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Sample records for noise psyko-akustisk vaerdering

  1. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  2. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  3. Noise Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... here: EPA Home Air and Radiation Noise Pollution Noise Pollution This page has moved. You should be ... epa.gov/clean-air-act-overview/title-iv-noise-pollution Local Navigation Air & Radiation Home Basic Information ...

  4. Noise prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  5. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  6. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  7. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  8. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  9. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  10. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  11. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  12. Aircraft Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  13. Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  14. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  15. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  16. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  17. Aircraft noise problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    The problems related to aircraft noise were studied. Physical origin (sound), human reaction (noise), quantization of noise and sound sources of aircraft noise are discussed. Noise abatement at the source, technical, fleet-political and air traffic measures are explained. The measurements and future developments are also discussed. The position of Lufthansa as regards aircraft noise problems is depicted.

  18. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  19. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-07-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  20. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  1. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  2. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  3. Minimal noise subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Byrd, Mark; Jacobs, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    A system subjected to noise contains a decoherence-free subspace or subsystem (DFS) only if the noise possesses an exact symmetry. Here we consider noise models in which a perturbation breaks a symmetry of the noise, so that if S is a DFS under a given noise process it is no longer so under the new perturbed noise process. We ask whether there is a subspace or subsystem that is more robust to the perturbed noise than S . To answer this question we develop a numerical method that allows us to search for subspaces or subsystems that are maximally robust to arbitrary noise processes. We apply this method to a number of examples, and find that a subsystem that is a DFS is often not the subsystem that experiences minimal noise when the symmetry of the noise is broken by a perturbation. We discuss which classes of noise have this property.

  4. Research In Helicopter Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Schmitz, Frederic H.; Morse, Andrew H.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in aeroacoustical theory and experiments reviewed. Report summarizes continuing U.S. Army programs of research into causes of noise generated by helicopters. Topics of study include high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex-interaction noise, and low-frequency harmonic noise.

  5. Noise, Health, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Leo L.

    There is reasonable agreement that hearing impairment is related to noise exposure. This hearing loss due to noise is considered a serious health injury, but there is still difficulty in delineating the importance of noise related to people's general non-auditory well-being and health. Beside hearing loss, noise inhibits satisfactory speech…

  6. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise. [noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  7. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  8. Shanghai alleviates noise pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Runling

    1983-07-14

    ''Environmental noise is now under control in Shanghai, the level of environmental noise is basically holding steady, and in some areas industrial and traffic noise has decreased.'' These were the conclusions of research by Hong Zonghui (3163 1350 6540) and Wang Shixian (3769 6164 6343) of Tongji University's Acoustics Laboratory, as put forward at a recent public academic lecture at Tongji University. In order to eliminate noise from the environment, Tongji University in the early 1970's began conducting investigations and research on noise pollution and its control together with concerned units in this city. After tests in a network of 2,117 points throughout the city, they determined that the most common form of noise pollution is traffic, which accounts for 50 percent of all noise. Since 1979, this city has adopted successive measures in the area of traffic control in order to eliminate the source of noise. Traffic noise has now dropped about 3 decibels in the city. This research report also pointed out that according to the results of regional environmental noise tests, this city does not meet the noise pollution standards set by the state. Tugboats on the Suzhou He blow their whistles late at night, and the noise at riverside homes can reach 82 decibels; the Fangua Lane residential district is close to a railroad where engine noise can reach 89 decibels and affect the residents' health. In addition, rather serious noise pollution is produced by more than 300 handicraft, light industry, textile, and electrical machinery plants.

  9. On Observer Internal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    1986-06-01

    Human observers behave as if they have two sources of intrinsic variability, commonly referred to as internal noise. One component (here referred to as "constant") is independent of the external noise level but does depend on mean display luminance. The other component (referred to as "induced") is directly proportional to the external noise level and dominates when the display noise is easily visible. The induced internal noise is predicted by two models - one based on intrinsic signal parameter jitter and the other on a zone of indecision. Spectral density is the appropriate measure for internal noise.

  10. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and in-mine noise measurements have been made. These show that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are the dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for cutting and conveying operations are 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show excellent agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra.

  11. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  12. NASA propeller noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.

    1980-01-01

    The research in propeller noise prediction, noise/performance optimization, and interior reduction is described. Selected results are presented to illustrate the status of the technology and the direction of future research.

  13. Predicting Aircraft Noise Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer program developed for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground tests. Noise sources include fan inlet and exhaust jet flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine and airframe. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  14. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  15. Characteristics of USB noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Searle, N.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive series of noise measurements, for a variety of geometric and operational parameters, was made on models of upper surface blowing (USB) powered lift systems. The data obtained were analyzed and the effects and trends of parametric variation defined. The behavior and nature of USB noise and the design of USB systems with low noise characteristics is examined.

  16. The Problem of "Noise"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagianos, Louis

    1972-01-01

    The library problem consists of equal parts of external and internal noise. The external noise consists of the volume of publication. The internal noise can be characterized by the present and continuing brouhaha concerning reform of library education. Scientists frankly regard librarians as impediments to information. (Author/NH)

  17. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  18. Dragline noise survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Bauer, Eric R.

    2002-05-01

    It is estimated that 70%-90% of miners have enough noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) to be classified as a disability (NIOSH, Publication No. 76-172, 1976; Franks, NIOSH Internal Report, 1996). In response, NIOSH is conducting a cross-sectional survey of the mining industry in order to determine the sources of mining noise and offer recommendations on how to mitigate high noise levels, and bring mining operations into compliance with the recent mining noise regulation: 30CFR, Part 62. This paper will outline the results from noise surveys of eight draglines which operate in above-ground coal mining operations. The data recorded include noise dosimetry in conjunction with time-at-task studies and 1/3-octave sound level (Leq, Lmin, and Lmax) measurements. The 1/3-octave band readings were used to create noise contour maps which allowed the spatial and frequency information of the noise to be considered. Comparison of Lmin and Lmax levels offer insight into the variability of the noise levels inside the dragline. The potential for administrative controls is limited due to consistently high noise levels throughout the deck. Implementation of engineering controls is also hindered by the size and number of the noise sources and the frequency content of the noise.

  19. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  20. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  1. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  2. Combustion and core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, J. Robert; Karchmer, Allen

    1991-08-01

    Two types of aircraft power plant are considered: the gas turbine and the reciprocating engine. The engine types considered are: the reciprocating engine, the turbojet engine, the turboprop engine, and the turbofan engine. Combustion noise in gas turbine engines is discussed, and reciprocating-engine combustion noise is also briefly described. The following subject areas are covered: configuration variables, operational variables, characteristics of combustion and core noise, sources of combustion noise, combustion noise theory and comparison with experiment, available prediction methods, diagnostic techniques, measurement techniques, data interpretation, and example applications.

  3. Infrared sky noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hardware and techniques to measure and compare sky noise at several sites were studied, and a device was developed that would maximize its output and minimize its output for modulation. The instrument and its functions are described. The nature of sky emissions and the fluctuation, gaseous sources of sky noise, and aerosol sources are discussed. It is concluded that sky noise really exists, and the spatial distribution of the sky noise sources are such that observed noise values are linear functions of chopping stroke.

  4. Interpreting Transistor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospieszalski, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    The simple noise models of field effect and bipolar transistors reviewed in this article are quite useful in engineering practice, as illustrated by measured and modeled results. The exact and approximate expressions for the noise parameters of FETs and bipolar transistors reveal certain common noise properties and some general noise properties of both devices. The usefulness of these expressions in interpreting the dependence of measured noise parameters on frequency, bias, and temperature and, consequently, in checking of consistency of measured data has been demonstrated.

  5. Acoustical measurement separates core noise and jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    Measuring technique discriminates between jet noise and core noise of jet engine. Results of experimentation confirmed that core noise and jet noise can be separated by examining cross-correlation of far-field microphone signals and that crossover point between core noise and jet noise moves toward higher velocities at higher angles with respect to jet axis.

  6. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  7. Low frequency cultural noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jin Soo; Kang, Tae-Seob; Baag, Chang-Eob

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal cultural seismic noise is observed in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz. Cultural noise generated by human activities is generally observed in frequencies above 1 Hz, and is greater in the daytime than at night. The low-frequency noise presented in this paper exhibits a characteristic amplitude variation and can be easily identified from time domain seismograms in the frequency range of interest. The amplitude variation is predominantly in the vertical component, but the horizontal components also show variations. Low-frequency noise is markedly periodic, which reinforces its interpretation as cultural noise. Such noise is observed world-wide, but is limited to areas in the vicinity of railways. The amplitude variation in seismograms correlates strongly with railway timetables, and the waveform shows a wavelength shift associated with the Doppler effect, which indicates that the origin of seismic background noise in the frequency range 0.01-0.05 Hz is railways.

  8. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Kovac, J.; Bartholomae, R.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Bureau of Mines contract J0387229 charters investigation and control of this noise through laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and through in-mine noise measurements. The results of these investigations indicate that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for both cutting and conveying operations are approximately 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra. 4 refs.

  9. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  10. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  11. Noise Mapping and Annoyance.

    PubMed

    Knauss, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EC has published a Green Paper on noise policy in the EU and has issued a directive on the assessment and reduction of environmental noise. This directive will make noise mapping mandatory for cities with at least 250.000 inhabitants. Due to the development in computer technology it is possible to calculate noise maps for large urban areas using the available data on buildings, ground profile, road and rail traffic. Examples for noise mapping are Birmingham (GB), Linz (A) and various German cities. Based on noise maps and empirical data on the correlation between annoyance and noise levels annoyance maps for different sources (rail, road, aircraft) can be calculated. Under the assumption that the annoyance for the different sources are only weakly correlated, a combined annoyance map can be calculated. In a second step using the distribution of the population the actual number of annoyed people can be evaluated. This analysis can be used, for example, to identify noise hot spots and to assess the impact of major traffic projects - roads, airports- on the noise situation as well as the impact on the population. Furthermore, the combined annoyance maps can be used to investigate on health effects and to check whether or not empirical correlations between annoyance and noise levels are sufficiently correct. PMID:12678944

  12. Urban Noise Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäcker-Cüppers, Michael

    Noise belongs to the severest environmental impairments in towns, with road traffic being the most annoying noise source. The reduction of these impairments and the precaution against new noise impacts is an important task of the communities. However, many of the potential abatement measures are not in the responsibility of the communities. In most European countries, noise emission regulations for road and rail vehicles and outdoor machinery are nowadays enforced by the European Union. Noise reception limits are generally enforced by national laws. Therefore, efficient noise abatement in towns has to be coordinated with the regional, national and supranational, i.e. European noise policy. The most important fields of action for the urban noise abatement are the roads, railways and airports with heavy traffic. For the avoidance of health risks due to noise here short-term reductions are needed, which can generally be achieved only by a combination of measures for which different stakeholders are responsible. This underlines the importance of integrated and coordinated noise abatement concepts.

  13. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  14. Understanding Slat Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medhi R.

    2003-01-01

    Model-scale aeroacoustic tests of large civil transports point to the leading-edge slat as a dominant high-lift noise source in the low- to mid-frequencies during aircraft approach and landing. Using generic multi-element high-lift models, complementary experimental and numerical tests were carefully planned and executed at NASA in order to isolate slat noise sources and the underlying noise generation mechanisms. In this paper, a brief overview of the supporting computational effort undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center, is provided. Both tonal and broadband aspects of slat noise are discussed. Recent gains in predicting a slat s far-field acoustic noise, current shortcomings of numerical simulations, and other remaining open issues, are presented. Finally, an example of the ever-expanding role of computational simulations in noise reduction studies also is given.

  15. Noise and public health.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, D M; Roettger, R W

    1976-01-01

    Environmental noise has increased to the point that it affects large numbers of people. The most consistently demonstrated health effect of exposure to noise is hearing impairment. Other effects, such as stress reaction, irritability, fatigue and disturbances to physiologic function have been seen in laboratory research but are highly individualized and restricted to such specific populations as industrial workers. Rising background sound levels in communities due to increased traffic flow, industralization, work saving machinery, and other noise sources have caused community noise levels to become dangerously high. This factor is complicated by exposure to high sound level recreational activities with greater frequency and for longer periods. Recognizing the existence of the problem, governmental agencies have begun to identify the scope of the problem, to designate standards and regulations controlling noise sources, and to regulate allowable noise exposure for workers. PMID:10297834

  16. Active noise silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    Many natural gas compressor stations which were previously located away from residential areas are now being encroached upon by surrounding building developments. An increased awareness of community noise issues has proved to be the impetus for investigating and developing more effective noise control methods and treatments for natural gas compressor facilities. This project investigates the feasibility of applying Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) to the exhaust of a large, internal combustion reciprocating type engine.

  17. Prediction of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.; Hayden, R. E.; Kadman, Y.; Africk, S.

    1975-01-01

    Methods of predicting airframe noise generated by aircraft in flight under nonpowered conditions are discussed. Approaches to predictions relying on flyover data and component theoretical analyses are developed. A nondimensional airframe noise spectrum of various aircraft is presented. The spectrum was obtained by smoothing all the measured spectra to remove any peculiarities due to airframe protrusions, normalizing each spectra by its overall sound pressure level and a characteristics frequency, and averaging the spectra together. A chart of airframe noise sources is included.

