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Sample records for noise spectrum suspension

  1. A technique for noise measurement optimization with spectrum analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2015-08-01

    Measuring low noise of electronic devices with a spectrum analyzer requires particular care as the instrument could add significant contributions. A Low Noise Amplifier, LNA, is therefore necessary to be connected between the source to be measured and the instrument, to mitigate its effect at the LNA input. In the present work we suggest a technique for the implementation of the LNA that allows to optimize both low frequency noise and white noise, obtaining outstanding performance in a very broad frequency range.

  2. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  3. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hati, A; Nelson, C W; Howe, D A

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem. PMID:27036804

  4. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hati, A.; Nelson, C. W.; Howe, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem.

  5. Properties of ambient seismic noise and summary of noise spectrum in the vicinity of RSTN sites

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.R.

    1981-01-26

    The general characteristics of seismic noise are reviewed in terms of its source, mode of propagation, seasonal variations, and variation with depth. The characteristics of the noise spectrum as a function of depth are important for extrapolating surface noise surveys to the expected noise in a borehole. A literature review of measured noise spectra in the vicinity of the five proposed Regional Seismic Test Network sites is combined with direct noise measurements from the National Seismic Station at the Cumberland Plateau Observatory and the LRSM station at Red Lake, Ontario. Results from a recent noise survey in the Adirondacks and Black Hills are also reviewed. Minimum noise values at all five Regional Seismic Test Network sites are tabulated at 1 Hz and appear to be higher than those of the low noise model of Brune and Oliver (1959).

  6. Optical spectrum analyzer with quantum-limited noise floor.

    PubMed

    Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Martin, M J; Ye, Jun

    2013-08-30

    Interactions between atoms and lasers provide the potential for unprecedented control of quantum states. Fulfilling this potential requires detailed knowledge of frequency noise in optical oscillators with state-of-the-art stability. We demonstrate a technique that precisely measures the noise spectrum of an ultrastable laser using optical lattice-trapped 87Sr atoms as a quantum projection noise-limited reference. We determine the laser noise spectrum from near dc to 100 Hz via the measured fluctuations in atomic excitation, guided by a simple and robust theory model. The noise spectrum yields a 26(4) mHz linewidth at a central frequency of 429 THz, corresponding to an optical quality factor of 1.6×10(16). This approach improves upon optical heterodyne beats between two similar laser systems by providing information unique to a single laser and complements the traditionally used Allan deviation which evaluates laser performance at relatively long time scales. We use this technique to verify the reduction of resonant noise in our ultrastable laser via feedback from an optical heterodyne beat. Finally, we show that knowledge of our laser's spectrum allows us to accurately predict the laser-limited stability for optical atomic clocks. PMID:24033036

  7. Reducing the suspension thermal noise of advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, G. D.; Cumming, A. V.; Hough, J.; Kumar, R.; Tokmakov, K.; Reid, S.; Rowan, S.

    2012-06-01

    The international network of gravitational wave detectors is currently undergoing sensitivity upgrades (aLIGO, aVIRGO and GEO-HF) which will lead to the first detection and subsequent observation of a rich variety of astrophysical sources. To obtain a factor of 10 improvement in the strain sensitivity at low frequencies requires the use of ultralow mechanical loss materials and monolithic fused silica suspensions, optimized mirror coatings and the development of cutting edge techniques to super-polish and figure the interferometer optics. The possibility of applying incremental upgrades to the second generation detectors can be realized by making small but significant changes to the suspensions and/or optical mirror coatings. This includes the use of longer suspensions to increase the dissipation dilution, the development of techniques to reduce the surface loss in fused silica suspensions and methods to lower the mechanical loss from the metal springs used to support the test mass. Such upgrades can potentially improve the strain sensitivity by a factor of 2.5. Looking beyond 2015, the development of techniques to further improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude are discussed. The third generation detectors will be located underground and will be operated at cryogenic temperatures. At low temperatures, silicon is a particularly promising candidate material as it displays good thermal conductivity, high tensile strength and zero thermal expansion coefficient at 120 K, 18 K and T → 0 K.

  8. The investigation of noise attenuation by plants and the corresponding noise-reducing spectrum.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang; Zhiyi, Bao; Zhujun, Zhu; Jiani, Liu

    2010-04-01

    As noise pollution is becoming more and more serious, many researchers are studying the noise attenuation effect provided by plants. This article examines six kinds of evergreens as research subjects so as to compare the different arrangements and densities of plants and their effect on noise attenuation. The authors studied the relationship between each of the plant's characteristics (the characteristics include leaf area, leaf fresh weight, leaf tactility, and leaf shape) and their average relative noise attenuation (deltaLAep). The authors then generated the noise-reducing spectrum of the six plants. The results show that there is a notable difference in noise-reducing effects for low frequency and high frequency (p < .05) when the plants are arranged differently. Also, every plant demonstrates a specific noise-reducing spectrum. By quantifying noise attenuation characteristics and abilities of plants, the authors combine noise attenuation species to achieve the mutual benefits of plant varieties and establish an ecotypic sound barrier model with effective density and arrangement. PMID:20420048

  9. Intrinsic noise power spectrum for the electronic noise in radiography image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Eun; Shin, Choul Woo

    2015-03-01

    In order to design low-dose imaging systems, the radiography detector should have a good noise performance especially at low incident exposures. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance at low incident exposures is influenced by the electronic noise of readout circuits as well as the quantum noise of x-rays. Hence, analyzing the electronic noise of a detector is of importance in developing good detectors. However, the SNR value for electronic noise is zero and does not provide any useful information. Observing the standard deviation of the acquired image without exposure may confuse the analysis due to the inconsistent electronic gains of the readout circuits. Hence, it is required to find an appropriate evaluation scheme for the electronic noise. A blind electronic noise evaluation approach, which uses a set of acquired images at various incident exposures, is considered in this paper. We calculate the electronic gain and then derive an intrinsic noise power spectrum (NPS), which is independent of the electronic gain. Furthermore, we can obtain the intrinsic NPS only for the electronic noise. The proposed evaluation schemes are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from various development prototypes of direct and indirect detectors. It is shown that the proposed schemes can efficiently provide an evaluation for the electronic noise performance.

  10. Analysis of noise power spectrum of gamma rays camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongwei; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Jinchuan; Chen, Dingyang; Li, Linbo

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays camera is widely used in many studies, including the image diagnostics of the radiation sources, flash photography, and nondestructive assessment (NDA), etc. As a major component of the high sensitivity gamma rays camera, the MCP image intensifier is characterized in the intensified image, tunable shutter time and gain. The gamma rays camera is consisting with rays-fluorescence convertor, the optical imaging system, the MCP image intensifier, CCD and other devices. The performance of the gamma rays camera is mainly dependent on such parameters as the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), etc. All of the parameters are somewhat limited by the noise characteristics of the system. Compared with the standard derivative noise distribution, the NPS, which can reflect the evolution characteristics of the noise of the imaging system with the change of the spatial frequency, could convey more information on the noise distribution in the system. In this paper, theoretical analysis is presented on the major sources of the noise in the gamma rays camera. Based on the analysis, the noise power spectra of the gamma rays camera were calibrated under various radiation dosages respectively with the visible light and gamma rays radiation sources (0.2MeV and 1.25MeV in energy, respectively). As indicated by the experimental results, the noise is majorly induced by the fluctuations of the gain of the MCP image intensifier. And the remarkable noise peak occurs nearby the spatial frequency of about 0.633 Hz/mm. And almost the same phenomena were found with both the 0.2MeV and 1.25MeV radiation energy. Besides, the noise power spectra are in circular symmetrical distribution, whose intensities are rapidly decreased with the increasing spatial frequencies.

  11. Effects of the Noises' Statistics and Spectrum on Noise-Induced Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deza, Roberto R.; Fuentes, Miguel A.; Wio, Horacio S.

    2007-07-01

    The study of the effect of the noises' statistics and spectrum on second-order, purely noise-induced phase transition (NIPT) is of wide interest: It is simplified if the noises are dynamically generated by means of stochastic differential equations driven by white noises, a well known case being that of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noises with a self-correlation time τ whose effect on the NIPT phase diagram has been studied some time ago. Another case is when the stationary pdf is a (colored) q-Gaussian which, being a fat-tail distribution for q > 1 and a compact-support one for q < 1, allows for a controlled study of the effects of the departure from Gaussian statistics. As done with stochastic resonance and other phenomena, we exploit this tool to study—within a simple mean-field approximation—the combined effect on NIPT of the noises' statistics and spectrum. Even for relatively small τ, it is shown that whereas for fat-tail noise distributions counteract the effect of self-correlation, compact-support ones enhance it.

  12. Normalized Noise Power Spectrum of Full Field Digital Mammography System

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, Norriza Mohd; Wan Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan

    2010-01-05

    A method to measure noise power spectrum of a full field digital mammography system is presented. The effect of X-ray radiation dose, size and configuration of region of interest on normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) was investigated. Flat field images were acquired using RQA-M2 beam quality technique (Mo/Mo anode-filter, 28 kV, 2 mm Al) with different clinical radiation doses. The images were cropped at about 4 cm from the edge of the breast wall and then divided into different size of non-overlapping or overlapping segments. NNPS was determined through detrending, 2-D fast Fourier transformation and normalization. Our measurement shows that high radiation dose gave lower NNPS at a specific beam quality.

  13. Correlation spectrum analyzer for direct measurement of device current noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco

    2002-07-01

    This article analyzes the realization and the performance of a correlation spectrum analyzer specifically conceived to directly measure the current noise produced by electronic devices with maximum sensitivity. The text describes in detail and gives the design rules of the instrument input amplifiers taking into consideration noise, dynamic range, stability, and bandwidth, together with the effects that a device under test (DUT) having complex impedance introduce. This article shows that the proposed scheme may allow current noise measurements with a sensitivity improved by few orders of magnitude with respect to a standard spectrum analyzer and to a correlation analyzer in voltage scheme whenever the DUT has an impedance larger than few 10 kOmega. Such a sensitivity makes the proposed instrument ideal for the characterization of advanced devices, such as ultrashort channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, mesoscopic junctions, or spin dependent electron transfer devices where it may be necessary to detect noise levels as low as fA/RADICAL:[[RADICAND:[Hz

  14. Noise power spectrum measurements under nonuniform gains and their compensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Eun; Shin, Choul Woo

    2016-03-01

    The fixed pattern noise, which is due to the nonuniform amplifier gains and scintillator sensitivities, should be alleviated in radiography imaging and should have less influence on measuring the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the radiography detector. In order to reduce the influence, background trend removing methods, which are based on low-pass filtering, polynomial fitting, and subtracting the average image of the uniform exposure images, are traditionally employed in the literature. In terms of removing the fixed pattern noise, the subtraction method shows a good performance. However, the number of images to be averaged is practically finite and thus the noise contained in the average image contaminates the image difference and inflates the NPS curve. In this paper, an image formation model considering the nonuniform gain is constructed and two measuring methods, which are based on the subtraction and gain correction, respectively, are considered. In order to accurately measure a normalized NPS (NNPS) in the measuring methods, the number of images to be averaged is considered for NNPS compensations. For several flat-panel radiography detectors, the NNPS measurements are conducted and compared with conventional approaches, which have no compensation stages. Through experiments it is shown that the compensation can provide accurate NNPS measurements less influenced by the fixed pattern noise.

  15. Noise-Induced Phase Transitions: Effects of the Noises' Statistics and Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deza, Roberto R.; Wio, Horacio S.; Fuentes, Miguel A.

    2007-05-01

    The local, uncorrelated multiplicative noises driving a second-order, purely noise-induced, ordering phase transition (NIPT) were assumed to be Gaussian and white in the model of [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 3395 (1994)]. The potential scientific and technological interest of this phenomenon calls for a study of the effects of the noises' statistics and spectrum. This task is facilitated if these noises are dynamically generated by means of stochastic differential equations (SDE) driven by white noises. One such case is that of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noises which are stationary, with Gaussian pdf and a variance reduced by the self-correlation time τ, and whose effect on the NIPT phase diagram has been studied some time ago. Another such case is when the stationary pdf is a (colored) Tsallis' q-Gaussian which, being a fat-tail distribution for q > 1 and a compact-support one for q < 1, allows for a controlled exploration of the effects of the departure from Gaussian statistics. As done before with stochastic resonance and other phenomena, we now exploit this tool to study—within a simple mean-field approximation and with an emphasis on the order parameter and the "susceptibility"—the combined effect on NIPT of the noises' statistics and spectrum. Even for relatively small τ, it is shown that whereas fat-tail noise distributions (q > 1) counteract the effect of self-correlation, compact-support ones (q < 1) enhance it. Also, an interesting effect on the susceptibility is seen in the last case.

  16. Viscosity of bacterial suspensions : hydrodynamic interactions and self-induced noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, S. D.; Haines, B. M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-05-01

    The viscosity of a suspension of swimming bacteria is investigated analytically and numerically. We propose a simple model that allows for efficient computation for a large number of bacteria. Our calculations show that long-range hydrodynamic interactions, intrinsic to self-locomoting objects in a viscous fluid, result in a dramatic reduction of the effective viscosity. In agreement with experiments on suspensions of Bacillus subtilis, we show that the viscosity reduction is related to the onset of large-scale collective motion due to interactions between the swimmers. The simulations reveal that the viscosity reduction occurs only for relatively low concentrations of swimmers: Further increases of the concentration yield an increase of the viscosity. We derive an explicit asymptotic formula for the effective viscosity in terms of known physical parameters and show that hydrodynamic interactions are manifested as self-induced noise in the absence of any explicit stochasticity in the system.

  17. Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Stefano

    2000-06-01

    Special suspension systems are used in gravitational wave detectors to reduce the transmission of seismic vibrations to test masses by many orders of magnitude. In ground-based interferometric antennas, this allows to detect gravitational signals even below a few tens of Hz, where seismic vibrations are very strong. The state of the art on this topic is presented. .

  18. Eliminating Noise at the Box-fitting Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufleur, Rodrigo Carlos; Emilio, Marcelo; Pacheco, Eduardo Janot; de La Reza, Jorge Ramiro; da Rocha, José Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Non gaussian sources of erros need to be taken into consideration when searching for planetary transits. Such phenomena are mostly caused by the impact of high energetic particles on the detector (Pinheiro da Silva et al. 2008). The detection efficiency of transits, therefor, depend significantly on the data quality and the algorithms utilized to deal with these errors sources. In this work we show that a modified detrend algorithm CDA (CoRoT Detrend Algorithm; Mislis et al. 2010) using a robust statistics and an empirical fit, instead of a polynomial one, can eliminate more efficiently gaps in the data and other long-term trends from the light-curve. Using this algorithm enables us to obtain a reconstructed light-curve with better signal-to-noise ratio that allows to improve the detection of exoplanet transits, although long term signals are destroyed. The results show that these modifications lead to an improved BLS (Box-fitting Least Squares; Kovács, Zucker & Mazeh 2002) algorithm spectrum. At the end we have compared our planetary search results with CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits) satellite chromatic light-curves available in the literature.

  19. A full-spectrum analysis of high-speed train interior noise under multi-physical-field coupling excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu; Hao, Zhiyong; Wang, Xu; Mao, Jie

    2016-06-01

    High-speed-railway-train interior noise at low, medium, and high frequencies could be simulated by finite element analysis (FEA) or boundary element analysis (BEA), hybrid finite element analysis-statistical energy analysis (FEA-SEA) and statistical energy analysis (SEA), respectively. First, a new method named statistical acoustic energy flow (SAEF) is proposed, which can be applied to the full-spectrum HST interior noise simulation (including low, medium, and high frequencies) with only one model. In an SAEF model, the corresponding multi-physical-field coupling excitations are firstly fully considered and coupled to excite the interior noise. The interior noise attenuated by sound insulation panels of carriage is simulated through modeling the inflow acoustic energy from the exterior excitations into the interior acoustic cavities. Rigid multi-body dynamics, fast multi-pole BEA, and large-eddy simulation with indirect boundary element analysis are first employed to extract the multi-physical-field excitations, which include the wheel-rail interaction forces/secondary suspension forces, the wheel-rail rolling noise, and aerodynamic noise, respectively. All the peak values and their frequency bands of the simulated acoustic excitations are validated with those from the noise source identification test. Besides, the measured equipment noise inside equipment compartment is used as one of the excitation sources which contribute to the interior noise. Second, a full-trimmed FE carriage model is firstly constructed, and the simulated modal shapes and frequencies agree well with the measured ones, which has validated the global FE carriage model as well as the local FE models of the aluminum alloy-trim composite panel. Thus, the sound transmission loss model of any composite panel has indirectly been validated. Finally, the SAEF model of the carriage is constructed based on the accurate FE model and stimulated by the multi-physical-field excitations. The results show

  20. Effects of Background Noise on Cortical Encoding of Speech in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Nicole; Zecker, Steven; Trommer, Barbara; Chen, Julia; Kraus, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This study provides new evidence of deficient auditory cortical processing of speech in noise in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Speech-evoked responses (approximately 100-300 ms) in quiet and background noise were evaluated in typically-developing (TD) children and children with ASD. ASD responses showed delayed timing (both conditions) and…

  1. Measurement of the Magnetic Flux Noise Spectrum in Superconducting Xmon Transmon Quantum Bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaro, Ben; Sank, D.; Kelly, J.; Chen, Z.; Campbell, B.; Dunsworth, A.; O'Malley, P.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Migrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Roushan, P.; White, T.; Martinis, J. M.

    Dephasing induced by magnetic flux noise limits the performance of modern superconducting quantum processors. We measure the flux noise power spectrum in planar, frequency-tunable, Xmon transmon quantum bits (qubits), with several SQUID loop geometries. We extend the Ramsey Tomography Oscilloscope (RTO) technique by rapid sampling up to 1 MHz, without state reset, to measure the flux noise power spectrum between 10-2 and 105 Hz. The RTO measurements are combined with idle gate randomized benchmarking and Ramsey decay to give a more complete picture of dephasing in SQUID-based devices.

  2. Violin mode amplitude glitch monitor for the presence of excess noise on the monolithic silica suspensions of GEO 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorazu, B.; Strain, K. A.; Heng, I. S.; Kumar, R.

    2010-08-01

    Non-Gaussian features of data from gravitational wave detectors are of interest as unpredictable 'glitches' limit the sensitivity of searches for many kinds of signal. We consider events due to non-random excitations of the test masses and their suspension fibres. These events could, for example, be related to acoustic emissions in the fibres due to the presence and propagation of cracks or another type of structural perturbation, and they would generate excess noise above the Gaussian background, which matches the level expected due to thermal noise. We look for excess noise in the fundamental violin modes of the monolithic silica suspension fibres of GEO 600. We describe the algorithm used to monitor the violin mode amplitude for glitches, present our results and consider how these may be applied to advanced detectors. The conclusion of our analysis is that no excess noise above what was considered to be thermal noise was observed for several days of h(t) data analysed at the frequency of the selected violin modes.

  3. A revised low-frequency cosmic noise spectrum.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic radio noise spectra obtained from an Astrobee sounding rocket and from more detailed analysis of RAE-1 data are presented. The flux levels measured by the two spacecraft are consistent and fall off more rapidly below 1 MHz than previous data.

  4. Phase noise effects on turbulent weather radar spectrum parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonggil; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate weather spectrum moment estimation is important in the use of weather radar for hazardous windshear detection. The effect of the stable local oscillator (STALO) instability (jitter) on the spectrum moment estimation algorithm is investigated. Uncertainty in the stable local oscillator will affect both the transmitted signal and the received signal since the STALO provides transmitted and reference carriers. The proposed approach models STALO phase jitter as it affects the complex autocorrelation of the radar return. The results can therefore by interpreted in terms of any source of system phase jitter for which the model is appropriate and, in particular, may be considered as a cumulative effect of all radar system sources.

  5. The tonotopicity of styrene-induced hearing loss depends on the associated noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Venet, Thomas; Campo, Pierre; Thomas, Aurélie; Cour, Chantal; Rieger, Benoît; Cosnier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The neuropharmacological and cochleotoxic effects of styrene can exacerbate the impact of noise on the peripheral auditory receptor. The mechanisms through which co-exposure to noise and styrene impairs hearing are complex as the slowly developing cochleotoxic process can be masked in the short-term by the rapid pharmacological effect on the central nervous system. The current investigation was therefore designed to delineate the auditory frequency range sensitive to noise, to styrene, and to noise and styrene combined. In case of different frequency ranges targeted by noise and styrene, it would be possible to point out the main factor responsible for cases of deafness by looking at the location of the audiometric deficits. Male Brown-Norway rats were exposed to 600-ppm styrene, to an octave band noise centered at 8 kHz, or to both noise and styrene. The noise exposure was of two different types: impulse noise with a LEX,8h (equivalent continuous noise level averaged over 8 h) of 80 dB and continuous noise with a LEX,8 h of 85 dB SPL. Hearing was tested using a non-invasive technique based on distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Hearing data were completed with histological analysis of cochleae. The results showed that exposure to styrene alone caused outer hair cell losses in the apical cochlear region, which discriminates low frequencies. In contrast, noise-induced hearing loss was located at half an octave above the central frequency of the spectrum, around 10-12 kHz. Damage due to impulse noise was significantly exacerbated by styrene, and the noise spectrum defined the location of the cochlear trauma. Combined exposure caused greater cell losses than the sum of losses measured with the impulse noise and styrene alone. The fact that the tonotopicity of the styrene-induced damage depends on the associated noise spectrum complicates the diagnosis of styrene-related hearing loss with a tone-frequency audiometric approach. In conclusion, there is not really a

  6. Comparison of Two Methods of Noise Power Spectrum Determinations of Medical Radiography Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan; Ahmed Darwish, Zeki

    2011-03-30

    Noise in medical images is recognized as an important factor that determines the image quality. Image noise is characterized by noise power spectrum (NPS). We compared two methods of NPS determination namely the methods of Wagner and Dobbins on Lanex Regular TMG screen-film system and Hologic Lorad Selenia full field digital mammography system, with the aim of choosing the better method to use. The methods differ in terms of various parametric choices and algorithm implementations. These parameters include the low pass filtering, low frequency filtering, windowing, smoothing, aperture correction, overlapping of region of interest (ROI), length of fast Fourier transform, ROI size, method of ROI normalization, and slice selection of the NPS. Overall, the two methods agreed to the practical value of noise power spectrum between 10{sup -3}-10{sup -6} mm{sup 2} over spatial frequency range 0-10 mm{sup -1}.

  7. Comparison of Two Methods of Noise Power Spectrum Determinations of Medical Radiography Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan; Ahmed Darwish, Zeki

    2011-03-01

    Noise in medical images is recognized as an important factor that determines the image quality. Image noise is characterized by noise power spectrum (NPS). We compared two methods of NPS determination namely the methods of Wagner and Dobbins on Lanex Regular TMG screen-film system and Hologic Lorad Selenia full field digital mammography system, with the aim of choosing the better method to use. The methods differ in terms of various parametric choices and algorithm implementations. These parameters include the low pass filtering, low frequency filtering, windowing, smoothing, aperture correction, overlapping of region of interest (ROI), length of fast Fourier transform, ROI size, method of ROI normalization, and slice selection of the NPS. Overall, the two methods agreed to the practical value of noise power spectrum between 10-3-10-6 mm2 over spatial frequency range 0-10 mm-1.

  8. Spectrum pattern resolution after noise exposure in a beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas: Evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-07-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) and the discrimination of spectrum patterns after fatiguing noise exposure (170 dB re 1 μPa, 10 min duration) was investigated in a beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas, using the evoked potential technique. Thresholds were measured using rhythmic (1000/s) pip trains of varying levels and recording the rhythmic evoked responses. Discrimination of spectrum patterns was investigated using rippled-spectrum test stimuli of various levels and ripple densities, recording the rhythmic evoked responses to ripple phase reversals. Before noise exposure, the greatest responses to rippled-spectrum probes were evoked by stimuli with a low ripple density with a decrease in the response magnitude occurring with an increasing ripple density. After noise exposure, both a TTS and a reduction of the responses to rippled-spectrum probes appeared and recovered in parallel. The reduction of the responses to rippled-spectrum probes was maximal for high-magnitude responses at low ripple densities and was negligible for low-magnitude responses at high ripple densities. It is hypothesized that the impacts of fatiguing sounds are not limited by increased thresholds and decreased sensitivity results in reduced ability to discriminate fine spectral content with the greatest impact on the discrimination of spectrum content that may carry the most obvious information about stimulus properties. PMID:26233037

  9. Noise-induced synchronization in a system with a 1 / f power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koverda, V. P.; Skokov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    A spatially distributed system with 1/ f fluctuations at coupled nonequilibrium phase transitions have been simulated by two nonlinear stochastic equations. It is shown numerically that at sufficiently high intensity of white noise in the system there arises noise-induced synchronization, which is a nonequilibrium phase transition. To the critical point of the nonequilibrium phase transition corresponds the 1/ f power spectrum and the maximum of informational entropy.

  10. Power spectrum for inflation models with quantum and thermal noises

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Silva, L.A. da E-mail: las.leandro@gmail.com

    2013-03-01

    We determine the power spectrum for inflation models covering all regimes from cold (isentropic) to warm (nonisentropic) inflation. We work in the context of the stochastic inflation approach, which can nicely describe both types of inflationary regimes concomitantly. A throughout analysis is carried out to determine the allowed parameter space for simple single field polynomial chaotic inflation models that is consistent with the most recent cosmological data from the nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and in conjunction with other observational cosmological sources. We present the results for both the amplitude of the power spectrum, the spectral index and for the tensor to scalar curvature perturbation amplitude ratio. We briefly discuss cases when running is present. Despite single field polynomial-type inflaton potential models be strongly disfavored, or even be already ruled out in their simplest versions in the case of cold inflation, this is not the case for nonisentropic inflation models in general (warm inflation in particular), though higher order polynomial potentials (higher than quartic order) tend to become less favorable also in this case, presenting a much smaller region of parameter space compatible with the recent observational cosmological data.

  11. Removing non-stationary noise in spectrum sensing using matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bloem, Jan-Willem; Schiphorst, Roel; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2013-12-01

    Spectrum sensing is key to many applications like dynamic spectrum access (DSA) systems or telecom regulators who need to measure utilization of frequency bands. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) recommends a 10 dB threshold above the noise to decide whether a channel is occupied or not. However, radio frequency (RF) receiver front-ends are non-ideal. This means that the obtained data is distorted with noise and imperfections from the analog front-end. As part of the front-end the automatic gain control (AGC) circuitry mainly affects the sensing performance as strong adjacent signals lift the noise level. To enhance the performance of spectrum sensing significantly we focus in this article on techniques to remove the noise caused by the AGC from the sensing data. In order to do this we have applied matrix factorization techniques, i.e., SVD (singular value decomposition) and NMF (non-negative matrix factorization), which enables signal space analysis. In addition, we use live measurement results to verify the performance and to remove the effects of the AGC from the sensing data using above mentioned techniques, i.e., applied on block-wise available spectrum data. In this article it is shown that the occupancy in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) band, obtained by using energy detection (ITU recommended threshold), can be an overestimation of spectrum usage by 60%.

  12. The effect of masking noise on rippled-spectrum resolution.

    PubMed

    Supin, A Y; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    2001-01-01

    Ripple-density resolution in a rippled sound spectrum (probe band) under the effect of another band (masker) was studied in normal listeners. The resolvable ripple density in the probe band was measured using a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to find the highest ripple density at which an interchange of mutual peak and valley position (the ripple phase reversal) was detectable. Probe bands were 0.5 octave (oct) wide with center frequencies of 1, 2, and 4 kHz. When a masker band was below the probe one (a low-frequency masker), it markedly reduced the ripple-density resolution. The effect of the low-frequency masker enhanced (ripple-density resolution decreased) with decreasing the stop-band (frequency spacing) between the probe and masker bands. The strongest masker effect was observed at zero spacing between the probe and masker bands. However, when the probe band overlapped the masker one so that no masker power was below the probe band, the masker effect diminished (ripple-density resolution partially released). Increase of the masker bandwidth above 0.5 oct by shifting its lower boundary downwards did not enhance the masker effect. Masker bands above the probe one (high-frequency maskers) did not influence the ripple-density resolution. PMID:11124463

  13. Power spectrum sensitivity of raster-scanned CMB experiments in the presence of 1/f noise

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Tom

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the effects of 1/f noise on the ability of a particular class of cosmic microwave background experiments to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropy. We concentrate on experiments that operate primarily in raster-scan mode and develop formalism that allows us to calculate analytically the effect of 1/f noise on power-spectrum sensitivity for this class of experiments and determine the benefits of raster-scanning at different angles relative to the sky field versus scanning at only a single angle (cross-linking versus not cross-linking). We find that the sensitivity of such experiments in the presence of 1/f noise is not significantly degraded at moderate spatial scales (l{approx}100) for reasonable values of scan speed and 1/f knee. We further find that the difference between cross-linked and non-cross-linked experiments is small in all cases and that the non-cross-linked experiments are preferred from a raw sensitivity standpoint in the noise-dominated regime - i.e., in experiments in which the instrument noise is greater than the sample variance of the target power spectrum at the scales of interest. This analysis does not take into account systematic effects.

  14. Diesel engine noise source identification based on EEMD, coherent power spectrum analysis and improved AHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Jian; Lin, Jiewei; Bi, Fengrong; Guo, Qian; Chen, Kongwu; Ma, Liang

    2015-09-01

    As the essential foundation of noise reduction, many noise source identification methods have been developed and applied to engineering practice. To identify the noise source in the board-band frequency of different engine parts at various typical speeds, this paper presents an integrated noise source identification method based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), the coherent power spectrum analysis, and the improved analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The measured noise is decomposed into several IMFs with physical meaning, which ensures the coherence analysis of the IMFs and the vibration signals are meaningful. An improved AHP is developed by introducing an objective weighting function to replace the traditional subjective evaluation, which makes the results no longer dependent on the subject performances and provides a better consistency in the meantime. The proposed noise identification model is applied to identifying a diesel engine surface radiated noise. As a result, the frequency-dependent contributions of different engine parts to different test points at different speeds are obtained, and an overall weight order is obtained as oil pan  >  left body  >  valve chamber cover  >  gear chamber casing  >  right body  >  flywheel housing, which provides an effectual guidance for the noise reduction.

  15. Scintillation noise power spectrum and its impact on high-redshift 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Visibility scintillation resulting from wave propagation through the turbulent ionosphere can be an important source of noise at low radio frequencies (ν ≲ 200 MHz). Many low-frequency experiments are underway to detect the power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations of the neutral-hydrogen 21-cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR: 12 ≳ z ≳ 7, 100 ≲ ν ≲ 175 MHz). In this paper, we derive scintillation noise power spectra in such experiments while taking into account the effects of typical data processing operations such as self-calibration and Fourier synthesis. We find that for minimally redundant arrays such as LOFAR and MWA, scintillation noise is of the same order of magnitude as thermal noise, has a spectral coherence dictated by stretching of the snapshot uv-coverage with frequency, and thus is confined to the well-known wedge-like structure in the cylindrical (two-dimensional) power spectrum space. Compact, fully redundant (dcore ≲ rF ≈ 300 m at 150 MHz) arrays such as HERA and SKA-LOW (core) will be scintillation noise dominated at all baselines, but the spatial and frequency coherence of this noise will allow it to be removed along with spectrally smooth foregrounds.

  16. A de-noising algorithm to improve SNR of segmented gamma scanner for spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huailiang; Tuo, Xianguo; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Jinzhao; Henderson, Mark Julian; Courtois, Jérémie; Yan, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    An improved threshold shift-invariant wavelet transform de-noising algorithm for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is proposed to optimize the threshold function of wavelet transforms and reduce signal resulting from pseudo-Gibbs artificial fluctuations. This algorithm was applied to a segmented gamma scanning system with large samples in which high continuum levels caused by Compton scattering are routinely encountered. De-noising data from the gamma ray spectrum measured by segmented gamma scanning system with improved, shift-invariant and traditional wavelet transform algorithms were all evaluated. The improved wavelet transform method generated significantly enhanced performance of the figure of merit, the root mean square error, the peak area, and the sample attenuation correction in the segmented gamma scanning system assays. We also found that the gamma energy spectrum can be viewed as a low frequency signal as well as high frequency noise superposition by the spectrum analysis. Moreover, a smoothed spectrum can be appropriate for straightforward automated quantitative analysis.

  17. Roundoff noise analysis for digital signal power processors using Welch's power spectrum estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, Chong-Yung; Long, David; Li, Fuk-Kwok

    1987-01-01

    The noise due to finite-word-length effects is analyzed for digital-signal power processors using Welch's power-spectrum estimation technique to measure the power of Gaussian random signals over a frequency band of interest. The input of the digital signal processor contains a finite-length time interval in which the true Gaussian signal is contaminated by Gaussian noise. The roundoff noise-to-signal ratio in the measurement of the signal power is derived, and computer simulations which validate the analytical results are presented. These results can be used in tradeoff studies of hardware design, such as the number of bits required at each processing stage. The results presented in this paper are currently being used in the design of a digital Doppler processor (Chi et al., 1986) for a radar scatterometer.

  18. Fiber-distributed Ultra-wideband noise radar with steerable power spectrum and colorless base station.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianyu; Wang, Hui; Fu, Jianbin; Wei, Li; Pan, Shilong; Wang, Lixian; Liu, Jianguo; Zhu, Ninghua

    2014-03-10

    A fiber-distributed Ultra-wideband (UWB) noise radar was achieved, which consists of a chaotic UWB noise source based on optoelectronic oscillator (OEO), a fiber-distributed transmission link, a colorless base station (BS), and a cross-correlation processing module. Due to a polarization modulation based microwave photonic filter and an electrical UWB pass-band filter embedded in the feedback loop of the OEO, the power spectrum of chaotic UWB signal could be shaped and notch-filtered to avoid the spectrum-overlay-induced interference to the narrow band signals. Meanwhile, the wavelength-reusing could be implemented in the BS by means of the distributed polarization modulation-to-intensity modulation conversion. The experimental comparison for range finding was carried out as the chaotic UWB signal was notch-filtered at 5.2 GHz and 7.8 GHz or not. Measured results indicate that space resolution with cm-level could be realized after 3-km fiber transmission thanks to the excellent self-correlation property of the UWB noise signal provided by the OEO. The performance deterioration of the radar raised by the energy loss of the notch-filtered noise signal was negligible. PMID:24663829

  19. M-Ary Alpha-Stable Noise Modulation in Spread-Spectrum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cek, Mehmet Emre

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a spread-spectrum communication system based on a random carrier is proposed which transmits M-ary information. The random signal is considered as a single realization of a random process taken from prescribed symmetric α-stable (SαS) distribution that carries digital M-ary information to be transmitted. Considering the noise model in the channel as additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), the transmitter sends the information carrying random signal from non-Gaussian density. Alpha-stable distribution is used to encode the M-ary message. Inspired by the chaos shift keying techniques, the proposed method is called M-ary symmetric alpha-stable differential shift keying (M-ary SαS-DSK). The main purpose of preferring non-Gaussian noise instead of conventional pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is to overcome the drawback of self-repeating noise-like sequences which are detectable due to the periodic behavior of the autocorrelation function of PN sequences. Having infinite second order moment in α-stable random carrier offers secrecy of the information due to the non-constant autocorrelation behavior. The bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed method is illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations with respect to various characteristic exponent values and different data length.

  20. Noise Power Spectrum Measurements in Digital Imaging With Gain Nonuniformity Correction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Sik

    2016-08-01

    The noise power spectrum (NPS) of an image sensor provides the spectral noise properties needed to evaluate sensor performance. Hence, measuring an accurate NPS is important. However, the fixed pattern noise from the sensor's nonuniform gain inflates the NPS, which is measured from images acquired by the sensor. Detrending the low-frequency fixed pattern is traditionally used to accurately measure NPS. However, detrending methods cannot remove high-frequency fixed patterns. In order to efficiently correct the fixed pattern noise, a gain-correction technique based on the gain map can be used. The gain map is generated using the average of uniformly illuminated images without any objects. Increasing the number of images n for averaging can reduce the remaining photon noise in the gain map and yield accurate NPS values. However, for practical finite n , the photon noise also significantly inflates NPS. In this paper, a nonuniform-gain image formation model is proposed and the performance of the gain correction is theoretically analyzed in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is shown that the SNR is O(√n) . An NPS measurement algorithm based on the gain map is then proposed for any given n . Under a weak nonuniform gain assumption, another measurement algorithm based on the image difference is also proposed. For real radiography image detectors, the proposed algorithms are compared with traditional detrending and subtraction methods, and it is shown that as few as two images ( n=1 ) can provide an accurate NPS because of the compensation constant (1+1/n) . PMID:27254867

  1. Effect of background trends removal on noise power spectrum measurements in digital x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhongxing; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-03-01

    Noise characterization through estimation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) is a central component of the evaluation of digital X-ray systems. Extensive works have been conducted to achieve accurate and precise measurement of NPS. One approach to improve the accuracy of the NPS measurement is to reduce the statistical variance of the NPS results. However, this method is based on the assumption that the noise in a radiographic image is arising from stochastic (random) processes. In the practical data, the artifactuals always superimpose on the stochastic noise as low-frequency background trends and prevent us from achieving accurate NPS. In this study, NPS measurement was implemented and compared before and after background trends removal, the results showed that background detrending reduced the variance of the low-frequency spectral components, hence improving the accuracy of NPS measurement. Our results also showed that involving more samples for ensemble averaging had little effect in reducing the variance of the low-frequency spectral components. All results implied that it is necessary and feasible to get better NPS estimate by appropriate background detredning.

