation. PMID:27320154

  10. Robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter noise reduction of ultrasonic signals using multiple sub-spectrum phase coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Gongzhang, R.; Xiao, B.; Lardner, T.; Gachagan, A.; Li, M.

    2014-02-18

    This paper presents a robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter reduction in ultrasonic A-scan waveforms. The performance of conventional spectral-temporal techniques like Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) is highly dependent on the parameter selection, especially when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low. Although spatial beamforming offers noise reduction with less sensitivity to parameter variation, phased array techniques are not always available. The proposed algorithm first selects an ascending series of frequency bands. A signal is reconstructed for each selected band in which a defect is present when all frequency components are in uniform sign. Combining all reconstructed signals through averaging gives a probability profile of potential defect position. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, Full Matrix Capture is applied on the austenitic steel and high nickel alloy (HNA) samples with 5MHz transducer arrays. When processing A-scan signals with unrefined parameters, the proposed algorithm enhances SNR by 20dB for both samples and consequently, defects are more visible in B-scan images created from the large amount of A-scan traces. Importantly, the proposed algorithm is considered robust, while SSP is shown to fail on the austenitic steel data and achieves less SNR enhancement on the HNA data.

  11. Correlation of neural responses in the cochlear nucleus with low-frequency noise amplitude modulation of a tonal signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    The responses of single neurons of the cochlear nucleus of a grass frog to long tonal signals amplitude-modulated by repeat intervals of low-frequency noise have been studied. The carrier frequency always corresponded to the characteristic frequency of the studied cell (a range of 0.2 kHz-2 kHz); the modulated signal was noise in the ranges 0-15 Hz, 0-50 Hz, or 0-150 Hz. We obtained the correlation functions of the cyclic histogram reflecting the change in probability of a neuron pulse discharge (spike) during the modulation period with the shape of the signal envelope in the same period. The form of the obtained correlation functions usually does not change qualitatively with a change in carrier level or modulation depth; however, this could essentially depend of the frequency component of the modulating function. In the majority of cases, comparison of the cyclic histogram of the reaction with only the current amplitude value does not adequately reveal the signal's time features that determine the reaction of a neuron. The response is also determined by the other sound features, primarily by the rate of the change in amplitude. The studied neurons differed among themselves, both in preference toward a certain range of modulated frequencies and in the features of the envelope that caused the cell's response.

  12. Measuring saliency of features using signal-to-noise ratios for detection of electrocardiographic changes in partial epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-12-01

    Medical diagnostic accuracies can be improved when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features. The feature vector, which is comprised of the set of all features used to describe a pattern, is a reduced-dimensional representation of that pattern. By identifying a set of salient features, the noise in a classification model can be reduced, resulting in more accurate classification. In this study, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) saliency measure was employed to determine saliency of input features of probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) used in classification of two types of electrocardiogram (ECG) beats (normal and partial epilepsy). In order to extract features representing the ECG signals, discrete wavelet transform was used. The PNNs used in the ECG signals classification were trained for the SNR screening method. The application results of the SNR screening method to the ECG signals demonstrated that classification accuracies of the PNNs with salient input features are higher than that of the PNNs with salient and non-salient input features. PMID:19058650

  13. Training sensory signal-to-noise resolution in children with ADHD in a global mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Mishra, J; Sagar, R; Joseph, A A; Gazzaley, A; Merzenich, M M

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impaired focus on goal-relevant signals and fail to suppress goal-irrelevant distractions. To address both these issues, we developed a novel neuroplasticity-based training program that adaptively trains the resolution of challenging sensory signals and the suppression of progressively more challenging distractions. We evaluated this sensory signal-to-noise resolution training in a small sample, global mental health study in Indian children with ADHD. The children trained for 30 h over 6 months in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Training completers showed steady and significant improvements in ADHD-associated behaviors from baseline to post training relative to controls, and benefits sustained in a 6-month follow-up. Post-training cognitive assessments showed significant positive results for response inhibition and Stroop interference tests in training completers vs controls, while measures of sustained attention and short-term memory showed nonsignificant improvement trends. Further, training-driven improvements in distractor suppression correlated with the improved ADHD symptoms. This initial study suggests utility of signal-to-noise resolution training for children with ADHD; it emphasizes the need for further research on this intervention and substantially informs the design of a larger trial. PMID:27070409