  18. Noise in biological circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Allen, Michael S.; Cox, Chris D.; Dar, Roy D.; Karig, David K; McCollum, James M.; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and reviewmany of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology.

  19. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  20. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  1. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  2. Proceedings of Noise-con 81: Applied noise control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Royster, L.H.; Hart, F.D.; Stewart, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    The conference was divided into sessions covering noise control regulations and benefits; noise source identification; barriers and enclosures; mufflers; hearing protection devices; textile and fibre industries; metal fabrication industry; transportation and aircraft noise control; punch-press noise control and miscellaneous topics; woodworking industry; tobacco and packaging industries; community noise; and applications of damping materials. One paper has been abstracted separately.

  3. Noise Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Lavaroni, Charles W.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on noise pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of noise pollution and involves students in processes of…

  4. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  5. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  6. Sounding Off about Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpton, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise in a community college library can be part of the nature of the environment. It can also become a huge distraction for those who see the library as their sanctuary for quiet study and review of resources. This article describes the steps that should be taken by library staff in order to be proactive about noise and the library environment,…

  7. Predicted airframe noise levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, J. P.

    1980-09-01

    Calculated values of airframe noise levels corresponding to FAA noise certification conditions for six aircraft are presented. The aircraft are: DC-9-30; Boeing 727-200; A300-B2 Airbus; Lockheed L-1011; DC-10-10; and Boeing 747-200B. The prediction methodology employed is described and discussed.

  8. Noise: The Ignored Contaminant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maurice H.

    1977-01-01

    Noise is the single most omnipresent noxious contaminant in the American environment, yet little attention has been paid to its dangers and relatively small amounts of money spent to control it. Compares the effects and management of hearing impairment due to noise with those resulting from other causes. (Editor)

  9. Community noise model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    MVMA has sponsored a study to assist the motor vehicle manufacturers and others in assessing the impact of motor vehicle noise on the community. As part of this study, a computer model was developed to quantify, by mathematical simulation, the impact of traffic noise on the community, with particular emphasis on passenger cars, light trucks and vans under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating. The primary objective of the program was to evaluate the incremental changes in exposure to traffic noise which would result from the promulgation of various new-vehicle emission standards and to compare these incremental changes with those which result from alternative approaches to vehicle noise abatement. The model is available for use on microcomputers and is capable of evaluating local, as well as national, noise control strategies.

  10. [Urban noise pollution].

    PubMed

    Chouard, C H

    2001-07-01

    Noise is responsible for cochlear and general damages. Hearing loss and tinnitus greatly depend on sound intensity and duration. Short-duration sound of sufficient intensity (gunshot or explosion) will not be described because they are not currently encountered in our normal urban environment. Sound levels of less than 75 d (A) are unlikely to cause permanent hearing loss, while sound levels of about 85 d (A) with exposures of 8 h per day will produce permanent hearing loss after many years. Popular and largely amplified music is today one of the most dangerous causes of noise induced hearing loss. The intensity of noises (airport, highway) responsible for stress and general consequences (cardiovascular) is generally lower. Individual noise sensibility depends on several factors. Strategies to prevent damage from sound exposure should include the use of individual hearing protection devices, education programs beginning with school-age children, consumer guidance, increased product noise labelling, and hearing conservation programs for occupational settings. PMID:11476007

  11. Rotorcraft Noise Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) is an aircraft noise impact modeling computer program being developed for NASA-Langley Research Center which calculates sound levels at receiver positions either on a uniform grid or at specific defined locations. The basic computational model calculates a variety of metria. Acoustic properties of the noise source are defined by two sets of sound pressure hemispheres, each hemisphere being centered on a noise source of the aircraft. One set of sound hemispheres provides the broadband data in the form of one-third octave band sound levels. The other set of sound hemispheres provides narrowband data in the form of pure-tone sound pressure levels and phase. Noise contours on the ground are output graphically or in tabular format, and are suitable for inclusion in Environmental Impact Statements or Environmental Assessments.

  12. Noise in coevolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, Marina; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2015-09-01

    Coupling dynamics of the states of the nodes of a network to the dynamics of the network topology leads to generic absorbing and fragmentation transitions. The coevolving voter model is a typical system that exhibits such transitions at some critical rewiring. We study the robustness of these transitions under two distinct ways of introducing noise. Noise affecting all the nodes destroys the absorbing-fragmentation transition, giving rise in finite-size systems to two regimes: bimodal magnetization and dynamic fragmentation. Noise targeting a fraction of nodes preserves the transitions but introduces shattered fragmentation with its characteristic fraction of isolated nodes and one or two giant components. Both the lack of absorbing state for homogeneous noise and the shift in the absorbing transition to higher rewiring for targeted noise are supported by analytical approximations.

  13. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  14. Nature of orchestral noise.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ian; Wilson, Wayne; Bradley, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Professional orchestral musicians are at risk of exposure to excessive noise when at work. This is an industry-wide problem that threatens not only the hearing of orchestral musicians but also the way orchestras operate. The research described in this paper recorded noise levels within a professional orchestra over three years in order to provide greater insight to the orchestral noise environment; to guide future research into orchestral noise management and hearing conservation strategies; and to provide a basis for the future education of musicians and their managers. Every rehearsal, performance, and recording from May 2004 to May 2007 was monitored, with the woodwind, brass, and percussion sections monitored in greatest detail. The study recorded dBALEQ and dBC peak data, which are presented in graphical form with accompanying summarized data tables. The findings indicate that the principal trumpet, first and third horns, and principal trombone are at greatest risk of exposure to excessive sustained noise levels and that the percussion and timpani are at greatest risk of exposure to excessive peak noise levels. However, the findings also strongly support the notion that the true nature of orchestral noise is a great deal more complex than this simple statement would imply. PMID:18681585

  15. [The fetus and noise].

    PubMed

    Brezinka, C; Lechner, T; Stephan, K

    1997-01-01

    From 23 weeks of gestation some and from 28 weeks all healthy fetuses are capable of reacting to sound stimulation. The intrauterine acoustic environment is dominated by maternal sounds--heartbeat, breathing, the mother's voice, borborygmi and sounds caused by body movements. Background noise is never below 28 dB and can rise to 84 dB when the mother is singing. Noises that are meant to reach the fetus must be louder than the background noise and must be of low frequency as high frequency sounds are damped by maternal tissue. Vibroacoustic stimulation tests (VAST) have become popular in pregnancy surveillance over the last 20 years, mostly using an artificial larynx. Advantages and problems of the various VAST protocols in fetal monitoring are discussed in the light of animal experiments and clinical studies. Health legislation laws in most countries forbid pregnant women to work in surroundings with a high noise level (80 dB continuous noise and/or rapid impulse noise changes of 40 dB). Whereas regulations for pregnant women are easy to enforce in industry, pregnant women employed in discos or performing as musicians spend most of their working day exposed to noise impact higher than the recommended limit. PMID:9483870

  16. Noise labeling in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Marco A. N.; Massarani, Paulo M.; de Azevedo, Jose A. J.; Gerges, Samir N. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The Brazilian Silence Program, created in 1990 by the Brazilian Ministry of Environment, advocates the production and use of equipment with lower noise level. The subcommittee of Noise Labeling of the Brazilian Committee of Certification is composed of INMETRO acoustic specialists to organize and implement the Brazilian Labeling Program. This subcommittee elaborated the label form and test procedure. The noise-labeling program will first concentrate on the following household devices, both manufactured in Brazil or imported from abroad; mixers, blenders, hairdryers, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners. The label should contain the sound-power level in dBA. INMETRO or other credited laboratories are responsible for the measurements. The ISO 4871, 3740 (1 to 5), ISO 8960, and IEC 704 (1 to 4) and also the equivalent Brazilian standards are used for the measurements, such as ABNT NBR 13910-1. The main objective of the label is to inform the consumer about the emitted noise level. The label offers the noise parameter to be used by the consumer when comparing devices, considering price, performance, and now also noise. No restriction for noise level was established.

  17. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-04-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  18. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  19. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  20. Propfan noise propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Sim, Ben WEL-C.

    1993-01-01

    The unconventional supersonic tip speed of advanced propellers has led to uncertainties about Propfan's noise acceptability and compliance with Federal Aviation Noise Regulation (FAR 36). Overhead flight testing of the Propfan with an SR-7L blade during 1989's Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program have shown unexpectedly high far-field sound pressure levels. This study here attempts to provide insights into the acoustics of a single-rotating propeller (SRP) with supersonic tip speed. At the same time, the role of the atmosphere in shaping the far-field noise characteristics is investigated.

  1. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  2. Hypermedicalization in White Noise.

    PubMed

    Benson, Josef

    2015-09-01

    The Nazis hijacked Germany's medical establishment and appropriated medical language to hegemonize their ideology. In White Noise, shifting medical information stifles the public into docility. In Nazi Germany the primacy of language and medical authority magnified the importance of academic doctors. The muddling of identities caused complex insecurities and the need for psychological doubles. In White Noise, Professor Gladney is driven by professional insecurities to enact a double in Murray. Through the manipulation of language and medical overreach the U.S., exemplified in the novel White Noise, has become a hypermedicalized society where the spirit of the Hippocratic Oath has eroded. PMID:24458659

  3. Fourth Aircraft Interior Noise Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The fourth in a series of NASA/SAE Interior Noise Workshops was held on May 19 and 20, 1992. The theme of the workshop was new technology and applications for aircraft noise with emphasis on source noise prediction; cabin noise prediction; cabin noise control, including active and passive methods; and cabin interior noise procedures. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the meeting which addressed the above issues.

  4. Noise in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2001-05-01

    Mexico City is known to be the largest city in the world, inhabited by some 20 percent of the national population, so noise pollution is not strange to it, particularly in view of the fact that industry is not concentrated, but rather spread throughout the city. The international airport also lies within the city limits, in the midst of residential areas. The heavy traffic during rush hours in the morning and in the evening and the activities of the populace, together with special events, produce a noise problem that is difficult to assess and to solve. Nevertheless, with educational programs begun several years ago and noise campaigns planned for the near future, in addition to existing regulations, the problem is not completely out of control. This paper presents a discussion of the general noise problem and describes how authorities and institutions are dealing with it.

  5. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  6. Noise Abatement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

  7. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  8. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  9. HVAC equipment and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Cerami, V.J.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to define how the selection of HVAC equipment and layout impact the achievable noise criteria (NC) levels in occupied spaces. It will focus on the design of HVAC systems that employ floor-by-floor air handling/air conditioning units and their acoustical ramifications. This is of increasing importance since tenants require incorporation of noise limits in lease agreements.

  10. Propeller noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Analytic propeller noise prediction involves a sequence of computations culminating in the application of acoustic equations. The prediction sequence currently used by NASA in its ANOPP (aircraft noise prediction) program is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next group of modules deals with the actual noise prediction, based on data from the first group. Deterministic predictions of periodic thickness and loading noise are made using Farassat's time-domain methods. Broadband noise is predicted by the semi-empirical Schlinker-Amiet method. Near-field predictions of fuselage surface pressures include the effects of boundary layer refraction and (for a cylinder) scattering. Far-field predictions include atmospheric and ground effects. Experimental data from subsonic and transonic propellers are compared and NASA's future direction is propeller noise technology development are indicated.

  11. Aircraft noise - Different ways to monitor the noise load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekebrede, G.

    Measures taken by the Dutch government to reduce aircraft-noise disturbances including the establishment of noise zones in which subsequent building is forbidden, while already existing homes are provided with noise insulation are discussed. To ensure accurate noise monitoring, the following recommendations were made by the NLR: (1) regular noise load calculations, utilizing aircraft noise and performance data, the air traffic mix, and flight route information; (2) flight track monitoring, performed by a computerized Flight Track and Aircraft Noise Monitoring System which identifies all aircraft deviating from the prescribed track (i.e., flying over congested regions); and (3) actual noise monitoring, to guard the noise level at a specific noise-sensitive area in close proximity to the airfield, such as a hospital.

  12. Disturbance caused by aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josse, R.

    1980-01-01

    Noise pollution caused by the presence of airfields adjacent to residential areas is studied. Noise effects on the sleep of residents near airports and the degree of the residents noise tolerance are evaluated. What aircraft noises are annoying and to what extent the annoyance varies with sound level are discussed.

  13. Making noise comfortable for people

    SciTech Connect

    Leventhall, H.G.; Wise, S.S.

    1998-10-01

    Typical HVAC noise may produce an uncomfortable environment, leading to the associated problems of general dissatisfaction and reduced productivity. It is not sufficient to have good thermal, lighting, and air cleanliness conditions if the noise is disturbing. In this paper, noise comfort is considered, with special emphasis on the developing criteria for low-frequency noise.

  14. Fundamentals of noise control engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.K.; Thumann, A.

    1986-01-01

    This reference provides coverage of noise control engineering. Techniques are presented in precise terms for both acoustical design of new facilities and cost-effective noise reduction in existing facilities. Examples illustrate how to design acoustical enclosures, apply silencing equipment, estimate equipment noise and meet noise criteria for communities.