  2. Noise power spectrum studies of CT systems with off-centered image object and bowtie filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Cruz-Bastida, Juan P.; Li, Ke; Budde, Adam; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies of the noise power spectrum (NPS) of multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems, the image object was usually placed at the iso-center of the CT system; therefore, the bowtie filter had negligible impact on the shape of the two-dimensional (2D) NPS of MDCT. This work characterized the NPS of off-centered objects when a bowtie filter is present. It was found that the interplay between the bowtie filter and object position has significant impact on the rotational symmetry of the 2D NPS. Depending on the size of the bowtie filter, the degree of object off-centering, and the location of the region of interest (ROI) used for the NPS measurements, the symmetry of the 2D NPS can be classified as circular, dumbbell, and a peculiar cloverleaf symmetry. An anisotropic NPS corresponds to structured noise texture, which may directly influence the detection performance of certain low contrast detection tasks.

  3. Growth rate of loudness, annoyance, and noisiness as a function of tone location within the noise spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellman, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute magnitude estimation methods were used to investigate the relation between the overall perceived magnitude of noise tone complexes and the location of the tone within the spectrum. In contrast to 'noisiness', loudness and annoyance growth behavior depends on the relationship of the single tones added to low- and high-pass noises in these tests, and to the spectral shape of the noise. Tones centered in noise produce nonmonotonic loudness and annoyance growth functions, while those added to the noise skirt produce power functions. Although a tone correction for annoyance is warranted for certain noise-tone configurations, none of the calculation procedures proposed can take all of the variables relevant to the perceived annoyance of tonal components into account. Complex auditory interactions generated by the simultaneous presentation of noise and tone can substantially account for the effects observed.

  4. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In x-ray breast imaging, the anatomical noise background of the breast has a significant impact on the detection of lesions and other features of interest. This anatomical noise is typically characterized by a parameter, β, which describes a power law dependence of anatomical noise on spatial frequency (the shape of the anatomical noise power spectrum). Large values of β have been shown to reduce human detection performance, and in conventional mammography typical values of β are around 3.2. Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) and the associated dark field imaging methods have received considerable attention as possible supplements to absorption imaging for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the impact of these additional contrast mechanisms on lesion detection is not yet well understood. In order to better understand the utility of these new methods, we measured the β indices for absorption, DPC, and dark field images in 15 cadaver breast specimens using a benchtop DPC imaging system. We found that the measured β value for absorption was consistent with the literature for mammographic acquisitions (β = 3.61±0.49), but that both DPC and dark field images had much lower values of β (β = 2.54±0.75 for DPC and β = 1.44±0.49 for dark field). In addition, visual inspection showed greatly reduced anatomical background in both DPC and dark field images. These promising results suggest that DPC and dark field imaging may help provide improved lesion detection in breast imaging, particularly for those patients with dense breasts, in whom anatomical noise is a major limiting factor in identifying malignancies.

  5. Multi-step shot noise spectrum induced by a local large spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Peng-Bin; Shi, Yun-Long; Sun, Zhu; Nie, Yi-Hang

    2015-12-01

    We use non-equilibrium Green’s function method to analyze the shot noise spectrum of artificial single molecular magnets (ASMM) model in the strong spin-orbit coupling limit in sequential tunneling regime, mainly focusing on the effects of local large spin. In the linear response regime, the shot noise shows 2S + 1 peaks and is strongly spin-dependent. In the nonlinear response regime, one can observe 2S + 1 steps in shot noise and Fano factor. In these steps one can see the significant enhancement effect due to the spin-dependent multi-channel process of local large spin, which reduces electron correlations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504210, 11504211, 11504212, 11274207, 11274208, 11174115, and 11325417), the Key Program of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 212018), the Scientific and Technological Project of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2015031002-2), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 2013011007-2 and 2013021010-5), and the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi Province, China.

  6. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nechaev, Dmitry I.; Milekhina, Olga N.; Supin, Alexander Ya.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels. PMID:26462066

  7. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise.

    PubMed

    Nechaev, Dmitry I; Milekhina, Olga N; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels. PMID:26462066

  8. [Denoising and assessing method of additive noise in the ultraviolet spectrum of SO2 in flue gas].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Sun, Chang-Ku; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yu-Mei

    2009-11-01

    The problem of denoising and assessing method of the spectrum of SO2 in flue gas was studied based on DOAS. The denoising procedure of the additive noise in the spectrum was divided into two parts: reducing the additive noise and enhancing the useful signal. When obtaining the absorption feature of measured gas, a multi-resolution preprocessing method of original spectrum was adopted for denoising by DWT (discrete wavelet transform). The signal energy operators in different scales were used to choose the denoising threshold and separate the useful signal from the noise. On the other hand, because there was no sudden change in the spectra of flue gas in time series, the useful signal component was enhanced according to the signal time dependence. And the standard absorption cross section was used to build the ideal absorption spectrum with the measured gas temperature and pressure. This ideal spectrum was used as the desired signal instead of the original spectrum in the assessing method to modify the SNR (signal-noise ratio). There were two different environments to do the proof test-in the lab and at the scene. In the lab, SO2 was measured several times with the system using this method mentioned above. The average deviation was less than 1.5%, while the repeatability was less than 1%. And the short range experiment data were better than the large range. In the scene of a power plant whose concentration of flue gas had a large variation range, the maximum deviation of this method was 2.31% in the 18 groups of contrast data. The experimental results show that the denoising effect of the scene spectrum was better than that of the lab spectrum. This means that this method can improve the SNR of the spectrum effectively, which is seriously polluted by additive noise. PMID:20101989

  9. Prediction of the spectrum of atmospheric microburst noise in the range 2-20 Hz - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Pope, D. Stuart

    1989-01-01

    An engineering estimate of the spectrum of atmospheric microburst noise radiation in the range 2-20 Hz is developed. This prediction is obtained via a marriage of standard aeroacoustic theory with a numerical computation of the relevant fluid dynamics. The 'computational aeroacoustics' technique applied here to the interpretation of atmospheric noise measurements is illustrative of a methodology that can now be employed in a wide class of problems.

  10. [Research of spectrum signal-to-noise ratio of large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Li, Li-Bo; Pi, Hai-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The process of acquiring hyperspectral data cube of a Large Aperture Static Imaging Spectrometer (LASIS) includes several vital and essential steps, such as interferometer modulation, rectangular convolution sampling by pixels of detector and spectra retrieving. In this process, how to precisely evaluate the Signal-Noise Ratio (SNR) of spectra and how to wholly establish a related evaluation model were both generally very complicated. After a full consideration of the transmission process, utilizing the theory of rectangular convolution sampling and the spectral retrieving method regarding the computation of real part of the discrete Fourier transform of interferogram, formulas of both spectral signal and spectral noise were deduced theoretically, and then a evaluation model regarding the spectral SNR of LASIS was established. By using this model and other design factors of LASIS involving the wavenumber related optical transmittance, the interferometer beam splitter efficiency, the detector quantum efficiency and the main circuit noise, a simulation of spectral SNR was implemented. The simulation result was compared with the measurement result of the SNR of a LASIS instrument. The SNR lines and trends of the two match each other basically in single spectral band. The average deviation between them is proved to be 3.58%. This comparison result demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the evaluation model. This SNR evaluation model consisting of the main technical aspects of typical LASIS instrument from the input spectral radiation to the output spectrum data is possible to be applied widely in practical design and implement of LASIS, as well as may provide valuable reference on SNR calculation and evaluation for other imaging spectrometers. PMID:25208427

  11. Intercomparison of methods for image quality characterization. II. Noise power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, James T. III; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Chen Ying

    2006-05-15

    Second in a two-part series comparing measurement techniques for the assessment of basic image quality metrics in digital radiography, in this paper we focus on the measurement of the image noise power spectrum (NPS). Three methods were considered: (1) a method published by Dobbins et al. [Med. Phys. 22, 1581-1593 (1995)] (2) a method published by Samei et al. [Med. Phys. 30, 608-622 (2003)], and (3) a new method sanctioned by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1, 2003), developed as part of an international standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency. In addition to an overall comparison of the estimated NPS between the three techniques, the following factors were also evaluated for their effect on the measured NPS: horizontal versus vertical directional dependence, the use of beam-limiting apertures, beam spectrum, and computational methods of NPS analysis, including the region-of-interest (ROI) size and the method of ROI normalization. Of these factors, none was found to demonstrate a substantial impact on the amplitude of the NPS estimates ({<=}3.1% relative difference in NPS averaged over frequency, for each factor considered separately). Overall, the three methods agreed to within 1.6%{+-}0.8% when averaged over frequencies >0.15 mm{sup -1}.

  12. Effects of correlated noise on the full-spectrum combining and complex-symbol combining arraying techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazirani, P.

    1995-01-01

    The process of combining telemetry signals received at multiple antennas, commonly referred to as arraying, can be used to improve communication link performance in the Deep Space Network (DSN). By coherently adding telemetry from multiple receiving sites, arraying produces an enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over that achievable with any single antenna in the array. A number of different techniques for arraying have been proposed and their performances analyzed in past literature. These analyses have compared different arraying schemes under the assumption that the signals contain additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and that the noise observed at distinct antennas is independent. In situations where an unwanted background body is visible to multiple antennas in the array, however, the assumption of independent noises is no longer applicable. A planet with significant radiation emissions in the frequency band of interest can be one such source of correlated noise. For example, during much of Galileo's tour of Jupiter, the planet will contribute significantly to the total system noise at various ground stations. This article analyzes the effects of correlated noise on two arraying schemes currently being considered for DSN applications: full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC). A framework is presented for characterizing the correlated noise based on physical parameters, and the impact of the noise correlation on the array performance is assessed for each scheme.

  13. A HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO COMPOSITE SPECTRUM OF GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 A in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 A pixel and reaches a maximum of {approx}300 in the range 2500-3500 A. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Ly{alpha} line to {approx}5200 A, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Ly{alpha} line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  14. A High Signal-to-noise Ratio Composite Spectrum of Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 Å in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 Å pixel and reaches a maximum of ~300 in the range 2500-3500 Å. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Lyα line to ~5200 Å, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Lyα line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  15. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  16. Vertical-plane sound localization probed with ripple-spectrum noise.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Ewan A; Middlebrooks, John C

    2003-07-01

    Ripple-spectrum stimuli were used to investigate the scale of spectral detail used by listeners in interpreting spectral cues for vertical-plane localization. In three experiments, free-field localization judgments were obtained for 250-ms, 0.6-16-kHz noise bursts with log-ripple spectra that varied in ripple density, peak-to-trough depth, and phase. When ripple density was varied and depth was held constant at 40 dB, listeners' localization error rates increased most (relative to rates for flat-spectrum targets) for densities of 0.5-2 ripples/oct. When depth was varied and density was held constant at 1 ripple/oct, localization accuracy was degraded only for ripple depths > or = 20 dB. When phase was varied and density was held constant at 1 ripple/oct and depth at 40 dB, three of five listeners made errors at consistent locations unrelated to the ripple phase, whereas two listeners made errors at locations systematically modulated by ripple phase. Although the reported upper limit for ripple discrimination is 10 ripples/oct [Supin et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2800-2804 (1999)], present results indicate that details finer than 2 ripples/oct or coarser than 0.5 ripples/oct do not strongly influence processing of spectral cues for sound localization. The low spectral-frequency limit suggests that broad-scale spectral variation is discounted, even though components at this scale are among those contributing the most to the shapes of directional transfer functions. PMID:12880054

  17. Two-time correlation of heat release rate and spectrum of combustion noise from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of combustion noise are dictated by the temporal correlation of the overall change of heat release rate fluctuations which has not received sufficient attention in prior studies. In this work, the two-time correlation of the volumetric heat release rate fluctuations within the flame brush and its role in modeling combustion noise spectrum are investigated by analyzing direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent premixed V-flames. This two-time correlation can be well represented by Gaussian-type functions and it captures the slow global variation of the fluctuating heat release rate and hence the low-frequency noise sources of unsteady combustion. The resulting correlation model is applied to predict the far-field noise spectrum from test open flames, and different reference time scales are used to scale this correlation from the DNS data to the test flames. The comparison between predictions and measurements indicates that the correlation models of all reference time scales are capable of reproducing the essential spectral shape including the low- and high-frequency dependencies. Reasonable agreement in the peak frequency, peak sound pressure level, and the Strouhal number scaling of peak frequency is also achieved for two turbulent time scales. A promising convective time scale shows great potential for characterizing the spectral features, yet its predictive capabilities are to be further verified through a longer DNS signal of a bounded flame configuration.

  18. Determination of Jet Noise Radiation Source Locations using a Dual Sideline Cross-Correlation/Spectrum Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. S.; Jaeger, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our efforts is to extrapolate nearfield jet noise measurements to the geometric far field where the jet noise sources appear to radiate from a single point. To accomplish this, information about the location of noise sources in the jet plume, the radiation patterns of the noise sources and the sound pressure level distribution of the radiated field must be obtained. Since source locations and radiation patterns can not be found with simple single microphone measurements, a more complicated method must be used.

  19. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup −1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  20. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. PMID:25430131

  1. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  2. Acoustic communication in two freshwater gobies: the relationship between ambient noise, hearing thresholds and sound spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Yan, H Y; Fine, M L

    2003-04-01

    Two freshwater gobies Padogobius martensii and Gobius nigricans live in shallow (5-70 cm) stony streams, and males of both species produce courtship sounds. A previous study demonstrated high noise levels near waterfalls, a quiet window in the noise around 100 Hz at noisy locations, and extremely short-range propagation of noise and goby signals. To investigate the relationship of this acoustic environment to communication, we determined audiograms for both species and measured parameters of courtship sounds produced in the streams. We also deflated the swimbladder in P. martensii to determine its effect on frequency utilization in sound production and hearing. Both species are maximally sensitive at 100 Hz and produce low-frequency sounds with main energy from 70 to 100-150 Hz. Swimbladder deflation does not affect auditory threshold or dominant frequency of courtship sounds and has no or minor effects on sound amplitude. Therefore, both species utilize frequencies for hearing and sound production that fall within the low-frequency quiet region, and the equivalent relationship between auditory sensitivity and maximum ambient noise levels in both species further suggests that ambient noise shapes hearing sensitivity. PMID:12665991

  3. Current noise spectrum and capacitance due to the membrane motor of the outer hair cell: theory.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, K H

    1997-01-01

    The voltage-dependent motility of the outer hair cell is based on a membrane motor densely distributed in the lateral membrane. The gating charge of the membrane motor is manifested as a bell-shaped membrane potential dependence of the membrane capacitance. In this paper it is shown that movements of the gating charge should produce a high-pass current noise described by an inverse Lorentzian similar to the one shown by Kolb and Läuger for ion carriers. The frequency dependence of the voltage-dependent capacitance is also derived. These derivations are based on membrane motor models with two or three states. These two models lead to similar predictions on the capacitance and current noise. It is expected that the examination of the spectral properties of these quantities would be a useful means of determining the relaxation time for conformational transitions of the membrane motor. PMID:9414211

  4. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  5. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    SciTech Connect

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  6. Elimination of directional wave spectrum contamination from noise in elevation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Surface Contour Radar (SCR) is a 36-GHz computer-controlled airborne radar which generates a false-color-coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time, and can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with post-flight data processing which have much higher angular resolution than pitch-and-roll buoys. The SCR range measurements are not error-free and the resulting errors in the elevations corrupt the directional wave spectrum. This paper presents a technique for eliminating that contamination.

  7. Robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter noise reduction of ultrasonic signals using multiple sub-spectrum phase coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Gongzhang, R.; Xiao, B.; Lardner, T.; Gachagan, A.; Li, M.

    2014-02-18

    This paper presents a robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter reduction in ultrasonic A-scan waveforms. The performance of conventional spectral-temporal techniques like Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) is highly dependent on the parameter selection, especially when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low. Although spatial beamforming offers noise reduction with less sensitivity to parameter variation, phased array techniques are not always available. The proposed algorithm first selects an ascending series of frequency bands. A signal is reconstructed for each selected band in which a defect is present when all frequency components are in uniform sign. Combining all reconstructed signals through averaging gives a probability profile of potential defect position. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, Full Matrix Capture is applied on the austenitic steel and high nickel alloy (HNA) samples with 5MHz transducer arrays. When processing A-scan signals with unrefined parameters, the proposed algorithm enhances SNR by 20dB for both samples and consequently, defects are more visible in B-scan images created from the large amount of A-scan traces. Importantly, the proposed algorithm is considered robust, while SSP is shown to fail on the austenitic steel data and achieves less SNR enhancement on the HNA data.

  8. Predicting binaural speech intelligibility using the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope power spectrum domain.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Leclerc, Alexandre; MacDonald, Ewen N; Dau, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a binaural extension to the multi-resolution speech-based envelope power spectrum model (mr-sEPSM) [Jørgensen, Ewert, and Dau (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 436-446]. It consists of a combination of better-ear (BE) and binaural unmasking processes, implemented as two monaural realizations of the mr-sEPSM combined with a short-term equalization-cancellation process, and uses the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv) as the decision metric. The model requires only two parameters to be fitted per speech material and does not require an explicit frequency weighting. The model was validated against three data sets from the literature, which covered the following effects: the number of maskers, the masker types [speech-shaped noise (SSN), speech-modulated SSN, babble, and reversed speech], the masker(s) azimuths, reverberation on the target and masker, and the interaural time difference of the target and masker. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the simulated speech reception thresholds and the data across all experiments was 0.91. A model version that considered only BE processing performed similarly (correlation coefficient of 0.86) to the complete model, suggesting that BE processing could be considered sufficient to predict intelligibility in most realistic conditions. PMID:27475146

  9. A High Signal-To-Noise Ultraviolet Spectrum of NGC 7469: New Support for Reprocessing of Continuum Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Zheng, Wei

    2000-01-01

    From 1996 June 10 to 1996 July 29, the International AGN Watch monitored the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 using the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, and a network of ground-based observatories. On 1996 June 18, in the midst of this intensive monitoring period, we obtained a high signal-to-noise snapshot of the UV spectrum from 1150 to 3300 A, using the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. This spectrum allows us to disentangle the UV continuum more accurately from the broad wings of the emission lines, to identify clean continuum windows free of contaminating emission and absorption, and to deblend line complexes such as Ly(alpha) + N V, C IV + He II + O III], Si III] + C III], and Mg II + Fe II. Using the FOS spectrum as a template, we have fitted and extracted line and continuum fluxes from the IUE monitoring data. The cleaner continuum extractions c o n h the discovery of time delays between the different UV continuum bands by Wanders et al. Our new measurements show delays increasing with wavelength for continuum bands centered at 1485, 1740, and 1825 A, relative to 1315 A with delays of 0.09, 0.28, and 0.36 days, respectively. Like many other Seyfert I galaxies, the UV spectrum of NGC 7469 shows intrinsic, blue-shifted absorption in Ly(alpha), N V, and C IV. Soft X-ray absorption is also visible in archival ASCA X-ray spectra. The strength of the UV absorption, however, is not compatible with a single-zone model in which the same material absorbs both the UV and X-ray light. Similar to other Seyfert galaxies, such as NGC 3516, the UV-absorbing gas in NGC 7469 has a lower ionization parameter and column density than the X-ray-absorbing material. While the UV and X-ray absorption does not arise in the same material, the frequent occurrence of both associated UV absorption and X-ray warm absorbers in the same galaxies suggests that the gas supply for each has a common origin.

  10. Association between power law coefficients of the anatomical noise power spectrum and lesion detectability in breast imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a parameter extracted from a power function fit to the anatomical noise power spectrum, β, may be predictive of breast mass lesion detectability in x-ray based medical images of the breast. In this investigation, the value of β was compared with a number of other more widely used parameters, in order to determine the relationship between β and these other parameters. This study made use of breast CT data sets, acquired on two breast CT systems developed in our laboratory. A total of 185 breast data sets in 183 women were used, and only the unaffected breast was used (where no lesion was suspected). The anatomical noise power spectrum computed from two-dimensional region of interests (ROIs), was fit to a power function (NPS(f) = α f-β), and the exponent parameter (β) was determined using log/log linear regression. Breast density for each of the volume data sets was characterized in previous work. The breast CT data sets analyzed in this study were part of a previous study which evaluated the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance using simulated spherical lesions and a pre-whitened matched filter computer observer. This ROC information was used to compute the detectability index as well as the sensitivity at 95% specificity. The fractal dimension was computed from the same ROIs which were used for the assessment of β. The value of β was compared to breast density, detectability index, sensitivity, and fractal dimension, and the slope of these relationships was investigated to assess statistical significance from zero slope. A statistically significant non-zero slope was considered to be a positive association in this investigation. All comparisons between β and breast density, detectability index, sensitivity at 95% specificity, and fractal dimension demonstrated statistically significant association with p < 0.001 in all cases. The value of β was also found to be associated with patient age and

  11. Signal, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency of indirect-detection flat-panel imagers for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, J H; Antonuk, L E; el-Mohri, Y; Yorkston, J; Huang, W; Cunningham, I A

    1998-05-01

    The performance of an indirect-detection, active matrix flat-panel imager (FPI) at diagnostic energies is reported in terms of measured and theoretical signal size, noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Based upon a 1536 x 1920 pixel, 127 microns pitch array of a-Si:H thin-film transistors and photodiodes, the FPI was developed as a prototype for examination of the potential of flat-panel technology in diagnostic x-ray imaging. The signal size per unit exposure (x-ray sensitivity) was measured for the FPI incorporating five commercially available Gd2O2S:Tb converting screens at energies 70-120 kVp. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NPS and DQE were measured for the FPI incorporating three such converters and as a function of the incident exposure. The measurements support the hypothesis that FPIs have significant potential for application in diagnostic radiology. A cascaded systems model that has shown good agreement with measured individual pixel signal and noise properties is employed to describe the performance of various FPI designs and configurations under a variety of diagnostic imaging conditions. Theoretical x-ray sensitivity, NPS, and DQE are compared to empirical results, and good agreement is observed in each case. The model is used to describe the potential performance of FPIs incorporating a recently developed, enhanced array that is commercially available and has been proposed for testing and application in diagnostic radiography and fluoroscopy. Under conditions corresponding to chest radiography, the analysis suggests that such systems can potentially meet or even exceed the DQE performance of existing technology, such as screen-film and storage phosphor systems; however, under conditions corresponding to general fluoroscopy, the typical exposure per frame is such that the DQE is limited by the total system gain and additive electronic noise. The cascaded systems analysis provides a valuable means of identifying the

  12. SU-C-304-05: Use of Local Noise Power Spectrum and Wavelets in Comprehensive EPID Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Gopal, A; Yan, G; Bassett, P; Park, C; Samant, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As EPIDs are increasingly used for IMRT QA and real-time treatment verification, comprehensive quality assurance (QA) of EPIDs becomes critical. Current QA with phantoms such as the Las Vegas and PIPSpro™ can fail in the early detection of EPID artifacts. Beyond image quality assessment, we propose a quantitative methodology using local noise power spectrum (NPS) to characterize image noise and wavelet transform to identify bad pixels and inter-subpanel flat-fielding artifacts. Methods: A total of 93 image sets including bar-pattern images and open exposure images were collected from four iViewGT a-Si EPID systems over three years. Quantitative metrics such as modulation transform function (MTF), NPS and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were computed for each image set. Local 2D NPS was calculated for each subpanel. A 1D NPS was obtained by radial averaging the 2D NPS and fitted to a power-law function. R-square and slope of the linear regression analysis were used for panel performance assessment. Haar wavelet transformation was employed to identify pixel defects and non-uniform gain correction across subpanels. Results: Overall image quality was assessed with DQE based on empirically derived area under curve (AUC) thresholds. Using linear regression analysis of 1D NPS, panels with acceptable flat fielding were indicated by r-square between 0.8 and 1, and slopes of −0.4 to −0.7. However, for panels requiring flat fielding recalibration, r-square values less than 0.8 and slopes from +0.2 to −0.4 were observed. The wavelet transform successfully identified pixel defects and inter-subpanel flat fielding artifacts. Standard QA with the Las Vegas and PIPSpro phantoms failed to detect these artifacts. Conclusion: The proposed QA methodology is promising for the early detection of imaging and dosimetric artifacts of EPIDs. Local NPS can accurately characterize the noise level within each subpanel, while the wavelet transforms can detect bad pixels and

  13. Numerical analysis of a broadband spectrum generated in a standard fiber by noise-like pulses from a passively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Pottiez, O.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper covers a numerical analysis of supercontinuum spectrum generation in a piece of standard fiber by using as the pump noise-like pulses produced by a passively mode-locked fiber laser. An experimental study was also carried out, yielding results that support the numerical results. In the numerical study we estimated that the spectral extension of the generated supercontinuum reaches ~ 1000 nm, and that it presents a high flatness over a region of ~ 220 nm (1630 nm-1850 nm) when we use as the pump noise-like pulses with a wide optical bandwidth (~ 50 nm) and a peak power of ~ 2 kW. Experimentally, the output signal spectrum extends from ~ 1530 nm to at least 1750 nm and presents a high flatness over a region of 1640 nm to 1750 nm for the same value of numerical input power, 1750 nm being the upper limit of the optical spectrum analyzer. The numerical analysis presented here is thus an essential part to overcome the severe limitation in measuring capabilities and to understand the phenomena of supercontinuum generation, which is mainly related to Raman self-frequency shift. Finally, this work demonstrates the potential of noise-like pulses from a passively mode-locked fiber laser for broadband spectrum generation.

  14. Suspensions with reduced violin string modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the possibility of significantly reducing the number and Q-factor of violin string modes in the mirror suspension. Simulations of a bar-flexure suspension and an orthogonal ribbon have shown a reduction in the number of violin string modes when compared to a normal ribbon suspension. By calculating the expected suspension thermal noise, we find that the orthogonal ribbon provides a promising suspension alternative. A lower number of violin modes oscillating in the direction of the laser and a reduction in violin mode peak values of at least 23dB can be achieved with a slight increase in thermal noise above 40Hz.

  15. Characterization of imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT: Spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k)

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiangyang; Yang Yi; Tang Shaojie

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) is emerging as a new technology to improve the contrast sensitivity of conventional attenuation-based CT. The noise equivalent quanta as a function over spatial frequency, i.e., the spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), is a decisive indicator of the signal and noise transfer properties of an imaging system. In this work, we derive the functional form of NEQ(k) in DPC-CT. Via system modeling, analysis, and computer simulation, we evaluate and verify the derived NEQ(k) and compare it with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Methods: The DPC-CT is implemented with x-ray tube and gratings. The x-ray propagation and data acquisition are modeled and simulated through Fresnel and Fourier analysis. A monochromatic x-ray source (30 keV) is assumed to exclude any system imperfection and interference caused by scatter and beam hardening, while a 360 Degree-Sign full scan is carried out in data acquisition to avoid any weighting scheme that may disrupt noise randomness. Adequate upsampling is implemented to simulate the x-ray beam's propagation through the gratings G{sub 1} and G{sub 2} with periods 8 and 4 {mu}m, respectively, while the intergrating distance is 193.6 mm (1/16 of the Talbot distance). The dimensions of the detector cell for data acquisition are 32 Multiplication-Sign 32, 64 Multiplication-Sign 64, 96 Multiplication-Sign 96, and 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 {mu}m{sup 2}, respectively, corresponding to a 40.96 Multiplication-Sign 40.96 mm{sup 2} field of view in data acquisition. An air phantom is employed to obtain the noise power spectrum NPS(k), spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), and detective quantum efficiency DQE(k). A cylindrical water phantom at 5.1 mm diameter and complex refraction coefficient n= 1 -{delta}+i{beta}= 1 -2.5604 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}+i1.2353 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} is placed in air to measure the edge transfer function, line spread function and

  16. Characterization of imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT: Spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) is emerging as a new technology to improve the contrast sensitivity of conventional attenuation-based CT. The noise equivalent quanta as a function over spatial frequency, i.e., the spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), is a decisive indicator of the signal and noise transfer properties of an imaging system. In this work, we derive the functional form of NEQ(k) in DPC-CT. Via system modeling, analysis, and computer simulation, we evaluate and verify the derived NEQ(k) and compare it with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Methods: The DPC-CT is implemented with x-ray tube and gratings. The x-ray propagation and data acquisition are modeled and simulated through Fresnel and Fourier analysis. A monochromatic x-ray source (30 keV) is assumed to exclude any system imperfection and interference caused by scatter and beam hardening, while a 360° full scan is carried out in data acquisition to avoid any weighting scheme that may disrupt noise randomness. Adequate upsampling is implemented to simulate the x-ray beam's propagation through the gratings G1 and G2 with periods 8 and 4 μm, respectively, while the intergrating distance is 193.6 mm (1/16 of the Talbot distance). The dimensions of the detector cell for data acquisition are 32 × 32, 64 × 64, 96 × 96, and 128 × 128 μm2, respectively, corresponding to a 40.96 × 40.96 mm2 field of view in data acquisition. An air phantom is employed to obtain the noise power spectrum NPS(k), spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), and detective quantum efficiency DQE(k). A cylindrical water phantom at 5.1 mm diameter and complex refraction coefficient n = 1 − δ + iβ = 1 −2.5604 × 10−7 + i1.2353 × 10−10 is placed in air to measure the edge transfer function, line spread function and then modulation transfer function MTF(k), of both DPC-CT and the conventional attenuation-based CT. The x-ray flux is set at 5 × 106 photon/cm2 per projection and

  17. SU-F-18C-02: Evaluations of the Noise Power Spectrum of a CT Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dolly, S; Chen, H; Anastasio, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the new, commercially released CT iterative reconstruction technique, iDose{sup 4} from Philips, to compare it with filtered back-projection techniques (FBP), and to provide clinical practice suggestions for radiation therapy. Methods: A uniform phantom was CT imaged with 120kVp tube potential over a range of mAs (250-3333). The image sets were reconstructed using two reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iDose{sup 4} with noise reduction levels 1, 3, and 6) and three reconstruction filters (standard B, smooth A, and sharp C), after which NPS variations were analyzed and compared on region of interest (ROI) sizes (16×16 to 128×128 pixels), ROI radii (0–65 mm), reconstruction algorithms, reconstruction filters, and mAs. Results: The NPS magnitude and shape depended considerably on ROI size and location for both reconstruction algorithms. Regional noise variance became more stationary as ROI size decreased, minimizing NPS artifacts. The optimal 32×32-pixel ROI size balanced the trade-off between stationary noise and adequate sampling. NPS artifacts were greatest at the center of reconstruction space and decreased with increasing ROI distance from the center. The optimal ROI position was located near the phantom's radial midpoint (∼40mm). For sharper filters, the NPS magnitude and the maximum magnitude frequency increased. Higher dose scans yielded lower NPS magnitudes for both reconstruction algorithms and all filters. Compared to FBP, the iDose{sup 4} algorithm reduced the NPS magnitude while preferentially reducing noise at mid-range spatial frequencies, altering noise texture. This reduction was more significant with increasing iDose{sup 4} noise reduction level. Conclusion: Compared to pixel standard deviation, NPS has greater clinical potential for task-based image quality assessment, describing both the magnitude and spatial frequency characteristics of image noise. While iDose{sup 4

  18. Rethinking Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Frank H.; Collins, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    The overrepresentation of the Black and Hispanic subgroups in suspension data is a national problem and a troubling issue for schools and school systems across the United States. In Maryland, an analysis of student suspensions by school districts for the 2006-2007 school year revealed disproportionality issues. In 23 of the 24 jurisdictions,…

  19. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Farnesini, L.; Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F.; Montani, M.; Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Piluso, A.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Travasso, F.; Vicerè, A.; Vocca, H.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV.

  20. Study of Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Critical-Band Energy Spectrum of Speech as Acoustic Indicators of Laryngeal and Voice Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shama, Kumara; krishna, Anantha; Cholayya, Niranjan U.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic analysis of speech signals is a noninvasive technique that has been proved to be an effective tool for the objective support of vocal and voice disease screening. In the present study acoustic analysis of sustained vowels is considered. A simple[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-means nearest neighbor classifier is designed to test the efficacy of a harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) measure and the critical-band energy spectrum of the voiced speech signal as tools for the detection of laryngeal pathologies. It groups the given voice signal sample into pathologic and normal. The voiced speech signal is decomposed into harmonic and noise components using an iterative signal extrapolation algorithm. The HNRs at four different frequency bands are estimated and used as features. Voiced speech is also filtered with 21 critical-bandpass filters that mimic the human auditory neurons. Normalized energies of these filter outputs are used as another set of features. The results obtained have shown that the HNR and the critical-band energy spectrum can be used to correlate laryngeal pathology and voice alteration, using previously classified voice samples. This method could be an additional acoustic indicator that supplements the clinical diagnostic features for voice evaluation.

  1. A new double FFT-based filter to reduce the effect of 1/f noise spectrum in a tunable diode laser spectrometer (TDLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Samira; Chen, Youhua; Anderson, Gary

    2013-05-01

    A Tunable diode laser spectrometer (TDLS) system has been designed to scan the near-surface atmosphere for ammonia gas over a wide range of distances (10 m to 1 Km). Since the system is designed for space applications, it needs to be small, lightweight, and low power, which dictates the use of relatively low frequency measurement scans. The spectrometer uses a diode laser, which is subject to a large 1/f noise component at these low frequencies. In this work, digital signal processing techniques are used to maximize the measurement sensitivity of a low frequency TDLS system depending on Double Fast Fourier Transform (DFFT-BF) based- filter. Simulations of the 1/f noise spectrum and ammonia gas absorption peak were performed using a sinusoidal waveform to drive the diode laser. A DFFT-BF-BF method is proposed that reduces the average of the error in the gas readings to nearly 50 percent. Because, this method decreases the effect of 1/f noise while keeping the measurement signal relatively constant.

  2. Suspension design for GEO 600-an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, N. A.; Cagnoli, G.; Hough, J.; Husman, M. E.; McIntosh, S.; Palmer, D.; Plissi, M. V.; Robertson, D. I.; Rowan, S.; Sneddon, P.; Strain, K. A.; Torrie, C. I.; Ward, H.

    2000-06-01

    The GEO 600 gravitational wave detector (1) is currently under construction at Ruthe, near Hannover in Germany. The design of the suspension system for the main mirrors in the detector has been chosen such that thermal noise due to the internal modes of the mirrors is expected to set the sensitivity limit from 50 Hz to ~200 Hz. Thus the design must be such that the effects of seismic noise and thermal noise from the suspensions are lower than the ``internal'' thermal noise at and above 50 Hz. To achieve this, a triple pendulum suspension incorporating fused silica fibers in the lowest stage forms the major part of the overall suspension and isolation system. In this paper, recent work on developing several aspects of the triple pendulum design is discussed. .

  3. Statistical linearization on 2 DOFs hydropneumatic suspension with asymmetric non-linear stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingming; Luo, Zhenxing

    2015-04-01

    Most references on hydropneumatic suspension analysis regard it as harden Duffing spring and take the white noise as the system input, which is quite different from real physical model. It will introduce considerable errors to the analytical result compared with the numerical simulation which makes it impossible to give a good depiction of the hydropneumatic suspension dynamics. In this paper, the dynamic response of the hydropneumatic suspension is worked out using statistical linearization based on 2 DOFs nonlinear suspension model. The damping of the suspension and the tire stiffness are both regarded as linear components and the real road roughness spectrum is used to work out the system input. The explicit analytical equivalent stiffness, dynamic mean value offset from statistic equilibrium position and the sprung acceleration varied with parameters of hydropneumatic spring, road roughness and vehicle velocity are worked out by substituting the nonlinear stiffness of hydropneumatic spring with its first three terms Tyler series at the static equilibrium position using James formula. The comparison of the numerical simulation and analytical result both on statistical parameters and distribution shows the validity of the analysis. The explicit form provides a concise and valid method on hydropneumatic suspension design and optimization.

  4. Measuring noise equivalent irradiance of a digital short-wave infrared imaging system using a broadband source to simulate the night spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, John R.; Robinson, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in developing helmet-mounted digital imaging systems (HMDIS) for integration into military aircraft cockpits. This interest stems from the multiple advantages of digital vs. analog imaging such as image fusion from multiple sensors, data processing to enhance the image contrast, superposition of non-imaging data over the image, and sending images to remote location for analysis. There are several properties an HMDIS must have in order to aid the pilot during night operations. In addition to the resolution, image refresh rate, dynamic range, and sensor uniformity over the entire Focal Plane Array (FPA); the imaging system must have the sensitivity to detect the limited night light available filtered through cockpit transparencies. Digital sensor sensitivity is generally measured monochromatically using a laser with a wavelength near the peak detector quantum efficiency, and is generally reported as either the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) or Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI). This paper proposes a test system that measures NEI of Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) digital imaging systems using a broadband source that simulates the night spectrum. This method has a few advantages over a monochromatic method. Namely, the test conditions provide spectrum closer to what is experienced by the end-user, and the resulting NEI may be compared directly to modeled night glow irradiance calculation. This comparison may be used to assess the Technology Readiness Level of the imaging system for the application. The test system is being developed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  5. Compressive power spectrum sensing for vibration-based output-only system identification of structural systems in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tau Siesakul, Bamrung; Gkoktsi, Kyriaki; Giaralis, Agathoklis

    2015-05-01

    Motivated by the need to reduce monetary and energy consumption costs of wireless sensor networks in undertaking output-only/operational modal analysis of engineering structures, this paper considers a multi-coset analog-toinformation converter for structural system identification from acceleration response signals of white noise excited linear damped structures sampled at sub-Nyquist rates. The underlying natural frequencies, peak gains in the frequency domain, and critical damping ratios of the vibrating structures are estimated directly from the sub-Nyquist measurements and, therefore, the computationally demanding signal reconstruction step is by-passed. This is accomplished by first employing a power spectrum blind sampling (PSBS) technique for multi-band wide sense stationary stochastic processes in conjunction with deterministic non-uniform multi-coset sampling patterns derived from solving a weighted least square optimization problem. Next, modal properties are derived by the standard frequency domain peak picking algorithm. Special attention is focused on assessing the potential of the adopted PSBS technique, which poses no sparsity requirements to the sensed signals, to derive accurate estimates of modal structural system properties from noisy sub- Nyquist measurements. To this aim, sub-Nyquist sampled acceleration response signals corrupted by various levels of additive white noise pertaining to a benchmark space truss structure with closely spaced natural frequencies are obtained within an efficient Monte Carlo simulation-based framework. Accurate estimates of natural frequencies and reasonable estimates of local peak spectral ordinates and critical damping ratios are derived from measurements sampled at about 70% below the Nyquist rate and for SNR as low as 0db demonstrating that the adopted approach enjoys noise immunity.

