Science.gov

Sample records for non-affine rubber elasticity

  1. Particle displacements in the elastic deformation of amorphous materials: Local fluctuations vs. non-affine field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, C.; Tanguy, A.; Barrat, J.-L.

    2007-10-01

    We study the local disorder in the deformation of amorphous materials by decomposing the particle displacements into a continuous, inhomogeneous field and the corresponding fluctuations. We compare these fields to the commonly used non-affine displacements in an elastically deformed 2D Lennard-Jones glass. Unlike the non-affine field, the fluctuations are very localized, and exhibit a much smaller (and system size independent) correlation length, on the order of a particle diameter, supporting the applicability of the notion of local "defects" to such materials. We propose a scalar "noise" field to characterize the fluctuations, as an additional field for extended continuum models, e.g., to describe the localized irreversible events observed during plastic deformation.

  2. Elastic instabilities in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Materials that undergo large elastic deformations can exhibit novel instabilities. Several examples are described: development of an aneurysm on inflating a rubber tube; non-uniform stretching on inflating a spherical balloon; formation of internal cracks in rubber blocks at a critical level of triaxial tension or when supersaturated with a dissolved gas; surface wrinkling of a block at a critical amount of compression; debonding or fracture of constrained films on swelling, and formation of ``knots'' on twisting stretched cylindrical rods. These various deformations are analyzed in terms of a simple strain energy function, using Rivlin's theory of large elastic deformations, and the results are compared with experimental measurements of the onset of unstable states. Such comparisons provide new tests of Rivlin's theory and, at least in principle, critical tests of proposed strain energy functions for rubber. Moreover the onset of highly non-uniform deformations has serious implications for the fatigue life and fracture resistance of rubber components. [4pt] References: [0pt] R. S. Rivlin, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. Ser. A241 (1948) 379--397. [0pt] A. Mallock, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. 49 (1890--1891) 458--463. [0pt] M. A. Biot, ``Mechanics of Incremental Deformations'', Wiley, New York, 1965. [0pt] A. N. Gent and P. B. Lindley, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 249 (1958) 195--205. [0pt] A. N. Gent, W. J. Hung and M. F. Tse, Rubb. Chem. Technol. 74 (2001) 89--99. [0pt] A. N. Gent, Internatl. J. Non-Linear Mech. 40 (2005) 165--175.

  3. Rubber elasticity: From topology to filled elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, G.; Vilgis, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Various new aspects in the elasticity of rubbers and statistics of unfilled and filled elastomers, together with various consequences for practical application are discussed. It is shown that the role of network topology is crucial in the statistics of rubbers. This is seen mostly on the influence of heterogeneities of crosslink density which determine the elastic modulus, ultimate properties as well as the dynamical behavior. The filler effects, entanglements in filled rubbers, and the filler/bound rubber/mobile rubber problem are discussed from a novel point of view. A localization model is adopted, where it can be shown that on a rough (filler) surface more polymer can be adsorbed compared to a flat surface with similar energetic properties. The role of carbon black networking and fractal properties of the filler are discussed in relation to the dynamic-mechanical properties of the elastomer.

  4. The role of pressure in rubber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Bower, A F; Weiner, J H

    2004-06-22

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics computations that reveal an intimate connection at the atomic scale between difference stress (which resists stretches) and pressure (which resists volume changes) in an idealized elastomer, in contrast to the classical theory of rubber elasticity. Our simulations idealize the elastomer as a "pearl necklace," in which the covalent bonds are stiff linear springs, while nonbonded atoms interact through a Lennard-Jones potential with energy epsilon(LJ) and radius sigma(LJ). We calculate the difference stress t(11)-(t(22)+t(33))/2 and mean stress (t(11)+t(22)+t(33))/3 induced by a constant volume extension in the x(1) direction, as a function of temperature T and reduced density rho(*)=Nsigma(IJ) (3)/nu. Here, N is the number of atoms in the simulation cell and nu is the cell volume. Results show that for rho(*)<1, the difference stress is purely entropic and is in good agreement with the classical affine network model of rubber elasticity, which neglects nonbonded interactions. However, data presented by van Krevelen [Properties of Polymers, 3rd ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1990), p. 79] indicate that rubber at standard conditions corresponds to rho(*)=1.2. For rho(*)>1, the system is entropic for kT/epsilon(LJ)>2, but at lower temperatures the difference stress contains an additional energy component, which increases as rho(*) increases and temperature decreases. Finally, the model exhibits a glass transition for rho(*)=1.2 and kT/epsilon(LJ) approximately 2. The atomic-scale processes responsible for generating stress are explored in detail. Simulations demonstrate that the repulsive portion of the Lennard-Jones potential provides a contribution sigma(nbr)>0 to the difference stress, the attractive portion provides sigma(nba) approximately 0, while the covalent bonds provide sigma(b)<0. In contrast, their respective contributions to the mean stress satisfy Pi(nbr)<0, Pi(nba)>0, and Pi(b)<0. Analytical calculations, together

  5. The role of pressure in rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, A. F.; Weiner, J. H.

    2004-06-01

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics computations that reveal an intimate connection at the atomic scale between difference stress (which resists stretches) and pressure (which resists volume changes) in an idealized elastomer, in contrast to the classical theory of rubber elasticity. Our simulations idealize the elastomer as a "pearl necklace," in which the covalent bonds are stiff linear springs, while nonbonded atoms interact through a Lennard-Jones potential with energy εLJ and radius σLJ. We calculate the difference stress t11-(t22+t33)/2 and mean stress (t11+t22+t33)/3 induced by a constant volume extension in the x1 direction, as a function of temperature T and reduced density ρ*=NσIJ3/ν. Here, N is the number of atoms in the simulation cell and ν is the cell volume. Results show that for ρ*<1, the difference stress is purely entropic and is in good agreement with the classical affine network model of rubber elasticity, which neglects nonbonded interactions. However, data presented by van Krevelen [Properties of Polymers, 3rd ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1990), p. 79] indicate that rubber at standard conditions corresponds to ρ*=1.2. For ρ*>1, the system is entropic for kT/εLJ>2, but at lower temperatures the difference stress contains an additional energy component, which increases as ρ* increases and temperature decreases. Finally, the model exhibits a glass transition for ρ*=1.2 and kT/εLJ≈2. The atomic-scale processes responsible for generating stress are explored in detail. Simulations demonstrate that the repulsive portion of the Lennard-Jones potential provides a contribution σnbr>0 to the difference stress, the attractive portion provides σnba≈0, while the covalent bonds provide σb<0. In contrast, their respective contributions to the mean stress satisfy Πnbr<0, Πnba>0, and Πb<0. Analytical calculations, together with simulations, demonstrate that mean and difference stresses are related by σnbr=-AΠnbr,

  6. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide a brief

  7. Disorder, pre-stress and non-affinity in polymer 8-chain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioroianu, Adrian R.; Spiesz, Ewa M.; Storm, Cornelis

    2016-04-01

    To assess the role of single-chain elasticity, non-affine strain fields and pre-stressed reference states we present and discuss the results of numerical and analytical analyses of a modified 8-chain Arruda-Boyce model for cross-linked polymer networks. This class of models has proved highly successful in modeling the finite-strain response of flexible rubbers. We extend it to include the effects of spatial disorder and the associated non-affinity, and use it to assess the validity of replacing the constituent chain's nonlinear elastic response with equivalent linear, Hookean springs. Surprisingly, we find that even in the regime of linear response, the full polymer model gives very different results from its linearized counterpart, even though none of the chains are stretched beyond their linear regime. We demonstrate that this effect is due to the fact that the polymer models are under considerable pre-stress in their ground state. We show that pre-stress strongly suppresses non-affinity in these unit cell models, resulting in a marked stiffening of the bulk response. Polymer networks with some degree of flexibility are thus intrinsically prestressed, and one effect of such prestresses is to reduce non-affine deformations. Combined, these findings may help explain why fully affine mechanical models, in many cases, predict the bulk mechanical response of disordered polymer networks so well.

  8. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There aremore » serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide

  9. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-07-01

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious conceptual objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo a simple volume-preserving linear motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, Quantum Chemistry, and Molecular Dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model (EPnet). When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high

  10. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  11. Mechanistic Constitutive Models for Rubber Elasticity and Viscoelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M

    2003-01-21

    Physically based models which describe the finite strain behavior of vulcanized rubber are developed. Constitutive laws for elasticity and viscoelasticity are derived by integrating over orientation space the forces due to each individual polymer chain. A novel scheme is presented which effectively approximates these integrals in terms of strain and strain invariants. In addition, the details involving the implementation of such models into a quasi-static large strain finite element formulation are provided. In order to account for the finite extensibility of a molecular chain, Langevin statistics is used to model the chain response. The classical statistical model of rubber assumes that polymer chains interact only at the chemical crosslinks. It is shown that such model when fitted for uniaxial tension data cannot fit compression or equibiaxial data. A model which incorporates the entanglement interactions of surrounding chains, in addition to the finite extensibility of the chains, is shown to give better predictions than the classical model. The technique used for approximating the orientation space integral was applied to both the classical and entanglement models. A viscoelasticity model based on the force equilibration process as described by Doi and Edwards is developed. An assumed form for the transient force in the chain is postulated. The resulting stress tensor is composed of an elastic and a viscoelastic portion with the elastic stress given by the proposed entanglement model. In order to improve the simulation of experimental data, it was found necessary to include the effect of unattached or dangling polymer chains in the viscoelasticity model. The viscoelastic effect of such chains is the manifestation of a disengagement process. This disengagement model for unattached polymer chains motivated an empirical model which was very successful in simulating the experimental results considered.

  12. Squeeze elastic deformation and contact area of a rubber adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordjeman, P.; Papon, E.; Villenave, J.-J.

    2000-12-01

    New experimental results show that the tack energy of a nonstringing rubber adhesive is proportional to the square function of the contact area. However, this area seems only to be controlled by the contact force and the thickness of the adhesive. A study of how the contact area depends on physical parameters is of great interest for the modeling of the tack properties of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). With this objective, we give a mechanical analysis of the tack test in the framework of elasticity. This analysis leads to an analytical expression of force versus thickness of material that is in agreement with the experimental data. Based on this mechanical analysis, a model is proposed to take into account the dependence of the contact area with the contact force and the adhesive thickness. This model is based on the idea that, in confined geometry, the adhesive behaves like an elastic solid and the contact area is a function of the elastic squeeze deformation close to the probe surface. The confrontation with experimental results is good and shows the relevance of this approach. Finally, the model underlines the importance of the roughness, the thickness and the Young's modulus of the adhesive according to the experimental results.

  13. Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, D. F.

    The word "rubber" immediately brings to mind materials that are highly flexible and will snap back to their original shape after being stretched. In this chapter a variety of materials are discussed that possess this odd characteristics. There will also be a discussion on the mechanism of this "elastic retractive force." Originally, rubber meant the gum collected from a tree growing in Brazil. The term "rubber" was coined for this material by the English chemist Joseph Priestley, who noted that it was effective for removing pencil marks from paper. Today, in addition to Priestley's natural product, many synthetic materials are made that possess these characteristics and many other properties. The common features of these materials are that they are made up of long-chain molecules that are amorphous (not crystalline), and the chains are above their glass transition temperature at room temperature.

  14. The molecular kink paradigm for rubber elasticity: Numerical simulations of explicit polyisoprene networks at low to moderate tensile strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.

    2011-08-01

    Based on recent molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of small isoprene molecules, we propose a new ansatz for rubber elasticity. We envision a network chain as a series of independent molecular kinks, each comprised of a small number of backbone units, and the strain as being imposed along the contour of the chain. We treat chain extension in three distinct force regimes: (Ia) near zero strain, where we assume that the chain is extended within a well defined tube, with all of the kinks participating simultaneously as entropic elastic springs, (II) when the chain becomes sensibly straight, giving rise to a purely enthalpic stretching force (until bond rupture occurs) and, (Ib) a linear entropic regime, between regimes Ia and II, in which a force limit is imposed by tube deformation. In this intermediate regime, the molecular kinks are assumed to be gradually straightened until the chain becomes a series of straight segments between entanglements. We assume that there exists a tube deformation tension limit that is inversely proportional to the chain path tortuosity. Here we report the results of numerical simulations of explicit three-dimensional, periodic, polyisoprene networks, using these extension-only force models. At low strain, crosslink nodes are moved affinely, up to an arbitrary node force limit. Above this limit, non-affine motion of the nodes is allowed to relax unbalanced chain forces. Our simulation results are in good agreement with tensile stress vs. strain experiments.

  15. The effect of elastic modulus and friction coefficient on rubber tube sealing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhimiao; Xu, Siyuan; Ren, Fushen; Liu, Jubao

    2015-03-01

    The packer is the key element in separating geosphere layers of water injection, water plugging and fracturing operations in the oilfield. The sealing ability of the packer is depending on the contact pressure between rubber tube and the casing. The circumferential strain of casing wall was tested by the strain gauge to get the contact pressure distribution along axial direction of the tube. The friction force between the casing and the rubber tube was taken by the pressure sensor in compression process. Under the 20,60 and 100 degrees Celsius conditions, the friction forces and the contact pressure distribution were taken in work condition of single rubber tube, double rubber tubes and combination rubber tubes after oil immersion .The result shows that elastic modulus of rubber tube has little effect on the friction force and contact pressure. With elastic modulus decreasing, the friction forces has gradually decreasing trend; The friction coefficient has much impact on friction force: the friction forces under the condition of dry friction and wet friction are respectively equivalent to 48.27% and 5.38% axial compression forces. At wet friction condition, the contact pressure distribution is more uniform and the sealing effect is better.

  16. Rubber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishen, Anoop

    1989-01-01

    This review covers methods for identification, characterization, and determination of rubber and materials in rubber. Topics include: general information, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal methods, gel permeation chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, analysis related to safety and health, and…

  17. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-01

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  18. Rubber Elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Takamasa

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation for Hookian spring network (EMA) to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1 ,G0, must be equal to G /G0 = (p - 2 / f) / (1 - 2 / f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA, and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  19. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Kengo E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Noguchi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sakai, Takamasa E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G{sub 0}, must be equal to G/G{sub 0} = (p − 2/f)/(1 − 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  20. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels. PMID:26567682

  1. Control of the low-frequency vibrations of elastic metamaterial shafts with discretized arc-rubber layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixia, Li; Anjiang, Cai

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new kind of elastic metamaterial (EM) shaft with discretized arc-shaped rubber layers, which shows excellent low-frequency vibration properties. The band gaps of the shaft structure were analyzed by employing the finite element method. The proposed EM shaft exhibits much lower band gaps than the corresponding structures with the whole rubber ring. Furthermore, the band gaps can be modulated by tuning the arc angle and the number of the arc-shaped rubbers. Additionally, we observed that the first complete band gap tends to disappear when the arc angle of each arc-shaped rubber section is decreased but the arc number remains fixed because the arc angle more strongly affects the rotational stiffness than the transverse stiffness of the rubber layers. This new type of EM shafts could find potential application as a means to control the low-frequency vibrations of rotor shafts in mechanical engineering.

  2. Analysis of adhesive elastic contact between a silica glass lens and silicone rubber using the JKR theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Dooyoung; Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Takahashi, Kunio

    2014-08-01

    Contact between a silica glass lens and silicone rubber is experimentally investigated by simultaneously measuring displacement, force and contact radius. The relationship between these three parameters is derived using elastic theory. The discrepancy between the theoretical relationship and the experimental results is observed to increase as the deformation of the silicone rubber increases. Under smaller deformation conditions, the elastic theory shows good agreement with the experimental results, although infinite stress on the edge of the contact area is predicted in the theory, and time dependence and adhesion hysteresis are observed in all experiments. It is suggested that time dependence and adhesion hysteresis in contact are not induced by the deformation of the bulk of the silicone rubber, but are induced by surface effects. The result suggests that the applicability limit of the elastic theory must be carefully considered in the JKR analysis of point contact for polymers.

  3. Using Rubber-Elastic Material-Ideal Gas Analogies To Teach Introductory Thermodynamics. Part I: Equations of State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Describes equations of state as a supplement to an introductory thermodynamics undergraduate course. Uses rubber-elastic materials (REM) which have strong analogies to the concept of an ideal gas and explains the molar basis of REM. Provides examples of the analogies between ideal gas and REM and mathematical analogies. (Contains 22 references.)…

  4. Using Rubber-Elastic Material-Ideal Gas Analogies To Teach Introductory Thermodynamics. Part II: The Laws of Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Describes the laws of thermodynamics as a supplement to an introductory thermodynamics undergraduate course. Uses rubber-elastic materials (REM) which have strong analogies to the concept of ideal gas. Provides examples of the analogies between ideal gas and REM and mathematical analogies. (YDS)

  5. Rejuvenation of metallic glasses by non-affine thermal strain.

    PubMed

    Ketov, S V; Sun, Y H; Nachum, S; Lu, Z; Checchi, A; Beraldin, A R; Bai, H Y; Wang, W H; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Carpenter, M A; Greer, A L

    2015-08-13

    When a spatially uniform temperature change is imposed on a solid with more than one phase, or on a polycrystal of a single, non-cubic phase (showing anisotropic expansion-contraction), the resulting thermal strain is inhomogeneous (non-affine). Thermal cycling induces internal stresses, leading to structural and property changes that are usually deleterious. Glasses are the solids that form on cooling a liquid if crystallization is avoided--they might be considered the ultimate, uniform solids, without the microstructural features and defects associated with polycrystals. Here we explore the effects of cryogenic thermal cycling on glasses, specifically metallic glasses. We show that, contrary to the null effect expected from uniformity, thermal cycling induces rejuvenation, reaching less relaxed states of higher energy. We interpret these findings in the context that the dynamics in liquids become heterogeneous on cooling towards the glass transition, and that there may be consequent heterogeneities in the resulting glasses. For example, the vibrational dynamics of glassy silica at long wavelengths are those of an elastic continuum, but at wavelengths less than approximately three nanometres the vibrational dynamics are similar to those of a polycrystal with anisotropic grains. Thermal cycling of metallic glasses is easily applied, and gives improvements in compressive plasticity. The fact that such effects can be achieved is attributed to intrinsic non-uniformity of the glass structure, giving a non-uniform coefficient of thermal expansion. While metallic glasses may be particularly suitable for thermal cycling, the non-affine nature of strains in glasses in general deserves further study, whether they are induced by applied stresses or by temperature change. PMID:26268190

  6. Pre-Yield Non-Affine Fluctuations and A Hidden Critical Point in Strained Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Tamoghna; Ganguly, Saswati; Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan

    2015-01-01

    A crystalline solid exhibits thermally induced localised non-affine droplets in the absence of external stress. Here we show that upon an imposed shear, the size of these droplets grow until they percolate at a critical strain, well below the value at which the solid begins to yield. This critical point does not manifest in most thermodynamic or mechanical properties, but is hidden and reveals itself in the onset of inhomogeneities in elastic moduli, marked changes in the appearance and local properties of non-affine droplets and a sudden enhancement in defect pair concentration. Slow relaxation of stress and an-elasticity appear as observable dynamical consequences of this hidden criticality. Our results may be directly verified in colloidal crystals with video microscopy techniques but are expected to have more general validity. PMID:26039380

  7. Rubber and gel origami: visco- and poro-elastic behavior of folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur; Bende, Nakul; Na, Junhee; Hayward, Ryan; Santangelo, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese art of origami is rapidly becoming a platform for material design, as researchers develop systematic methods to exploit the purely geometric rules that allow paper to folded without stretching. Since any thin sheet couples mechanics strongly to geometry, origami provides a natural template for generating length-scale independent structures from a variety of different materials. In this talk I discuss some of the implications of using polymeric sheets and shells over many length scales to create folded materials with tunable shapes and properties. These implications include visco-elastic snap-through transitions and poro-elastically driven micro origami. In each case, mechanical response, dynamics, and reversible folding is tuned through a combination of geometry and constitutive properties, demonstrating the efficacy of using origami principles for designing functional materials.

  8. Nonlinear force propagation, anisotropic stiffening and non-affine relaxation in a model cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Head, David; Ikebe, Emi; Nakamasu, Akiko; Kinoshita, Suguru; Peijuan, Zhang; Ando, Shoji

    2013-03-01

    Forces are generated heterogeneously in living cells and transmitted through cytoskeletal networks that respond highly non-linearly. Here, we carry out high-bandwidth passive microrheology on vimentin networks reconstituted in vitro, and observe the nonlinear mechanical response due to forces propagating from a local source applied by an optical tweezer. Since the applied force is constant, the gel becomes equilibrated and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be employed to deduce the viscoelasticity of the local environment from the thermal fluctuations of colloidal probes. Our experiments unequivocally demonstrate the anisotropic stiffening of the cytoskeletal network behind the applied force, with greater stiffening in the parallel direction. Quantitative agreement with an affine continuum model is obtained, but only for the response at certain frequency ~ 10-1000 Hz which separates the high-frequency power law and low-frequency elastic behavior of the network. We argue that the failure of the model at lower frequencies is due to the presence of non-affinity, and observe that zero-frequency changes in particle separation can be fitted when an independently-measured, empirical nonaffinity factor is applied.

  9. Tough Rubber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Sue

    1994-01-01

    Describes the benefits of using rubber floor coverings in a gym's free-weight and cardiovascular equipment areas. Tips on purchasing a rubber floor are highlighted as is an annotated list of suppliers and their rubber flooring products. (GR)

  10. Rubber linings answer to many problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, L.

    1998-12-31

    The uses of rubber linings in different fields industries are discussed.The physical properties of rubber both natural and synthetic rubber are listed and their importance is evaluated. The aging of rubber is discussed in detail, including effects of temperature on aging of rubber. By virtue of its inherent elasticity and chemical resistance, rubber linings have found many uses in the protection of mining equipment, water treatment tanks and vessels, flue gas desulfurization equipment in power plants and varied process and storage vessels in chemical industries. Rubber has found extensive use in civil engineering field as expansion joints and bladders in dams. Electrical resistance of rubber is useful for its application as an insulating material. Rubber is chemically resistant to acids, alkalies and many salt solutions. Rubber linings are therefore used for protection of steel against these acids, alkalies or salt solutions. The extreme elasticity of rubber has been found useful in its application as a lining material in areas subject to high abrasion. Frequently rubber linings are the linings of choice when a combination of abrasion and chemical attack are to be protected against. Constantly, new formulations of rubber lining compounds are being developed just as new chemical processes are being made. The flexibility of compounding and the relative ease of putting layers of different rubber formulations together in multilayered formulations of rubber lining compounds is leading to new uses of this lining material.

  11. Elastic protectors for ultrasound injection

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhatov, V.A.; Nesterova, L.A.

    1995-07-01

    A new material has been developed for elastic protectors on ultrasonic probes: sonar rubber. This combines low ultrasonic absorption, high strength, and wear resistance, and so the rubber can be used in sensor designs.

  12. Importance of non-affine viscoelastic response in disordered fibre networks.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S; Head, D A

    2016-05-11

    Disordered fibre networks are ubiquitous in nature and have a wide range of industrial applications as novel biomaterials. Predicting their viscoelastic response is straightforward for affine deformations that are uniform over all length scales, but when affinity fails, as has been observed experimentally, modelling becomes challenging. Here we present a numerical methodology, related to an existing framework for amorphous packings, to predict the steady-state viscoelastic spectra and degree of affinity for disordered fibre networks driven at arbitrary frequencies. Applying this method to a peptide gel model reveals a monotonic increase of the shear modulus as the soft, non-affine normal modes are successively suppressed as the driving frequency increases. In addition to being dominated by fibril bending, these low frequency network modes are also shown to be delocalised. The presented methodology provides insights into the importance of non-affinity in the viscoelastic response of peptide gels, and is easily extendible to all types of fibre networks. PMID:27079274

  13. Rubber Reclamation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2007-01-01

    The safety and health hazards related to recycling of used rubber, due to the scarcity and high price of virgin rubber are reported. Various threats like stagnant water pools trapped in tires leading to diseases and ignited tires, which become very difficult to extinguish and generating smoke that is extremely detrimental to the environment, have…

  14. Non-affine fluctuations and the statistics of defect precursors in the planar honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Amartya; Ganguly, Saswati; Sengupta, Surajit; Sollich, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Certain localised displacement fluctuations in the planar honeycomb lattice may be identified as precursors to topological defects. We show that these fluctuations are among the most pronounced non-affine distortions of an elemental coarse graining volume of the honeycomb structure at non zero temperatures. We obtain the statistics of these precursor modes in the canonical ensemble, evaluating exactly their single point and two-point spatio-temporal distributions, for a lattice with harmonic nearest neighbour and next near neighbour bonds. As the solid is destabilised by tuning interactions, the precursor fluctuations diverge and correlations become long-lived and long-ranged.

  15. How far can a rubber molecule stretch before breaking? Ab initio study of tensile elasticity and failure in single-molecule polyisoprene and polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Martin, Richard L.

    2009-02-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the internal C-C bond dissociation curve for single molecules of (cis-1,4) polyisoprene and polybutadiene. We define "bond rupture" as that point on the reaction coordinate where the unrestricted Kohn-Sham, or diradical, solution falls below the restricted, or closed-shell, solution. Using this definition, we find that rupture occurs at a tensile force of 6.8 nN for polyisoprene and 7.2 nN for polybutadiene. Their respective rupture strains are 45% and 42%. Our calculations show that the energy density versus extension is not sensitive to the number of isoprene units contained in the molecule, i.e., it is essentially independent of the chain length. These relatively large rupture strains have important implications for understanding the failure mechanism in rubber, and imply that purely enthalpic chain stretching must commence well before tensile failure occurs.

  16. Non-affinity factors modulating vascular targeting of nano- and microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Jacob W; Anselmo, Aaron C; Liu, Yaling; Mitragotri, Samir; Eckmann, David M; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-04-01

    Particles capable of homing and adhering to specific vascular biomarkers have potential as fundamental tools in drug delivery for mediation of a wide variety of pathologies, including inflammation, thrombosis, and pulmonary disorders. The presentation of affinity ligands on the surface of a particle provides a means of targeting the particle to sites of therapeutic interest, but a host of other factors come into play in determining the targeting capacity of the particle. This review presents a summary of several key considerations in nano- and microparticle design that modulate targeted delivery without directly altering epitope-specific affinity. Namely, we describe the effect of factors in definition of the base carrier (including shape, size, and flexibility) on the capacity of carriers to access, adhere to, and integrate in target biological milieus. Furthermore, we present a summary of fundamental dynamics of carrier behavior in circulation, taking into account interactions with cells in circulation and the role of hemodynamics in mediating the direction of carriers to target sites. Finally, we note non-affinity aspects to uptake and intracellular trafficking of carriers in target cells. In total, recent findings presented here may offer an opportunity to capitalize on mitigating factors in the behavior of ligand-targeted carriers in order to optimize targeting. PMID:26596696

  17. Early-time particle dynamics and non-affine deformations during microstructure selection in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan; Bhattacharya, Jayee

    2011-07-01

    Solid-solid transitions are invariably associated with groups of particles whose deformations cannot be expressed as an affine strain about a reference configuration. The dynamics of these non-affine zones (NAZ) determine the subsequent microstructure, i.e. the mesoscale patterning resulting from the structural transition. Here, we focus on early-time dynamics of individual particles within an NAZ associated with a nucleation event. We show that the early-time behavior of these particles have distinctive characteristics depending on the transition temperature. The dynamics is heterogeneous, consisting of a few active particles exhibiting complex intermittent jamming and flow in response to internal stresses generated during the transformation. At low temperatures, the dynamics of these active particles is ballistic and the structural transformation proceeds via string-like correlated movement of active particles, along ridges in the potential energy topography set up by inactive particles. On increasing temperature, the dynamics of active particles show an abrupt transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior with a diffusion coefficient which appears to be independent of temperature. This dynamical transition in the nature of the trajectories of particles is coincident with a discontinuous transition in the microstructure of the solid. Finally, we characterize this transition in terms of a dynamical order parameter in the space of trajectories and discuss its connection with the glass transition and rheology of soft and granular matter.

  18. How far can a rubber molecule stretch before breaking? Ab initio study of tensile elasticity and failure in single-molecule polyisoprene

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David E

    2008-01-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the internal C-C bond dissociation curve for single molecules of (cis 1,4) polyisoprene, polybutadiene, and polyethylene, all of comparable length. We define 'bond rupture' as that point on the reaction coordinate where the unrestricted Kohn-Sham, or diradical, solution falls below the restricted, or closed-shell, solution. Using this well-defined though crude approximation, we find that rupture occurs at a tensile force of 6.8 nN for poly isoprene and 7.2 nN for polybutadiene. Their respective rupture strains are 45% and 42%. Our calculations show that the energy density vs. extension is not sensitive to the length of the molecule, i.e., it is essentially independent of the number of isoprene units contained. These relatively large rupture strains have important implications for understanding the failure mechanism in rubber, and imply that purely enthalpic chain stretching must commence well before tensile failure occurs.

  19. Stress-strain determination in rubber-cord and rubber-metal structures by the frozen inset method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, B. N.; Tartakover, E. I.

    1996-06-01

    The new experimental method for determination of stresses inside of real rubber, rubber-cord and rubber-metal structures using frozen insets and photoelasticity is considered. This method is based on analogy between the elasticity and viscoelasticity problems for polymers during polymerization. The photoelastic materials of cold polymerization for insets making are developed and testing technology is reported. The results of stress analysis in automobile tires under interior pressure and radial loads are presented.

  20. Reinforcement Effect of Corn Flour in Rubber Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn flour is an economical renewable material and investigated in this study as filler for rubber composites. The composites were prepared by mixing an aqueous dispersion of corn flour with rubber latex, followed by freeze-drying and compression molding. The small strain elastic modulus and the str...

  1. The Functional Identification of Rubber Biosynthetic Genes in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an essential plant derived raw material required for the manufacture of numerous industrial and medical related products. This elastic polymer is synthesized and sequestered within cytosolic vesicles known as rubber particles. When provided with farnesyl-pyro...

  2. Burning rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Mario Andretti, look out You are about to be surpassed in the burning rubber category by a joint venture between Oxford Energy Company and General Electric. The two companies are building the first whole tire-to-energy facility in the US in Modesto, California. This $41 million facility does not require tires to be shredded prior to incineration; it has the capacity to burn 700 tires per minute. The electricity generated will be provided to a utility company. Oxford says there are two billion waste tires on the ground and this number is increasing by 220 million a year. Of that amount, only 18 million a year are recycled.

  3. Thermoviscoplastic behaviors of anisotropic shape memory elastomeric composites for cold programmed non-affine shape change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yiqi; Robertson, Jaimee M.; Mu, Xiaoming; Mather, Patrick T.; Jerry Qi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can fix a temporary shape and recover their permanent shape upon activation by an external stimulus. Most SMPs require programming at above their transition temperatures, normally well above the room temperature. In addition, most SMPs are programmed into shapes that are affine to the high temperature deformation. Recently, a cold-programmed anisotropic shape memory elastomeric composite was developed and showed interesting low temperature stretching induced shape memory behavior. There, simple, uniaxial stretching at low temperature transformed the composites into curled temporary shapes upon unloading. The exact geometry of the curled state depended on the microstructure of the composite, and the curled shape showed no affinity to the deformed shape. Heating the sample recovered the sample back to its original shape. This new composite consisted of an elastomeric matrix reinforced by aligned amorphous polymer fibers. By utilizing the plastic-like behavior of the amorphous polymer phase at low temperatures, a temporary shape could be fixed upon unloading since the induced plastic-like strain resists the recovery of the elastomer matrix. After heating to a high temperature, the permanent shape was recovered when the amorphous polymer softened and the elastomer matrix contracted. To set a theoretical foundation for capturing the cold-programmed shape memory effects and the dramatic non-affine shape change of this composite, a 3D anisotropic thermoviscoelastic constitutive model is developed in this paper. In this model, the matrix is modeled as a hyperelastic solid, and the amorphous phase of the fibrous mat is considered as a nonlinear thermoviscoplastic solid, whose viscous flow resistance is sensitive to both temperature and stress. The plastic-deformation like behavior demonstrated in the fiber is treated as nonlinear viscoplasticity with extremely high viscosity or long relaxation time at zero-stress state at low temperature. The

  4. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  5. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  6. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    PubMed

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications. PMID:24734968

  7. Vulcanization and the mechanical response of rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundurthi, S.; Mythravaruni, P.; Ravindran, P.

    2015-06-01

    Hyperelastic models are widely used to describe the mechanical response of rubber. However, purely mechanical models cannot account for changes in the material due to chemical reactions such as those that take place during vulcanization. Here, we present a model developed within a thermodynamic framework accounting for chemical reactions. A mixture theory approach that allows for the existence of multiple species and their interconversion is followed. The existence of a Helmholtz potential and a rate of entropy production function for the mixture as a whole are posited. Following the multiple natural configuration approach, the rate of entropy production is maximized to obtain constitutive equations. The viscoelastic model is then specialized to the elastic case. The model is calibrated using data available in the literature for rubber. A simulation of the stress-strain curve of rubber as vulcanization progresses is presented.