  15. Reducing environmental noise impacts: A USAREUR noise management program handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Timothy D.; Shekell, Ted K.

    1991-06-01

    Noise pollution is a major environmental problem faced by the U.S. Army in Europe. Noise-related complaints from German citizens can escalate into intense political issues in German communities. This in turn hampers efficient operation of military training and often times threatens the Army's mission. In order to remedy these problems, USAREUR has developed a noise management program. A successful noise management program will limit the impact of unavoidable noise on the populace. This report, a component of the noise management program, is a reference document for noise management planning. It contains guidelines and rules-of-thumb for noise management. This document contains procedures which operation and training level personnel can understand and apply in their day to day noise management planning. Noise mitigation tips are given. Basic technical information that will aid in understanding noise mitigation is provided along with noise management through land use planning. Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are described.

  16. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  17. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  18. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  19. Rotor noise in maneuvering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsuan-Nien

    The objective of this research is to understand the physics of rotor noise in the maneuvering flight. To achieve this objective, an integrated noise prediction system is constructed, namely GenHel-MFW-PSU-WOPWOP. This noise prediction system includes a flight simulation code, a high fidelity free vortex-wake code, and a rotor acoustic prediction code. By using this noise prediction system, rotor maneuver noise characteristics are identified. Unlike periodic rotor noise, a longer duration is required to describe rotor maneuver noise. The variation of helicopter motion, blade motion and blade airloads are all influencing the noise prediction results in both noise level and directivity in the maneuvering flight. In this research, two types of rotor maneuver noise are identified, steady maneuver noise and transient maneuver noise. In the steady maneuver, rotor noise corresponds to a steady maneuver condition, which has nearly steady properties in flight dynamics and aerodynamics. Transient maneuver noise is the result of the transition between two steady maneuvers. In a transient maneuver, the helicopter experiences fluctuations in airload and helicopter angular rates, which lead to excess rotor noise. Even though the transient maneuver only exists for a fairly short period of time, the corresponding transient maneuver noise could be significant when compared to steady maneuver noise. The blade tip vortices also present complex behaviors in the transient maneuver condition. With stronger vortex circulation strength and the potential for vortex bundling, blade vortex-interaction (BVI) noise may increase significantly during a transient maneuver. In this research, it is shown that even with small pilot controls, significant BVI noise can be generated during a transient flight condition. Finally, through this research, the importance of transient maneuver noise is demonstrated and recognized.

  20. Noise: a forgotten environmental problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kloos, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Highway traffic noise is a serious problem for communities. The traffic noise can be lessened by source controls. The impact of the noise can be mitigated with barriers built along heavily traveled roads. However, the most promising long-range solution is noise compatible land use planning at the local level. Low cost methods are available to prevent noise problems from ever occuring. The Federal Highway Administration is attempting to encourage local officials to use these methods.

  1. Road Traffic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckenbauer, Thomas

    Road traffic is the most interfering noise source in developed countries. According to a publication of the European Union (EU) at the end of the twentieth century [1], about 40% of the population in 15 EU member states is exposed to road traffic noise at mean levels exceeding 55 dB(A). Nearly 80 million people, 20% of the population, are exposed to levels exceeding 65 dB(A) during daytime and more than 30% of the population is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during night time. Such high noise levels cause health risks and social disorders (aggressiveness, protest, and helplessness), interference of communication and disturbance of sleep; the long- and short-term consequences cause adverse cardiovascular effects, detrimental hormonal responses (stress hormones), and possible disturbance of the human metabolism (nutrition) and the immune system. Even performance at work and school could be impaired.

  2. [Noise in fishing vessels].

    PubMed

    Peretti, Alessandro; Nataletti, Pietro; Bonfiglio, Paolo; di Bisceglie, Anita Pasqua

    2013-01-01

    The present research concerns the noise analysis of five vessels during navigation and fishing activities. In locations where staff operates, sound levels (produced substantially by the engine) were close to 90 dB(A); within the rest areas the noise is also quite significant. On the basis of working time, exposure levels ranged between 80 and 90 dB(A). In order to identify interventions able to reduce the risk, reverberation times, sound insulation of the different areas and the vibrations produced by the engine were measured on the same vessels docked in port. Noise level reduction as a result of sound absorptive treatments were estimated using an analytical model. PMID:24303698

  3. Network structure controls noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2004-03-01

    Biochemical reactions often involve low copy number of reactant molecules. Bio-networks, however, control the intrinsic noise arising from the fluctuations of low copy number of reactant molecules quite efficiently to perform their job in a robust manner. Network structures may be very crucial in the effective modulation of fluctuation effects. We investigate the interplay between the network structure and the noise behavior in signal transduction networks using Stochastic simulations. Some of the recurrent modules in biological networks seem to be vital in noise control. We correlate the effect of those modules to the function of the global topology of the network. This may explain why certain class of modules are so ubiquitous in Bio-networks.

  4. Helicopter internal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niesl, G.; Laudien, E.

    1994-09-01

    Compared to fixed wing aircraft, helicopter interior noise is higher, and subjectively more annoying. This is mainly due to discrete frequencies by the main transmission system, and also from other components like main and tail rotor, engines, or cooling fans. Up to now, mainly passive measures have been used for interior noise reduction. Despite intensive experimental and theoretical investigation to improve acoustic treatment, their weight penalties remain high especially in the low frequency range. Here, active noise control offers additional capacities without excessive weight efforts. Loud-speaker based systems are sufficiently well developed for implementing a prototype system in the helicopter. Two other principles are in development: active panel control which introduces mechanical actuators to excite the cabin walls, and active control of gearbox struts with actuators in the load path between gearbox and fuselage.

  5. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental technique of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Area requiring further research are discussed and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installations is addressed.

  6. Rocket Noise Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margasahayam, Ravi; Caimi, Raoul

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive, automated, and user-friendly software program was developed to predict the noise and ignition over-pressure environment generated during the launch of a rocket. The software allows for interactive modification of various parameters affecting the generated noise environment. Predictions can be made for different launch scenarios and a variety of vehicle and launch mount configurations. Moreover, predictions can be made for both near-field and far-field locations on the ground and any position on the vehicle. Multiple engine and fuel combinations can be addressed, and duct geometry can be incorporated efficiently. Applications in structural design are addressed.

  7. Ancient noise generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio; Menchaca, Rolando; Velazquez, Roberto

    2002-11-01

    There has been found a whole family of similar artifacts which produce singing noises. These noises sometimes resemble those sounds generated by some animals and/or naturally produced by strong winds passing through holes and edges. It means that these sounds have wide frequency spectrums and very often some clear tones are identified. The original purpose of these artifacts is unknown, but some researchers think that some were used in mortuary ceremonies and employed by H-men. The Olmecan whistle previously presented belongs to this family, and now it is compared with a bone or wooden instrument shown in the Florentine codex.

  8. Brontides: natural explosive noises.

    PubMed

    Gold, T; Soter, S

    1979-04-27

    Episodes of explosive noises of natural origin, or brontides, have been well documented, often in association with seismic activity and in a few cases as precursors to major earthquakes. Ground-to-air acoustic transmission from shallow earthquakes can account for many of these episodes, but not for all, and other causes, such as the sudden eruption of gas from high-pressure sources in the ground may at times have been responsible. Confusion with distant thunder or artillery at times of anomalous sound propagation complicates the analysis, and more recently the greatly increased frequency of artificial explosive noises and sonic booms has tended to mask the recognition of natural brontides. PMID:17757998

  9. Noise in longwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    Antel, J.W.

    1983-03-01

    A series of full-shift noise surveys conducted on longwall sections of six randomly selected coal mines has indicated that the potential exists for 58 percent of the total number of longwall operators surveyed (i.e. shearer operators, headgate and tailgate operators) to be overexposed according to limits set forth in the Code of Federal Regulation; Title 30, Subpart F, Part 70.510. A breakdown by occupation shows that 50 percent of the headgate operators surveyed and 67 percent of the shearer operators surveyed potentially failed to comply with the noise standards.

  10. AM noise impact on low level phase noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Cibiel, Gilles; Régis, Myrianne; Tournier, Eric; Llopis, Oliver

    2002-06-01

    The influence of the source AM noise in microwave residual phase noise experiments is investigated. The noise floor degradation problem, caused by the parasitic detection of this type of noise by an unperfectly balanced mixer, is solved thanks to a refinement of the quadrature condition. The parasitic noise contribution attributable to the AM to PM (phase modulation) conversion occurring in the device under test is minimized through the development of a dedicated microwave source featuring an AM noise level as low as -170 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset from a 3.5 GHz carrier. PMID:12075970

  11. Aeroacoustics: Jet noise, combustion and core engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1976-01-01

    The papers in this volume deal essentially with the question whether the amplification of noise is due to the jet noise phenomenon or perhaps an interaction of airframe and core engine noise. In the area of jet noise suppression, various promising suppressor concepts are examined. The swirling flow jet noise suppressor is shown to provide significant noise reduction with minimal thrust losses. Progress in the aircraft engine core noise problem is reflected by seven research-type papers. Two possible mechanisms are seen to be responsible for core noise. One is the direct noise radiated from the turbulent combustion in the primary combuster and transmitted through the turbine, passing out the nozzle into the far field. The other mechanism is the noise that is emitted from hot spots being convected through the turbine. Which of these mechanisms (or perhaps both mechanisms) is responsible for core noise, and what are the coupling mechanisms of core engine noise and jet noise are the questions confronting researchers.

  12. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  13. Noise Control through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennino, Martha

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are the public education and information programs on noise pollution control currently in operation within the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area that have been either developed or implemented under the auspices of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. (BT)

  14. Noise Assessment Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Theodore J.; McMahon, Nancy M.

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in its efforts to provide decent housing and a suitable living environment, is concerned with noise as a major source of environmental pollution. To this end, these guidelines are presented to provide site screening techniques. The procedures described have been developed so that people…

  15. Jet Screech Noise Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2003-01-01

    The near-field screech-tone noise of a typical underexpanded circular jet issuing from a sonic nozzle is simulated numerically. The self-sustained feedback loop is automatically established in the simulation. The computed shock-cell structure, acoustic wave length, screech tone frequencies, and sound pressure levels in the near field are in good agreement with existing experimental results.

  16. Curing the noise epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  17. Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    One of the great technical challenges facing the Deep Space Network is receiving signals from a severely weight limited spacecraft hundreds of thousands to billions of kilometers from Earth. This weight limitation has always imposed strict limitations on the size of the spacecraft antenna and the amount of transmitter power radiated. The communication burden is placed upon the ground systems of the Deep Space Network which must recover an extremely weak signal in the presence of nearly overwhelming amounts of noise. Two key parameters that determine the signal to noise ratio of a received signal using a deep space station are the collecting area and efficiency of the antenna, and the amount of noise which is generated in, as well as allowed to enter in, the antenna-mounted receiver. These parameters are used to describe the relative ability of a deep space station to receive weak signals. As spacecraft to Earth communication distances have increased, the Deep Space Network engages in a relentless effort to increase the figure of merit through larger and more efficient antennas, higher frequencies, and lower system noise temperature.

  18. Low noise amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.

    1983-07-01

    One of the great technical challenges facing the Deep Space Network is receiving signals from a severely weight limited spacecraft hundreds of thousands to billions of kilometers from Earth. This weight limitation has always imposed strict limitations on the size of the spacecraft antenna and the amount of transmitter power radiated. The communication burden is placed upon the ground systems of the Deep Space Network which must recover an extremely weak signal in the presence of nearly overwhelming amounts of noise. Two key parameters that determine the signal to noise ratio of a received signal using a deep space station are the collecting area and efficiency of the antenna, and the amount of noise which is generated in, as well as allowed to enter in, the antenna-mounted receiver. These parameters are used to describe the relative ability of a deep space station to receive weak signals. As spacecraft to Earth communication distances have increased, the Deep Space Network engages in a relentless effort to increase the figure of merit through larger and more efficient antennas, higher frequencies, and lower system noise temperature.

  19. Playback Experiments for Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Holles, Sophie; Simpson, Stephen D; Lecchini, David; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Playbacks are a useful tool for conducting well-controlled and replicated experiments on the effects of anthropogenic noise, particularly for repeated exposures. However, playbacks are unlikely to fully reproduce original sources of anthropogenic noise. Here we examined the sound pressure and particle acceleration of boat noise playbacks in a field experiment and reveal that although there remain recognized limitations, the signal-to-noise ratios of boat playbacks to ambient noise do not exceed those of a real boat. The experimental setup tested is therefore of value for use in experiments on the effects of repeated exposure of aquatic animals to boat noise. PMID:26610992

  20. Fighting noise with noise in realistic quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Raphael; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2015-07-01

    We investigate how the efficiency of the quantum teleportation protocol is affected when the qubits involved in the protocol are subjected to noise or decoherence. We study all types of noise usually encountered in real-world implementations of quantum communication protocols, namely, the bit-flip, phase-flip (phase damping), depolarizing, and amplitude-damping noise. Several realistic scenarios are studied in which a part or all of the qubits employed in the execution of the quantum teleportation protocol are subjected to the same or different types of noise. We find noise scenarios not yet known in which more noise or less entanglement lead to more efficiency. Furthermore, we show that if noise is unavoidable it is better to subject the qubits to different noise channels in order to obtain an increase in the efficiency of the protocol.