  14. Training sensory signal-to-noise resolution in children with ADHD in a global mental health setting

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, J; Sagar, R; Joseph, A A; Gazzaley, A; Merzenich, M M

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impaired focus on goal-relevant signals and fail to suppress goal-irrelevant distractions. To address both these issues, we developed a novel neuroplasticity-based training program that adaptively trains the resolution of challenging sensory signals and the suppression of progressively more challenging distractions. We evaluated this sensory signal-to-noise resolution training in a small sample, global mental health study in Indian children with ADHD. The children trained for 30 h over 6 months in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Training completers showed steady and significant improvements in ADHD-associated behaviors from baseline to post training relative to controls, and benefits sustained in a 6-month follow-up. Post-training cognitive assessments showed significant positive results for response inhibition and Stroop interference tests in training completers vs controls, while measures of sustained attention and short-term memory showed nonsignificant improvement trends. Further, training-driven improvements in distractor suppression correlated with the improved ADHD symptoms. This initial study suggests utility of signal-to-noise resolution training for children with ADHD; it emphasizes the need for further research on this intervention and substantially informs the design of a larger trial. PMID:27070409

  15. Influence of signals length and noise in power spectral densities computation using Hilbert-Huang Transform in synthetic HRV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, María. G.; Altuve, Miguel; Lollett, Carlos; Wong, Sara

    2013-11-01

    Among non-invasive techniques, heart rate variability (HRV) analysis has become widely used for assessing the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Research in this area has not stopped and alternative tools for the study and interpretation of HRV, are still being proposed. Nevertheless, frequency-domain analysis of HRV is controversial when the heartbeat sequence is non-stationary. The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is a relative new technique for timefrequency analyses of non-linear and non-stationary signals. The main purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of time serieś length and noise in HRV from synthetic signals, using HHT and to compare it with Welch method. Synthetic heartbeat time series with different sizes and levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR) were investigated. Results shows i) sequencés length did not affect the estimation of HRV spectral parameter, ii) favorable performance for HHT for different SNR. Additionally, HHT can be applied to non-stationary signals from nonlinear systems and it will be useful to HRV analysis to interpret autonomic activity when acute and transient phenomena are assessed.

  16. Optimizing MRI signal-to-noise ratio for quadrature unmatched RF coils: two preamplifiers are better than one.

    PubMed

    Sorgenfrei, B L; Edelstein, W A

    1996-07-01

    Using separate preamplifiers for the two outputs of a quadrature receive coil (and then combining the preamplifier outputs in a quadrature hybrid) provides a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than is obtained by directly combining the quadrature outputs in a hybrid followed by a single preamplifier. The advantage of the two-preamplifier configuration increases when the body coil impedance changes and is no longer matched to 50 ohms. Using 0.4 dB noise figure preamplifiers, theory predicts 1.53, 0.42, 0, 0.42, and 1.53 dB SNR advantage of the two-preamplifier configuration over the one-preamplifier arrangement at body coil impedances of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ohms, respectively. Experimental hot/cold resistor noise figure measurements indicate 2.86, 0.65, 0.36, 0.83, and 1.40 dB noise figure advantage for the two preamplifier configuration relative to the one-preamplifier configuration at those impedances. Empirical gains larger than theoretically calculated are attributable to insertion losses of various circuit elements, such as the quadrature hybrid, for the one-preamplifier configuration. PMID:8795028

  17. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  18. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  19. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Nathan A.; Gannon, Matthew A.; Long, Stephanie M.; Young, Madeleine E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets. PMID:26903849