  6. Metals in the z ˜ 3 intergalactic medium: results from an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES quasar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; Pomante, E.; Carswell, R. F.; Viel, M.; Barai, P.; Becker, G. D.; Calura, F.; Cupani, G.; Fontanot, F.; Haehnelt, M. G.; Kim, T.-S.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Rorai, A.; Tescari, E.; Vanzella, E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the abundance and distribution of metals in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at ≃ 2.8 through the analysis of an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES spectrum of the quasar HE0940-1050. In the C IV forest, our deep spectrum is sensitive at 3 σ to lines with column density down to log NCIV ≃ 11.4 and in 60 percent of the considered redshift range down to ≃ 11.1. In our sample, all H I lines with log NHI ≥ 14.8 show an associated C IV absorption. In the range 14.0 ≤ log NHI < 14.8, 43 percent of H I lines has an associated C IV absorption. At log NHI < 14.0, the detection rates drop to <10 percent, possibly due to our sensitivity limits and not to an actual variation of the gas abundance properties. In the range log NHI ≥ 14, we observe a fraction of H I lines with detected C IV a factor of 2 larger than the fraction of H I lines lying in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) of relatively bright Lyman-break galaxies hosted by dark matter halos with ˜ 1012 M⊙ (Rudie et al. 2012). The comparison of our results with the output of a grid of photoionization models and of two cosmological simulations implies that the volume filling factor of the IGM gas enriched to a metallicity log Z/Z⊙ ≳ - 3 should be of the order of ˜10 - 13 percent. In conclusion, our results favour a scenario in which metals are found also outside the CGM of bright star-forming galaxies, possibly due to pollution by lower mass objects and/or to an early enrichment by the first sources.

  7. Prediction of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.; Hayden, R. E.; Kadman, Y.; Africk, S.

    1975-01-01

    Methods of predicting airframe noise generated by aircraft in flight under nonpowered conditions are discussed. Approaches to predictions relying on flyover data and component theoretical analyses are developed. A nondimensional airframe noise spectrum of various aircraft is presented. The spectrum was obtained by smoothing all the measured spectra to remove any peculiarities due to airframe protrusions, normalizing each spectra by its overall sound pressure level and a characteristics frequency, and averaging the spectra together. A chart of airframe noise sources is included.

  8. Characterization of imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT—Noise power spectrum NPS(k)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The differential phase contrast CT is emerging as a new technology to improve the contrast sensitivity of the conventional CT. Via system analysis, modeling, and computer simulation, the authors study the noise power spectrum (NPS)—an imaging performance indicator—of the differential phase contrast CT and compare it with that of the conventional CT. Methods: The differential phase contrast CT is implemented with x-ray tube and gratings. The x-ray propagation and data acquisition are modeled and simulated with Fourier analysis and Fresnel analysis. To avoid any interference caused by scatter and beam hardening, a monochromatic x-ray source (30 keV) is assumed, which irradiates the object to be imaged by 360° so that no weighting scheme is needed. A 20-fold up-sampling is assumed to simulate x-ray beam’s propagation through the gratings G1 and G2 with periods 8 and 4 μm, respectively, while the intergrating distance is 193.6 mm (1∕16 of the Tabolt distance). The dimension of the detector cell for data acquisition ranges from 32 × 32 to 128 × 128 μm2, while the field of view in data acquisition is 40.96 × 40.96 mm2. A uniform water phantom with a diameter 37.68 mm is employed to study the NPS, with its complex refraction coefficient n = 1 − δ + iβ = 1 − 2.5604 × 10−7 + i1.2353 × 10−10. The x-ray flux ranges from 106 to 108 photon∕cm2·projection and observes the Poisson distribution, which is consistent with that of micro-CT in preclinical applications. The image matrix of reconstructed water phantom is 1280 × 1280, and a total of 180 regions at 128 × 128 matrix are used for NPS calculation via 2D Fourier Transform in which adequate zero padding is applied to avoid aliasing. Results: The preliminary data show that the differential phase contrast CT manifests its NPS with a 1∕|k| trait, while the distribution of the conventional CTs NPS observes |k|. This accounts for the

  9. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise. [noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  10. Noise spectroscopy of an optical microresonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, G. G.

    2013-05-15

    The noise spectrum is calculated for the intensity of light transmitted through an optical microresonator whose thickness experiences thermal oscillations. The noise spectrum reveals a maximum at the frequency of an acoustic mode localized in the optical microresonator and depends on the size of the illuminated region. The noise intensity estimates show that it can be detected by the modern noise spectroscopy technique.

  11. An Introduction to the Virgo Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasconi, Franco; Rapagnani, Piero

    Suspending the mirrors is one of the most crucial tasks in gravitational wave interferometer technology. The performance of the suspensions must provide the required attenuation of seismic noise and reduction of thermal noise, two fundamental limits to the sensitivity of any gravitational wave detector. Moreover, the suspension system must be equipped with sensors and actuators which are used to actively control some relevant degrees of freedom, so to be able to keep the interferometer at its working point (i.e., "locked"). In the first part of this chapter, we deal with the basic principles behind the Superattenuator chains developed in Virgo to reduce the seismic noise. In the second part, we illustrate the techniques to reduce the thermal noise in the detection bandwidth, according to the theory illustrated in Chap. 8, 10.1007/978-3-319-03792-9_8.

  12. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, C; Soto, R

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies. PMID:25122386

  13. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  14. System Measures Thermal Noise In A Microphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Ngo, Kim Chi T.

    1994-01-01

    Vacuum provides acoustic isolation from environment. System for measuring thermal noise of microphone and its preamplifier eliminates some sources of error found in older systems. Includes isolation vessel and exterior suspension, acting together, enables measurement of thermal noise under realistic conditions while providing superior vibrational and accoustical isolation. System yields more accurate measurements of thermal noise.

  15. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  16. NON-Shock-Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``1''/f -``Noise'' Power-Spectrum Power-Law UNIVERSALITY is Merely F=ma Time-Series Integral-Transform, aka ``Bak'' -``SOC'' REdiscovery'' PRE(1687)-``Bak''(1988)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Edward; Nabarro, Frank; Brailsford, Alan; Tatro, Clement

    2011-06-01

    NON-shock-plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71);PSS:(a)5,601/607(71);Xl.-Latt. Defects 5,277(74);Scripta Met.:6,785(72); 8,587/617(74);3rd Tokyo AE Symp.(76);Acta Met. 25,383(77);JMMM 7,312(78)] ``1''/ ω-``noise'' power-spectrum ``pink''-Zipf-(NOT ``red''-Pareto) power-law UNIVERSALITY is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but Newton Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery!!!(aka ``Bak''(1988)-``SOC'':1687 < < < 1988: 1988-1687=301-years!!! PHYSICS:(1687) cross-multiplied F=ma rewritten as 1/m=a/F=OUTPUT/IN-PUT=EFFECT/CAUSE=inverse-mass mechanical-susceptibility=X(`` ω'') X(`` ω '') ~(F.-D. thm.) ~P(`` ω'') ``noise'' power-spectrum; (``Max & Al show''): E ~ ω , & E ~(or any/all media with upper-limiting-speeds) ~m. Thus: ω ~ E ~m inverting: 1/ ω ~ 1/E ~1/m ~a/F= X(`` ω'') ~ P(`` ω'') thus: F=ma integral-transform(I-T) is ```SOC'''s'' P(ω) ~ 1/ ω !!!; ``PURE''-MATHS: F=ma DOUBLE-integral time-series(T-S) s(t)=[v0t+(1/2)at2] I-T formally defines power-spectrum:

  17. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  18. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  19. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  20. Suspensions in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N.

    1996-12-31

    Suspensions or slurries are widely used in well stimulation and hydraulic fracturing processes to enhance the production of oil and gas from the underground hydrocarbon-bearing formation. The success of these processes depends significantly upon having a thorough understanding of the behavior of suspensions used. Therefore, the characterization of suspensions under realistic conditions, for their rheological and hydraulic properties, is very important. This chapter deals with the state-of-the-art hydraulic fracturing suspension technology. Specifically it deals with various types of suspensions used in well stimulation and fracturing processes, their rheological characterization and hydraulic properties, behavior of suspensions in horizontal wells, review of proppant settling velocity and proppant transport in the fracture, and presently available measurement techniques for suspensions and their merits. Future industry needs for better understanding of the complex behavior of suspensions are also addressed. 74 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Janssen, Sabine A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  2. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Erik M; Janssen, Sabine A

    2011-06-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  3. Broadband noise of propellers and rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S.-T.

    Three categories of rotor noise (discrete frequency noise, impulsive noise, and broadband noise) are described and a study made of broadband noise is reported. Broadband noise has a continuous spectrum and is caused by disturbances which are not precisely repeated at each blade revolution but are basically due to some sort of turbulence-blade interactions. Source mechanisms include: inflow turbulence noise, boundary layer trailing edge noise, tip vortex noise, and several uncommon mechanisms. Broadband noise analyses are reviewed and calculations based on various analyses are compared to each other and to some available experimental data. Several satisfactory analyses are discussed and their limitations are delineated. Twenty-two references are cited.

  4. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  5. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  6. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  7. The Binaural Masking-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Detection and the Binaural Intelligibility-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Recognition in the Presence of Speech-Spectrum Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Yu; Li, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Yuan-Chuan; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2015-01-01

    Binaural hearing involves using information relating to the differences between the signals that arrive at the two ears, and it can make it easier to detect and recognize signals in a noisy environment. This phenomenon of binaural hearing is quantified in laboratory studies as the binaural masking-level difference (BMLD). Mandarin is one of the most commonly used languages, but there are no publication values of BMLD or BILD based on Mandarin tones. Therefore, this study investigated the BMLD and BILD of Mandarin tones. The BMLDs of Mandarin tone detection were measured based on the detection threshold differences for the four tones of the voiced vowels /i/ (i.e., /i1/, /i2/, /i3/, and /i4/) and /u/ (i.e., /u1/, /u2/, /u3/, and /u4/) in the presence of speech-spectrum noise when presented interaurally in phase (S0N0) and interaurally in antiphase (SπN0). The BILDs of Mandarin tone recognition in speech-spectrum noise were determined as the differences in the target-to-masker ratio (TMR) required for 50% correct tone recognitions between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The detection thresholds for the four tones of /i/ and /u/ differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The average detection thresholds of Mandarin tones were all lower in the SπN0 condition than in the S0N0 condition, and the BMLDs ranged from 7.3 to 11.5 dB. The TMR for 50% correct Mandarin tone recognitions differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions, at –13.4 and –18.0 dB, respectively, with a mean BILD of 4.6 dB. The study showed that the thresholds of Mandarin tone detection and recognition in the presence of speech-spectrum noise are improved when phase inversion is applied to the target speech. The average BILDs of Mandarin tones are smaller than the average BMLDs of Mandarin tones. PMID:25835987

  8. Data processing and algorithm development for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph: reduction of noise free simulated images, analysis and spectrum extraction with reference star differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ygouf, Marie; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; van der Marel, Roeland; Macintosh, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    Direct detection and characterization of mature giant or sub-Neptunes exoplanets in the visible require space-based instruments optimized for high-contrast imaging with contrasts of 10-9. In this context, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope - Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) will reach raw contrasts of about 8×10-9 to 10-9 using state-of-the-art starlight suppression and wavefront control techniques. A ten-fold contrast improvement is therefore expected using post-processing techniques to reduce the speckle noise level to a factor of at least 10 lower in order to distinguish 10-9 planets from speckles. Point spread function (PSF) subtractions have been successfully applied to ground-based and space-based data with contrasts up to 10-6 but performance has yet to be demonstrated at higher contrast levels. We use both a classical PSF subtraction and the Karunhen-Loéve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm to reduce noise free WFIRST-AFTA-like simulated images in the context of reference star differential imaging (RDI). The two WFIRST-AFTA baseline coronagraphs are considered for this study: the hybrid lyot coronagraph (HLC) for the imaging channel and the shaped-pupil coronagraph (SPC) for the integral field spectrograph channel (IFS). The two reduction methods are compared with respect to the amount and stability of the aberrations for detection in the imaging channel and preliminary spectra extractions are performed for characterization in the IFS channel.

  9. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  10. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  11. Research on School Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iselin, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Schools across the nation report increases in the use of punitive disciplinary methods (e.g., suspension). The need for these disciplinary practices to address serious student misconduct is undisputed. What research has questioned is why some students seem to be suspended more often than others, what effects suspension has on students, and whether…

  12. Suspension Geometry Measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, M. J.; Yu, C. C.; Chang, H.; Tsung, T. T.; Lin, H. M.

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the instrumentation and analysis of the Vehicle suspension's electrical signals. It will measure the Vehicle suspensions' Vertical Displacement, Track Change, Camber Angle, Caster Angle Steer Angle and convert physical quantity into electrical signals in a various vehicle load change. With using electrical signals for computer control, the electrical controlled vehicle has brought great convenience, great safety and thoughtful kindness vehicle system in our daily life. It will measure the Vehicle suspensions' Vertical Displacement, Track Change, Camber Angle, Caster Angle Steer Angle and convert physical quantity into electrical signals in a various vehicle load change. The function of a suspension system in an automobile is to improve ride comfort and stability. Advances in electronic control technology, applied to the automobile, can improve those functions. The results show that the photocell can convert the electrical signals of suspension for peripheral communications link between the vehicle driving and the electronic control unit (ECU) employed for processing.

  13. Noise Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... here: EPA Home Air and Radiation Noise Pollution Noise Pollution This page has moved. You should be ... epa.gov/clean-air-act-overview/title-iv-noise-pollution Local Navigation Air & Radiation Home Basic Information ...

  14. NON-Shock-Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``1''/f -``Noise'' Power-Spectrum(PS) Power-Law UNIVERSALITY is Merely F =ma Time-Series Integral-Transform, aka ``Bak'' -``SOC'' REdiscovery'' PRE(1687)-``Bak'' (1988)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Edward

    2015-06-01

    NON-shock plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71); PSS:(a)5,601/607(71); Xl.-Latt.Defects 5,277(74); Scripta Met.:6,785(72); 8,587/617(74); 3rd Tokyo AE Symp.(76); Acta Met. 5,383(77); JMMM 7,312(78)] ``1''/ ω-``noise'' power-spectrum ``pink''-Zipf(NOT ``red'' =Pareto) power-law UNIVERSALITY is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but Newton 3rd Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery!!! (aka ``Bak''(1988)-``SOC'':1687 <<<1988: 1988-1687 =301-years!!! PHYSICS:F =ma cross-multiplied as 1/m =a/F =OUTPUT/INPUT = EFFECT/CAUSE =inverse-mass mechanical-susceptibility = χ (`` ω'') χ(`` ω'') ~(F.-D.thm.) ~P(`` ω'') ``noise'' power-spectrum; (``Max & Al show''): E ~ ω & E ~ (upper-limiting-speeds media) ~m. Thus: ω ~ E ~m Inverting: 1/ ω ~ 1/E ~1/m ~a/F = χ (`` ω'') ~P(`` ω'') Thus: F =ma integral-transform(I-T) is ````SOC'''s'' P(ω) ~ 1/ ω!!! ; ''PURE''-MATHS: F =ma DOUBLE-integral time-series(T-S) s(t) =[v0t +(1/2)at2] I-T formally de?nes power-spectrum(PS): P(ω) ≡ ∫ s(t)e-iωtdt = ∫ [vot +(1/2)at2]e-iωtdt = vo ∫ a(t)e-iωtdt +(1/2)[a ≠a(t)] ∫t2e-iωtdt =vo(∂ / ∂ω) δ(ω) + (1/2)[a ≠a(t)](∂2/ ∂ω2) δ(ω) = vo/ω0 + (1/2)[a ≠a(t)]/ω 1 . 000 ...; uniform-velocity a =0 PS P(ω) = 1/ωo WHITE vs. uniform:-a>0a<0) PS P(ω) = 1/ω 1 . 000 ... pink/flicker/HYPERBOLICITY.

  15. Noise prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  16. Ultrasonic separation of a suspension for in situ spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Qi, Wei; Mori, Keita; Ogawa, Satoshi; Inohara, Daichi; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic techniques to suspensions is difficult because optical scattering caused by solid particles reduces the accuracy. At the extreme, dense suspensions like blood cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. In the present study, an ultrasonic standing wave was used to agglomerate fluorescent particles in an aqueous ethanol suspension at the nodes of the standing wave. Relatively clear liquid regions, which contained few particles that could cause optical scattering, appeared around the anti-nodes and were used for spectroscopic imaging. This produced a spectrum that was similar to that of clear aqueous ethanol without any fluorescent particles.

  17. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    Retropubic suspension is surgery to help control stress incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ... This procedure is done to treat stress incontinence . Before discussing ... medicines, or other options. If you tried these and are ...

  18. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007374.htm Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension To use the sharing features on ... may be because other problems are causing your urinary incontinence. Over time, some or all of the leakage ...

  19. Dielectric permittivity of suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, M. Ya.

    2007-08-15

    A strict macroscopic analysis of the limiting long-wavelength permittivity of a model suspension is presented in which the suspension is considered as a finely dispersed system consisting of isotropic dielectric balls with piecewise-continuous radial permittivity profile. The analysis is performed within the framework of the notion of compact groups of inhomogeneities and the procedure of field averaging over volumes significantly exceeding the scale of these groups. The indicated value is described by the Lorentz-Lorenz formula. The effective polarizability of balls in the suspension is reconstructed from their parameters and the parameters of the medium by means of integration. The result is valid for any concentration of the balls at which the suspension remains macroscopically homogeneous and isotropic with respect to the field and for an arbitrary difference between the ball and medium permittivities.

  20. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  1. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  2. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  3. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-11-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  4. Experimental upper limit on the estimated thermal noise at low frequencies in a gravitational wave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Di Virgilio, A.; Bigotta, S.; Barsotti, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Cella, G.; Del Prete, M.; Fiori, I.; Frasconi, F.; Gennai, A.; Giazotto, A.; Passuello, D.; Raffaelli, F.; Dattilo, V.; La Penna, P.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Passaquieti, R.; Losurdo, G.; Majorana, E.

    2007-12-15

    The mirror relative motion of a suspended Fabry-Perot cavity is studied in the frequency range 3-100 Hz. The experimental measurements presented in this paper have been performed at the Low Frequency Facility, a high finesse optical cavity 1 cm long suspended to a mechanical seismic isolation system like the one of the VIRGO gravitational wave antenna. Because of the radiation pressure between the two mirrors of the cavity, the dynamic behavior of the system is characterized by the optical spring stiffness. In the frequency region above 3 Hz, where seismic noise contamination is negligible, the mirror displacement noise is stationary and its statistical distribution is Gaussian. Using a simplified mechanical model of the suspended system and applying the fluctuation dissipation theorem, we show that the measured power spectrum is reproduced in the frequency region 3-90 Hz. Since the contribution coming from different sources of the system to the total noise budget turns out to be negligible, we conclude that the relative displacement power spectrum of this opto-mechanical system is compatible with a system at thermal equilibrium within its environment. In the region 3-10 Hz this measurement gives so far the best upper limit for the thermal noise of the suspension for a gravitational wave interferometer.

  5. Invited Article: CO2 laser production of fused silica fibers for use in interferometric gravitational wave detector mirror suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptonstall, A.; Barton, M. A.; Bell, A.; Cagnoli, G.; Cantley, C. A.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cumming, A.; Grant, A.; Hammond, G. D.; Harry, G. M.; Hough, J.; Jones, R.; Kelley, D.; Kumar, R.; Martin, I. W.; Robertson, N. A.; Rowan, S.; Strain, K. A.; Tokmakov, K.; van Veggel, M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the first mirror suspensions to use a quasi-monolithic final stage were installed at the GEO600 detector site outside Hannover, pioneering the use of fused silica suspension fibers in long baseline interferometric detectors to reduce suspension thermal noise. Since that time, development of the production methods of fused silica fibers has continued. We present here a review of a novel CO_2 laser-based fiber pulling machine developed for the production of fused silica suspensions for the next generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors and for use in experiments requiring low thermal noise suspensions. We discuss tolerances, strengths, and thermal noise performance requirements for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. Measurements made on fibers produced using this machine show a 0.8% variation in vertical stiffness and 0.05% tolerance on length, with average strengths exceeding 4 GPa, and mechanical dissipation which meets the requirements for Advanced LIGO thermal noise performance.

  6. Invited article: CO2 laser production of fused silica fibers for use in interferometric gravitational wave detector mirror suspensions.

    PubMed

    Heptonstall, A; Barton, M A; Bell, A; Cagnoli, G; Cantley, C A; Crooks, D R M; Cumming, A; Grant, A; Hammond, G D; Harry, G M; Hough, J; Jones, R; Kelley, D; Kumar, R; Martin, I W; Robertson, N A; Rowan, S; Strain, K A; Tokmakov, K; van Veggel, M

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the first mirror suspensions to use a quasi-monolithic final stage were installed at the GEO600 detector site outside Hannover, pioneering the use of fused silica suspension fibers in long baseline interferometric detectors to reduce suspension thermal noise. Since that time, development of the production methods of fused silica fibers has continued. We present here a review of a novel CO(2) laser-based fiber pulling machine developed for the production of fused silica suspensions for the next generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors and for use in experiments requiring low thermal noise suspensions. We discuss tolerances, strengths, and thermal noise performance requirements for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. Measurements made on fibers produced using this machine show a 0.8% variation in vertical stiffness and 0.05% tolerance on length, with average strengths exceeding 4 GPa, and mechanical dissipation which meets the requirements for Advanced LIGO thermal noise performance. PMID:21280809

  7. Diffusion of passive particles in active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafai, Salima; John, Thomas; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-11-01

    We study how an active suspension consisting of a definite volume fraction of the microswimmer Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii modifies the Brownian movement of small to medium size microspheres. We present measurements and simulations of trajectories of microspheres with a diameter of 20 μm in suspensions of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a so called ``puller,'' and show that the mean squared displacement of such trajectories consist of parabolic and a linear part. The linear part is due to the hydrodynamic noise of the microswimmers while the parabolic part is a consequence of directed motion events that occur randomly, when a microsphere is transported by a microswimmer on a timescale that is in higher order of magnitude than the Brownian like hydrodynamic interaction. In addition, we theoretically describe this effect with a dimensional analysis that takes the force dipole model used to describe ``puller'' like Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii into account.

  8. Microfluidic bead suspension hopper.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander K; MacConnell, Andrew B; Paegel, Brian M

    2014-05-20

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load beads into a microfluidic droplet generator. A suspension hopper continuously delivered synthesis resin beads (17 μm diameter, 112,000 over 2.67 h) functionalized with a photolabile linker and pepstatin A into picoliter-scale droplets of an HIV-1 protease activity assay to model ultraminiaturized compound screening. Likewise, trypsinogen template DNA-coated magnetic beads (2.8 μm diameter, 176,000 over 5.5 h) were loaded into droplets of an in vitro transcription/translation system to model a protein evolution experiment. The suspension hopper should effectively remove any barriers to using suspensions as sample inputs, paving the way for microfluidic automation to replace robotic library distribution. PMID:24761972

  9. Electrical spectrum analysis of operating Hydro Electric machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timperley, J. E.

    1981-12-01

    The electrical spectrum analysis of the operation of five pumped storage machines is discussed. It was found that machines without electrical problems produced little radio noise, although all machines produced some noise. Severe problems produced severe radio noise. If stator deterioration increases, the noise level increases. Similar machines produce similar electrical spectrum signatures. The general source of discharges can be located. A likelihood of failure can be calculated from spectrum analysis.

  10. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  11. Measurements of Electronic Noise in Gyroklystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, J. P.

    1999-11-01

    The noise properties of millimeter-wave gyroklystron amplifiers are an important issue in the design of advanced radar and communication systems. Therefore, experimental measurements of electron beam shot noise in a 35 GHz, 225 kW, 30 dB gain, three-cavity gyroklystron have been obtained from both the input and output cavities. This intrinsic noise was initially studied without an applied carrier (i.e. at zero drive power). The noise spectrum emitted by the input cavity has a Lorentzian shape, with peak noise power densities typically reaching 6.3x10-15 W/Hz (-112 dBm/Hz), and typical 3 dB bandwidths of 160 MHz. The output cavity noise spectrum is found to be equal to the input cavity noise spectrum multiplied by the measured linear frequency response of the gyroklystron. The input cavity noise power exhibits complex variations as a function of beam current, beam velocity ratio, and circuit magnetic field. Overall, the measured noise levels at the input cavity are 0 to 5 dB lower than theoretical predictions for shot noise unaltered by collective effects, with the largest reductions occurring at high currents. This implies that space charge has a role in shielding the shot noise. The measurements also fail to show noise growth from electrostatic cyclotron instabilities; analytic theory indicates that the lack of growth is due to the finite velocity spread of the beam and operation at a modest detuning from the cyclotron frequency. Experimental measurements of phase noise in a 4 cavity, 50 dB gain, 35 GHz gyroklystron producing a saturated 200 kW carrier are also under way. Contributions to the phase noise spectrum from shot noise, 1/f noise, and extrinsic noise have been observed.

  12. Ancient noise generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio; Menchaca, Rolando; Velazquez, Roberto

    2002-11-01

    There has been found a whole family of similar artifacts which produce singing noises. These noises sometimes resemble those sounds generated by some animals and/or naturally produced by strong winds passing through holes and edges. It means that these sounds have wide frequency spectrums and very often some clear tones are identified. The original purpose of these artifacts is unknown, but some researchers think that some were used in mortuary ceremonies and employed by H-men. The Olmecan whistle previously presented belongs to this family, and now it is compared with a bone or wooden instrument shown in the Florentine codex.

  13. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  14. Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening Truss; Upper & Lower Decks; Assembled System - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  16. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  17. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  18. Keep solids in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Gladki, H.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing is an important operation in the CPI. It is not synonymous with agitation. Mixing is a random distribution into and through one another of two or more initially separate phases. Within that broad definition is the important specialty area of liquid-solid dispersion. This paper addresses the dispersion of solids in lower concentrations that don`t affect the rheological properties of the fluid. The just suspended condition represents the lowest grade of complete suspension, but this level of agitation is the most efficient for solids-liquid agitation. Higher mixing speeds waste energy. Undersized mixers need replacing. The top-entering mixer has a long history in the CPI and the environmental area. Many suspension studies were run with this type. These papers result in empirical correlations for just suspension conditions to scale up from laboratory measurement. Variables considered are the agitation speed, liquid and solids physical properties, solids concentration, system geometry and impeller type. Lately, submersible mixers are becoming more popular, but there are no published sizing methods. This article will explain how to define the critical hydraulic conditions in the tank to reach just solids suspension for a submersible agitator of the type described here as FJFA (Free Jet Flow Agitator).

  19. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  20. Flywheel Magnetic Suspension Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Sifford, Curtiss; Thomas, Erwin; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Provenza, Andrew; Kascak, Albert; Montague, Gerald; Lei, Shuliang; Kim, Yeonkyu; Sun, Guangyoung; Chon, ChonHee; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Li, Ming; Minihan, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of many areas of the flywheel magnetic suspension (MS) R&D being performed at the Texas A&M Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab (TAMU-VCEL). This includes system response prediction, actuator optimization and redundancy, controller realizations and stages, sensor enhancements and backup bearing reliability.

  1. Stability of Metronidazole Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ronald F; Ying, James

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antiprotozoal agent used in the treatment of bacterial and protozoal anaerobic infections. The objectives of this study were to develop concentrated metronidazole suspensions that are inexpensive and easy to prepare and determine the stability of these suspensions after storage in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles at room temperature (23°C) and under refrigeration (5°C). Metronidazole suspensions (50 mg/mL) were prepared from powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup as the vehicles. Samples were collected in triplicate from each container on days 0, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 93. Samples were assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method that had been validated as stability indicating. Color, change in physical appearance, and pH were also monitored at each time interval. There was no apparent change in color or physical appearance. The pH values changed by less than 0.20 units over the 93 days. The stability of metronidazole suspensions compounded from United States Pharmacopeia powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup and packaged in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles was determined to be 93 days when stored at either room temperature or under refrigeration. PMID:26714365

  2. Airframe noise component interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted to examine the noise-generating processes of an airframe during approach flight. The airframe model was a two-dimensional wing section, to which highlift leading and trailing edge devices and landing gear could be added. Far field conventional microphones were utilized to determine component spectrum levels. An acoustic mirror directional microphone was utilized to examine noise source distributions on airframe components extended separately and in combination. Measured quantities are compared with predictions inferred from aircraft flyover data. Aeroacoustic mechanisms for each airframe component are identified. Component interaction effects on total radiated noise generally were small (within about 2 dB). However, some interactions significantly redistributed the local noise source strengths by changing local flow velocities and turbulence levels. Possibilities for noise reduction exist if trailing edge flaps could be modified to decrease their noise radiation caused by incident turbulent flow.

  3. In-School Suspension Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas County Schools, Thomasville, GA.

    The in-school suspension program (ISS) for grades 6-12 in Thomas County, Georgia, is described in this report. The program retains students in school, offers individual help, and provides the opportunity to stay on task. During the suspension period, students are placed in individualized carrels in the suspension center and must complete…

  4. On the nonlinear modeling of shot noise

    PubMed Central

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    We introduced a nonlinear shot-noise model, a natural generalization of the “classic” shot-noise model, which differs markedly from the existing linear shot-noise models. This model produces a wide spectrum of stationary noise processes. Because of its intrinsic nonlinearity, the model's resulting noise processes are capable of displaying a rich variety of both amplitudal and temporal statistical behaviors. Surprisingly, the nonlinear model is amenable to mathematical analysis and yields closed-form formulae for the characterizing statistics of its resulting noise processes. PMID:16172376

  5. Multipath noise reduction spread spectrum signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The concepts of early-prompt delay tracking, multipath correction of early-prompt delay tracking from correlation shape, and carrier phase multipath correction are addressed. In early-prompt delay tracking, since multipath is always delayed with respect to the direct signals, the system derives phase and pseudorange observables from earlier correlation lags. In multipath correction of early-prompt delay tracking from correlation shape, the system looks for relative variations of amplitude across the code correlation function that do not match the predicted multipath-free code cross-correlation shape. The system then uses deviations from the multipath-free shape to infer the magnitude of multipath, and to generate corrections pseudorange observables. In carrier phase multipath correction, the system looks for variations of phase among plural early and prompt lags. The system uses the measured phase variations, along with the general principle that the multipath errors are larger for later lags, to infer the presence of multipath, and to generate corrections for carrier-phase observables.

  6. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  7. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  8. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  9. Update on quadruple suspension design for Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aston, S. M.; Barton, M. A.; Bell, A. S.; Beveridge, N.; Bland, B.; Brummitt, A. J.; Cagnoli, G.; Cantley, C. A.; Carbone, L.; Cumming, A. V.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, R. M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Hammond, G. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayler, T. M.; Heptonstall, A.; Heefner, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hough, J.; Jones, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kumar, R.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Martin, I. W.; Murray, P. G.; O'Dell, J.; Plissi, M. V.; Reid, S.; Romie, J.; Robertson, N. A.; Rowan, S.; Shapiro, B.; Speake, C. C.; Strain, K. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torrie, C.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vecchio, A.; Wilmut, I.

    2012-12-01

    We describe the design of the suspension systems for the major optics for Advanced LIGO, the upgrade to LIGO—the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory. The design is based on that used in GEO600—the German/UK interferometric gravitational wave detector, with further development to meet the more stringent noise requirements for Advanced LIGO. The test mass suspensions consist of a four-stage or quadruple pendulum for enhanced seismic isolation. To minimize suspension thermal noise, the final stage consists of a silica mirror, 40 kg in mass, suspended from another silica mass by four silica fibres welded to silica ears attached to the sides of the masses using hydroxide-catalysis bonding. The design is chosen to achieve a displacement noise level for each of the seismic and thermal noise contributions of 10-19 m/√Hz at 10 Hz, for each test mass. We discuss features of the design which has been developed as a result of experience with prototypes and associated investigations.

  10. Heteropolar Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen; Johnson, Bruce; Downer, James; Eisenhaure, David; Hockney, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Compact permanent-magnet/electromagnet actuator has six degrees of freedom. Heteropolar magnetic actuator conceived for use as actively controlled vibration-isolating suspension device. Exerts forces along, and torques about, all three principal coordinate axes to resist all three components of translational vibration and all three components of rotational vibration. Inner cylinder suspended magnetically within outer cylinder. Electro-magnet coils interact with fields of permanent magnets to provide active control of suspending force and torque.

  11. Articulated Suspension Without Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Wheels negotiate bumps and holes with minimal tilting of vehicle body. In new suspension, wheel climbs obstacle as high as 1 1/2 times its diameter without excessive tilting of chassis. Provides highly stable ride over rough ground for such vehicles as wheelchairs, military scout cars, and police and fire robots. System of levers distributes weight to wheels. Sized to distribute equal or other desired portions of load among wheels.

  12. Aircraft Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  13. Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  14. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  15. Noise Injury: Etiology and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to noise might be responsible for a wide and varied spectrum of physical and mental morbidity, although many of the claims of cause and effect relationship are controversial and unproven. The etiological relationship between noise and high frequency hearing loss is, however, well documented. While noise-induced hearing loss is considered to be primarily an occupational problem, current leisure time activities have created the potential for it to become more common in the community at large. Once developed, this hearing loss is permanent and cannot be influenced by therapy. Noise-induced hearing loss is almost completely preventable and the family physician has an important responsibility for primary and secondary prevention, whether the noise source is in the workplace or in some other location. PMID:21286519

  16. Squeezed light spin noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for determining physical properties of an unperturbed spin system from its power noise spectrum both in atomic and solid state physics. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, we detect spontaneous spin fluctuations of a dense Rb vapor via Faraday rotation of an off-resonance probe beam, resulting in the excess of spectral noise at the Larmor frequency over a white photon shot-noise background. We report quantum enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio via polarization squeezing of the probe beam up to 3dB over the full density range up to n = 1013 atoms cm-3, covering practical conditions used in optimized SNS experiments. Furthermore, we show that squeezing improves the trade-off between statistical sensitivity and systematic errors due to line broadening, a previously unobserved quantum advantage.

  17. Zellweger Spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Zellweger spectrum result from defects in the assembly of a cellular structure called the peroxisome, and ... Zellweger spectrum are caused by defects in the assembly of the peroxisome. There are at least 12 ...

  18. Impact-activated solidification of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Shear-thickening, non-Newtonian fluids have typically been investigated under steady-state conditions. This approach has produced two pictures for suspension response to imposed forcing. In the weak shear-thickening picture, the response is typically attributed to the hydrodynamic interactions giving rise to hydroclusters, small groups of particles interacting through lubrication forces. At the other end of the spectrum, in the discontinuous shear-thickening regime, the response can be seen as a system-wide jamming that is ultimately limited in strength by the system boundaries. While these steady-state pictures have proven extremely useful, some of the most interesting phenomena associated with dense suspensions is transient and local in character. A prototypical example is the extraordinarily large impact resistance of dense suspensions such as cornstarch and water. When poked lightly these materials respond like a fluid, but when punched or kicked they seem to temporarily ``solidify'' and provide enormous resistance to the motion of the impacting object. Using an array of experimental techniques, including high-speed video, embedded force and acceleration sensing, and x-ray imaging, we are able to investigate the dynamic details this process as it unfolds. We find that an impacting object drives the rapid growth of a jammed, solid-like region directly below the impact site. Being coupled to the surrounding fluid by grain-mediated lubrication forces, this creates substantial peripheral flow and ultimately leads to the sudden extraction of the impactor's momentum. With a simple jamming picture to describe the solidification and an added mass model to explain the force on the rod, we are able to predict the forces on the impactor quantitatively. These findings highlight the importance of the non-equilibrium character of dense suspensions near jamming and might serve as a bridge between the weak and discontinuous shear-thickening pictures.

  19. Low endogenous neural noise in autism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Greg; Plaisted-Grant, Kate

    2015-04-01

    'Heuristic' theories of autism postulate that a single mechanism or process underpins the diverse psychological features of autism spectrum disorder. Although no such theory can offer a comprehensive account, the parsimonious descriptions they provide are powerful catalysts to autism research. One recent proposal holds that 'noisy' neuronal signalling explains not only some deficits in autism spectrum disorder, but also some superior abilities, due to 'stochastic resonance'. Here, we discuss three distinct actions of noise in neural networks, arguing in each case that autism spectrum disorder symptoms reflect too little, rather than too much, neural noise. Such reduced noise, perhaps a function of atypical brainstem activation, would enhance detection and discrimination in autism spectrum disorder but at significant cost, foregoing the widespread benefits of noise in neural networks. PMID:25248666

  20. Long-term noise statistics from the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Anthony I.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Larue, James P.