  1. Noise and noise abatement in fans and blowers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neise, W.

    1980-03-01

    Noise generation and its reduction industrial fans (ventilators) is addressed. A review is given of the fan types commonly in use and their practical applications, the mechanisms of the aerodynamic noise generation in fans, theoretical and empirical prediction methods for fan noise, acoustic similarity laws, and noise reduction methods by means of the fan construction and fan operation. Measurement procedures are discussed with respect to the noise radiated from different parts of a fan, e.g. from the fan inlet or outlet, from the fan casing, from the fan as a whole, and to the noise radiated into ducts connected to the fan. Finally, considerations are made, for which classes of fans noise standards can be defined to characterize the noise emission of the various fan types.

  2. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  3. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  4. Effects of simulated forward flight on jet noise, shock noise and internal noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Tanna, H. K.; Tester, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    Inflight simulation experiments are conducted in an anechoic free-jet facility to examine the flight effects on various combinations of jet noise, shock noise and internal noise. The jet mixing noise component reduces with forward velocity at all angles and frequencies. When jet mixing noise is contaminated with internal noise, forward motion provides a noise reduction in the rear arc and a noise increase in the forward arc, with little change at 90 deg. The results are similar for shock-containing jets. It is found that the existing anomalies between full-scale flight data and model-scale flight simulation data could well be due to the contamination of the flight data by internal noise.

  5. Noise issues in Kanagawa Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Shigenori; Tamura, Akihiro

    2001-05-01

    In Kanagawa Prefecture, bordering Tokyo Metropolis and the third most densely populated prefecture in Japan, various noises have caused serious problems in terms of living environment preservation and human health protection. This paper describes present states of noise issues in Kanagawa. Road traffic noise, remaining one of serious pollution issues, was monitored at a total 217 sites along trunk roads in Kanagawa from fiscal year 2000 to 2002. The percentage of the sites that achieve environmental quality standards for road traffic noise was approximately 20%. Noise caused by Tokaido Shinkansen trains, of which the total daily number is 287, also has negative impacts on inhabitants along the railway. As a result of the noise measurement from fiscal year 1994 to 2002, about 80% of the measurement sites exceeded environmental quality standards for Shinkansen railway noise during the years. In the areas surrounding the Atsugi Base, noise generated by training flights damagingly affects inhabitants' daily life. The number of complaints due to the noise was largest among noise issues. Moreover, neighborhood noises, noises emitted during the nighttime operation of bars, restaurants and shops, and noises produced by work in out-of-door yards have recently provoked social issues.

  6. 23 CFR 772.3 - Noise standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noise standards. 772.3 Section 772.3 Highways FEDERAL... OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.3 Noise standards. The highway traffic noise prediction requirements, noise analyses, noise abatement criteria, and requirements for informing...

  7. 23 CFR 772.3 - Noise standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noise standards. 772.3 Section 772.3 Highways FEDERAL... OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.3 Noise standards. The highway traffic noise prediction requirements, noise analyses, noise abatement criteria, and requirements for informing...

  8. 23 CFR 772.3 - Noise standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noise standards. 772.3 Section 772.3 Highways FEDERAL... OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.3 Noise standards. The highway traffic noise prediction requirements, noise analyses, noise abatement criteria, and requirements for informing...

  9. 23 CFR 772.3 - Noise standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noise standards. 772.3 Section 772.3 Highways FEDERAL... OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.3 Noise standards. The highway traffic noise prediction requirements, noise analyses, noise abatement criteria, and requirements for informing...

  10. Jet engine noise source and noise footprint computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D. G.; Peart, N. A.; Miller, D. L.; Crowley, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation procedures are presented for predicting maximum passby noise levels and contours (footprints) of conventional jet aircraft with or without noise suppression devices. The procedures have been computerized and a user's guide is presented for the computer programs to be used in predicting the noise characteristics during aircraft takeoffs, fly-over, and/or landing operations.

  11. The Traffic Noise Index: A Method of Controlling Noise Nuisance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, F. J.; Scholes, W. E.

    This building research survey is an analysis of the social nuisance caused by urban motor ways and their noise. The Traffic Noise Index is used to indicate traffic noises and their effects on architectural designs and planning, while suggesting the need for more and better window insulation and acoustical barriers. Overall concern is for--(1)…

  12. Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The Acoustics Branch is responsible for reducing noise levels for jet and fan components on aircraft engines. To do this, data must be measured and calibrated accurately to ensure validity of test results. This noise reduction is accomplished by modifications to hardware such as jet nozzles, and by the use of other experimental hardware such as fluidic chevrons, elliptic cores, and fluidic shields. To insure validity of data calibration, a variety of software is used. This software adjusts the sound amplitude and frequency to be consistent with data taken on another day. Both the software and the hardware help make noise reduction possible. work properly. These software programs were designed to make corrections for atmosphere, shear, attenuation, electronic, and background noise. All data can be converted to a one-foot lossless condition, using the proper software corrections, making a reading independent of weather and distance. Also, data can be transformed from model scale to full scale for noise predictions of a real flight. Other programs included calculations of Over All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL), Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL). OASPL is the integration of sound with respect to frequency, and EPNL is weighted for a human s response to different sound frequencies and integrated with respect to time. With the proper software correction, data taken in the NATR are useful in determining ways to reduce noise. display any difference between two or more data files. Using this program and graphs of the data, the actual and predicted data can be compared. This software was tested on data collected at the Aero Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) using a variety of window types and overlaps. Similarly, short scripts were written to test each individual program in the software suite for verification. Each graph displays both the original points and the adjusted points connected with lines. During this summer, data points were taken during a live experiment

  13. High noise immunity one shot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Multivibrator circuit, which includes constant current source, isolates line noise from timing circuitry and field effect transistor controls circuit's operational modes. Circuit has high immunity to supply line noise.

  14. Sounds Alive: A Noise Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna McCord

    Sarah Screech, Danny Decibel, Sweetie Sound and Neil Noisy describe their experiences in the world of sound and noise to elementary students. Presented are their reports, games and charts which address sound measurement, the effects of noise on people, methods of noise control, and related areas. The workbook is intended to stimulate students'…

  15. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Erik M; Janssen, Sabine A

    2011-06-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  16. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Janssen, Sabine A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  17. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  18. Fan noise prediction assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bent, Paul H.

    1995-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of two techniques for predicting the fan noise radiation from engine nacelles. The first is a relatively computational intensive finite element technique. The code is named ARC, an abbreviation of Acoustic Radiation Code, and was developed by Eversman. This is actually a suite of software that first generates a grid around the nacelle, then solves for the potential flowfield, and finally solves the acoustic radiation problem. The second approach is an analytical technique requiring minimal computational effort. This is termed the cutoff ratio technique and was developed by Rice. Details of the duct geometry, such as the hub-to-tip ratio and Mach number of the flow in the duct, and modal content of the duct noise are required for proper prediction.

  19. Scaling aircraft noise perception.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollerhead, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Following a brief review of the background to the study, an extensive experiment is described which was undertaken to assess the practical differences between numerous alternative methods for calculating the perceived levels of individual aircraft flyover wounds. One hundred and twenty recorded sounds, including jets, turboprops, piston aircraft and helicopters were rated by a panel of subjects in a pair comparison test. The results were analyzed to evaluate a number of noise rating procedures, in terms of their ability to accurately estimate both relative and absolute perceived noise levels over a wider dynamic range (84-115 dB SPL) than had generally been used in previous experiments. Performances of the different scales were examined in detail for different aircraft categories, and the merits of different band level summation procedures, frequency weighting functions, duration and tone corrections were investigated.

  20. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  1. Noise in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Tsimring, Lev S.

    2014-01-01

    Noise permeates biology on all levels, from the most basic molecular, sub-cellular processes to the dynamics of tissues, organs, organisms, and populations. The functional roles of noise in biological processes can vary greatly. Along with standard, entropy-increasing effects of producing random mutations, diversifying phenotypes in isogenic populations, limiting information capacity of signaling relays, it occasionally plays more surprising constructive roles by accelerating the pace of evolution, providing selective advantage in dynamic environments, enhancing intracellular transport of biomolecules and increasing information capacity of signaling pathways. This short review covers the recent progress in understanding mechanisms and effects of fluctuations in biological systems of different scales and the basic approaches to their mathematical modeling. PMID:24444693

  2. Cabin acoustical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1981-12-01

    Using a hand-held sound pressure level meter the crew made one octave band and A-weight sound level measurements at four locations in the Orbiter on Mission Day 1. The data were voice recorded and transmitted to the ground prior to the first inflight sleep period. The data obtained are summarized. From a physiological point of view the noise levels measured on STS-1 were not hazardous to the crewmens' hearing.

  3. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  4. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, Robert L.; Blalock, Theron V.; Roberts, Michael J.; Maxey, Lonnie C.

    1992-01-01

    Method and device for direct, non-contact temperature measure of a body. A laser beam is reflected from the surface of the body and detected along with the Planck radiation. The detected signal is analyzed using signal correlation technique to generate an output signal proportional to the Johnson noise introduced into the reflected laser beam as a direct measure of the absolute temperature of the body.

  5. Noise, A bibliography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. L., Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Noise is the subject of this bibliography which has been developed from the military point-of-view. Operationally it may be defined as sound which lacks musical quality due to its discordant harmonic features. Selection of material coverage has been drawn from the unclassified book, document, and military periodicals holdings of the Morris Swet Technical Library, USAFAS. Inclusion of an item, or omission, neither implies USAFAS indorsement or sanction of the compiler's approach.

  6. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    The contradictory and confusing results in noise research on humans may partly be due to individual differences between the subjects participating in different studies. This review is based on a twelve year research on the role of neuroticism, extroversion and subjective noise sensitivity during mental work in noisy environment. Neurotic persons might show enhanced "arousability" i.e. their arousal level increases more in stress. Additional unfavorable factors for neurotics are worrying and anxiety, which might prevent them coping successfully with noise, or some other stressors during mental performance. In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short periods of noise during performance. Correlation analyses have regularly revealed a highly significant negative relation between extroversion and noise annoyance during mental processing. Numerous studies have shown that people with high noise sensitivity may be prevented from achieving the same work results as other people in noisy environment, thus leading to psychosomatic, neurotic or other difficulties. Positive relation between noise annoyance and subjective noise sensitivity might be very strong. Our results have shown, after matching with the results of other relevant studies, that more stable personality, with extroversive tendencies and with a relatively lower subjective noise sensitivity measured with standard questionnaires, may be expected to better adapt to noise during mental performance, compared to people with opposite personality traits. PMID:14965455

  7. Aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  8. Handbook for industrial noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The basic principles of sound, measuring techniques, and instrumentation associated with general purpose noise control are discussed. Means for identifying and characterizing a noise problem so that subsequent work may provide the most efficient and cost effective solution are outlined. A methodology for choosing appropriate noise control materials and the proper implementation of control procedures is detailed. The most significant NASA sponsored contributions to the state of the art development of optimum noise control technologies are described including cases in which aeroacoustics and related research have shed some light on ways of reducing noise generation at its source.

  9. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  10. Emerging Community Noise Reduction Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current NASA research portfolio in the area of aircraft noise reduction is presented. The emphasis of the research described herein is on meeting the aggressive near- and mid-term national goals for reducing aircraft noise emissions, which NASA internal studies have shown to be feasible using noise reduction technologies currently being developed in-house or in partnership with NASA s industry and academic partners. While NASA has an active research effort in airframe noise reduction, this overview focuses on propulsion noise reduction only.

  11. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  12. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Ditto, William L.; Lindner, John F.; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  13. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  14. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  15. Noise Emission from Laboratory Air Blowers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Windham, Betty

    1978-01-01

    Product noise ratings for a number of laboratory air blowers are reported and several recommendations for reducing laboratory noise from air blowers are given. Relevant noise ratings and methods for measuring noise emission of appliances are discussed. (BB)

  16. Proceedings of noise-con 91

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.A.; Prasad, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers the following topics related to noise control: control of mine ventilation fans; physical phenomena; gas turbine exhaust system silencing; computer models for estimating electric utility environmental noise; noise from rotary coal car unloading; noise analysis.

  17. Technologies for Turbofan Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's engine noise research since 1992 is given for subsonic commercial aircraft applications. Highlights are included from the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project with emphasis on engine source noise reduction. Noise reduction goals for 10 EPNdB by 207 and 20 EPNdB by 2022 are reviewed. Fan and jet noise technologies are highlighted from the AST program including higher bypass ratio propulsion, scarf inlets, forward-swept fans, swept/leaned stators, chevron nozzles, noise prediction methods, and active noise control for fans. Source diagnostic tests for fans and jets that have been completed over the past few years are presented showing how new flow measurement methods such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) have played a key role in understanding turbulence, the noise generation process, and how to improve noise prediction methods. Tests focused on source decomposition have helped identify which engine components need further noise reduction. The role of Computational AeroAcoustics (CAA) for fan noise prediction is presented. Advanced noise reduction methods such as Hershel-Quincke tubes and trailing edge blowing for fan noise that are currently being pursued n the QAT program are also presented. Highlights are shown form engine validation and flight demonstrations that were done in the late 1990's with Pratt & Whitney on their PW4098 engine and Honeywell on their TFE-731-60 engine. Finally, future propulsion configurations currently being studied that show promise towards meeting NASA's long term goal of 20 dB noise reduction are shown including a Dual Fan Engine concept on a Blended Wing Body aircraft.