  8. Another Demo of the Unusual Thermal Properties of Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liff, Mark I.

    2010-10-01

    The unusual thermal behavior of rubbers, though discovered a long time ago, can still be mind-boggling for students and teachers who encounter this class of polymeric systems. Unlike other solids, stretched elastic polymers shrink upon heating. This is a manifestation of the Gough-Joule (G-J) effect.1-4 Joule in the 1850s studied the thermal behavior of rubbers that was initially explored by Gough in 1805. Properties of rubbers such as contraction upon heating, or the related phenomenon of heating upon fast expansion, did not make much sense at that time. Joule's work validated Gough's results, but the molecular basis of the unusual thermal behavior of rubbers remained unexplained for another 70 years. The physical ideas, taking into account gigantic conformational entropy of elastic polymers that explain their contraction on heating, were developed by Staudinger, Kuhn, and others only in the 1920s and 1930s.5

  9. Robust adaptive control for a class of uncertain non-affine nonlinear systems using affine-type neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shitie; Gao, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    A robust adaptive control is proposed for a class of single-input single-output non-affine nonlinear systems. In order to approximate the unknown nonlinear function, a novel affine-type neural network is used, and then to compensate the approximation error and external disturbance a robust control term is employed. By Lyapunov stability analysis for the closed-loop system, it is proved that tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero. Moreover, an observer is designed to estimate the system states because all the states may not be available for measurements. Furthermore, the adaptation laws of neural networks and the robust controller are given out based on the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  10. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  11. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  12. Mechanism of Resilin Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Resilin is critical in the flight and jumping systems of insects as a polymeric rubber-like protein with outstanding elasticity. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. Here we report the structure and function of resilin from Drosophila CG15920. A reversible beta-turn transition was identified in the peptide encoded by exon III and for full length resilin during energy input and release, features that correlate to the rapid deformation of resilin during functions in vivo. Micellar structures and nano-porous patterns formed after beta-turn structures were present via changes in either the thermal or mechanical inputs. A model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for this protein. Further, this model offers a view of elastomeric proteins in general where beta-turn related structures serve as fundamental units of the structure and elasticity. PMID:22893127

  13. Elastic activator for treatment of open bite.

    PubMed

    Stellzig, A; Steegmayer-Gilde, G; Basdra, E K

    1999-06-01

    This article presents a modified activator for treatment of open bite cases. The intermaxillary acrylic of the lateral occlusal zones is replaced by elastic rubber tubes. By stimulating orthopaedic gymnastics (chewing gum effect), the elastic activator intrudes upper and lower posterior teeth. A noticeable counterclockwise rotation of the mandible was accomplished by a decrease of the gonial angle. Besides the simple fabrication of the device and uncomplicated replacement of the elastic rubber tubes, treatment can be started even in mixed dentition when affixing plates may be difficult. PMID:10420241

  14. Finite element analysis on the fracture of rubber toughened polymer blends

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Mai, Y.W.; Wu, J.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of rubber particle volume fraction on the constitutive relation and fracture toughness of polymer blends was studied using elastic-plastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The effect of rubber particle cavitation on the stress-strain state at a crack tip was also investigated. Stress analysis reveals that because of the high rubber bulk modulus, the hydrostatic stress inside the rubber particle is close to that in the adjacent matrix material element. As a result, the rubber particle imposes a severe plastic constraint to the surrounding matrix and limits its plastic strain. Rubber particle cavitation can effectively release the constraint and enable large scale plastic strain to occur. Different failure criteria were used to determine the optimum rubber particle volume fraction for the polymer blends studied in this paper.

  15. Flow properties of natural rubber composites filled with defatted soy flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The linear and nonlinear viscoelastic properties of natural rubber composites reinforced with defatted soy flour were studied. Defatted soy flour is an abundant, renewable commodity, and its rigid nature makes it suitable as a reinforcement phase in rubber composites. At small strain, the elastic ...

  16. Mechanical properties of concrete containing a high volume of tire-rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Ali R; Dehestani, M; Rahmatabadi, P

    2008-12-01

    Due to the increasingly serious environmental problems presented by waste tires, the feasibility of using elastic and flexible tire-rubber particles as aggregate in concrete is investigated in this study. Tire-rubber particles composed of tire chips, crumb rubber, and a combination of tire chips and crumb rubber, were used to replace mineral aggregates in concrete. These particles were used to replace 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, and 50% of the total mineral aggregate's volume in concrete. Cylindrical shape concrete specimens 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in height were fabricated and cured. The fresh rubberized concrete exhibited lower unit weight and acceptable workability compared to plain concrete. The results of a uniaxial compressive strain control test conducted on hardened concrete specimens indicate large reductions in the strength and tangential modulus of elasticity. A significant decrease in the brittle behavior of concrete with increasing rubber content is also demonstrated using nonlinearity indices. The maximum toughness index, indicating the post failure strength of concrete, occurs in concretes with 25% rubber content. Unlike plain concrete, the failure state in rubberized concrete occurs gently and uniformly, and does not cause any separation in the specimen. Crack width and its propagation velocity in rubberized concrete are lower than those of plain concrete. Ultrasonic analysis reveals large reductions in the ultrasonic modulus and high sound absorption for tire-rubber concrete. PMID:18372166

  17. Rubber Band Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowens, John

    2005-01-01

    Not only are rubber bands great for binding objects together, but they can be used in a simple science experiment that involves predicting, problem solving, measuring, graphing, and experimenting. In this article, the author describes how rubber bands can be used to teach the force of mass.

  18. Failure studies on rubber and rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhenghong

    A research study has been conducted to investigate selected failure processes in rubber and rubbery composites. Specific failure modes and materials considered included mechanical tearing of rubber-coated fabrics and mechanical/thermal fatigue of carbon black-filled elastomers. Experimental efforts developed novel evaluation techniques that were used to access failure resistance of the materials, as well as to elucidate molecular structure/physical properties relationships. Results are presented in multi-monograph format consisting of a series of four interdependent papers published in peer-reviewed journals. The first monograph measures the tear resistance of a series of polyester fabrics, of controlled fill-yarn size, coated with a compounded butyl rubber resin. A constrained trouser tear test is used to quantify the role of yarn mobility on crack-tip development and the resultant tear strength. As the area around a propagating crack is constrained, tear strength decreases by several orders of magnitude, indicating that the ability of the composite structure to dissipate energy away from the crack tip contributes more to tear resistance than the intrinsic strength of the concomitant materials. Monograph number two continues the work of the first by developing a novel cutting technique to monitor the role of the fiber/rubber interphase during tear propagation. This approach was applied to five different elastomers coated onto one of the polyester yarns. These data show a threefold increase in strength is possible by proper optimization of the fiber/rubber bond. In the third monograph, five different rubber bushing compounds were evaluated for mechanical/thermal fatigue resistance. Samples were dynamically excited in combined compression and shear loadings using a specially designed test fixture. Results indicated that heat build-up was a major contributing factor to the eventual failure of the materials via a complex fracture mechanism, with epoxidized natural

  19. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.

  20. US rubber markets recover

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.

    1993-02-03

    Synthetic rubber markets in North America bounced back in no uncertain terms last year, with demand climbing an impressive 9.5%, to 2.97 million m.t.; and, according to the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers (IIS-RP; Houston) latest five-year forecast, producers can look forward to a 3.3% increase in demand during 1993. This growth rate outpaced out 1992 forecast and demonstrates the resilience of the synthetic rubber industry, says William E. Tessemer, managing director of IISRP. We expect demand in 1993 to surpass 1992 and level off at a 2%/year growth rate for synthetic rubber - 2.5% including thermoplastic elastomers [TPEs]-over the 1993-97 period. The improvement reflects signs of a recovery in North America, especially the pickup in the auto and tire industry. The two major tire rubbers - styrene butadiene and polybutadiene rubber - notched up double-digit gains, and other materials that have autos uses, such as nitrile rubber and many of the specialty elastomers, also advanced strongly.

  1. Elastic scintillation materials based on polyorganosiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Grinev, B.V.; Andryushchenko, L.A.; Shershukov, V.M.; Ulanenko, K.B.; Minakova, R.A.; Sevastjanova, I.V.

    1994-12-31

    The developed elastic scintillators based on polymethyl-phenylsiloxane rubber are characterized by an elevated light output and a low toxicity. The increase of their light output is achieved by raising the content of phenyl chains, varying the chemical structure of luminescent additions and using isopropylnaphthalene. This high-boiling solvent introduced into the scintillation siloxane compositions is confined within siloxane matrix after the hardening of the rubber.

  2. Rubber Impact on 3D Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbs, Sebastian; Van Den Broucke, Björn; Duplessis Kergomard, Yann; Dau, Frederic; Malherbe, Benoit

    2012-06-01

    A low velocity impact study of aircraft tire rubber on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates was performed experimentally and numerically. In contrast to regular unidirectional composite laminates, no delaminations occur in such a 3D textile composite. Yarn decohesions, matrix cracks and yarn ruptures have been identified as the major damage mechanisms under impact load. An increase in the number of 3D warp yarns is proposed to improve the impact damage resistance. The characteristic of a rubber impact is the high amount of elastic energy stored in the impactor during impact, which was more than 90% of the initial kinetic energy. This large geometrical deformation of the rubber during impact leads to a less localised loading of the target structure and poses great challenges for the numerical modelling. A hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin constitutive law was used in Abaqus/Explicit based on a step-by-step validation with static rubber compression tests and low velocity impact tests on aluminium plates. Simulation models of the textile weave were developed on the meso- and macro-scale. The final correlation between impact simulation results on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates and impact test data was promising, highlighting the potential of such numerical simulation tools.

  3. Ericameria Nauseosa (rubber rabbitbrush): a complementary rubber feedstock to augment the guayule rubber production stream

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ericameria nauseosa (rubber rabbitbrush) is a highly prolific desert shrub that produces high quality natural rubber. Over the past several years we have investigated rabbitbrush’s potential as a commercial rubber feedstock. Like guayule, rabbitbrush produces natural rubber within its bark tissues a...

  4. New application of crystalline cellulose in rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Wen

    Rubber without reinforcement has limited applications. The strength of reinforced rubber composites can be ten times stronger than that of unreinforced rubbers. Therefore, rubber composites are widely used in various applications ranging from automobile tires to seals, valves, and gaskets because of their excellent mechanical elastic properties. Silica and carbon black are the two most commonly used reinforcing materials in rubber tires. They are derived from non-renewable materials and are expensive. Silica also contributes to a large amount of ash when used tires are disposed of by incineration. There is a need for a new reinforcing filler that is inexpensive, renewable and easily disposable. Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer. Native cellulose includes crystalline regions and amorphous regions. Crystalline cellulose can be obtained by removing the amorphous regions with the acid hydrolysis of cellulose because the amorphous cellulose can be hydrolyzed faster than crystalline cellulose. We recently discovered that the partial replacement of silica with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) provided numerous benefits: (1) low energy consumption for compounding, (2) good processability, (3) strong tensile properties, (4) good heat resistance, and (5) potential for good fuel efficiency in the application of rubber tires. Strong bonding between fillers and a rubber matrix is essential for imparting rubber composites with the desired properties for many specific applications. The bonding between hydrophilic MCC and the hydrophobic rubber matrix is weak and can be improved by addition of a coupling agent or surface modifications of MCC. In this study, MCC was surface-modified with acryloyl chloride or alkenyl ketene dimer (AnKD) to form acrylated MCC (A-MCC) and AnKD-modified MCC (AnKD-MCC). The surface modifications of MCC did not change the integrity and mechanical properties of MCC, but provided functional groups that were able to form covalent linkages with

  5. The Isolation of Rubber from Milkweed Leaves. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volaric, Lisa; Hagen, John P.

    2002-01-01

    We present an introductory organic chemistry lab in which students isolate rubber from the leaves of milkweed plants (Asclepias syriaca). Students isolated rubber with a recovery of 2.4 ± 1.8% and 1.8 ± 0.7% for the microscale and macroscale procedures, respectively. Infrared spectra of their products were compared with the spectrum of synthetic rubber, cis-polyisoprene. Students tested for elasticity of their product by twisting it on a spatula and pulling; all students found some degree of elasticity.

  6. Another Demo of the Unusual Thermal Properties of Rubber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liff, Mark I.

    2010-01-01

    The unusual thermal behavior of rubbers, though discovered a long time ago, can still be mind-boggling for students and teachers who encounter this class of polymeric systems. Unlike other solids, stretched elastic polymers shrink upon heating. This is a manifestation of the Gough-Joule (G-J) effect. Joule in the 1850s studied the thermal behavior…

  7. Improved rubber nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    During this task, Silane functionalized TiO2 and HK3Ti4O4(SiO4)3 were sent to Goodyear (GY) for testing. These materials were characterized based on their interaction with the model elastomer, squalene. The Van der Waals interactions and Hamaker Constants for ZnO particles in squalene and rubber materials were characterized and it was determined that a 10-20 nm spacing was necessary between primary filler particles to maintain a stable nanocomposite. Contact angle measurements on the ZnO and ZnO-silane materials indicated that the solvent should wet the particles, and solvophobic attractions should not be present. These studies showed that the surface modification with sulfosilane coupling agents was successful, and high levels of dispersion of the particles remained possible. Further, a novel surface charging phenomenon where negative surface charging is developed in the squalene environment was observed and corroborated by measurements of particle size and of the surface modified materials in squalene. This impacts the dispersion of the particles according to the traditional colloidal interpretation of electrostatic repulsive forces between particles. Additionally, thin nanocomposite fibers were developed using electrospinning. The size and shape of the oxides did not change during the electrospinning process, although the shape of the fiber and the distribution of the particles, particularly for ZnO, was not ideal. There was an obvious increase in elastic modulus and hardness from the addition of the oxides, but differentiating the oxides, and particularly the surfactants, was difficult. The A-1289 lead to the greatest dispersion of the filler particles, while the A-1589 and the NXT produced clustered particle aggregates. This agrees with previous study of these materials in low molecular weight squalene solvent studies reported earlier. The behavior of the nanoparticle ZnO and the microparticle silica is different as well, with the ZnO being contained within

  8. Microwave treatment of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Folz, Diane C.

    2002-07-16

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds broken by microwave radiation. The direct application of microwaves in combination with uniform heating of the crumb rubber renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger particle sizes and/or loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures to produce recycled composite products with good properties.

  9. Epoxy-rubber interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, F.J.; Rosner, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Films containing amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) rubber and diglycidal ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy, cross-linked with amine curing agent, exhibit tensile extensibility over the composition range of 50-600 parts by weight rubber to 100 parts by weight epoxy. This tensile extensibility suggests the presence of ductile behavior in the second-phase particles of ATBN rubber-toughened DGEBA epoxy systems, even if the particles contain substantial amounts of epoxy. Such cured films also are capable of absorbing large additional amounts of liquid epoxy that contains the cure agent. When the epoxy is cured in situ, the film tensile behavior is consistent with the overall proportions of rubber and epoxy present. The solubility behavior also suggests that the glassy epoxy matrix immediately surrounding a precipated particle contains rubber in solid solution and thereby can plastically yield under shear-stress action. As observations confirm, such flow would be heat recoverable. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Dermatitis in rubber manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    White, I.R.

    1988-01-01

    This review describes the history of rubber technology and the manufacturing techniques used in rubber manufacturing industries. The important aspects of the acquisition of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis within the industry are presented for the reader.

  11. Effect of processing methods on the mechanical properties of natural rubber filled with stearic acid modified soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber was reinforced with stearic acid modified soy protein particles prepared with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber composites. Elastic modulus of the composites increased with the increasing filler concen...

  12. Elastin-Based Rubber-Like Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Desai, Malav S; Wang, Eddie; Joyner, Kyle; Chung, Tae Won; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2016-07-11

    We developed rubber-like elastomeric materials using a natural elastin derived sequence and genetic engineering to create precisely defined elastin-like polypeptides. The coiled elastin-like polypeptide chains, which behave like entropic springs, were cross-linked using an end-to-end tethering scheme to synthesize simple hydrogels with excellent extensibility and reversibility. Our hydrogels extend to strains as high as 1500% and remain highly resilient with elastic recovery as high as 94% even at 600% strain, significantly exceeding any other protein-based hydrogel. These materials are valuable as elastomeric hydrogels for designing extremely robust scaffolds useful for tissue engineering. PMID:27257908

  13. Application of asphalt rubber technology to recreational trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Haifeng

    Crumb rubber aggregate was employed instead of stone/sand aggregate in asphalt pavement that was modified by fine rubber particles. Crumb rubber aggregate forms an elastic network in the asphalt, which improves the pavement's susceptibility to low-temperature cracking, and absorb more stress at the crack tips than the conventional asphalt pavement. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the tension/compression performance of a blend of asphalt rubber with rubber aggregate (ARRA). An optimum design methodology was introduced by examining the effect of asphalt source, curing temperature, curing time, rubber content, aggregate size, compaction pressure, and the effect of certain additives. At ambient temperature, the ARRA with equal amount of binder and aggregate exhibits good mechanical properties. Vestenamer helps improve the pavement's strength, stiffness, and fracture resistance to low temperature cracking. It was demonstrated that such pavement meets the mechanical requirements for recreational trails, such as bicycle, or pedestrian trails. ARRA is a viscoelastic material which exhibits time-dependent and loading rate-dependent behavior. Temperature is a key issue to its response to an external load. Both temperature and rate dependences were investigated. A series of uniaxial compression relaxation tests on ARRA or Vestenamer modified ARRA were conducted at room temperature to study the time-dependent performance of ARRA. Schapery's theory was applied to characterize the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of ARRA.

  14. Theory of powdery rubber wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2009-12-01

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  15. Modeling mechanical properties of core-shell rubber-modified epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Xiao, K.; Ye, L.; Mai, Y.W.; Wang, C.H.; Rose, L.R.F.

    2000-01-24

    Experiments have been carried out to quantify the effects of rubber content and strain rate on the elastic and plastic deformation behavior of core-shell rubber-modified epoxies. Both the Young's modulus and the yield stress were found to be slightly dependent on strain rate, but very sensitive to the volume fraction of rubber particles. Finite element analyses have also been performed to determine the influences of rubber content on the bulk elasticity modulus and the yield stress. By comparing with experimental results, it is found that the Young's modulus of rubber-toughened epoxies can be accurately estimated using the Mori-Tanaka method, provided that the volume fraction of rubber particles is appropriately evaluated. A yield function is provided that the volume fraction of rubber particles is appropriately evaluated. A yield function is proposed to quantify the effects of hydrostatic stress on the plastic yielding behaviors of rubber-modified epoxies. Agreement with experimental results is good. Also, a visco-plastic model is developed to simulate the strain-rate-dependent stress-strain relations.

  16. Biodesulfurization of rubber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E. ); Raghavan, D. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in municipal waste treatment is the recycling of polymeric waste materials. The present study has demonstrated the applicability of biotechnological principles in the desulfurization of rubber using shake flask and Warburg respirometric techniques. In terms of oxygen uptake and specific rate of oxygen uptake, it was found that the mixed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans was more efficient in this process than the individual pure cultures of these bacteria. Furthermore, the mixed cultures resulted in ten times higher sulfur removals from rubber relative to those of sterile controls. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of biodesulfurization of rubber. It is expected that the development of this process may provide a solution to recycling of car tire materials. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Smart damper using the combination of magnetic friction and pre-compressed rubber springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Choi, Gyuchan; Kim, Hong-Taek; Youn, Heejung

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a new concept of a smart damper using the combination of magnetic friction and rubber springs. The magnet provides energy dissipation, and the rubber springs with precompression contribute to increasing the recentering capacity of the damper. To verify their performance, dynamic tests of magnet frictional dampers and precompressed rubber springs were conducted. For this purpose, hexahedron neodymium (NdFeB) magnets and polyurethane rubber cylinders were used. In the dynamic tests, the loading frequency was varied from 0.1 to 2.0 Hz. The magnets showed almost perfect rectangular behavior in the force-deformation curve, and the frictional coefficient of the magnets was estimated through averaging and regression. The rubber springs were tested with and without precompression. The rubber springs showed different loading path from the second cycle and residual deformation that was not recovered immediately. The rubber springs showed greater rigid force with increasing precompression. Finally, this paper discusses the combination of rigid-elastic behavior and friction to generate 'flag-shaped' behavior for a smart damper and suggests how to combine magnets and rubber springs to obtain flag-shaped behavior. The performance of the magnets and precompressed rubber springs was verified through analytical models.

  18. Recycled rubber in cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, D.; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

  19. Rubber cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... common household glue. It is often used for arts and crafts projects. Breathing in large amounts of rubber cement fumes or swallowing any amount can be extremely dangerous, especially for a small child. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  20. Recycling rubber products sensibly

    SciTech Connect

    Fesus, E.M.; Eggleton, R.W.

    1991-03-01

    This article examines processes for surface treating ground rubber from tires and other sources to enhance its ability to chemically bond with an uncured elastomer matrix during vulcanization. The topics discussed are environmental effects, processing and physical and chemical properties, mesh size, compounding, loading study, mineral fillers, and applications.

  1. Measurement of Silicone Rubber Using Impedance Change of a Quartz-Crystal Tuning-Fork Tactile Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideaki; Yamada, Yuuki

    2006-05-01

    Silicone rubber has been investigated experimentally using the impedance change (Δ R) of a quartz-crystal tuning-fork tactile sensor when its base is in contact with the surface of many kinds of rectangular silicone rubber plates in order to discover how viscosity and elasticity of silicone rubber may be separately determined. Eleven silicone rubber plates (the values of the rubber hardness are JIS85, 80, 70, 65, 60, 50, 45, 40, 35, 30, and 20) are investigated in this experiment. Δ R increases linearly according to acoustic impedance ρ C (ρ: density of silicone rubber, C: sound velocity of a longitudinal acoustic wave in silicone rubber). We compare Δ R with ρ C when C is calculated in three cases: in first, C is calculated using Young’s modulus of silicone rubber measured by a tensiometer; in second, using Young’s modulus which is converted by the shear modulus measured by a rotating viscometer using the Poisson ratio of silicone rubber, 0.49; in third, using a complex Young’s modulus which is converted by the complex shear modulus measured by a rotating viscometer. We investigated which case in the three described showed good linearity between Δ R and ρ C. In order to clarify how the longitudinal plane wave generated in the sensor’s base travels into the silicone rubber plate, Δ R is measured when the tactile sensor is in contact with the surface of the rectangular silicone rubber plates of varying thickness and a size.

  2. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Mechanics of Cross-linked Rubbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper develops a general theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity, and specifies it in the form, convenient for solving problems important for rubber, tire and space industries. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory has been developed for arbitrary nonisothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations are presented as the sum of known equilibrium (rubber elastic) and non-equilibrium (liquid polymer viscoelastic) terms. These equations are then simplified using several modeling arguments. Stability constraints for the proposed constitutive equations are also discussed. It is shown that only strong ellipticity criteria are applicable for assessing stability of the equations governing viscoelastic solids.

  3. Study on the Aging Behaviors of Rubber Materials in Tension and Compression Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Can; Wang, Hongyu; Ma, Xiaobing

    Rubber materials are widely used in aviation, aerospace, shipbuilding, automobile and other military field. However, rubber materials are easy to aging, which largely restricts its using life. In working environment, due to the combined effect of heat and oxygen, vulcanized rubber will undergo degradation and crosslinking reaction which will cause elasticity decease and permanent deformation, so mostly rubber products are used under stress state. Due to the asymmetric structure and asymmetric stress distribution, mechanical stress may cause serious damage to molecular structure; therefore, this paper is aimed to analyze the aging behavior of rubber materials under tensile and compressive loadings, through analyzing experiment data, and adopting Gauss function to describe stress relaxation coefficient, to build an aging equation containing compression ratio parameter and aging time.

  4. Adaptive robust control of a class of non-affine variable-speed variable-pitch wind turbines with unmodeled dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Pedram; Sun, Qiao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a novel synthesis of Nussbaum-type functions, and an adaptive radial-basis function neural network is proposed to design controllers for variable-speed, variable-pitch wind turbines. Dynamic equations of the wind turbine are highly nonlinear, uncertain, and affected by unknown disturbance sources. Furthermore, the dynamic equations are non-affine with respect to the pitch angle, which is a control input. To address these problems, a Nussbaum-type function, along with a dynamic control law are adopted to resolve the non-affine nature of the equations. Moreover, an adaptive radial-basis function neural network is designed to approximate non-parametric uncertainties. Further, the closed-loop system is made robust to unknown disturbance sources, where no prior knowledge of disturbance bound is assumed in advance. Finally, the Lyapunov stability analysis is conducted to show the stability of the entire closed-loop system. In order to verify analytical results, a simulation is presented and the results are compared to both a PI and an existing adaptive controllers. PMID:27157849

  5. Dynamic Spring Model of Rubber Bush Based on Linear Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Masaki; Sato, Masami; Kobayashi, Takaya

    A set of simplified formulae is proposed for estimating the dynamic spring constants of rubber bushes used in suspension systems. These formulae are structured by extending a set of elastic solutions[Editor2] proposed before to calculate the dynamic spring constants according to the associated law (pseudo-elasticity) of the linear viscoelasticity theory. A unique feature of this method is that it helps in the easy and quick evaluation of the dynamic behavior of rubber bushes for all the six degrees of freedom (axial loading, loading normal to an axis in two directions, wrench in two directions, and torsion[Editor3]) with no direct involvement of the FEM. In order to validate this method of calculation, the results obtained for all the degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained using the FEM. It is verified that this approach is capable of qualitatively reproducing the results obtained by using the FEM analysis.

  6. Crumb rubber feasibility report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-11-01

    The Cumberland County supply region generates approximately 58,000 tons of scrap tires each year, equivalent to 45,000 tons of rubber after processing. Approximately 8,000 tons per year are in concentrated locations and can be easily collected. The costs of collection for the remainder vary significantly. Given current markets, economically feasible processes (ambient technology) can reprocess approximately 65 to 75 percent of the 37,000 tons into a marketable product. A processing plant sized for this supply would process 120 tons per day, a viable plant by industry standards. The end uses for whole tires constitute a negligible market, aside from the retreader market. Crumbed rubber is the major development efforts, there are potentially large opportunities in North Carolina.

  7. Theory of powdery rubber wear.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J

    2009-12-01

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear. PMID:21832508

  8. A numerical investigation on mechanical property improvement of styrene butadine rubber by static straight blade indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyana, B.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; Schipper, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical property improvement of rubber is widely carried out by adding carbon black or silica as a filler in rubber. In general, this improvement aims on the increase of stiffness and abrasion resistance. By means of the static straight blade indentation technique, this paper studies the mechanical properties of Unfilled Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR-0) and Filled Styrene Butadiene Rubber that is compounded with carbon black (SBR-25). The numerical method applied was Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in which the rubber was modeled as a hyper-elastic material and indented by a blade indenter with various wedge angles i.e. 30, 45 and 60 degrees. At the same depth of indentation, the results showed that there was an increase in both rubber stiffness and maximum stress if the rubber was compounded. However, it is found that the rubber stiffness showed a regular slight increase, while the maximum stress experienced an irregularly significant increase. Especially for the 30 degree wedge angle, the maximum stress extremely increased at a certain depth of indentation.

  9. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models. PMID:23005490

  10. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models.

  11. Foundation, analysis, and numerical investigation of a variational network-based model for rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloria, Antoine; Le Tallec, Patrick; Vidrascu, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Treloar, many models based on polymer chain statistics have been proposed to describe rubber elasticity. Recently, Alicandro, Cicalese, and the first author rigorously derived a continuum theory of rubber elasticity from a discrete model by variational convergence. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, we further physically motivate this model and complete the analysis by numerical simulations. Second, in order to compare this model to the literature, we present in a common language two other representative types of models, specify their underlying assumptions, check their mathematical properties, and compare them to Treloar's experiments.

  12. Natural Rubber from Domestic Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States is wholly dependent upon imports of natural rubber from tropical countries and is the world’s largest consumer of this strategic raw material. Development of domestic rubber crops will create supply security for this strategic raw material, enhance rural development, and create bio...

  13. Rubber composition compatible with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repar, J.

    1973-01-01

    Formulation improves compatibility of butyl rubbers with hydrazine while reducing permeation to low levels necessary for prolonged storage in space. This is accomplished by replacing carbon-black filler with inert materials such as hydrated silica or clay. Pressure increases suggest that hydrazine is decomposed only slightly by new type of rubber.

  14. Recycled rubber roads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    The paper describes several innovative approaches for recycling old tires in the construction of roads. In one, 18 inches of shredded tire chips (2 X 2 inches) were used on top of 6-8 inches of small stone to construct a road across a sanitary landfill. No compacting or linders were needed. In another application, sidewall mats linked together with steel strapping were used as a sub-base for a road across a swampy area. A third application uses 1/2 inch bits of groundup rubber tires as a replacement for aggregate in an asphalt road base.

  15. Robotically enhanced rubber hand illusion.

    PubMed

    Arata, Jumpei; Hattori, Masashi; Ichikawa, Shohei; Sakaguchi, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    The rubber hand illusion is a well-known multisensory illusion. In brief, watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while one's own unseen hand is synchronously stroked causes the rubber hand to be attributed to one's own body and to "feel like it's my hand." The rubber hand illusion is thought to be triggered by the synchronized tactile stimulation of both the subject's hand and the fake hand. To extend the conventional rubber hand illusion, we introduce robotic technology in the form of a master-slave telemanipulator. The developed one degree-of-freedom master-slave system consists of an exoskeleton master equipped with an optical encoder that is worn on the subject's index finger and a motor-actuated index finger on the rubber hand, which allows the subject to perform unilateral telemanipulation. The moving rubber hand illusion has been studied by several researchers in the past with mechanically connected rigs between the subject's body and the fake limb. The robotic instruments let us investigate the moving rubber hand illusion with less constraints, thus behaving closer to the classic rubber hand illusion. In addition, the temporal delay between the body and the fake limb can be precisely manipulated. The experimental results revealed that the robotic instruments significantly enhance the rubber hand illusion. The time delay is significantly correlated with the effect of the multisensory illusion, and the effect significantly decreased at time delays over 100 ms. These findings can potentially contribute to the investigations of neural mechanisms in the field of neuroscience and of master-slave systems in the field of robotics. PMID:25532152

  16. A micro-continuum-mechanical material model for failure of rubber-like materials: Application to ageing-induced fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hüsnü; Kaliske, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Rubbery polymers are subjected to severe environmental conditions under service. As a consequence of various ageing mechanisms, the outer surface of rubber components hardens in time and cracking occurs as a result of combined mechanical and chemical processes. Conventional phenomenological hyperelastic constitutive models do not account for material softening. Consequently, the stored energy and stresses tend to infinity as stretch increases. In this contribution, a network alteration for the ageing mechanism of rubber-like materials is introduced along with a micromolecular description of material failure. The proposed micro-continuum material model is based on a serial construction of a Langevin-type spring representing the energy storage owing to conformational changes induced by deformation, to a bond potential representing the energy stored in the polymer chain due to the interatomic displacement. For the representation of the micro-macro transition, the non-affine kinematics of the micro-sphere model is used. The Morse potential is utilized for the interatomic bond, which describes the energetic contribution to rubber-like materials and governs the failure of the polymer chain in terms of bond rupture. A novel numerical scheme for the FE implementation of the proposed model is demonstrated. The hardening phenomenon as a result of diffusion limited oxidation of rubber is explained by the principle of mass conservation which dictates simultaneous modulus hardening along with decrease in ultimate stretch observed in aged rubbery polymers.

  17. Energy functions for rubber from microscopic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, A. S.; Dunstan, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    The finite deformation theory of rubber and related materials is based on energy functions that describe the macroscopic response of these materials under deformation. Energy functions and elastic constants are here derived from a simple microscopic (ball-and-spring) model. Exact uniaxial force-extension relationships are given for Hooke's Law and for the thermodynamic entropy-based microscopic model using the Gaussian and the inverse Langevin statistical approximations. Methods are given for finding the energy functions as expansions of tensor invariants of deformation, with exact solutions for functions that can be expressed as expansions in even powers of the extension. Comparison with experiment shows good agreement with the neo-Hookean energy function and we show how this derives directly from the simple Gaussian statistical model with a small modification.

  18. Chlorinolysis reclaims rubber of waste tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, E. R.; Tervet, J. H.; Hull, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Process reclaims rubber and reduces sulfur content by using chlorine gas to oxidize sulfur bonds in preference to other bonds. Rubber does not have poor hysteresis and abrasion resistance like conventionally reclaimed rubber and is suitable for premium radial tires. Chlorinated rubber is less susceptible to swelling by oils and may be used as paint ingredient.

  19. Recycling, production and use of reprocessed rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Klingensmith, B. )

    1991-03-01

    This article examines the various methods used to produce recycled rubber and to compare their characteristics and application. The topics discussed include reclaiming by chemical digestion, devulcanization by the severing of sulfur bonds, ambient temperature and cryogenically ground rubber, processing and mixing of ground rubber, and properties of reclaimed rubbers by reclamation method.

  20. Investigating Low Temperature Properties of Rubber Seals - 13020

    SciTech Connect

    Jaunich, M.; Wolff, D.; Stark, W.