  20. Strainmeter observations of the 2010 slow slip event in Cascadia: A critical look at noise, artifacts, and tectonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, R.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Periodic slow-slip events along the Cascadia subduction zone represent the transient release of accumulated strain along the plate interface. The location of these events helps to map the lower edge of the seismogenic zone and constrain the seismic hazard. The primary observations of these slow-slip events have come from a large array of GPS stations in the Pacific Northwest. However, newly installed borehole strainmeters provide greater temporal resolution and greater precision than GPS. Incorporating strainmeter data into current slip inversion models, which have previously depended upon GPS data, will help to further constrain models of the slip distribution at depth. Understanding the capabilities and limitations of strainmeter data, especially in regards to the quantification of noise sources and identification of non-tectonic artifacts, is necessary for the data to be used in formal inversions. The method of power density spectra is used to analyze noise as a function of frequency for several strainmeters in the PBO network. Preliminary work shows that the noise spectra obey a random walk model where the amplitude is proportional to f-2. The noise levels of these strainmeters are compared to each other and to closely located GPS stations in order to evaluate their ability to detect tectonic signals. We particularly focus our analysis of the time series for the August 2010 slow slip event in Washington State. Our initial analysis of the data suggests that the event originated under Puget Sound and propagated both to the north and south. A clear signal of approximately 0.10 microstrain can be seen in several strainmeters in the Olympic Peninsula area of the PBO network, including stations B003, B004, B005, B006, B007, B014 and B018. The temporal signal of the transient strain correlates with the timing and location of tremor activity associated with the slow-slip event. By calculating strain from the GPS displacement measurements, the magnitude and quality of

  1. Regionalization and calibration of seismic discriminants, path effects and signal-to-noise for station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A.J.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    We report measurements and analysis of regional seismic phase amplitude ratios and signal-to-noise for earthquakes observed at the International Monitoring System primary station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan). We measured noise and phase amplitudes of the regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg in four frequency bands between 0.75-9.0 Hz. Measurements were made in both the time and frequency domains. The spatial variation of amplitude ratios (e.g., Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg, Pn/Sn, Pg/Sn) and signal-to-noise (phase/noise) reveal significant path effect differences between the Hindu Kush, Kazahk Platform, Iranian Plateau and Caspian Sea. In order to represent this behavior, we have investigated several techniques for characterizing the data. These techniques are: 1) correlation with along-path distance and waveguide properties; 2) sector analysis; and 3) spatial averaging. Along-path waveguide properties, such as mean elevation and rms topographic slope are found to be the strongest factors related to Pg/Lg amplitude ratios at the lowest frequencies (<3.0 Hz). Other path properties such as mean crustal thickness and basement depth are not strongly correlated with Pg/Lg ratios. For sector analysis we divided the data into four (4) azimuthal sectors and characterized the data within each sector by a distance trend. Sectors were chosen based on the behavior of Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg and Pn/Sn amplitude ratios as well as topographic and tectonic character. Results reveal significant reduction (up to a factor of two) in the scatter of the Pn/Lg and Pg/Lg amplitude ratios for the sectorized data compared to the entire data set from all azimuths. Spatial averaging involves smoothing and interpolation for the ratios projected at the event location. Methods such as cap averaging and kriging will be presented at the meeting. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Impact of motion-associated noise on intrinsic optical signal imaging in humans with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Teussink, Michel M.; Cense, Barry; van Grinsven, Mark J.J.P.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Hoyng, Carel B.; Theelen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that phototransduction can be studied in the human eye in vivo by imaging of fast intrinsic optical signals (IOS). There is consensus concerning the limiting influence of motion-associated imaging noise on the reproducibility of IOS-measurements, especially in those employing spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). However, no study to date has conducted a comprehensive analysis of this noise in the context of IOS-imaging. In this study, we discuss biophysical correlates of IOS, and we address motion-associated imaging noise by providing correctional post-processing methods. In order to avoid cross-talk of adjacent IOS of opposite signal polarity, cellular resolution and stability of imaging to the level of individual cones is likely needed. The optical Stiles-Crawford effect can be a source of significant IOS-imaging noise if alignment with the peak of the Stiles-Crawford function cannot be maintained. Therefore, complete head stabilization by implementation of a bite-bar may be critical to maintain a constant pupil entry position of the OCT beam. Due to depth-dependent sensitivity fall-off, heartbeat and breathing associated axial movements can cause tissue reflectivity to vary by 29% over time, although known methods can be implemented to null these effects. Substantial variations in reflectivity can be caused by variable illumination due to changes in the beam pupil entry position and angle, which can be reduced by an adaptive algorithm based on slope-fitting of optical attenuation in the choriocapillary lamina. PMID:26137369