    2003-04-01

    Long-term, omnidirectional acoustic noise measurements were conducted in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2001. These efforts were a part of the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center project, Phase I. Initial looks at the noise time series, processed in standard one-third-octave bands from 10 to 5000 Hz, show noise levels that differ substantially from customary deep-water noise spectra. Contributing factors to this highly dynamic noise environment are an abundance of marine mammal emissions and various industrial noises. Results presented here address long-term temporal variability, temporal coherence times, the fluctuation spectrum, and coherence of fluctuations across the frequency spectrum. [Research supported by ONR.

  1. Dielectrophoresis of graded microparticles in suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Dong; Ji-Ping, Huang; Wah, Yu Kin; Q, Gu G.

    2003-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis of graded microparticles in suspensions L. Dong, J. P. Huang, K. W. Yu and G. Q. Gu Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Shatin, NT, HK. Dielectrophoresis is an AC electrokinetic phenomenon that employs the difference in the electric polarizability of microparticles and the suspending media. Under the action of an external electric field, these particles polarize, and experience a force in a nonuniform field. The degree of polarizability can depend on the frequency of the applied AC field. In this work, we consider graded spherical particles in which the material properties can vary continuously in space. These inhomogeneous particles can be more useful and interesting than the homogeneous inclusions. A new theory has been established to study the effective properties of graded composite materials under externally applied field, namely, the differential effective dipole approximation (DEDA). The theory has been applied to two model dielectric profiles, namely, the power-law and linear profiles. Moreover, we have shown that these profiles actually admit exact solutions for the local electric field. We have compared the DEDA results with the exact results for the two model profiles and the agreement is excellent. Based on the DEDA, we investigate the DEP spectrum of a colloidal suspension of graded spherical particles, and compare the results with the DEP spectrum derived from the homogeneous particles.

  2. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  3. Starch Suspensions with Different Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody; Melville, Audrey; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A suspension made of starch particles dispersed in water displays significant non-Newtonian behavior for high enough particulate concentration. This surprising behavior has recently inspired a series of experiments that have shed much light on the possible mechanism behind this phenomenon. In our studies we assess the role of the fluid phase in these suspensions. We find that using fluids other than water can significantly alter the behavior of starch suspensions. Through mechanical tests of various kinds, we assess the interaction between starch particles and different liquids, and how this interaction affects the non-Newtonian behavior of starch suspensions.

  4. Controls of maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. A one-dimensional vehicle with two degrees of freedom, to simulate the German Transrapid Maglev System, is used for suspension control designs. The transient and frequency responses of suspension systems and PSDs of vehicle accelerations are calculated to evaluate different control designs. The results show that active and semi-active control designs indeed improve the response of vehicle and provide an acceptable ride comfort for maglev systems.

  5. Emergence of collective motion in suspensions of swimming cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roffin, Maria Chiara; Denissenko, Petr; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-11-01

    Collective motion is one of the most fascinating manifestations of self-organization in non-equilibrium systems. The phenomena emerges with the increase in concentration of motile individuals ranging from molecular motors to large animals like fish and humans. We have studied the suspension of swimming sperm cells in a microfluidic device which gradually concentrates motile cells in the region of interest. The onset of collective motion is identified by investigating correlations of fluid velocity and image brightness associated with the cell orientation. Cell concentration and the noise parameter are varied to switch on/off the collective interaction. The level of noise is controlled by adjusting the cell motility which depends on the temperature in the microfluidic chip. Fluid velocity is measured by tracing passive fluorescent beads in the suspension.

  6. Semiconductor Laser Low Frequency Noise Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Logan, Ronald T.

    1996-01-01

    This work summarizes the efforts in identifying the fundamental noise limit in semiconductor optical sources (lasers) to determine the source of 1/F noise and it's associated behavior. In addition, the study also addresses the effects of this 1/F noise on RF phased arrays. The study showed that the 1/F noise in semiconductor lasers has an ultimate physical limit based upon similar factors to fundamental noise generated in other semiconductor and solid state devices. The study also showed that both additive and multiplicative noise can be a significant detriment to the performance of RF phased arrays especially in regard to very low sidelobe performance and ultimate beam steering accuracy. The final result is that a noise power related term must be included in a complete analysis of the noise spectrum of any semiconductor device including semiconductor lasers.

  7. Aircraft and background noise annoyance effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate annoyance of multiple noise sources, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment, which used 48 subjects, was designed to establish annoyance-noise level functions for three community noise sources presented individually: jet aircraft flyovers, air conditioner, and traffic. The second experiment, which used 216 subjects, investigated the effects of background noise on aircraft annoyance as a function of noise level and spectrum shape; and the differences between overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance. In both experiments, rated annoyance was the dependent measure. Results indicate that the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for traffic is significantly different from that of flyover and air conditioner noise and that further research was justified to determine the influence of the two background noises on overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance (e.g., experiment two). In experiment two, total noise exposure, signal-to-noise ratio, and background source type were found to have effects on all three types of annoyance. Thus, both signal-to-noise ratio, and the background source must be considered when trying to determine community response to combined noise sources.

  8. Six degrees of freedom vibration isolation using electromagnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sang-Il; Debra, Daniel B.; Michelson, Peter F.; Taber, Robert C.; Price, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for modeling an electromagnet. Control laws are considered with and without flux feedback and with position and orientation information of the suspended body. Base motion and sensor noise are the principal disturbances. Proper selection of the geometrical operating point minimizes the passive coupling above the bandwidth of the control and filtering can attenuate the high frequency content of sensor noise. Six electromagnets are arranged in a configuration which optimizes the load support and provides control over all six degrees of freedom of the suspended body. The design is based on experimental data generated with a specially designed test facility. Application for suspension of a gravity wave antenna is discussed.

  9. Dense suspension splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Schaarsberg, Martin H. Klein; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2014-11-01

    Impact of a dense suspension drop onto a solid surface at speeds of several meters-per-second splashes by ejecting individual liquid-coated particles. Suppression or reduction of this splash is important for thermal spray coating and additive manufacturing. Accomplishing this aim requires distinguishing whether the splash is generated by individual scattering events or by collective motion reminiscent of liquid flow. Since particle inertia dominates over surface tension and viscous drag in a strong splash, we model suspension splash using a discrete-particle simulation in which the densely packed macroscopic particles experience inelastic collisions but zero friction or cohesion. Numerical results based on this highly simplified model are qualitatively consistent with observations. They also show that approximately 70% of the splash is generated by collective motion. Here an initially downward-moving particle is ejected into the splash because it experiences a succession of low-momentum-change collisions whose effects do not cancel but instead accumulate. The remainder of the splash is generated by scattering events in which a small number of high-momentum-change collisions cause a particle to be ejected upwards. Current Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

  10. Magnetic Suspension Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Agreement, intended to support focused research efforts in the area of magnetic suspension systems, was initiated between NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Old Dominion University (ODU) starting January 1, 1997. The original proposal called for a three-year effort, but funding for the second year proved to be unavailable, leading to termination of the agreement following a 5-month no-cost extension. This report covers work completed during the entire 17-month period of the award. This research built on work that had taken place over recent years involving both NASA LARC and the Principal Investigator (PI). The research was of a rather fundamental nature, although specific applications were kept in mind at all times, such as wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), space payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, magnetic bearings for unconventional applications, magnetically levitated ground transportation and electromagnetic launch systems. Fundamental work was undertaken in areas such as the development of optimized magnetic configurations, analysis and modelling of eddy current effects, control strategies for magnetically levitated wind tunnel models and system calibration procedures. Despite the termination of this Cooperative Agreement, several aspects of the research work are currently continuing with alternative forms of support.

  11. Direct computation of turbulence and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, C.; Gordon, G.; Karniadakis, G.; Batcho, P.; Jackson, E.; Orszag, S.

    1991-01-01

    Jet exhaust turbulence noise is computed using a time dependent solution of the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations to supply the source terms for an acoustic computation based on the Phillips convected wave equation. An extrapolation procedure is then used to determine the far field noise spectrum in terms of the near field sound. This will lay the groundwork for studies of more complex flows typical of noise suppression nozzles.

  12. Alternatives to Suspension. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Suspension from school is directly related to student learning. When students are suspended from school they are deprived of instructional time. Often the students that are suspended most frequently are those behind academically. Principals have worked with their staff to identify several alternatives to school suspension. First and foremost, is…

  13. TECHNICAL NOTE: Electroconductive magnetorheological suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2006-12-01

    A magnetorheological suspension (MRS) is obtained by thermal decomposition of Fe2(CO)9 in mineral oil with stearic acid. For well-chosen values of the intensity of the magnetic field, the suspension becomes electroconductive. By addition of styrene acrylate copolymer iron oxide, MRSs are obtained with prescribed domains of electrical conductivity. The experimental results obtained are presented and discussed.

  14. Flow properties of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, K.; Izumi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The viscosity and flow behavior of a concentrated suspension, with special emphasis on fresh concrete containing a superplasticizer, is analyzed according to Newton's law of viscosity. The authors interpreted Newton's law in a new way, and explain non-Newton flow from Newton's law. The outline of this new theory is given. Viscosity of suspensions, and the effect of dispersants are analyzed.

  15. Aesthetic canthal suspension.

    PubMed

    De Silva, D Julian; Prasad, Amiya

    2015-01-01

    Support of the lower eyelid with canthal suspension is a useful tool in the prevention of complications of lower blepharoplasty with particular relevance to eyelids with increased lower lid laxity, relatively prominent globes, and negative vector configuration of the eyelid-cheek junction. Caution is required in surgical management of this highly delicate anatomic area, as relatively small adjustments can result in relatively large changes that can alter the shape and appearance of the lower eyelids. Management options include canthopexy, orbicularis sling, and modified canthoplasty. The most conservative surgical management option is canthopexy, which supports the lower eyelid over either the short or long term. The use of the orbicularis sling technique avoids surgery around the relatively complex lateral canthus, but may not be suitable for cases without a need for a skin incision or a history of dry eye. Canthoplasty is generally reserved for more marked laxity, which is less common in the group of patients seeking aesthetic blepharoplasty. PMID:25440744

  16. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  17. Fiber coating with suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Nunes, Janine K.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    The basic features of fiber coating with Newtonian fluids are well characterized at low capillary numbers by the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin analysis. Several extensions have been reported including studies of the influence of polymers, surfactants, and emulsions. Here we present an experimental study of fiber coating with suspensions of micron-sized particles where we perform direct visualization of the coating process using fluorescent particles. The addition of particles to the coating liquid produce several novel effects including (a) accumulation of particles in the neighborhood of the meniscus, which changes the dynamics of the coating process, and (b) crystallization can occur on the fiber, in some cases in the form of a continuous film that is at most a few particles thick, and which depends on capillary number. These results using continuous withdrawal will be contrasted with those reported in the literature for colloidal cystallization produced by evaporative processes.

  18. Electrorheology of nanofiber suspensions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluid, which can be transformed rapidly from a fluid-like state to a solid-like state under an external electric field, is considered to be one of the most important smart fluids. However, conventional ER fluids based on microparticles are subjected to challenges in practical applications due to the lack of versatile performances. Recent researches of using nanoparticles as the dispersal phase have led to new interest in the development of non-conventional ER fluids with improved performances. In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers. Our goal is to highlight the advantages of using anisotropic nanostructured materials as dispersal phases to improve ER performances. PMID:21711790

  19. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  20. Noise Properties of Rectifying Nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2011-01-01

    Ion currents through three types of rectifying nanoporous structures are studied and compared: conically shaped polymer nanopores, glass nanopipettes, and silicon nitride nanopores. Time signals of ion currents are analyzed by the power spectrum. We focus on the low-frequency range where the power spectrum magnitude scales with frequency, f, as 1/f. Glass nanopipettes and polymer nanopores exhibit nonequilibrium 1/f noise; thus, the normalized power spectrum depends on the voltage polarity and magnitude. In contrast, 1/f noise in rectifying silicon nitride nanopores is of equilibrium character. Various mechanisms underlying the voltage-dependent 1/f noise are explored and discussed, including intrinsic pore wall dynamics and formation of vortices and nonlinear flow patterns in the pore. Experimental data are supported by modeling of ion currents based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent 1/f noise observed in polymer and glass asymmetric nanopores might result from high and asymmetric electric fields, inducing secondary effects in the pore, such as enhanced water dissociation.

  1. Noise Properties of Rectifying Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M R; Sa, N; Davenport, M; Healy, K; Vlassiouk, I; Letant, S E; Baker, L A; Siwy, Z S

    2011-02-18

    Ion currents through three types of rectifying nanoporous structures are studied and compared for the first time: conically shaped polymer nanopores, glass nanopipettes, and silicon nitride nanopores. Time signals of ion currents are analyzed by power spectrum. We focus on the low-frequency range where the power spectrum magnitude scales with frequency, f, as 1/f. Glass nanopipettes and polymer nanopores exhibit non-equilibrium 1/f noise, thus the normalized power spectrum depends on the voltage polarity and magnitude. In contrast, 1/f noise in rectifying silicon nitride nanopores is of equilibrium character. Various mechanisms underlying the voltage-dependent 1/f noise are explored and discussed, including intrinsic pore wall dynamics, and formation of vortices and non-linear flow patterns in the pore. Experimental data are supported by modeling of ion currents based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent 1/f noise observed in polymer and glass asymmetric nanopores might result from high and asymmetric electric fields inducing secondary effects in the pore such as enhanced water dissociation.

  2. A simple hindlimb suspension apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, E.; Schultz, E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the assembly of a simple, inexpensive apparatus for application of the hindlimb suspension model to studies of the effects of unloading on mammalian physiology. Construction of a cage and suspension assembly is described using materials that can be obtained from most hardware stores. The design is kept simple for easy assembly and disassembly to facilitate cleaning and storage. The suspension assembly allows the animals full access to all portions of the floor area and provides an effective environment to study the effects of unloading.

  3. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  4. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  5. Analysis of handling noises on wound strings.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, J; Penttinen, H; Bank, B

    2007-12-01

    This study analyzes the handling noises that occur when a finger is slid along a wound string. The resulting noise has a harmonic structure due to the periodic texture of the wound string. The frequency of the harmonics and the root-mean-square amplitude of the noise were found to be linearly proportional to the sliding speed. In addition, the sliding excites the longitudinal modes of the string, thus resulting in a set of static harmonics in the noise spectrum. The sliding excites different longitudinal modes depending on the sliding location. PMID:18247641

  6. 49 CFR 238.427 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 238.427 Section 238.427... Equipment § 238.427 Suspension system. (a) General requirements. (1) Suspension systems shall be designed to... equipment. (2) Passenger equipment shall meet the safety performance standards for suspension...

  7. 33 CFR 156.112 - Suspension order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension order. 156.112 Section... § 156.112 Suspension order. The COTP or OCMI may issue a suspension order to suspend transfer operations... OCMI is unable to verify compliance with the regulations through an inspection. A suspension order:...

  8. 33 CFR 156.112 - Suspension order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspension order. 156.112 Section... § 156.112 Suspension order. The COTP or OCMI may issue a suspension order to suspend transfer operations... OCMI is unable to verify compliance with the regulations through an inspection. A suspension order:...

  9. Adaptive magnetorheological seat suspension for shock mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    An adaptive magnetorheological seat suspension (AMSS) was analyzed for optimal protection of occupants from shock loads caused by the impact of a helicopter with the ground. The AMSS system consists of an adaptive linear stroke magnetorheological shock absorber (MRSA) integrated into the seat structure of a helicopter. The MRSA provides a large controllability yield force to accommodate a wide spectrum for shock mitigation. A multiple degrees-of-freedom nonlinear biodynamic model for a 50th percentile male occupant was integrated with the dynamics of MRSA and the governing equations of motion were investigated theoretically. The load-stroke profile of MRSA was optimized with the goal of minimizing the potential for injuries. The MRSA yield force and the shock absorber stroke limitations were the most crucial parameters for improved biodynamic response mitigation. An assessment of injuries based on established injury criteria for different body parts was carried out.

  10. Paradoxical ratcheting in cornstarch suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Siu, Theo; Rutala, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Cornstarch suspensions are well known to exhibit strong shear thickening, and we show as a result that they must - and do - climb vertically vibrating rods and plates. This occurs because when the rod moves upward, it shears the suspension against gravity, and so the fluid stiffens, but when the rod moves downward, the suspension moves with gravity, and so the fluid is more compliant. This causes the fluid to be dragged up by the upstroke more than it is dragged down by the downstroke, effectively ratcheting the fluid up the rod every cycle. We show experimentally and computationally that this effect is paradoxically caused by gravity - and so goes away when gravity is removed - and we show that the suspension can be made to balance on the uphill side of an inclined rod in an analog of the inverted ``Kapitza pendulum,'' closely related to the recent report by Ramachandran & Nosonovsky, Soft Matter 10, 4633 (2014).

  11. NASA CSI suspension methods overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Cooley, Victor M.

    1989-01-01

    New suspension techniques will be necesary for ground testing the flexible spacecraft anticipated in NASA's future space activity. The most complex spacecraft involve nonlinear maneuvering (i.e., large angle slewing) with articulating substructures such as remote manipulating systems. The NASA control-structure interaction (CSI) ground test method team has begun researching and developing methodology to suspend the future class of spacecraft. This overview describes the work completed thus far. The research objective and technical approach will be presented first. Second, will be a suspension device overview followed by an assessment of existing hardware. Two different mechanical zero-spring-rate mechanisms will be compared for optimal performance. Next, will be a description of how existing hardware can be evolved to meet more general suspension requirements. A comparison of suspending articulating structures overhead vs underneath will follow. After a few experimental results from the zero-spring-rate mechanism/air suspension cart will be concluding remarks and future work.

  12. Nonlinear Single Spin Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-03-01

    Qubits have been used as linear spectrum analyzers of their environments, through the use of decoherence spectroscopy. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for discrete noise induced by a strongly coupled environment. Our nonperturbative analytical model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We develop a noise characterization scheme adapted to this nonlinearity. We then apply it using a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis. Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 110503 (2013). Synopsis at http://physics.aps.org/synopsis-for/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.110503 Current position: NIST, Boulder, CO.

  13. Linear viscoelasticity of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichocki, B.; Felderhof, B. U.

    1992-12-01

    We develop a phenomenological theory of the dynamic viscosity of colloidal suspensions, based on an extrapolation of the low-frequency behavior by use of a continued-fraction representation. In lowest approximation the dynamic viscosity depends on a small number of parameters, which may be determined experimentally. For semidilute suspensions the parameters may be found by theoretical calculation. The theory is tested by comparison with an exactly soluble model.

  14. Debarment and suspension. [of contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The changing Government attitude toward contractor debarment and suspension is examined, with emphasis on the fact that the Government is more alert to fraud, waste, and abuse. Consideration is given to causes of debarment or suspension, procedures and due process hearings, settlement agreements, compliance programs, and recent related legislation. It is concluded that the change in the Government contracting environment in recent years should be sufficient incentive for contractors to monitor their operations more closely.

  15. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  16. Squeezed photon-number noise and sub-Poissonian electrical partition noise in a semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. H.; Machida, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Amplitude noise on the light from a semiconductor laser produced a photocurrent fluctuation spectrum that was a maximum of 85 percent (-8.3 dB) below the shot-noise limit. Squeezing in semiconductor lasers is not limited by the overall quantum, or current transfer, efficiency from the laser injection current to the detector photocurrent. Current leakage away from the lasing junction does not introduce Poissonian partition noise.

  17. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  18. Spectral information in noise-mapping: An exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, Vivian; Mosconi, Patricia; Yanitelli, Marta; Cabanellas, Susana; Vazquez, Jorge; Rall, Juan C.; Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    International standards such as ISO 1996 and ISO 717 as well as noise regulations in several countries are increasingly relying on spectral information in order to assess the acoustical behavior of materials and structures and the effects of noise on people. Nevertheless, the new European Union Directive on the assessment and management of environmental noise reinforces the A-weighted equivalent level (with appropriate night and evening corrections) as the preferred indicator for noise mapping. Considering that noise maps are a powerful zoning and planning resource, the idea of reporting the mean spectrum of noise at each selected location at different times is proposed and thoroughly justified. Arguments in favor of its feasibility are given, showing that, in spite of the widespread opinion, costs and required time may be reduced considerably by the use of low-priced, new-technology auxiliary equipment. Then an exploratory study is reported, in which (a) the spectrum of traffic noise in Rosario (Argentina) is compared with the internationally standardized traffic noise spectrum, and (b) the noise spectrum at an open street is compared with the noise spectrum at a street with a U-profile owing to the same vehicles.

  19. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  20. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  1. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  2. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  3. Magnetostochastic resonance under colored noise condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapanese, Marco

    2012-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an amplification of the system output in correspondence of well-defined finite values of the noise strength that is injected into the system [Gammaitoni et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 223 (1998), Grigorenko et al., IEEE Trans. Magn. 31, 2491 (1995), Mantegna et al., J. Appl. Phys. 97, 10E519 (2005)]. In order to clarify the influence of a colored noise, in this paper magnetostochastic resonance (MSR) in magnetic systems described by the dynamic Preisach model is numerically investigated in the presence of colored noise. In this paper it is shown that: a) noise spectrum affects MSR; b) white noise, 1/f and 1/f2 noise induce in magnetic systems described by the dynamic Preisach model MSR; c) the maximum level of signal-to-noise (SNR) is obtained by using white noise but 1/f noise presents a range where SNR value is higher than the case of white noise; d) maximum signal amplification is obtained for white noise.

  4. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise.

    PubMed

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect-that is, the plasmonic effect-on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors. PMID:26266548

  5. Nonlinear single-spin spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-03-15

    Qubits have been used as linear spectrum analyzers of their environments. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for discrete noise induced by a strongly coupled environment. Our nonperturbative analytical model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We develop a noise characterization scheme adapted to this nonlinearity. We then apply it using a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis. PMID:25166519

  6. Nonlinear Single-Spin Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-03-01

    Qubits have been used as linear spectrum analyzers of their environments. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for discrete noise induced by a strongly coupled environment. Our nonperturbative analytical model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We develop a noise characterization scheme adapted to this nonlinearity. We then apply it using a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis.

  7. Aircraft noise problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    The problems related to aircraft noise were studied. Physical origin (sound), human reaction (noise), quantization of noise and sound sources of aircraft noise are discussed. Noise abatement at the source, technical, fleet-political and air traffic measures are explained. The measurements and future developments are also discussed. The position of Lufthansa as regards aircraft noise problems is depicted.

  8. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  9. The noise of BL Lacertae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Angel, J. R. P.; Duerr, R.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Wisniewski, W. Z.; Rieke, G. H.; Axon, D. J.; Bailey, J.; Hough, J. M.; Mcgraw, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented from an intensive optical and IR monitoring program of the flux and polarization characteristics of BL Lac. It is found that the polarization variations increase in amplitude with increasing time interval, and that the path traced out by the polarization vector in the Q-U plane is a random walk. In view of earlier measurements of BL Lac, the polarization fluctuations can be represented at low frequencies by the flat power spectrum of white noise, up to a frequency of 0.05 cycles/day. Above this frequency, the spectrum steepens to that of a random walk. A model for BL Lac suggested by the polarimetric noise can be constructed from independent sources of light with randomly oriented, strong polarization. Small random differences in spectral index from source to source could also explain the variable wavelength dependence of polarization.

  10. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  11. Suspension biomechanics of swimming microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organisms play a vital role in many biological, medical and engineering phenomena. Some recent research efforts have demonstrated the importance of biomechanics in understanding certain aspects of micro-organism behaviours such as locomotion and collective motions of cells. In particular, spatio-temporal coherent structures found in a bacterial suspension have been the focus of many research studies over the last few years. Recent studies have shown that macroscopic properties of a suspension, such as rheology and diffusion, are strongly affected by meso-scale flow structures generated by swimming microbes. Since the meso-scale flow structures are strongly affected by the interactions between microbes, a bottom-up strategy, i.e. from a cellular level to a continuum suspension level, represents the natural approach to the study of a suspension of swimming microbes. In this paper, we first provide a summary of existing biomechanical research on interactions between a pair of swimming micro-organisms, as a two-body interaction is the simplest many-body interaction. We show that interactions between two nearby swimming micro-organisms are described well by existing mathematical models. Then, collective motions formed by a group of swimming micro-organisms are discussed. We show that some collective motions of micro-organisms, such as coherent structures of bacterial suspensions, are satisfactorily explained by fluid dynamics. Lastly, we discuss how macroscopic suspension properties are changed by the microscopic characteristics of the cell suspension. The fundamental knowledge we present will be useful in obtaining a better understanding of the behaviour of micro-organisms. PMID:19674997

  12. Developments Toward Monolithic Suspensions for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptonstall, Alastair; Cantley, Caroline; Crooks, David; Cumming, Alan; Hough, James; Jones, Russell; Martin, Iain; Rowan, Sheila; Cagnoli, Gianpietro

    2008-09-01

    The proposed upgrades to both the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories will seek to improve detector sensitivity by reducing thermal noise. Based on technologies first implemented at the GEO600 detector, the test mass mirrors will be suspended using fused silica fibres of either circular or rectangular cross section to form monolithic suspensions. In GEO600 cylindrical fused silica fibres were produced using a hydrogen-oxygen flame based machine. Here we report on a new CO2 laser based fibre pulling system under development in Glasgow designed to achieve higher tolerances and reduce contamination of fibres. Preliminary testing of a laser welding process suitable for constructing full scale monolithic suspensions for advanced detectors is described.

  13. Measurements of intrinsic shot noise in a 35 GHz gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, J. P.; Danly, B. G.; Garven, M.

    1999-07-01

    Experimental measurements of electron beam shot noise in a 35 GHz, 225 kW, three-cavity gyroklystron have been obtained from both the input and output cavities. This intrinsic noise was studied in the absence of an applied carrier (i.e., at zero drive power). The spectrum of the noise emitted by the input cavity is found to have a Lorentzian shape, with peak noise power densities from the input cavity typically reaching 6.3×10-15 W/Hz (-112 dBm/Hz), and typical 3 dB bandwidths of 160 MHz. The output cavity noise spectrum is found to be equal to the input cavity noise spectrum multiplied by the measured linear frequency response of the gyroklystron. The measured noise levels at the input cavity are 0-5 dB lower than theoretical predictions for shot noise unaltered by collective effects. Furthermore, the input cavity noise power exhibits complex variations as a function of beam current, beam velocity ratio, and circuit magnetic field that are not predicted by present theory. Noise-to-carrier ratios expected in the input cavity during full power amplifier operation are inferred from the noise measurements and known values of drive power required to saturate the gyroklystron. The noise-to-carrier ratio, with typical values of -90 to -80 dBc, is found to be a strong function of the operating parameters.

  14. Frequency noise characterisation of narrow linewidth diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, L. D.; Weber, K. P.; Hawthorn, C. J.; Scholten, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    We examine several approaches to laser frequency noise measurement in the frequency and time domains. Commonly employed methods such as optical frequency discrimination and the Allan variance are found to be complex, expensive, time-consuming, or incomplete. We describe a practical method of demodulating a laser beat note to measure a frequency noise spectrum, using a phase-locked loop frequency discriminator based on a single low-cost integrated circuit. This method measures the frequency noise spectrum of a laser directly and in detail and is insensitive to intensity fluctuations. The advantages of this scheme are demonstrated through measurement of the frequency noise spectrum for two external cavity diode lasers (ECDL), clearly distinguishing several common noise sources. These are isolated and removed, reducing the individual laser rms linewidth from 2 MHz to 450 kHz. The spectrum is used to calculate the Allan variance, which shows almost none of the important information.

  15. Controllable damping of high-Q violin modes in fused silica suspension fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Mescheriakov, S. D.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Mitrofanov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    Fused silica fiber suspension of the test masses will be used in the interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the next generation. This allows a significant reduction of losses in the suspension and thermal noise associated with the suspension. Unfortunately, unwanted violin modes may be accidentally excited in the suspension fibers. The Q-factor of the violin modes also exceeds 108. They have a ring-down time that is too long and may complicate the stable control of the interferometer. Results of the investigation of a violin mode active damping system are described. An original sensor and actuator were especially developed to realize the effective coupling of a thin, optically transparent, non-conducting fused silica fiber with an electric circuit. The damping system allowed the changing of the violin mode's damping rate over a wide range.

  16. The stability of a homogeneous suspension of chemotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, G.; Koch, Donald L.; Fitzgibbon, Sean R.

    2011-04-01

    The linear stability of a homogeneous dilute suspension of chemotactic bacteria in a constant chemoattractant gradient is analyzed. The bacteria execute a run-and-tumble motion, typified by the species E. coli, wherein periods of smooth swimming (runs) are interrupted by abrupt uncorrelated changes in swimming direction (tumbles). Bacteria tumble less frequently when swimming toward regions of higher chemoattractant concentration, leading to a mean bacterial orientation and velocity in the base state. The stability of an unbounded suspension, both with and without a chemoattractant, is controlled by coupled long wavelength perturbations of the fluid velocity and bacterial orientation fields. In the former case, the most unstable perturbations have their wave vector oriented along the chemoattractant gradient. Chemotaxis reduces the critical bacteria concentration, for the onset of collective swimming, compared with that predicted by Subramanian and Koch ["Critical bacterial concentration for the onset of collective swimming," J. Fluid Mech. 632, 359 (2009)] in the absence of a chemoattractant. A part of this decrease may be attributed to the increase in the mean tumbling time in the presence of a chemoattractant gradient. A second destabilizing influence comes from the ability of the shearing motion, associated with a velocity perturbation in which the velocity and chemical gradients are aligned, to sweep prealigned bacteria into the local extensional quadrant thereby creating a stronger destabilizing active stress than in an initially isotropic suspension. The chemoattractant gradient also fundamentally alters the unstable spectrum for any finite wavenumber. In suspensions of bacteria that do not tumble, Saintillan and Shelley ["Instabilities and pattern formation in active particle suspensions: Kinetic theory and continuum simulations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 178103 (2008); "Instabilities, pattern formation and mixing in active suspensions," Phys. Fluids 20

  17. Jet Aeroacoustics: Noise Generation Mechanism and Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the third year research effort of the project. The research work focussed on the fine scale mixing noise of both subsonic and supersonic jets and the effects of nozzle geometry and tabs on subsonic jet noise. In publication 1, a new semi-empirical theory of jet mixing noise from fine scale turbulence is developed. By an analogy to gas kinetic theory, it is shown that the source of noise is related to the time fluctuations of the turbulence kinetic theory. On starting with the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, a formula for the radiated noise is derived. An empirical model of the space-time correlation function of the turbulence kinetic energy is adopted. The form of the model is in good agreement with the space-time two-point velocity correlation function measured by Davies and coworkers. The parameters of the correlation are related to the parameters of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Thus the theory is self-contained. Extensive comparisons between the computed noise spectrum of the theory and experimental measured have been carried out. The parameters include jet Mach number from 0.3 to 2.0 and temperature ratio from 1.0 to 4.8. Excellent agreements are found in the spectrum shape, noise intensity and directivity. It is envisaged that the theory would supercede all semi-empirical and totally empirical jet noise prediction methods in current use.

  18. Improved All-Terrain Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Redesigned suspension system for all-terrain vehicle exhibits enhanced ability to negotiate sand and rocks. Improved six-wheel suspension system includes only two links on each side. Bogie tends to pull rear wheels with it as it climbs. Designed for rover vehicle for exploration of Mars, also has potential application in off-road vehicles, military scout vehicles, robotic emergency vehicles, and toys. Predecessors of suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354), "Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System" (NPO-17407), and "High-Clearance Six-Wheel Suspension" (NPO-17821).

  19. Cancellation of simulated environmental noise as a tool for measuring vocal performance during noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Ternström, Sten; Södersten, Maria; Bohman, Mikael

    2002-06-01

    It can be difficult for the voice clinician to observe or measure how a patient uses his voice in a noisy environment. We consider here a novel method for obtaining this information in the laboratory. Worksite noise and filtered white noise were reproduced over high-fidelity loudspeakers. In this noise, 11 subjects read an instructional text of 1.5 to 2 minutes duration, as if addressing a group of people. Using channel estimation techniques, the site noise was suppressed from the recording, and the voice signal alone was recovered. The attainable noise rejection is limited only by the precision of the experimental setup, which includes the need for the subject to remain still so as not to perturb the estimated acoustic channel. This feasibility study, with 7 female and 4 male subjects, showed that small displacements of the speaker's body, even breathing, impose a practical limit on the attainable noise rejection. The noise rejection was typically 30 dB and maximally 40 dB down over the entire voice spectrum. Recordings thus processed were clean enough to permit voice analysis with the long-time average spectrum and the computerized phonetogram. The effects of site noise on voice sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, long-term average spectrum centroid, phonetogram area, and phonation time were much as expected, but with some interesting differences between females and males. PMID:12150372

  20. The stealth spectrum analysis (SSA) of the electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dequan

    Stealth spectrum analysis is discussed for assessing total system stability in aircraft communications and navigation equipment by evaluating the stealth circuit. The general frequency response and convolution are calculated for the entire frequency spectrum in both the frequency and time domains. The general energy-density spectrum and the general equivalent noise bandwidth can be computed to analyze problems with stealth technologies.

  1. Numerical Estimation of the Lyapunov Exponents of Chaotic Time Series Corrupted by Noises of Large Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, M. Eugenia; Morán, Manuel

    2009-09-01

    We show that the Lyapunov spectrum of chaotic vector time series corrupted by noises with a noise-to-signal ratio of up to 100% in one of the coordinates can be estimated using the output of a noise reduction algorithm designed to deal with noises of large amplitude.

  2. Spectrum analysis in beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-04-23

    In this article, we discuss fundamentals of the spectrum analysis in beam diagnostics, where several important particle motions in a circular accelerator are considered. The properties of the Fourier transform are presented. Then the coasting and the bunched beam motion in both longitudinal and transverse are studied. The discussions are separated for the signal particle, multiple particle, and the Schottky noise cases. To demonstrate the interesting properties of the beam motion spectrum, time domain functions are generated, and then the associated spectra are calculated and plotted. In order to show the whole picture in a single plot, some data have been scaled, therefore they may not be realistic in an accelerator.

  3. The Rheology of Concentrated Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas Acrivos

    2004-09-07

    Research program on the rheological properties of flowing suspensions. The primary purpose of the research supported by this grant was to study the flow characteristics of concentrated suspensions of non-colloidal solid particles and thereby construct a comprehensive and robust theoretical framework for modeling such systems quantitatively. At first glance, this seemed like a modest goal, not difficult to achieve, given that such suspensions were viewed simply as Newtonian fluids with an effective viscosity equal to the product of the viscosity of the suspending fluid times a function of the particle volume fraction. But thanks to the research findings of the Principal Investigator and of his Associates, made possible by the steady and continuous support which the PI received from the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the subject is now seen to be more complicated and therefore much more interesting in that concentrated suspensions have been shown to exhibit fascinating and unique rheological properties of their own that have no counterpart in flowing Newtonian or even non-Newtonian (polymeric) fluids. In fact, it is generally acknowledged that, as the result of these investigations for which the PI received the 2001 National Medal of Science, our understanding of how suspensions behave under flow is far more detailed and comprehensive than was the case even as recently as a decade ago. Thus, given that the flow of suspensions plays a crucial role in many diverse physical processes, our work has had a major and lasting impact in a subject having both fundamental as well as practical importance.

  4. Precision magnetic suspension linear bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Queen, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown the design and analyzed the electromechanics of a linear motor suitable for independently controlling two suspension degrees of freedom. This motor, at least on paper, meets the requirements for driving an X-Y stage of 10 Kg mass with about 4 m/sq sec acceleration, with travel of several hundred millimeters in X and Y, and with reasonable power dissipation. A conceptual design for such a stage is presented. The theoretical feasibility of linear and planar bearings using single or multiple magnetic suspension linear motors is demonstrated.

  5. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  6. On the Massive Antenna Suspension System in the Brazilian Gravitational Wave Detector SCHENBERG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Bortoli, Fabio; Frajuca, Carlos; de Sousa, Sergio Turano; de Waard, Arlette; Magalhaes, Nadja Simao; de Aguiar, Odylio Denys

    2016-06-01

    SCHENBERG is a resonant-mass gravitational wave detector built in Brazil. Its spherical antenna, weighting 1.15 t, is connected to the outside world by a suspension system whose main function is to attenuate the external seismic noise. In this work, we report how the system was modeled using finite elements method. The model was validated on experimental data. The simulation showed that the attenuation obtained is of the order of 260 dB, which is sufficient for decreasing the seismic noise below the level of the thermal noise of the detector operating at 50 mK.