    2013-07-01

    To achieve the required tightness levels of containers for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes rubbers are widely applied as main sealing materials. The save encapsulation of the radioactive container contents has to be guaranteed according to legislation and appropriate guidelines for long storage periods as well as down to temperatures of -40 deg. C during transportation. Therefore the understanding of failure mechanisms that lead to leakage at low temperatures is of high importance. It is known that the material properties of rubbers are strongly influenced by temperature. At low temperatures this is caused by the rubber-glass transition (abbr. glass transition). During continuous cooling the material changes from rubber-like entropy-elastic to stiff energy-elastic behaviour, that allows nearly no strain or retraction. Therefore, rubbers are normally used above their glass transition but the minimum working temperature limit is not defined precisely, what can cause problems during application. The temperature range where full functionality is possible is strongly dependent on the application conditions and the material. For this investigation mainly ethylene propylene diene (EPDM) and fluorocarbon rubbers (FKM) were selected as they are often used for radioactive waste containers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) are typically used for the determination of the temperature range of the glass transition process. The standardized compression set measurement according to ISO 815 is common for investigation of rubber sealing materials as the test simulates the seal behaviour after release. To reduce the test time of the standard tests a faster technique giving the same information was developed. Additionally, the breakdown temperature of the sealing function of complete O-ring seals is measured in a component test setup to compare it with the results of the other tests. The experimental setup is capable of

  1. Vibration isolation of beam structure using hybrid mount associated with rubber and piezoactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Hong, Sung-Ryong

    2003-08-01

    A hybrid mount featuring elastic rubber and piezoelectric material is proposed and applied to the vibration control of a beam structure subjected to high frequency excitations. A mechanical model of the proposed hybrid mount is derived, and then the frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness of rubber and the voltage-dependent stroke of piezoactuator are verified experimentally. After formulating a mathematical model of the beam structure associated with the hybrid mount and the passive rubber mounts, a robust sliding mode controller is designed to attenuate vibration of the beam structure. The controller is experimentally realized and control responses such as accelerations of the beam structure and force transmission through the hybrid mount and rubber mounts are presented in frequency domain.

  2. In vitro biocompatibility of EPM and EPDM rubbers.

    PubMed

    Mast, F; Hoschtitzky, J A; Van Blitterswijk, C A; Huysmans, H A

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro toxicity of two EPDM rubbers (K 778 and K 4802) and one EPM rubber (K 740) was tested using human fibroblasts. The modulus of elasticity of each rubber was varied by exposure to different amounts of electron-beam radiation (0, 5 and 10 Mrad). The short-term in vitro toxicity was tested by culturing cells on polymer films. The long-term effect of ageing was simulated by growing fibroblasts in nutrient media prepared from extracts of heat-exposed materials. Cell cultures were studied both quantitatively and (ultra) structurally. Growth curves obtained in the toxicity test did not differ significantly from control values at any day of observation, and also showed that electron-beam radiation did not alter the biocompatibility. The same results were found for all but one material in the artificial ageing test. The number of cells in the K4802/10 Mrad extraction medium was decreased. Ultrastructurally no gross deviations from normal morphology were observed, either in the direct contact test or in the artificial ageing test. The most characteristic feature was a somewhat dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, the in vitro biocompatibility of EPDM-rubbers as observed in this study is satisfactory and motivates further investigation of their biocompatibility in animal experiments. PMID:15348835

  3. Characterization of Hexsyn, a polyolefin rubber.

    PubMed

    McMillin, C R

    1987-07-01

    Hexsyn is the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company tradename for a polyolefin rubber synthesized from 1-hexene with 3-5% methylhexadiene as the source of residual double bonds for vulcanization. Under license from Goodyear, this same polymer has been manufactured by Lord Corporation for the hinge portion of finger joint prostheses using the tradename Bion. This rubber is currently licensed to the University of Akron and to the Cleveland Clinic Foundation for use in biomedical applications, and is being used primarily for biocompatible and highly fatigue resistant rubber components in ventricular assist and artificial heart systems. Results are presented from the physical, mechanical, and biological characterization of Hexsyn. Procedures are described for the synthesis, compounding, and post-molding extraction for Hexsyn. The physical testing of Hexsyn reported includes determinations of its density at 23 and 37 degrees C, initial hardness and hardness after aging in oxygen, blood, pseudoextracellular fluid and polyethylene glycol 600, typical molecular weights determined by gel permeation chromatography/low angle laser light scattering and intrinsic viscosity, thermal analyses by differential scanning calorimetry of Hexsyn gum, and vulcanized Hexsyn after exposure to blood and blood/fatigue conditions. Also reported are results of differential thermal analyses, thermomechanical analyses of virgin and annealed samples, and thermogravimetric analyses conducted in helium and in air. Dynamic mechanical analyses of Hexsyn include Clash-Berg and Rheovibron tests. Swelling was conducted to determine lot-to-lot and sheet-to-sheet variation for quality control and also a number of solvents were used so that the polymer-solvent interaction parameters could be determined. The permeability of Hexsyn to water, water vapor, and a variety of gases is reported. The permeability by contact angle measurements, refractive index, residual solvent analyses, migration of blood components

  4. Stress-Strain Relation and strain-Induced Crystallization in Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.

    2006-01-01

    Rubber is composed of flexible chains and network points. Theory of rubber elasticity succeeds to elucidate stress-strain relation of rubber using the inverse Langevin equation of entropy modulus. However, actual rubber is much different from ideal networks composed of ideal rubber chains. Network points may not distribute homogeneously and the molecular weight between two network points may show wide distribution. Flexible chains show strain-induced crystallization. Recent synchrotron X-ray and simultaneous stress-strain measurements reveal that strain-induced crystallization reduces the stress by increasing the length of molecules along the stretching direction. Also, strain-induced crystals are created not at the middle of the network points, but at the close location to the network points. The hybrid structure of strain-induced crystallites and network points may be stronger than network points alone. Therefore, strain induced crystallization may increase the tensile strength of rubber by two mechanisms, they are, increase of elongation at break and reinforcement of network points. Natural rubber has biotic network points in nature. After vulcanization, the biotic network may contribute the superior toughness of NR, comparing to IR. Carbon filled NR also shows strain induced crystallization. In order to acquire high tensile strength, molecules should have higher flexibility to perform strain induced crystallization by selecting a kind of carbon blacks, an accelerator and a curing condition.

  5. Rubber stopper remover

    DOEpatents

    Stitt, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    A device for removing a rubber stopper from a test tube is mountable to an upright wall, has a generally horizontal splash guard, and a lower plate spaced parallel to and below the splash guard. A slot in the lower plate has spaced-apart opposing edges that converge towards each other from the plate outer edge to a narrowed portion, the opposing edges shaped to make engagement between the bottom of the stopper flange and the top edge of the test tube to wedge therebetween and to grasp the stopper in the slot narrowed portion to hold the stopper as the test tube is manipulated downwardly and pulled from the stopper. The opposing edges extend inwardly to adjoin an opening having a diameter significantly larger than that of the stopper flange.

  6. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production. PMID:25809497

  7. A study of the influence of micro and nano phase morphology on the mechanical properties of a rubber-modified epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Bobby Glenn

    Epoxy resins are thermosets with extraordinary adhesion; high strength; good resistance to creep, heat, and chemicals; and they have low shrinkage. Conversely, these polymers are brittle, they are sensitive to moisture, and they exhibit poor toughness. To improve their toughness, they are often modified by introducing dispersed rubber particles in the primary phase. In this study, the epoxy resin was modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN), liquid-reactive rubbers. The initiator concentration, percent acrylonitrile in the CTBN rubber, and cure temperatures were altered to give varying materials properties. Statistical analysis of the morphology data showed that the percentage of rubber acrylonitrile had an effect on both the rubber particle size and volume fraction. The cure temperature had an effect on the rubber particle volume and modulus. Plots of the rubber particle size, volume fraction, and modulus versus bulk elastic storage modulus and fracture toughness revealed that rubber particle size had no effect on bulk properties, volume fraction and rubber particle modulus had an effect on both the bulk storage elastic modulus and fracture toughness.

  8. A Micro-Mechanically Based Continuum Model for Strain-Induced Crystallization in Natural Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Sunny Jigger

    Recent experimental results show that strain-induced crystallization can substantially improve the crack growth resistance of natural rubber. While this might suggest superior designs of tires or other industrial applications where elastomers are used, a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics of strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber has to be developed before any design process can be started. The objective of this work is to develop a computationally-accessible micro-mechanically based continuum model, which is able to predict the macroscopic behavior of strain crystallizing natural rubber. While several researchers have developed micro-mechanical models of partially crystallized polymer chains, their results mainly give qualitative agreement with experimental data due to a lack of good micro-macro transition theories or the lack of computational power. However, recent developments in multiscale modeling in polymers provide new tools to continue this early work. In this thesis, a new model is proposed to model strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber. To this end, a micro-mechanical model of a constrained partially crystallized polymer chain with an extended-chain crystal is derived and connected to the macroscopic level using the non-affine micro-sphere model. On the macroscopic level, a thermodynamically consistent framework for strain-crystallizing materials is developed, and a description of the crystallization kinetics is introduced. For that matter, an evolution law for crystallization based on the gradient of the macroscopic Helmholtz free energy function (chemical potential) in combination with a simple threshold function is used. A numerical implementation of the model is proposed and its predictive performance assessed using published data.

  9. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  10. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  11. Rubber shock absorber for deep-well rod operated pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Bagirov, M.M.

    1984-05-01

    Tests of hydropneumatic shock absorbers of deep-well pumps in oil fields showed that they improve the efficiency of the installations by their design is very complicated. Mechanically acting absorbers of dynamic forces are simpler in design. Rubber shock absorbers differ advantageously from spring absorbers in that considerable oscillation-damping forces of any amplitude act in them. The design of a shock absorber is described which is situated under the balance arm of a pumping jack. A prototype of the shock absorber, in which the elastic elements were cylinders made of rubber was tested in a test borehole. Dynamographic recordings made in this borehole in operation with and without shock absorber show that the shock absorber reduces the maximum load on the rods and the double amplitude of load change. Calculations show that when the described shock absorber is used the reduced load is 11-18% smaller. This may considerably reduce the number of breakages of deepwell pump rods.

  12. A three-level non-deterministic modeling methodology for the NVH behavior of rubber connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenti, A.; Moens, D.; Sas, P.; Desmet, W.

    2010-03-01

    Complex built-up structures such as vehicles have a variety of joint types, such as spot-welds, bolted joints, rubber joints, etc. Rubber joints highly contribute to the nonlinear level of the structure and are a major source of uncertainties and variability. In the general framework of developing engineering tools for virtual prototyping and product refinement, the modeling of the NVH behavior of rubber joints involve the computational burden of including a detailed nonlinear model of the joint and the uncertainties and variability typical of that joint in a full-scale system model. However, in an engineering design phase the knowledge on the joint rubber material properties is typically poor, and the working conditions a rubber joint will experience are generally not known in detail. This lack of knowledge often do not justify the computational burden and the modeling effort of including detailed nonlinear models of the joint in a full-scale system model. Driven by these issues a non-deterministic numerical methodology based on a three-level modeling approach is being developed. The methodology aims at evaluating directly in the frequency domain the sensitivity of the NVH behavior of a full-scale system model to the rubber joint material properties when nonlinear visco-elastic rubber material behavior is considered. Rather than including directly in the model a representation of the rubber nonlinear visco-elastic behavior, the methodology proposes to model the material nonlinear visco-elastic behavior by using a linear visco-elastic material model defined in an interval sense, from which the scatter on the full-scale system NVH response is evaluated. Furthermore the development of a multi-level solution scheme allows to reduce the computational burden introduced by the non-deterministic approach by allowing the definition of an equivalent linear interval parametric rubber joint model, ready to be assembled in a full-scale system model at a reasonable

  13. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  14. Coprocessing of coal and waste rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The disposal of used tires, the main source of waste rubber, is an important environmental problem. We describe a method to transform used rubber tires into useful liquid products by coprocessing them with coal. Carbon black, an important constituent in rubber tires, provides a good hydrocracking catalyst during coprocessing. Due to the presence of carbon black in the rubber tires, the yields of liquids obtained by coal-rubber tires coprocessing are superior to those that could be obtained by coprocessing rubber with coal in the absence of carbon black.

  15. Coprocessing of coal and waste rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    The disposal of used tires, the main source of waste rubber, is an important environmental problem. We describe a method to transform used rubber tires into useful liquid products by coprocessing them with coal. Carbon black, an important constituent in rubber tires, provides a good hydrocracking catalyst during coprocessing. Due to the presence of carbon black in the rubber tires, the yields of liquids obtained by coal-rubber tires coprocessing are superior to those that could be obtained by coprocessing rubber with coal in the absence of carbon black.

  16. Experimental Investigation on Mechanical Property of Metal Rubber Used in Lunar Rover at High or Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Deng, Z.; Gao, H.; Wang, S.; Hu, M.; Meng, X.

    Metal rubber is a kind of elastic damping material for aerospace environment It can keep its capacity even in some extreme environment such as high temperature high pressure high vacuum ultra-low temperature and violent vibration where traditional rubber can t deal with so it can be used in space craft as vibration reduction filter element and sealing element On the prototype of a lunar rover developed by Harbin Institute of Technology metal rubber is firstly used for the vibration dampers in the rover wheels In this paper the experimental investigation on rigidity and damping characteristic of metal rubber is carried out at high temperature and ultra-low temperature that corresponds to lunar environment The quasi-statics property of the samples made of metal rubber is tested at desired temperatures by the universal tensile testing machine model Y-71 The low temperatures down to -175° were realized by liquid nitrogen and the high temperatures up to 130° were realized by flexible electrical heater band Based on the method of least squares some curves to curve fit the experimental data on rigidity of the metal rubber samples at simulated temperatures to lunar environment were given The damping ratios of metal rubber at ordinary temperatures have been mentioned in some documents But there are hardly any reports about them at simulated temperatures to lunar environment Because it is difficult to know directly the exact damping mechanism of the metal rubber the free attenuation method is feasible to test its damping

  17. Natural rubber latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Deval, Ravi; Ramesh, V; Prasad, G B K S; Jain, Arun Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL) is a ubiquitous allergen as it is a component of > 40,000 products in everyday life. Latex allergy might be attributed to skin contact or inhalation of latex particles. Latex allergy is an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to NRL, presenting a wide range of clinical symptoms such as angioedema, swelling, cough, asthma, and anaphylactic reactions. Until 1979, latex allergy appeared only as type IV delayed hypersensitivity; subsequently, the proportion of different allergy types drifted towards type IV contact allergy reactions. Several risk factors for sensitization to NRL are already known and well documented. Some authors have established a positive correlation between a history of multiple surgical interventions, atopy, spina bifida malformation, and latex allergy incidence. We suspect an increase in latex allergy incidence in association with increased atopy and sensitivity to environmental allergens in the industrial population. It is often postulated in literature that the groups of workers at risk for this allergy are essentially workers in the latex industry and healthcare professionals. In this population, direct internal and mucosal contact with NRL medical devices may be the route of sensitization as factors such as the number of procedures and use of NRL materials (catheters and tubes) were associated with increased risk of latex sensitization and allergy. PMID:18797048

  18. Rolling tires into rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-06-01

    For Envirotire (Lillington, North Carolina), producing quality crumb rubber this summer is all in a night`s work. The tire recycling facility has operated in Lillington, which is about an hour south of Raleigh, North Carolina, for about a year and a half, since October 1995. In the summer, the plant runs at night to save money in electricity costs by operating during off-peak hours; in the winter, daytime hours also can be off-peak. In contrast to the cryogenic systems used elsewhere to recycle tires, Envirotire`s system works on mechanical principles. Before the tires are even shredded, a worker cuts the white-walls out of the tires manually, so the white does not contaminate the black end-product. A worker places the tires manually on a conveyor, which feed them up to an initial shredder that sections them quickly into pieces. While the tires are on the conveyor, dividing strips on the conveyor mark off a place for each tire. The system takes nine new tires per minute.

  19. Silicone-Rubber Microvalves Actuated by Paraffin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svelha, Danielle; Feldman, Sabrina; Barsic, David

    2004-01-01

    Microvalves containing silicone-rubber seals actuated by heating and cooling of paraffin have been proposed for development as integral components of microfluidic systems. In comparison with other microvalves actuated by various means (electrostatic, electromagnetic, piezoelectric, pneumatic, and others), the proposed valves (1) would contain simpler structures that could be fabricated at lower cost and (2) could be actuated by simpler (and thus less expensive) control systems. Each valve according to the proposal would include a flow channel bounded on one side by a flat surface and on the other side by a curved surface defined by an arched-cross-section, elastic seal made of silicone rubber [polydimethylsilane (PDMS)]. The seal would be sized and shaped so that the elasticity of the PDMS would hold the channel open except when the seal was pressed down onto the flat surface to close the channel. The principle of actuation would exploit the fact that upon melting or freezing, the volume of a typical paraffin increases or decreases, respectively, by about 15 percent. In a valve according to the proposal, the seal face opposite that of the channel would be in contact with a piston-like plug of paraffin. In the case of a valve designed to be normally open at ambient temperature, one would use a paraffin having a melting temperature above ambient. The seal would be pushed against the flat surface to close the channel by heating the paraffin above its melting temperature. In the case of a valve designed to be normally closed at ambient temperature, one would use a paraffin having a melting temperature below ambient. The seal would be allowed to spring away from the flat surface to open the channel by cooling the paraffin below its melting temperature. The availability of paraffins that have melting temperatures from 70 to +80 C should make it possible to develop a variety of normally closed and normally open valves. The figure depicts examples of prototype normally

  20. System identification methods for metal rubber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Lang, Z. Q.; Billings, S. A.; Tomlinson, G. R.; Rongong, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    Metal rubber (MR) devices, a new wire mesh material, have been extensively used in recent years due to several unique properties especially in adverse environments. Although many practical studies have been completed, the related theoretical research on metal rubber is still in its infancy. In this paper, a semi-constitutive dynamic model that involves nonlinear elastic stiffness, nonlinear viscous damping and bilinear hysteresis Coulomb damping is adopted to model MR devices. The model is first approximated by representing the bilinear hysteresis damping as Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind and then generalised by taking into account the effects of noises. A very efficient systematic procedure based on the orthogonal least squares (OLS) algorithm, the adjustable prediction error sum of squares (APRESS) criterion and the nonlinear model validity tests is proposed for model structure detection and parameter estimation of MR devices for the first time. The OLS algorithm provides a powerful tool to effectively select the significant model terms step by step, one at a time, by orthogonalising the associated terms and maximising the error reduction ratio, in a forward stepwise manner. The APRESS statistic regularises the OLS algorithm to facilitate the determination of the optimal number of model terms that should be included into the model. And whether the final identified dynamic model is adequate and acceptable is determined by the model validity tests. Because of the orthogonal property of the OLS algorithm, the selection of the dynamic model terms and noise model terms are totally decoupled and the approach also leads to a parsimonious model. Numerical ill-conditioning problems which can arise in the conventional least squares algorithm can be avoided as well. The methods of choosing the sampling interval for nonlinear systems are also incorporated into the approach. Finally by utilising the response of a cylindrical MR specimen, it is shown how the model

  1. Electrospinning of PVC with natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Muhammad Hariz; Mohamed, Mahathir; Abdullah, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was mixed with natural rubbers which are liquid natural rubber (LNR), liquid epoxidised natural rubber (LENR) and liquid epoxidised natural rubber acrylate (LENRA) for a preparation of a fine non-woven fiber's mat. PVC and each natural rubbers(PVC:LENR, PVC:LNR and PVC:LENRA) were mixed based on ratio of 70:30. Electrospinning method was used to prepare the fiber. The results show that the spinnable concentration of PVC/ natural rubber/THF solution is 16 wt%. The morphology, diameter, structure and degradation temperature of electrospun fibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). SEM photos showed that the morphology and diameter of the fibers were mainly affected by the addition of natural rubber. TGA results suggested that PVC electrospun fiber has higher degradation temperature than those electrospun fibers that contain natural rubber.

  2. Electrospinning of PVC with natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Muhammad Hariz; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Mohamed, Mahathir

    2013-11-27

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was mixed with natural rubbers which are liquid natural rubber (LNR), liquid epoxidised natural rubber (LENR) and liquid epoxidised natural rubber acrylate (LENRA) for a preparation of a fine non-woven fiber’s mat. PVC and each natural rubbers(PVC:LENR, PVC:LNR and PVC:LENRA) were mixed based on ratio of 70:30. Electrospinning method was used to prepare the fiber. The results show that the spinnable concentration of PVC/ natural rubber/THF solution is 16 wt%. The morphology, diameter, structure and degradation temperature of electrospun fibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). SEM photos showed that the morphology and diameter of the fibers were mainly affected by the addition of natural rubber. TGA results suggested that PVC electrospun fiber has higher degradation temperature than those electrospun fibers that contain natural rubber.

  3. Advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhixin; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2014-02-01

    The research advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes (rubber/HNTs) nanocomposites are reviewed. HNTs are environmentally-friendly natural nanomaterials, which could be used to prepare the rubber-based nanocomposites with high performance and low cost. Unmodified HNTs could be adopted to prepare the rubber/HNTs composites with improved mechanical properties, however, the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites with fine morphology and excellent properties were chiefly prepared with various modifiers by in situ mixing method. A series of rubber/HNTs nanocomposites containing several rubbers (SBR, NR, xSBR, NBR, PU) and different modifiers (ENR, RH, Si69, SA, MAA, ILs) have been investigated. The results showed that all the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites achieved strong interfacial interaction via interfacial covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds or multiple interactions, realized significantly improved dispersion of HNTs at nanoscale and exhibited excellent mechanical performances and other properties. PMID:24749454

  4. Rubber-like electrically conductive polymeric materials with shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H. P.; Song, C. L.; Huang, W. M.; Wang, C. C.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a heating-responsive shape memory polymeric material, which is not only rubber-like at room temperature and above its shape recovery temperature, but also electrically conductive. This polymeric material is made of silicone, melting glue (MG), and carbon black (CB). The influence of volume fractions of MG and CB on the elasticity, electrical resistivity, and shape memory effect of the polymeric material is systematically investigated. The feasibility of Joule heating for shape recovery is experimentally demonstrated with an electric power of 31 V.

  5. Effect of crumb-rubber particle size on mechanical response of polyurethane foam composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjay, Omer Sheik

    The compression properties of foam are governed by by three factors: i) cell edge bending ii) compression of cell fluid iii) membrane stresses in the cell faces. The effect of reinforcement, granular form of scrap tire rubber on contribution of each of these effects along with the physical properties of polyurethane foam is investigated. It is seen that the addition of crumb-rubber hinders the formation of cell membranes during the foaming process. Four different sizes of particles were chosen to closely study the effect of particle size on the physical properties of the foam composite. There is a definite pattern seen in each of the physical property of the composite with change in the particle size. Addition of crumb-rubber decreases the compressive strength but in turn increases the elastic modulus of the composite. The rubber particles act as the sites for stress concentration and hence the inclusion of rubber particles induces the capability to transfer the axial load laterally along the surface of the foam. Also, the filler material induces porosity into the foam, which is seen in the SEM images, and hence the addition of rubber particles induces brittleness, which makes the foam composites extensively applicable for structural application in sandwich components. The lightweight composite therefore is a potential substitute to the heavier metal foams and honeycombs as a protective layer.

  6. Combined effects of microwaves, electron beams and polyfunctional monomers on rubber vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Manaila, Elena; Martin, Diana; Stelescu, Daniela Zuga; Craciun, Gabriela; Ighigeanu, Daniel; Matei, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents comparative results obtained by conventional vulcanization with benzoyl peroxide (CV-BP), separate electron beam vulcanization (EB-V) and simultaneous electron beam and microwave vulcanization (EB+MW-V) applied to two kind of rubber samples: EVA (ethylene vinyl acetate) rubber-sample (EVA-sample) and EPDM (ethylene-propylene terpolymer) rubber-sample (EPDM-sample). The EVA-samples contain 61.54% EVA Elvax 260, 30.77% carbon black, 1.85% TAC (triallylcyanurate) polyfunctional monomer and 5.84% filler (zinc oxide, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol and antioxidant). The EPDM-samples contain 61.54% EPDM Nordel 4760, 30.77% carbon black, 1.85% TMPT (trimethylopropane trimethacrylate) polyfunctional monomer and 5.84% filler (zinc oxide, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol and antioxidant). The rubber samples designed for different vulcanization methods were obtained from raw rubber mixtures, as compressed sheets of 2 mm in the polyethylene foils to minimize oxidation. For EB and EB + MW treatments the sheets were cut in rectangular shape 0.15 x 0.15 m2. The physical properties of samples obtained by CV-BP EV-Vand EB + MW-V methods were evaluated by measuring the tearing strength, residual elongation, elongation at break, tensile strength, 300% modulus, 100% modulus, elasticity and hardness. The obtained results demonstrate an improvement of rubber several properties obtained by EB and EB + MW processing as compared to classical procedure using benzoyl peroxide. PMID:21384707

  7. Rubber friction and tire dynamics.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J

    2011-01-12

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms. PMID:21406818

  8. Rubber friction and tire dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

  9. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  10. Reinforced rubber composition containing ground coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sperley, R.J.

    1984-10-16

    A reinforced rubber composition is provided comprising a mixture of (a) a sulfur vulcanizable rubber and (b) ground coal having an average mesh size of 25 or more and which produces an aqueous slurry with a pH of less than 7.0, and wherein a metallic reinforcing member is embedded in the rubber mixture of (a) and (b).

  11. Elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Gheorghe; Mursa, Condrat

    2006-12-01

    In this book we present the basic concepts of the theory of elasticity: stress and deformation states (plane and three-dimensional) and generalized Hooke's law. We present a number of problems which have applications in strength analysis. The book includes a synthesis of the theory of elasticity and modern methods of applied mathematics. This book is designed for students, post graduate students and specialists in strength analysis. the book contains a number of appendixes which includes: elements of matrix-calculation, concepts of tensorial calculation, the Fourier transform, the notion of improper integrals,singular and hypersingular integrals, generalized functions, the Dirac Delta function

  12. Elasticity reconstructive imaging by means of stimulated echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Skovoroda, A R; O'Donnell, M; Emelianov, S Y

    1998-03-01

    A method is introduced to measure internal mechanical displacement and strain by means of MRI. Such measurements are needed to reconstruct an image of the elastic Young's modulus. A stimulated echo acquisition sequence with additional gradient pulses encodes internal displacements in response to an externally applied differential deformation. The sequence provides an accurate measure of static displacement by limiting the mechanical transitions to the mixing period of the simulated echo. Elasticity reconstruction involves definition of a region of interest having uniform Young's modulus along its boundary and subsequent solution of the discretized elasticity equilibrium equations. Data acquisition and reconstruction were performed on a urethane rubber phantom of known elastic properties and an ex vivo canine kidney phantom using <2% differential deformation. Regional elastic properties are well represented on Young's modulus images. The long-term objective of this work is to provide a means for remote palpation and elasticity quantitation in deep tissues otherwise inaccessible to manual palpation. PMID:9498605

  13. Quantitative rubber sheet models of gravitation wells using Spandex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gary

    2008-04-01

    Long a staple of introductory treatments of general relativity, the rubber sheet model exhibits Wheeler's concise summary---``Matter tells space-time how to curve and space-time tells matter how to move''---very nicely. But what of the quantitative aspects of the rubber sheet model: how far can the analogy be pushed? We show^1 that when a mass M is suspended from the center of an otherwise unstretched elastic sheet affixed to a circular boundary it exhibits a distortion far from the center given by h = A*(M*r^2)^1/3 . Here, as might be expected, h and r are the vertical and axial distances from the center, but this result is not the expected logarithmic form of 2-D solutions to LaPlace's equation (the stretched drumhead). This surprise has a natural explanation and is confirmed experimentally with Spandex as the medium, and its consequences for general rubber sheet models are pursued. ^1``The shape of `the Spandex' and orbits upon its surface'', American Journal of Physics, 70, 48-52 (2002), G. D. White and M. Walker. See also the comment by Don S. Lemons and T. C. Lipscombe, also in AJP, 70, 1056-1058 (2002).

  14. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.; Bagheri, Reza

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  15. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  16. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  17. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Scharff, Robert P.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  18. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  19. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  20. Sprayed Coating Renews Butyl Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Damaged butyl rubber products are renewed by spray technique originally developed for protective suits worn by NASA workers. A commercial two-part adhesive is mixed with Freon-113 (or equivalent) trichlorotrifluoroethane to obtain optimum viscosity for spraying. Mix is applied with an external-air-mix spray gun.

  1. CHEMICAL RECLAMATION OF SCRAP RUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptual, commercial-scale plant design was formulated for processing 22,500 t/yr of scrap rubber tires to hydrocarbon fuel gases, oils, petrochemicals (principally ethylene and aromatic liquids), and carbon black. The process is based upon molten salt (zinc chloride) pyrolys...

  2. Flow-Noise Calculation Using the Mutual Coupling Between Vulcanized Rubber and the Flow Around in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue-Gang; Yang, Kun-De; Ma, Yuan-Liang

    2012-06-01

    A vulcanized rubber layer is usually used on the head of an axisymmetric body to keep it streamlined and watertight. The elastic boundary condition is considered when the flow noise of an axisymmetric body is calculated, and we employ the mutual coupling method between the vulcanized rubber layer and the flow around to solve the flow-noise field for an axisymmetric body in water. The results show that the deformation of the vulcanized rubber layer is reduced with the increase in Young's modulus. The Young's modulus of the rubber material should be large enough to keep it streamlined, and the noise power levels in the peak of the axisymmetric body are smaller than the other positions, which provides us with important theoretical support for laying acoustic arrays on the head of the body.

  3. On the two-potential constitutive modeling of rubber viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aditya; Lopez-Pamies, Oscar

    2016-02-01

    This Note lays out the specialization of the two-potential constitutive framework - also known as the "generalized standard materials" framework - to rubber viscoelasticity. Inter alia, it is shown that a number of popular rubber viscoelasticity formulations, introduced over the years following different approaches, are special cases of this framework. As a first application of practical relevance, the framework is utilized to put forth a new objective and thermodynamically consistent rubber viscoelastic model for incompressible isotropic elastomers. The model accounts for the non-Gaussian elasticity of elastomers, as well as for the deformation-enhanced shear thinning of their viscous dissipation governed by reptation dynamics. The descriptive and predictive capabilities of the model are illustrated via comparisons with experimental data available from the literature for two commercially significant elastomers.

  4. Determination Of Mechanical Property Of Synthetic Rubber Using Optical Mouse As A Vibration Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta*, N.; Sharma, M.; Sarangi, S.; Bhattacharyya, R.

    Synthetic rubber is an incompressible isotropic hyper-elastic material. Its mechanical property is described only by rigidity modulus at undeformed configuration which is one third of Young's modulus at the same configuration. This paper describes an indirect method to determine its rigidity modulus by measuring the frequency of oscillation of a loaded rubber string. Small superimposed oscillation at static equilibrium stretch is measured with an optical mouse. The obtained data is processed to determine the frequency of oscillation. This process of acquiring data and processing it to obtain the desired information is known as Data Acquisition. Post processing and interpretation of the signal is done with help of MATLAB. The rigidity modulus of synthetic rubber is thus determined.

  5. Rubber lining for FGD scrubbers for waste incinerator plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rullmann, H.E.

    1999-11-01

    Flue gas desulfurization scrubbers for waste incineration plants can be lined with soft rubber or hard rubber for corrosion protection. Hard rubber is cured under high temperature and pressure in an autoclave. The advantage of hard rubber is the excellent temperature and chemical resistance. The authors have experience with hard rubber lined scrubbers that are in service without failures for over 20 years.

  6. The enzymatic synthesis of rubber polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachalam, K.V.; Wooten, L.; Benedict, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Washed rubber particles (WRP) isolated from stem homogenates of Parthenium argentatum by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration on columns of LKB Ultrogel AcA34 contain a tightly bound rubber transferase which catalyzes the polymerization of IPP into rubber polymer. The polymerization reaction requires Mg{sup 2+}, IPP and an allylic-PP. The Km values for Mg{sup 2+}, IPP and DMAPP are 5.2{times}10{sup {minus}4}M, 8.3{times}10{sup {minus}5} M and 9.6{times}10{sup {minus}5}M respectively. Gel permeation chromatography of the enzymatic polymer product on 3 linear columns of 1{times}10{sup 6} to 500 {angstrom} Ultrastyragel shows that the in vitro formed polymer has a similar mol wt to natural rubber. Over 90% of the in vitro formation of the rubber polymer was a de novo polymerization reaction from DMAPP initiator and IPP monomers. The bound rubber polymerase substantially differs from cytosolic rubber transferase which catalyzes only chain lengthening reactions. Treatment of the WRP with Chaps solubilized the bound rubber transferase which was further purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The purified preparation primarily consists of a 52 kD polypeptide which binds to a photolabile substrate analog. The soluble rubber transferase catalyzes the synthesis of a 1{times}10{sup 5} mol wt rubber polymer from Mg{sup 2+}, DMAPP, IPP and detergent.