  18. 23 CFR 772.3 - Noise standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noise standards. 772.3 Section 772.3 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.3 Noise standards. The highway traffic noise prediction requirements, noise analyses,...

  19. Imaging with ambient noise

    SciTech Connect

    Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees

    2010-09-15

    Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

  20. Occupational noise in printing companies.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Grujic, Selena D; Kiurski, Jelena; Krstic, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Kovacevic, Ilija

    2011-10-01

    The extent of noise in five printing companies in Novi Sad, Serbia, was determined using TES-1358A Sound Analyzer with RS-232 Interface. The data on equivalent A-level (dBA), as well as, maximum and minimum sound pressure levels were collected. It was found that folders and offset printing units are the predominant noise sources, with the average L (eq) levels of 87.66 and 82.7 dBA, respectively. Forty percent of the machines produced noise levels above the limiting threshold level of 85 dBA, allowed by law. The noise in all printing companies was dominated by higher frequency noise, and the maximum level mostly appeared at 4,000 Hz. For offset printing machines and folders, the means of L (eq) levels exceeded the permissible levels given by NR-80 curve at higher frequencies. There are no published studies of occupational noise and hearing impairment of workers exposed to hazardous noise in printing industry in Serbia. More extensive studies are needed to determine the exact impact of noise on the workers. Technical and organizational measures in order to control noise and prevent noise exposure, and general hearing conservation program to protect workers, should be introduced in printing industry. PMID:21161679

  1. Noise temperature and noise figure concepts: DC to light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is investigating the use of higher operational frequencies for improved performance. Noise temperature and noise figure concepts are used to describe the noise performance of these receiving systems. It is proposed to modify present noise temperature definitions for linear amplifiers so they will be valid over the range (hf/kT) 1 (hf/kT). This is important for systems operating at high frequencies and low noise temperatures, or systems requiring very accurate calibrations. The suggested definitions are such that for an ideal amplifier, T sub e = (hg/k) = T sub q and F = 1. These definitions revert to the present definition for (hf/kT) 1. Noise temperature calibrations are illustrated with a detailed example. These concepts are applied to system signal-to-noise analysis. The fundamental limit to a receiving system sensitivity is determined by the thermal noise of the source and the quantum noise limit of the receiver. The sensitivity of a receiving system consisting of an ideal linear amplifier with a 2.7 K source, degrades significantly at higher frequencies.

  2. Noise temperature and noise figure concepts: DC to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1982-02-01

    The Deep Space Network is investigating the use of higher operational frequencies for improved performance. Noise temperature and noise figure concepts are used to describe the noise performance of these receiving systems. It is proposed to modify present noise temperature definitions for linear amplifiers so they will be valid over the range (hf/kT) 1 (hf/kT). This is important for systems operating at high frequencies and low noise temperatures, or systems requiring very accurate calibrations. The suggested definitions are such that for an ideal amplifier, T sub e = (hg/k) = T sub q and F = 1. These definitions revert to the present definition for (hf/kT) 1. Noise temperature calibrations are illustrated with a detailed example. These concepts are applied to system signal-to-noise analysis. The fundamental limit to a receiving system sensitivity is determined by the thermal noise of the source and the quantum noise limit of the receiver. The sensitivity of a receiving system consisting of an ideal linear amplifier with a 2.7 K source, degrades significantly at higher frequencies.

  3. Prediction of Externally Blown Flap Noise and Turbomachinery Strut Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods were developed for predicting externally blown flap (EBF) noise and turbomachinery strut noise. Noise radiated by under-the-wing and upper-surface-blowing EBF configurations is calculated as a sum of lift dipole noise, trailing edge noise, and jet quadrupole noise. Resulting predictions of amplitudes and spectra generally were in good agreement with data from small-scale models. These data cover a range of exhaust velocity, flap deflection, exhaust nozzle position, exhaust nozzle shape, and ratio of exhaust nozzle diameter to wing chord. A semi-empirical method for predicting dipole noise radiation from a strut with incident turbulence was in good agreement with data. Leading-edge regions made of perforated plate backed by a bulk acoustic absorber achieved up to 7 db reduction of strut noise caused by incident turbulence at high frequencies. Radial turbulence in a turbofan exit duct was found to have a relatively high level associated with the mean velocity defect in the rotor blade wakes. Use of these turbulence spectra and a dipole noise radiation equation gave general prediction of measured aft-radiated sound power caused by a splitter ring in a full-scale fan exit duct.

  4. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  5. Low-noise SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E.; Clarke, J.

    2000-02-08

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w(C), which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers ({mu}m). When made with film widths of about 4 {mu}m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla ({mu}T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 {mu}m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 {mu}T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  6. Single-electron thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Akira

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of thermal noise in the motion of single electrons in an ultimately small dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The nanometer-scale transistors that compose the DRAM resolve the thermal noise in single-electron motion. A complete set of fundamental tests conducted on this single-electron thermal noise shows that the noise perfectly follows all the aspects predicted by statistical mechanics, which include the occupation probability, the law of equipartition, a detailed balance, and the law of kT/C. In addition, the counting statistics on the directional motion (i.e., the current) of the single-electron thermal noise indicate that the individual electron motion follows the Poisson process, as it does in shot noise. PMID:25093235

  7. Airframe noise component interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted to examine the noise-generating processes of an airframe during approach flight. The airframe model was a two-dimensional wing section, to which highlift leading and trailing edge devices and landing gear could be added. Far field conventional microphones were utilized to determine component spectrum levels. An acoustic mirror directional microphone was utilized to examine noise source distributions on airframe components extended separately and in combination. Measured quantities are compared with predictions inferred from aircraft flyover data. Aeroacoustic mechanisms for each airframe component are identified. Component interaction effects on total radiated noise generally were small (within about 2 dB). However, some interactions significantly redistributed the local noise source strengths by changing local flow velocities and turbulence levels. Possibilities for noise reduction exist if trailing edge flaps could be modified to decrease their noise radiation caused by incident turbulent flow.

  8. Broadband noise of propellers and rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S.-T.

    Three categories of rotor noise (discrete frequency noise, impulsive noise, and broadband noise) are described and a study made of broadband noise is reported. Broadband noise has a continuous spectrum and is caused by disturbances which are not precisely repeated at each blade revolution but are basically due to some sort of turbulence-blade interactions. Source mechanisms include: inflow turbulence noise, boundary layer trailing edge noise, tip vortex noise, and several uncommon mechanisms. Broadband noise analyses are reviewed and calculations based on various analyses are compared to each other and to some available experimental data. Several satisfactory analyses are discussed and their limitations are delineated. Twenty-two references are cited.

  9. Externally blown flap noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center cold-flow model externally blown flap (EBF) noise research test program is summarized. Both engine under-the-wing and over-the-wing EBF wing section configurations were studied. Ten large scale and nineteen small scale EBF models were tested. A limited number of forward airspeed effect and flap noise suppression tests were also run. The key results and conclusions drawn from the flap noise tests are summarized and discussed.

  10. Aircraft community noise impact studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to: (1) conduct a program to determine the community noise impact of advanced technology engines when installed in a supersonic aircraft, (2) determine the potential reduction of community noise by flight operational techniques for the study aircraft, (3) estimate the community noise impact of the study aircraft powered by suppressed turbojet engines and by advanced duct heating turbofan engines, and (4) compare the impact of the two supersonic designs with that of conventional commercial DC-8 aircraft.

  11. PREDICTION OF AIRCRAFT NOISE LEVELS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center for predicting the noise contributions from various aircraft noise sources have been incorporated into a computer program for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground test. The noise sources accounted for include fan inlet and exhaust, jet, flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine, and airframe. Noise propagation corrections are available in the program for atmospheric attenuation, ground reflections, extra ground attenuation, and shielding. The capacity to solve the geometrical relationships between an aircraft in flight and an observer on the ground has been included in the program to make it useful in evaluating noise estimates and footprints for various proposed engine installations. The program contains two main routines for employing the noise prediction routines. The first main routine consists of a procedure to calculate at various observer stations the time history of the noise from an aircraft flying at a specified set of speeds, orientations, and space coordinates. The various components of the noise are computed by the program. For each individual source, the noise levels are free field with no corrections for propagation losses other than spherical divergence. The total spectra may then be corrected for the usual effects of atmospheric attenuation, extra ground attenuation, ground reflection, and aircraft shielding. Next, the corresponding values of overall sound pressure level, perceived noise level, and tone-weighted perceived noise level are calculated. From the time history at each point, true effective perceived noise levels are calculated. Thus, values of effective perceived noise levels, maximum perceived noise levels, and tone-weighted perceived noise levels are found for a grid of specified points on the ground. The second main routine is designed to give the usual format of one-third octave sound pressure level values at a fixed radius for a number of user

  12. Fluctuating noise drives Brownian transport

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    The transport properties of Brownian ratchet were studied in the presence of stochastic intensity noise in both overdamped and underdamped regimes. In the overdamped case, an analytical solution using the matrix-continued fraction method revealed the existence of a maximum current when the noise intensity fluctuates on intermediate timescale regions. Similar effects were observed for the underdamped case by Monte Carlo simulations. The optimal time-correlation for Brownian transport coincided with the experimentally observed time-correlation of the extrinsic noise in Escherichia coli gene expression and implied the importance of environmental noise for molecular mechanisms. PMID:22977101

  13. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Michael C

    2005-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a major hazard in many workplaces and in society. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health estimates that more than 30 million workers (almost 1 in 10) are exposed to unsafe noise levels on the job. Helicopter emergency medical services crews work in an environment in which exposure to aviation noise makes the issue of hearing loss and prevention strategies salient. Applying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard for a regulated hearing conservation program through controlling noise exposure will benefit helicopter emergency medical services professionals. PMID:15741953

  14. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung H; Sauro, Herbert M

    2012-01-01

    Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks. PMID:22253584

  15. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Catlin, F I

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. PMID:2938482

  16. Fan and pump noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misoda, J.; Magliozzi, B.

    1973-01-01

    The development is described of improved, low noise level fan and pump concepts for the space shuttle. In addition, a set of noise design criteria for small fans and pumps was derived. The concepts and criteria were created by obtaining Apollo hardware test data to correlate and modify existing noise estimating procedures. A set of space shuttle selection criteria was used to determine preliminary fan and pump concepts. These concepts were tested and modified to obtain noise sources and characteristics which yield the design criteria and quiet, efficient space shuttle fan and pump concepts.

  17. High level white noise generator

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  18. Noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  19. Noise exposure and public health.

    PubMed Central

    Passchier-Vermeer, W; Passchier, W F

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to noise constitutes a health risk. There is sufficient scientific evidence that noise exposure can induce hearing impairment, hypertension and ischemic heart disease, annoyance, sleep disturbance, and decreased school performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and birth defects, the evidence is limited. Most public health impacts of noise were already identified in the 1960s and noise abatement is less of a scientific but primarily a policy problem. A subject for further research is the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying noise-induced cardiovascular disorders and the relationship of noise with annoyance and nonacoustical factors modifying health outcomes. A high priority study subject is the effects of noise on children, including cognitive effects and their reversibility. Noise exposure is on the increase, especially in the general living environment, both in industrialized nations and in developing world regions. This implies that in the twenty-first century noise exposure will still be a major public health problem. Images Figure 2 PMID:10698728

  20. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-11-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  1. Quantum noise in photothermal cooling

    SciTech Connect

    De Liberato, Simone; Lambert, Neill; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-15

    We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. We achieve this by developing a Langevin formalism for the motion of the cantilever, valid in the bad-cavity limit, which includes both photon absorption shot noise and the noise due to radiation pressure. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise-dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

  2. How anthropogenic noise affects foraging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinhong; Siemers, Björn M; Koselj, Klemen

    2015-09-01

    The influence of human activity on the biosphere is increasing. While direct damage (e.g. habitat destruction) is relatively well understood, many activities affect wildlife in less apparent ways. Here, we investigate how anthropogenic noise impairs foraging, which has direct consequences for animal survival and reproductive success. Noise can disturb foraging via several mechanisms that may operate simultaneously, and thus, their effects could not be disentangled hitherto. We developed a diagnostic framework that can be applied to identify the potential mechanisms of disturbance in any species capable of detecting the noise. We tested this framework using Daubenton's bats, which find prey by echolocation. We found that traffic noise reduced foraging efficiency in most bats. Unexpectedly, this effect was present even if the playback noise did not overlap in frequency with the prey echoes. Neither overlapping noise nor nonoverlapping noise influenced the search effort required for a successful prey capture. Hence, noise did not mask prey echoes or reduce the attention of bats. Instead, noise acted as an aversive stimulus that caused avoidance response, thereby reducing foraging efficiency. We conclude that conservation policies may seriously underestimate numbers of species affected and the multilevel effects on animal fitness, if the mechanisms of disturbance are not considered. PMID:26046451

  3. Assessment of military shooting noise.

    PubMed

    Boegli, Hans; Wunderli, Jean Marc; Brink, Mark

    2008-05-01

    The assessment of the impact of noise exposure on the population is a fundamental step in noise abatement. It includes the establishing of an exposure-response relationship and the setting of an impact threshold that specifies the protection level for the population and triggers eventually mitigating measures to reduce noise exposure. In Switzerland, the impact thresholds should be set so that, in the light of current scientific knowledge and experience, noise exposure below these thresholds will not seriously disturb the well-being of the population. For most current noise sources such as roads, railways and airports there already exist impact thresholds as part of the noise abatement legislation. Yet, no impact thresholds for military shooting grounds have been specified so far. Therefore a study was carried out in order to assess the impact of military noise exposure. The research included the calculation of noise exposure of eight military shooting grounds ranging from small infantry shooting ranges to expanded artillery and tank training facilities and a survey at over 1000 residents in the neighbourhood of these installations. Preliminary results suggest that although the responses of the population to military noise are rather dispersed, data should be sufficiently consistent to establish an exposure-response relationship. PMID:18532285

  4. The effects of noise on man

    SciTech Connect

    Kryter, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    As a reference source of research concerning effects of noise on people, this book reports and analyzes procedures used in regulation and control of noise. Quantitative relations are formed between physical measures of environmental noise and the reactions of people and communities to noise. The author reviews scientific and engineering research published from 1970 to the present. The Effects of Noise on Man, Second Edition discusses: adverse effects of noise and noise-induced hearing loss on speech communications; damage to hearing from ''everyday'' noise; damage to hearing from industrial noise and gunfire; work performance in noise; effects of noise on non-auditory systems of the body and sleep; aircraft and street traffic noise and its effects on health, annoyance, and house depreciation; physical measurements used for the assessment and control of environmental noise; federal standards and guidelines for community noise and proposed modification based on recent research findings.