  3. Emergence of bimodal cell population responses from the interplay between analog single-cell signaling and protein expression noise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell-to-cell variability in protein expression can be large, and its propagation through signaling networks affects biological outcomes. Here, we apply deterministic and probabilistic models and biochemical measurements to study how network topologies and cell-to-cell protein abundance variations interact to shape signaling responses. Results We observe bimodal distributions of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, which are generally thought to indicate bistable or ultrasensitive signaling behavior in single cells. Surprisingly, we find that a simple MAPK/ERK-cascade model with negative feedback that displays graded, analog ERK responses at a single cell level can explain the experimentally observed bimodality at the cell population level. Model analysis suggests that a conversion of graded input–output responses in single cells to digital responses at the population level is caused by a broad distribution of ERK pathway activation thresholds brought about by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression. Conclusions Our results show that bimodal signaling response distributions do not necessarily imply digital (ultrasensitive or bistable) single cell signaling, and the interplay between protein expression noise and network topologies can bring about digital population responses from analog single cell dose responses. Thus, cells can retain the benefits of robustness arising from negative feedback, while simultaneously generating population-level on/off responses that are thought to be critical for regulating cell fate decisions. PMID:22920937

  4. The role of coincidence-detector neurons in the reliability and precision of subthreshold signal detection in noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueling; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Hengtong; Yu, Lianchun; Chen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Subthreshold signal detection is an important task for animal survival in complex environments, where noise increases both the external signal response and the spontaneous spiking of neurons. The mechanism by which neurons process the coding of signals is not well understood. Here, we propose that coincidence detection, one of the ways to describe the functionality of a single neural cell, can improve the reliability and the precision of signal detection through detection of presynaptic input synchrony. Using a simplified neuronal network model composed of dozens of integrate-and-fire neurons and a single coincidence-detector neuron, we show how the network reads out the subthreshold noisy signals reliably and precisely. We find suitable pairing parameters, the threshold and the detection time window of the coincidence-detector neuron, that optimize the precision and reliability of the neuron. Furthermore, it is observed that the refractory period induces an oscillation in the spontaneous firing, but the neuron can inhibit this activity and improve the reliability and precision further. In the case of intermediate intrinsic states of the input neuron, the network responds to the input more efficiently. These results present the critical link between spiking synchrony and noisy signal transfer, which is utilized in coincidence detection, resulting in enhancement of temporally sensitive coding scheme. PMID:23418604

  5. Differential abundance of IGF1, bile acids, and the genes involved in their signaling in the dominant follicle microenvironment of lactating cows and nulliparous heifers.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ricardo; Schuermann, Yasmin; Gagnon-Duval, Laurianne; Baldassarre, Hernan; Murphy, Bruce D; Gevry, Nicolas; Agellon, Luis B; Bordignon, Vilceu; Duggavathi, Raj

    2014-04-01

    It is well documented that incidence of fertility problems is high in lactating cows but not in heifers of the same genetic merit. Understanding the metabolic and molecular differences between fertile heifers and relatively infertile lactating cows will help us understand the pathogenesis of infertility in dairy cows. Follicular waves in lactating cows (30-50 days in milk; n = 12) and heifers (n = 10) were synchronized by ultrasound-guided follicle ablation. Follicular fluid and granulosa cells of the dominant follicle were collected by ultrasound-guided aspiration along with blood sampling on Day 6 after synchronization. Dominant and subordinate follicles were larger in lactating cows than in heifers. Metabolic stress in lactating cows was evidenced by lower glucose and higher ß-hydroxy butyric acid compared with heifers. Insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling was reduced in the dominant follicle in lactating cows through reduced insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations in plasma and follicular fluid of the dominant follicle, and reduced expression of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPPA) in their granulosa cells. We also found increased levels of total bile acids in the follicular fluid of the dominant follicle of lactating cows compared with heifers. Granulosa cells of the dominant follicle had higher expression of SLC10A2 and GPBAR1 (bile acid transporter and receptor, respectively) in lactating cows. These novel data are indicative of increased bile acid signaling within the dominant follicles of lactating cows compared with heifers. Overall, we demonstrate in the present study the metabolic, endocrine, and molecular differences within the microenvironment of the dominant follicles in lactating cows and heifers. These differences in follicular microenvironment may contribute toward abnormal ovarian function in lactating dairy cows. PMID:24503106