  7. Performance of diamond-like carbon-protected rubber under cyclic friction. I. Influence of substrate viscoelasticity on the depth evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; van der Pal, J. P.; Pei, Y. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of the viscoelastic properties of rubber substrate on the tribological behavior of DLC film-coated alkyl acrylate rubber is studied. The mechanical behavior of the rubber was first characterized by creep experiments using spherical indentations. The results were adjusted using a delayed elasticity model, and a numerical simulation of the indentation of the sliding counterpart ball during the tribotest was carried out. The results show a progressive increase of the contact depth, which is in agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Effects of filler modification and structuring on dielectric enhancement of silicone rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Sara; Razzaghi-Kashani, Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    Preferred structuring of filler particles in a polymer matrix by using dielectrophoretic assembly process can enhance anisotropic dielectric properties. For this purpose, precipitated silica (SiO2) was structured in silicone rubber using an alternating electric field. This filler structure was stabilized by vulcanizing rubber during electric field application. Filler particle orientation and resulted anisotropy was verified by equilibrium swelling. Structuring filler in the rubber matrix led to increased dielectric permittivity and loss in the thickness direction. Filler surface modification by (vinyl-tris-(2- diethoxy/methoxy) silane) improved structure formation and anisotropic properties. It was shown that applying silane modifier and orientation of silica particles by dielectrophoretic assembly process increased dielectric permittivity of silicone rubber in the thickness direction while dielectric loss had either minor changes or increased less than permittivity in this direction. Although elastic modulus of composite, which was measured by dynamic-mechanical analysis, increased to some extent, enhancement in dielectric permittivity was much higher. This introduced the structured composite as a potential for dielectric elastomeric actuator with higher efficiency than the original silicone rubber with no filler addition.

  9. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  10. Compatibilizer for crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Labib, M.E.; Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The United States of America discards more than 300 million tires each year, and out of that a large fraction of the tires is dumped into stock piles. This large quantity of tires creates an environmental problem. The use of scrap tires is limited. There is a usage potential in such fields as fuel for combustion and Crumb Rubber-Modified Asphalt binder (CRMA). The use of crumb rubber in modifying asphalt is not a new technique; it is been used since early 1960 by pavement engineers. Crumb rubber is a composite of different blends of natural and synthetic rubber (natural rubber, processing oils, polybutadiene, polystyrene butadiene, and filler). Prior research had concluded that the performance of crumb rubber modified asphalt is asphalt dependent. In some cases it improves the Theological properties and in some cases it degrades the properties of modified asphalt.

  11. Blow molding of melt processible rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, W.R.; Stuart, R.E.; Myrick, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of making hollow rubber parts by blow molding thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) versus conventional rubber processing. It describes the various types of blow molding processes and it provides some insight into the rheological properties of melt processible rubber (MPR) and how MPR should be molded by each of these processes. A number of blow molded applications for MPR are also discussed.

  12. Surgical rubber gloves impervious to methylmethacrylate monomer.

    PubMed

    Darre, E; Vedel, P

    1984-06-01

    Conventional surgical rubber gloves are permeable to the methylmethacrylate monomer (MMM) of acrylic bone cement. An in vitro technique was used which proved butyl rubber gloves, 0.48 mm thick, to be impervious to MMM. to avoid sensitization, butyl rubber gloves may be recommended to persons who are in contact with MMM. Such gloves should be worn by persons with known contact sensitization to MMM. PMID:6741470

  13. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period. PMID:22139094

  14. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: RUBBER PROCESSING, STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the production of vulcanized elastomers (rubbers) and fabrication of rubber products. Hydrocarbons and particulates are emitted from various operations. Hydrocarbon emissions consist of monomers, rubber chemicals, and solvents whi...

  15. The functional analyses of the cis-prenyltransferase and the rubber elongation factor in rubber biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an essential plant derived commodity required for the manufacture of numerous industrial, medical and household items. Rubber is synthesized and sequestered on cytsolic vesicles known as rubber particles. When provided with farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and is...

  16. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Method for the addition of vulcanized waste rubber to virgin rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.J.

    1997-01-28

    The invention is a method of using enzymes from thiophyllic microbes for selectively breaking the sulfur rubber cross-link bonds in vulcanized rubber. The process is halted at the sulfoxide or sulfone step so that a devulcanized layer is reactive with virgin rubber. 8 figs.

  19. Method for the addition of vulcanized waste rubber to virgin rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Romine, Robert A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a method of using enzymes from thiophyllic microbes for selectively breaking the sulfur rubber cross-link bonds in vulcanized rubber. The process is halted at the sulfoxide or sulfone step so that a devulcanized layer is reactive with virgin rubber.

  20. Ionic Modification Turns Commercial Rubber into a Self-Healing Material.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Sallat, Aladdin; Böhme, Frank; Suckow, Marcus; Basu, Debdipta; Wiessner, Sven; Stöckelhuber, Klaus Werner; Voit, Brigitte; Heinrich, Gert

    2015-09-23

    Invented by Charles Goodyear, chemical cross-linking of rubbers by sulfur vulcanization is the only method by which modern automobile tires are manufactured. The formation of these cross-linked network structures leads to highly elastic properties, which substantially reduces the viscous properties of these materials. Here, we describe a simple approach to converting commercially available and widely used bromobutyl rubber (BIIR) into a highly elastic material with extraordinary self-healing properties without using conventional cross-linking or vulcanising agents. Transformation of the bromine functionalities of BIIR into ionic imidazolium bromide groups results in the formation of reversible ionic associates that exhibit physical cross-linking ability. The reversibility of the ionic association facilitates the healing processes by temperature- or stress-induced rearrangements, thereby enabling a fully cut sample to retain its original properties after application of the self-healing process. Other mechanical properties, such as the elastic modulus, tensile strength, ductility, and hysteresis loss, were found to be superior to those of conventionally sulfur-cured BIIR. This simple and easy approach to preparing a commercial rubber with self-healing properties offers unique development opportunities in the field of highly engineered materials, such as tires, for which safety, performance, and longer fatigue life are crucial factors. PMID:26332010

  1. Dynamic Elasticity Model of Resilin Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Resilin proteins are `super elastic rubbers' in the flight and jumping systems of most insects, and can extend and retract millions of times. Natural resilin exhibits high resilience (> 95%) under high-frequency conditions, and could be stretched to over 300% of its original length with a low elastic modulus of 0.1-3 MPa. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. We report on the dynamic structure transitions and functions of full length resilin from fruit fly (D. melanogaster CG15920) and its different functional domains. A dynamic computational model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for resilins, as well as other elastomeric proteins. A strong beta-turn transition was experimentally identified in the full length resilin and its non-elastic domains (Exon III). Changes in periodic long-range order were demonstrated during this transition, induced either by thermal or mechanical inputs, to confirm the universality of proposed mechanism. Further, this model offers new options for designing protein-based biopolymers with tunable material applications.

  2. RUBBER-PROCESSING CHEMICALS DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research program was to compile a data base covering all the commercially significant organic rubber-processing chemicals produced or imported in the United States. The Rubber-Processing Chemicals Data Base contains the following elements: chemical informati...

  3. Biotechnological Development of Domestic Rubber Producing Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber is an irreplaceable raw material vital to industry, transportation, medicine and defense, largely produced from clonal plantations of Hevea brasiliensis in South-east Asia. Additional rubber-producing crops are greatly desired to increase biodiversity, protect supplies, and provide a...

  4. Roughness Perception during the Rubber Hand Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz-Bosbach, Simone; Tausche, Peggy; Weiss, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while feeling identical stroking of one's own occluded hand can create a compelling illusion that the seen hand becomes part of one's own body. It has been suggested that this so-called rubber hand illusion (RHI) does not simply reflect a bottom-up multisensory integration process but that the…

  5. 75 FR 38119 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... from Japan (38 FR 33593). Following five-year reviews by the Department of Commerce (``Commerce'') and... imports of polychloroprene rubber from Japan (64 FR 47765, September 1, 1999). Following second five-year... antidumping duty finding on imports of polychloroprene rubber from Japan (70 FR 44893). The Commission is...

  6. 75 FR 57980 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... interested parties did not participate in this sunset review * * *.'' (75 FR 51981). Accordingly, pursuant to... COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... whether revocation of the antidumping duty finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan would be likely...

  7. Unraveling the Mystery of Natural Rubber Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (NR) is primarily obtained from Hevea brasiliensis, commonly known as the Brazilian rubber tree. As this species contains little genetic variation, it is susceptible to pathogen-based eradication. Consequently, it is imperative that a biomimetic pathway for NR production be developed....

  8. Guayule: A Source of Natural Rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is a perennial shrub native to the Chihuahuan Desert. Guayule's use as a natural rubber source dates before 1500 A.D. when Native Americans used its latex to make balls for games. Guayule has been evaluated in the U.S. as a commercial rubber crop during three per...

  9. Guayule: A Source of Natural Rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is a perennial shrub native to the Chihuahuan Desert. Guayule’s use as a natural rubber source dates before 1500 A.D. when Native Americans used its latex to make balls for games. Guayule has been evaluated in the U.S. as a commercial rubber crop during three per...

  10. Zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily P; Ren, Zhiyong; Mays, David C

    2012-12-01

    Because tires contain approximately 1-2% zinc by weight, zinc leaching is an environmental concern associated with civil engineering applications of tire crumb rubber. An assessment of zinc leaching data from 14 studies in the published literature indicates that increasing zinc leaching is associated with lower pH and longer leaching times, but the data display a wide range of zinc concentrations, and do not address the effect of crumb rubber size or the dynamics of zinc leaching during flow through porous crumb rubber. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crumb rubber size using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), the effect of exposure time using quiescent batch leaching tests, and the dynamics of zinc leaching using column tests. Results indicate that zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber increases with smaller crumb rubber and longer exposure time. Results from SPLP and quiescent batch leaching tests are interpreted with a single-parameter leaching model that predicts a constant rate of zinc leaching up to 96 h. Breakthrough curves from column tests displayed an initial pulse of elevated zinc concentration (~3 mg/L) before settling down to a steady-state value (~0.2 mg/L), and were modeled with the software package HYDRUS-1D. Washing crumb rubber reduces this initial pulse but does not change the steady-state value. No leaching experiment significantly reduced the reservoir of zinc in the crumb rubber. PMID:23145882

  11. Amino acid modifiers in guayule rubber compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tire producers are increasingly interested in biobased materials, including rubber but also as compounding chemicals. An alternative natural rubber for tire use is produced by guayule, a woody desert shrub native to North America. Alternative compounding chemicals include naturally-occurring amino a...

  12. RADIATION INDUCED VULCANIZATION OF RUBBER LATEX

    DOEpatents

    Mesrobian, R.B.; Ballantine, D.S.; Metz, D.J.

    1964-04-28

    A method of vulcanizing rubber latex by exposing a mixture containing rubber latex and from about 15 to about 21.3 wt% of 2,5-dichlorostyrene to about 1.1 megarads of gamma radiation while maintaining the temperature of the mixture at a temperature ranging between from about 56 to about 59 deg C is described. (AEC)

  13. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  14. Mesoscopic bead-and-spring model of hard spherical particles in a rubber matrix. I. Hydrodynamic reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raos, Guido; Allegra, Giuseppe

    2000-11-01

    Exploiting an electrostatic analogy, we show that the elastic forces between a set of rigid particles embedded in a phantom polymer network can be represented by a simple bead-and-spring model. The beads represent the particles and the springs the rubber matrix. The model is validated by Monte Carlo simulation of rubbers filled with hard spherical particles, at volume fractions between 0.1 and 0.3. We derive both the moduli and the full stress-strain curves, under uniaxial elongation. The model reproduces and extends previous theoretical results on the so-called hydrodynamic reinforcement effect.

  15. Design of silicone rubber according to requirements based on the multi-objective optimization of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Yuxi; Sun Sheng; Liu Lili; Mu Yue; An Lijia

    2004-08-16

    The explicit expression between composition and mechanical properties of silicone rubber was derived from the physics of polymer elasticity, the implicit expression among material composition, reaction conditions and reaction efficiency was obtained from chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, and then an implicit multi-objective optimization model was constructed. Genetic algorithm was applied to optimize material composition and reaction conditions, and the finite element method of cross-linking reaction processes was used to solve multi-objective functions, on the basis of which a new optimization methodology of cross-linking reaction processes was established. Using this methodology, rubber materials can be designed according to pre-specified requirements.

  16. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-01

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (Tm) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  17. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-30

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (T{sub m}) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  18. Elastic-resilience-induced dispersion of carbon nanotubes: a novel way of fabricating high performance elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Siwu; Lin, Tengfei; Guo, Baochun

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art processes cannot achieve rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites with satisfactory performance by using pristine MWCNTs and conventional processing equipment. In this work, high performance rubber/MWCNT composites featuring a combination of good mechanical properties, electrical and thermal conductivities and damping capacity over a wide temperature range are fabricated based on a well-developed master batch process. It is demonstrated that the MWCNTs are dispersed homogeneously due to the disentanglement induced by well-wetting and shearing, and the elastic-resilience-induced dispersion of the MWCNTs by rubber chains via the novel processing method. To further enhance the efficacy of elastic-resilience-induced dispersion for MWCNTs, a slightly pre-crosslinked network is constructed in the master batch. Consequently, we obtain rubber/MWCNT composites with unprecedented performance by amplifying the reinforcing effect of relatively low MWCNT loading. This work provides a novel insight into the fabrication of high performance functional elastomeric composites with pristine CNTs by taking advantage of the unique elastic resilience of rubber chains as the driving force for the disentanglement of CNTs.

  19. Elastic-resilience-induced dispersion of carbon nanotubes: a novel way of fabricating high performance elastomer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siwu; Lin, Tengfei; Guo, Baochun

    2013-11-22

    State-of-the-art processes cannot achieve rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites with satisfactory performance by using pristine MWCNTs and conventional processing equipment. In this work, high performance rubber/MWCNT composites featuring a combination of good mechanical properties, electrical and thermal conductivities and damping capacity over a wide temperature range are fabricated based on a well-developed master batch process. It is demonstrated that the MWCNTs are dispersed homogeneously due to the disentanglement induced by well-wetting and shearing, and the elastic-resilience-induced dispersion of the MWCNTs by rubber chains via the novel processing method. To further enhance the efficacy of elastic-resilience-induced dispersion for MWCNTs, a slightly pre-crosslinked network is constructed in the master batch. Consequently, we obtain rubber/MWCNT composites with unprecedented performance by amplifying the reinforcing effect of relatively low MWCNT loading. This work provides a novel insight into the fabrication of high performance functional elastomeric composites with pristine CNTs by taking advantage of the unique elastic resilience of rubber chains as the driving force for the disentanglement of CNTs. PMID:24164916

  20. High breakdown-strength composites from liquid silicone rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul; Yu, Liyun; Sager Hassouneh, Suzan; Benslimane, Mohamed; Ladegaard Skov, Anne

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs) as dielectric elastomer transducers. Commonly used silicones in this application include room-temperature vulcanisable (RTV) silicone elastomers and composites thereof. Pure LSRs and their composites with commercially available fillers (an anatase TiO2, a core-shell TiO2-SiO2 and a CaCu3Ti4O12 filler) are evaluated with respect to dielectric permittivity, elasticity (Young’s modulus) and electrical breakdown strength. Film formation properties are also evaluated. The best-performing formulations are those with anatase TiO2 nanoparticles, where the highest relative dielectric permittivity of 5.6 is obtained, and with STX801, a core-shell morphology TiO2-SiO2 filler from Evonik, where the highest breakdown strength of 173 V μm-1 is obtained.

  1. Magnetic silicone rubber: Fabrication and analysis with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Takanori; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-08-01

    In this research, we fabricated magnetic silicone rubbers (MSR) by using magnetic powders of Fe or Sr ferrite ( ϕ 3-5 um) and investigated the physical properties of the MSR, such as the elastic and the magnetic characteristics. MSR is a new approach to flexible magnetic actuators. If the MSR is to be solidified, the mixing ratio between a silicone elastomer and the magnetic powders is important. In addition, the ratio determines the magnetic properties in a magnetic field. If soft magnetic powders are used in the MSR, magnetic force control is possible. We applied MSR to an electromagnetic linear actuator to verify the capability of MSR based on Fe or Sr ferrite materials. In the linear actuator for inchworm motion, MSR improved the magnetic force and the velocity. MSR can provide a simple mechanism for robotic applications and magnetic artificial muscles.

  2. History of Rubber and Its Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ingo; Strehlow, Peter

    Despite its spectacular properties rubber was not much good for anything before the latter part of the 19th century. To be sure the Aztecs had used it to make balls for their ceremonial ball games - or so we are told. But those games died along with the Aztec culture in the 16th century and there is no record of other useful applications until the late 18th century. But then, after that, rubber took off in a small way. After the American inventor Samuel Peal had obtained a patent in 1791 for the production of rubber-coated watertight textiles, the Scottish chemist Charles Macintosh (1766-1843) used such textiles for making rain-coats, and Thomas Hancock (1786-1865) produced rubber boots. At that time it was not really appropriate to speak of a rubber industry. What little material the evil-smelling workshops in New York and London needed, could be satisfied with the import of 30 tons of Caoutchouc1 annually - extracted from the sap of the tree Hevea brasiliensis - and most of that went for making erasers. Indeed, it had been reported by the English minister and scientist Joseph Priestley (1733-1804) that pieces of rubber are well-suited to rub out (sic!) pencil marks. Even today there is nothing better for the purpose and rubber became the English word for Caoutchouc.

  3. Hyundai plans rubber unit despite overcapacity

    SciTech Connect

    Hyoungjin Kim

    1993-02-24

    Despite the oversupply of synthetic rubber in South Korea, the government has granted approval to Hyundai Petrochemical (Seoul) to build the country's second synthetic rubber unit, to be located alongside its petrochemical complex at Daesan. The plant is due for startup during second-half 1995, when the local market is expected to be in better balance. Hyundai will use Goodyear Tire Rubber technology for the plant, which will have annual capacities for 40,000 m.t. of polybutadiene rubber (BR), 30,000 m.t. of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and 12,000 m.t. of nitrile rubber (NBR). Styrene and butadiene requirements will be met from Hyundai's own production at Daesan. The current local producer of synthetic rubber is Korea Kumho Petrochemicals (Seoul), which has annual capacities for 150,000 m.t. of SBR, 95,000 m.t. of BR, and 10,000 m.t. of NBR. Korean SBR demand is about 141,000 m.t./year but is expected to increase to 161,000 m.t./year by 1996 and reach 194,000 m.t./year by the end of the decade.

  4. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  5. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayari, F.; Bayraktar, E.; Zghal, A.

    2011-01-01

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  6. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari, F.

    2011-01-17

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  7. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  8. Chemistry of rubber processing and disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Bebb, R L

    1976-01-01

    The major chemical changes during the processing of rubber occur with the breakdown in mastication and during vulcanization of the molded tire. There is little chemical change during the compounding, calendering, extrusion, and molding steps. Reclaiming is the process of converting scrap rubber into an unsaturated, processible product that can be vulcanized with sulfur. Pyrolysis of scrap rubber yields a complex mixture of liquids, gas, and residue in varying ratios dependent on the nature of the scrap and the conditions of pyrolysis. PMID:799964

  9. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-25

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  10. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Micromorphological characterization and label-free quantitation of small rubber particle protein in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Liu, Jiahui; Wu, Yanxia; You, Yawen; He, Jingyi; Zhang, Jichuan; Zhang, Liqun; Dong, Yiyang

    2016-04-15

    Commercial natural rubber is traditionally supplied by Hevea brasiliensis, but now there is a big energy problem because of the limited resource and increasing demand. Intensive study of key rubber-related substances is urgently needed for further research of in vitro biosynthesis of natural rubber. Natural rubber is biosynthesized on the surface of rubber particles. A membrane protein called small rubber particle protein (SRPP) is a key protein associated closely with rubber biosynthesis; however, SRPP in different plants has been only qualitatively studied, and there are no quantitative reports so far. In this work, H. brasiliensis was chosen as a model plant. The microscopic distribution of SRPP on the rubber particles during the washing process was investigated by transmission electron microscopy-immunogold labeling. A label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor was developed to quantify SRPP in H. brasiliensis for the first time. The immunosensor was then used to rapidly detect and analyze SRPP in dandelions and prickly lettuce latex samples. The label-free SPR immunosensor can be a desirable tool for rapid quantitation of the membrane protein SRPP, with excellent assay efficiency, high sensitivity, and high specificity. The method lays the foundation for further study of the functional relationship between SRPP and natural rubber content. PMID:26844871

  12. The rubber tree genome reveals new insights into rubber production and species adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chaorong; Yang, Meng; Fang, Yongjun; Luo, Yingfeng; Gao, Shenghan; Xiao, Xiaohu; An, Zewei; Zhou, Binhui; Zhang, Bing; Tan, Xinyu; Yeang, Hoong-Yeet; Qin, Yunxia; Yang, Jianghua; Lin, Qiang; Mei, Hailiang; Montoro, Pascal; Long, Xiangyu; Qi, Jiyan; Hua, Yuwei; He, Zilong; Sun, Min; Li, Wenjie; Zeng, Xia; Cheng, Han; Liu, Ying; Yang, Jin; Tian, Weimin; Zhuang, Nansheng; Zeng, Rizhong; Li, Dejun; He, Peng; Li, Zhe; Zou, Zhi; Li, Shuangli; Li, Chenji; Wang, Jixiang; Wei, Dong; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Luo, Wei; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Huang, Huasun

    2016-01-01

    The Para rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is an economically important tropical tree species that produces natural rubber, an essential industrial raw material. Here we present a high-quality genome assembly of this species (1.37 Gb, scaffold N50 = 1.28 Mb) that covers 93.8% of the genome (1.47 Gb) and harbours 43,792 predicted protein-coding genes. A striking expansion of the REF/SRPP (rubber elongation factor/small rubber particle protein) gene family and its divergence into several laticifer-specific isoforms seem crucial for rubber biosynthesis. The REF/SRPP family has isoforms with sizes similar to or larger than SRPP1 (204 amino acids) in 17 other plants examined, but no isoforms with similar sizes to REF1 (138 amino acids), the predominant molecular variant. A pivotal point in Hevea evolution was the emergence of REF1, which is located on the surface of large rubber particles that account for 93% of rubber in the latex (despite constituting only 6% of total rubber particles, large and small). The stringent control of ethylene synthesis under active ethylene signalling and response in laticifers resolves a longstanding mystery of ethylene stimulation in rubber production. Our study, which includes the re-sequencing of five other Hevea cultivars and extensive RNA-seq data, provides a valuable resource for functional genomics and tools for breeding elite Hevea cultivars. PMID:27255837

  13. Oils and rubber from arid land plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Hinman, C. W.

    1980-05-01

    In this article the economic development potentials of Cucurbita species (buffalo gourd and others), Simmondsia chinensis (jojoba), Euphorbia lathyris (gopher plant), and Parthenium argentatum (guayule) are discussed. All of these plants may become important sources of oils or rubber.

  14. Rubber compounding materials -- ground coal. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    This classification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee on Rubber and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D11.20 on Compounding Materials and Procedures. The current edition was approved March 15, 1193 and published in May 1993.

  15. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  16. The Pressure Curve for a Rubber Balloon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, D. R.; Weinhaus, F.

    1978-01-01

    Derives an equation relating the internal pressure of a rubber balloon to its radius. Shows that the theoretical pressure curve is experimentally verifiable, and discusses the problem of equilibrium configuration of two interconnected ballons. (Author/GA)

  17. Enhanced Stuffing Box Rubbers Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2002-07-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Scott's Oil Field Service tested an enhanced stuffing box rubber at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3. The enhanced stuffing box rubbers have saved money from not having to replace packing as often and not spilling valuable oil on the ground. A reduction in environmental hazards and the cost of cleaning up spilled oil have also been a benefit.

  18. Exploring the thermodynamics of a rubber band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Rogers, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We describe an upper-division experiment in thermal physics where students measure the tension of a rubber band as a function of temperature and length and use a Maxwell relation to find the change in internal energy and entropy for an isothermal stretch. This allows students to experimentally check the predictions of the entropic spring model for elastomers and observe that the entropy does indeed decrease as a rubber band is stretched.

  19. Fabrication and electrical properties of metal-coated acrylate rubber microspheres by electroless plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D. L.; Zhan, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    Electroless copper plating on micron-scale acrylate rubber (ACM) microspheres was studied. The core-shell structured Cu-coated ACM microspheres with high conductivity and low density were fabricated by introducing a reaction control method. Via multi-times activating treatment, the acrylate rubber (ACM) microspheres were implanted with more Ag catalytic active centers on the surfaces to promote the formation of coatings. The surface-coating structures and the electrical properties of Cu-coated ACM microspheres were investigated. It was found that the Cu-coated ACM microspheres were a kind of elastic particles. The different coating structures could be produced by controlling the extent of plating reaction. The coated microspheres with different coating structures were conductive, and their volume resistivities decreased remarkably with the increasing of applied pressure and varied with the temperature according to their surface coating structures.

  20. Biomimetic surface-conducting silicone rubber obtained by physical deposition of MWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylka, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents a minimal approach to produce superhydrophobic, surface-conducting silicone rubber with a strongly developed surface modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes partially embedded in the silicone elastic matrix. The modification was achieved by physical deposition of carbon nanotube powder on a semi-liquid silicone rubber surface prior to its cross-linking. The resulting biomimetic material displayed superhydrophobic properties (static wetting angle >160°, sliding angle ∼10°), as well as elevated electric surface resistance (surface resistivity approx 18 kΩ). A piezoresistive hysteretic response with nonmonotonic change of the surface resistance accompanying substantial linear stretching was also demonstrated in the developed specimens displaying negative resistance change in a broad range of extension ratios, making them applicable as highly compliant, large-specific-area electrodes.

  1. An Approximate Dissipation Function for Large Strain Rubber Thermo-Mechanical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2003-01-01

    Mechanically induced viscoelastic dissipation is difficult to compute. When the constitutive model is defined by history integrals, the formula for dissipation is a double convolution integral. Since double convolution integrals are difficult to approximate, coupled thermo-mechanical analyses of highly viscous rubber-like materials cannot be made with most commercial finite element software. In this study, we present a method to approximate the dissipation for history integral constitutive models that represent Maxwell-like materials without approximating the double convolution integral. The method requires that the total stress can be separated into elastic and viscous components, and that the relaxation form of the constitutive law is defined with a Prony series. Numerical data is provided to demonstrate the limitations of this approximate method for determining dissipation. Rubber cylinders with imbedded steel disks and with an imbedded steel ball are dynamically loaded, and the nonuniform heating within the cylinders is computed.

  2. Adding crumb rubber into exterior wall materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Thong-On, Norasit; Zhang, Xiong

    2002-10-01

    In Arizona US, most houses are built with walls covered by stuccos/coatings/mortars. This paper presents an explorative investigation of adding crumb rubber into stuccos/coatings/mortars. A series of experiments are conducted to examine the thermal and mechanical performance of the crumb rubber mixes. The results show that, the mixes with crumb rubber do exhibit more desirable performances like being high in crack-resistance and thermal insulation, and low in thermal expansion/contraction. The drawback for the crumb rubber mixes is the reduction in compressive strength, but which can be compensated by other means. As a site experiment, an area of 100 square-feet of crumb rubber coatings for two mix designs is sprayed on a tire-adobe wall. After being sprayed more than 14 months, the coatings apparently are in good condition. Significance of this study is that this practice, if accepted, will yield improved products that consume large quantities of crumb rubber. PMID:12498477

  3. Rubber linings -- Overview and new technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, L.; Polaski, E.L.; Lewis, R.K.; Mauri, A.

    1995-12-01

    The authors have covered at some length the basic steps involved in rubber lining. They have talked about the progress made in adhesives for lining. The new system in use now is far superior to previous systems. The new systems and the developments going on towards water-based adhesives are discussed. The authors briefly brought up the various types of rubber materials and new developments in terms of chlorobutyl-faced three-ply rubbers as well as development of EPDM-based compounds in Europe. The methods of vulcanization used have been discussed, including hot air vulcanizing which is prevalent in Europe. The development of self-vulcanizing rubber and the advantages in use of pre-cured rubber have been described. The development of new methods, techniques and products for rubber lining has been slow but sure. As can be expected, new product development costs are huge, requiring expert attention and participation. The possibilities are limitless and effort is forthcoming from various sources. There is a need for an interchange of ideas, and the involvement of NACE International and other professional bodies is acknowledged and appreciated.

  4. Pseudo-Casimir stresses and elasticity of a confined elastomer film.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-05-11

    Investigations of the elastic behavior of bulk elastomers have traditionally proceeded on the basis of classical rubber elasticity, which regards chains as thermally fluctuating but disregards the thermal fluctuations of the cross-links. Herein, we consider an incompressible and flat elastomer film of an axisymmetric shape confined between two large hard co-planar substrates, with the axis of the film perpendicular to the substrates. We address the impact that thermal fluctuations of the cross-links have on the free energy of elastic deformation of the system, subject to the requirement that the fluctuating elastomer cannot detach from the substrates. We examine the behavior of the deformation free energy for one case where a rigid pinning boundary condition is applied to a class of elastic fluctuations at the confining surfaces, and another case where the same elastic fluctuations are subjected to soft "gluing" potentials. We find that there can be significant departures (both quantitative and qualitative) from the prediction of classical rubber elasticity theory when elastic fluctuations are included. Finally, we compare the character of the attractive part of the elastic fluctuation-induced, or pseudo-Casimir, stress with the standard thermal Casimir stress in confined but non-elastomeric systems, finding the same power law decay behavior when a rigid pinning boundary condition is applied; for the case of the gluing potential, we find that the leading order correction to the attractive part of the fluctuation stress decays inversely with the inter-substrate separation. PMID:27079513

  5. A calculation method for torsional vibration of a crankshafting system with a conventional rubber damper by considering rubber form

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Tomoaki; Honda, Yasuhiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko; Iwamoto, Shoichi

    1996-09-01

    The cheap and compact rubber dampers of shear-type have been widely employed as the torsional vibration control of the crankshaft system of high-speed, automobile diesel engines. The conventional rubber dampers have various rubber forms owing to the thorough investigation of optimum dampers in the design stage. Their rubber forms can be generally grouped into three classes such as the disk type, the bush type and the composite type. The disk type and the bush type rubber dampers are called the basic-pattern rubber dampers hereafter. The composite type rubber part is supposed to consist of the disk type and the bush type parts, regarded respectively as the basic patterns of the rubber part, at large. The dynamic characteristics of the vibration isolator rubber depend generally on temperature, frequency, strain amplitude, shape and size effect,s so it is difficult to estimate accurately their characteristics. With the present technical level, it is also difficult to determine the suitable rubber geometry which optimizes the vibration control effect. The study refers to the calculation method of the torsional vibration of a crankshaft system with a shear-type rubber damper having various rubber forms in order to offer the useful method for optimum design. In this method, the rheological formula of the three-element Maxwell model, from which the torsional stiffness and the damping coefficient of the damper rubber part in the equivalent vibration system are obtained, are adopted in order to decide the dynamic characteristics of the damper rubber part.

  6. Combination biological and microwave treatments of used rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.; Wicks, George G.

    2002-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds altered by biotreatment with thermophillic microorganisms selected from natural isolates from hot sulfur springs. Following the biotreatment, microwave radiation is used to further treat the surface and to treat the bulk interior of the crumb rubber. The resulting combined treatments render the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels and sizes of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures and good properties obtained from the new recycled products.

  7. Preliminary validation of Sm-Fe-N magnetic silicone rubber for a flexible magnetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Takanori; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for a flexible magnetic actuator (FMA) using Sm-Fe-N magnetic silicone rubber (MSR) that has a higher degree of freedom (DOF) in shape, flexibility, ease of fabrication and combinative ability than permanent magnets. To verify its potential for use in an FMA, we examined its magnetic and elastic properties and focused on magnetic torque control within a uniform rotating magnetic field. Silicone rubber liquid and hardener were mixed with Sm-Fe-N powder and poured into a mold. The fabricated Sm-Fe-N MSR included Sm-Fe-N powder of 13.5, 17.3, and 21.2 vol% ratio. The physical and elastic properties were determined by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and elastic load, respectively. Furthermore, we fabricated two FMAs (multiple-magnetic anisotropy type and spiral-type), and evaluated the suitability of the Sm-Fe-N MSR for magnetic wireless actuators based on magnetic torque control.

  8. Elastic properties of hollow colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoldesi, C. I.; Ivanovska, I. L.; Quilliet, C.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Imhof, A.

    2008-11-01

    The elastic properties of micrometer-sized hollow colloidal particles obtained by emulsion templating are probed by nanoindentation measurements in which point forces are applied to solvent-filled particles supported on a flat substrate. We show that the shells respond linearly up to forces of 7-21nN , where the indentation becomes of the order of the shell thickness (20-40nm) . In the linear region, the particle deformation is reversible. The measured Young’s modulus (˜200MPa) is comparable to values for stiff rubbers or soft polymers. At larger applied force, we observe a crossover into a nonlinear regime, where the shells assume a buckled shape. Here, the force increases approximately as the square root of the indentation, in agreement with the theory of elasticity of thin shells. We also observe permanent deformation of the shells after probing them repetitively beyond the linear regime. Finally, the measured elastic properties of the shells nicely explain their spontaneous buckling in solution and due to drying.