  5. Noise reduction experience at Hughes Helicopter, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janakiram, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    Noise reduction is mostly limited to light helicopters whose noise signature is dominated by their tail rotors. It is primarily hardware oriented. Well known noise reduction techniques such as reduction of rotor speeds with an accompanying increase in solidity to maintain performance, engine noise reduction with the use of exhaust mufflers, and acoustic blanketing of transmission and engine compartment are used. The concept of blade phasing as a means of reducing tail rotor noise is also used. Engine noise (exhaust noise), power train noise and airframe noise becomes important at low rotor tip speeds and means must be found to reduce these noise sources if further noise reductions are desired. The use of a special test rig aids in isolating the various noise sources and arriving at the penalties (performance or payload) involved in quieting them. Significant noise reduction are achieved for the light helicopter with minimum performance or weight penalties because of the dominance of a single noise source (the tail rotor).

  6. Fish Hatchery Noise Levels and Noise Reduction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M E; Hewitt, C R; Parker, T M

    2015-07-01

    This study examined occupational noise within two rearing facilities at a production fish hatchery and evaluated two simple noise reduction techniques. Ambient noise levels in the hatchery tank room ranged from 50 dB in the absence of flowing water to over 73 dB when water was flowing to all 35 tanks under typical hatchery operating procedures. Covering the open standpipes did not significantly reduce noise levels. However, placing partial tank covers over the top of the tanks above the water inlet significantly reduced noise levels, both with and without the use of standpipe covers. Noise levels in the salmon building rose from 43.2 dB without any flowing water to 77.5 dB with water flowing to all six in-ground tanks. Significant noise reductions were observed when the tanks were completely covered or with standpipe covers. Decibel levels showed the greatest reduction when the tanks and standpipes were both covered. These results indicate that occupational noise levels in aquaculture environments may be reduced through the use of simple and relatively inexpensive techniques. PMID:26373216

  7. GRACE star camera noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  8. Physiological, Psychological, and Social Effects of Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kryter, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The physiological, and behavioral effects of noise on man are investigated. Basic parameters such as definitions of noise, measuring techniques of noise, and the physiology of the ear are presented prior to the development of topics on hearing loss, speech communication in noise, social effects of noise, and the health effects of noise pollution. Recommendations for the assessment and subsequent control of noise is included.

  9. Airframe noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-11-01

    This Data Item 90023, an addition to the Noise Sub-series, provides the FORTRAN listing of a computer program for a semi-empirical method that calculates the far-field airframe aerodynamic noise generated by turbo-fan powered transport aircraft or gliders in one-third octave bands over a frequency range specified by the user. The overall sound pressure level is also output. The results apply for a still, lossless atmosphere; other ESDU methods may be used to correct for atmospheric attenuation, ground reflection, lateral attenuation, and wind and temperature gradients. The position of the aircraft relative to the observer is input in terms of the height at minimum range, and the elevation and azimuthal angles to the aircraft; if desired the user may obtain results over a range of those angles in 10 degree intervals. The method sums the contributions made by various components, results for which can also be output individually. The components are: the wind (conventional or delta), tailplane, fin, flaps (single/double slotted or triple slotted), leading-edge slats, and undercarriage legs and wheels (one/two wheel or four wheel units). The program requires only geometric data for each component (area and span in the case of lifting elements, flap deflection angle, and leg length and wheel diameter for the undercarriage). The program was validated for aircraft with take-off masses from 42,000 to 390,000 kg (92,000 to 860,000 lb) at airspeeds from 70 to 145 m/s (135 to 280 kn). Comparisons with available experimental data suggest a prediction rms accuracy of 1 dB at minimum range, rising to between 2 and 3 dB at 60 degrees to either side.

  10. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  11. Assessment of Domestic Appliance Noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jeanette Rosamond

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The aims of this study were: (i) to identify the factors involved in eliciting a subjective reaction to domestic appliance noise, (ii) to identify the noise index (or indices) that correlate highly with a subjective reaction to the noise, and (iii) to investigate the contribution of domestic appliance noise to an individual's daily noise dose. Two series of experimental studies were carried out using several examples of each of five types of domestic appliances. One determined the index values of domestic appliance noise--namely L_{WA} (using ISO 3741), L_{pA} , L_{pD}, L _{p}, PNL, L_{Aeq, 30 sec}, L_{Amax} and L_{AX}; the other determined subjective reactions to domestic appliance noise (judgements of noisiness, annoyance, the acceptability of the appliance noise and appraisals of usefulness). The success or failure of the research hypotheses was assessed statistically by analysis of variance, regression analysis, log linear analysis, Hotelling test, bootstrapping, t-test and post-hoc comparisons. Ratings of annoyance, noisiness and the acceptability of the noise of the appliance were found to be interrelated and interdependent, and not influenced by appraisals of usefulness of the appliances. Noisiness ratings were the most consistent of the subjective ratings investigated, and were influenced by the duration of the exposure, and the actual appliance type under investigation. Significant correlations were obtained between noisiness ratings and all the noise indices under investigation. However, statistical analysis demonstrated that L_ {WA} correlated less successfully with noisiness ratings than all other indices. L_ {Amax},L_{Aeq,30 sec }, and L_{AX} indices were the most successful. It is therefore suggested that the labelling of domestic appliance noise consist of L_{WA} and L _{Aeq} as measured in a standardised test environment. The percentage contribution of domestic appliance noise to the total

  12. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  13. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  14. Technologies for Aircraft Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Technologies for aircraft noise reduction have been developed by NASA over the past 15 years through the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project. This presentation summarizes highlights from these programs and anticipated noise reduction benefits for communities surrounding airports. Historical progress in noise reduction and technologies available for future aircraft/engine development are identified. Technologies address aircraft/engine components including fans, exhaust nozzles, landing gear, and flap systems. New "chevron" nozzles have been developed and implemented on several aircraft in production today that provide significant jet noise reduction. New engines using Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) ratios are projected to provide about 10 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise Level in decibels) engine noise reduction relative to the average fleet that was flying in 1997. Audio files are embedded in the presentation that estimate the sound levels for a 35,000 pound thrust engine for takeoff and approach power conditions. The predictions are based on actual model scale data that was obtained by NASA. Finally, conceptual pictures are shown that look toward future aircraft/propulsion systems that might be used to obtain further noise reduction.

  15. Television noise-reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamps, J. C.; Gordon, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    System greatly improves signal-to-noise ratio with little or no loss in picture resolution. By storage of luminance component, which is summed with chrominance component, system performs mathematical integration of basically-repetitive television signals. Integration of signals over interval of their repetition causes little change in original signals and eliminates random noise.

  16. Noise sensitivity: A neurophenomenological perspective.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the current limitations of noise sensitivity research and the benefit of undertaking a neurophenomenological approach of investigation. It begins by questioning the invariance of noise sensitivity across different studies and contexts and argues that these are issues associated with the psychometric construct rather than the underlying reaction patterns. It suggest that our definition and operationalization of noise sensitivity might have been misspecified and that it needs to be revised on the basis of heuristically derived first-person data about our experiences of noise. It then shows why the basic principles of the neurophenomenological program are applicable to psychoacoustic research. Namely, it argues that phenomenological training leading to reflexive introspection and verbalization of our susceptibility to noise might have three-fold implication - (i) it will generate deeper understanding of noise sensitivity which will then allow us to deduce a hierarchical structure of meaning and concepts to supplement and be fed to quantitative research, (ii) it will provide better interpretation of neuroimaging and electroencephalographic data related to noise reaction and perception, which in turn will allow a process of reciprocal validation, (iii) and, most importantly, it presents a promising technique for emotional regulation of noise processing via modulation of the amygdalar function, when a state of awareness of this processing has been achieved. PMID:26315447

  17. Noise Spectroscopy Used in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žacik, Michal

    This thesis contains glossary topic of spectroscopic measurement methods in broad bands of frequency. There is designed experimental measurement method for simple samples and biological samples measurements for noise spectroscopy in frequency range of 0.1 - 6 GHz, using broadband noise generator. There is realized the workplace and the measurement method is verified by measuring on selected samples. Measurements a displayed and analyzed.

  18. Noise pollution: a modem plague.

    PubMed

    Goines, Lisa; Hagler, Louis

    2007-03-01

    Noise is defined as unwanted sound. Environmental noise consists of all the unwanted sounds in our communities except that which originates in the workplace. Environmental noise pollution, a form of air pollution, is a threat to health and well-being. It is more severe and widespread than ever before, and it will continue to increase in magnitude and severity because of population growth, urbanization, and the associated growth in the use of increasingly powerful, varied, and highly mobile sources of noise. It will also continue to grow because of sustained growth in highway, rail, and air traffic, which remain major sources of environmental noise. The potential health effects of noise pollution are numerous, pervasive, persistent, and medically and socially significant. Noise produces direct and cumulative adverse effects that impair health and that degrade residential, social, working, and learning environments with corresponding real (economic) and intangible (well-being) losses. It interferes with sleep, concentration, communication, and recreation. The aim of enlightened governmental controls should be to protect citizens from the adverse effects of airborne pollution, including those produced by noise. People have the right to choose the nature of their acoustical environment; it should not be imposed by others. PMID:17396733

  19. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Smartphone Sound Apps Music-induced Hearing Loss ... SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Smartphone Sound Apps Music-induced Hearing Loss ...

  20. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  1. Measuring Excess Noise in SDL's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Kowitz, H. R.; Rowland, C. W.; Shull, T. A.; Ruggles, S. L.; Matthews, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument gives quantitive information on "excess noise" in semiconductor-diode laser (SDL's). By proper selection of detector, instrument tests any SDL from visible wavelengths through thermal infrared. Lasers determine excess noise in SKL source by measuring photocurrent generated in photodetector exposed first to reference laser then to SKL under test.

  2. Consumer oriented product noise testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Les

    2005-09-01

    This paper explores the need for product noise measurements and how best to meet that need in the near future. Currently there is only a small market place for quieter consumer products. This is not because of lack of interest. No one really wants to announce to everyone in their house that they just flushed the toilet, few really want the entire neighborhood to know they are mowing their yard, etc. The small market place is primarily due to a lack of regulations on product noise, a lack of information easily available to consumers about which products are quieter, and market consolidation resulting in fewer manufacturers, most of whom are unwilling to emphasize their quieter products at the risk of eroding sales of their noisier ones (that currently have greater market share). In the absence of the EPA fulfilling its statutory requirement to regulate and label product noise under the Noise Control Act of 1972, and with the unwillingness of most industries to voluntarily publish accurate product noise data, there is a significant role for ``Consumer Oriented Product Noise Testing.'' This paper explores the Noise Pollution Clearinghouse's ongoing and planned product noise testing, evaluating its advantages, disadvantages, and limitations.

  3. The battle against noise in industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iudin, E. Ia.

    The physiological effects of noise in manufacturing plants and other industrial facilities are discussed, and several common noise abatement methods are described. Consideration is given to the acoustic properties of three types of noise which are present in industrial plants: aerohydrodynamic noise; mechanical noise; and electromagnetic noise. Among the specific noise abatement techniques discussed are: sound isolation by means of noise-absorbant screens; insulation or noise-emitting media; and acoustic interference. The use of earplugs and external ear protectors for protection of individual workers in noisy work environments is also considered.