  7. Quantitatively mimicking wet colloidal suspensions with dry granular media.

    PubMed

    Messina, René; Aljawhari, Sarah; Bécu, Lydiane; Schockmel, Julien; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Athermal two-dimensional granular systems are exposed to external mechanical noise leading to Brownian-like motion. Using tunable repulsive interparticle interaction, it is shown that the same microstructure as that observed in colloidal suspensions can be quantitatively recovered at a macroscopic scale. To that end, experiments on granular and colloidal systems made up of magnetized particles as well as computer simulations are performed and compared. Excellent agreement throughout the range of the magnetic coupling parameter is found for the pair distribution as well as the bond-orientational correlation functions. This finding opens new ways to efficiently and very conveniently explore phase transitions, crystallization, nucleation, etc in confined geometries. PMID:26030718

  8. Ultrahigh [ital Q] pendulum suspensions for gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.G.; Ju, L.; Notcutt, M. )

    1993-07-01

    Pendulum suspensions for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors need to have an extremely high [ital Q] factor to minimize Brownian motion noise. In this paper we analyze the limits to the [ital Q] factor of the compound pendulum. We show that the observed acoustic loss of niobium can allow pendulum [ital Q] factors of 10[sup 10] to be achieved. This should enable a 3 km terrestrial laser interferometer detector to achieve strain sensitivity of 10[sup [minus]22]/[radical]Hz at frequencies as low as 10 Hz. At cryogenic temperatures [ital Q] factors up to 10[sup 12] should be achievable.

  9. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  10. Noise exposure in oil mills

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. V. Prasanna; Dewangan, K. N.; Sarkar, Amaresh

    2008-01-01

    , USA, equivalent SPL and noise spectrum at each reading was obtained. Noise survey map of equivalent SPL was drawn for each oil mill by drawing contour lines on the sketch of the oil mill between the points of equal SPL. The floor area in the oil mill where SPL exceeded 85 dBA was identified from the noise survey map of each oil mill to determine the causes of high level of noise. Subjective assessment was done during the rest period of workers and it was assessed with personal interview with each worker separately. Demographic information, nature of work, working hours, rest period, experience of working in the mill, degree of noise annoyance, activity interference, and psychological and physiological effects of machine noise on the worker were asked during the interview. These details were noted in a structured form. Statistical Analysis Used: Nil. Results: The noise survey conducted in three renowned oil mills of north-eastern region of India revealed that about 26% of the total workers were exposed to noise level of more than 85 dBA. Further, 10% to 30% floor areas of workrooms, where oil expellers are provided have the SPL of more than 85 dBA. The noise in the oil mills was dominated by low frequency noise. The predominant noise sources in the oil mills were seed cleaner and power transmission system to oil expellers. Poor maintenance of machines and use of bamboo stick to prevent the fall of belt from misaligned pulleys were the main reason of high noise. Noise emitted by the electric motor, table ghani and oil expellers in all the oil mills was well within 85 dBA. Subjective response indicated that about 63% of the total workers felt that noise interfered with their conversation. About 16% each were of the opinion that noise interfered in their work and harmed their hearing. About 5% of workers stated that the workroom noise gave them headaches. Conclusions: The workers engaged in the workrooms of the oil mills are exposed to high noise, which will have

  11. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-07-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  12. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  13. Characterizing Fullerene Nanoparticles in Aqueous Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have indicated that fullerenes can form stable colloidal suspensions in water when introduced to the aqueous phase through solvent exchange, sonication, or extended mixing. The colloidal suspensions created using these techniques have effective aqueous phase concentratio...

  14. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or cracked, other than superficial surface cracks. Ball joints and kingpins shall not be bent...

  15. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or cracked, other than superficial surface cracks. Ball joints and kingpins shall not be bent...

  16. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or cracked, other than superficial surface cracks. Ball joints and kingpins shall not be bent...

  17. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or cracked, other than superficial surface cracks. Ball joints and kingpins shall not be bent...

  18. Noise Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaitoni, L.; Cottone, F.; Neri, I.; Vocca, H.

    2009-04-01

    Kinetic energy harvesting has been the subject of a significant research effort in the last twenty years. Unfortunately most of the energy available at the microscales comes in the form of random vibrations with a wide spectrum of frequencies while standard harvesting methods are based on linear oscillators that are resonantly tuned in narrow frequency ranges. In this paper we present a novel approach based on the exploitation of nonlinear stochastic dynamics and show that, under proper conditions nonlinear oscillators can beat the standard linear approaches with significant increase in the harvesting efficency. For the sake of demonstration we present experimental results from a toy-model bistable oscillator made by a piezoelectric inverted pendulum.

  19. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  20. Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Four-wheel suspension system uses simple system of levers with no compliant components to provide three-point suspension of chassis of vehicle while maintaining four-point contact with uneven terrain. Provides stability against tipping of four-point rectangular base, without rocking contact to which rigid four-wheel frame susceptible. Similar to six-wheel suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354).

  1. Phase Transitions for Suspension Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iommi, Godofredo; Jordan, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the thermodynamic formalism for suspension flows defined over countable alphabets. We are mostly interested in the regularity properties of the pressure function. We establish conditions for the pressure function to be real analytic or to exhibit a phase transition. We also construct an example of a potential for which the pressure has countably many phase transitions.

  2. Mathematics in Use: Suspension Bridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginther, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the mathematics utilized in the design and construction of suspension bridges, in general, then illustrates these mathematical concepts by examining data associated with the Mackinac Bridge, which connects the two peninsulas of Michigan. Emphasizes the strong interest factor these gigantic structures have for students by attaching a sense…

  3. Effective In-House Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gootman, Marilyn E.

    1998-01-01

    Although educators can do little to change students' out-of-school environments, they can use inhouse suspension time to help them behave more responsibly and become more resilient in handling daily pressures. The adult in charge should assume the role of a supportive resource, establish a personal connection with students, listen, take interest,…

  4. Microgravity combustion of dust suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John H. S.; Peraldi, Olivier; Knystautas, Rom

    1993-01-01

    Unlike the combustion of homogeneous gas mixtures, there are practically no reliable fundamental data (i.e., laminar burning velocity, flammability limits, quenching distance, minimum ignition energy) for the combustion of heterogeneous dust suspensions. Even the equilibrium thermodynamic data such as the constant pressure volume combustion pressure and the constant pressure adiabatic flame temperature are not accurately known for dust mixtures. This is mainly due to the problem of gravity sedimentation. In normal gravity, turbulence, convective flow, electric and acoustic fields are required to maintain a dust in suspension. These external influences have a dominating effect on the combustion processes. Microgravity offers a unique environment where a quiescent dust cloud can in principle be maintained for a sufficiently long duration for almost all combustion experiments (dust suspensions are inherently unstable due to Brownian motion and particle aggregation). Thus, the microgravity duration provided by drop towers, parabolic flights, and the space shuttle, can all be exploited for different kinds of dust combustion experiments. The present paper describes some recent studies on microgravity combustion of dust suspension carried out on the KC-135 and the Caravelle aircraft. The results reported are obtained from three parabolic flight campaigns.

  5. Large gap magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Eyssa, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a large gap magnetic suspension system is discussed. Some of the topics covered include: the system configuration, permanent magnet material, levitation magnet system, superconducting magnets, resistive magnets, superconducting levitation coils, resistive levitation coils, levitation magnet system, and the nitrogen cooled magnet system.

  6. Suspense at the Ballot Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kell, Nat; Kretchmar, Matt

    2013-01-01

    In the popular television show "Survivor", the winner of a million-dollar prize is determined in a final election, where the votes are read aloud as the winner is announced. We hypothesize that the show's producers purposely alter the order of the ballots in order to build audience suspense. We test our hypothesis using the Poisson binomial…

  7. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  8. Engineering of Novel Biocolloid Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. A.; Rodges, S.; Hiddessen, A.; Weitz, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions are materials with a variety of uses from cleaners and lubricants to food, cosmetics, and coatings. In addition, they can be used as a tool for testing the fundamental tenets of statistical physics. Colloidal suspensions can be synthesized from a wide variety of materials, and in the form of monodisperse particles, which can self-assemble into highly ordered colloidal crystal structures. As such they can also be used as templates for the construction of highly ordered materials. Materials design of colloids has, to date, relied on entropic self-assembly, where crystals form as result of lower free energy due to a transition to order. Here, our goal is to develop a completely new method for materials fabrication using colloidal precursors, in which the self-assembly of the ordered colloidal structures is driven by a highly controllable, attractive interaction. This will greatly increase the range of potential structures that can be fabricated with colloidal particles. In this work, we demonstrate that colloidal suspensions can be crosslinked through highly specific biological crosslinking reactions. In particular, the molecules we use are protein-carbohydrate interactions derived from the immune system. This different driving force for self-assembly will yield different and novel suspensions structures. Because the biological interactions are heterotypic (A binding to B), this chemical system can be used to make binary alloys in which the two colloid subpopulations vary in some property - size, density, volume fraction, magnetic susceptibility, etc. An additional feature of these molecules which is unique - even within the realm of biological recognition - is that the molecules bind reversibly on reasonable time-scales, which will enable the suspension to sample different configurations, and allow us to manipulate and measure the size of the suspension dynamically. Because of the wide variety of structures that can be made from these novel

  9. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  10. Flow properties of suspensions rich in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. P.; Gay, E. C.; Nelson, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Mathematical evaluation of flow properties of fluids carrying high concentrations of solids in suspension relates suspension viscosity to physical properties of the solids and liquids, and provides a means for predicting flow behavior. A technique for calculating a suspensions flow rates is applicable to the design of pipelines.

  11. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  12. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  13. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  14. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  15. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 570.61 Section 570.61 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be...

  16. 48 CFR 2509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suspension. 2509.407 Section 2509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2509.407 Suspension....

  17. 48 CFR 2509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Suspension. 2509.407 Section 2509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2509.407 Suspension....

  18. 48 CFR 2509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suspension. 2509.407 Section 2509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2509.407 Suspension....

  19. 48 CFR 2509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suspension. 2509.407 Section 2509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2509.407 Suspension....

  20. Alternatives to Suspensions: Rationale and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Jenna K.; Dowdy, Erin; Jimerson, Shane R.; Rime, W. Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Suspensions are often used as an individual disciplinary consequence in attempts to reduce problem behaviors in the future. However, suspensions have shown to be less effective for students with specific behavioral challenges and problems. When examining suspensions in the context of behaviorist and social-ecological learning theories, suspending…

  1. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  2. Spin noise of a polariton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Glazov, M. M.; Kavokin, A. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Aßmann, M.; Tsotsis, P.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, P. G.; Bayer, M.; Zapasskii, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    We report on experimental study of the exciton-polariton emission (PE) polarization noise below and above the polariton lasing threshold under continuous-wave nonresonant excitation. The experiments were performed with a high-Q graded 5 λ /2 GaAs/AlGaAs microcavity with four sets of three quantum wells in the strong-coupling regime. The PE polarization noise substantially exceeded in magnitude the shot-noise level and, in the studied frequency range (up to 650 MHz), had a flat spectrum. We have found that the polarization and intensity noise dependences on the pump power are strongly different. This difference is ascribed to the bosonic stimulation effect in spin-dependent scattering of the polaritons to the condensate. A theoretical model describing the observed peculiarity of the PE polarization noise is proposed.

  3. Interstellar communication: The case for spread spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2012-12-01

    Spread spectrum, widely employed in modern digital wireless terrestrial radio systems, chooses a signal with a noise-like character and much higher bandwidth than necessary. This paper advocates spread spectrum modulation for interstellar communication, motivated by robust immunity to radio-frequency interference (RFI) of technological origin in the vicinity of the receiver while preserving full detection sensitivity in the presence of natural sources of noise. Receiver design for noise immunity alone provides no basis for choosing a signal with any specific character, therefore failing to reduce ambiguity. By adding RFI to noise immunity as a design objective, the conjunction of choice of signal (by the transmitter) together with optimum detection for noise immunity (in the receiver) leads through simple probabilistic argument to the conclusion that the signal should possess the statistical properties of a burst of white noise, and also have a large time-bandwidth product. Thus spread spectrum also provides an implicit coordination between transmitter and receiver by reducing the ambiguity as to the signal character. This strategy requires the receiver to guess the specific noise-like signal, and it is contended that this is feasible if an appropriate pseudorandom signal is generated algorithmically. For example, conceptually simple algorithms like the binary expansion of common irrational numbers like π are shown to be suitable. Due to its deliberately wider bandwidth, spread spectrum is more susceptible to dispersion and distortion in propagation through the interstellar medium, desirably reducing ambiguity in parameters like bandwidth and carrier frequency. This suggests a promising new direction in interstellar communication using spread spectrum modulation techniques.

  4. An overview of health effects on noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.

    1988-12-01

    Although noise can damage the inner ear and cause other pathological changes, its most common negative effects are non-somatic, such as a perception of noisiness and disturbance of daily activities. According to the definition of health by WHO, this should be considered as a health hazard. These health effects of noise can be classified into the following three categories: (I) hearing loss, perception of noisiness and masking are produced along the auditory pathway and are thus direct and specific effects of noise; (II) interference with performance, rest and sleep, a feeling of discomfort and some physiological effects are produced as indirect and non-specific effects via reticular formation of the midbrain; (III) annoyance is not merely a feeling of unpleasantness but the feeling of being bothered or troubled, and includes the development of a particular attitude toward the noise source. Individual or group behavioral responses will be evoked when annoyance develops. Annoyance and behavioral response are integrated and composite effects. The health effects of noise are modified by many factors related to both the noise and the individual. Noise level, frequency spectrum, duration and impulsiveness modify the effects. Sex, age, health status and mental character also have an influence on the effects. Direct effects of noise are most dependent on the physical nature of the noise and least dependent on human factors. Indirect effects are more dependent, and integrated effects most dependent, on human factors.

  5. A Colorful Mixing Experiment in a Stirred Tank Using Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujilo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecillia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballesca´-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Marion Moise´s

    2014-01-01

    A simple experiment designed to study mixing of a material of complex rheology in a stirred tank is described. Non-Newtonian suspensions of blue maize flour that naturally contain anthocyanins have been chosen as a model fluid. These anthocyanins act as a native, wide spectrum pH indicator exhibiting greenish colors in alkaline environments, blue…

  6. SHOCKS Impulse-Jerk(I-J) Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) NON:``1''/ ω -``Noise'' Power-Law; Universality Power-Spectrum is I-J Time-Series Fourier-Transform: 1687 < < < 1988: VERY-LONG PRE-``Bak''!!!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavira, Aldo; Gregson, Victor, Jr.; Green, Sidney; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    SHOCKS impulse-jerk(I-J) [apply strain/impulse to get stress/jerk ],{VS. NON-shocks[apply stress to get strain]}, plasticity/fracture BAE[E. S.: MSE 8.,310(71); PSS: (a) 5, 601/607(71); Xl..-Latt. Defects 5, 277(74); Scripta Met.: 6, 785(72); 8, 587/617(74); 3rd Tokyo A.-E. Symp. (76);Acta Met.25,383(77); JMMM 7, 312(78)] NON: ``1''/ ω -``Noise'' Zipf(NON-Pareto); power-law ; universality power-spectrum is manifestly-demonstrated in ONLY ``PURE''-MATHS way to be nothing but d[F(t)=m(t)a(t)=Newton's (3rd) Law of Motion=(I-J)]/dt I-Jderivative d(I-J)/dt=dF(t)/dt=[m(t)da(t)/dt+a(t)dm(t)/dt] REdiscovery!!! A/Siegel NON-shock PHYSICS derivation fails!!!; ''PURE''-MATHS: dF(t)/dt=d2p(t)/dt2=[m(t)da(t)/dt+a(t)dm(t)/dt] TRIPLE-integral [VS. NON -shocks F = ma time-series DOUBLE-integral] Dichotomy: s(t) = [v0+(1/2)a(t)t2+EXTRA-TERM(S)], {VS. s(t) = [v0t+(1/2) at2]}, integral-transform formally defines power-spectrum Dichotomy:

  7. Electrorheological characteristics of polypyrrole-based suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weijiu

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, electrorheological (ER) suspensions containing polypyrrole particles and castor oil were prepared. The rheological and conductive properties of these polypyrrole-based suspensions and their influencing factors, such as electric field strength, particle concentration, temperature and shear rate, were investigated as well. The experimental results show that with increasing electric field strength, particle concentration and shear rate, the shear stress of the suspension is enhanced; while with an increasing temperature, the shear stress of a suspension decreases. The conductive properties of the suspension was found to increase with an increase of electric field strength, particle concentration and temperature, but decrease with shear rate.

  8. Current noise in three-terminal hybrid quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Wu, B H; Wang, C R; Chen, X S; Xu, G J

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the current noise of three-terminal hybrid structures at arbitrary bias voltages. Our results indicate that the noise can be a useful tool to extract dynamical information in multi-terminal hybrid structures. The zero-frequency noise is sensitive to the coupling with a normal lead. As a result, the characteristic multiple-step structure of the noise Fano factor due to multiple Andreev reflection will be suppressed as we increase this coupling. In addition, the internal dynamics due to processes of Andreev reflection and multiple Andreev reflection raises rich features in the noise spectrum corresponding to the energy differences of various dynamical processes. PMID:24305057

  9. Nonlinear Single Spin Spectrum Analayzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-05-01

    Qubits are excellent probes of their environment. When operating in the linear regime, they can be used as linear spectrum analyzers of the noise processes surrounding them. These methods fail for strong non-Gaussian noise where the qubit response is no longer linear. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for strongly coupled environments. Our non-perturbative analytic model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We developed a noise characterization scheme adapted to this non-linearity. We then applied it using a single trapped 88Sr+ ion as the a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. With this method, we attained a ten fold improvement over the standard Fourier limit. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs. Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis. Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 110503 (2013), Synopsis at http://physics.aps.org/synopsis-for/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.110503 Current position: National Institute of Standards and Tehcnology, Boulder, CO.

  10. Characterization of the Crab Pulsar's Timing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. M.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a power spectral analysis of the Crab pulsar's timing noise, mainly using radio measurements from Jodrell Bank taken over the period 1982-1989, an interval bounded by sparse data sampling and a large glitch. The power spectral analysis is complicated by nonuniform data sampling and the presence of a steep red power spectrum that can distort power spectra measurement by causing severe power 'leakage'. We develop a simple windowing method for computing red noise power spectra of uniformly sampled data sets and test it on Monte Carlo generated sample realizations of red power-law noise. We generalize time-domain methods of generating power-law red noise with even integer spectral indices to the case of noninteger spectral indices. The Jodrell Bank pulse phase residuals are dense and smooth enough that an interpolation onto a uniform time series is possible. A windowed power spectrum is computed revealing a periodic or nearly periodic component with a period of 568 +/- 10 days and a l/f(exp 3) power-law noise component in pulse phase with a noise strength S(sub infinity)=(1.24 +/- 0.067) x 10(exp 16) cycles(exp 2)/sec(exp 2) over the analysis frequency range f=0.003- 0.1 cycles/day. This result deviates from past analyses which characterized the pulse phase timing residuals as either l/f(sub 4) power-law noise or a quasiperiodic process. The analysis was checked using the Deeter polynomial method of power spectrum estimation that was developed for the case of nonuniform sampling, but has lower spectral resolution. The timing noise is consistent with a torque noise spectrum rising with analysis frequency as f implying blue torque noise, a result not predicted by current models of pulsar timing noise. If the periodic or nearly periodic component is due to a binary companion, we find a mass function f(M) = (6.8 +/- 2.4) x 10(exp -16) solar mass and a companion mass, M(sub c) is greater than or equal to 3.2 solar mass assuming a Crab pulsar mass of 1.4 solar

  11. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  12. Minimal noise subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Byrd, Mark; Jacobs, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    A system subjected to noise contains a decoherence-free subspace or subsystem (DFS) only if the noise possesses an exact symmetry. Here we consider noise models in which a perturbation breaks a symmetry of the noise, so that if S is a DFS under a given noise process it is no longer so under the new perturbed noise process. We ask whether there is a subspace or subsystem that is more robust to the perturbed noise than S . To answer this question we develop a numerical method that allows us to search for subspaces or subsystems that are maximally robust to arbitrary noise processes. We apply this method to a number of examples, and find that a subsystem that is a DFS is often not the subsystem that experiences minimal noise when the symmetry of the noise is broken by a perturbation. We discuss which classes of noise have this property.

  13. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Shawn A.; Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Ge, Zhenbin; Shimmin, Robert G.

    2006-04-01

    We describe an optical beam deflection technique for measurements of the thermal diffusivity of fluid mixtures and suspensions of nanoparticles with a precision of better than 1%. Our approach is tested using the thermal conductivity of ethanol-water mixtures; in nearly pure ethanol, the increase in thermal conductivity with water concentration is a factor of 2 larger than predicted by effective medium theory. Solutions of C60-C70 fullerenes in toluene and suspensions of alkanethiolate-protected Au nanoparticles were measured to maximum volume fractions of 0.6% and 0.35 vol %, respectively. We do not observe anomalous enhancements of the thermal conductivity that have been reported in previous studies of nanofluids; the largest increase in thermal conductivity we have observed is 1.3%+/-0.8% for 4 nm diam Au particles suspended in ethanol.

  14. Wood fuel in suspension burners

    SciTech Connect

    Wolle, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    Experience and criteria for solid fuel suspension burning is presented based on more than ten years of actual experience with commercially installed projects. Fuel types discussed range from dried wood with less than 15% moisture content, wet basis, to exotic biomass material such as brewed tea leaves and processed coffee grounds. Single burner inputs range from 1,465 kW (5,000 Mbh) to 13,771 kW (47,000 Mbh) as well as multiple burner applications with support burning using fuel oil and/or natural gas. General requirements for self-sustaining combustion will be reviewed as applied to suspension solid fuel burning, together with results of what can happen if these requirements are not met. Solid fuel preparation, sizing, transport, storage, and metering control is essential for proper feed. Combustion chamber volume, combustion air requirements, excess air, and products of combustion are reviewed, together with induced draft fan sizing. (Refs. 7).

  15. Increased roll stability suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, L.

    1987-05-26

    A suspension system is described for suspending an elongated chassis of a vehicle, such as a heavy duty truck, above the front axle and rear axle of a transversely extending tandem axle combination. The suspension system comprises: means for locating the roll center of the vehicle at an elevation below the elevation of the axles; and a stabilizer unit for providing roll stability to the vehicle. The stabilizer unit is mounted to the vehicle chassis at a pivot point longitudinally intermediate the front axle and the rear axle of the tandem axle combination for rotation in a generally horizontal plane. The stabilizer unit includes a pair of linkage members, each linkage member extending generally longitudinally outward from the pivot point in a direction opposite from the other linkage member and toward a corresponding axle.

  16. Chain Dynamics in Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, A. P.; Furst, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) suspensions are composed of colloidal particles which acquire dipole moments when subjected to an external magnetic field. At sufficient field strengths and concentrations, the dipolar particles rapidly aggregate to form long chains. Subsequent lateral cross-linking of the dipolar chains is responsible for a rapid liquid-to-solid-like rheological transition. The unique, magnetically-activated rheological properties of MR suspensions make them ideal for interfacing mechanical systems to electronic controls. Additionally, the ability to experimentally probe colloidal suspensions interacting through tunable anisotropic potentials is of fundamental interest. Our current experimental work has focused on understanding the fluctuations of dipolar chains. It has been proposed by Halsey and Toor (HT) that the strong Landau-Peierls thermal fluctuations of dipolar chains could be responsible for long-range attractions between chains. Such interactions will govern the long-time relaxation of MR suspensions. We have synthesized monodisperse neutrally buoyant MR suspensions by density matching stabilized ferrofluid emulsion droplets with D2O. This allows us to probe the dynamics of the dipolar chains using light scattering without gravitational, interfacial, and polydispersity effects to resolve the short-wavelength dynamics of the dipolar chains. We used diffusing wave spectroscopy to measure these dynamics. The particle displacements at short times that show an independence to the field strength, but at long times exhibit a constrained, sub-diffusive motion that slows as the dipole strength is increased. The experiments are in good qualitative agreement with Brownian dynamics simulations of dipolar chains. Although there have been several important and detailed studies of the structure and interactions in MR suspensions, there has not been conclusive evidence that supports or contradicts the HT model prediction that long-range interactions exist between

  17. [Spectrum diagnostic of arcjet].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Hua; Shen, Yan; Chen, Li-Ming

    2004-08-01

    Arcjet is a kind of propulsion device for mechanical operation and control of spacecraft. As its specific impulse is far greater than classical device using chemical propellant, arcjet is playing an increasing role in spacecraft propulsion. To improve our understanding of its working mechanics, the diagnostic method of arcjet is discussed and a set of spectrum diagnostic system is established in this paper. With this system, spectrum diagnostic was executed for Ar propellant at a setting value of flow rate and input current in a vacuum chamber. The result shows that the system has a high signal-to-noise ratio and the data collected can reflect the physical process objectively. Through transaction and analysis of these data, radial distribution of emission coefficient was obtained for different spectral lines, and radial distribution of temperature was also obtained through farther analysis of the emission coefficient. The result shows that under the experiment conditions of this paper, arcjet is in thermodynamic non-equilibrium state, therefore the temperatures obtained by different spectral lines are different. PMID:15766102

  18. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  19. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  20. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum. PMID:23546253

  1. Membrane filtration of food suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, A N; Peterkin, P I; Dudas, I

    1979-01-01

    Factors affecting the membrane filtration of food suspensions were studied for 58 foods and 13 membrane filters. Lot number within a brand, pore size (0.45 or 0.8 micrometer), and time elapsed before filtration had little effect on filterability. Brand of membrane filter, flow direction, pressure differential, age (microbiological quality) of the food, duration of the blending process, temperature, and concentration of food in the suspension had significant and often predictable effects. Preparation of suspensions by Stomacher (relative to rotary blender) addition of surfactant (particularly at elevated temperature) and prior incubation with proteases sometimes had dramatic effects of filterability. In contrast to popular opinion, foods can be membrane filtered in quantities pertinent to the maximums used in conventional plating procedures. Removal of growth inhibitors and food debris is possible by using membrane filters. Lowering of the limits of detection of microorganisms by concentration on membrane filters can be considered feasible for many foods. The data are particularly relevant to the use of hydrophobic grid-membrane filters (which are capable of enumerating up to 9 X 10(4) organisms per filter) in instrumented methods of food microbiological analysis. Images PMID:760637

  2. Efficiency of single noise barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hothersall, D. C.; Chandler-Wilde, S. N.; Hajmirzae, M. N.

    1991-04-01

    A numerical model is described which enables the sound field in the region of outdoor noise barriers to be calculated by using the boundary element method. The non-uniqueness of solution of the method, producing unreliable results in some conditions, is discussed. The model can be applied to barriers of arbitrary cross-sectional shape and arbitrary distribution of surface cover. The model is two-dimensional, but results are shown to agree well with those obtained for the three-dimensional problem of propagation from a point source over a noise barrier of infinite length. The model is used to compare the efficiency of a wide range of constructions of single noise barriers of different height, cross-sectional shape and surface cover. The effects of the ground cover are also considered. Comparison is made by examining spectra of the insertion loss of the barriers, and also broadband insertion losses for a source with a characteristic A-weighted road traffic noise spectrum. Single-figure estimates are presented of the relative efficiency, in terms of insertion loss, in the deep shadow zone, of a wide range of barrier configurations.

  3. On the Two Components of Turbulent Mixing Noise from Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Golebiowski, Michel; Seiner, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    It is argued that because of the lack of intrinsic length and time scales in the core part of the jet flow, the radiated noise spectrum of a high-speed jet should exhibit similarity. A careful analysis of all the axisymmetric supersonic jet noise spectra in the data-bank of the Jet Noise Laboratory of the NASA Langley Research Center has been carried out. Two similarity spectra, one for the noise from the large turbulence structures/instability waves of the jet flow, the other for the noise from the fine-scale turbulence, are identified. The two similarity spectra appear to be universal spectra for axisymmetric jets. They fit all the measured data including those from subsonic jets. Experimental evidence are presented showing that regardless of whether a jet is supersonic or subsonic the noise characteristics and generation mechanisms are the same. There is large turbulence structures/instability waves noise from subsonic jets. This noise component can be seen prominently inside the cone of silence of the fine-scale turbulence noise near the jet axis. For imperfectly expanded supersonic jets, a shock cell structure is formed inside the jet plume. Measured spectra are provided to demonstrate that the presence of a shock cell structure has little effect on the radiated turbulent mixing noise. The shape of the noise spectrum as well as the noise intensity remain practically the same as those of a fully expanded jet. However, for jets undergoing strong screeching, there is broadband noise amplification for both turbulent mixing noise components. It is discovered through a pilot study of the noise spectrum of rectangular and elliptic supersonic jets that the turbulent mixing noise of these jets is also made up of the same two noise components found in axisymmetric jets. The spectrum of each individual noise component also fits the corresponding similarity spectrum of axisymmetric jets.

  4. Noise, Health, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Leo L.

    There is reasonable agreement that hearing impairment is related to noise exposure. This hearing loss due to noise is considered a serious health injury, but there is still difficulty in delineating the importance of noise related to people's general non-auditory well-being and health. Beside hearing loss, noise inhibits satisfactory speech…

  5. Research In Helicopter Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Schmitz, Frederic H.; Morse, Andrew H.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in aeroacoustical theory and experiments reviewed. Report summarizes continuing U.S. Army programs of research into causes of noise generated by helicopters. Topics of study include high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex-interaction noise, and low-frequency harmonic noise.

  6. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  7. Acoustic Probe for Solid-Gas-Liquid Suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2003-09-14

    /monitoring two-phase flows in relatively ideal, well-characterized suspensions. Two major factors which we judge has prevented its wide-spread use in the processing industry, particularly for dilute suspensions, is careful selection of the frequency range for interrogation and quantification and removal of the noise introduced by bubbles from the acoustic signal obtained from the suspension. Our research during the first funding period to develop an acoustic probe for solid-gas liquid suspensions has resulted in a theory, supported by our experiments, to describe small amplitude dilute suspensions (Norato, 1999, Spelt et al., 1999, Spelt et al., 2001). The theory agrees well with experimental data of sound attenuation up to 45 {approx}01% suspensions of 0.11 and 77 micron radius polystyrene particles in water and 0.4 to 40 vol %, suspensions of 32 micron soda-lime glass particles in water. Also, analyses of our attenuation experiments for solid-gas liquid experiments suggest the theory can be applied to correct for signal interference due to the presence of bubbles over a selected frequency range to permit determination of the solid-liquid volume fraction. Further, we show experimentally that a reliable linear dependency of weight percent solids with attenuation is obtained for low weight fractions at high frequencies of interrogation where bubble interference is minimal. There was a collaborative effort during the first funding period with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories in that Dr. Margaret Greenwood was a co-investigator on the project. Dr. Greenwood provided a high level of experimental knowledge and techniques on ultrasound propagation, measurement and data processing. During the second funding period the slurry test loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratories under the direction of Mr. Tom Hylton will be employed to demonstrate the measurement capabilities of the prototype acoustic monitor.

  8. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  9. Procedure for Separating Noise Sources in Measurements of Turbofan Engine Core Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources like the fan and jet have been reduced. A multiple microphone and acoustic source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources has been developed. The auto and cross spectrum in the frequency range below 1000 Hz is fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent source with a single coherent source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent source with two coherent point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method works well.

  10. Statistical effects in the absorption and optical activity of particulate suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, C; Maestre, M F

    1988-01-01

    The phenomenon of Duysens flattening of the absorption spectra resulting from the inhomogeneous distribution of the chromophores in the solution is analyzed. These inhomogeneities are treated as localized statistical fluctuations in the concentration of the absorbing species, by using the Gaussian distribution. A law of absorbance is obtained, and the effect of light scattering on the flattening is also characterized. The flattening in the circular dichroism spectra of particulate suspensions is then analyzed. It is shown that the degree of flattening of the circular dichroism of a suspension is, in general, different from the corresponding flattening of its absorption spectrum. A quantitative relationship between the two effects is established. PMID:3186738

  11. 1/f Noise in a Coulomb Glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Clare C.; Shtengel, Kirill

    2002-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is found in Coulomb glasses, among other systems with slow relaxation. It has been recently studied in detail in Si:B in the experimental work of Massey and Lee [1]. They concluded that their findings were inconsistent with the single-particle mechanisms proposed earlier. We show that the observed noise can be produced by charge fluctuations due to electrons hopping between isolated sites and a percolating network at low temperatures [2]. Coulomb interactions are included through the Coulomb gap in the density of states. The low frequency noise spectrum goes as ω^-α with α slightly larger than 1. This result, together with the temperature dependence of α and the noise amplitude are in good agreement with the experiments of Massey and Lee. [1] J. G. Massey and Mark Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3986 (1997). [2] Kirill Shtengel and Clare C. Yu (2001), cond-mat/0111302.

  12. Frequency resolving power measured by rippled noise.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    1994-07-01

    Frequency resolving power (FRP) was measured in normal humans using rippled noise with a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to find the highest ripple density at which an interchange of mutual peak and trough position (the phase reversal) in the rippled spectrum is detectable. In the frequency range below 0.5 kHz FRP was found to be about 21 ripples per kHz when tested by both broad-band and narrow-band rippled noise. In the frequency range above 2 kHz, FRP measured by the narrow-band rippled noise was 22 to 23 relative units (relation of the noise central frequency to the ripple frequency spacing). PMID:7961175

  13. Optimized Noise Filtration through Dynamical Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J.; Bollinger, John J.

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that applying a sequence of Hahn spin-echo pulses to a qubit system at judiciously chosen intervals can, in certain noise environments, greatly improve the suppression of phase errors compared to traditional dynamical decoupling approaches. By enforcing a simple analytical condition, we obtain sets of dynamical decoupling sequences that are designed for optimized noise filtration, but are independent of the noise spectrum up to a single scaling factor set by the coherence time of the system. These sequences are tested in a model qubit system, Be+9 ions in a Penning trap. Our combined theoretical and experimental studies show that in high-frequency-dominated noise environments with sharp high-frequency cutoffs this approach may suppress phase errors orders of magnitude more efficiently than comparable techniques can.

  14. Optimized noise filtration through dynamical decoupling.

    PubMed

    Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J; Bollinger, John J

    2009-07-24

    Recent studies have shown that applying a sequence of Hahn spin-echo pulses to a qubit system at judiciously chosen intervals can, in certain noise environments, greatly improve the suppression of phase errors compared to traditional dynamical decoupling approaches. By enforcing a simple analytical condition, we obtain sets of dynamical decoupling sequences that are designed for optimized noise filtration, but are independent of the noise spectrum up to a single scaling factor set by the coherence time of the system. These sequences are tested in a model qubit system, ;{9}Be;{+} ions in a Penning trap. Our combined theoretical and experimental studies show that in high-frequency-dominated noise environments with sharp high-frequency cutoffs this approach may suppress phase errors orders of magnitude more efficiently than comparable techniques can. PMID:19659335

  15. Large angle magnetic suspension text fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1995-01-01

    In lieu of a final report for this project for the period 1 April 1995 through 31 October 1995, a compilation of three reports are included herein. The three reports are: (1) 'Design and Implementation of a Digital Controller for a Magnetic Suspension and Vernier Pointing System', (2) 'Influence of Eddy Currents on the Dynamic Characteristics of Magnetic Suspensions and Magnetic Bearings', and (3) 'Design and Implementation of a Digital Controller for a Magnetic Suspension and Vernier Pointing System'.

  16. Magnetic suspension systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havenhill, Douglas G.; Wolke, Patrick J.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of techniques is presented used in the described magnetic suspension systems. Also a review is presented of the systems already developed, which demonstrate the usefulness, applicability, and flight readiness of magnetic suspension to a broad range of payloads and environments. The following subject areas are covered: programs overview; key concepts; magnetic suspension as an isolator and as a pointer; pointing and isolation systems; magnetic actuator control techniques; and test data.

  17. EFFECTS OF INTERMITTENT EMISSION: NOISE INVENTORY FOR THE SCINTILLATING PULSAR B0834+06

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.; Smirnova, T. V.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu

    2011-05-20

    We compare signal and noise for observations of the scintillating pulsar B0834+06, using very long baseline interferometry and a single-dish spectrometer. Comparisons between instruments and with models suggest that amplitude variations of the pulsar strongly affect the amount and distribution of self-noise. We show that noise follows a quadratic polynomial with flux density, in spectral observations. Constant coefficients, indicative of background noise, agree well with expectation; whereas second-order coefficients, indicative of self-noise, are {approx}3 times values expected for a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density. We show that variations in flux density during the 10 s integration accounts for the discrepancy. In the secondary spectrum, {approx}97% of spectral power lies within the pulsar's typical scintillation bandwidth and timescale; an extended scintillation arc contains {approx}3%. For a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density, noise in the dynamic spectrum will appear as a uniformly distributed background in the secondary spectrum. We find that this uniform noise background contains 95% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for interferometric observations; but only 35% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for single-dish observations. Receiver and sky dominate noise for our interferometric observations, whereas self-noise dominates for single-dish. We suggest that intermittent emission by the pulsar, on timescales <300 {mu}s, concentrates self-noise near the origin in the secondary spectrum, by correlating noise over the dynamic spectrum. We suggest that intermittency sets fundamental limits on pulsar astrometry or timing. Accounting of noise may provide means for detection of intermittent sources, when effects of propagation are unknown or impractical to invert.

  18. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  19. Shanghai alleviates noise pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Runling

    1983-07-14

    ''Environmental noise is now under control in Shanghai, the level of environmental noise is basically holding steady, and in some areas industrial and traffic noise has decreased.'' These were the conclusions of research by Hong Zonghui (3163 1350 6540) and Wang Shixian (3769 6164 6343) of Tongji University's Acoustics Laboratory, as put forward at a recent public academic lecture at Tongji University. In order to eliminate noise from the environment, Tongji University in the early 1970's began conducting investigations and research on noise pollution and its control together with concerned units in this city. After tests in a network of 2,117 points throughout the city, they determined that the most common form of noise pollution is traffic, which accounts for 50 percent of all noise. Since 1979, this city has adopted successive measures in the area of traffic control in order to eliminate the source of noise. Traffic noise has now dropped about 3 decibels in the city. This research report also pointed out that according to the results of regional environmental noise tests, this city does not meet the noise pollution standards set by the state. Tugboats on the Suzhou He blow their whistles late at night, and the noise at riverside homes can reach 82 decibels; the Fangua Lane residential district is close to a railroad where engine noise can reach 89 decibels and affect the residents' health. In addition, rather serious noise pollution is produced by more than 300 handicraft, light industry, textile, and electrical machinery plants.