  9. New rubber qualification for the igniter adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humpherys, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Kirkhill Rubber Company (KRC) has informed Thiokol Corporation that two raw materials used in the asbestos and silica filled acrylonitrile butadience rubber (NBR) formulation per STW 2621 are no longer available from their vendors. Agerite White (Di-beta-naphthyl-paraphenylene diamine), manufactured by B. F. Goodrich, is an antioxidant used in NBR. This raw material makes up roughly 1-2 percent of the finished product. KRC proposed that this raw material be replaced by Agerite Stalite S (mixture of octylated diphenylamines) distributed by R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Protox-166 zinc oxide, manufactured by Zinc Corporation of America, is an activator currently used in NBR. This material also makes up about 1-2 percent of the finished material. Protox-166 is an American process grade zinc oxide. It is proposed by KRC to replace Protox-166 with Kadox-930C, a French process grade zinc oxide. American process grades have an ASTM minimum purity of 99.0 percent; the French process grades have a minimum purity of 99.5 percent. Previous testing per WTP-0270 has demonstrated that the mechanical and thermal properties of the rubber with the new ingredients are comparable to the 'old' rubber. The test results are reported in TWR-61790. One igniter adapter, Part no. 7U77562-02 serial no. 2 was insulated per ETP-1206 using the new rubber formulation and a modified lay up and cure method to demonstrate that there is no impact on this process. The results of this demonstration are reported.

  10. Investigation of natural latex rubber gloves

    SciTech Connect

    Vessel, E.M.

    1993-03-19

    Seventy five percent of natural latex rubber gloves used in laboratories at the Savannah River Site are not reused. A cost analysis performed by the SRS Procurement Department determined that a net savings of $1,092,210 could be achieved annually by recycling latex rubber gloves. The Materials Technology Section, at the request of the Procurement Department, examined some mechanical and chemical properties of latex rubber gloves manufactured by Ansell Edmont, which had been purchased by the site specifications for protective clothing. It also examined mechanical properties of re-cycled gloves purchased by specifications and of {open_quotes}off the shelf{close_quotes} gloves manufactured by North Brothers Company. Finally, water vapor transmission studies, simulating tritium permeation, were performed on gloves from both manufacturers. These studies were performed to determine whether latex rubber gloves can be recycled or whether using only new, unwashed gloves is required in areas where tritium exposure is a possibility. The results of these studies indicate that the acceptable glove characteristics, required in the WSRC Manual 5Q1.11, Protective Clothing Specifications, are not adversely affected after washing and drying the gloves manufactured by Ansell Edmont for seven cycles. Results also indicate that natural latex rubber gloves manufactured by North Brothers comply with most of the acceptable glove characteristics specified in the WSRC Manual 5Q1.11. Statistical analysis of the water vapor permeation data show that there is no correlation between permeation rates and the manufacturer.

  11. On Optimizing an Archibald Rubber-Band Heat Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, J. G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the criteria and procedure for optimizing the performance of Archibald rubber-band heat engines by using the appropriate choice of dimensions, minimizing frictional torque, maximizing torque and balancing the rubber band system. (GA)

  12. Evaluation of synergy in tire rubber-coal coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Mastral, A.M.; Mayoral, M.C.; Murillo, R.; Callen, M.; Garcia, T.; Tejero, M.P.; Torres, N.

    1998-09-01

    The tire rubber-coal synergy is evaluated through the different roles that rubber can have in coprocessing systems. For that, two different experimental designs were used: a swept fixed-bed reactor and tubing bomb minireactors. In this way, coal was coprocessed with rubber liquids from rubber pyrolysis and rubber hydrogenation, in a hydrogen atmosphere at 400 C. Coal was mixed as well with rubber in different proportions and hydrogenated at 375, 400, and 425 C, and oils obtained were characterized by thin-layer chromatography to obtain hydrocarbon type composition. Rubber behavior was compared to each of the main components of tires, and all the results indicated that the slight synergy found can be due to the small free radicals from vulcanized rubber decomposition, which are able to stabilize coal radicals to light products.

  13. Insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations in the mining industry. [elastodynamic response of rubber insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeveleanu, C.

    1974-01-01

    The insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations is considered for some ore preparing and sorting implements: rotary crushers, resonance screens, hammer mills, etc. The appearance of subharmonic vibrations is analyzed, and the conditions for their appearance are determined. A method is given for calculating the insulation of these vibrations by means of elastic elements made of rubber. The insulation of the random vibrations produced by Symons crushers is calculated by determining the transmissability and deformation of the insulation system for a narrow band random response.

  14. Effects of preparation process on performance of rubber modified asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanbing; Luo, Guobao; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo

    2015-06-01

    The rational utilization of waste rubber tire is essential for the environmental protection. Utilizing rubber particles to modify asphalt can not only improve asphalt performance, but also help the recycling of waste materials. Considering the effect of different preparation process parameters on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, this paper analyzes the effects of the shear temperature, shear time and shear rate on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, and provided a reference for its preparation.

  15. Use of scrap rubber in asphalt pavement surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Robert A.; Roberts, Richard J.; Blackburn, Robert R.

    1991-12-01

    Scrap tire rubber was mixed into an asphalt concrete wearing course to study the effect of ice disbonding from the pavement surface under traffic. Rubber contents of 0, 3, 6, and 12 percent by weight were studied. Initial laboratory ice disbonding test results led to the development of a new paving material, Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC), that uses larger pieces of rubber in a much denser asphalt concrete mix. Strength values doubled and ice disbonding performance was enhanced.

  16. Estimating the Degree of Cross-Linking in Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Degree of cross-linking or network chain concentration of rubber estimated with aid of new method. Quantity is needed in studies of mechanical behavior of rubber. New method is based on finding rubber follows different stress/ strain relationships in extension and retraction. When rubber specimen is stretched to given extension ration and released. Stress-vs-strain curve follows two paths: one for extension and other for retraction.

  17. [Contemporary state of work conditions and occupational morbidity of workers engaged into rubber, mechanical rubber and tire industries].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, E G; Galiullina, É F; Samsonov, V M; Kudriavtsev, V P; Davletgareeva, G R; Shakirova, É D; Khasanov, B G; Buliakov, R T; Kamilov, R F; Shakirov, D F

    2014-01-01

    Based on analysis of materials provided by occupational safety department PC "UZEMiK" and JSC "Kauchuk", the authors evaluate contemporary work conditions and occupational morbidity in workers engaged into rubber, mechanical rubber and tyre industries. PMID:25335420

  18. Anaerobic desulfurization of ground rubber with the thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus--a new method for rubber recycling.

    PubMed

    Bredberg, K; Persson, J; Christiansson, M; Stenberg, B; Holst, O

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic sulfur-reducing archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated regarding its capacity to desulfurize rubber material. The microorganism's sensitivity towards common rubber elastomers and additives was tested and several were shown to be toxic to P. furiosus. The microorganism was shown to utilize sulfur in vulcanized natural rubber and an increase in cell density was obtained when cultivated in the presence of spent tire rubber. Ethanol-leached cryo-ground tire rubber treated with P. furiosus for 10 days was vulcanized together with virgin rubber material (15% w/w) and the mechanical properties of the resulting material were determined. The increase in the stress at break value and the decrease in swell ratio and stress relaxation rate obtained for material containing microbially treated rubber (compared to untreated material) show the positive effects of microbial desulfurization on rubber. PMID:11234957

  19. Anomalous crack propagation in reinforced natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotta, Paul; Gabrielle, Brice; Long, Didier; Vanel, Loic; Albouy, Pierre-Antoine; Peditto, Francesca

    2009-03-01

    In reinforced natural rubber, crack propagation in mode I exhibits rotation of the tear in a direction perpendicular to the usual one. Our objective is, first, to understand the impact of this phenomenon on fracture toughness of the material, and, secondly, to understand how this phenomenon is related to the specific properties of reinforced natural rubber. To this aim, we combine measurements of ultimate properties, measurements of the number and length of tear rotations as a function of loading velocity and temperature, and investigation of material heterogeneities at sub-micrometric scales, originating both from fillers and strain-induced crystallites (strain-induced crystallinity is measured up to failure by X ray diffraction), in natural rubber samples reinforced by nanometric aggregates. Observations suggest that tear rotation is related both to the mechanical anisotropy induced by strain-induced crystallinity and to the dissipative properties of the material at high strain.

  20. Coatings for rubber bonding and paint adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, M. S.; Petschel, M.

    1997-08-01

    Conversion coatings form an important base for the adhesion of paint to metal substrates and for the bonding of rubber to metal parts. Four types of conversion coatings were assessed as base treatments for the bonding of rubber to steel and for the corrosion protection of metal substrates under paint: amorphous iron phosphate, heavy zinc phosphate, and three types of modified zinc phosphates that utilized one or more metal cations in addition to zinc. When applied, these conversion coatings formed a thin film over the metal substrate that was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and chemical methods. The performance of the coatings was assessed using physical methods such as dry adhesion, conical mandrel, impact, and stress adhesion for the rubber-bonded parts, and by corrosion resistance methods such as humidity, salt spray, and cyclic corrosion. Coating characterization and performance were correlated.

  1. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves...

  2. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves...

  3. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves...

  4. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves...

  5. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  6. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  7. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  8. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  9. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  10. Natural Rubber Biosynthesis and a Profitable Guayule Crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is a biopolymer apparently synthesized in plants by a membrane-bound rubber transferase protein complex. The kinetic features of rubber transfereases make them a distinct class of cis-prenyl transferases. The structure of the particular allylic pyrophosphate in...

  11. Interface interactions of natural rubber and protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical properties of natural rubber are improved with a renewable filler for rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of the natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced ...

  12. Modified Silicone-Rubber Tooling For Molding Composite Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Snoha, John J.; Weiser, Erik S.

    1995-01-01

    Reduced-thermal-expansion, reduced-bulk-modulus silicone rubber for use in mold tooling made by incorporating silica powder into silicone rubber. Pressure exerted by thermal expansion reduced even further by allowing air bubbles to remain in silicone rubber instead of deaerating it. Bubbles reduce bulk modulus of material.

  13. Bonding soft rubber or plasticized elastomers to metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; White, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Approach using bond-cover coat of unplasticized rubber between soft rubber and adhesive eliminates diffusion problem. Approach is useful in making improved seals in automobile engines, industrial and public plumbing, and in other areas using soft-rubber-to-metal bonds. Seals and gaskets made this way would not have to be replaced very often, reducing cost of maintenance.

  14. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves (lineman's... be used and tested in accordance with the provisions of §§ 77.704-6 through 77.704-8. (b)...

  15. A sustainability review of domestic rubber from the guayule plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is an arid-adapted, low-input perennial shrub native to Mexico and southern Texas that has received considerable attention as an alternative source of natural rubber. It has potential to replace the most common types of rubbers, including synthetic rubber derived...

  16. Development of Crops To Produce Industrially Useful Natural Rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is an essential industrial commodity that most developed countries have to import. Hevea brasiliensis, grown in tropical and subtropical areas is the primary source of natural rubber. The goal of our work is to develop rubber-producing crops suitable for culti...

  17. Development of crops to produce industrially useful natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is an essential industrial commodity that most developed countries have to import. Hevea brasiliensis (Hevea), grown in tropical and subtropical areas is the primary source of natural rubber. The high quality and quantity of the rubber cause us to focus on und...

  18. Coliquefaction of waste rubber tires with coal

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, E.C.; Tuntawiroon, W.

    1994-12-31

    There is an interest in the conversion of coal to liquid fuels because of the abundant supply of coal and the diminishing reserves of petroleum. Standard coal liquefaction techniques utilize H{sub 2} gas as a source of hydrogen to cap the radical species produced during liquefaction. Waste materials such as plastics, oils, and rubber tires with a high hydrogen content could be an alternative source of hydrogen that, in principle, could be transferred from the waste materials to the coal during liquefaction. An added benefit of such a program of waste material utilization would be a diminution in materials disposed of in landfills or incinerators. Rubber tires are approximately one third by weight carbon black. Farcasiu and Smith have shown that carbon black increases yields in coal liquefaction. Since carbon black is one of the top fifty chemicals produced in America during 1993 (3.22 billion pounds) the recovery and reuse of carbon black from tires could become economically attractive. Giavarini has shown in recent work that carbon black could be reclaimed and activated to produce quality carbon blacks after pyrolyzing waste rubber tires. Rubber tires also contain zinc oxide which is added as a filler and also aids in the vulcanization of the rubber. Waste plastics contain many metals used for coloring, waste oils contain metals acquired while used as a lubricant, and waste rubber tires contain zinc. A past investigation suggested that coal undergoing liquefaction may act as a {open_quotes}scavenger{close_quotes} for heavy metals. The ability of coal to trap metals will be discussed in the present paper. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) is a technique which can map the dispersion of an element within a sample by the detection of characteristic X-rays. Using EPMA, samples of the insoluble fraction produced by the coliquefaction experiments were analyzed to determine whether several heavy elements of interest were trapped in coal particles.

  19. Nonlinear elasticity, fluctuations and heterogeneity of nematic elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Xiangjun Radzihovsky, Leo

    2008-01-15

    Liquid crystal elastomers realize a fascinating new form of soft matter that is a composite of a conventional crosslinked polymer gel (rubber) and a liquid crystal. These solid liquid crystal amalgams, quite similarly to their (conventional, fluid) liquid crystal counterparts, can spontaneously partially break translational and/or orientational symmetries, accompanied by novel soft Goldstone modes. As a consequence, these materials can exhibit unconventional elasticity characterized by symmetry-enforced vanishing of some elastic moduli. Thus, a proper description of such solids requires an essential modification of the classical elasticity theory. In this work, we develop a rotationally invariant, nonlinear theory of elasticity for the nematic phase of ideal liquid crystal elastomers. We show that it is characterized by soft modes, corresponding to a combination of long wavelength shear deformations of the solid network and rotations of the nematic director field. We study thermal fluctuations of these soft modes in the presence of network heterogeneities and show that they lead to a large variety of anomalous elastic properties, such as singular length-scale dependent shear elastic moduli, a divergent elastic constant for splay distortion of the nematic director, long-scale incompressibility, universal Poisson ratios and a nonlinear stress-strain relation for arbitrary small strains. These long-scale elastic properties are universal, controlled by a nontrivial zero-temperature fixed point and constitute a qualitative breakdown of the classical elasticity theory in nematic elastomers. Thus, nematic elastomers realize a stable 'critical phase', characterized by universal power-law correlations, akin to a critical point of a continuous phase transition, but extending over an entire phase.

  20. The role of the small rubber particle protein in determining rubber yields and polymer length in Russian dandelion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several proteins have been identified and implicated in natural rubber biosynthesis, one of which, the small rubber particle protein (SRPP), was originally identified in Hevea brasiliensis as an abundant protein associated with cytosolic vesicles known as rubber particles. While previous in vitro s...

  1. Kinetics of zinc release from ground tire rubber and rubber ash in a calcareous soil as alternatives to Zn fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground rubber contains 15-20 g Zn/kg but very low levels of Cd and could serve as an inexpensive byproduct Zn fertilizer. The aim of this investigation was to test the kinetics of Zn release in a soil treated with ground tire rubber and rubber ash compared with commercial Zn fertilizer and a labora...

  2. Radiation-induced vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene-butadiene rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Patil, N. D.; Dubey, K. A.; Kumar, Virendra; Sabharwal, S.

    2005-04-01

    Radiation vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene butadiene rubber latex (SBRL) has been investigated. The cast films were characterised for their swelling properties, tensile strength and thermal stability as a function of radiation dose as well as SBRL content. The gel content, tensile strength and thermal stability of the copolymer films were found to increase with increasing the SBRL content in the feed solution and radiation dose.

  3. Enzymatic synthesis of rubber polymer in Hevea brasiliensis

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, F.; Hu, S.; Benedict, C.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Light and Dennis purified serum soluble rubber transferase from Hevea latex to homogeneity. Prenyl transferase co-purified with rubber transferase. In the absence of washed rubber particles (WRP) the prenyl transferase catalyzed the formation of trans FPP from DMAPP and IPP. In the presence of WRP the transferase catalyzed cis additions of IPP to pre-existing rubber chains. Control mixtures of WRP, Mg{sup 2+} and FPP were not included to test for the contributions of the bound rubber transferase on WRP to the incorporation of IPP into polyisoprene. Bound rubber transferase catalyzes the repetitive addition of IPP to allylic-PP starter molecules to form polyisoprene. The order of utilization of allylic-PP starters was GGPP > FPP > GPP > DMAPP. The authors have shown that the polyisoprene enzymatically synthesized on WRP is a bimodal polymer consisting of different mol wt rubber chains similar to the polymeric characteristics of natural rubber. The bound rubber transferase was solubilized with Chaps and purified on DEAE-cellulose. The polymerization reaction catalyzed by the purified preparation showed a 98% requirement for pre-existing rubber chains. Results suggest that the prenyl transferase from Hevea serum may be part of the polymer starter system furnishing allylic-PP for the bound rubber transferase.

  4. Natural rubber (NR) biosynthesis: perspectives from polymer chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Barkakaty, Balaka

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber is an important strategic raw material for manufacturing a wide variety of industrial products. There are at least 2,500 different latex-producing plant species; however, only Hevea brasiliensis (the Brazilian rubber tree) is a commercial source. The chemical structure of natural rubber is cis-1,4-polyisoprene, but the exact structure of the head and end groups remains unknown. Since synthetic cis-1,4-polyisoprenes cannot match the superior properties of natural rubber, understanding the chemistry behind the biosynthetic process is key to finding a possible replacement. T his chapter summarizes our current understandings from the perspective of a polymer scientist by comparing synthetic polyisoprenes to natural rubber. The chapter also highlights biomimetic polymerization, research towards a synthetic match of natural rubber and the role of natural rubber in health care.

  5. Hardness and compression resistance of natural rubber and synthetic rubber mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguello, J. M.; Santos, A.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to mechanically characterize through compression resistance and shore hardness tests, the mixture of hevea brasiliensis natural rubber with butadiene synthetic rubber (BR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer rubber (EPDM). For each of the studied mixtures were performed 10 tests, each of which increased by 10% the content of synthetic rubber in the mixture; each test consisted of carrying out five tests of compression resistance and five tests of shore hardness. The specimens were vulcanized on a temperature of 160°C, during an approximate time of 15 minutes, and the equipment used in the performance of the mechanical tests were a Shimadzu universal machine and a digital durometer. The results show that the A shore hardness increases directly proportional, with a linear trend, with the content of synthetic BR, SBR or EPDM rubber present in the mixture, being the EPDM the most influential. With respect to the compression resistance is observed that the content of BR or SBR increase this property directly proportional through a linear trend; while the EPDM content also increases but with a polynomial trend.

  6. The rubber tree genome shows expansion of gene family associated with rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Taylor, Todd D; Kondo, Shinji; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Matsui, Minami

    2016-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg, a member of the family Euphorbiaceae, is the sole natural resource exploited for commercial production of high-quality natural rubber. The properties of natural rubber latex are almost irreplaceable by synthetic counterparts for many industrial applications. A paucity of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of rubber biosynthesis in high yield traits still persists. Here we report the comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the widely planted H. brasiliensis clone, RRIM 600. The genome was assembled based on ~155-fold combined coverage with Illumina and PacBio sequence data and has a total length of 1.55 Gb with 72.5% comprising repetitive DNA sequences. A total of 84,440 high-confidence protein-coding genes were predicted. Comparative genomic analysis revealed strong synteny between H. brasiliensis and other Euphorbiaceae genomes. Our data suggest that H. brasiliensis's capacity to produce high levels of latex can be attributed to the expansion of rubber biosynthesis-related genes in its genome and the high expression of these genes in latex. Using cap analysis gene expression data, we illustrate the tissue-specific transcription profiles of rubber biosynthesis-related genes, revealing alternative means of transcriptional regulation. Our study adds to the understanding of H. brasiliensis biology and provides valuable genomic resources for future agronomic-related improvement of the rubber tree. PMID:27339202

  7. The rubber tree genome shows expansion of gene family associated with rubber biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Taylor, Todd D.; Kondo, Shinji; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Matsui, Minami

    2016-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg, a member of the family Euphorbiaceae, is the sole natural resource exploited for commercial production of high-quality natural rubber. The properties of natural rubber latex are almost irreplaceable by synthetic counterparts for many industrial applications. A paucity of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of rubber biosynthesis in high yield traits still persists. Here we report the comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the widely planted H. brasiliensis clone, RRIM 600. The genome was assembled based on ~155-fold combined coverage with Illumina and PacBio sequence data and has a total length of 1.55 Gb with 72.5% comprising repetitive DNA sequences. A total of 84,440 high-confidence protein-coding genes were predicted. Comparative genomic analysis revealed strong synteny between H. brasiliensis and other Euphorbiaceae genomes. Our data suggest that H. brasiliensis’s capacity to produce high levels of latex can be attributed to the expansion of rubber biosynthesis-related genes in its genome and the high expression of these genes in latex. Using cap analysis gene expression data, we illustrate the tissue-specific transcription profiles of rubber biosynthesis-related genes, revealing alternative means of transcriptional regulation. Our study adds to the understanding of H. brasiliensis biology and provides valuable genomic resources for future agronomic-related improvement of the rubber tree. PMID:27339202

  8. Carboxy terminated rubber based on natural rubber grafted with acid anhydrides and its adhesion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinpituksa, P.; Kongkalai, P.; Kaesaman, A.

    2014-08-01

    The chemical modification of natural rubber by grafting of various polar functional molecules is an essential method, improving the versatility of rubber in applications. This research investigated the preparation of natural rubber-graft-citraconic anhydride (NR-g-CCA), natural rubber-graft-itaconic anhydride (NR-g-ICA), and natural rubber-graft-maleic anhydride (NR-g-MA), with the anhydrides grafted to natural rubber in toluene using benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. Variations of monomer content, initiator content, temperature and reaction time of the grafting copolymerization were investigated. The maximum degrees of grafting were 1.06% for NR-g-CCA, 4.66% for NR-g-ICA, and 5.03% for NR-g-MA, reached using 10 phr citraconic anhydride, 10 phr of itaconic anhydride, or 8 phr of maleic anhydride, 3 phr benzoyl peroxide, at 85, 80 and 80°C for 2, 2 and 3 hrs, respectively. Solvent-based wood adhesives were formulated from these copolymers with various contents of wood resin in the range 10-40 phr. The maximal 289 N/in cleavage peel and 245.7 KPa shear strength for NR-g-MA (5.03% grafting) were obtained at 40 phr wood resin.

  9. Preparation of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers from natural rubber vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonsawat, Worapong; Poompradub, Sirilux; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a series of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers were prepared by aqueous phase oxidation of natural rubber vulcanizates in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and formic acid (HCOOH). The starting vulcanizates were neatly prepared via an efficient vulcanization (EV) system by varying mass ratio of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), as an accelerator, to sulfur. The oxidation conditions were controlled at the molar ratio of H2O2: HCOOH = 1:1, the concentration of H2O2 = 15 wt.%, the temperature = 50 °C, and the reaction time = 3 h. The rubber materials before and after the oxidation were characterized for their physicochemical properties by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, bomb calorimetry, acid-base titration and swelling measurements. The results indicated the presence of sulfonic acid group in the oxidized rubbers, generated by the oxidative cleaves of sulfide crosslinks in the rubber vulcanizates. The oxidation decreased the sulfur content of the rubber in which the level of sulfur loss was determined by the CBS/sulfur ratio. Moreover, the acidity of the oxidized products was correlated with the amount of sulfur remaining.

  10. Bacterial degradation of natural and synthetic rubber.

    PubMed

    Bode, H B; Kerkhoff, K; Jendrossek, D

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of natural rubber (NR), synthetic poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) (SR), and cross-linked NR (latex gloves) by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was analyzed by weight loss, gel permeation chromatography, and determination of the protein content. Weight losses of 11-18% and an increase in protein up to 850 microg/mL after incubation of Nocardia sp. DSMZ43191, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces griseus, bacterial isolate 18a, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Xanthomonas sp. with latex gloves as a carbon source indicated degradation of the polymer. An increase of protein up to 1250 microg/mL was obtained upon incubation of the bacteria with SR. No or only little weight losses and no increase in the protein content were found for nondegrading control strains such as Streptomyces lividans and Streptomyces exfoliatus and for mutants of degrading strains of S. coelicolor and S. griseus, which have been identified by their inability to produce clearing zones on opaque latex agar. Measurement of the average molecular weight of synthetic rubber before and after degradation showed a time-dependent shift to lower values for the degrading strains. Diketone derivates of oligo(cis-1,4-isoprene) were identified as metabolites of rubber degradation. An oxidative degradation pathway of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) to acetyl-coenzymeA and propionyl-coenzymeA by beta-oxidation is suggested for bacterial degradation of isoprene rubber. PMID:11749186

  11. Why Do Calculators Have Rubber Feet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our students like using the covers of their TI graphing calculators in an inquiry-based extension of a traditional exercise that challenges their preconceived ideas about friction. Biology major Fiona McGraw (Fig. 1) is obviously excited about the large coefficient of static friction ([mu][subscript s] = 1.3) for the four little rubber feet on her…

  12. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  13. Why Do Calculators Have Rubber Feet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-09-01

    Our students like using the covers of their TI graphing calculators in an inquiry-based extension of a traditional exercise that challenges their preconceived ideas about friction. Biology major Fiona McGraw (Fig. 1) is obviously excited about the large coefficient of static friction (μs = 1.3) for the four little rubber feet on her TI calculator cover. The angle of repose of 53° is three times the value she just obtained for a wood block on the same plane. That block fits nicely inside her calculator cover. By using the string already attached to the block, the cover with the block inside can be pulled along the board at a constant speed to obtain the coefficient of kinetic friction μk for rubber on wood (Fig. 2). Results vary with the age and condition of the rubber feet. Observations with only three rubber feet on some covers help to reinforce the idea that the friction force is independent of the area of the surface in contact. (Students first study the effect of area by working with the wood block on its wide side and then on its narrow side.)

  14. The blue rubber bleb [corrected] nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    The blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, a rare condition characterized by lesions of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and other parts of the body, can result in serious gastrointestinal bleeding and other adverse results and be challenging to manage. The clinical features and treatment of this rare disorder are reviewed here. PMID:19518008

  15. FTIR investigation into Degradation of Natural Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Ryan; Waldek Zerda, T.

    2006-10-01

    The aging of tires is of the highest concerns to the automotive industry, due to its implications in fuel economy and automobile safety. Previously, the high absorption rate of carbon black filled polymers has hindered the use of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in studying this occurrence. However, recent developments in attenuated total reflection (ATR) techniques have provided a means for spectroscopically monitoring the composition changes induced in rubber blends by heat, exposure to ultra-violet radiation, and mechanical strain. The ATR apparatus, employing a germanium crystal, collected high quality infrared spectra at a reduced penetration depth of less than one micron. This research analyzed natural polymer blends with varied aggregate size and concentration of carbon black. The samples were analyzed as a function of exposure time to 70 C heat and UV radiation, as well elongation by mechanical strain. In these spectra, growth of the 1740cm-1 peak is assigned to increase populations of the C=O band. Carbon black filler rubber is shown to slow the rate of oxidation in pure natural rubber. Crystallization of rubber composites under strain is characterized by changes in the shapes of the CH stretch bands.

  16. Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Vulcanizates

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchii, Akio; Suzuki, Tomoo; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    An actinomycete, Nocardia sp. strain 835A, grows well on unvulcanized natural rubber and synthetic isoprene rubber, but not on other types of synthetic rubber. Not only unvulcanized but also various kinds of vulcanized natural rubber products were more or less utilized by the organism as the sole source of carbon and energy. The thin film from a latex glove was rapidly degraded, and the weight loss reached 75% after a 2-week cultivation period. Oligomers with molecular weights from 104 to 103 were accumulated during microbial growth on the latex glove. The partially purified oligomers were examined by infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the spectra were those expected of cis-1, 4-polyisoprene with the structure, OHC—CH2—[—CH2—C(—CH3)=CH —CH2—]n—CH2—C(=O)— CH3, with average values of n of about 114 and 19 for the two oligomers. PMID:16346923

  17. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  18. Reinforcement of graphene in natural rubber nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Kamal, M. M.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we report the use of graphene as multi-functional nanofiller for natural rubber (NR). Dispersion of reduced graphene into natural rubber (NR) was found to enhance the mechanical and electrical properties of NR. Through a facile approach rubber molecules are successfully grafted onto the surface of graphene. Stable graphene suspension with NR afforded a weblike morphology consisting of platelet networks between the rubber particles, while internal mixer processing broke down this structure, yielding a homogeneous and improved dispersion. The resulting graphene can be dispersed in NR via dry mixing. It is found that graphene is prominent in improving the mechanical properties of NR at low filler loading. The percolation point of graphene in the nanocomposites takes place at a content of less than 0.1 wt%. With incorporation of as low as 0.1 wt% of graphene, an increase in the tensile strength and improvement in the tensile modulus achieved. The improvement in the mechanical properties of NR nanocomposites at such low filler loading is attributed to the strong interfacial interaction and the molecular-level dispersion of graphene in the NR matrix. .

  19. Rubber valve seal with tough skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Curing technique for producing variable viscosity seal has hard sealing surface supported by softer rubber. Valve seal is clamped between two jaws for curing with hotter jaw at temperature of approximately 350 F and lower at room temperature. Result is durable tight valve-seat.

  20. Chemical changes in rubber allergens during vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Bergendorff, Ola; Persson, Christina; Lüdtke, Anna; Hansson, Christer

    2007-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis to rubber is caused by residues of chemicals used in manufacturing a rubber product. Several different additives are used to achieve a final product of the desired characteristics. Accelerators such as thiurams, dithiocarbamates, and mercaptobenzothiazoles are often among the additives responsible for allergic reactions recognized by dermatologists. The chemistry of the vulcanization process is complicated; as it occurs at an elevated temperature with a mixture of reactive chemicals, the compositions of the initial and final products differ. This paper investigates the changes in composition of common allergens during vulcanization, doing so by chemically analysing various rubber formulations at different stages of the process. Major changes were found in which added chemicals were consumed and new ones produced. An important observation is that thiuram disulfides rarely appear in the final rubber although they may have been used as additives. Instead, thiurams are often converted to dithiocarbamates or to products formed by addition to mercaptobenzothiazole structures, if these have been used together with thiurams as accelerators. PMID:17680862

  1. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10-3- 1 fb range.

  2. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  3. Elastic Moduli Inheritance and Weakest Link in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Lu, Z.P.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald

    2012-01-01

    We show that a variety of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) inherit their Young s modulus and shear modulus from the solvent components. This is attributed to preferential straining of locally solvent-rich configurations among tightly bonded atomic clusters, which constitute the weakest link in an amorphous structure. This aspect of inhomogeneous deformation, also revealed by our in-situ neutron diffraction studies of an elastically deformed BMG, suggests a scenario of rubber-like viscoelasticity owing to a hierarchy of atomic bonds in BMGs.

  4. Similarities and differences in rubber biochemistry among plant species.

    PubMed

    Cornish, K

    2001-08-01

    This report reviews aspects of the biochemical regulation of rubber yield and rubber quality in three contrasting rubber-producing species, Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Ficus elastica. Although many similarities are revealed, considerable differences also exist in enzymatic mechanisms regulating biosynthetic rate and the molecular weight of the rubber biopolymers produced. In all three species, rubber molecule initiation, biosynthetic rate and molecular weight, in vitro, are dependent upon substrate concentration and the ratio of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP, the elongation substrate, or monomer) and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP, an initiator), but these parameters are affected by intrinsic properties of the rubber transferases as well. All three rubber transferases are capable of producing a wide range of rubber molecular weight, depending upon substrate concentration, clearly demonstrating that the transferases are not the prime determinants of product size in vivo. However, despite these commonalities, considerable differences exist between the species with respect to cosubstrate effects, binding constants, effective concentration ranges, and the role of negative cooperativity in vitro. The P. argentatum rubber transferase appears to exert more control over the molecular weight it produces than the other two species and may, therefore, provide the best prospect for the source of genes for transformation of annual crop species. The kinetic data, from the three contrasting rubber-producing species, also were used to develop a model of the rubber transferase active site in which, in addition to separate IPP and allylic-PP binding sites, there exists a hydrophobic region that interacts with the linear portion of allylic-PP initiator proximal to the pyrophosphate. Substrate affinity increases until the active site is traversed and the rubber interior of the rubber particle is reached. The kinetic data suggest that the hydrophobic region in H

  5. Elastic internal flywheel gimbal

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenhorst, D.W.

    1981-01-13

    An elastic joint mounting and rotatably coupling a rotary inertial energy storage device or flywheel, to a shaft, the present gimbal structure reduces vibration and shock while allowing precession of the flywheel without the need for external gimbal mounts. The present elastic joint usually takes the form of an annular elastic member either integrally formed into the flywheel as a centermost segment thereof or attached to the flywheel or flywheel hub member at the center thereof, the rotary shaft then being mounted centrally to the elastic member.

  6. Tensile Properties and Swelling Behavior of Sealing Rubber Materials Exposed to High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Shin

    Rubber O-rings exposed to high-pressure hydrogen gas swell, and the volume increase induced by swelling influences tensile properties of the O-rings. Samples of nonfilled (NF), carbon black-filled (CB), and silica-filled (SC) sulfur-vulcanized acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber were exposed to hydrogen at 30 °C and pressures of up to 100 MPa, and the effect of hydrogen exposure on the volume increase, hydrogen content, and tensile properties was investigated. The residual hydrogen content, measured 35 minutes after decompression, increased with increasing hydrogen pressure in the range 0.7-100 MPa for all three samples. In contrast, the volumes of NF, CB, and SC barely changed at pressures below 10 MPa, whereas they increased at pressures above 10 MPa. This nonlinear volume increase is probably related to the free volume of the rubber structure. The volume increase of the CB and SC samples was smaller than that of the NF samples, possibly because of the superior tensile properties of CB and SC. As the volumes of the NF, CB, and SC samples increased, their tensile elastic moduli decreased as a result of a decrease in crosslink density and elongation by volume increase. Although the true fracture stress of NF was barely dependent on the volume of the specimen, those of CB and SC clearly decreased as the volume increased. The decrease in the true fracture stress of CB and SC was related to the volume increase by swelling, showing that the boundary structure between the filler and the rubber matrix was changed by the volume increase.