  6. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  7. Single vacancy defect spectroscopy on HfO2 using random telegraph noise signals from scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamankar, R.; Raghavan, N.; Molina, J.; Puglisi, F. M.; O'Shea, S. J.; Shubhakar, K.; Larcher, L.; Pavan, P.; Padovani, A.; Pey, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Random telegraph noise (RTN) measurements are typically carried out at the device level using standard probe station based electrical characterization setup, where the measured current represents a cumulative effect of the simultaneous response of electron capture/emission events at multiple oxygen vacancy defect (trap) sites. To better characterize the individual defects in the high-κ dielectric thin film, we propose and demonstrate here the measurement and analysis of RTN at the nanoscale using a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope setup, with an effective area of interaction of the probe tip that is as small as 10 nm in diameter. Two-level and multi-level RTN signals due to single and multiple defect locations (possibly dispersed in space and energy) are observed on 4 nm HfO2 thin films deposited on n-Si (100) substrate. The RTN signals are statistically analyzed using the Factorial Hidden Markov Model technique to decode the noise contribution of more than one defect (if any) and estimate the statistical parameters of each RTN signal (i.e., amplitude of fluctuation, capture and emission time constants). Observation of RTN at the nanoscale presents a new opportunity for studies on defect chemistry, single-defect kinetics and their stochastics in thin film dielectric materials. This method allows us to characterize the fast traps with time constants ranging in the millisecond to tens of seconds range.

  8. Allan Variance Computed in Space Domain: Definition and Application to InSAR Data to Characterize Noise and Geophysical Signal.

    PubMed

    Cavalié, Olivier; Vernotte, François

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance was introduced 50 years ago for analyzing the stability of frequency standards. In addition to its metrological interest, it may be also considered as an estimator of the large trends of the power spectral density (PSD) of frequency deviation. For instance, the Allan variance is able to discriminate different types of noise characterized by different power laws in the PSD. The Allan variance was also used in other fields than time and frequency metrology: for more than 20 years, it has been used in accelerometry, geophysics, geodesy, astrophysics, and even finances. However, it seems that up to now, it has been exclusively applied for time series analysis. We propose here to use the Allan variance on spatial data. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is used in geophysics to image ground displacements in space [over the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spatial coverage] and in time thanks to the regular SAR image acquisitions by dedicated satellites. The main limitation of the technique is the atmospheric disturbances that affect the radar signal while traveling from the sensor to the ground and back. In this paper, we propose to use the Allan variance for analyzing spatial data from InSAR measurements. The Allan variance was computed in XY mode as well as in radial mode for detecting different types of behavior for different space-scales, in the same way as the different types of noise versus the integration time in the classical time and frequency application. We found that radial Allan variance is the more appropriate way to have an estimator insensitive to the spatial axis and we applied it on SAR data acquired over eastern Turkey for the period 2003-2011. Spatial Allan variance allowed us to well characterize noise features, classically found in InSAR such as phase decorrelation producing white noise or atmospheric delays, behaving like a random walk signal. We finally applied the spatial Allan variance to an InSAR time

  9. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B{sub 4}C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems.

  10. Signal photon flux and background noise in a coupling electromagnetic detecting system for high-frequency gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangyu; Yang, Nan; Fang, Zhenyun; Baker, Robert M. L., Jr.; Stephenson, Gary V.; Wen, Hao

    2009-09-01

    A coupling system among Gaussian-type microwave photon flux, a static magnetic field, and fractal membranes (or other equivalent microwave lenses) can be used to detect high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs) in the microwave band. We study the signal photon flux, background photon flux, and the requisite minimal accumulation time of the signal in the coupling system. Unlike the pure inverse Gertsenshtein effect (G effect) caused by the HFGWs in the gigahertz band, the electromagnetic (EM) detecting scheme proposed by China and the U.S. HFGW groups is based on the composite effect of the synchroresonance effect and the inverse G effect. The key parameter in the scheme is the first-order perturbative photon flux (PPF) and not the second-order PPF; the distinguishable signal is the transverse first-order PPF and not the longitudinal PPF; the photon flux focused by the fractal membranes or other equivalent microwave lenses is not only the transverse first-order PPF but the total transverse photon flux, and these photon fluxes have different signal-to-noise ratios at the different receiving surfaces. Theoretical analysis and numerical estimation show that the requisite minimal accumulation time of the signal at the special receiving surfaces and in the background noise fluctuation would be ˜103-105 seconds for the typical laboratory condition and parameters of hrms˜10-26-10-30/Hz at 5 GHz with bandwidth ˜1Hz. In addition, we review the inverse G effect in the EM detection of the HFGWs, and it is shown that the EM detecting scheme based only on the pure inverse G effect in the laboratory condition would not be useful to detect HFGWs in the microwave band.