  20. Rheology of dense bubble suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang-Yoon; Sangani, Ashok S.; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Koch, Donald L.

    1997-06-01

    The rheological behavior of rapidly sheared bubble suspensions is examined through numerical simulations and kinetic theory. The limiting case of spherical bubbles at large Reynolds number Re and small Weber number We is examined in detail. Here, Re=ργa2/μ and We=ργ2a3/s, a being the bubble radius, γ the imposed shear, s the interfacial tension, and μ and ρ, respectively, the viscosity and density of the liquid. The bubbles are assumed to undergo elastic bounces when they come into contact; coalescence can be prevented in practice by addition of salt or surface-active impurities. The numerical simulations account for the interactions among bubbles which are assumed to be dominated by the potential flow of the liquid caused by the motion of the bubbles and the shear-induced collision of the bubbles. A kinetic theory based on Grad's moment method is used to predict the distribution function for the bubble velocities and the stress in the suspension. The hydrodynamic interactions are incorporated in this theory only through their influence on the virtual mass and viscous dissipation in the suspension. It is shown that this theory provides reasonable predictions for the bubble-phase pressure and viscosity determined from simulations including the detailed potential flow interactions. A striking result of this study is that the variance of the bubble velocity can become large compared with (γa)2 in the limit of large Reynolds number. This implies that the disperse-phase pressure and viscosity associated with the fluctuating motion of the bubbles is quite significant. To determine whether this prediction is reasonable even in the presence of nonlinear drag forces induced by bubble deformation, we perform simulations in which the bubbles are subject to an empirical drag law and show that the bubble velocity variance can be as large as 15γ2a2.

  1. Mesohydrodynamics of suspensions of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian Feng

    Complex fluids are ubiquitous in science and engineering. Biological fluids, immiscible blends, foams, and many types of suspensions are familiar examples of complex fluids. Their internal structure (e.g. suspended particles in suspensions or the interface in immiscible blends) evolves in time on the time scale that is comparable with the time scale of the macroscopic motion. The macroscopic time evolution has to be therefore coupled to the microstructure time evolution. Such coupling then causes the complexity of the flow phenomena. This thesis focuses on suspensions of interfaces or elastic membranes. They include the clean interface between two liquid bulks, liquid interfaces covered with surface active agents, and solid-liquid membranes of red blood cells. The popular point of departure of a theoretical analysis of this type of complex fluids is microhydrodynamics. The formulation can either be made into a basis for direct numerical simulations or it can be carried to a field formulation. In both cases an extensive computer power is needed to solve the governing equation. To pass finally to predictions of flow properties one needs to involve still an additional physics and approximations that allow to transform the solutions (addressing typically trajectories of individual particles or a single particle deformations) into stresses arising in the fluids. The approach that we use in this thesis is mesoscopic. The starting point is a. mesoscopic model of the internal structure and of the physics taking place in the fluid. The physics is then expressed into governing equations of the rheological model by following the thermodynamic (GENERIC) framework. In most cases, the governing equations are just a set of ordinary differential equations that can readily be solved by using a standard software. Predictions of our models are found to be in a good agreement with results of experimental observations and predictions of the models based on microhydrodynamics.

  2. Ultrasonic characterization of solid liquid suspensions

    DOEpatents

    Panetta, Paul D.

    2010-06-22

    Using an ultrasonic field, properties of a solid liquid suspension such as through-transmission attenuation, backscattering, and diffuse field are measured. These properties are converted to quantities indicating the strength of different loss mechanisms (such as absorption, single scattering and multiple scattering) among particles in the suspension. Such separation of the loss mechanisms can allow for direct comparison of the attenuating effects of the mechanisms. These comparisons can also indicate a model most likely to accurately characterize the suspension and can aid in determination of properties such as particle size, concentration, and density of the suspension.

  3. Modeling of Electromagnetic Damper for Automobile Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Yasuhiro; Suda, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kondo, Takuhiro

    In this paper, the modeling of the electromagnetic damper (EMD) for automobile suspension is presented and the validation of the model is demonstrated by comparing the numerical results with the experimental results obtained using shaker tests. EMD is used as an active suspension and controlled to have output force calculated from velocities of sprung and unsprung masses. The formulation of EMD system for active suspensions is first developed, and the validation of the EMD model is demonstrated by experiments of the EMD for automobile suspensions. The validity of the formulation of the EMD developed in this investigation is shown for the frequency responses as well as energy balance for its active use.

  4. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a... liability or relating to the practitioner's own tax liability, for— (i) Instituting or...

  5. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a... liability or relating to the practitioner's own tax liability, for— (i) Instituting or...

  6. Enhancing the cosmic shear power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Fergus; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Jimenez, Raul; Joachimi, Benjamin; Verde, Licia

    2016-02-01

    Applying a transformation to a non-Gaussian field can enhance the information content of the resulting power spectrum, by reducing the correlations between Fourier modes. In the context of weak gravitational lensing, it has been shown that this gain in information content is significantly compromised by the presence of shape noise. We apply clipping to mock convergence fields, a technique which is known to be robust in the presence of noise and has been successfully applied to galaxy number density fields. When analysed in isolation the resulting convergence power spectrum returns degraded constraints on cosmological parameters. However, substantial gains can be achieved by performing a combined analysis of the power spectra derived from both the original and transformed fields. Even in the presence of realistic levels of shape noise, we demonstrate that this approach is capable of reducing the area of likelihood contours within the Ωm - σ8 plane by more than a factor of 3.

  7. ROTATIONAL- SHOCK(S) Impulse-Jerk(I-J) [VS. T=I α] Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) NON: ``1''/[f= ω]-``Noise'' Power-Law Power-Spectrum is T=I α DERIVATIVE I-J Time-Series Integral-Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Thomas; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    ROTATIONAL-[``spin-up''/``spin-down'']-SHOCK(S)-plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71); PSS:(a)5,601 /607(71); Xl..-Latt. Defects 5,277(74);Scripta Met.:6,785(72);8,587/617(74);3rd Tokyo A.-E. Symp.(76);Acta Met. 25,383(77);JMMM 7,312(78)] NON: ``1''/ ω noise'' Zipf-(Pareto); power-law universality power-spectrum; is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but ROTATIONAL(in 2 OR 3-dimensions)ANGULAR-momentum Newton's 3rd Law of Motion T=I α=dJ/dt REdiscovery!!! A/Siegel PHYSICS derivation FAILS!!! ''PURE''-MATHS: dT(t)/dt=(dJ(t)/dt)2=[I(t)d α(t)/dt+ α(t)(t)dI(t)/dt TRIPLE-integral VS. T=I α DOUBLE-integral time-series(T-S) Dichotomy: θ(t)=[ϖ0 t + α(t) t 2 / 2 + EXTRA-TERM(S)] VS. θ(t)=[ϖ0 t + α(t) t 2 / 2 ] integral-transform formally defines power-spectrum Dichotomy: P(ω) =? θ(t)e-iωtdt=?[ϖ0 t + αt2 / 2 ]e-iωtdt=φ0?te-iωtdt+?{[ α ≠ α (t)]/2}t2eiωtdt= φ0 (ω) /d ω+{[a ≠a(t)]/2}d2 δ (ω) /dω2 =φ0 /ω0+{[ α ≠ α (t)]/2}/ω 1 . 000 ...: if α=0, then P(ω) 1/ω0, VS. if α ≠ α (t) ≠0, then P(ω) 1/ ω 1/ω 1 . 000 ...

  8. Magnetic suspension options for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Design criteria for spacecraft inertia-wheel suspensions are listed. The advantages of magnetic suspensions over other suspension types for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications are cited along with the functions performed by magnetic suspension. The common designs for magnetic suspensions are enumerated. Materials selection of permanent magnets and core materials is considered.

  9. Role of colored noise in active dynamical theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex

    2015-03-01

    The noise driving many dynamical systems is temporally correlated, or colored. Biological motor proteins, for example, generate processive stresses in biopolymer networks, and it would be incorrect to model this forcing as uncorrelated white noise. To gain insight into the role of the noise spectrum, we study a phi⌃4 theory in the presence of active colored noise with renormalization group techniques. Using a frequency shell integration scheme, we perform an epsilon expansion around d =8 for power law noise of the form 1/f⌃2 and find frequency and wavevector dependent corrections to the transport coefficients. The power law noise assumption is, of course, an approximation: all physical processes possess a small frequency cutoff. We study the effect of this cutoff and find a change in scaling behavior as the system transitions from a power law divergent regime to one dominated by white noise.

  10. On Observer Internal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    1986-06-01

    Human observers behave as if they have two sources of intrinsic variability, commonly referred to as internal noise. One component (here referred to as "constant") is independent of the external noise level but does depend on mean display luminance. The other component (referred to as "induced") is directly proportional to the external noise level and dominates when the display noise is easily visible. The induced internal noise is predicted by two models - one based on intrinsic signal parameter jitter and the other on a zone of indecision. Spectral density is the appropriate measure for internal noise.

  11. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and in-mine noise measurements have been made. These show that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are the dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for cutting and conveying operations are 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show excellent agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra.

  12. A Comparison of Combustor-Noise Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    The present status of combustor-noise prediction in the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP)1 for current-generation (N) turbofan engines is summarized. Several semi-empirical models for turbofan combustor noise are discussed, including best methods for near-term updates to ANOPP. An alternate turbine-transmission factor2 will appear as a user selectable option in the combustor-noise module GECOR in the next release. The three-spectrum model proposed by Stone et al.3 for GE turbofan-engine combustor noise is discussed and compared with ANOPP predictions for several relevant cases. Based on the results presented herein and in their report,3 it is recommended that the application of this fully empirical combustor-noise prediction method be limited to situations involving only General-Electric turbofan engines. Long-term needs and challenges for the N+1 through N+3 time frame are discussed. Because the impact of other propulsion-noise sources continues to be reduced due to turbofan design trends, advances in noise-mitigation techniques, and expected aircraft configuration changes, the relative importance of core noise is expected to greatly increase in the future. The noise-source structure in the combustor, including the indirect one, and the effects of the propagation path through the engine and exhaust nozzle need to be better understood. In particular, the acoustic consequences of the expected trends toward smaller, highly efficient gas-generator cores and low-emission fuel-flexible combustors need to be fully investigated since future designs are quite likely to fall outside of the parameter space of existing (semi-empirical) prediction tools.

  13. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  14. Two algorithms for compressing noise like signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaian, Sos S.; Cherukuri, Ravindranath; Akopian, David

    2005-05-01

    Compression is a technique that is used to encode data so that the data needs less storage/memory space. Compression of random data is vital in case where data where we need preserve data that has low redundancy and whose power spectrum is close to noise. In case of noisy signals that are used in various data hiding schemes the data has low redundancy and low energy spectrum. Therefore, upon compressing with lossy compression algorithms the low energy spectrum might get lost. Since the LSB plane data has low redundancy, lossless compression algorithms like Run length, Huffman coding, Arithmetic coding are in effective in providing a good compression ratio. These problems motivated in developing a new class of compression algorithms for compressing noisy signals. In this paper, we introduce a two new compression technique that compresses the random data like noise with reference to know pseudo noise sequence generated using a key. In addition, we developed a representation model for digital media using the pseudo noise signals. For simulation, we have made comparison between our methods and existing compression techniques like Run length that shows the Run length cannot compress when data is random but the proposed algorithms can compress. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms can be extended to all kinds of random data used in various applications.

  15. Spectroscopy of surface-induced noise using shallow spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Romach, Y; Müller, C; Unden, T; Rogers, L J; Isoda, T; Itoh, K M; Markham, M; Stacey, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Naydenov, B; McGuinness, L P; Bar-Gill, N; Jelezko, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the noise spectrum experienced by few nanometer deep nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond as a function of depth, surface coating, magnetic field and temperature. Analysis reveals a double-Lorentzian noise spectrum consistent with a surface electronic spin bath in the low frequency regime, along with a faster noise source attributed to surface-modified phononic coupling. These results shed new light on the mechanisms responsible for surface noise affecting shallow spins at semiconductor interfaces, and suggests possible directions for further studies. We demonstrate dynamical decoupling from the surface noise, paving the way to applications ranging from nanoscale NMR to quantum networks. PMID:25615501

  16. Status of magnetic suspension technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, Richmond P.; Tcheng, Ping

    1986-01-01

    The reasons for the continuing interest in the Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) are highlighted. Typical problems that can arise because of model-support interference in a transonic wind tunnel are shown to illustrate the need for MSBS. The two magnetic suspension systems in operation at Langley are the only ones active in the U.S. One of these systems is the 13 inch MSBS which was borrowed from the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center. The other system is the 6 inch MSBS which was developed by MIT Aerophysics Laboratory with NASA and DOD funding. Each of these systems is combined with a subsonic wind tunnel. Ongoing research in both of these systems is covered. Last year, Madison Magnetics, Inc., completed a contractual design and cost study utilizing some advance concepts for a large MSBS which would be compatible with an 8 foot transonic wind tunnel and the highlights of the study are presented. Sverdrup Technology, Inc., recently performed a study under contract for Langley on the potential usefulness to the aerospace industry of a proposed large MSBS combined with a suitable transonic wind tunnel. The results of that study are discussed. Langley has partially funded the MSBS work at the University of Southampton for about 6 years under a grant arrangement and the major results are summarized.

  17. Photomixing of chlamydomonas rheinhardtii suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Capellazzi Resta, Marina; Abou, Bérengère; Brunet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas rheinhardtii is a fast swimming unicellular alga able to bias its swimming direction in gradients of light intensity, an ability know as phototaxis. We have investigated experimentally both the swimming behavior of individual cells and the macroscopic response of shallow suspensions of these micro-organisms in response to a localized light source. At low light intensity, algae exhibit positive phototaxis and accumulate beneath the excitation light. In weakly concentrated thin layers, the balance between phototaxis and cell motility results in steady symmetrical patterns compatible with a purely diffusive model using effective diffusion coefficients extracted from the analysis of individual cell trajectories. However, at higher cell density and layer depth, collective effects induce convective flows around the light source. These flows disturb the cell concentration patterns which spread and may then becomes unstable. Using large passive tracer particles, we have characterized the velocity fields associated with this forced bioconvection and their dependence on the cell density and layer depth. By tuning the light distribution, this mechanism of photo-bioconvection allows a fine control over the local fluid flows, and thus the mixing efficiency, in algal suspensions.

  18. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  19. The effects of ear protectors and hearing losses on sentence intelligibility in aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, G. R.

    1981-06-01

    Flight line personnel with hearing defects often complain that face-to-face speech communication in noise is considerably reduced when ear protectors are worn. Whether this could be confirmed or not was determined. An effective noise protecting flight helmet changes the flat aircraft cabin noise spectrum into a spectrum with predominance of lower frequencies. Whether the additional wearing of earplugs under the ear cups might improve speech perception was investigated.

  20. Predicting Aircraft Noise Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer program developed for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground tests. Noise sources include fan inlet and exhaust jet flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine and airframe. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  1. NASA propeller noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.

    1980-01-01

    The research in propeller noise prediction, noise/performance optimization, and interior reduction is described. Selected results are presented to illustrate the status of the technology and the direction of future research.

  2. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  3. Thermal Noise in Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Raffaele

    Thermal noise is one of the major limitations to the sensitivity of present and future laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection. According to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem any mechanical oscillator is affected by a motion of thermal origin directly related to its thermodynamic temperature. The mirrors and their suspensions that are used in gravitational wave detectors such as Virgo or LIGO are examples of such mechanical oscillators. As a consequence their position is affected by this thermal vibration and the sensitivity of the gravitational wave detector is thermal noise limited over a wide range of frequencies. After recalling briefly the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and its origins, this chapter describes the main types of thermal noise affecting gravitational wave detectors. In the last part of the chapter a special emphasis is given to the thermal noise due to dissipation in the mirrors optical coatings.

  4. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  5. Measurement of Mechanical Excess Noise from the Stressed Silicate Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashentseva, Maria; Bilenko, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this work is an experimental search for excess mechanical noise which might be generated in a contact area of parts glued to each other by silicate bonding technique under external stress. This technique is an important method developed for the second generation of the ground based gravitational wave detectors. Although this technique is already used in AdvLIGO for the attachment of "ears" with suspension fibers to the test masses, the absence of additional non-gaussian noise caused by the bond area subjected by heavy load wasn't proved yet.

  6. Spread-spectrum communications using sequences generated by phase filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, M.

    The principal characteristics of spread-spectrum communications is to extend the signal spectrum in order to combat jammers and other interferences. The 'noise-like' emitted signal must have a power spectral density as flat as possible. It is shown that the impulse response of an ARMA phase filter can be considered an infinite sequence with this good spectrum property. Such sequences are studied as alternatives for spread-spectrum communications signal design. Characteristics of these signals, such as their autocorrelation, spectrum, and intercorrelation are investigated. Some comparisons with other pseudorandom sequences are given.

  7. 36 CFR 25.3 - Supervision; suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision; suspensions. 25.3 Section 25.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL MILITARY PARKS; LICENSED GUIDE SERVICE REGULATIONS § 25.3 Supervision; suspensions. (a) The...

  8. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee...

  9. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee...

  10. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee...

  11. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF... Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee has materially failed to comply and remains out of compliance with the terms and conditions of the grant,...

  12. 33 CFR 156.112 - Suspension order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suspension order. 156.112 Section 156.112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER OPERATIONS Oil and Hazardous Material Transfer Operations § 156.112 Suspension order. The COTP or OCMI...

  13. 33 CFR 156.112 - Suspension order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suspension order. 156.112 Section 156.112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER OPERATIONS Oil and Hazardous Material Transfer Operations § 156.112 Suspension order. The COTP or OCMI...

  14. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee...

  15. 32 CFR 552.79 - Suspension action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension action. 552.79 Section 552.79 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... Suspension action. (a) When suspended for cause, immediately notify the company and the agent, in writing,...

  16. Alternatives to Suspension: A Government Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Thomas G.; Zoldy, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Student discipline and the ineffectiveness of out-of-school suspension is examined in light of the Ontario (Canada) legislative reform that supported a greater emphasis on progressive discipline alternatives to out-of-school suspension. Alternative discipline herein is explored via the behavior education plan, the school survival group, and…

  17. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  18. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  19. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  20. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  1. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  2. 49 CFR 238.227 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 238.227 Section 238.227 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.227 Suspension system. On or after November 8, 1999— (a) All passenger equipment...

  3. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited suspension. 10.82 Section 10.82 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a) When applicable. Whenever the Director of the...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1640 - Oxibendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxibendazole suspension. 520.1640 Section 520.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1640 Oxibendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. The...

  5. Suspension System Provides Independent Translation And Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    1994-01-01

    Spring suspension provides one translational and one rotational degree of freedom. Suspension used to provide for pitching and plunging movements of airfoil in wind tunnel. Translational freedom provided by two thin, flat steel spring tines, clamped at one end to stationary block fixed to ceiling of wind tunnel, and clamped to movable block at other end.

  6. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adequately correct the deficiency which led to the initiation of the suspension proceeding. (9) The... section as well as any showing that the recipient has adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the... adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the suspension and that repetition is not...

  7. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adequately correct the deficiency which led to the initiation of the suspension proceeding. (9) The... section as well as any showing that the recipient has adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the... adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the suspension and that repetition is not...

  8. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adequately correct the deficiency which led to the initiation of the suspension proceeding. (9) The... section as well as any showing that the recipient has adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the... adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the suspension and that repetition is not...

  9. 48 CFR 1509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Suspension. 1509.407 Section 1509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 1509.407...

  10. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suspension. 1210.3-3 Section 1210.3-3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION...

  11. 48 CFR 1509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suspension. 1509.407 Section 1509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 1509.407...

  12. 48 CFR 1509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suspension. 1509.407 Section 1509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 1509.407...

  13. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF... § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  14. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF... § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  15. Characteristics of USB noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Searle, N.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive series of noise measurements, for a variety of geometric and operational parameters, was made on models of upper surface blowing (USB) powered lift systems. The data obtained were analyzed and the effects and trends of parametric variation defined. The behavior and nature of USB noise and the design of USB systems with low noise characteristics is examined.

  16. Dragline noise survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Bauer, Eric R.

    2002-05-01

    It is estimated that 70%-90% of miners have enough noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) to be classified as a disability (NIOSH, Publication No. 76-172, 1976; Franks, NIOSH Internal Report, 1996). In response, NIOSH is conducting a cross-sectional survey of the mining industry in order to determine the sources of mining noise and offer recommendations on how to mitigate high noise levels, and bring mining operations into compliance with the recent mining noise regulation: 30CFR, Part 62. This paper will outline the results from noise surveys of eight draglines which operate in above-ground coal mining operations. The data recorded include noise dosimetry in conjunction with time-at-task studies and 1/3-octave sound level (Leq, Lmin, and Lmax) measurements. The 1/3-octave band readings were used to create noise contour maps which allowed the spatial and frequency information of the noise to be considered. Comparison of Lmin and Lmax levels offer insight into the variability of the noise levels inside the dragline. The potential for administrative controls is limited due to consistently high noise levels throughout the deck. Implementation of engineering controls is also hindered by the size and number of the noise sources and the frequency content of the noise.

  17. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  18. The Problem of "Noise"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagianos, Louis

    1972-01-01

    The library problem consists of equal parts of external and internal noise. The external noise consists of the volume of publication. The internal noise can be characterized by the present and continuing brouhaha concerning reform of library education. Scientists frankly regard librarians as impediments to information. (Author/NH)

  19. Noise figure of amplified dispersive Fourier transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-09-15

    Amplified dispersive Fourier transformation (ADFT) is a powerful tool for fast real-time spectroscopy as it overcomes the limitations of traditional optical spectrometers. ADFT maps the spectrum of an optical pulse into a temporal waveform using group-velocity dispersion and simultaneously amplifies it in the optical domain. It greatly simplifies spectroscopy by replacing the diffraction grating and detector array in the conventional spectrometer with a dispersive fiber and single-pixel photodetector, enabling ultrafast real-time spectroscopic measurements. Following our earlier work on the theory of ADFT, here we study the effect of noise on ADFT. We derive the noise figure of ADFT and discuss its dependence on various parameters.

  20. Period analysis at high noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, G.

    1980-05-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for the variances of three types of periodograms due to normal-distributed noise present in the data: the conventional Fourier spectrum, the method of Warner and Robinson (1972), and Jurkevich's method (1971). The equivalence of the Jurkevich method and that of Warner and Robinson is proved. The optimum phase cell number of the Warner-Robinson method is given; this number depends on the data length, signal form, and noise level. Results are illustrated by the analysis of two typical forms of light curves: an eclipsing type light curve and an RRa curve.

  1. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  2. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  3. Internal waves interacting with particles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micard, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Internal waves are produced as a consequence of the dynamic balance between buoy- ancy and gravity forces when a particle of fluid is vertically displaced in a stable stratified environment. Geophysical systems such as ocean and atmosphere are naturally stratified and therefore suitable for internal waves to propagate. Furthermore, these two environ- ments stock a vast amount of particles in suspension, which present a large spectrum of physical properties (size, density, shape), and can be organic, mineral or pollutant agents. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that internal waves will have an active effect over the dynamics of these particles. In order to study the interaction of internal waves and suspended particles, an ide- alized experimental setup has been implemented. A linear stratification is produced in a 80×40×17 cm3 tank, in which two dimensional plane waves are created thanks to the inno- vative wave generator GOAL. In addition, a particle injector has been developed to produce a vertical column of particles within the fluid, displaying the same two-dimensional sym- metry as the waves. The particle injector allows to control the volumic fraction of particles and the size of the column. The presence of internal waves passing through the column of particles allowed to observe two main effects: The column oscillates around an equilibrium position (which is observed in both, the contours an the interior of the column), and the column is displaced as a whole. The column is displaced depending on the characteristics of the column, the gradient of the density, and the intensity and frequency of the wave. When displaced, the particles within the column are sucked towards the source of waves. The direction of the displacement of the column is explained by computing the effect of the Lagrangian drift generated by the wave over the time the particles stay in the wave beam before settling.

  4. Compact low-noise preamplifier for noise spectroscopy with biased photodiodes in cargo inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Bob; Langeveld, Willem G. J.

    2013-09-01

    Noise Spectroscopy, a.k.a. Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis (Z-SCAN), is a statistical technique to determine a quantity called the "noise figure" from digitized waveforms of pulses of transmitted x-rays in cargo inspection systems. Depending only on quantities related to the x-ray energies, it measures a characteristic of the transmitted x-ray spectrum, which depends on the atomic number, Z, of the material penetrated. The noise figure can thus be used for material separation. In an 80-detector prototype, scintillators are used with large-area photodiodes biased at 80V and digitized using 50-MSPS 12-bit ADC boards. We present an ultra-compact low-noise preamplifier design, with one high-gain and one low-gain channel per detector for improved dynamic range. To achieve adequate detection sensitivity and spatial resolution each dual-gain preamplifier channel must fit within a 12.7 mm wide circuit board footprint and maintain adequate noise immunity to conducted and radiated interference from adjacent channels. The novel design included iterative SPICE analysis of transient response, dynamic range, frequency response, and noise analysis to optimize the selection and configuration of amplifiers and filter response. We discuss low-noise active and passive components and low-noise techniques for circuit board layout that are essential to achieving the design goals, and how the completed circuit board performed in comparison to the predicted responses.

  5. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page Condensed from Autism Spectrum ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Autism Spectrum Disorder? Autistic disorder (sometimes called autism or ...

  6. Noise produced by turbulent flow into a rotor: Theory manual for noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the calculation of noise produced by turbulent flow into a helicopter rotor. The method is based on the analysis of Amiet for the sound produced by an airfoil moving in rectilinear motion through a turbulent flow field. The rectilinear motion results are used in a quasi-steady manner to calculate the instantaneous spectrum of the rotor noise at any given rotor position; the overall spectrum is then found by averaging the instantaneous spectrum over all rotor azimuth angles. Account is taken of the fact that the rotor spends different amounts of retarded time at different rotor positions. Blade to blade correlation is included in the analysis, leading to harmonics of blade passing frequency. The spectrum of the turbulence entering the rotor is calculated by applying rapid distortion theory to an isotropic turbulence spectrum, assuming that the turbulence is stretched as it is pulled into the rotor. The inputs to the program are obtained from the atmospheric turbulence model and mean flow distortion calculation, described in another volume of this set of reports. The analytical basis is provided for a module which was incorporated in NASA's ROTONET helicopter noise prediction program.

  7. Defects and noise in Type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Wörl, Andreas; Daumer, Volker; Rehm, Robert; Kirste, Lutz; Rutz, Frank; Schmitz, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    To examine defects in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices we investigated GaSb substrates and epitaxial InAs/GaSb layers by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography to characterize the distribution of threading dislocations. Those measurements are compared with wet chemical etch pit density measurements on GaSb substrates and InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices epitaxial layer structures. The technique uses a wet chemical etch process to decorate threading dislocations and an automated optical analyzing system for mapping the defect distribution. Dark current and noise measurements on processed InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice single element photo diodes reveal a generation-recombination limited dark current behavior without contributions by surface leakage currents for midwavelength infrared detectors. In the white noise part of the noise spectrum, the extracted diode noise closely matches the theoretically expected shot noise behavior. For diodes with an increased dark current in comparison to the dark current of generation-recombination limited material, the standard shot-noise model fails to describe the noise experimentally observed in the white part of the spectrum. Instead, we find that McIntyre's noise model for avalanche multiplication processes fits the data quite well. We suggest that within high electric field domains localized around crystallographic defects, electrons initiate avalanche multiplication processes leading to increased dark current and excess noise.

  8. Combustion and core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, J. Robert; Karchmer, Allen

    1991-08-01

    Two types of aircraft power plant are considered: the gas turbine and the reciprocating engine. The engine types considered are: the reciprocating engine, the turbojet engine, the turboprop engine, and the turbofan engine. Combustion noise in gas turbine engines is discussed, and reciprocating-engine combustion noise is also briefly described. The following subject areas are covered: configuration variables, operational variables, characteristics of combustion and core noise, sources of combustion noise, combustion noise theory and comparison with experiment, available prediction methods, diagnostic techniques, measurement techniques, data interpretation, and example applications.

  9. Infrared sky noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hardware and techniques to measure and compare sky noise at several sites were studied, and a device was developed that would maximize its output and minimize its output for modulation. The instrument and its functions are described. The nature of sky emissions and the fluctuation, gaseous sources of sky noise, and aerosol sources are discussed. It is concluded that sky noise really exists, and the spatial distribution of the sky noise sources are such that observed noise values are linear functions of chopping stroke.

  10. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  11. Interpreting Transistor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospieszalski, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    The simple noise models of field effect and bipolar transistors reviewed in this article are quite useful in engineering practice, as illustrated by measured and modeled results. The exact and approximate expressions for the noise parameters of FETs and bipolar transistors reveal certain common noise properties and some general noise properties of both devices. The usefulness of these expressions in interpreting the dependence of measured noise parameters on frequency, bias, and temperature and, consequently, in checking of consistency of measured data has been demonstrated.

  12. Magnetic suspension and pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Groom, N. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is reported for accurate pointing of instruments on a carrier vehicle and for isolation of the instruments from the vehicle's motion disturbances. The apparatus includes two assemblies with connecting interfaces. The first assembly is attached to the carrier vehicle and consists of an azimuth gimbal and an elevation gimbal which provide coarse pointing by allowing two rotations of the instruments relative to the carrier vehicle. The second or vernier pointing assembly is made up of magnetic suspension and fine pointing actuators, roll motor segments, and an instrument mounting plase which provides appropriate magnetic circuits for the actuators and the roll motor segments. The vernier pointing assembly provides attitude fine pointing and roll positioning of the instruments as well as six degree-of-freedom isolation from carrier motion disturbances.

  13. Acoustical measurement separates core noise and jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    Measuring technique discriminates between jet noise and core noise of jet engine. Results of experimentation confirmed that core noise and jet noise can be separated by examining cross-correlation of far-field microphone signals and that crossover point between core noise and jet noise moves toward higher velocities at higher angles with respect to jet axis.

  14. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  15. Low frequency cultural noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jin Soo; Kang, Tae-Seob; Baag, Chang-Eob

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal cultural seismic noise is observed in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz. Cultural noise generated by human activities is generally observed in frequencies above 1 Hz, and is greater in the daytime than at night. The low-frequency noise presented in this paper exhibits a characteristic amplitude variation and can be easily identified from time domain seismograms in the frequency range of interest. The amplitude variation is predominantly in the vertical component, but the horizontal components also show variations. Low-frequency noise is markedly periodic, which reinforces its interpretation as cultural noise. Such noise is observed world-wide, but is limited to areas in the vicinity of railways. The amplitude variation in seismograms correlates strongly with railway timetables, and the waveform shows a wavelength shift associated with the Doppler effect, which indicates that the origin of seismic background noise in the frequency range 0.01-0.05 Hz is railways.

  16. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Kovac, J.; Bartholomae, R.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Bureau of Mines contract J0387229 charters investigation and control of this noise through laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and through in-mine noise measurements. The results of these investigations indicate that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for both cutting and conveying operations are approximately 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra. 4 refs.

  17. A Digital Control Algorithm for Magnetic Suspension Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Thomas C.

    1996-01-01

    An ongoing program exists to investigate and develop magnetic suspension technologies and modelling techniques at NASA Langley Research Center. Presently, there is a laboratory-scale large air-gap suspension system capable of five degree-of-freedom (DOF) control that is operational and a six DOF system that is under development. Those systems levitate a cylindrical element containing a permanent magnet core above a planar array of electromagnets, which are used for levitation and control purposes. In order to evaluate various control approaches with those systems, the Generic Real-Time State-Space Controller (GRTSSC) software package was developed. That control software package allows the user to implement multiple control methods and allows for varied input/output commands. The development of the control algorithm is presented. The desired functionality of the software is discussed, including the ability to inject noise on sensor inputs and/or actuator outputs. Various limitations, common issues, and trade-offs are discussed including data format precision; the drawbacks of using either Direct Memory Access (DMA), interrupts, or program control techniques for data acquisition; and platform dependent concerns related to the portability of the software, such as memory addressing formats. Efforts to minimize overall controller loop-rate and a comparison of achievable controller sample rates are discussed. The implementation of a modular code structure is presented. The format for the controller input data file and the noise information file is presented. Controller input vector information is available for post-processing by mathematical analysis software such as MATLAB1.

  18. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  19. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  20. Toddlers' recognition of noise-vocoded speech

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Rochelle; Chatterjee, Monita

    2013-01-01

    Despite their remarkable clinical success, cochlear-implant listeners today still receive spectrally degraded information. Much research has examined normally hearing adult listeners' ability to interpret spectrally degraded signals, primarily using noise-vocoded speech to simulate cochlear implant processing. Far less research has explored infants' and toddlers' ability to interpret spectrally degraded signals, despite the fact that children in this age range are frequently implanted. This study examines 27-month-old typically developing toddlers' recognition of noise-vocoded speech in a language-guided looking study. Children saw two images on each trial and heard a voice instructing them to look at one item (“Find the cat!”). Full-spectrum sentences or their noise-vocoded versions were presented with varying numbers of spectral channels. Toddlers showed equivalent proportions of looking to the target object with full-speech and 24- or 8-channel noise-vocoded speech; they failed to look appropriately with 2-channel noise-vocoded speech and showed variable performance with 4-channel noise-vocoded speech. Despite accurate looking performance for speech with at least eight channels, children were slower to respond appropriately as the number of channels decreased. These results indicate that 2-yr-olds have developed the ability to interpret vocoded speech, even without practice, but that doing so requires additional processing. These findings have important implications for pediatric cochlear implantation. PMID:23297920

  1. Spread spectrum watermarking: malicious attacks and counterattacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Frank H.; Su, Jonathan K.; Girod, Bernd

    1999-04-01

    Most watermarking methods for images and video have been proposed are based on ideas from spread spectrum radio communications, namely additive embedding of a (signal adaptive or non-adaptive) pseudo-noise watermark pattern, and watermark recovery by correlation. Even methods that are not presented as spread spectrum methods often build on these principles. Recently, some skepticism about the robustness of spread spectrum watermarks has arisen, specifically with the general availability of watermark attack software which claim to render most watermarks undetectable. In fact, spread spectrum watermarks and watermark detectors in their simplest form are vulnerable to a variety of attacks. However, with appropriate modifications to the embedding and extraction methods, spread spectrum methods can be made much more resistant against such attacks. In this paper, we review proposed attacks on spread spectrum watermarks are systematically. Further, modifications for watermark embedding and extraction are presented to avoid and counterattack these attacks. Important ingredients are, for example, to adapt the power spectrum of the watermark to the host signal power spectrum, and to employ an intelligent watermark detector with a block-wise multi-dimensional sliding correlator, which can recover the watermark even in the presence of geometric attacks.

  2. Investigating high-concentration monoclonal antibody powder suspension in nonaqueous suspension vehicles for subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Mayumi; Armstrong, Nick; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2012-12-01

    Developing high-concentration monoclonal antibody (mAb) liquid formulations for subcutaneous (s.c.) administration is challenging because increased viscosity makes injection difficult. To overcome this obstacle, we investigated a nonaqueous powder suspension approach. Three IgG1 mAbs were spray dried and suspended at different concentrations in Miglyol® 840, benzyl benzoate, or ethyl lactate. Suspensions were characterized for viscosity, particle size, and syringeability; physical stability was visually inspected. Suspensions generally outperformed liquid solutions for injectability despite higher viscosity at the same mAb concentrations. Powder formulations and properties had little effect on viscosity or injectability. Ethyl lactate suspensions had lowest viscosity (<20 cP) and lowest syringe injection glide force (<15 N) at mAb concentrations as high as 333 mg/mL (500 mg powder/mL). Inverse gas chromatography analysis indicated that the vehicle was the most important factor impacting suspension performance. Ethyl lactate rendered greater heat of sorption (suggesting strong particle-suspension vehicle interaction may reduce particle-particle self-association, leading to low suspension viscosity and glide force) but lacked the physical suspension stability exhibited by the other vehicles. Specific mixtures of ethyl lactate and Miglyol® 840 improved overall performance in high mAb concentration suspensions. This study demonstrated the viability of high mAb concentration (>300 mg/mL) in suspension formulations for s.c. administration. PMID:23001898

  3. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Partial removal of correlated noise in thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.

    1996-04-01

    Correlated noise occurs in many imaging systems such as scanners and push-broom imagers. The sources of correlated noise can be from the detectors, pre-amplifiers and sampling circuits. Correlated noise appears as streaking along the scan direction of a scanner or in the along track direction of a push-broom imager. We have developed algorithms to simulate correlated noise and pre-filter to reduce the amount of streaking while not destroying the scene content. The pre- filter in the Fourier domain consists of the product of two filters. One filter models the correlated noise spectrum, the other is a windowing function e.g. Gaussian or Hanning window with variable width to block high frequency noise away from the origin of the Fourier Transform of the image data. We have optimized the filter parameters for various scenes and find improvements of the RMS error of the original minus the pre-filtered noisy image.