  4. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  5. Squeezed light spin noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for determining physical properties of an unperturbed spin system from its power noise spectrum both in atomic and solid state physics. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, we detect spontaneous spin fluctuations of a dense Rb vapor via Faraday rotation of an off-resonance probe beam, resulting in the excess of spectral noise at the Larmor frequency over a white photon shot-noise background. We report quantum enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio via polarization squeezing of the probe beam up to 3dB over the full density range up to n = 1013 atoms cm-3, covering practical conditions used in optimized SNS experiments. Furthermore, we show that squeezing improves the trade-off between statistical sensitivity and systematic errors due to line broadening, a previously unobserved quantum advantage.

  6. Noise Prediction for Maneuvering Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Jones, Henry E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the initial work toward first-principles noise prediction for maneuvering rotors. Both the aeromechanical and acoustics aspects of the maneuver noise problem are discussed. The comprehensive analysis code, CAMRAD 2. was utilized to predict the time-dependent aircraft position and attitude, along - with the rotor blade airloads and motion. The major focus of this effort was the enhancement of the acoustic code WOPWOP necessary to compute the noise from a maneuvering rotorcraft. Full aircraft motion, including arbitrary transient motion, is modeled together with arbitrary rotor blade motions. Noise from a rotorcraft in turning and descending flight is compared to level flight. A substantial increase in the rotor noise is found both for turning flight and during a transient maneuver. Additional enhancements to take advantage of parallel computers and clusters of workstations, in addition to a new compact-chordwise loading formulation, are also described.

  7. Noise Injury: Etiology and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to noise might be responsible for a wide and varied spectrum of physical and mental morbidity, although many of the claims of cause and effect relationship are controversial and unproven. The etiological relationship between noise and high frequency hearing loss is, however, well documented. While noise-induced hearing loss is considered to be primarily an occupational problem, current leisure time activities have created the potential for it to become more common in the community at large. Once developed, this hearing loss is permanent and cannot be influenced by therapy. Noise-induced hearing loss is almost completely preventable and the family physician has an important responsibility for primary and secondary prevention, whether the noise source is in the workplace or in some other location. PMID:21286519

  8. Highway noise barrier perceived benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. N.; Osman, M. M.

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed in which 82 subjects judged the benefit of a noise barrier by listening to tape recordings of before-barrier and after-barrier traffic noise. These perceived benefit judgments were related by regression analysis to the barrier attenuation, the before-barrier traffic sound level, and a music background level, all of which were varied over the course of the experiment. Prediction equations were developed for barrier benefit in terms of these sound levels, their purpose being to provide a model for barrier benefit that can be used in barrier site selection and design. An unexpected finding was that barrier benefit was highest when before-barrier sound levels were lowest: i.e., subjects preferred a noise barrier that solved a moderate noise problem over an equally-attenuating barrier that only partially solved a more severe noise problem.

  9. Focusing of Helicopter BVI Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowson, M. V.

    1996-02-01

    Results are reported from an exact analytic model for the kinematics of noise radiation due to blade-vortex interaction which gives new predictions of the directionality of BVI noise from helicopters. It is shown that the blade-vortex interaction process will give rise to focused regions of intense noise which can decay locally at a rate less than inverse square law. This finding has obvious consequences for helicopter detection and community annoyance. However, the model also gives explicit prediction of the location of the regions of intense noise, and of the location in the disc of the interaction source responsible. Thus the model can also be used to suggest methods for exploiting directionality effects to reduce noise from helicopter operations.

  10. Controlling employee exposure to noise

    SciTech Connect

    Nuspl, S.P.; VanHandle, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Attempts to define those areas or that equipment that makes the largest contribution to an employee's noise dose. Assesses the cost impact of meeting a plantwide noise level criterion vs. an exposure-based criterion. Chooses a 90-dBA level as one criterion, along with the 1974 proposed OSHA criterion and an 85-dBA, 8-hr exposure criterion. Explains that Phase I activities dealt with the acquisition of employee noise exposure data, while Phase II was a followup engineering survey in which individual noise sources and generating mechanisms were identified through a more detailed acoustical analysis, which consisted of close-range measurements and 1/3-octave band analyses. Recommends this work as a point of reference and data base for utilities seeking a constructive and cost/ benefit response to their noise specification problems.

  11. A Literature Survey of Noise Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, H. H.

    Physically, noise is a complex sound that has little or no periodicity. However, the essential characteristic of noise is its undesirability. Thus, noise can be defined as any annoying or unwanted sound. In recent years, the rapid increase of noise level in our environment has become a national public health hazard. Noise affects man's state of…

  12. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... construction noise impacts to the community. This determination shall include a weighing of the benefits... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. For all Type I and...

  13. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... construction noise impacts to the community. This determination shall include a weighing of the benefits... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. For all Type I and...

  14. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. The following general... may be affected by noise from construction of the project. The identification is to be...

  15. 23 CFR 772.11 - Noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.11 Noise abatement. (a) In determining and abating traffic noise impacts, primary consideration is to be given to exterior areas. Abatement will usually be necessary only where frequent human use occurs and a lowered noise level would be of...

  16. 23 CFR 772.11 - Noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.11 Noise abatement. (a) In determining and abating traffic noise impacts, primary consideration is to be given to exterior areas. Abatement will usually be necessary only where frequent human use occurs and a lowered noise level would be of...

  17. The Effects of Noise on Pupil Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Barbara Ruth

    Effects of school noise conditions on student written task performance were studied. Three noise levels were examined--(1) irregular interval noise, 75-90 decibels, (2) average or normal noise, and (3) quiet condition, 45-55 decibels. An attempt was made to reproduce noise conditions typical of the school environment. A second controlled…

  18. Recent Advances in Studies of Current Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanter, Yaroslav M.

    This is a brief review of recent activities in the field of current noise intended for newcomers. We first briefly discuss main properties of shot noise in nanostructures, and then turn to recent developments, concentrating on issues related to experimental progress: non-symmetrized cumulants and quantum noise; counting statistics; super-Poissonian noise; current noise and interferometry

  19. Fan Noise Prediction with Applications to Aircraft System Noise Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an assessment of current fan noise prediction tools by comparing measured and predicted sideline acoustic levels from a benchmark fan noise wind tunnel test. Specifically, an empirical method and newly developed coupled computational approach are utilized to predict aft fan noise for a benchmark test configuration. Comparisons with sideline noise measurements are performed to assess the relative merits of the two approaches. The study identifies issues entailed in coupling the source and propagation codes, as well as provides insight into the capabilities of the tools in predicting the fan noise source and subsequent propagation and radiation. In contrast to the empirical method, the new coupled computational approach provides the ability to investigate acoustic near-field effects. The potential benefits/costs of these new methods are also compared with the existing capabilities in a current aircraft noise system prediction tool. The knowledge gained in this work provides a basis for improved fan source specification in overall aircraft system noise studies.

  20. En route noise: NASA propfan test aircraft (calculated source noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickley, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    The second phase of a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) program to study the high-altitude, low-frequency acoustic noise propagation characteristics of the Advanced Turboprop (propfan) Aircraft was conducted on April 3-13, 1989 at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico. The first phase was conducted on October 26-31, 1987 in Huntsville, Alabama. NASA (Lewis) measured the source noise of the test aircraft during both phases while NASA (Langley) measured surface noise only during the second phase. FAA/NASA designed a program to obtain noise level data from the propfan test bed aircraft, both in the near field and at ground level, during simulated en route flights (35,000 and 20,000 feet ASL), and to test low frequency atmospheric absorption algorithms and prediction technology to provide insight into the necessity for regulatory measures. The curves of calculated source noise versus emission angle are based on a second order best-fit curve of the peak envelope of the adjusted ground data. Centerline and sideline derived source noise levels are shown to be in good agreement. A comparison of the Alabama chase plane source data and the calculated source noise at centerline for both the Alabama and New Mexico data shows good agreement for the 35,000 and the 20,000 feet (ASL) overflights. With the availability of the New Mexico in-flight data, further in depth comparisons will be made.

  1. Proceedings, inter-noise 84 - international cooperation for noise control. 2 Vols

    SciTech Connect

    Maling, G.C. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A total of 199 papers were presented on noise control engineering, especially in the areas of community noise control, sound intensity, noise emission sources, active sound attenuation and noise reduction by barriers. 4 papers have been abstracted separately.

  2. General Aviation Interior Noise. Part 3; Noise Control Measure Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.; Till, Paul D.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The work reported herein is an extension to the work accomplished under NASA Grant NAG1-2091 on the development of noise/source/path identification techniques for single engine propeller driven General Aviation aircraft. The previous work developed a Conditioned Response Analysis (CRA) technique to identify potential noise sources that contributed to the dominating tonal responses within the aircraft cabin. The objective of the present effort was to improve and verify the findings of the CRA and develop and demonstrate noise control measures for single engine propeller driven General Aviation aircraft.

  3. The Alternative Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Elliott, David M.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Moore, Royce D.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2000-01-01

    A 106 bladed fan with a design takeoff tip speed of 1100 ft/sec was hypothesized as reducing perceived noise because of the shift of the blade passing harmonics to frequencies beyond the perceived noise rating range. A 22 in. model of this Alternative Low Noise Fan, ALNF, was tested in the NASA Glenn 9x 15 Wind Tunnel. 'Me fan was tested with a 7 vane long chord stator assembly and a 70 vane conventional stator assembly in both hard and acoustically treated configurations. In addition a partially treated 7 vane configuration was tested wherein the acoustic material between the 7 long chord stators was made inactive. The noise data from the 106 bladed fan with 7 long chord stators in a hard configuration was shown to be around 4 EPNdB quieter than a low tip speed Allison fan at takeoff and around 5 EPNdB quieter at approach. Although the tone noise behaved as hypothesized, the majority of this noise reduction was from reduced broadband noise related to the large number of rotor blades. This 106 bladed ALNF is a research fan designed to push the technology limits and as such is probably not a practical device with present materials technology. However, a low tip speed fan with around 50 blades would be a practical device and calculations indicate that it could be 2 to 3 EPNdB quieter at takeoff and 3 to 4 EPNdB quieter at approach than the Allison fan. 7 vane data compared with 70 vane data indicated that the tone noise was controlled by rotor wake-stator interaction but that the broadband noise is probably controlled by the interaction of the rotor with incoming flows. A possible multiple pure tone noise reduction technique for a fan/acoustic treatment system was identified. The data from the fully treated configuration showed significant noise reductions over a large frequency range thereby providing a real tribute to this bulk absorber treatment design. The tone noise data with the partially treated 7 vane configuration indicated that acoustic material in the

  4. Noise exposure in oil mills

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. V. Prasanna; Dewangan, K. N.; Sarkar, Amaresh

    2008-01-01

    Context: Noise of machines in various agro-based industries was found to be the major occupational hazard for the workers of industries. The predominant noise sources need to be identified and the causes of high noise need to be studied to undertake the appropriate measures to reduce the noise level in one of the major agro-based industries, oil mills. Aims: To identify the predominant noise sources in the workrooms of oil mills. To study the causes of noise in oil mills. To measure the extent of noise exposure of oil mill workers. To examine the response of workers towards noise, so that appropriate measures can be undertaken to minimize the noise exposure. Settings and Design: A noise survey was conducted in the three renowned oil mills of north-eastern region of India. Materials and Methods: Information like output capacity, size of power source, maintenance condition of the machines and workroom configurations of the oil mills was collected by personal observations and enquiry with the owner of the mill. Using a Sound Level Meter (SLM) (Model-824, Larson and Davis, USA), equivalent SPL was measured at operator's ear level in the working zone of the workers near each machine of the mills. In order to study the variation of SPL in the workrooms of the oil mill throughout its operation, equivalent SPL was measured at two appropriate locations of working zone of the workers in each mill. For conducting the noise survey, the guidelines of Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) were followed. Grid points were marked on the floor of the workroom of the oil mill at a spacing of 1 m × 1 m. SPL at grid points were measured at about 1.5 m above the floor. The direction of the SLM was towards the nearby noisy source. To increase accuracy, two replications were taken at each grid point. All the data were recorded for 30 sec. At the end of the experiment, data were downloaded to a personal computer. With the help of utility software of Larson and Davis

  5. Effects of a traffic noise background on judgements of aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted in which subjects judged aircraft noises in the presence of road traffic background noise. Two different techniques for presenting the background noises were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over the whole of a test session. For the other, the background noise was changed with each aircraft noise. A range of aircraft noise levels and traffic noise levels were presented to simulate typical indoor levels.

  6. Comparison of noise reduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, S. D.; Whitaker, R. W.

    1991-06-01

    When using infrasound as a tool for verification, the most important measurement to determine yield has been the peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of the signal. Therefore, there is a need to operate at the most favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) possible. Winds near the ground can degrade the SNR, thereby making accurate signal amplitude measurement difficult. Wind noise reduction techniques were developed to help alleviate this problem; however, a noise reducing system should reduce the noise, and should not introduce distortion of coherent signals. An experiment is described to study system response for a variety of noise reducing configurations to a signal generated by an underground test (UGT) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In addition to the signal, background noise reduction is examined through measurements of variance. Sensors using two particular geometries of noise reducing equipment, the spider and the cross appear to deliver the best SNR. Because the spider configuration is easier to deploy, it is now the most commonly used.