  11. Transmission of electric and magnetic foetal cardiac signals in a case of ectopia cordis: the dominant role of the vernix caseosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakai, R. T.; Lengle, J. M.; Leuthold, A. C.

    2000-07-01

    Foetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) and foetal magnetocardiograms (fMCGs) were recorded in the 26th, 29th and 31st weeks of gestation from a foetus with ectopia cordis - a rare condition in which the heart lies outside the chest wall. This provided an opportunity to study foetal cardiograms uninfluenced by the insulating effects of the foetal skin and vernix caseosa. The fECG of the ectopia cordis foetus was striking. Unlike recordings from age-matched normal foetuses, recordings from this subject had very high signal-to-noise ratio and showed no anomalous signal transmission properties. In contrast, fMCGs recorded from the ectopia cordis foetus and normal foetuses were largely similar. Both showed high signal-to-noise ratio and signal transmission properties consistent with volume conduction. The findings corroborate the hypothesis that high foetal skin resistance due primarily to the vernix caseosa is responsible for the low amplitude and anomalous transmission properties of the normal fECG, and demonstrate that the fMCG is relatively insensitive to conductivity inhomogeneities.

  12. Self-Consistent Signal-to-Noise Analysis of CDMA Multiuser Detection with M-Ary Phase-Shift Keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Okada, Masato; Miyoshi, Seiji

    2013-02-01

    We present a theory of the performance of parallel interference cancellation (PIC) for code division multiple access (CDMA) multiuser detection with M-ary phase-shift keying (M-ary PSK) in the large-system limit. The behavior of PIC is essentially the same as that of the associative memory model. Therefore, we analyze the PIC for CDMA using self-consistent signal-to-noise analysis (SCSNA), which was developed to describe the behavior of the associative memory model. We obtain a quantitative description of the performance of PIC.

  13. High-precision image-drift-correction method for EM images with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Isakozawa, Shigeto; Tomonaga, Sachihiko; Hashimoto, Takahito; Baba, Norio

    2014-08-01

    The phase correlation method (PCM) is well known for high-precision matching between images. However, if the signal-to-noise ratio of an image is low, the method is difficult to apply. To solve this problem, we developed an improved PCM that can match images automatically with sub-pixel matching precision. Using this method, a 0.2-nm crystal lattice spacing was clearly revealed after 10 blurred images were processed in a verification experiment; such a lattice could not be recognized or hardly be recognized in each individual image. PMID:24827157

  14. Performance evaluation of signal dependent noise predictive maximum likelihood detector for two-dimensional magnetic recording read/write channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, S.; Okamoto, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Osawa, H.; Kanai, Y.; Muraoaka, H.

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic recording is affected by the inter-track interference (ITI) from the adjacent tracks. We investigate the improvement of partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) systems with signal dependent noise predictor (SDNP) in the bit error rate performance. The systems reduce the influence of ITI by two dimensional finite impulse response filter using the waveforms reproduced by triple readers from the adjacent tracks. The results show that the SDNP provides larger improvement to PR(2,6,1)ML system compare with PR1ML system.

  15. Automated measurement of the bit-error rate as a function of signal-to-noise ratio for microwave communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Daugherty, Elaine S.; Kramarchuk, Ihor

    1987-01-01

    The performance of microwave systems and components for digital data transmission can be characterized by a plot of the bit-error rate as a function of the signal to noise ratio (or E sub b/E sub o). Methods for the efficient automated measurement of bit-error rates and signal-to-noise ratios, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, are described. Noise measurement considerations and time requirements for measurement accuracy, as well as computer control and data processing methods, are discussed.