  7. Electromechanical characterization of a new synthetic rubber membrane for dielectric elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertechy, R.; Fontana, M.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomers (DE) are incompressible polymeric solids that experience finite elastic deformations and are electrically non-conductive. Stacking multiple DE films separated by compliant electrodes makes a deformable capacitor transducer, namely a DE Transducer (DET), which can expand in area while shrinking in thickness and vice versa. DETs can be used as solid-state actuators, sensors and generators. The development of an effective DET requires the accurate knowledge of the constitutive behavior of the employed DE material. In this context, this paper reports the experimental results of the electromechanical characterization of a new synthetic rubber membrane (TheraBanTM Latex Free Resistance Band Yellow (P/N #11726), or TheraBand LFRB-Y in short) to be used as elastic dielectric in DETs. Comparison of the obtained results with those of the best quoted Natural Rubber membrane (OPPO BAND 8003) is also provided that shows the superior performances of TheraBand LFRB-Y both in terms of reduced mechanical hysteresis and of higher dielectric strength stability to ambient wetness conditions.

  8. Manufacturable conducting rubber ambers and stretchable conductors from copper nanowire aerogel monoliths.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yue; Gong, Shu; Chen, Yi; Yap, Lim Wei; Cheng, Wenlong

    2014-06-24

    We report on a low-cost, simple yet efficient strategy to fabricate ultralightweight aerogel monoliths and conducting rubber ambers from copper nanowires (CuNWs). A trace amount of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) substantially improved the mechanical robustness and elasticity of the CuNW aerogel while maintaining a high electrical conductivity. The resistivity was highly responsive to strains manifesting two distinct domains, and both followed a power law function consistent with pressure-controlled percolation theory. However, the values of the exponents were much less than the predicted value for 3D systems, which may be due to highly porous structures. Remarkably, the CuNW-PVA aerogels could be further embedded into PDMS resin, forming conducting rubber ambers. The ambers could be further manufactured simply by cutting into any arbitrary 1D, 2D, and 3D shapes, which were all intrinsically conductive without the need of external prewiring, a condition required in the previous aerogel-based conductors. The outstanding electrical conductivity in conjunction with high mechanical compliance enabled prototypes of the elastic piezoresistivity switches and stretchable conductors. PMID:24873318

  9. Composite Piezoelectric Rubber Band for Energy Harvesting from Breathing and Limb Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jhih-Jhe; Su, Huan-Jan; Hsu, Chang-I.; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-01

    We have successfully demonstrated the design and microfabrication of piezoelectric rubber bands and their application in energy harvesting from human motions. Composite polymeric and metallic microstructures with embedded bipolar charges are employed to realize the desired stretchability and electromechanical sensitivity. In the prototype demonstration, multilayer PDMS cellular structures coated with PTFE films and stretchable gold electrodes are fabricated and implanted with bipolar charges. The composite structures show elasticity of 300~600 kPa and extreme piezoelectricity of d33 >2000 pC/N and d31 >200 pC/N. For a working volume of 2.5cm×2.5cm×0.3mm, 10% (or 2.5mm) stretch results in effective d31 of >17000 pC/N. It is estimated that electric charge of >0.2 μC can be collected and stored per breath (or 2.5cm deformation). As such, the composite piezoelectric rubber bands (with spring constants of ~200 N/m) can be mounted on elastic waistbands to harvest the circumferential stretch during breathing, or on pads around joints to harvest the elongation during limb motion. Furthermore, the wearable piezoelectric structures can be spread, stacked and connected to charge energy storages and power micro devices.

  10. Effects of Cryogenic Temperature on Fracture Toughness of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Cannon, S. A.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at ambient and liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace MX130 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin. Elastic modulus was calculated using quasi-static tensile data. Fracture toughness was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface morphology. The addition of the CSR nanoparticles increased the breaking energy with negligible change in elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress (UTS). At ambient temperature the breaking energy increased with increasing additions of the CSR nanoparticles, while at LN2 temperatures, it reached a maximum at 5 wt% CSR concentration. KEY WORDS: liquid nitrogen (LN2) properties, fracture toughness, core-shell rubber (CSR).

  11. Normal contact and friction of rubber with model randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yashima, S; Romero, V; Wandersman, E; Frétigny, C; Chaudhury, M K; Chateauminois, A; Prevost, A M

    2015-02-01

    We report on normal contact and friction measurements of model multicontact interfaces formed between smooth surfaces and substrates textured with a statistical distribution of spherical micro-asperities. Contacts are either formed between a rigid textured lens and a smooth rubber, or a flat textured rubber and a smooth rigid lens. Measurements of the real area of contact A versus normal load P are performed by imaging the light transmitted at the microcontacts. For both interfaces, A(P) is found to be sub-linear with a power law behavior. Comparison with two multi-asperity contact models, which extend the Greenwood-Williamson (J. Greenwood and J. Williamson, Proc. Royal Soc. London Ser. A, 295, 300 (1966)) model by taking into account the elastic interaction between asperities at different length scales, is performed, and allows their validation for the first time. We find that long range elastic interactions arising from the curvature of the nominal surfaces are the main source of the non-linearity of A(P). At a shorter range, and except for very low pressures, the pressure dependence of both density and area of microcontacts remains well described by Greenwood-Williamson's model, which neglects any interaction between asperities. In addition, in steady sliding, friction measurements reveal that the mean shear stress at the scale of the asperities is systematically larger than that found for a macroscopic contact between a smooth lens and a rubber. This suggests that frictional stresses measured at macroscopic length scales may not be simply transposed to microscopic multicontact interfaces. PMID:25514137

  12. Silencing the lettuce homologs of small rubber particle protein does not influence natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Romit; Qu, Yang; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2015-05-01

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is an important raw material in chemical industries, but its biosynthetic mechanism remains elusive. Natural rubber is known to be synthesized in rubber particles suspended in laticifer cells in the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In the rubber tree, rubber elongation factor (REF) and its homolog, small rubber particle protein (SRPP), were found to be the most abundant proteins in rubber particles, and they have been implicated in natural rubber biosynthesis. As lettuce (Lactuca sativa) can synthesize natural rubber, we utilized this annual, transformable plant to examine in planta roles of the lettuce REF/SRPP homologs by RNA interference. Among eight lettuce REF/SRPP homologs identified, transcripts of two genes (LsSRPP4 and LsSRPP8) accounted for more than 90% of total transcripts of REF/SRPP homologs in lettuce latex. LsSRPP4 displays a typical primary protein sequence as other REF/SRPP, while LsSRPP8 is twice as long as LsSRPP4. These two major LsSRPP transcripts were individually and simultaneously silenced by RNA interference, and relative abundance, polymer molecular weight, and polydispersity of natural rubber were analyzed from the LsSRPP4- and LsSRPP8-silenced transgenic lettuce. Despite previous data suggesting the implications of REF/SRPP in natural rubber biosynthesis, qualitative and quantitative alterations of natural rubber could not be observed in transgenic lettuce lines. It is concluded that lettuce REF/SRPP homologs are not critically important proteins in natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce. PMID:25553584

  13. Initiator-independent and initiator-dependent rubber biosynthesis in Ficus elastica.

    PubMed

    Espy, Stephanie C; Keasling, Jay D; Castillón, Javier; Cornish, Katrina

    2006-04-15

    The rubber-producing tree, Ficus elastica (the Indian rubber tree), requires the same substrates for rubber production as other rubber-producing plants, such as Hevea brasiliensis (the Brazilian or Para rubber tree), the major source of commercial natural rubber in the world, and Parthenium argentatum (guayule), a widely studied alternative for natural rubber production currently under commercial development. Rubber biosynthesis can be studied, in vitro, using purified, enzymatically active rubber particles, an initiator such as FPP, IPP as the source of monomer, and a metal cofactor such as Mg2+. However, unlike H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum, we show that enzymatically active rubber particles purified from F. elastica are able to synthesize rubber, in vitro, in the absence of added initiator. In this paper, we characterize, for the first time, the kinetic differences between initiator-dependent rubber biosynthesis, and initiator-independent rubber biosynthesis, and the effect of cofactor concentration on both of these processes. PMID:16488387

  14. Unconventional elasticity in smectic- A elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenull, Olaf; Lubensky, T. C.

    2007-07-01

    We study two aspects of the elasticity of smectic- A elastomers that make these materials genuinely and qualitatively different from conventional uniaxial rubbers. Under strain applied parallel to the layer normal, monodomain smectic- A elastomers exhibit a drastic change in Young’s modulus above a threshold strain value of about 3% , as has been measured in experiments by [Nishikawa and Finkelmann, Macromol. Chem. Phys. 200, 312 (1999)]. Our theory predicts that such strains induce a transition to a smectic- C -like state and that it is this transition that causes the change in elastic modulus. We calculate the stress-strain behavior as well as the tilt of the smectic layers and the molecular orientation for strain along the layer normal, and we compare our findings with the experimental data. We also study the electroclinic effect in chiral smectic- A* elastomers. According to experiments by [Lehmann , Nature (London) 410, 447 (2001)] and [Köhler , Appl. Phys. A 80, 381 (2003)], this effect leads in smectic- A* elastomers to a giant or, respectively, at least very large lateral electrostriction. Incorporating polarization into our theory, we calculate the height change of smectic- A* elastomer films in response to a lateral external electric field, and we compare this result to the experimental findings.

  15. MAGNESIUM ION REGULATION OF THE IN VITRO RUBBER BIOSYNTHESIS BY PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM GRAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber is produced by a rubber transferase (a cis-preny transferase). Rubber transferase uses allylic pyrophosphate to initiate the rubber molecule and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) to form the polymer. Rubber biosynthesis also requires a divalent metal cation. Understanding how molecular ...

  16. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  17. Postinstability models in elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the instability caused by the failure of hyperbolicity in elasticity and associated with the problem of unpredictability in classical mechanics expresses the incompleteness of the original model of an elastic medium. The instability as well as the ill-posedness of the Cauchy problem are eliminated by reformulating the original model.

  18. Elastic limit of silicane.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; De, Suvranu

    2014-10-21

    Silicane is a fully hydrogenated silicene-a counterpart of graphene-having promising applications in hydrogen storage with capacities larger than 6 wt%. Knowledge of its elastic limit is critical in its applications as well as tailoring its electronic properties by strain. Here we investigate the mechanical response of silicane to various strains using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. We illustrate that non-linear elastic behavior is prominent in two-dimensional nanomaterials as opposed to bulk materials. The elastic limits defined by ultimate tensile strains are 0.22, 0.28, and 0.25 along armchair, zigzag, and biaxial directions, respectively, an increase of 29%, 33%, and 24% respectively in reference to silicene. The in-plane stiffness and Poisson ratio are reduced by a factor of 16% and 26%, respectively. However, hydrogenation/dehydrogenation has little effect on its ultimate tensile strengths. We obtained high order elastic constants for a rigorous continuum description of the nonlinear elastic response. The limitation of second, third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are in the strain range of 0.02, 0.08, and 0.13, and 0.21, respectively. The pressure effect on the second order elastic constants and Poisson's ratio were predicted from the third order elastic constants. Our results could provide a safe guide for promising applications and strain-engineering the functions and properties of silicane monolayers. PMID:25190587

  19. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.-H.; Gi, Y.-F.; Pan, C.-L.; Cheng, C.-C.

    2005-04-09

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  20. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Gi, Yu-Fung; Pan, Chi-Ling; Cheng, Chia-Chi

    2005-04-01

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  1. Neuro-fuzzy estimation of passive robotic joint safe velocity with embedded sensors of conductive silicone rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah; Petković, Dalibor; Danesh, Amir Seyed; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Issa, Mirna; Zentner, Lena

    2016-05-01

    Robotic operations need to be safe for unpredictable contacts. Joints with passive compliance with springs can be used for soft robotic contacts. However the joints cannot measure external collision forces. In this investigation was developed one passive compliant joint which have soft contacts with external objects and measurement capabilities. To ensure it, conductive silicone rubber was used as material for modeling of the compliant segments of the robotic joint. These compliant segments represent embedded sensors. The conductive silicone rubber is electrically conductive by deformations. The main task was to obtain elastic absorbers for the external collision forces. These absorbers can be used for measurement in the same time. In other words, the joint has an internal measurement system. Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was used to estimate the safety level of the robotic joint by head injury criteria (HIC).

  2. A computational study of adhesion between rubber and metal sulfides at rubber-brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chian Ye; Hirvi, Janne T.; Suvanto, Mika; Bazhenov, Andrey S.; Ajoviita, Tommi; Markkula, Katriina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2015-05-01

    Computational study at level of density functional theory has been carried out in order to investigate the adhesion between rubber and brass plated steel cord, which has high importance in tire manufacturing. Adsorption of natural rubber based adsorbate models has been studied on zinc sulfide, ZnS(1 1 0), and copper sulfide, Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1), surfaces as the corresponding phases are formed in adhesive interlayer during rubber vulcanization. Saturated hydrocarbons exhibited weak interactions, whereas unsaturated hydrocarbons and sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with the metal atoms of sulfide surfaces more strongly. Sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with ZnS(1 1 0) surface stronger than unsaturated hydrocarbons, whereras both Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1) surfaces showed opposite adsorption preference as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed stronger than sulfur-containing adsorbates. The different interaction strength order can play role in rubber-brass adhesion with different relative sulfide concentrations. Moreover, Cu2S(1 1 1) surface exhibits higher adsorption energies than CuS(0 0 1) surface, possibly indicating dominant role of Cu2S in the adhesion between rubber and brass.

  3. Excitation of the soliton-type wave of change of reflection and conduction in the rubber: new experimental data important for its mechanism development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudriavtsev, Eugene M.; Zodov, S. D.

    2002-05-01

    It was shown experimentally, that in elastic soft polymer samples such as rubber the IR-laser pulse excites components of the soliton-like Wave of change of reflection and conduction (WCRC). It is most probable, that the arrival of a wave results in local decreasing of the temperature of different rubber samples. At room temperature the WCRC velocity measurement for two vacuum rubber samples with different thickness given agreeable data correspond to the nineteenth WCRC component. In crude, not polymerized rubber and at cooling of vacuum rubber up to approximately 230 K the WCRC also was excited. As well as in researches with plexiglas, in the present work of the effect of saturation of a new sample by components of soliton-like WCRC was observed. The obtained data confirm availability of soliton properties for studied WCRC and in applicability of the dislocations recombination mechanism as the causes resulting in formation WCRC. These results are important for the WCRC mechanism development. It presents a phenomenon, which in process of its research appears to be more and more universal. The work was made at financial support by RFBR, project 00-02-17249-(a), and by KIE.

  4. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  5. Quantitative Electron Tomography of Rubber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniewicz, Lech; Vaudey, Thomas; Degrandcourt, Christophe; Couty, Marc; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Midgley, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Rubber composite materials have many applications, one example being tyre manufacture. The presence of a filler material in the composite (such as carbon black or silica) causes its mechanical properties to differ in several ways when compared to pure rubber such as viscoelastic behaviour (the Payne effect), increased tensile strength and improved wear resistance. To fully understand these properties, it is necessary to characterise how the filler material is organised on the nanoscale. Using composite materials representative of those found in tyres, this work illustrates the use of electron tomography and machine learning methods as tools to describe the percolation behaviour of the filler; in this case, we focus on the largest proportion of particles absorbed into one single object as a function of particle spacing.

  6. Trapped rubber processing for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Trapped rubber processing is a molding technique for composites in which precast silicone rubber is placed within a closed cavity where it thermally expands against the composite's surface supported by the vessel walls. The method has been applied by the Douglas Aircraft Company, under contract to NASA-Langley, to the design and fabrication of 10 DC-10 graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder assemblies. A three-bay development tool form mold die has been designed and manufactured, and tooling parameters have been established. Fabrication procedures include graphite layup, assembly of details in the tool, and a cure cycle. The technique has made it possible for the cocured fabrication of complex primary box structures otherwise impracticable via standard composite material processes.

  7. Rubber plantations act as water pumps in tropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Song, Qing-Hai; Liu, Wen-Jie; Deng, Xiao-Bao; Tang, Jian-Wei; Deng, Yun; Zhou, Wen-Jun; Yang, Lian-Yan; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Liang, Nai-Shen

    2011-12-01

    Whether rubber plantations have the role of water pumps in tropical Southeast Asia is under active debate. Fifteen years (1994-2008) of paired catchments water observation data and one year paired eddy covariance water flux data in primary tropical rain forest and tropical rubber plantation was used to clarify how rubber plantation affects local water resources of Xishuangbanna, China. Both catchment water observations and direct eddy covariance estimates indicates that more water was evapotranspired from rubber plantation (1137 mm based on catchment water balance, 1125 mm based on eddy covariance) than from the rain forest (969 mm based on catchment water balance, 927 mm based on eddy covariance). Soil water storage during the rainy season is not sufficient to maintain such high evapotranspiration rates, resulting in zero flow and water shortages during the dry season in the rubber plantation. Therefore, this study supports the idea that rubber plantations act as water pumps as suggested by local inhabitants.

  8. New routes to improve toughness of rubber-modified epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Significant progress has been made in modeling the toughening mechanisms in rubber-modified epoxies due to the efforts of many researchers. The result of these efforts has led to an increased awareness of the roles of rubber particle bridging, rubber particle cavitation, matrix dilation, and matrix shear banding on the enhancement of fracture toughness. However, there are still many questions regarding rubber-toughening which remain unanswered. This talk will focus on the importance and the roles of the interphase region between the epoxy matrix and the rubber particle and of the overall particle morphology on the toughness enhancement in rubber-modified epoxies. It will be demonstrated that additional toughness enhancement may be achieved by means not included in any of the toughening models proposed to date. Methods to incorporate these effects into existing toughening models will be discussed.

  9. Overview of the rubber industry and tire manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R

    1999-01-01

    The production of rubber and rubber products is a large and diverse industry. Natural rubber, obtained from plantations in Africa and Asia, accounts for only about 25% of the rubber used in industry. Synthetic alternatives, developed during World War II, are the primary sources of raw materials today. Health hazards in synthetic rubber production are primary related to exposure to monomers. An excess incidence of leukemia has been observed in styrene/butadiene rubber production, attributed to exposure to 1,3-butadiene. Excesses of cancer and respiratory disease have been reported, although specific causative agents are rarely identified. Exposures have varied greatly over the years, based on changes in materials used, work practices, and ventilation. In modern industry, exposures to noise, skin and respiratory irritants, and ergonomic stressors remain important. The tire industry, in particular, has been studied extensively over the past 50 years. PMID:10495481

  10. Silicone-Rubber Tooling for Hollow Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Wave-free contour surface obtained by using flexible mold. Silicone-rubber layup tool, when used in conjunction with hard plastic laminating mold defining desired contour, produces panel with wave-free surface that accurately reproduces shape of mold. In addition to providing porous hollow-panel wing structure that acts as duct for transporting sucked boundary layer tooling, also used to fabricate high-strength lightweight door panels and any single-or compound-contour panel.

  11. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  12. [Forensic medical assessment of the mechanisms of development of gunshot lesions caused by elastic destructive agents].

    PubMed

    Musin, É Kh; Roman'ko, N A; Makarov, I Iu; Kutsenko, K I

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of analysis of the data obtained in experimental studies and practical expert assessments of body injuries inflicted by rubber balls for traumatic weapons. The causes accounting for the polymorphism of such injuries and the mechanisms of their development were elucidated by means of damage simulation taking into consideration the physical and dynamic properties of elastic ball-type destructive agents and the morphological structure of different anatomical regions of the human body. The results of the study may be of interest for differential diagnostics of gunshot lesions caused by elastic destructive agents. PMID:22876645

  13. Inhibition of deterioration of rubbers by hydroaromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi )

    1993-03-01

    Based on the results obtained from previous works, which concluded that hydrogen donating hydroaromatics can be available as radical scavengers in inhibiting the deterioration of hydrocarbon products at lower oxygen partial pressure, a hydroaromatic type inhibitor which contains various hydroaromatics as its main components produced from coal tar fraction was examined by adding it to natural rubber (NR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). It was found that the inhibitor was as effective as the conventional amine-type inhibitor. From practical viewpoint, heavy hydroaromatics from petroleum (HHAP) was produced by the hydrogenation of the highly aromatic oil from the heavy fraction of petroleum to improve the physical properties of the previous inhibitor from coal tar fraction. From the deterioration tests for NR, SBR, and chloroprene (CR), the following results could be obtained: (1) HHAP showed excellent inhibiting abilities toward NR and CR, exceeding the conventional inhibitor; (2) inhibiting effect toward SBR could be recognized, viscosity and flex cracking were improved by the addition of HHAP. From these results, the hydrogen donation from hydroaromatic is considered to be effective in inhibiting the deterioration of rubbers.

  14. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications.

  15. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications. PMID:23974435

  16. Cancer mortality in the British rubber industry.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, H G; Veys, C A; Waterhouse, J A; Peters, A

    1982-01-01

    Although it is over 30 years since an excess of bladder cancer was first identified in British rubber workers, the fear has persisted that this hazard could still be affecting men working in the industry today. Furthermore, suspicions have also arisen that other and hitherto unsuspected excesses of cancer might be occurring. For these reasons 33 815 men, who first started work in the industry between 1 January 1946 and 31 December 1960, have been followed up to 31 December 1975 to ascertain the number of deaths attributable to malignant disease and to compare these with the expected number calculated from the published mortality rates applicable to the male population of England and Wales and Scotland. The findings confirm the absence of any excess mortality from bladder cancer among men entering the industry after 1 January 1951 (the presumed bladder carcinogens were withdrawn from production processes in July 1949), but they confirm also a statistically significant excess of both lung and stomach cancer mortality. A small excess of oesophageal cancer was also observed in both the tyre and general rubber goods manufacturing sectors. American reports of an excess of leukaemia among rubber workers receive only limited support from the present study, where a small numerical excess of deaths from leukaemia is not statistically significant. A special feature of the study is the adoption of an analytical method that permits taking into account the long latent period of induction of occupational cancer. PMID:7093147

  17. The enzymatic synthesis of rubber polymer in Parthenium argentatum Gray

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, C.R.; Madhavan, S.; Greenblatt, G.A.; Venkatachalam, K.V.; Foster, M.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Washed rubber particles isolated from stem homogenates of Parthenium argentatum Gray by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration on columns of LKB Ultrogel AcA34 contain rubber transferase which catalyzes the polymerization of isopentenyl pyrophosphate into rubber polymer. The polymerization reaction requires Mg{sup 2+} isopentenyl pyrophosphate, and an allylic pyrophosphate. The K{sub m} values for Mg{sup 2+}, isopentenyl pyrophosphate, and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate were 5.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} molar, 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} molar, and 9.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} molar, respectively. The molecular characteristics of the rubber polymer synthesized from ({sup 14}C)isopentenyl pyrophosphate were examined by gel permeation chromatography. The peak molecular weight of the radioactive polymer increased from 70,000 in 15 minutes to 750,000 in 3 hours. The weight average molecular weight of the polymer synthesized over a 3 hour period was 1.17 {times} 10{sup 6} compared to 1.49 {times} 10{sup 6} for the natural rubber polymer extracted from the rubber particles. Over 90% of the in vitro formation of the rubber polymer was de novo from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate and isopentenyl pyrophosphate. Treatment of the washed rubber particles with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio) -1-propanesulfonate solubilized the rubber transferase. The solubilized enzyme(s) catalyzed the polymerization of isopentenyl pyrophosphate into rubber polymer with a peak molecular weight of 1 {times} 10{sup 5} after 3 hours of incubation with Mg{sup 2+} and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. The data support the conclusion that the soluble preparation of rubber transferase is capable of catalyzing the formation of a high molecular weight rubber polymer from an allylic pyrophosphate initiator and isopentenyl pyrophosphate monomer.

  18. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  19. On the Evaluation of the Elastic Modulus of Soft Materials Using Beams with Unknown Initial Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Khatam, Hamed; Ravi-Chandar, K.

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear optimization procedure is established to determine the elastic modulus of slender, soft materials using beams with unknown initial curvature in the presence of large rotations. Specifically, the deflection of clamped-free beams under self-weight – measured at different orientations with respect to gravity – is used to determine the modulus of elasticity and the intrinsic curvature in the unloaded state. The approach is validated with experiments on a number of different materials – steel, polyetherimide, rubber and pig skin. Since the loading is limited to self-weight, the strain levels attained in these tests are small enough to assume a linear elastic material behavior. This nondestructive methodology is also applicable to engineered tissues and extremely delicate materials in order to obtain a quick estimate of the material’s elastic modulus. PMID:24159244

  20. PTFE-Based Rubber Composites for Tribological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Heinrich, G.

    The unique properties of rubber, along with its diverse applications, have prompted a great deal of interest among researchers to explore advanced multifunctional materials for special purpose applications by incorporating various filler materials into the rubber matrix. This article deals with the application of a relatively new class of materials based on the addition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) powder to rubber matrixes for preparing PTFE-based elastomeric composites. Besides other properties, the remarkably low friction coefficient of PTFE enables its utilization for tribological applications. However, PTFE in rubbers has not been fully explored, mainly due to its inherent chemical inertness and incompatibility. The present work describes the electron modification of PTFE powder to improve its compatibility with rubber matrixes, the state of the art regarding its application in rubbers, and the preparation of PTFE-based elastomeric composites for tribological applications. It has been demonstrated that, in addition to the improvement in engineering properties, the chemical coupling of modified PTFE powder with rubber matrixes can significantly improve the friction and wear properties of the host elastomer. In addition, a new class of chloroprene composites, with exceptional mechanical and dispersion properties due to chemical coupling of electron-modified PTFE particles and chloroprene rubbers, has been produced. An explanation of the proposed chemical reaction mechanism between the irradiated PTFE and chloroprene rubber, along with a detailed characterization of the compatibility, dispersion, and chemical coupling is presented.

  1. Fatigue properties of rubber modified pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raad, L.; Saboundjian, S.; Yuan, X.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents results of a study to determine the fatigue behavior of rubber modified pavements in Alaska in comparison with conventional asphalt concrete pavements. Laboratory studies were conducted on field specimens using the flexural fatigue test in the controlled-displacement mode. Tests were performed at 72 deg F and 40 deg F. Tested materials include (1) conventional HMA with AC 2.5 and AC 5; (2) PlusRide RUMAC with AC 5; (3) asphalt-rubber concrete with AC 2.5 (wet Process); and (4) rubberized asphalt-rubber concrete with AC 2.5 (wet/dry process).

  2. Isolation of Microorganisms Able To Metabolize Purified Natural Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Heisey, R. M.; Papadatos, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria able to grow on purified natural rubber in the absence of other organic carbon sources were isolated from soil. Ten isolates reduced the weight of vulcanized rubber from latex gloves by >10% in 6 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed the ability of the microorganisms to colonize, penetrate, and dramatically alter the physical structure of the rubber. The rubber-metabolizing bacteria were identified on the basis of fatty acid profiles and cell wall characteristics. Seven isolates were strains of Streptomyces, two were strains of Amycolatopsis, and one was a strain of Nocardia. PMID:16535106

  3. Amphiphilic semi-interpenetrating polymer networks using pulverized rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidi, Nima

    Scrap rubber materials provide a significant challenge to either reuse or safe disposal. Every year, millions of tires are discarded to landfills in the United States, consuming a staggering amount of land space, creating a high risk for large fires, breeding mosquitoes that spread diseases, and wasting the planet's natural resources. This situation cannot be sustained. The challenge of reusing scrap rubber materials is mainly due to the crosslinked structure of vulcanized rubber that prevent them from melting and further processing for reuse. The most feasible recycling approach is believed to be a process in which the vulcanized rubber is first pulverized into a fine powder and then incorporated into new products. The production of fine rubber particles is generally accomplished through the use of a cryogenic process that is costly. Therefore, development of a cost effective technology that utilizes a large quantity of the scrap rubber materials to produce high value added materials is an essential element in maintaining a sustainable solution to rubber recycling. In this research, a cost effective pulverization process, solid state shear extrusion (SSSE), was modified and used for continuous pulverization of the rubber into fine particles. In the modified SSSE process, pulverization takes place at high compressive shear forces and a controlled temperature. Furthermore, an innovative particle modification process was developed to enhance the chemical structure and surface properties of the rubber particles for manufacturing of high value added products. Modification of rubber particles was accomplished through the polymerization of a hydrophilic monomer mixture within the intermolecular structure of the hydrophobic rubber particles. The resulting composite particles are considered as amphiphilic particulate phase semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (PPSIPNs). The modified rubber particles are water dispersible and suitable for use in a variety of aqueous media

  4. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  5. A quinozolinone derivative as a novel rubber additive

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B.C.; Khanra, T.K.; Maiti, S.; Adhikari, B.

    1993-12-31

    A new quinozolinone derivative containing -NH and -SH functional sites has been developed as a novel antioxidant for diene rubbers. A sulfenamide derivative was prepared from the above compound which acts as an excellent accelerator cum antioxidant for natural rubber. This sulfenamide compound even when used at 50% concentration of the combined amount of commercial accelerator (CBS) and antioxidant (MBI) exhibits comparable accelerating characteristics and superior antiaging performance in the vulcanization of natural rubber. This dual function sulfenamide promises to offer better dispersion in the rubber matrix than two separate chemicals - one accelerator and the other antioxidant - used commercially.

  6. Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex with polyfunctional monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Makuuchi, K.; Hagiwara, M.

    1984-03-01

    Natural rubber latex was irradiated with ..gamma..-rays from Co-60 in the presence of polyfunctional monomers to accelerate crosslinking of rubber molecules. Hydrophobic monomers were more effective in accelerating the vulcanization than were hydrophilic monomers. This was ascribed to high solubility of hydrophobic monomers in rubber particles. Among the hydrophobic monomers, neopentylglycol dimethacrylate (NPG) exhibited the highest efficiency in accelerating the vulcanization. Advantages of using NPG are high colloidal stability of the irradiated latex and high thermal stability of dried rubber film.

  7. Effect of pretreatment of rubber material on its biodegradability by various rubber degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Berekaa, M M; Linos, A; Reichelt, R; Keller, U; Steinbüchel, A

    2000-03-15

    The effect of pretreatment of several cis-1,4-polyisoprene containing rubbers on their biodegradability was examined. Tests were carried out with six recently isolated and characterized rubber degrading bacteria belonging to the genera Gordonia (strains Kb2, Kd2 and VH2), Mycobacterium, Micromonospora and Pseudomonas. All strains were able to use natural rubber (NR) as well as NR latex gloves as sole carbon source. Extraction of NR latex gloves by organic solvents resulted in an enhancement of growth for three of the selected strains. On the other hand, growth of Gordonia sp. (strain Kb2 and Kd2), Mycobacterium fortuitum NF4 and Micromonospora aurantiaca W2b on synthetic cis-1,4-polyisoprene did only occur after removal of the antioxidants, that are usually added during manufacture to prevent aging of the materials. Detailed degradation studies performed with Gordonia sp. Kb2 revealed an enhanced mineralization of pretreated NR latex gloves and mineralization of purified natural rubber (NR), indicating the actual mineralization of cis-1,4-polyisoprene rubber constituent even after removal of non-rubber constituent that may act as co-metabolic substrate and support microbial growth. Further analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) clearly demonstrated the enhanced colonization efficiency of these bacteria towards pretreated NR latex gloves. Colonization was additionally visualized by staining of overgrown NR latex gloves with Schiff's reagent, and the purple color produced in the area of degradation was an evidence for the accumulation of aldehydes containing oligomers. Further enhancement of latex gloves degradation could be achieved after successive replacement of mineral salts medium during cultivation. Thereby, a rapid disintegration of untreated NR latex gloves material was accomplished by Gordonia sp. strain VH2. PMID:10713421

  8. Buffing dust as a filler of carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Chronska, K; Przepiorkowska, A

    2008-03-01

    Buffing dust from chrome tanned leather is one of the difficult tannery wastes to manage. It is also hazardous to both human health and the environment. The scientific literature rarely reports studies on dust management, especially on its utilization as a filler for elastomers. In this connection we have made an attempt to use this leather waste as a filler for rubbers such as XNBR and NBR. The addition of the buffing dust to rubber mixes brought improvement in mechanical properties, and increase in resistance to thermal ageing as well as in electric conductivity and crosslink density of vulcalizates. PMID:17629616

  9. A systematic framework for computer-aided design of engineering rubber formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Prasenjeet

    This thesis considers the design of engineering rubber formulations, whose unique properties of elasticity and resilience enable diverse applications. Engineering rubber formulations are a complex mixture of different materials called curatives that includes elastomers, fillers, crosslinking agents, accelerators, activators, retarders, anti-oxidants and processing aids, where the amount of curatives must be adjusted for each application. The characterization of the final properties of the rubber in application is complex and depends on the chemical interplay between the different curatives in formulation via vulcanization chemistry. The details of the processing conditions and the thermal, deformational, and chemical environment encountered in application also have a pronounced effect on the performance of the rubber. Consequently, for much of the history of rubber as an engineering material, its recipe formulations have been developed largely by trial-and-error, rather than by a fundamental understanding. A computer-aided, systematic and automated framework for the design of such materials is proposed in this thesis. The framework requires the solution to two sub-problems: (a) the forward problem, which involves prediction of the desired properties when the formulation is known and (b) the inverse problem that requires identification of the appropriate formulation, given the desired target properties. As part of the forward model, the chemistry of accelerated sulfur vulcanization is reviewed that permits integration of the knowledge of the past five decades in the literature to answer some old questions, reconcile some of the contradicting mechanisms and present a holistic description of the governing chemistry. Based on this mechanistic chemistry, a fundamental kinetic model is derived using population balance equations. The model quantitatively describes, for the first time, the different aspects of vulcanization chemistry. Subsequently, a novel three

  10. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  11. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  12. Agronomic and Natural Rubber Characteristics of Sunflower as a Rubber-Producing Plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) is a genus native to North American and is a potential natural rubber (NR) producing crop. The objectives of the study were to: 1) evaluate commercial sunflower cultivars to determine biomass production and how they partition biomass into leaves, stems, ...