  5. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  6. Detecting overblown flute fingerings from the residual noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Verfaille, Vincent; Depalle, Philippe; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2010-01-01

    Producing a tone by increasing the blowing pressure to excite a higher frequency impedance minimum, or overblowing, is widely used in standard flute technique. In this paper, the effect of overblowing a fingering is explored with spectral analysis, and a fingering detector is designed based on acoustical knowledge and pattern classification techniques. The detector performs signal analysis of the strong broadband signal, that is, spectrally shaped by the pipe impedance, and measures the spectral energy during the attack around multiples of the fundamental frequency sub-multiples over the first octave and a half. It is trained and evaluated on sounds recorded with four expert performers. They played six series of tones from overblown and regular fingerings, with frequencies that are octave- and non-octave-related to the playing frequency. The best of the four proposed sound descriptors allows for a detection error below 1.3% for notes with two and three fingerings (C(5), D(5), C(6), and Cmusical sharp(6)) and below 14% for four (E(6)) or five fingerings (G(6)). The error is shown to dramatically increase when two fingerings' impedance become too similar (E(6) and A(4) and G(6) and C(5)). PMID:20058998

  7. Measurements of Man-Made Spectrum Noise Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Do, Juyong; Simoneau, Joel B.; Pearson, L. Wilson; Seetharam, Venkatesh; Oria, A. J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This report consolidates research carried out at Clemson University and Stanford University where a series of measurements were undertaken to identify the man-made radiation present in four bands used by rather different services, namely, L1 Band (1563.42 1587.42 MHz), the Unified S-Band (2025 2110 MHz), the 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) Band (2400 2482.50 MHz), and the 23.6-24.0 GHz Passive Sensing Band. Results show that there were distinctive differences in the measurement data in the frequency bands, which should be expected based on the function/regulation associated with each. The GPS L1 Band had little to none terrestrial man-made sources, but the ISM 2.4 GHz Band had a large number of man-made sources regardless of the site and the time. The Unified S Band showed mixed results depending on the sites. The Passive Sensing Band does not contain appreciable man-made radiation.

  8. Noise Mapping and Annoyance.

    PubMed

    Knauss, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EC has published a Green Paper on noise policy in the EU and has issued a directive on the assessment and reduction of environmental noise. This directive will make noise mapping mandatory for cities with at least 250.000 inhabitants. Due to the development in computer technology it is possible to calculate noise maps for large urban areas using the available data on buildings, ground profile, road and rail traffic. Examples for noise mapping are Birmingham (GB), Linz (A) and various German cities. Based on noise maps and empirical data on the correlation between annoyance and noise levels annoyance maps for different sources (rail, road, aircraft) can be calculated. Under the assumption that the annoyance for the different sources are only weakly correlated, a combined annoyance map can be calculated. In a second step using the distribution of the population the actual number of annoyed people can be evaluated. This analysis can be used, for example, to identify noise hot spots and to assess the impact of major traffic projects - roads, airports- on the noise situation as well as the impact on the population. Furthermore, the combined annoyance maps can be used to investigate on health effects and to check whether or not empirical correlations between annoyance and noise levels are sufficiently correct. PMID:12678944

  9. Urban Noise Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäcker-Cüppers, Michael

    Noise belongs to the severest environmental impairments in towns, with road traffic being the most annoying noise source. The reduction of these impairments and the precaution against new noise impacts is an important task of the communities. However, many of the potential abatement measures are not in the responsibility of the communities. In most European countries, noise emission regulations for road and rail vehicles and outdoor machinery are nowadays enforced by the European Union. Noise reception limits are generally enforced by national laws. Therefore, efficient noise abatement in towns has to be coordinated with the regional, national and supranational, i.e. European noise policy. The most important fields of action for the urban noise abatement are the roads, railways and airports with heavy traffic. For the avoidance of health risks due to noise here short-term reductions are needed, which can generally be achieved only by a combination of measures for which different stakeholders are responsible. This underlines the importance of integrated and coordinated noise abatement concepts.

  10. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogério

    2011-05-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a nonlinear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in nonlinear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and numerical simulations to study the impact of the more ubiquitous “natural” noise with a 1/f frequency spectrum. Specifically, we study the impact of the 1/f noise on a leaky integrate and fire model of a neuron. The impact of noise is considered on two quantities of interest to neuron function: The spike count Fano factor and the speed of neuron response to a small steplike stimulus. For the perfect (nonleaky) integrate and fire model, we show that the Fano factor can be expressed as an integral over noise spectrum weighted by a (low-pass) filter function given by F(t,f)=sinc2(πft). This result elucidates the connection between low-frequency noise and disorder in neuron dynamics. Under 1/f noise, spike dynamics lacks a characteristic correlation time, inducing the leaky and nonleaky models, to exhibit nonergodic behavior and the Fano factor, increasing logarithmically as a function of time. We compare our results to experimental data of single neurons in vivo [Teich, Heneghan, Lowen, Ozaki, and Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. AJNRSDS1084-752910.1364/JOSAA.14.000529 14, 529 (1997)] and show how the 1/f noise model provides much better agreement than the usual approximations based on Lorentzian noise. The low-frequency noise, however, complicates the case for an information-coding scheme based on interspike intervals by introducing variability in the neuron response time. On a positive note, the neuron response time to a step stimulus is, remarkably, nearly optimal in the presence

  11. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise.

    PubMed

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogério

    2011-05-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a nonlinear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in nonlinear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and numerical simulations to study the impact of the more ubiquitous "natural" noise with a 1/f frequency spectrum. Specifically, we study the impact of the 1/f noise on a leaky integrate and fire model of a neuron. The impact of noise is considered on two quantities of interest to neuron function: The spike count Fano factor and the speed of neuron response to a small steplike stimulus. For the perfect (nonleaky) integrate and fire model, we show that the Fano factor can be expressed as an integral over noise spectrum weighted by a (low-pass) filter function given by F(t,f)=sinc(2)(πft). This result elucidates the connection between low-frequency noise and disorder in neuron dynamics. Under 1/f noise, spike dynamics lacks a characteristic correlation time, inducing the leaky and nonleaky models, to exhibit nonergodic behavior and the Fano factor, increasing logarithmically as a function of time. We compare our results to experimental data of single neurons in vivo [Teich, Heneghan, Lowen, Ozaki, and Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 529 (1997)] and show how the 1/f noise model provides much better agreement than the usual approximations based on Lorentzian noise. The low-frequency noise, however, complicates the case for an information-coding scheme based on interspike intervals by introducing variability in the neuron response time. On a positive note, the neuron response time to a step stimulus is, remarkably, nearly optimal in the presence of 1/f noise. An explanation of this

  12. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  13. Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Radisson Hotel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, on December 1-3, 1999. The symposium included 18 sessions in which a total of 53 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, controls, modeling, electromagnetic launch, magnetic suspension in wind tunnels, applications flywheel energy storage, rotating machinery, vibration isolation, and maglev. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  14. Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at The Nagaragawa Convention Center in Gifu, Japan, on October 30 - November 1, 1997. The symposium included 13 sessions in which a total of 35 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of maglev, controls, high critical temperature (T(sub c)) superconductivity, bearings, magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBS), levitation, modeling, and applications. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  15. Vehicle suspensions with a mechatronic network strut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Cheng; Chan, Hsiang-An

    2011-05-01

    This paper applies a novel mechatronic network strut to vehicle suspensions and discusses the benefits of system performance. The proposed mechatronic strut consists of a ball-screw inerter and permanent magnet electric machinery, such that the system impedance can be realised through a combination of mechanical and electrical networks. Applying the mechatronic strut to vehicle suspensions, we evaluate the improvement of system performance using passive electrical networks. Furthermore, a prototype mechatronic strut is constructed for properties verification. Finally, nonlinearities of the mechatronic strut are taken into account to modify the suspension design. From the simulation and experimental results, the proposed mechatronic network strut is shown to be effective.

  16. Large angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P. (Principal Investigator); Huang, Jen-Kuang (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Good progress is being made in several major areas. These include eddy current modelling and analysis, design optimization methods, wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, and system identification. In addition, another successful International Symposium has been completed, with the Proceedings being printed at the time of writing. These activities continue current work under this Grant and extend previous work on magnetic suspension systems and devices in the Guidance and Control Branch and will permit the demonstration of several new developments in the field of magnetic suspension technology.

  17. A Robust Spectrum Sensing Method Based on Maximum Cyclic Autocorrelation Selection for Dynamic Spectrum Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Kazushi; Ariyoshi, Masayuki; Fujii, Takeo

    Spectrum sensing is an important function for dynamic spectrum access (DSA) type cognitive radio systems to detect opportunities for sharing the spectrum with a primary system. The key requirements for spectrum sensing are stability in controlling the probability of false alarm as well as detection performance of the primary signals. However, false alarms can be triggered by noise uncertainty at the secondary devices or unknown interference signals from other secondary systems in realistic radio environments. This paper proposes a robust spectrum sensing method against such uncertainties; it is a kind of cyclostationary feature detection (CFD) approaches. Our proposed method, referred to as maximum cyclic autocorrelation selection (MCAS), compares the peak and non-peak values of the cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF) to detect primary signals, where the non-peak value is the CAF value calculated at cyclic frequencies between the peaks. In MCAS, the desired probability of false alarm can be obtained by setting the number of the non-peak values. In addition, the multiple peak values are combined in MCAS to obtain noise reduction effect and coherent combining gain. Through computer simulations, we show that MCAS can control the probability of false alarm under the condition of noise uncertainty and interference. Furthermore, our method achieves better performance with much less computational complexity in comparison to conventional CFD methods.

  18. Cathodoluminescence Spectrum Imaging Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-04-07

    The software developed for spectrum imaging is applied to the analysis of the spectrum series generated by our cathodoluminescence instrumentation. This software provides advanced processing capabilities s such: reconstruction of photon intensity (resolved in energy) and photon energy maps, extraction of the spectrum from selected areas, quantitative imaging mode, pixel-to-pixel correlation spectrum line scans, ASCII, output, filling routines, drift correction, etc.

  19. Simple analytical model for low-frequency frequency-modulation noise of monolithic tunable lasers.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tam N; Ó Dúill, Seán P; Nguyen, Lim; Rusch, Leslie A; Barry, Liam P

    2014-02-10

    We employ simple analytical models to construct the entire frequency-modulation (FM)-noise spectrum of tunable semiconductor lasers. Many contributions to the laser FM noise can be clearly identified from the FM-noise spectrum, such as standard Weiner FM noise incorporating laser relaxation oscillation, excess FM noise due to thermal fluctuations, and carrier-induced refractive index fluctuations from stochastic carrier generation in the passive tuning sections. The contribution of the latter effect is identified by noting a correlation between part of the FM-noise spectrum with the FM-modulation response of the passive sections. We pay particular attention to the case of widely tunable lasers with three independent tuning sections, mainly the sampled-grating distributed Bragg reflector laser, and compare with that of a distributed feedback laser. The theoretical model is confirmed with experimental measurements, with the calculations of the important phase-error variance demonstrating excellent agreement. PMID:24663260

  20. Effect of the temporal pattern of a given noise dose on TTS in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Buck, K; Dancer, A; Franke, R

    1984-10-01

    To show the effect of the temporal pattern of acoustic stimulation on TTS 15 min, guinea pigs were subjected to isoenergetic noises with the same spectrum. The exposures in a first experimental series were continuous noises and noise bursts. The continuous noise was presented with different durations and levels but always with the same energy. The noise burst stimulation consisted of a constant number of bursts with different interstimulus intervals. Both duration and repetition rate were shown to affect the TTS 15 min measured for these isoenergetic stimuli. A duration of 225 to 1800 s and a repetition rate of one per second produced the greatest TTS 15 min. In a second experimental series continuous noise and acoustic impulses with the same spectrum and 100-Hz repetition rate were presented at different levels. In this case the waveform of the stimulus (phase spectrum) was shown to have an effect on TTS 15 min. PMID:6501705

  1. Inertial effects in suspension dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ganesh

    2002-04-01

    This work analyses the role of small but finite particle inertia on the microstructure of suspensions of heavy particles subjected to an external flow. The magnitude of particle inertia is characterized by the Stokes number (St), defined as the ratio of the inertial relaxation time of a particle to the flow time scale. Fluid inertia is neglected so that the fluid motion satisfies the quasi-steady Stokes equations. The statistics of the particles is governed by a Fokker-Planck equation in position and velocity space. For small St, a multiple scales formalism is developed to solve for the phase-space probability density of a single spherical Brownian particle in a linear flow. Though valid for an arbitrary flow field, the method fails for a spatially varying mass and drag coefficient. In all cases, however, a Chapman-Enskog-like formulation provides a valid multi-scale description of the dynamics both for a single Brownian particle and a suspension of interacting particles. For long times, the leading order solution simplifies to the product of a local Maxwellian in velocity space and a spatial density satisfying the Smoluchowski equation. The higher order corrections capture both short-time momentum relaxations and long-time deviations from the Maxwellian. The inertially corrected Smoluchowski equation includes a non-Fickian term at O( St). The pair problem is solved to O(St) for non-Brownian spherical particles in simple shear flow. In contrast to the zero inertia case, the relative trajectories of two particles are asymmetric. Open trajectories in the plane of shear suffer a downward displacement in the velocity gradient direction. The surface of the reference sphere 'repels' nearby trajectories that spiral out onto a new stable limit cycle in the shearing plane. This limit cycle acts as a local attractor and all in-plane trajectories from an initial offset of O(St½ ) or less approach the limit cycle. The topology of the off-plane trajectories is more complicated

  2. Understanding Slat Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medhi R.

    2003-01-01

    Model-scale aeroacoustic tests of large civil transports point to the leading-edge slat as a dominant high-lift noise source in the low- to mid-frequencies during aircraft approach and landing. Using generic multi-element high-lift models, complementary experimental and numerical tests were carefully planned and executed at NASA in order to isolate slat noise sources and the underlying noise generation mechanisms. In this paper, a brief overview of the supporting computational effort undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center, is provided. Both tonal and broadband aspects of slat noise are discussed. Recent gains in predicting a slat s far-field acoustic noise, current shortcomings of numerical simulations, and other remaining open issues, are presented. Finally, an example of the ever-expanding role of computational simulations in noise reduction studies also is given.

  3. Noise and public health.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, D M; Roettger, R W

    1976-01-01

    Environmental noise has increased to the point that it affects large numbers of people. The most consistently demonstrated health effect of exposure to noise is hearing impairment. Other effects, such as stress reaction, irritability, fatigue and disturbances to physiologic function have been seen in laboratory research but are highly individualized and restricted to such specific populations as industrial workers. Rising background sound levels in communities due to increased traffic flow, industralization, work saving machinery, and other noise sources have caused community noise levels to become dangerously high. This factor is complicated by exposure to high sound level recreational activities with greater frequency and for longer periods. Recognizing the existence of the problem, governmental agencies have begun to identify the scope of the problem, to designate standards and regulations controlling noise sources, and to regulate allowable noise exposure for workers. PMID:10297834

  4. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  5. Modeling of Turbulence Generated Noise in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A numerically calculated Green's function is used to predict jet noise spectrum and its far-field directivity. A linearized form of Lilley's equation governs the non-causal Green s function of interest, with the non-linear terms on the right hand side identified as the source. In this paper, contributions from the so-called self- and shear-noise source terms will be discussed. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution yields the required mean flow as well as time- and length scales of a noise-generating turbulent eddy. A non-compact source, with exponential temporal and spatial functions, is used to describe the turbulence velocity correlation tensors. It is shown that while an exact non-causal Green's function accurately predicts the observed shift in the location of the spectrum peak with angle as well as the angularity of sound at moderate Mach numbers, at high subsonic and supersonic acoustic Mach numbers the polar directivity of radiated sound is not entirely captured by this Green's function. Results presented for Mach 0.5 and 0.9 isothermal jets, as well as a Mach 0.8 hot jet conclude that near the peak radiation angle a different source/Green's function convolution integral may be required in order to capture the peak observed directivity of jet noise.

  6. The behavior of quantization spectra as a function of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    An expression for the spectrum of quantization error in a discrete-time system whose input is a sinusoid plus white Gaussian noise is derived. This quantization spectrum consists of two components: a white-noise floor and spurious harmonics. The dithering effect of the input Gaussian noise in both components of the spectrum is considered. Quantitative results in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) example show the behavior of spurious harmonics as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results have strong implications for digital reception and signal analysis systems. At low SNRs, spurious harmonics decay exponentially on a log-log scale, and the resulting spectrum is white. As the SNR increases, the spurious harmonics figure prominently in the output spectrum. A useful expression is given that roughly bounds the magnitude of a spurious harmonic as a function of the SNR.

  7. Uniform apparent contrast noise: A picture of the noise of the visual contrast detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Watson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A picture which is a sample of random contrast noise is generated. The noise amplitude spectrum in each region of the picture is inversely proportional to spatial frequency contrast sensitivity for that region, assuming the observer fixates the center of the picture and is the appropriate distance from it. In this case, the picture appears to have approximately the same contrast everywhere. To the extent that contrast detection thresholds are determined by visual system noise, this picture can be regarded as a picture of the noise of that system. There is evidence that, at different eccentricities, contrast sensitivity functions differ only by a magnification factor. The picture was generated by filtering a sample of white noise with a filter whose frequency response is inversely proportional to foveal contrast sensitivity. It was then stretched by a space-varying magnification function. The picture summmarizes a noise linear model of detection and discrimination of contrast signals by referring the model noise to the input picture domain.

  8. Acoustic background noise variation in Air Force platforms and its effect on noise removal algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafollette, Philip A.

    1991-06-01

    In this study of short-term noise variation in Air Force platforms, we followed two avenues of investigation. First, we applied quantitative measures of variation to individual noise recordings, and compared the results across various aircraft. Some measures used were simple descriptive statistics, but we also measured attenuation obtained by spectral restoration (spectral subtraction), applied to the noise signal alone. The noise attenuation obtained for real aircraft environments was in most cases about the same as predicted theoretically for white Gaussian noise, but in some instances was considerably higher, especially in the presence of propeller noise. Second, we applied the nonparametric Mann-Whitney statistic to test the stationarity of power spectrum estimates on time scales of 200 to 800 ms. There was little or no evidence of nonstationarity in large jet or turboprop aircraft. In fighter aircraft and helicopters, there was some evidence of nonstationarity confined to more or less narrow frequency ranges. The nonstationarity found did not appear to limit the performance of special restoration algorithms. The noise recordings used were taken from the RADC/EEV database of field recordings made in the E-3A, E-4B, EC-135, E-130, P-3C, F-15, F-16, F-4, A-10, HH-53 and Tornado aircraft.

  9. Active noise silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    Many natural gas compressor stations which were previously located away from residential areas are now being encroached upon by surrounding building developments. An increased awareness of community noise issues has proved to be the impetus for investigating and developing more effective noise control methods and treatments for natural gas compressor facilities. This project investigates the feasibility of applying Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) to the exhaust of a large, internal combustion reciprocating type engine.

  10. Suspension, Race, and Disability: Analysis of Statewide Practices and Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krezmien, Michael P.; Leone, Peter E.; Achilles, Georgianna M.

    2006-01-01

    This analysis of statewide suspension data from 1995 to 2003 in Maryland investigated disproportionate suspensions of minority students and students with disabilities. We found substantial increases in over-all rates of suspensions from 1995 to 2003, as well as disproportionate rates of suspensions for African American students, American Indian…

  11. 48 CFR 42.1302 - Suspension of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension of work. 42... MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of Work 42.1302 Suspension of work. A suspension of work under a construction or...

  12. 21 CFR 526.1590 - Novobiocin oil suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Novobiocin oil suspension. 526.1590 Section 526... oil suspension. (a)(1) Specifications. Each 10 milliliters of oil suspension contains the equivalent.... (b)(1) Specifications. Each 10 milliliters of oil suspension contains the equivalent of...

  13. 21 CFR 526.1590 - Novobiocin oil suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Novobiocin oil suspension. 526.1590 Section 526... oil suspension. (a)(1) Specifications. Each 10 milliliters of oil suspension contains the equivalent.... (b)(1) Specifications. Each 10 milliliters of oil suspension contains the equivalent of...

  14. 48 CFR 9.407-4 - Period of suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Period of suspension. 9.407-4 Section 9.407-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 9.407-4 Period of suspension. (a) Suspension shall be for a...

  15. 14 CFR 1274.701 - Suspension or termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension or termination. 1274.701 Section 1274.701 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Suspension or Termination § 1274.701 Suspension or termination. (a) Suspension. NASA or the recipient may suspend...

  16. 48 CFR 42.1302 - Suspension of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension of work. 42... MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of Work 42.1302 Suspension of work. A suspension of work under a construction or...

  17. 48 CFR 42.1302 - Suspension of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suspension of work. 42... MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of Work 42.1302 Suspension of work. A suspension of work under a construction or...

  18. 45 CFR 1641.13 - Causes for suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Causes for suspension. 1641.13 Section 1641.13..., SUSPENSION AND REMOVAL OF RECIPIENT AUDITORS Suspension § 1641.13 Causes for suspension. The debarring... that: (a) A cause for debarment under § 1641.7 may exist; (b) The IPA has been indicted for...

  19. 12. UNIDENTIFIED CABLESTAYED SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TIMBER RAILING OF TWELVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. UNIDENTIFIED CABLE-STAYED SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TIMBER RAILING OF TWELVE PANELS, SHOWING CABLE PATTERN SIMILAR TO E.E. RUNYON'S SUSPENSION BRIDGE PATENTS. THE BLUFF DALE SUSPENSION BRIDGE'S CABLES MAY HAVE ORIGINALLY FOLLOWED THIS PATTERN. 3/4 VIEW FROM ABOVE. - Bluff Dale Suspension Bridge, Spanning Paluxy River at County Route 149, Bluff Dale, Erath County, TX

  20. 13. UNIDENTIFIED CABLESTAYED SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TIMBER RAILING OF TWELVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. UNIDENTIFIED CABLE-STAYED SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TIMBER RAILING OF TWELVE PANELS, SHOWING CABLE PATTERN SIMILAR TO E.E. RUNYON'S SUSPENSION BRIDGE PATENTS. THE BLUFF DALE SUSPENSION BRIDGE'S CABLES MAY HAVE ORIGINALLY FOLLOWED THIS PATTERN. ELEVATION VIEW. - Bluff Dale Suspension Bridge, Spanning Paluxy River at County Route 149, Bluff Dale, Erath County, TX

  1. 49 CFR 19.13 - Debarment and suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Requirements § 19.13 Debarment and suspension. Federal awarding agencies and recipients shall comply with the nonprocurement debarment and suspension rule, 49 CFR part 29, “Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Debarment and suspension. 19.13 Section...

  2. 49 CFR 19.13 - Debarment and suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirements § 19.13 Debarment and suspension. Federal awarding agencies and recipients shall comply with the nonprocurement debarment and suspension rule, 49 CFR part 29, “Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Debarment and suspension. 19.13 Section...

  3. 49 CFR 19.13 - Debarment and suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Requirements § 19.13 Debarment and suspension. Federal awarding agencies and recipients shall comply with the nonprocurement debarment and suspension rule, 49 CFR part 29, “Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Debarment and suspension. 19.13 Section...

  4. 12 CFR 19.111 - Suspension, removal, or prohibition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension, removal, or prohibition. 19.111... AND PROCEDURE Removals, Suspensions, and Prohibitions When a Crime Is Charged or a Conviction is Obtained § 19.111 Suspension, removal, or prohibition. The Comptroller may serve a notice of suspension...

  5. 12 CFR 19.244 - Automatic removal, suspension, and debarment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic removal, suspension, and debarment... Services § 19.244 Automatic removal, suspension, and debarment. (a) An independent public accountant or... suspension or permanent revocation of registration or a temporary or permanent suspension or bar from...

  6. Noise in biological circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Allen, Michael S.; Cox, Chris D.; Dar, Roy D.; Karig, David K; McCollum, James M.; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and reviewmany of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology.

  7. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  8. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  9. Colloidal suspension simulates linear dynamic pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Cann, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Missile nose fairings immersed in colloidal suspension prepared with various specific gravities simulate pressure profiles very similar to those encountered during reentry. Stress and deflection conditions similar to those expected during atmospheric reentry are thus attained in the laboratory.

  10. Torsional suspension system for testing space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H., III (Inventor); Gold, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A low frequency torsional suspension system for testing a space structure uses a plurality of suspension stations attached to the space structure along the length thereof in order to suspend the space structure from an overhead support. Each suspension station includes a disk pivotally mounted to the overhead support, and two cables which have upper ends connected to the disk and lower ends connected to the space structure. The two cables define a parallelogram with the center of gravity of the space structure being vertically beneath the pivot axis of the disk. The vertical distance between the points of attachment of the cables to the disk and the pivot axis of the disk is adjusted to lower the frequency of the suspension system to a level which does not interfere with frequency levels of the space structure, thereby enabling accurate measurement.

  11. Large angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress made under the subject grant in the period from 1 Nov. 1992 to 31 May 1993 is presented. The research involves the continued development of the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) and also the recommissioning of an additional piece of exisiting hardware. During the period in question, the initial configuration of LAMSTF was completed and made routinely and reliably operational. A digital phase advance controller was completed and documented. The goal of a controlled 360 deg rotation was achieved. Work started on the recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). Work completed during the report period included: modeling; position sensing; controller; support of the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology; and recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System.

  12. A Course in Fluid Mechanics of Suspensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a course focusing on fluid mechanics and physical chemistry of suspensions. Describes the main themes of the lectures and includes a list of course outlines. Possible textbooks and many journal articles are listed. (YP)

  13. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a...), relating to any taxpayer's tax liability or relating to the practitioner's own tax liability, for—...

  14. 21 CFR 26.16 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.16 Suspension. (a) Each party has the...

  15. Magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBSs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of wind tunnel testing are outlined, with attention given to the problems caused by mechanical support systems, such as support interference, dynamic-testing restrictions, and low productivity. The basic principles of magnetic suspension are highlighted, along with the history of magnetic suspension and balance systems. Roll control, size limitations, high angle of attack, reliability, position sensing, and calibration are discussed among the problems and limitations of the existing magnetic suspension and balance systems. Examples of the existing systems are presented, and design studies for future systems are outlined. Problems specific to large-scale magnetic suspension and balance systems, such as high model loads, requirements for high-power electromagnets, high-capacity power supplies, highly sophisticated control systems and position sensors, and high costs are assessed.

  16. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  17. Noise and interference study for satellite lightning sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The use of radio frequency techniques for the detection and monitoring of terrestrial thunderstorms from space are discussed. Three major points are assessed: (1) lightning and noise source characteristics; (2) propagation effects imposed by the atmosphere and ionosphere; and (3) the electromagnetic environment in near space within which lightning RF signatures must be detected. A composite frequency spectrum of the peak of amplitude from lightning flashes is developed. Propagation effects (ionospheric cutoff, refraction, absorption, dispersion and scintillation) are considered to modify the lightning spectrum to the geosynchronous case. It is suggested that in comparing the modified spectrum with interfering noise source spectra RF lightning pulses on frequencies up to a few GHz are detectable above the natural noise environment in near space.

  18. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David; Putnam, Shawn

    2006-03-01

    We present our experimental study on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids loaded with small volume fractions of C60-C70 fullerenes and alkanethiolate-protected Au nanoparticles. We use an optical beam deflection technique that measures the thermal diffusivity of fluid mixtures and suspensions of nanoparticles with a precision of better than 1%. Our approach is tested using the thermal conductivity of ethanol-water mixtures; in nearly pure ethanol, the increase in thermal conductivity with water concentration is a factor of two larger than predicted by effective medium theory. The solutions of the C60-C70 fullerenes and the alkanethiolate-protected Au nanoparticles were measured to maximum volume fractions of 0.6% and 0.35 vol%, respectively. We do not observe anomalous enhancements of the thermal conductivity that have been reported in previous studies of nanofluids; the largest increase in thermal conductivity we have observed is 1.3 ±0.8% for 4 nm diameter Au particles suspended in ethanol. However, within the context of effective medium theory, these findings are expected: effective medium theory predicts that the largest possible increase in the thermal conductivity of a fluid loaded by a volume fraction φ1 of spherical particles will be 3φλ0, where λ0 is the thermal conductivity of the carrier fluid.

  19. Melting in temperature sensitive suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    We describe two experimental studies about melting in colloidal systems. In particular we studied melting of 1-dimensional lamellar phases and 3-dimensional colloidal crystals. In the first set of experiments we prepared suspensions composed of rodlike fd virus and the thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The phase diagram of this systems is temperature and concentration dependent. Using video microscopy, we directly observed melting of lamellar phases and single lamellae into nematic phase. We found that lamellar phases swell with increasing temperature before melting into the nematic phase. The highly swollen lamellae can be superheated as a result of topological nucleation barriers that slow the formation of the nematic phase. In another set of experiments we prepared colloidal crystals from thermally responsive microgel spheres. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed three-dimensional structures. Upon increasing the temperature slightly above room temperature, particle volume fraction decreased from 0.74 to less than 0.5. Using video microscopy, we observed premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals. Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at sample volume fractions above the bulk melting transition. Particle tracking revealed increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. In total these observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and in atomic scale crystals.

  20. Noise Performance of the Advanced LIGO Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Evan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Advanced LIGO has completed a four-month search for gravitational wave events using two 4-km laser interferometers separated by a 3000 km baseline. These instruments can sense spacetime strain to better than 10-23 /Hz 1 / 2 in their most sensitive frequency band (80 Hz to 400 Hz). The interferometers' sensitivity is limited by a variety of noise sources, including thermal fluctuations of the test masses and their suspensions, quantum and classical fluctuations of the laser light used to interrogate the test masses, residual environmental disturbances, and noises arising from the sensing and control of the interferometers' length and angular degrees of freedom. We present a budget of these noise sources as they appeared during the first observing run, and discuss ongoing improvements as we look forward to Advanced LIGO achieving full design sensitivity. LIGO was constructed by the California Institute of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology with funding from the National Science Foundation and operates under cooperative agreement PHY-0757058.

  1. Worldwide monitoring of VLF-LF propagation and atmospheric noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomko, A. A.; Hepner, T.

    2001-03-01

    A joint effort is underway between The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and the Space and Naval Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center, San Diego, to deploy monitoring equipment capable of characterizing worldwide VLF-LF radio wave propagation and atmospheric noise levels. The monitoring equipment consists of a PC-based spectrum analyzer and orthogonal ferrite core magnetic loop antennas. The analyzer performs continuous measurements of the radio spectrum from 12 to 62 kHz and records time histories of VLF-LF signals (equivalent vertical electric field strength), noise amplitude probability distribution, noise impulsiveness, and average noise field strength. Data are downloaded via the Internet to a central database server. The Internet connection also provides for system reconfiguration and clock synchronization. Data collected by the monitoring network will be used to improve communication coverage forecasts and to analyze transient and long-term propagation effects. This paper provides an overview of the monitoring network and samples of data collected by it.

  2. UHB demonstrator interior noise control flight tests and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Druez, P. M.; Kimbrough, A. J.; Brock, M. P.; Burge, P. L.; Mathur, G. P.; Cannon, M. R.; Tran, B. N.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of MD-UHB (McDonnell Douglas Ultra High Bypass) Demonstrator noise and vibration flight test data are described as they relate to passenger cabin noise. The analyses were done to investigate the interior noise characteristics of advanced turboprop aircraft with aft-mounted engines, and to study the effectiveness of selected noise control treatments in reducing passenger cabin noise. The UHB Demonstrator is an MD-80 test aircraft with the left JT8D engine replaced with a prototype UHB engine. For these tests, the UHB engine was a General Electric Unducted Fan, with either 8x8 or 10x8 counter-rotating propeller configurations. Interior noise level characteristics were studied for several altitudes and speeds, with emphasis on high altitude (35,000 ft), high speed (0.75 Mach) cruise conditions. The effectiveness of several noise control treatments was evaluated based on cabin noise measurements. The important airborne and structureborne transmission paths were identified for both tonal and broadband sources using the results of a sound intensity survey, exterior and interior noise and vibration data, and partial coherence analysis techniques. Estimates of the turbulent boundary layer pressure wavenumber-frequency spectrum were made, based on measured fuselage noise levels.

  3. UHB demonstrator interior noise control flight tests and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Druez, P. M.; Kimbrough, A. J.; Brock, M. P.; Burge, P. L.; Mathur, G. P.; Cannon, M. R.; Tran, B. N.

    1989-10-01

    The measurement and analysis of MD-UHB (McDonnell Douglas Ultra High Bypass) Demonstrator noise and vibration flight test data are described as they relate to passenger cabin noise. The analyses were done to investigate the interior noise characteristics of advanced turboprop aircraft with aft-mounted engines, and to study the effectiveness of selected noise control treatments in reducing passenger cabin noise. The UHB Demonstrator is an MD-80 test aircraft with the left JT8D engine replaced with a prototype UHB engine. For these tests, the UHB engine was a General Electric Unducted Fan, with either 8x8 or 10x8 counter-rotating propeller configurations. Interior noise level characteristics were studied for several altitudes and speeds, with emphasis on high altitude (35,000 ft), high speed (0.75 Mach) cruise conditions. The effectiveness of several noise control treatments was evaluated based on cabin noise measurements. The important airborne and structureborne transmission paths were identified for both tonal and broadband sources using the results of a sound intensity survey, exterior and interior noise and vibration data, and partial coherence analysis techniques. Estimates of the turbulent boundary layer pressure wavenumber-frequency spectrum were made, based on measured fuselage noise levels.

  4. High-Clearance Six-Wheel Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    Multilevered suspension system gives body of vehicle high clearance and allows wheels to be steered independently. Suspension linkages above wheels enable body to skim over obstacles as high as wheel. Levers and independently steered wheels enable vehicle to climb steps 1 1/2 wheel diameters high and cross gaps 1 3/4 wide. Adaptable to off-the-road recreational vehicles, military scout vehicles, and robotic emergency vehicles.

  5. Sedimentation of multisized particles in concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Selim, M.S.; Kothari, A.C.; Turian, R.M.

    1983-11-01

    A model is developed for predicting the sedimentation velocity in suspensions of multisized nonflocculating solids, in which the retarding effect of the smaller particles on the setting velocities of the larger ones is taken into account. Tests of the model, and comparisons with other models, demonstrate that it provides improved prediction of data on suspensions comprising both discrete particle size mixtures and continuous size distributions, and that it is applicable to continuous countercurrent solid-liquid operations.

  6. Dynamic shear jamming in granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    Jamming by shear allows a frictional granular packing to transition from an unjammed state into a jammed state while keeping the system volume and average packing fraction constant. Shear jamming of dry granular media can occur quasi-statically, but boundaries are crucial to confine the material. We perform experiments in aqueous starch suspension where we apply shear using a rheometer with a large volume (400 ml) cylindrical Couette cell. In our suspensions the packing fraction is sufficiently low that quasi-static deformation does not induce a shear jammed state. Applying a shock-like deformation however, will turn the suspension into a jammed solid. A fully jammed state is reached within tens of microseconds, and can be sustained for at least several seconds. High speed imaging of the initial process reveals a jamming front propagating radially outward through the suspension, while the suspension near the outer boundary remains quiescent. This indicates that granular suspensions can be shear jammed without the need of confining solid boundaries. Instead, confinement is most likely provided by the dynamics in the front region.

  7. Bubbly Suspension Generated in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    2000-01-01

    Bubbly suspensions are crucial for mass and heat transport processes on Earth and in space. These processes are relevant to pharmaceutical, chemical, nuclear, and petroleum industries on Earth. They are also relevant to life support, in situ resource utilization, and propulsion processes for long-duration space missions such as the Human Exploration and Development of Space program. Understanding the behavior of the suspension in low gravity is crucial because of factors such as bubble segregation, which could result in coalescence and affect heat and mass transport. Professors A. Sangani and D. Koch, principal investigators in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, are studying the physics of bubbly suspension. They plan to shear a bubbly suspension in a couette cell in microgravity to study bubble segregation and compare the bubble distribution in the couette gap with the one predicted by the suspension-averaged equations of motion. Prior to the Requirement Definition Review of this flight experiment, a technology for generating a bubbly suspension in microgravity has to be established, tested, and verified.

  8. Hierarchical cosmic shear power spectrum inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Kiessling, Alina; Wandelt, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Till

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models a posteriori without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear E-mode, B-mode and EB-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both E- and B-modes.

  9. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Christopher

    the pressure fluctuations when the turbulent scales are on order of, or smaller than, the characteristic size of the hydrophone. At both sites, flow-noise levels can exceed ambient noise levels during slack currents by more than 50 dB at 20 Hz and flow-noise is measured at frequencies greater than 500 Hz. In Admiralty Inlet, the use of a compact flow shield is shown to reduce flow-noise levels by up to 30 dB. Below 1 kHz, the dominant source of ambient noise is vessel traffic, though during periods of strong currents, the propagating noise from vessels can be difficult to identify because of flow-noise. At frequencies above 1 kHz, during periods of strong currents, the dominant source of ambient noise is bedload transport. Observation of this higher frequency sound is not affected by flow-noise, which is limited to lower frequencies in northern Admiralty Inlet. These results are combined with marine species hearing thresholds, a turbine source spectrum, and a simple propagation model to roughly quantify the probability of marine animals detecting the sound of operating turbines against ambient noise. The results suggest that the likely detection range of operating turbines is limited to less than 1 km under most conditions. The sound produced by operating tidal turbines at the proposed demonstration-scale tidal power project is not likely to have any significant behavioral effect at greater range. Finally, the ambient statistics at the site are also combined with a sound propagation model and vocalization characteristics of Southern Resident killer whales to determine the effective range for passive acoustic monitoring techniques at the proposed project location. Due to the frequency overlap between sediment-generated noise and killer whale vocalizations, during peak currents the detection range for vocalizations is reduced by up to 90% when compared to slack current noise levels. Although the reduction in detection range is significant, this analysis suggests that

  10. Proceedings of Noise-con 81: Applied noise control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Royster, L.H.; Hart, F.D.; Stewart, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    The conference was divided into sessions covering noise control regulations and benefits; noise source identification; barriers and enclosures; mufflers; hearing protection devices; textile and fibre industries; metal fabrication industry; transportation and aircraft noise control; punch-press noise control and miscellaneous topics; woodworking industry; tobacco and packaging industries; community noise; and applications of damping materials. One paper has been abstracted separately.