  16. A low-noise instrumentation amplifier with DC suppression for recording ENG signals.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Sivylla E; Eftekhar, Amir; Kulasekeram, Nishanth; Toumazou, Christofer

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an AC-coupled instrumentation amplifier for electroneurogram (ENG) activity recording. For this design, we evaluate gain and noise requirements based on interference sources (electrodes, power line, EMG). The circuit has been implemented in a commercially-available 0.35μm CMOS technology with total power consumption 460μW. The amplifier achieves CMRR 107 dB and integrated input referred noise 940 nV. The gain is 63 dB and the bandwidth is 0.5 Hz- 13 kHz. The chosen topology enables to minimise on-chip capacitance (only 27 pF), with a total chip area of 0.4mm2. PMID:26736847

  17. Noise-driven signal transmission device using molecular dynamics of organic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Naoki; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic threshold devices using trap-filling transition coupled with molecular dynamics in poly(3-alkyl thiophene)s [P3ATs] were fabricated as potential key devices for noise-driven bio-inspired sensors and infor- mation processors. This article deals with variable-temperature direct current conductivity and alternating current impedance measurements for vertical-type device elements of Au/regioregular poly(3-decylthiophene) [RR-P3DT] (thickness:100nm)/Au, which show multiple conducting states and quasi-stochastic transitions between these states. Noise measurements indicate the ω-2-type (if V < VTFT = 10V) and ω-1-type (if V > VTFT) power spectral densities, where V and VTFT are an applied voltage and the voltage for trap-filling transition(TFT),respectively. The noise generation is due to TFT that associated with twist dynamics of π-conjugated polymers near the order-disorder phase transition. At 298K, the quasi-stochastic behavior is more noticeable for RR-P3DT than poly(3-hexylthiophene) [RR-P3HT]. The dynamics of the order-disorder phase transition (ODT) for powder samples were also investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements and high-resolution solid-state C NMR spectroscopy, and the correlation of molecular structure and dynamics with electric properties was discussed.

  18. Increasing the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of magnetic resonance sounding data using a central loop configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Auken, Esben; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Rejkjaer, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance technique, also called magnetic resonance sounding (MRS), is an emerging geophysical method that can detect the presence and spatial variations of the subsurface water content directly. In this paper, we introduce the MRS central loop geometry, in which the receiver loop is smaller than the transmitter loop and placed in its centre. In addition, using a shielded receiver coil we show how this configuration greatly increases signal-to-noise ratio and improves the resolution of the subsurface layers compared to the typically used coincident loop configuration. We compare sensitivity kernels for different loop configurations and describe advantages of the MRS central loop geometry in terms of superior behaviour of the sensitivity function, increased sensitivity values, reduced noise level of the shielded receiver coil, improved resolution matrix and reduced instrument dead time. With no extra time and effort in the field, central-loop MRS makes it possible to reduce measurement time and to measure data in areas with high anthropogenic noise. The results of our field example agree well with the complementary data, namely airborne electromagnetics, borehole data, and the hydrologic model of the area.

  19. Physically secured orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network employing noise-based encryption and signal recovery process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei; Zhang, Chongfu; Yuan, Weicheng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a physically enhanced secure scheme for direct detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network (DD-OFDM-PON) and long reach coherent detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network (LRCO-OFDM-PON), by employing noise-based encryption and channel/phase estimation. The noise data generated by chaos mapping are used to substitute training sequences in preamble to realize channel estimation and frame synchronization, and also to be embedded on variable number of key-selected randomly spaced pilot subcarriers to implement phase estimation. Consequently, the information used for signal recovery is totally hidden as unpredictable noise information in OFDM frames to mask useful information and to prevent illegal users from correctly realizing OFDM demodulation, and thereby enhancing resistance to attackers. The levels of illegal-decryption complexity and implementation complexity are theoretically discussed. Through extensive simulations, the performances of the proposed channel/phase estimation and the security introduced by encrypted pilot carriers have been investigated in both DD-OFDM and LRCO-OFDM systems. In addition, in the proposed secure DD-OFDM/LRCO-OFDM PON models, both legal and illegal receiving scenarios have been considered. These results show that, by utilizing the proposed scheme, the resistance to attackers can be significantly enhanced in DD-OFDM-PON and LRCO-OFDM-PON systems without performance degradations.

  20. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.