  13. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  14. Evaluating Waste Charcoal as Potential Rubber Composite Filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, charcoal in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural products was evaluated as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated styrene-butadiene lat...

  15. Specification guidelines for flue gas desulfurization rubber: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, P.

    1987-11-01

    After investigating the historical performance (as of spring 1986) of rubber liners in 27 utility FGD systems and examining the causes of failures, Radian Corporation and Texas Research Institute developed user guidelines to assist in the selection and installation of rubber product systems. As part of the process, the utility should prepare a rubber lining technical job specification. This document will govern material selection and quality control measures and should include the general requirements, a description of the service conditions, rubber lining specification, technical requirements (for design, welding surface preparation, application, and inspection), and quality control requirements. Three generic classes of sheet rubber products have been commonly used as FGD liners: chlorobutyl, natural rubber, and neoprene. Of these, the rubber industry considers chlorobutyl to be the material of choice. Proposed rubber systems should be evaluated according to the utility's prior experience, objective test results in FGD systems, long-term FGD simulation tests, and accelerated screening tests as defined in this document. 49 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Charcoal byproducts as potential styrene-butadiene rubber composte filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, various renewable charcoals in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural byproducts were evaluted as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated s...

  17. IDENTIFICATION AND COMPARISON OF NATURAL RUBBER FROM TWO LACTUCA SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewed interest in the identification of alternative sources of natural rubber to Hevea brasiliensis has focused on the Compositae family. In our search for Compositae models for rubber synthesis, we extracted latex from stems of two lettuce species: Lactuca serriola, prickly lettuce, and Lactuca...

  18. Rubber Flooring Impact on Production and Herdlife of Dairy Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of rubber flooring in dairies has become popular because of perceived cow comfort. The overall objective of this longitudinal study was to evaluate production, reproduction, and retention of first and second lactations of cows assigned to either rubber (RUB) or concrete (CON) flooring at the fe...

  19. Guayule resin detection and influence on guayule rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is a natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) producing crop, native to North America. Guayule also produces organic resins, complex mixtures of terpenes, triglycerides, guayulins, triterpenoids and other components. During natural rubber extraction, guayule resins can b...

  20. Natural Rubber Quantification in Sunflower Using an Automated Solvent Extractor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) produce a small amount of low molecular weight natural rubber (NR) and this species has potential as a rubber-producing crop plant. Quantifying NR in plant tissue has traditionally been accomplished using Soxhlet or gravimetric methodologies. Accelerated solve...

  1. Carcinoma of the scrotum associated with rubber urinals. Case report.

    PubMed

    Grundy, D; Jones, A C; Powley, P H

    1993-09-01

    A paraplegic patient, who had worn a rubber urinal in close contact with the scrotum for over 40 years, developed carcinoma of the scrotum. It is likely that this is a previously unsuspected example of chemical carcinogenesis, and in view of this, we believe that the use of rubber urinals should be discontinued. PMID:8247605

  2. Attitudes of Operative Dentistry Faculty toward Rubber Dam Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackett, William W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Dental faculty responses (N=332) to a survey concerning use of rubber dams for excluding fluids from the working field in operative dentistry procedures indicated students receive adequate instruction in rubber dam use and are proficient at graduation, though motivating students to its use is problematic and patient resistance a factor. (MSE)

  3. Leaching of nitroso rubber material removes uncured polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratfisch, W. A.; Gonzalez, R.

    1972-01-01

    New leaching process removes uncured polymer from nitroso rubber, elastomer used in presence of nitrogen tetroxide. Uncured portion is removed by controlled soaking of polymer slab in Freon TF. Leaching with Freon TF prevents nitroso rubber from adhering to adjoining surfaces and limiting its usefulness in either static or dynamic applications.

  4. A study of amino acid modifiers in guayule natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber from the Hevea tree is a critical agricultural material vital to United States industry, medicine, and defense, yet the country is dependent on imports to meet domestic needs. Guayule, a desert shrub indigenous to the US, is under development as an alternative source of natural rubber...

  5. Sealing a rubber bladder between two sections of an accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schartau, G. M.

    1969-01-01

    Leak-free clamping of a two section accumulator is accomplished by a flat metallic ring molded peripherally to the rubber flange of the bladder, and an inset rubber seal bonded to the face of the flange of each section. Method maintains constant torque on the clamping bolts.

  6. Glass fabric fire barrier for silicone rubber parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmer, K. L.

    1969-01-01

    Preformed knitted glass-fabric covers are placed about silicone rubber items in such a way as to completely isolate them from the effects of adjacent fire. These covers permit retention of the desirable resilient properties of the silicone rubber while forming a very effective fire barrier.

  7. Identification and comparison of natural rubber from two lactuca species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewed interest in the identification of alternative sources of natural rubber to Hevea brasiliensis has focused on the Compositae family. In our search for Compositae models for rubber synthesis, we extracted latex from stems of two lettuce species: Lactuca serriola, prickly lettuce, and Lactuca s...

  8. Reinforcement of rubber by fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.; Rubinstein, M.; Colby, R. H.

    1993-03-01

    Rubber is commonly reinforced with colloidal aggregates of carbon or silica, whose structure has the scale invariance of a fractal object. Reinforced rubbers support large stresses, which often grow faster than linearly with the strain. We argue that under strong elongation the stress arises through lateral compression of the aggregates, driven by the large bulk modulus of the rubber. We derive a power-law relationship between stress and elongation λ when λgg 1. The predicted power p depends on the fractal dimension D and a second structural scaling exponent C. For diffusion-controlled aggregates this power p should lie beween 0.9 and 1.1 ; for reaction-controlled aggregates p should lie between 1.8 and 2.4. For uniaxial compression the analogous powers lie near 4. Practical rubbers filled with fractal aggregates should approach the conditions of validity for these scaling laws. On renforce souvent le caoutchouc avec des agrégats de carbone ou de silice dont la structure a l'invariance par dilatation d'un objet fractal. Les caoutchoucs ainsi renforcés supportent de grandes contraintes qui croissent souvent plus vite que l'élongation. Nous prétendons que, sous élongation forte, cette contrainte apparaît à cause d'une compression latérale des agrégats induite par le module volumique important du caoutchouc. Nous établissons une loi de puissance reliant la contrainte et l'élongation λ quand λgg 1. Cet exposant p dépend de la dimension fractale D et d'un deuxième exposant structural C. Pour des agrégats dont la cinétique de formation est limitée par diffusion, p vaut entre 0,9 et 1,1. Si la cinétique est limitée par le soudage local des particules, p vaut entre 1,8 et 2,4. Sous compression uniaxiale, les puissances homologues valent environ 4. Des caoutchoucs pratiques chargés de tels agrégats devraient approcher des conditions où ces lois d'échelle sont valables.

  9. Rubber-toughened cyanate composites - Properties and toughening mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P. C.; Woo, E. P.; Laman, S. A.; Jakubowski, J. J.; Pickelman, D. M.; Sue, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier work by Young et al. (1990) has shown that Dow experimental cyanate ester resin XU71787.02 is readily toughenable by rubber. A particularly effective rubber for this purpose is an experimental core-shell rubber which toughens the polymer by inducing shear yielding. This paper describes an investigation into the toughening mechanism in the corresponding carbon-fiber composite systems and the effect of fibers on composite properties. Resin-fiber interfacial shear strengths have been successfully correlated to the compressive strengths after impact and other key properties of composites based on rubber-toughened cyanate and several carbon fibers. The differences in the properties are explained by the difference in the functioning of the rubber particles during the fracture process.

  10. Method for co-processing waste rubber and carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Smith, Charlene M.

    1991-01-01

    In a process for the co-processing of waste rubber and carbonaceous material to form a useful liquid product, the rubber and the carbonaceous material are combined and heated to the depolymerization temperature of the rubber in the presence of a source of hydrogen. The depolymerized rubber acts as a liquefying solvent for the carbonaceous material while a beneficial catalytic effect is obtained from the carbon black released on depolymerization the reinforced rubber. The reaction is carried out at liquefaction conditions of 380.degree.-600.degree. C. and 70-280 atmospheres hydrogen pressure. The resulting liquid is separated from residual solids and further processed such as by distillation or solvent extraction to provide a carbonaceous liquid useful for fuels and other purposes.

  11. 3D silicone rubber interfaces for individually tailored implants.

    PubMed

    Stieghorst, Jan; Bondarenkova, Alexandra; Burblies, Niklas; Behrens, Peter; Doll, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    For the fabrication of customized silicone rubber based implants, e.g. cochlear implants or electrocortical grid arrays, it is required to develop high speed curing systems, which vulcanize the silicone rubber before it runs due to a heating related viscosity drop. Therefore, we present an infrared radiation based cross-linking approach for the 3D-printing of silicone rubber bulk and carbon nanotube based silicone rubber electrode materials. Composite materials were cured in less than 120 s and material interfaces were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, curing related changes in the mechanical and cell-biological behaviour were investigated with tensile and WST-1 cell biocompatibility tests. The infrared absorption properties of the silicone rubber materials were analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in transmission and attenuated total reflection mode. The heat flux was calculated by using the FTIR data, emissivity data from the infrared source manufacturer and the geometrical view factor of the system. PMID:25975600

  12. Recycling of rubber tires in electric arc furnace steelmaking: simultaneous combustion of metallurgical coke and rubber tyres blends

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalena Zaharia; Veena Sahajwalla; Byong-Chul Kim; Rita Khanna; N. Saha-Chaudhury; Paul O'Kane; Jonathan Dicker; Catherine Skidmore; David Knights

    2009-05-15

    The present study investigates the effect of addition of waste rubber tires on the combustion behavior of its blends with coke for carbon injection in electric arc furnace steelmaking. Waste rubber tires were mixed in different proportions with metallurgical coke (MC) (10:90, 20:80, 30:70) for combustion and pyrolysis at 1473 K in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), respectively. Under experimental conditions most of the rubber blends indicated higher combustion efficiencies compared to those of the constituent coke. In the early stage of combustion the weight loss rate of the blends is much faster compared to that of the raw coke due to the higher volatile yield of rubber. The presence of rubber in the blends may have had an impact upon the structure during the release and combustion of their high volatile matter (VM) and hence increased char burnout. Measurements of micropore surface area and bulk density of the chars collected after combustion support the higher combustion efficiency of the blends in comparison to coke alone. The surface morphology of the 30% rubber blend revealed pores in the residual char that might be attributed to volatile evolution during high temperature reaction in oxygen atmosphere. Physical properties and VM appear to have a major effect upon the measured combustion efficiency of rubber blends. The study demonstrates that waste rubber tires can be successfully co-injected with metallurgical coke in electric arc furnace steelmaking process to provide additional energy from combustion. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. [Mites (Acari) from rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg., Euphorbiaceae) and spontaneous euphorbiaceous in rubber trees cultivation].

    PubMed

    Bellini, Marcos R; Feres, Reinaldo J F; Buosi, Renato

    2008-01-01

    Quarterly samples were done in 2001 on three rubber tree plantation in the northwest of the state of São Paulo. Three rubber trees of each locality were sampled. Between the rows of rubber tree four species of spontaneous euphorbiaceous were collected: Chamaesyce hirta, C. hyssopifolia, Euphorbia heterophylla and Phyllanthus tenellus. A total of 8.954 mites of 38 species, belonging to 31 genera of 11 families were collected. Tydeidae and Phytoseiidae had the highest diversity of species, 9 and 7, respectively. The most abundant families were Eriophyidae (3.594), Tydeidae (2.825) and Tenuipalpidae (1.027). The most abundant species on the rubber trees were: phytophagous - Calacarus heveae Feres, Tenuipalpus heveae Baker, Lorryia sp.2, Lorryia formosa Cooreman and Lorryia sp.1; predators - Zetzellia quasagistemas Hernandes & Feres, Pronematus sp., Iphiseiodes zuluagai Denmark & Muma and Euseius citrifolius Denmark & Muma. Among the spontaneous euphorbiaceous, predatory mites were abundantly found on C. hirta and E. heterophylla, mainly Pronematus sp. and E. citrifolius, suggesting that these plants could be important in the maintenance of these predators in the rubber tree cultivation areas. However, plants that can shelter predators and at the same time exert strong competition (nutrients, water etc) to rubber trees, can not be recommended for pest management programs. Studies about competition between rubber trees and spontaneous plants need to be conducted for feasible efficient programs of environmental management, aiming at the control of pest mites of rubber tree. PMID:18813750

  14. Statistical Discrimination of Latex between Healthy and White Root Infected Rubber Tree based on Dry Rubber Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaimi Sulaiman, Mohd; Hashim, Hadzli; Faiz Mohd Sampian, Ahmad; Korlina Madzhi, Nina; Faris Mohd Azmi, Azrie; Aishah Khairuzzaman, Noor; Aima Ismail, Faridatul

    2015-11-01

    Dry rubber content (DRC) is one of main material existing inside latex. It is usually in ranged of 25% - 45% of rubber latex. Statistical analysis are done to determine the discrimination of dry rubber content of latex between healthy and white root infected rubber tree. Based on 150 rubber trees and 10 clones tested, parametric test which include normality test, error-bar plot, and paired samples test are done. The result outcomes have shown that both data of dry rubber content of latex for healthy and white root infected rubber tree are normally distributed. Error-bar plot test is clearly indicated that there is visible discrimination between both cases. Paired samples test are done to reinforce this findings in terms of numerical p- value which is found to be less than 0.05. Thus, this indicate overwhelming evidence that healthy group can be discriminated from white root. Conclusively, changes in DRC content in latex can be correlated with white root disease infections of rubber tree.

  15. Quantum Critical Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Mario; Paul, Indranil; Garst, Markus

    2015-07-01

    We discuss elastic instabilities of the atomic crystal lattice at zero temperature. Because of long-range shear forces of the solid, at such transitions the phonon velocities vanish, if at all, only along certain crystallographic directions, and, consequently, the critical phonon fluctuations are suppressed to a lower dimensional manifold and governed by a Gaussian fixed point. In the case of symmetry-breaking elastic transitions, a characteristic critical phonon thermodynamics arises that is found, e.g., to violate Debye's T3 law for the specific heat. We point out that quantum critical elasticity is triggered whenever a critical soft mode couples linearly to the strain tensor. In particular, this is relevant for the electronic Ising-nematic quantum phase transition in a tetragonal crystal as discussed in the context of certain cuprates, ruthenates, and iron-based superconductors.

  16. Mechanics of elastic networks

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a periodic lattice structure in d=2 or 3 dimensions with unit cell comprising Z thin elastic members emanating from a similarly situated central node. A general theoretical approach provides an algebraic formula for the effective elasticity of such frameworks. The method yields the effective cubic elastic constants for three-dimensional space-filling lattices with Z=4, 6, 8, 12 and 14, the last being the ‘stiffest’ lattice proposed by Gurtner & Durand (Gurtner & Durand 2014 Proc. R. Soc. A 470, 20130611. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2013.0611)). The analytical expressions provide explicit formulae for the effective properties of pentamode materials, both isotropic and anisotropic, obtained from the general formulation in the stretch-dominated limit for Z=d+1. PMID:25484608

  17. Elastic properties of HMX.

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T. D.; Bedrov, D.; Menikoff, Ralph; Smith, G. D.

    2001-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate isothermal elastic properties for {beta}-, {alpha}-, and {delta}-HMX. The complete elastic tensor for each polymorph was determined at room temperature and pressure via analysis of microscopic strain fluctuations using formalism due to Rahman and Parrinello [J. Chem. Phys. 76,2662 (1982)]. Additionally, the isothermal compression curve was computed for {beta}-HMX for 0 {le} p {le} 10.6 GPa; the bulk modulus K and its pressure derivative K{prime} were obtained from two fitting forms employed previously in experimental studies of the {beta}-HMX equation of state. Overall, the results indicate good agreement between the bulk modulus predicted from the measured and calculated compression curves. The bulk modulus determined directly from the elastic tensor of {beta}-HMX is in significant disagreement with the compression curve-based results. The explanation for this discrepancy is an area of current research.

  18. An elastic second skin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Gilchrest, Barbara A; Anderson, R Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings. PMID:27159017

  19. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. PMID:27440257

  20. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Quantum Critical Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Mario; Paul, Indranil; Garst, Markus

    2015-07-10

    We discuss elastic instabilities of the atomic crystal lattice at zero temperature. Because of long-range shear forces of the solid, at such transitions the phonon velocities vanish, if at all, only along certain crystallographic directions, and, consequently, the critical phonon fluctuations are suppressed to a lower dimensional manifold and governed by a Gaussian fixed point. In the case of symmetry-breaking elastic transitions, a characteristic critical phonon thermodynamics arises that is found, e.g., to violate Debye's T(3) law for the specific heat. We point out that quantum critical elasticity is triggered whenever a critical soft mode couples linearly to the strain tensor. In particular, this is relevant for the electronic Ising-nematic quantum phase transition in a tetragonal crystal as discussed in the context of certain cuprates, ruthenates, and iron-based superconductors. PMID:26207483

  2. An elastic second skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  3. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  4. Pneumatic artificial rubber muscle using shape-memory polymer sheet with embedded electrical heating wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Kazuto; Sugitani, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Naohiro; Sakaguchi, Seiya; Noritsugu, Toshiro; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2014-12-01

    Shape-memory polymer (SMP) can be deformed by applying a small load above its glass transition temperature (Tg). Shape-memory polymer maintains its shape after it has cooled below Tg and returns to a predefined shape when subsequently heated above Tg. The reversible change in the elastic modulus between the glassy and rubbery states of an SMP can be on the order of several hundred times. Based on the change in stiffness of the SMP in relation to the change in temperature, the present study attempts to evaluate the application of the SMP to soft actuators of a robot. In order to control the temperature of the SMP, we developed an SMP sheet with an embedded electrical heating wire. We formed a uniform, thin SMP sheet without air bubbles using a heat press. The SMP sheet with a heating wire can be heated quickly and can be maintained at a constant temperature. Moreover, the effects of the embedded wire on the mechanical properties in bending and tensile tests were small. Then, we applied the SMP sheet with the embedded electrical heating wire to a pneumatic artificial rubber muscle. The enhanced versatility of SMP sheet applications is demonstrated through a series of experiments conducted using a prototype. The initial shape and bending displacement of the pneumatic artificial rubber muscle can be changed by controlling the temperature of the SMP sheet.

  5. Coiling of Elastic Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Ribe, N. M.; Bonn, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    A rope falling onto a solid surface typically forms a series of regular coils. Here, we study this phenomenon using laboratory experiments (with cotton threads and softened spaghetti) and an asymptotic “slender-rope” numerical model. The excellent agreement between the two with no adjustable parameters allows us to determine a complete phase diagram for elastic coiling comprising three basic regimes involving different force balances (elastic, gravitational, and inertial) together with resonant “whirling string” and “whirling shaft” eigenmodes in the inertial regime.

  6. Tuning the vibration of a rotor with shape memory alloy metal rubber supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong; Hong, Jie

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes a novel smart rotor support damper with variable stiffness made with a new multifunctional material - the shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR). SMA-MR gives high load bearing capability (yield limit up to 100 MPa and stiffness exceeding 1e8 N/m), high damping (loss factor between 0.15 and 0.3) and variable stiffness (variation of 2.6 times between martensite and austenite phases). The SMA-MR has been used to replace a squeeze film damper and combined with an elastic support. The mechanical performance of the smart support damper has been investigated at room and high temperatures on a rotor test rig. The vibration tuning capabilities of the SMA-MR damper have been evaluated through FEM simulations and experimental tests. The study shows the feasibility of using the SMA-MR material for potential applications of active vibration control at different temperatures in rotordynamics systems.

  7. Radiation graft modification of EPDM rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katbab, A. A.; Burford, R. P.; Garnett, J. L.

    N-Vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP), 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and acrylamide (AAm) have been grafted to the surface of rubber vulcanizates based on ethylene-propylene-terpolymer (EPDM) using the simultaneous radiation method to alter surface properties such as wettability and therefore biocompatibility. The effect of monomer concentration, solvent and EPDM structural factors on the grafting behavior have been investigated. The inhibitory effect upon homopolymerization of various salts has also been evaluated for the three monomers. NVP and HEMA could be grafted onto EPDM rubber in the presence of aqueous solutions of cupric nitrate at 0.005 M and 1.0 M concentrations respectively. Aqueous solutions of Mohr's salt (ammonium ferrous sulphate) at 0.05 M not only suppressed the homopolymerization of AAm but also increased grafting yield. The percentage grafting also increased with increasing AAm concentration. A mechanism has been proposed to explain the behaviour of these monomers. The inclusion of multifunctional acrylates in additive amounts (1.0 vol%) enhanced the graft degree. Modified samples were able to be efficiently stained, allowing the depth of the graft copolymerization to be determined by light microscopy. Water was found to have an accelerating effect on the polymerization of these monomers, but methanol prevented their polymerization completely. The effect of EPDM structural factors upon degree of grafting was found to vary, depending upon the monomer type.

  8. Hot air vulcanization of rubber profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, J.

    1995-07-01

    Elastomer profiles are deployed in quantity by the automobile industry as seals and wateproofing in coachwork. The high standards demanded by the industry; improvement in weather prediction, noise reduction, restriction of tolerances, together with powerful demand for EPDM force the rubber processing industry into development, particularly of elastomers. Complex proofing systems must also be achieved with extremely complicated profile forms. All too often such profiles have an extremely large surface together with a low cross-section density. They frequently consist of two or three rubber compounds and are steel reinforced. Sometimes they are flocked and coated with a low friction finish. Such high-tech seals require an adjustment of the vulcanization method. The consistent trend in the nineties towards lower quantities of elastomer per sealing unit and the dielectric factor, especially with EPDM, has brought an old fashioned vulcanization method once more to the fore, a method developed over the past years to an extremely high standard, namely the hot-air method. This paper describes various vulcanization and curing methods and their relative merits and disadvantages, the Gerlach hot-air concept, the hot air installation concept, and energy saving and efficiency afforded by this technique. 4 figs.

  9. Improved methods for extraction and quantification of resin and rubber from guayule

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guayule, a desert shrub native to the Chihuahuan desert, is a natural source of high quality, hypo-allergenic rubber. Unlike rubber trees that produce rubber in lactifers, the rubber in guayule is produced in parenchyma cells of the bark tissue of stems and roots. Consequently, guayule tissue must...

  10. 40 CFR 428.40 - Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... latex rubber subcategory. 428.40 Section 428.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.40 Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory....

  11. The Rubber Hand Illusion Revisited: Visuotactile Integration and Self-Attribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakiris, Manos; Haggard, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Watching a rubber hand being stroked, while one's own unseen hand is synchronously stroked, may cause the rubber hand to be attributed to one's own body, to "feel like it's my hand." A behavioral measure of the rubber hand illusion (RHI) is a drift of the perceived position of one's own hand toward the rubber hand. The authors investigated (a) the…

  12. 40 CFR 428.40 - Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... latex rubber subcategory. 428.40 Section 428.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.40 Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory. The provisions...

  13. 21 CFR 801.437 - User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... rubber. 801.437 Section 801.437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber. (a) Data in the Medical Device Reporting System..., natural rubber that contacts humans. The term “natural rubber” includes natural rubber latex, dry...

  14. 40 CFR 428.40 - Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... latex rubber subcategory. 428.40 Section 428.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.40 Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory....

  15. 40 CFR 428.30 - Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... solution crumb rubber subcategory. 428.30 Section 428.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.30 Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber...

  16. 21 CFR 801.437 - User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rubber. 801.437 Section 801.437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber. (a) Data in the Medical Device Reporting System..., natural rubber that contacts humans. The term “natural rubber” includes natural rubber latex, dry...

  17. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  18. 26 CFR 48.4073-3 - Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping..., Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Tires, Tubes, and Tread Rubber § 48.4073-3 Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires. (a) Sold direct by manufacturer for nontaxable...

  19. 21 CFR 801.437 - User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... rubber. 801.437 Section 801.437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber. (a) Data in the Medical Device Reporting System..., natural rubber that contacts humans. The term “natural rubber” includes natural rubber latex, dry...

  20. 40 CFR 428.30 - Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... solution crumb rubber subcategory. 428.30 Section 428.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.30 Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber...

  1. 26 CFR 48.4073-3 - Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping..., Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Tires, Tubes, and Tread Rubber § 48.4073-3 Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires. (a) Sold direct by manufacturer for nontaxable...

  2. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  3. 40 CFR 428.40 - Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... latex rubber subcategory. 428.40 Section 428.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.40 Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory. The provisions...

  4. 26 CFR 48.4073-3 - Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping..., Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Tires, Tubes, and Tread Rubber § 48.4073-3 Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires. (a) Sold direct by manufacturer for nontaxable...

  5. 26 CFR 48.4073-3 - Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping..., Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Tires, Tubes, and Tread Rubber § 48.4073-3 Exemption of tread rubber used for recapping nonhighway tires. (a) Sold direct by manufacturer for nontaxable...

  6. 40 CFR 428.40 - Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... latex rubber subcategory. 428.40 Section 428.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.40 Applicability; description of the latex rubber subcategory....

  7. The rationale for transforming sunflower into a rubber-producing crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber is an irreplaceable raw material and constitutes about 45% of the total amount of both natural and synthetic rubber used. Currently, nearly all commercial natural rubber comes from a single species, the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and the United States is almost complet...

  8. Elastic modulus and surface tension of a polyurethane rubber in nanometer thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Meiyu; McKenna, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Estane is a kind of polyurethane with thermodynamically incompatible hard and soft segments. In this study the macro and micro properties of Estane have been characterized and compared. The viscoelastic properties of this material in bulk scale have been determined using dynamic rheometry. Time-temperature superposition was found to be applicable for this material, and a master curve was successfully constructed from the dynamic shear responses of G'(ω) and G''(ω) . Also a novel nano bubble inflation method was used to obtain the creep compliance of the Estane ultrathin films and the results show stiffening in the rubbery region for the Estane over thicknesses ranging from 110nm to 22nm. The dependence of the rubbery stiffening on film thickness is studied and the relative influences of nano confinement and surface tension effect are analyzed using both a direct stress strain analysis and an energy balance method for the membrane. The contributions of surface tension and nano confinement are considered separately. Office of Naval Research under project No.N00014-11-1-0424.

  9. The Calculus of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Warren B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the elasticity of demand, and shows that geometrically, it may be interpreted as the ratio of two simple distances along the tangent line: the distance from the point on the curve to the x-intercept to the distance from the point on the curve to the y-intercept. It also shows that total revenue is maximized at the transition…

  10. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  11. Elastically tailored composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Elastically tailored composite structures using out-of-autoclave processes. Several unsymetric autoclave-cured and electron-beam-cured composite laminates are compared. Cantilevered beam (unbalanced/asymetric laminate) used to demonstrate bend-twist coupling effects. Photographed in building 1145, photographic studio.

  12. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  13. Renormalization of curvature elastic constants for elastic and fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, S.; Kleinert, H.

    1987-02-01

    We study the fluctuations of membranes with area and curvature elasticity and calculate the renormalization of the curvature elastic constants due to thermal fluctuations. For the mean curvature elastic constant the result is the same as obtained previously for “ideal membranes” which resist only to curvature deformations. The renormalization of the gaussian curvature, on the other hand, depends on the elastic contants. In an incompressible membrane, it is five times weaker than in an ideal membrane.

  14. Circuit racing, track texture, temperature and rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R. S.; Gruber, P.; Fina, E.

    2016-04-01

    Some general observations relating to tyre shear forces and road surfaces are followed by more specific considerations from circuit racing. The discussion then focuses on the mechanics of rubber friction. The classical experiments of Grosch are outlined and the interpretations that can be put on them are discussed. The interpretations involve rubber viscoelasticity, so that the vibration properties of rubber need to be considered. Adhesion and deformation mechanisms for energy dissipation at the interface between rubber and road and in the rubber itself are highlighted. The enquiry is concentrated on energy loss by deformation or hysteresis subsequently. Persson's deformation theory is outlined and the material properties necessary to apply the theory to Grosch's experiments are discussed. Predictions of the friction coefficient relating to one particular rubber compound and a rough surface are made using the theory and these are compared with the appropriate results from Grosch. Predictions from Persson's theory of the influence of nominal contact pressure on the friction coefficient are also examined. The extent of the agreement between theory and experiment is discussed. It is concluded that there is value in the theory but that it is far from complete. There is considerable scope for further research on the mechanics of rubber friction.

  15. Recycling of plastic and rubber tire waste in asphalt pavements

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.R.; Lee, N.K.; Hesp, S.A.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses some important issues related to the use of recycled thermoplastics and rubber tire waste in asphalt binders for hot-mix pavements. Both high temperature rheological and low temperature fracture studies are presented on recycled polyethylene, devulcanized and crumb rubber-modified asphalt binders. The results are compared to unmodified and commercially available modified binders. This research is especially timely in light of the US Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Section 1038 which, starting in 1995, will force state and local governments to use significant amounts of recycled rubber tire or plastic waste in federally funded highway projects. High temperature rheological measurements of the loss modulus, loss tangent and complex modulus show a significant improvement when only small quantities of crumb rubber, devulcanized crumb rubber or waste polyethylene are added to the asphalt binders. The low temperature fracture performance of the modified asphalts is greatly influenced by the interfacial strength between the dispersed and continuous phase. The fracture toughness increases dramatically, only when low molecular weight polymers are grafted in-situ onto the rubber and polymer dispersed phases in order to strength the interface. This points to a crack-pinning mechanism as being responsible for the dramatic increase in fracture toughness that is observed in this work. Single phase, devulcanized crumb rubber-asphalt systems perform quite poorly at low temperatures.

  16. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly. PMID:19710121

  17. Utilization of waste tire rubber in manufacture of oriented strandboard.

    PubMed

    Ayrilmis, Nadir; Buyuksari, Umit; Avci, Erkan

    2009-09-01

    Some physical and mechanical properties of oriented strandboards (OSBs) containing waste tire rubber at various addition levels based on the oven-dry strand weight, using the same method as that used in the manufacture of OSB. Two resin types, phenol-formaldehyde (PF) and polyisocyanate, were used in the experiments. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.65 and waste tire rubber content (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70 by wt.% of waste tire rubber/wood strand). Average internal bond values of PF-bonded OSB panels with rubber chips were between 17.6% and 48.5% lower than the average of the control samples while polyisocyanate bonded OSBs were 16.5-50.6%. However, water resistance and mechanical properties of OSBs made using polyisocyanate resin were found to comply with general-purpose OSB minimum property requirements of EN 300 Type 1 (1997) values for use in dry conditions at the lowest tire rubber loading level (10%) based on the oven-dry panel weight. The tire rubber improved water resistance of the OSB panel due to its almost hydrophobic property. Based on the findings obtained from this study, we concluded that waste tire rubber could be used for general-purpose OSB manufacturing up to 10% ratio based on the oven-dry panel weight. PMID:19553097

  18. Radiation crosslinking of styrene-butadiene rubber containing waste tire rubber and polyfunctional monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Khan, Sara; Shafiq, Muhammad; Gill, Rohama

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) and absorbed dose on the final characteristics of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) mixed with waste tire rubber (WTR). A series of SBR/WTR blends were prepared by varying the ratios of WTR in the presence of PFMs, namely trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and crosslinked using gamma rays. The physicochemical characteristics of the prepared blends were investigated. It was observed that tensile strength, hardness and gel content of the blends increased with absorbed dose while the blends containing TMPTA showed higher tensile strength, gel content and thermal stability as compared to the blends containing TMPTMA. Higher thermal stability was observed in the blends which were crosslinked by radiation as compared to the blends crosslinked by sulfur. These blends exhibited higher rate of swelling in organic solvents, whereas negligible swelling was observed in acidic and basic environment.

  19. Model fire tests on polyphosphazene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widenor, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A video tape record of model room fire tests was shown, comparing polyphosphazene (P-N) rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber closed-cell foams as interior finish thermal insulation under conditions directly translatable to an actual fire situation. Flashover did not occur with the P-N foam and only moderate amounts of low density smoke were formed, whereas with the PVC/nitrile foam, flashover occurred quickly and large volumes of high density smoke were emitted. The P-N foam was produced in a pilot plant under carefully controlled conditions. The PVC/nitrile foam was a commercial product. A major phase of the overall program involved fire tests on P-N open-cell foam cushioning.