  7. Industrial jet noise: Coanda nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Halliwell, N. A.

    1985-04-01

    Within the U.K. manufacturing industries noise from industrial jets ranks third as a major contributor to industrial deafness. Noise control is hindered because use is made of the air once it has exuded from the nozzle exit. Important tasks include swarf removal, paint spreading, cooling, etc. Nozzles which employ the Coanda effect appear to offer the possibility of significant noise reduction whilst maintaining high thrust efficiency when compared with the commonly used simple open pipe or ordinary convergent nozzle. In this paper the performance of Coanda-type nozzles is examined in detail and an index rating for nozzle performance is introduced. Results show that far field stagnation pressure distributions are Gaussian and similar in all cases with a dispersion coefficient σ = 0·64. Noise reduction and thrust efficiency are shown to be closely related to the design geometry of the central body of the nozzle. Performance is based on four fundamental characteristics, these being the noise level at 1 m from the exit and at a 90° station to the nozzle axis, and the thrust on a chosen profile, the noise reduction and the thrust efficiency. Physically, performance is attributed to flow near field effects where, although all nozzles are choked, shock cell associated noise is absent.

  8. Noise Pollution--What can be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edgar A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the ratio of energy dissipated as sound to the mechanical output of devices. Considers noise levels, ranges vs. peaks, noise indexes, and health hazards. Indicates some problems vs. solutions in the technology of noise control. (GH)

  9. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  10. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Davis, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment. PMID:23257577

  11. Mitigation of structureborne noise nuisance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wing P.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a noise complaint case which was solved by me a few years ago in Hong Kong. A newlywed couple in the residential unit complained to the Government that the noise emitted from the pump room directly beneath their unit was very annoying, especially in the night-time period. The owner of the building was then required by the Government to mitigate the noise to the night-time statutory noise requirement within 30 days, otherwise he would be prosecuted. Ideally, the structureborne noise from the pump room could be effectively mitigated by installation of floating slab and vibration isolators under the pumps. Also, the water tanks and water pipes were required to be isolated from the walls and floor. However, this work was impossible to be completed within 30 days to stop the prosecution. Water supply to the above residents would be seriously interrupted during the construction period. As the only noise parameter of the statutory requirement was 30 minute A-weighted Leq, the most effective and practical way in this exigent situation was to reduce the pump operation time within any 30 minute period to decrease the Leq values. In addition, the water pipes and pumps were also required to be isolated from the walls and floor with resilient materials to break the vibration channels. These noise mitigation measures were successfully applied to the pump room before the end of the 30 days. Finally, the noise levels inside the complainant's unit were found to meet the statutory requirement. The noise complaint case was then closed by the Government.

  12. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  13. Removal of noise from noise-degraded speech signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-06-01

    Techniques for the removal of noise from noise-degraded speech signals were reviewed and evaluation with special emphasis on live radio and telephone communications and the extraction of information from similar noisy recordings. The related area on the development of speech-enhancement devices for hearing-impaired people was reviewed. Evaluation techniques were reviewed to determine their suitability, particularly for the assessment of changes in the performance of workers who might use noise-reduction equipments on a daily basis in the applications cited above. The main conclusion was that noise-reduction methods may be useful in improving the performance of human operators who extract information from noisy speech material despite a lack of improvement found in using conventional closed-response intelligibility tests to assess those methods.

  14. Airframe noise reduction studies and clean-airframe noise investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, M. R.; Bailey, D. A.

    1980-04-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a wing model with modified leading edge slat and trailing edge flap. The modifications were intended to reduce the surface pressure response to convected turbulence and thereby reduce the airframe noise without changing the lift at constant incidence. Tests were conducted at 70.7 and 100 m/sec airspeeds, with Reynolds numbers 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 6th power. Considerable reduction of noise radiation from the side edges of a 40 deflection single slotted flap was achieved by modification to the side edge regions or the leading edge region of the flap panel. Total far field noise was reduced 2 to 3 dB over several octaves of frequency. When these panels were installed as the aft panel of a 40 deg deflection double slotted flap, 2 dB noise reduction was achieved.

  15. Airframe Noise Reduction Studies and Clean-Airframe Noise Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Bailey, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a wing model with modified leading edge slat and trailing edge flap. The modifications were intended to reduce the surface pressure response to convected turbulence and thereby reduce the airframe noise without changing the lift at constant incidence. Tests were conducted at 70.7 and 100 m/sec airspeeds, with Reynolds numbers 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 6th power. Considerable reduction of noise radiation from the side edges of a 40 deflection single slotted flap was achieved by modification to the side edge regions or the leading edge region of the flap panel. Total far field noise was reduced 2 to 3 dB over several octaves of frequency. When these panels were installed as the aft panel of a 40 deg deflection double slotted flap, 2 dB noise reduction was achieved.

  16. Spin noise amplification and giant noise in optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Lagoudakis, P. V.

    2015-06-14

    When studying the spin-noise-induced fluctuations of Kerr rotation in a quantum-well microcavity, we have found a dramatic increase of the noise signal (by more than two orders of magnitude) in the vicinity of anti-crossing of the polariton branches. The effect is explained by nonlinear optical instability of the microcavity giving rise to the light-power-controlled amplification of the polarization noise signal. In the framework of the developed model of built-in amplifier, we also interpret the nontrivial spectral and intensity-related properties of the observed noise signal below the region of anti-crossing of polariton branches. The discovered effect of optically controllable amplification of broadband polarization signals in microcavities in the regime of optical instability may be of interest for detecting weak oscillations of optical anisotropy in fundamental research and for other applications in optical information processing.

  17. Model of aircraft noise adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Coates, G. D.; Cawthorn, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Development of an aircraft noise adaptation model, which would account for much of the variability in the responses of subjects participating in human response to noise experiments, was studied. A description of the model development is presented. The principal concept of the model, was the determination of an aircraft adaptation level which represents an annoyance calibration for each individual. Results showed a direct correlation between noise level of the stimuli and annoyance reactions. Attitude-personality variables were found to account for varying annoyance judgements.

  18. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  19. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  20. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  1. Noise attenuation of hearing protectors against heavy weapon noise.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, R; Lehtomäki, K; Savolainen, S; Myllyniemi, J; Hämäläinen, E

    2000-09-01

    This study evaluated the noise attenuation of earplugs and earmuffs or their combined use against heavy weapon noise in field conditions for military personnel. The noise attenuation was measured with a miniature microphone inserted into the ear canal. The subjects (13) were tested against pink noise and against the noise of explosions and bazooka, mortar, cannon, and howitzer. The attenuation (insertion loss) was 16 to 23 dB for earplugs, 10 to 20 dB for earmuffs, and 24 to 34 dB for the combined use of plugs and muffs. The transfer function of an open ear was 5 to 7 dB when measured as the C-weighted peak level. The combined use of earplugs and earmuffs gave smaller attenuation values than expected. If the limit for the C-weighted peak level is 140 dB for unprotected ears, then protection against low-frequency noise is provided for up to 156 dB by earplugs, up to 150 dB by earmuffs, and up to 165 dB by the combined use of plugs and muffs. PMID:11011540

  2. Effects of noise upon human information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H. H.; Conrad, D. W.; Obrien, J. F.; Pearson, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of noise effects upon human information processing are described which investigated whether or not effects of noise upon performance are dependent upon specific characteristics of noise stimulation and their interaction with task conditions. The difficulty of predicting noise effects was emphasized. Arousal theory was considered to have explanatory value in interpreting the findings of all the studies. Performance under noise was found to involve a psychophysiological cost, measured by vasoconstriction response, with the degree of response cost being related to scores on a noise annoyance sensitivity scale. Noise sensitive subjects showed a greater autonomic response under noise stimulation.

  3. Rotor-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted to develop a validated first principles analysis for predicting noise generated by helicopter main-rotor shed vortices interacting with the tail rotor. The generalized prediction procedure requires a knowledge of the incident vortex velocity field, rotor geometry, and rotor operating conditions. The analysis includes compressibility effects, chordwise and spanwise noncompactness, and treats oblique intersections with the blade planform. Assessment of the theory involved conducting a model rotor experiment which isolated the blade-vortex interaction noise from other rotor noise mechanisms. An isolated tip vortex, generated by an upstream semispan airfoil, was convected into the model tail rotor. Acoustic spectra, pressure signatures, and directivity were measured. Since assessment of the acoustic prediction required a knowledge of the vortex properties, blade-vortes intersection angle, intersection station, vortex stength, and vortex core radius were documented. Ingestion of the vortex by the rotor was experimentally observed to generate harmonic noise and impulsive waveforms.

  4. Active Interior Noise Control Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Veeramani, S.; Sampath, A.; Balachandran, B.; Wereley, N.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations into the control of noise in the interior of a three-dimensional enclosure with a flexible boundary are presented. The rigid boundaries are constructed from acrylic material, and in the different cases considered the flexible boundary is constructed from either aluminum or composite material. Noise generated by an external speaker is transmitted into the enclosure through the flexible boundary and active control is realized by using Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) piezoelectric actuators bonded to the flexible boundary. Condenser microphones are used for noise measurements inside and outside the enclosure. Minimization schemes for global and local noise control in the presence of a harmonic disturbance are developed and discussed. In the experiments, analog feedforward control is implemented by using the harmonic disturbance as a reference signal.

  5. Noise control: ten years later

    SciTech Connect

    Seebold, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for 47 out of 124 papers presented at this conference. The papers include both retrospective and prospective views or noise control engineering and its impact on society. (ACR)

  6. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  7. Low-Noise Rotorcraft Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Blades of helicopter rotors, tilt rotors, and like reshaped to reduce noise, according to proposal. Planform features combination of rearward and forward sweep. Forward sweep over large outer portion of blade constitutes primary noise-reduction feature. Relieves some of compressive effect in tip region, with consequent reduction of noise from compressive sources. Performance at high advance ratio improved. Cabin vibration and loading noise reduced by load-averaging effect of double-sweep planform. Aft-swept section provides balancing of aerodynamic and other dynamic forces on blade along 1/4-chord line of straight inboard section and along projection of line to outermost blade radius. Possible for hub-hinge forces and moments to remain within practical bounds. Provides stabilizing blade forces and moments to counteract any instability caused by forward sweep.

  8. Noise in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2009-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume three; 1. The effects of coloured quadratic noise on a turbulent transition in liquid He II J. T. Tough; 2. Electrohydrodynamic instability of nematic liquid crystals: growth process and influence of noise S. Kai; 3. Suppression of electrohydrodynamic instabilities by external noise Helmut R. Brand; 4. Coloured noise in dye laser fluctuations R. Roy, A. W. Yu and S. Zhu; 5. Noisy dynamics in optically bistable systems E. Arimondo, D. Hennequin and P. Glorieux; 6. Use of an electronic model as a guideline in experiments on transient optical bistability W. Lange; 7. Computer experiments in nonlinear stochastic physics Riccardo Mannella; 8. Analogue simulations of stochastic processes by means of minimum component electronic devices Leone Fronzoni; 9. Analogue techniques for the study of problems in stochastic nonlinear dynamics P. V. E. McClintock and Frank Moss; Index.

  9. Atmospheric noise mitigation for Loran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, C. O. Lee, Jr.

    While aircraft users increasingly rely on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation, the received signal strength from these distant satellites is low and hence may easily be jammed. Of the alternative systems available to provide aircraft with a backup to GPS for non-precision approach (NPA), Loran promises to be an exceptional candidate since its signal is present over the continental United States (CONUS). Loran, a low-frequency hyperbolic radio-navigation system, provides positioning with quarter nautical mile accuracy, 95% of the time. Since it was not originally designed for aircraft navigation, the system requires upgrades to both the transmitters and user receivers to meet NPA requirements. Furthermore, to be viable, Loran's coverage area, defined as where it meets the NPA requirements, must be across most of CONUS. Impeding its success is Loran's susceptibility to lightning and other atmospheric noise. Determining Loran's coverage requires the estimation of atmospheric noise and the processing gain or credit for noise reduction due to non-linear processing techniques within a typical receiver. The traditional method uses the standard atmospheric noise model from the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), and estimates the processing gain as a constant. While easy to implement, such an analysis produces overly conservative results and, therefore, a poor estimate of coverage area. This dissertation presents a new method for predicting coverage by extending the ITU model and by demonstrating empirically that a lower bound on atmospheric noise impulsivity is proportional to the noise strength. Since it is well known that the gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in a receiver produced by non-linear signal processing is proportional to the noise impulsivity, then the correlation of noise impulsivity to noise strength implies that the processing gain is also proportional to noise strength and is not simply constant as previously predicted. The new

  10. Emissions and Noise Pervasive Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Lee, Chi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives include: Provide interagency coordination of technology development, aimed at engine noise reduction. a) Provide recommendations to the Steering Committee on potential areas of interagency technology collaboration to maximize the use of government investments in noise reduction. b) Serve as a forum for information and technology exchange in order to coordinate gas turbine engine environmental strategies and policies among the member agencies and industry; c) Coordinate activities across panel representatives; and d) Communicate progress to VAATE steering committee.