  11. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  12. Airframe noise component interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a two-dimensional wing section with removable high-lift leading and trailing edge devices and a removeable two-wheel landing gear with open cavity. An array of far field conventional microphones and an acoustic mirror directional microphone were utilized to determine far field spectrum levels and noise source distribution. Data were obtained for the wing with components deployed separately and in various combinations. The basic wing model had 0.305 m (1.00 ft) chord, which is roughly 1/10 scale for a one-hundred passenger transport airplane. Most of the data were obtained at 70.7 and 100 m/sec (232 and 328 ft/sec) airspeeds, which bracket the range of practical approach speeds for such aircraft. Data were obtained at frequence to 40 kHz so that, when scaled to s typical full-airframe, the frequency region which strongly influences preceived noise level would be included.

  13. Active control of road booming noise in automotive interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Shi-Hwan; Kim, Hyoun-Suk; Park, Youngjin

    2002-01-01

    An active feedforward control system has been developed to reduce the road booming noise that has strong nonlinear characteristics. Four acceleration transducers were attached to the suspension system to detect reference vibration and two loudspeakers were used to attenuate the noise near the headrests of two front seats. A leaky constraint multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm with an IIR-based filter that has fast convergence speed and frequency selective controllability was proposed to increase the control efficiency in computing power and memory usage. During the test drive on the rough asphalt and turtle-back road at a constant speed of 60 km/h, we were able to achieve a reduction of around 6 dB of A-weighted sound pressure level in the road booming noise range with the proposed algorithm, which could not be obtained with the conventional multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm.

  14. Active control of road booming noise in automotive interiors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shi-Hwan; Kim, Hyoun-suk; Park, Youngjin

    2002-01-01

    An active feedforward control system has been developed to reduce the road booming noise that has strong nonlinear characteristics. Four acceleration transducers were attached to the suspension system to detect reference vibration and two loudspeakers were used to attenuate the noise near the headrests of two front seats. A leaky constraint multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm with an IIR-based filter that has fast convergence speed and frequency selective controllability was proposed to increase the control efficiency in computing power and memory usage. During the test drive on the rough asphalt and turtle-back road at a constant speed of 60 km/h, we were able to achieve a reduction of around 6 dB of A-weighted sound pressure level in the road booming noise range with the proposed algorithm, which could not be obtained with the conventional multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm. PMID:11831793

  15. Control of ground-borne noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. P.; Saurenman, H. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1983-03-01

    Ground-borne noise and vibration created by train operations is one of the major environmental problems faced by rail transit systems. In the past 10-20 years there have been a number of developments in the control and prediction of ground-borne noise and vibration although it is evident that further research is needed. In this paper the focus is on two methods of controlling the vibration radiated by the transit structure. First is the use of floating slab trackbeds, a method that has proven to be very effective at reducing vibration at frequencies above the resonance frequency of the floating slab system. Second is to modify the design of transit car bogies such that the wheel/rail forces are reduced. Although this method is still in the exploratory phase it has been shown that proper design of the bogie suspension can significantly reduce the levels of ground-borne noise and vibration.

  16. The formation of electronically excited species in the human multiple myeloma cell suspension

    PubMed Central

    Rác, Marek; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of electronically excited species in human multiple myeloma cells U266 in the growth medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Two-dimensional imaging of ultra-weak photon emission using highly sensitive charge coupled device camera revealed that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension caused the formation of triplet excited carbonyls 3(R = O)*. The kinetics of 3(R = O)* formation in the real time, as measured by one-dimensional ultra-weak photon emission using low-noise photomultiplier, showed immediate enhancement followed by a slow decay. In parallel to the formation of 3(R = O)*, the formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in U266 cells caused by the addition of H2O2 was visualized by the imaging of 1O2 using the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the formation of 1O2 after the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone. Presented results indicate that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension results in the formation of 3(R = O)* and 1O2 in U266 cell suspension. The contribution of the cell-free medium to the formation of electronically excited species was discussed. PMID:25744165

  17. The formation of electronically excited species in the human multiple myeloma cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Rác, Marek; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of electronically excited species in human multiple myeloma cells U266 in the growth medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Two-dimensional imaging of ultra-weak photon emission using highly sensitive charge coupled device camera revealed that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension caused the formation of triplet excited carbonyls (3)(R = O)*. The kinetics of (3)(R = O)* formation in the real time, as measured by one-dimensional ultra-weak photon emission using low-noise photomultiplier, showed immediate enhancement followed by a slow decay. In parallel to the formation of (3)(R = O)*, the formation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) in U266 cells caused by the addition of H2O2 was visualized by the imaging of (1)O2 using the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the formation of (1)O2 after the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone. Presented results indicate that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension results in the formation of (3)(R = O)* and (1)O2 in U266 cell suspension. The contribution of the cell-free medium to the formation of electronically excited species was discussed. PMID:25744165

  18. Empirical mode decomposition based background removal and de-noising in polarization interference imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunmin; Ren, Wenyi; Mu, Tingkui; Fu, Lili; Jia, Chenling

    2013-02-11

    Based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD), the background removal and de-noising procedures of the data taken by polarization interference imaging interferometer (PIIS) are implemented. Through numerical simulation, it is discovered that the data processing methods are effective. The assumption that the noise mostly exists in the first intrinsic mode function is verified, and the parameters in the EMD thresholding de-noising methods is determined. In comparison, the wavelet and windowed Fourier transform based thresholding de-noising methods are introduced. The de-noised results are evaluated by the SNR, spectral resolution and peak value of the de-noised spectrums. All the methods are used to suppress the effect from the Gaussian and Poisson noise. The de-noising efficiency is higher for the spectrum contaminated by Gaussian noise. The interferogram obtained by the PIIS is processed by the proposed methods. Both the interferogram without background and noise free spectrum are obtained effectively. The adaptive and robust EMD based methods are effective to the background removal and de-noising in PIIS. PMID:23481716

  19. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  20. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  1. Noise: The Ignored Contaminant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maurice H.

    1977-01-01

    Noise is the single most omnipresent noxious contaminant in the American environment, yet little attention has been paid to its dangers and relatively small amounts of money spent to control it. Compares the effects and management of hearing impairment due to noise with those resulting from other causes. (Editor)

  2. Predicted airframe noise levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, J. P.

    1980-09-01

    Calculated values of airframe noise levels corresponding to FAA noise certification conditions for six aircraft are presented. The aircraft are: DC-9-30; Boeing 727-200; A300-B2 Airbus; Lockheed L-1011; DC-10-10; and Boeing 747-200B. The prediction methodology employed is described and discussed.

  3. Noise Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Lavaroni, Charles W.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on noise pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of noise pollution and involves students in processes of…

  4. Sounding Off about Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpton, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise in a community college library can be part of the nature of the environment. It can also become a huge distraction for those who see the library as their sanctuary for quiet study and review of resources. This article describes the steps that should be taken by library staff in order to be proactive about noise and the library environment,…

  5. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul Samuel

    For many years, wiring has been treated as a system that could be installed and expected to work for the life of the aircraft. As aircraft age far beyond their original expected life span, this attitude is rapidly changing. Wiring problems have recently been identified as the cause of several tragic mishaps and hundreds of thousands of lost mission hours. Intermittent wiring faults have been and continue to be difficult to resolve. Test methods that pinpoint faults on the ground can miss intermittent failures. New test methods involving spread spectrum signals are investigated that could be used in flight to locate intermittent failures, including open circuits, short circuits, and arcs. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR) and sequence time domain reflectometry (STDR) are analyzed in light of the signals commonly present on aircraft wiring. Pseudo noise codes used for the generation of STDR and SSTDR signals are analyzed for application in a STDR/SSTDR test system in the presence of noise. The effects of Mil-Std 1553 and white noise on the STDR and SSTDR signals are discussed analytically, through simulations, and with the use of test hardware. A test system using STDR and SSTDR is designed, built, and used to collect STDR and SSTDR test data. The data collected with the STDR/SSTDR test hardware is analyzed and compared to the theoretical results. Experimental data for open and short circuits collected using SSTDR and a curve fitting algorithm shows a maximum range estimation error of +/-0.2 ft for 75O coaxial cable up to 100ft, and +/-0.6ft for a sample 32.5ft non-controlled impedance aircraft cable. Mil-Std 1553 is specified to operate reliably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17.5dB, and the SSTDR test system was able to locate an open circuit on a cable also carrying simulated Mil-Std 1553 data where the SSTDR signal was 50dB below the Mil-Std 1553 signal. STDR and SSTDR are shown to be effective in detecting and locating dry and wet arcs on wires.

  6. Inertial Effects in Suspension Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    J. F. Brady; Subramanian, G.

    2000-01-01

    The present work analyses the dynamics of a suspension of heavy particles in shear flow. The magnitude of the particle inertia is given by the Stokes number St = m(gamma/6(pi)a, which is the ratio of the viscous relaxation time of a particle tau(sub p) = m=6pi(eta)a to the flow time gamma(sup -1). Here, m is the mass of the particle, a is its size, eta is the viscosity of the suspending fluid and gamma is the shear rate. The ratio of the Stokes number to the Reynolds number, Re = (rho)f(gamma)a(exp 2)/eta, is the density ratio rho(sub p)/rho(sub f). Of interest is to understand the separate roles of particle (St) and fluid (Re) inertia in the dynamics of suspensions. In this study we focus on heavy particles, rho(sub p)/rho(sub f) much greater than 1, for which the Stokes number is finite, but the Reynolds number is sufficiently small for inertial forces in the fluid to be neglected; thus, the fluid motion is governed by the Stokes equations. On the other hand, the probability density governing the statistics of the suspended particles satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation that accounts for both configuration and momentum coordinates, the latter being essential for finite St. The solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is obtained to O(St) via a Chapman-Enskog type-procedure, and the conditional velocity distribution so obtained is used to derive a configuration-space Smoluchowski equation with inertial corrections. The inertial effects are responsible for asymmetry in the relative trajectories of two spheres in shear flow, in contrast to the well known symmetric structure in the absence of inertia. Finite St open trajectories in the plane of shear suffer a downward lateral displacement resulting from the inability of a particle of finite mass to follow the curvature of the zero-Stokes-number pathlines. In addition to the induced asymmetry, the O(St) inertial perturbation dramatically alters the nature of the near-field trajectories. The stable closed orbits (for St

  7. Electrostatic Effects on Droplet Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Fernandez, Arturo; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2002-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to examine the effect of electric fields on the behavior of a suspensions of drops in channels. The effect of the electric field is modeled using the "leaky dielectric" model, coupled with the full Navier-Stokes equations. The governing equations are solved using a front-tracking/finite volume technique. The method has been validated by detailed comparison with previous results for the axisymmetric interactions of two drops in Stokes flow. An extensive set of two-dimensional simulations has allowed us to explore the effect of the conductivity and permittivity ratios in some detail. The interaction of two drops is controlled by two effects. The drops are driven together due to the charge distribution on the surface. Since the net charge of the drops is zero, the drops see each other as dipoles. This dielectrophoretic motion always leads to drops attraction. The second effect is fluid motion driven by tangential stresses at the fluid interface. The fluid motion depends on the relative magnitude of the permittivity and conductivity ratios. When the permittivity ratio is higher than the conductivity ratio, the tangential forces induce flow from the poles of the drops to the equator. If the center of two such drops lies on a line parallel to the electric field, the flow drains from the region between the drops and they attract each other. When the ratios are equal, no tangential motion is induced and the drops attract each other by dielectrophoretic motion. When an electric field is applied to many drops suspended in a channel flow, drops first attract each other pair-wise and some drops move to the wall. If the forces are strong (compared to the fluid shear) the drops can form columns or fibers, spanning the channel and blocking the two-dimensional flow. Electronic "fibration" of suspensions has been observed in a number of systems, including dispersion of milk droplets and red blood cells. If the attractive forces are weak

  8. Stability of Propranolol in Extemporaneously Compounded Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Ensom, Mary H H; Kendrick, Jennifer; Rudolph, Susan; Decarie, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Background: Propranolol is a drug of choice for many diseases occurring in neonates and infants, an age group for which oral suspensions are required almost exclusively. Many adult and elderly patients for whom propranolol is prescribed are also unable to swallow solid dosage forms. In Canada, propranolol is not commercially available in a liquid dosage form, and existing recipes for extemporaneously compounded suspensions of propranolol (1 mg/mL) are limited by concerns regarding diabetes mellitus in certain subpopulations, the need for a more concentrated suspension for patients taking larger doses, and the tediousness of compounding. Objective: To evaluate the stability of propranolol suspensions in a sugar-free, commercially available vehicle after storage at room temperature and under refrigeration for up to 120 days. Methods: Suspensions of propranolol (2 and 5 mg/mL) were prepared in the sugar-free vehicle (Ora-Blend SF), placed in 100-mL amber plastic prescription bottles, and stored at 25°C and 4°C. Samples were collected from each bottle once weekly for 120 days, stored frozen, and analyzed by a validated, stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography – ultraviolet detection method. A suspension was considered stable if it maintained at least 90% of its initial concentration of propranolol. Physical compatibility was evaluated in terms of colour, taste, precipitation, and pH. Results: Propranolol suspensions 2 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL stored at 25°C maintained at least 94.7% of their initial concentration for 120 days, and suspensions stored at 4°C maintained at least 93.9% of their initial concentration for 120 days. There were no notable changes in pH, and all samples remained physically unchanged except for a slight change in colour, around day 70, of suspensions stored at room temperature. Conclusion: Propranolol suspensions (2 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL) prepared in Ora-Blend SF and stored in plastic prescription bottles at either 25°C or 4

  9. Infrasonic wind noise under a deciduous tree canopy.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jeremy; Raspet, Richard

    2015-05-01

    In a recent paper, the infrasonic wind noise measured at the floor of a pine forest was predicted from the measured wind velocity spectrum and profile within and above the trees [Raspet and Webster, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137, 651-659 (2015)]. This research studies the measured and predicted wind noise under a deciduous forest with and without leaves. A calculation of the turbulence-shear interaction pressures above the canopy predicts the low frequency peak in the wind noise spectrum. The calculated turbulence-turbulence interaction pressure due to the turbulence field near the ground predicts the measured wind noise spectrum in the higher frequency region. The low frequency peak displays little dependence on whether the trees have leaves or not. The high frequency contribution with leaves is approximately an order of magnitude smaller than the contribution without leaves. Wind noise levels with leaves are very similar to the wind noise levels in the pine forest. The calculated turbulence-shear contribution from the wind within the canopy is shown to be negligible in comparison to the turbulence-turbulence contribution in both cases. In addition, the effect of taller forests and smaller roughness lengths than those of the test forest on the turbulence-shear interaction is simulated based on measured meteorological parameters. PMID:25994698

  10. Investigation of the Jet Noise Prediction Theory and Application Utilizing the PAO Formulation. [mathematical model for calculating noise radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Application of the Phillips theory to engineering calculations of rocket and high speed jet noise radiation is reported. Presented are a detailed derivation of the theory, the composition of the numerical scheme, and discussions of the practical problems arising in the application of the present noise prediction method. The present method still contains some empirical elements, yet it provides a unified approach in the prediction of sound power, spectrum, and directivity.

  11. Community noise model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    MVMA has sponsored a study to assist the motor vehicle manufacturers and others in assessing the impact of motor vehicle noise on the community. As part of this study, a computer model was developed to quantify, by mathematical simulation, the impact of traffic noise on the community, with particular emphasis on passenger cars, light trucks and vans under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating. The primary objective of the program was to evaluate the incremental changes in exposure to traffic noise which would result from the promulgation of various new-vehicle emission standards and to compare these incremental changes with those which result from alternative approaches to vehicle noise abatement. The model is available for use on microcomputers and is capable of evaluating local, as well as national, noise control strategies.

  12. [Urban noise pollution].

    PubMed

    Chouard, C H

    2001-07-01

    Noise is responsible for cochlear and general damages. Hearing loss and tinnitus greatly depend on sound intensity and duration. Short-duration sound of sufficient intensity (gunshot or explosion) will not be described because they are not currently encountered in our normal urban environment. Sound levels of less than 75 d (A) are unlikely to cause permanent hearing loss, while sound levels of about 85 d (A) with exposures of 8 h per day will produce permanent hearing loss after many years. Popular and largely amplified music is today one of the most dangerous causes of noise induced hearing loss. The intensity of noises (airport, highway) responsible for stress and general consequences (cardiovascular) is generally lower. Individual noise sensibility depends on several factors. Strategies to prevent damage from sound exposure should include the use of individual hearing protection devices, education programs beginning with school-age children, consumer guidance, increased product noise labelling, and hearing conservation programs for occupational settings. PMID:11476007

  13. Rotorcraft Noise Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) is an aircraft noise impact modeling computer program being developed for NASA-Langley Research Center which calculates sound levels at receiver positions either on a uniform grid or at specific defined locations. The basic computational model calculates a variety of metria. Acoustic properties of the noise source are defined by two sets of sound pressure hemispheres, each hemisphere being centered on a noise source of the aircraft. One set of sound hemispheres provides the broadband data in the form of one-third octave band sound levels. The other set of sound hemispheres provides narrowband data in the form of pure-tone sound pressure levels and phase. Noise contours on the ground are output graphically or in tabular format, and are suitable for inclusion in Environmental Impact Statements or Environmental Assessments.

  14. Noise in coevolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, Marina; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2015-09-01

    Coupling dynamics of the states of the nodes of a network to the dynamics of the network topology leads to generic absorbing and fragmentation transitions. The coevolving voter model is a typical system that exhibits such transitions at some critical rewiring. We study the robustness of these transitions under two distinct ways of introducing noise. Noise affecting all the nodes destroys the absorbing-fragmentation transition, giving rise in finite-size systems to two regimes: bimodal magnetization and dynamic fragmentation. Noise targeting a fraction of nodes preserves the transitions but introduces shattered fragmentation with its characteristic fraction of isolated nodes and one or two giant components. Both the lack of absorbing state for homogeneous noise and the shift in the absorbing transition to higher rewiring for targeted noise are supported by analytical approximations.

  15. Feedback Control for Noise Reduction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's continuing noise reduction program, an active noise control system (ANC) is being developed to suppress noise inside an aircraft cabin. This interior noise reduction system consists of the following major components: 1. Several accelerometers. 2. An input amplifier. 3. A digital signal processor (DSP) system that includes an analog to digital converter (ADC) and a digital to analog converter (DAC). 4. A high voltage power amplifier. 5. PZT actuators. 6. Power supply and distribution. The accelerometers detect interior panel vibrations. The accelerometer signals are fed to the input amplifier where they are conditioned prior to being sent to the ADC. The DSP receives the digitized signals form the ADC, processes these signals, and sends the result to the DAC. The DAC's analog output is used as input to the high voltage power amplifier. The power amplifier drives the PZT actuators to cancel noise form 50 to 1,300 Hz. The specific area of concern for this work was development of a DSP system that could be used for an actual flight demonstration. It was decided to base the system on a commercially available DSP board, the Spectrum Digital eZdsp. This was complicated by the fact that the ADC and DAC capabilities available on the eZdsp board were not sufficient to meet the system specification. Designing and fabricating a special ADC and DAC daughter card for the eZdsp circumvented this problem. The DSP system hardware has been successfully tested and is currently being integrated into the complete noise reduction system. This work has been completed in collaboration with another ASEE Fellow, Dr.William Edmonson from Hampton University and was conducted under the direction of the principle investigator, Dr. Qamar A. Shams of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch, as part of a continuing noise reduction program.

  16. Annoyance response to spectrally modified recorded aircraft noise during television-viewing.

    PubMed

    Gunn, W J; Shigehisa, T; Shepherd, W T

    1977-10-01

    Magnitude estimations of the annoyance of 27 individual noise stimuli were made by 24 Ss while viewing television; 8 different spectrum modifications of a basic aircraft noise were introduced at 3 overall intensities. The basic spectrum was that of an untreated commercial jet aircraft takeoff noise; the other 8 were created by removal of one of two amounts of energy from an octave band centerered at either .315, .8, 1.6, or 4 kc/s. An ANOVA showed significant annoyance differences for spectrum modification, overall noise intensity and their interaction. Annoyance reduction was greatest when energy was removed at the octave band centered at 1.6 kc/s, next at .8, and .315, and least at 4 kc/s. Although greater overall intensity reduction yielded progressively less annoyance with various spectrally-modified noises as well as unmodified noise, the spectrum modification was apparently most effective in reducing annoyance when the overall maximum noise intensity ranged from 88.0 to 89.1 dbA, and was least effective from 83.9 to 85.3 dbA. Annoyance reduction resulting from spectrum modification at a single octave band (centered at either .8 or 1.6 kc/s) was equivalent to that resulting from a 2.7 dbA overall intensity reduction. The results are discussed in terms of speech interference as well as intermodal effects of noise during television viewing. PMID:617812

  17. 21 CFR 1301.36 - Suspension or revocation of registration; suspension of registration pending final order...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suspension or revocation of registration; suspension of registration pending final order; extension of registration pending final order. 1301.36 Section 1301.36 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REGISTRATION OF MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTORS, AND DISPENSERS...

  18. 48 CFR 3023.506 - Suspension of payments, termination of contract, and debarment and suspension actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 3023.506 Suspension of payments, termination of contract, and debarment and suspension actions. (e) Submit requests per (HSAR) 48 CFR 3001.7000....

  19. 48 CFR 3023.506 - Suspension of payments, termination of contract, and debarment and suspension actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 3023.506 Suspension of payments, termination of contract, and debarment and suspension actions. (e) Submit requests per (HSAR) 48 CFR 3001.7000....

  20. 48 CFR 3023.506 - Suspension of payments, termination of contract, and debarment and suspension actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 3023.506 Suspension of payments, termination of contract, and debarment and suspension actions. (e) Submit requests per (HSAR) 48 CFR 3001.7000....

  1. Suspension, a Wake-Up Call: Rural Educators' Attitudes toward Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Joan; Friedland, Billie

    Data from the West Virginia Department of Education reveals that from September 1991 to January 1992, school districts reported 18,915 out-of-school suspensions involving 12,997 students. In 1995, the West Virginia State Legislature enacted the Safe Schools Act, which specifically mandates suspension for no less than 12 consecutive months for…

  2. Magma Suspension As a Complex Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, A.; Kurita, K.

    2012-12-01

    Magma is essentially a multiphase suspension of solid crystals, gaseous bubbles and silicate liquid. As for non-linear properties of magma two aspects have been focused for controlling factors in magma flow instability: the existence of the yield stress and the multiplicity in the relation between driving pressure and flow rate. The emergence of the yield stress in a suspension system has been experimentally investigated by using PNIPAM aqueous suspension as an analogue of magma (Kurokawa et al, EGU 2012-4105-2,2012). In this presentation we focus on the other aspect, the multiplicity in the rheological relationship. We investigate its physical origin of the rheology and its role in generating pressure oscillation associated with tube flow of suspension based on the PNIPAM analogue material. PNIPAM is a polymer gel and undergoes volumetric phase change at the temperature around 35 degree C: below this temperature the gel phase absorbs water and swells while over this temperature, it expels water and shrinks. Due to this property, the volume fraction of gel phase systematically changes with temperature. This makes it possible to observe the change of rheology continuously associated with the change of the fraction of solid phase. By series of rheological measurements PNIPAM aqueous suspension has been revealed to exhibit peculiar ageing effect, which is well known for complex suspension fluid. This ageing effect is responsible for generating the yield stress and the multiplicity. The multiplicity; coexistence of several flow rates at a certain pressure drives jumping between low and high flow rates, which causes oscillatory behavior of flow. We report experimental support of this model by demonstrating pressure oscillation in tube flow of PNIPAM aqueous suspension.

  3. A noise control package for vibrating screens1),2)

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, M. Jenae; Yantek, David S.; Yang, Junyi; Schuster, Kevin C.; Mechling, Jessie J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss was the second-most common illness reported to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2009. Furthermore, between 2000 and 2010, 30% of all noise-related injury complaints reported to MSHA were for coal preparation plant employees. Previous National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) studies have shown that vibrating screens are key noise sources to address in order to reduce coal preparation plant noise. In response, NIOSH researchers have developed a suite of noise controls for vibrating screens consisting of constrained layer damping (CLD) treatments, a tuned mechanism suspension, an acoustic enclosure, and spring inserts. Laboratory testing demonstrates that this noise control suite reduces the A-weighted sound power level of the vibrating screen by 6 dB. To provide a comparison to laboratory results and prove durability, field testing of two noise controls was performed on a vibrating screen in a working coal preparation plant. The spring inserts and CLD treatments were selected due to their ease of installation and practicability. Field testing of these controls yielded reductions that were comparable to laboratory results. PMID:26257468

  4. Modal noise impact in radio over fiber multimode fiber links.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, I; Capmany, J

    2008-01-01

    A novel analysis is given on the statistics of modal noise for a graded-index multimode fiber (MMF) link excited by an analog intensity modulated laser diode. We present the speckle contrast as a function of the power spectrum of the modulated source and the transfer function of the MMF which behaves as an imperfect transversal microwave photonic filter. The theoretical results confirm that the modal noise is directly connected with the coherence properties of the optical source and show that the performance of high-frequency Radio Over Fiber (ROF) transmission through MMF links for short and middle reach distances is not substantially degraded by modal noise. PMID:18521139

  5. Shock-turbulence interaction and the generation of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H S

    1954-01-01

    Interaction of convected field of turbulence with shock wave is analyzed to yield modified turbulence, entropy spottiness, and noise generated downstream of the shock. Analysis is generalization of single-spectrum-wave treatment of NACA-TN-2864. Formulas for spectra and correlations are obtained. Numerical calculations yield curves of rms velocity components, temperature, pressure, and noise in db against Mach number for m = 1 to infinity; both isotropic and strongly axisymmetric (lateral/longitudinal = 36/1) initial turbulence are treated. In either case, turbulence of 0.1 percent longitudinal component generates about 120 dbs of noise.

  6. Rheological behavior of oxide nanopowder suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinar, Simge

    Ceramic nanopowders offer great potential in advanced ceramic materials and many other technologically important applications. Because a material's rheological properties are crucial for most processing routes, control of the rheological behavior has drawn significant attention in the recent past. The control of rheological behavior relies on an understanding of how different parameters affect the suspension viscosities. Even though the suspension stabilization mechanisms are relatively well understood for sub-micron and micron size particle systems, this knowledge cannot be directly transferred to nanopowder suspensions. Nanopowder suspensions exhibit unexpectedly high viscosities that cannot be explained with conventional mechanisms and are still a topic of investigation. This dissertation aims to establish the critical parameters governing the rheological behavior of concentrated oxide nanopowder suspensions, and to elucidate the mechanisms by which these parameters control the rheology of these suspensions. Aqueous alumina nanopowders were chosen as a model system, and the findings were extrapolated to other oxide nanopowder systems such as zirconia, yttria stabilized zirconia, and titania. Processing additives such as fructose, NaCl, HCl, NaOH, and ascorbic acid were used in this study. The effect of solids content and addition of fructose on the viscosity of alumina nanopowder suspensions was investigated by low temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC), rheological, and zeta potential measurements. The analysis of bound water events observed in LT-DSC revealed useful information regarding the rheological behavior of nanopowder suspensions. Because of the significance of interparticle interactions in nanopowder suspensions, the electrostatic stabilization was investigated using indifferent and potential determining ions. Different mechanisms, e.g., the effect of the change in effective volume fraction caused by fructose addition and electrostatic

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a ... and pervasive developmental disorders. It is called a "spectrum" disorder because people with ASD can have a ...

  8. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of developmental disabilities that can cause significant social, communication and behavioral ... for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. More E-mail Your Friends "Children with autism ...

  9. A robust power spectrum split cancellation-based spectrum sensing method for cognitive radio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Pei-Han; Li, Zan; Si, Jiang-Bo; Gao, Rui

    2014-12-01

    Spectrum sensing is an essential component to realize the cognitive radio, and the requirement for real-time spectrum sensing in the case of lacking prior information, fading channel, and noise uncertainty, indeed poses a major challenge to the classical spectrum sensing algorithms. Based on the stochastic properties of scalar transformation of power spectral density (PSD), a novel spectrum sensing algorithm, referred to as the power spectral density split cancellation method (PSC), is proposed in this paper. The PSC makes use of a scalar value as a test statistic, which is the ratio of each subband power to the full band power. Besides, by exploiting the asymptotic normality and independence of Fourier transform, the distribution of the ratio and the mathematical expressions for the probabilities of false alarm and detection in different channel models are derived. Further, the exact closed-form expression of decision threshold is calculated in accordance with Neyman—Pearson criterion. Analytical and simulation results show that the PSC is invulnerable to noise uncertainty, and can achive excellent detection performance without prior knowledge in additive white Gaussian noise and flat slow fading channels. In addition, the PSC benefits from a low computational cost, which can be completed in microseconds.

  10. Highly specific DNA detection employing ligation on suspension bead array readout.

    PubMed

    Mezger, Anja; Kühnemund, Malte; Nilsson, Mats; Herthnek, David

    2015-09-25

    We show for the first time that monomerized rolling circle amplification (RCA) products can be directly detected with the Luminex suspension bead array readout without the need of PCR amplification. Furthermore, using monomerized RCA products to guide ligation of the detection oligonucleotide (DO) to barcode sequences on the magnetic Luminex beads, combined with efficient washing and increased measurement temperature, yields a higher signal to noise ratio. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate detection of pathogenic DNA sequences with high reproducibility, sensitivity and a dynamic range over four orders of magnitude. Using padlock probes in combination with bead suspension arrays opens up the possibility for highly multiplexed DNA targeting and readout. PMID:25681158

  11. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  12. A seesaw-lever force-balancing suspension design for space and terrestrial gravity-gradient sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huafeng; Pike, W. T.; Dou, Guangbin

    2016-03-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a seesaw-lever force-balancing suspension for a silicon gravity-gradient sensor, a gravity gradiometer, that is capable of operation over a range of gravity from 0 to 1 g. This allows for both air and space deployment after ground validation. An overall rationale for designing a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) gravity gradiometer is developed, indicating that a gravity gradiometer based on a torsion-balance, rather than a differential-accelerometer, provides the best approach. The fundamental micromachined element, a seesaw-lever force-balancing suspension, is designed with a low fundamental frequency for in-plane rotation to response gravity gradient but with good rejection of all cross-axis modes. During operation under 1 g, a gravitational force is axially loaded on two straight-beams that perform as a stiff fulcrum for the mass-connection lever without affecting sensitive in-plane rotational sensing. The dynamics of this suspension are analysed by both closed-form and finite element analysis, with good agreement between the two. The suspension has been fabricated using through-wafer deep reactive-ion etching and the dynamics verified both in air and vacuum. The sensitivity of a gravity gradiometer built around this suspension will be dominated by thermal noise, contributing in this case a noise floor of around 10 E /√{Hz } (1 E = 10-9/s2) in vacuum. Compared with previous conventional gravity gradiometers, this suspension allows a gradiometer of performance within an order of magnitude but greatly reduced volume and weight. Compared with previous MEMS gravity gradiometers, our design has the advantage of functionality under Earth gravity.

  13. Effects of conversation interference on annoyance due to aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, K. F.; Powell, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    The annoyance and interference effects of aircraft flyover noise on face to face conversation were investigated. Twenty 5 minute sessions, each composed of three flyovers, were presented to each of 20 pairs of female subjects in a simulated living room. Flyovers varied in peak noise level (55-79 dB, A-weighted) and spectrum (low or high frequency components). Subjects engaged in conversation for 10 sessions and in reverie for the other 10 sessions, and completed subjective ratings following every session. Annoyance was affected by noise level, but was not significantly different for the two activities of reverie and conversation. A noise level of 77 db was found unacceptable for conversation by 50 percent of the subjects. Conversation interference was assessed by incidence of increased vocal effort and/or interruption of conversation during flyovers. Although conversation interference increased with noise level, the conversation interference measures did not improve prediction of individual annoyance judgments.

  14. Model for excess noise in voltage-biased superconducting bolometers.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, J M; Lee, A T; Richards, P L

    2001-12-01

    We are developing superconducting transition-edge bolometers for far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. The bolometers described here are suspended by thin legs of silicon nitride for thermal isolation. At frequencies between 200 mHz and 10-50 Hz these devices show white noise at their thermal fluctuation limit (NEP approximately 10(-17) W/ radicalHz). At higher frequencies a broad peak appears in the noise spectrum, which we attribute to a combination of thermal fluctuations in complex thermal circuits and electrothermal feedback. Detailed noise calculations fit the noise measured in three different devices that were specifically designed to test the model. We discuss how changes in bolometer materials can shift the noise peak above the frequency range of interest for most applications. PMID:18364926

  15. Nature of orchestral noise.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ian; Wilson, Wayne; Bradley, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Professional orchestral musicians are at risk of exposure to excessive noise when at work. This is an industry-wide problem that threatens not only the hearing of orchestral musicians but also the way orchestras operate. The research described in this paper recorded noise levels within a professional orchestra over three years in order to provide greater insight to the orchestral noise environment; to guide future research into orchestral noise management and hearing conservation strategies; and to provide a basis for the future education of musicians and their managers. Every rehearsal, performance, and recording from May 2004 to May 2007 was monitored, with the woodwind, brass, and percussion sections monitored in greatest detail. The study recorded dBALEQ and dBC peak data, which are presented in graphical form with accompanying summarized data tables. The findings indicate that the principal trumpet, first and third horns, and principal trombone are at greatest risk of exposure to excessive sustained noise levels and that the percussion and timpani are at greatest risk of exposure to excessive peak noise levels. However, the findings also strongly support the notion that the true nature of orchestral noise is a great deal more complex than this simple statement would imply. PMID:18681585

  16. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  17. [The fetus and noise].

    PubMed

    Brezinka, C; Lechner, T; Stephan, K

    1997-01-01

    From 23 weeks of gestation some and from 28 weeks all healthy fetuses are capable of reacting to sound stimulation. The intrauterine acoustic environment is dominated by maternal sounds--heartbeat, breathing, the mother's voice, borborygmi and sounds caused by body movements. Background noise is never below 28 dB and can rise to 84 dB when the mother is singing. Noises that are meant to reach the fetus must be louder than the background noise and must be of low frequency as high frequency sounds are damped by maternal tissue. Vibroacoustic stimulation tests (VAST) have become popular in pregnancy surveillance over the last 20 years, mostly using an artificial larynx. Advantages and problems of the various VAST protocols in fetal monitoring are discussed in the light of animal experiments and clinical studies. Health legislation laws in most countries forbid pregnant women to work in surroundings with a high noise level (80 dB continuous noise and/or rapid impulse noise changes of 40 dB). Whereas regulations for pregnant women are easy to enforce in industry, pregnant women employed in discos or performing as musicians spend most of their working day exposed to noise impact higher than the recommended limit. PMID:9483870

  18. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-04-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  19. Noise labeling in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Marco A. N.; Massarani, Paulo M.; de Azevedo, Jose A. J.; Gerges, Samir N. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The Brazilian Silence Program, created in 1990 by the Brazilian Ministry of Environment, advocates the production and use of equipment with lower noise level. The subcommittee of Noise Labeling of the Brazilian Committee of Certification is composed of INMETRO acoustic specialists to organize and implement the Brazilian Labeling Program. This subcommittee elaborated the label form and test procedure. The noise-labeling program will first concentrate on the following household devices, both manufactured in Brazil or imported from abroad; mixers, blenders, hairdryers, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners. The label should contain the sound-power level in dBA. INMETRO or other credited laboratories are responsible for the measurements. The ISO 4871, 3740 (1 to 5), ISO 8960, and IEC 704 (1 to 4) and also the equivalent Brazilian standards are used for the measurements, such as ABNT NBR 13910-1. The main objective of the label is to inform the consumer about the emitted noise level. The label offers the noise parameter to be used by the consumer when comparing devices, considering price, performance, and now also noise. No restriction for noise level was established.

  20. Transdimensional Bayesian approach to pulsar timing noise analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. A.; Cornish, N. J.

    2016-04-01

    The modeling of intrinsic noise in pulsar timing residual data is of crucial importance for gravitational wave detection and pulsar timing (astro)physics in general. The noise budget in pulsars is a collection of several well-studied effects including radiometer noise, pulse-phase jitter noise, dispersion measure variations, and low-frequency spin noise. However, as pulsar timing data continue to improve, nonstationary and non-power-law noise terms are beginning to manifest which are not well modeled by current noise analysis techniques. In this work, we use a transdimensional approach to model these nonstationary and non-power-law effects through the use of a wavelet basis and an interpolation-based adaptive spectral modeling. In both cases, the number of wavelets and the number of control points in the interpolated spectrum are free parameters that are constrained by the data and then marginalized over in the final inferences, thus fully incorporating our ignorance of the noise model. We show that these new methods outperform standard techniques when nonstationary and non-power-law noise is present. We also show that these methods return results consistent with the standard analyses when no such signals are present.