  20. Frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion for interstratified dispersive elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2016-08-01

    The elastic impedance equation is extended to frequency dependent elastic impedance equation by taking partial derivative to frequency. With this equation as the forward solver, a practical frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion approach is presented to implement the estimation of the interstratified dispersive elastic parameters which makes full use of the frequency information of elastic impedances. Three main steps are included in this approach. Firstly, the elastic Bayesian inversion is implemented for the estimation of elastic impedances from different incident angle. Secondly, with those estimated elastic impedances, their variations are used to estimate P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity. Finally, with the prior elastic impedance and P-wave and S-wave velocity information, the frequency dependent elastic variation with incident angle inversion is presented for the estimation of the interstratified elastic parameters. With this approach, the interstratified elastic parameters rather than the interface information can be estimated, making easier the interpretation of frequency dependent seismic attributes. The model examples illustrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed method in P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion estimation. The field data example validates the possibility and efficiency in hydrocarbon indication of the estimated P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion.

  1. Band gaps in the low-frequency range based on the two-dimensional phononic crystal plates composed of rubber matrix with periodic steel stubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kunpeng; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the numerical investigation of elastic wave propagation in two-dimensional phononic crystals composed of an array of steel stepped resonators on a thin rubber slab is presented. For the first time the rubber material is used as the matrix of the PCs. With the finite-element method, the dispersion relations of this novel PCs structure and some factors of the band structure are studied. Results show that, with the rubber material as matrix, the PC structures exhibit extremely low-frequency band gaps, in the frequency range of hundreds of Hz or even tens of Hz; the geometrical parameters and the material parameters can modulate the band gaps to different extents. Furthermore, to understand the low-frequency band gaps caused by this new structure, some resonance eigenmodes of the structure are calculated. Results show that the vibration of the unit cell of the structure can be seen as several mass-spring systems, in which the vibration of the steel stepped resonator decides the lower boundary of the first band gap and the vibration of the rubber that is not in contact with the resonator decides the upper boundary.

  2. Crack front échelon instability in mixed mode fracture of a strongly nonlinear elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess the role of elastic nonlinearity in gel fracture, we study the échelon instability in gelatin under mixed mode tensile and antiplane shear loading —i.e. the emergence of segmented crack front structures connected by steps. We evidence the existence of an energy-release-rate-dependent mode mixity threshold. We show that échelons appear via nucleation of localized helical front distortions, and that their emergence is the continuation of the cross-hatching instability of gels and rubbers under pure tensile loading, shifted by the biasing effect of the antiplane shear. This result, at odds with the direct bifurcation predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics, can be assigned to the controlling role of elastic nonlinearity.

  3. Printable elastic conductors with a high conductivity for electronic textile applications.

    PubMed

    Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Jinno, Hiroaki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-01-01

    The development of advanced flexible large-area electronics such as flexible displays and sensors will thrive on engineered functional ink formulations for printed electronics where the spontaneous arrangement of molecules aids the printing processes. Here we report a printable elastic conductor with a high initial conductivity of 738 S cm(-1) and a record high conductivity of 182 S cm(-1) when stretched to 215% strain. The elastic conductor ink is comprised of Ag flakes, a fluorine rubber and a fluorine surfactant. The fluorine surfactant constitutes a key component which directs the formation of surface-localized conductive networks in the printed elastic conductor, leading to a high conductivity and stretchability. We demonstrate the feasibility of our inks by fabricating a stretchable organic transistor active matrix on a rubbery stretchability-gradient substrate with unimpaired functionality when stretched to 110%, and a wearable electromyogram sensor printed onto a textile garment. PMID:26109453

  4. Printable elastic conductors with a high conductivity for electronic textile applications

    PubMed Central

    Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Jinno, Hiroaki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-01-01

    The development of advanced flexible large-area electronics such as flexible displays and sensors will thrive on engineered functional ink formulations for printed electronics where the spontaneous arrangement of molecules aids the printing processes. Here we report a printable elastic conductor with a high initial conductivity of 738 S cm−1 and a record high conductivity of 182 S cm−1 when stretched to 215% strain. The elastic conductor ink is comprised of Ag flakes, a fluorine rubber and a fluorine surfactant. The fluorine surfactant constitutes a key component which directs the formation of surface-localized conductive networks in the printed elastic conductor, leading to a high conductivity and stretchability. We demonstrate the feasibility of our inks by fabricating a stretchable organic transistor active matrix on a rubbery stretchability-gradient substrate with unimpaired functionality when stretched to 110%, and a wearable electromyogram sensor printed onto a textile garment. PMID:26109453

  5. Printable elastic conductors with a high conductivity for electronic textile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Jinno, Hiroaki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-06-01

    The development of advanced flexible large-area electronics such as flexible displays and sensors will thrive on engineered functional ink formulations for printed electronics where the spontaneous arrangement of molecules aids the printing processes. Here we report a printable elastic conductor with a high initial conductivity of 738 S cm-1 and a record high conductivity of 182 S cm-1 when stretched to 215% strain. The elastic conductor ink is comprised of Ag flakes, a fluorine rubber and a fluorine surfactant. The fluorine surfactant constitutes a key component which directs the formation of surface-localized conductive networks in the printed elastic conductor, leading to a high conductivity and stretchability. We demonstrate the feasibility of our inks by fabricating a stretchable organic transistor active matrix on a rubbery stretchability-gradient substrate with unimpaired functionality when stretched to 110%, and a wearable electromyogram sensor printed onto a textile garment.

  6. Impact tests on rubber compression springs for airplane landing gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K

    1930-01-01

    The present report gives the results of tests which were made for the purpose of solving the problem of whether diagrams obtained from pressure tests could be conclusive for the determination of the safe impact coefficients. It is first established that the rubber rings adhere firmly to the compression surfaces during deformation. Suggestions are thus obtained for a constructive simplification of the rubber rings. The hysteresis phenomenon is ascribed to external and internal friction forces. A device for falling tests is then described with which the process of shock absorption with rubber rings was tested.

  7. Laminated rubber articulated joint for the Deep Water Gravity Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillot, F.; Stevenson, A.

    1983-12-01

    The Deep Water Gravity Tower is an articulated structure resting on a fixed base through an articulated joint which is composed of curved laminated rubber pads, made from alternate layers of rubber and metallic shims. The paper first outlines the main design concept with the articulated joint. Some analysis is then provided of the response to imposed rotation and vertical load. This includes a brief description of the results of a finite element analysis. The paper then reviews the test performed on laminated rubber during 1980 and 1981 to assess the feasibility of the articulation: fatigue tests; environmental tests (effect of sea water, temperature, pressure).

  8. Preparation, characterization and conductivity studies of chlorinated natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Subburaj; Ramesan, M. T.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated natural rubber (CNR) was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of chloroform using phase transfer catalyst. The chlorination in CNR was monitored by FTIR and UV spectroscopy and these studies indicated the formation of dichloro cyclopropyl ring to the double bond of natural rubber (NR). XRD and SEM analysis revealed the extent of chlorination in natural rubber. Electrical properties such as AC conductivity, dielectric constant and dielectric loss of CNR was higher than that of NR. Conductivity of NR increased with the increase in the concentration of chlorine percentage. LOI values indicated that the chemical modification imparts better flame resistant to NR.

  9. Interfacial interaction between the epoxidized natural rubber and silica in natural rubber/silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiwen; Jia, Zhixin; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin; Peng, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) as an interfacial modifier was used to improve the mechanical and dynamical mechanical properties of NR/silica composites. In order to reveal the interaction mechanism between ENR and silica, the ENR/Silica model compound was prepared by using an open mill and the interfacial interaction of ENR with silica was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stress-strain testing. The results indicated that the ring-opening reaction occurs between the epoxy groups of ENR chains and Si-OH groups on the silica surfaces and the covalent bonds are formed between two phases, which can improve the dispersion of silica in the rubber matrix and enhance the interfacial combination between rubber and silica. The ring-opening reaction occurs not only in vulcanization process but also in mixing process, meanwhile, the latter seems to be more important due to the simultaneous effects of mechanical force and temperature.

  10. Effect of Nanoclay on Natural Rubber Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Carretero-Gonzalez,J.; Retsos, H.; Verdejo, R.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.; Giannelis, E.; Lopez-Manchado, M.

    2008-01-01

    The inclusion of highly anisotropic clay nanoparticles (nanoclays) in cross-linked natural rubber (NR) provides a more homogeneous distributed network structure and induces an early onset as well as enhancement of crystallization under uniaxial deformation. The molecular structure of the polymer network and its morphological changes during deformation were characterized by using broadband dielectric spectroscopy and in situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction, respectively. It was found that the presence of nanoclay introduces a dual crystallization mechanism due to the alignment of nanoparticles during stretching. The improved properties in NR-nanoclay nanocomposites can be attributed to both microstructural and morphological changes induced by nanoclay as well as to the nanoclay mobility in the NR matrix during crystallization. The interplay of these factors during deformation contributes to the formation of a supernetwork structure containing cross-linked chemical chains, nanofiller, and crystallizable networks with similar length scales.

  11. Polybenzoxazole-filled nitrile butadiene rubber compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor); Guillot, David G. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) having an acrylonitrile content that ranges from approximately 26% by weight to approximately 35% by weight and polybenzoxazole (PBO) fibers. The NBR may be a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene and may be present in the insulation composition in a range of from approximately 45% by weight to approximately 56% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. The PBO fibers may be present in a range of from approximately 3% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. A rocket motor including the insulation composition and a method of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  12. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. PMID:26076611

  13. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  14. Experimental Study and Dynamic Modeling of Metal Rubber Isolating Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Yanguo; Jiang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, dynamic shear mechanical properties of a new metal rubber isolating bearing is tested and studied. The mixed damping model is provided for theoretical modeling of MR isolating bearing, the shear stiffness and damping characteristics of the MR bearing can be analyzed separately and easily discussed, and the mixed damping model is proved to be an rather effective approach. The test results indicate that loading frequency bears little impact over shear property of metal rubber isolating bearing, the total energy consumption of metal rubber isolating bearing increases with the increase in loading amplitude. With the increase in loading amplitude, the stiffness of the isolating bearing will reduce showing its “soft property” and the type of damping force gradually changes to be close to dry friction. The features of “soft property” and dry friction energy consumption of metal rubber isolating bearing are very useful in practical engineering application.

  15. Rubber Characterization with Fatigue and Crack Growth Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perier, Laurent; Favier, Arnaud

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic Mechanical Analysis brings advanced capabilities to generate quantitative dynamic property data of rubber compounds for modelers and end users. Additionally to the recognized DMA testing benefits, a new METRAVIB Analyzer DMA+300 includes new testing solutions for analyzing rubbers mechanical property data under extended testing conditions closer to the real product's life conditions. The DMA+300 is specifically designed and dimensioned for fatigue tests on elastomers and crack growth tests. Combined with new MULTITEST software, DMA+300 makes possible to generate multi harmonics excitation and to control the application of a specific wave form to the specimen of rubber. This paper presents the main benefits available with this machine in the domain of rubber and elastomer applications.

  16. Pressure molding of powdered materials improved by rubber mold insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pressure molding tungsten microspheres is accomplished by applying hydraulic pressure to a silicone rubber mold insert with several barrel shaped chambers which is placed in a steel die cavity. This technique eliminates castings containing shear fractures.

  17. Utilization of surface-treated rubber particles from waste tires

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. |

    1994-12-01

    During a 12-month program, the author successfully demonstrated commercial applications for surface-treated rubber particles in two major markets: footwear (shoe soles and components) and urethane-foam carpet underlay (padding). In these markets, he has clearly demonstrated the ease of using R-4080 and R-4030 surface-treated rubber particles in existing manufacturing plants and processes and have shown that the material meets or exceeds existing standards for performance, quality, and cost-effectiveness. To produce R-4080 and R-4030, vulcanized rubber, whole-tire material is finely ground to particles of nominal 80 and mesh size respectively. Surface treatment is achieved by reacting these rubber particles with chlorine gas. In this report, the author describes the actual test and evaluations of the participant companies, and identifies other potential end uses.

  18. An Illustration of the Bernoulli Effect With a Rubber Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a simple method of demonstrating the Bernoulli effect, by spinning a length of rubber tubing around one's head. A manometer attached to the stationary end of the tube indicates a reduction in pressure. (JR)

  19. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  20. Method for Molding Structural Parts Utilizing Modified Silicone Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor); Snoha, John J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention improves upon a method for molding structural parts from preform material. Preform material to be used for the part is provided. A silicone rubber composition containing entrained air voids is prepared. The silicone rubber and preform material assembly is situated within a rigid mold cavity used to shape the preform material to die desired shape. The entire assembly is heated in a standard heating device so that the thermal expansion of the silicone rubber exerts the pressure necessary to force the preform material into contact with the mold container. The introduction of discrete air voids into the silicone rubber allows for accurately controlled pressure application on the preform material at the cure temperature.

  1. Thermodynamics of a Simple Rubber-Band Heat Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, J. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the basic engine design and nomenclature, develops some relations between the state parameters of the rubber-band system, defines engine efficiency, and compares the Archibald engine with the Carnot engine. (GS)

  2. Elastic properties of hedenbergite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandelin, John; Weidner, Donald J.

    1988-02-01

    The single-crystal elastic moduli of hedenbergite (CaFeSi2O6) hare been measured at 20°C and 1 bar using Brillouin spectroscopy. The moduli are (in gigapascals): C11 = 222, C22 = 176, C23 = 249, C44 = 55, C55 = 63, C66 = 60, C12 = 69, C13 = 79, C33, = 86, C15 = 12, C25 = 13, C35 = 26, C46 = -10. The comparison of elastic properties among Mg-Fe-Ca bearing pyroxenes, known as quadrilateral pyroxenes, reveals only weak variations with changes in composition. Of the four quadrilateral pyroxenes, orthoferrosilite has elastic properties distinctive from the others. The principal differences among these pyroxenes are due to subtle structural differences. In particular, the mechanical linkage between the M2 polyhedral chains in clinopyroxenes enhances the importance of the cation in this site. In contrast to the orthopyroxenes, the aggregate shear modulus μ of the calcium-bearing clinopyroxenes (diopside and hedenbergite) exhibits no dependence on the amount of iron (Fe2+) present in the structure, while the ratio K/μ does. As a result, the compressional and shear acoustic velocities of the calcium-bearing clinopyroxenes show a smaller dependency on iron content than do the orthopyroxenes.

  3. Sensing elasticity from the phase difference of the stepper motor.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Toshikazu; Nishio, Kensuke; Morita, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Yuji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a made-to-order surgical support manipulator with a function that senses the mechanical characteristics of internal organs, and which can be customized based on the maximum grasping force of the patient. The purpose of this study is to establish an elasticity-sensing model that uses the phase difference of the stepper motor based on material strength and to apply it to in vitro organs. In this study, we propose a measurement model and develop a prototype that is used in experiments on silicon rubber and in vitro organs in a dog. Young's modulus E and spring constant K are measured by the prototype and a material testing machine. The results of the prototype showed good agreement with those of the material testing machine, and that the proposed model will be a great help in the development of surgical support manipulators. PMID:24110846

  4. Finite strain crack tip fields in soft incompressible elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Venkat R; Hui, Chung Yuen; Long, Rong

    2008-12-16

    A finite element model (FEM) is used to study the behavior of the large deformation field near the tip of a crack in a soft incompressible plane stress fracture specimen loaded in mode I. Results are obtained for the case of a neo-Hookean solid (ideal rubber) and a hyperelastic solid with exponentially hardening behavior. In contrast to the predictions of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), the near tip stress fields are dominated by the opening stress which shows a 1/R singularity for the neo-Hookean material and a -1/(R ln R) singularity for the exponential hardening solid. We found very similar qualitative behavior in the near tip stress fields despite the very large difference in strain hardening behavior of the two material models. Our result shows that the near tip opening stress is controlled by the far field energy release rate for large applied loads. PMID:19053624

  5. Initiation of rubber biosynthesis: in vitro comparisons of benzophenone-modified diphosphate analogue structure in three natural rubber-producing species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber is synthesized by initiation with one allylic pyrophosphate (APPs) molecule followed by elongation with thousands of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) molecules by the enzyme rubber transferase (a cis-prenyl transferase). To better understand how rubber transferase initiates and binds A...

  6. Evaluation of asphalt-rubber membrane field performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, S.; Gallaway, B. M.; Epps, J. A.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents a record of asphalt-rubber membrane field performance in Texas. An evaluation of performance is presented for forty-five separate projects in thirteen state highway districts. Approximately 850 lane miles of highways are represented by materials constructed as stress absorbing membranes (asphalt-rubber seal coats beneath asphalt concrete overlay). All projects reviewed were constructed between June, 1976 and September, 1981.

  7. Mechanistic study of the rubber-brass adhesion interphase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashirgade, Akshay

    Brass-plated steel tire cords form an essential strengthening component of a radial automobile tire. Adhesion between rubber compound and brass-plated steel tire cord is crucial in governing the overall performance of tires. The rubber-brass interfacial adhesion is influenced by the chemical composition and thickness of the interfacial layer. It has been shown that the interfacial layer consists mainly of sulfides and oxides of copper and zinc. This thesis discusses the effect of changes in the chemical composition and the structure of the interfacial layers due to addition of adhesion promoter resins. Grazing incidence X-Ray Diffraction (GIXRD) experiments were run on sulfidized polished brass coupons previously bonded to six experimental rubber compounds. It was confirmed that heat and humidity conditions lead to physical and chemical changes of the rubber-steel tire cord interfacial layer, closely related to the degree of rubber-brass adhesion. Morphological transformation of the interfacial layer led to loss of adhesion after aging. The adhesion promoter resins inhibit unfavorable morphological changes in the interfacial layer thus stabilizing it during aging and prolonging failure. Tire cord adhesion tests illustrated that the one-component resins improved adhesion after aging using a rubber compound with lower cobalt loading. Based on the acquired diffraction profiles, these resins were also found to impede crystallization of the sulfide layer after aging leading to improved adhesion. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiles, SEM micrographs and AFM images strongly corroborated the findings from GIXRD. FTIR was utilized in a novel way to understand the degradation mechanism due to aging. A model for rubber and interfacial layer degradation is proposed to illustrate the effect of aging and the one-component resins. This interfacial analysis adds valuable new information to our understanding of the complex nature of the rubber-brass bonding

  8. Static and fatigue fracture characteristics of rubber modified epoxy adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, Y.; Miyazaki, K.; Fujii, T.; Okubo, H.; Nejigaka, K.; Kurosawa, K.

    1993-12-31

    A conventional epoxy adhesive is modified with Closs-linked NBR-COOH to increase the fracture toughness. This paper presents the static and fatigue fracture characteristics of the rubber modified epoxy adhesives under Mode 1 loading. The fracture toughness under static loading is measured using Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens. The energy release rate is used as a parameter of fracture toughness. Rubber contents are 2.8% and 5.5% in weight. Generally, toughened adhesives show relatively large plastic deformation ahead the crack tip. The crack extension is thought to be influenced by loading condition. Namely, monotonous loading up to the final failure gives the toughness which is different from the toughness obtained under loading-unloading condition. Therefore, two loading conditions are adopted under static loading in order to show the effect of loading history. Under cyclic loading, the fatigue crack velocity is measured with respect to number of loading cycles. The effect of rubber content on the fatigue crack growth is examined. The effect of adhesive thickness on both static and fatigue fracture also is examined. All tests are conducted at the laboratory condition at room temperature. Following conclusions are obtained from this study. The rubber modified adhesives show higher fracture toughness and fatigue resistance than unmodified one. Higher rubber content always show higher fracture toughness. The effect of rubber content on the fracture toughness is influenced by adhesive thickness. The observed fracture toughness increases with an increase of adhesive thickness while no effect of adherend thickness is found at the present condition. The stable crack extension force is higher than that at the crack starting moment. Rubber modification reduces the fatigue crack velocity. The fracture surface topology becomes different according to rubber content.

  9. Structure properties relationship in electrospun thermoset butyl rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyabanthorn, Nantiya

    Development of breathable elastomeric membranes based upon butyl rubber (IIR) compounds was investigated. These semi-permeable membranes were produced by electrospinning the compounded butyl rubber under appropriate conditions. They were designed to be selectively permeable. Specifically, these elastomeric membranes allowed moisture vapor transport, while maintaining a barrier against liquid water. Additionally, the conductive nature of carbon black in the compounds was shown to allow greater control over membrane thickness than generally observed in electrospun fabrics. Data were presented to show that the excellent chemical resistance of butyl rubber to organic solvents and toxic agents was maintained despite the porous nature of the membranes. Air flow resistance could also be adjusted as functions of processing conditions which related to fiber diameter and porosity of the membrane. Mechanical properties, in addition to various transport properties, are compared to a butyl rubber baseline. The moisture vapor transport properties are compared to expanded PTFE films. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of thermoset elastomeric membranes for producing flexible, selectively permeable barriers. Moreover, It also shows the capability to produce nonwoven materials for applications requiring high elongation (stretch) and porosity. In most elastomer formulations, carbon black is used as filler because of its reinforcing properties. The addition of carbon was also found to be important in the electrospinning of butyl rubber. Carbon black typically results in improved mechanical properties for rubber compounds, however, its conductive properties can also play a role in the resulting fiber structure during the electrospinning process. Carbon black loadings were varied from 0, 25, 50, and 75 parts per hundred rubber (phr). Increased carbon black loading resulted in a larger process window and reduced density and bead formation. Tensile modulus (corrected for changes

  10. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  11. Waste tyre rubberized concrete: properties at fresh and hardened state.

    PubMed

    Aiello, M A; Leuzzi, F

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the properties of various concrete mixtures at fresh and hardened state, obtained by a partial substitution of coarse and fine aggregate with different volume percentages of waste tyres rubber particles, having the same dimensions of the replaced aggregate. Workability, unit weight, compressive and flexural strength and post-cracking behaviour were evaluated and a comparison of the results for the different rubcrete mixtures were proposed in order to define the better mix proportions in terms of mechanical properties of the rubberized concrete. Results showed in this paper were also compared to data reported in literature. Moreover, a preliminary geometrical, physical and mechanical characterization on scrap tyre rubber shreds was made. The rubberized concrete mixtures showed lower unit weight compared to plain concrete and good workability. The results of compressive and flexural tests indicated a larger reduction of mechanical properties of rubcrete when replacing coarse aggregate rather than fine aggregate. On the other hand, the post-cracking behaviour of rubberized concrete was positively affected by the substitution of coarse aggregate with rubber shreds, showing a good energy absorption and ductility indexes in the range observed for fibrous concrete, as suggested by standard (ASTM C1018-97, 1997). PMID:20207128

  12. Optical and Thermal Stability of Oligofluorene/Rubber Luminescent Blend.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Camila G; Faez, Roselena; Péres, Laura O

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes to obtain homogeneous and stable blends of oligo(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-co-phenylene (OF), a conjugated oligomer with strong tendency of formation of excimers in the solid state, and nitrile rubber (NBR). This rubber protection reduces the formation of polymer excimers in the films. The fluorene oligomer was synthesized via Suzuki reaction and incorporated in the nitrile rubber. The films were formed by spin coating and casting techniques on the proportions of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 % (w/w) of OF in the nitrile rubber (NBR). The structural, optical and thermal properties of the films were evaluated with infrared, UV-Vis, fluorescence and thermogravimetry, respectively. The nitrile rubber proved to be essential for the preparation of homogeneous and stable films, since it was not possible to obtain films with only fluorene using the above-mentioned techniques. Furthermore, luminescent properties of OF are unchanged and the excimers formation in the solid state decrease suggesting the efficiency of nitrile rubber as the matrix for making films. PMID:27351668

  13. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  14. Criteria for asphalt-rubber concrete in civil airport pavements: Mixture design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, F. L.; Lytton, R. L.; Hoyt, D.

    1986-07-01

    A mixture design procedure is developed to allow the use of asphalt-rubber binders in concrete for flexible airport pavement. The asphalt-rubber is produced by reacting asphalt with ground, scrap tire rubber to produce the binder for the asphalt-rubber concrete. Procedures for laboratory preparation of alsphalt-rubber binders using an equipment setup that was found by researchers to produce laboratory binders with similar properties to field processes are included. The rubber-asphalt concrete mixture design procedure includes adjustments to the aggregate gradation to permit space for the rubber particles in the asphalt-rubber binder as well as suggested mixing and compaction temperatures, and compaction efforts. While the procedure was used in the laboratory to successfully produce asphalt-rubber concrete mixtures, it should be evaluated in the field to ensure that consistent results can be achieved in a production environment.

  15. Cross-Sectional Elastic Imaging of Arterial Wall Using Intravascular Ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hitoshi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Yoshiro; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2001-07-01

    There have been several studies on the imaging of the distribution of the elasticity of the arterial wall using intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS). In those studies, the elasticity is estimated only during ventricular diastole. However, the viscous characteristics of the smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall are also included in the strain measured during diastole. Alternatively, during systole, the smooth muscle has an almost purely elastic characteristic. However, the IVUS probe moves greatly due to the arrival of the pulsatile wave at the beginning of the ejection period. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method to compensate for the movement of the IVUS probe in order to precisely measure the regional change in thickness of the arterial wall during one cardiac cycle. Basic experiments using a silicone rubber tube, in which pulsatile flow is generated by an artificial heart, determined the two-dimensional (2-D) distribution of the regional change in thickness and the elasticity. The obtained incremental elastic modulus coincides with that determined by the static pressure-strain test. Furthermore, in an in vitro experiment performed on an extracted human iliac artery, the 2-D distribution of elasticity is obtained and compared with pathological results.

  16. Guayule rubber: Cultivation and manufacture. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Rsearch Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of guayule as a natural rubber source. Cultivation methods and locations, physical and chemical properties, economic factors of cultivation through manufacture, production forecasts, effects of mixing with synthetic rubbers, and vulcanization are among the topics discussed. Industrial health hazards, performance in the world market, and applications are considered. (Contains a minimum of 206 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Convergence of the synaptic weights for the elastic net method, and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamasaee, Rahman; Goldberg, Jeffrey B.

    1997-06-01

    Solution procedures for the traveling salesman problem (TSP), i.e. the problem of finding the minimum Hamiltonian circuit in a network of cities, can be divided into two categories: exact methods and approximate (or heuristic) methods. Since TSP is an NP hard problem, good heuristic approaches are of interest. The neural networks heuristic solutions of TSP was initiated by Hopfield and Tank. One such heuristic called the elastic net method is illustrated by the following, an imaginary rubber band is placed at the centroid of the distribution of n cities. Then some finite number (m greater than n) of points (nodes) on this rubber band changes their positions according to the dynamics of the method. Eventually they describe a tour around the cities. We express the dynamics and stability of the elastic net algorithm. We show that if a unique node is converging to a city, then the synaptic strength between them approaches one. Then we generalize to the case where more than one node converges to a city. Furthermore, a typical application that could make use of the elastic net method (e.g. multi-target tracking) will be pointed out for later studies. In order to verify the proof of the concept and the associated theorems, computer simulations were conducted for a reasonable number of cities.

  18. Predicting the glass transition temperature as function of crosslink density and polymer interactions in rubber compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Escamard, Gabriella; De Rosa, Claudio; Auriemma, Finizia

    2016-05-01

    Crosslink sulfur density in rubber compounds and interactions in polymer blends are two of the composition elements that affect the rubber compound properties and glass transition temperature (Tg), which is a marker of polymer properties related to its applications. Natural rubber (NR), butadiene rubber (BR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) compounds were investigated using calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results indicate that the Di Marzio's and Schneider's Models predict with accuracy the dependence of Tg on crosslink density and composition in miscible blends, respectively, and that the two model may represent the base to study the relevant "in service" properties of real rubber compounds.

  19. Chrome-tanned leather shavings as a filler of butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Przepiórkowska, A; Chrońska, K; Zaborski, M

    2007-03-01

    The noxious wastes from the tanning industry such as chrome-tanned leather shavings were used as the only filler of rubber mixes containing carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (XNBR) or butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), and a dispersing agent Limanol PEV (Schill & Seilacher). The best form addition of leather powder to the rubber mixes is mixed the waste protein with zinc oxide. The leather powder added to the rubber mixes improves the mechanical properties: tensile strength (T(s)), elongation at break (epsilon(b)) and increase the cross-linking density of carboxylated XNBR and NBR rubber mixes. Satisfactory results of these studies are presented in this work. PMID:16942836

  20. Dynamically vulcanized biobased polylactide/natural rubber blend material with continuous cross-linked rubber phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Yuan, Daosheng; Xu, Chuanhui

    2014-03-26

    We prepared a biobased material, dynamically vulcanized polylactide (PLA)/natural rubber (NR) blend in which the cross-linked NR phase owned a continuous network-like dispersion. This finding breaks the traditional concept of a sea-island morphology formed after dynamic vulcanization of the blends. The scan electron microscopy and dissolution/swell experiments provided the direct proof of the continuous cross-linked NR phase. This new biobased PLA/NR blend material with the novel structure is reported for the first time in the field of dynamic vulcanization and shows promise for development for various functional applications. PMID:24621374

  1. Nucleon elastic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    D. Day

    2007-03-01

    The nucleon form factors are still the subject of active investigation even after an experimental effort spanning 50 years. This is because they are of critical importance to our understanding of the electromagnetic properties of nuclei and provide a unique testing ground for QCD motivated models of nucleon structure. Progress in polarized beams, polarized targets and recoil polarimetry have allowed an important and precise set of data to be collected over the last decade. I will review the experimental status of elastic electron scattering from the nucleon along with an outlook for future progress.

  2. Dynamic Elastic Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    This is an exploration of dynamic tides on elastic bodies. The body is thought of as a dynamical system described by its modes of oscillation. The dynamics of these modes are governed by differential equations that depend on the rheology. The modes are damped by dissipation. Tidal friction occurs as exterior bodies excite the modes and the modes act back on the tide raising body. The whole process is governed by a closed set of differential equations. Standard results from tidal theory are recovered in a two-timescale approximation to the solution of these differential equations.

  3. Soft-materials elastic and shear moduli measurement using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markidou, Anna; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a soft-material elastic modulus and shear modulus sensor using piezoelectric cantilevers. A piezoelectric cantilever is consisted of a highly piezoelectric layer, e.g., lead-zirconate-titanate bonded to a nonpiezoelectric layer, e.g., stainless steel. Applying an electric field in the thickness direction causes a piezoelectric cantilever to bend, generating an axial displacement or force. When a piezoelectric cantilever is in contact with an object, this electric field-generated axial displacement is reduced due to the resistance by the object. With a proper design of the piezoelectric cantilever's geometry, its axial displacements with and without contacting the object could be accurately measured. From these measurements the elastic modulus of the object can be deduced. In this study, we tailored the piezoelectric cantilevers for measuring the elastic and shear moduli of tissue-like soft materials with forces in the submilli Newton to milliNewton range. Elastic moduli and shear moduli of soft materials were measured using piezoelectric cantilevers with a straight tip and an L-shaped tip, respectively. Using gelatin and commercial rubber material as model soft tissues, we showed that a piezoelectric cantilever 1.5-2cm long could measure the elastic modulus and the shear modulus of a small soft material sample (1-3mm wide) in the small strain range (<1%). For samples 5mm high, the resultant compressive (shear) strains were less than 0.5% (1%). The measurements were validated by (1) comparing the measured Young's modulus of the commercial rubber sample with its known value and (2) by measuring both the Young's modulus and shear modulus on the samples and confirming the thus deduced Poisson's ratios with the separately measured Poisson's ratios.

  4. Quantification of the effects of crumb rubber in CRM binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, Bradley James

    Since the mid-1960s, crumb rubber has been used to modify asphalt binders. The crumb rubber, also referred to as crumb rubber modifier (CRM), is produced by grinding scrap tires into fine powders with particulate sizes generally smaller than 2 mm. In most cases, CRM is incorporated into binder using the "wet" method, where the crumb rubber is blended with the asphalt binder. The binder modification that occurs during this blending process is physical in nature, where the lighter oils of the binder diffuse into the CRM particles. As the rubber particles absorb the oils, the particles swell; therefore, increasing the viscosity and stiffness of the CRM binder. This research evaluated the viscosity and complex shear modulus (G*) of 36 different laboratory-produced CRM binder combinations (two CRM processing methods, two CRM contents, three CRM sizes, and three binder sources) and three base binders. From this investigation, a method was developed to quantify the effects of the crumb rubber modification. These effects were identified as the interaction effect (IE) resulting from the diffusion of the lighter binder factions into the rubber particles and the particle effect (PE), which is the result of the change in the rheological properties due to the filling effect of the particulate CRM. Following statistical analyses of the results, it was determined that CRM binders had greater viscosity and complex shear modulus (G*) values than the base binders. These values increased with CRM content. The CRMs having higher surface area (i.e., ambient ground and finer CRM) generally had higher IE values, while the PE generally increased with particle size. HP-GPC testing indicated that the CRM binders also had higher large molecular size (LMS) fractions and lower small molecular size (SMS) fractions as determined from the HP-GPC profiles. As the LMS increased and the SMS decreased, the IE increased. Two of the three binder sources followed this trend, indicating that those

  5. Filled liquid silicone rubbers: possibilities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul; Benslimane, Mohamed Y.; Skov, Anne L.

    2014-03-01

    Liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs) have been shown to possess very favorable properties as dielectric electroactive polymers due to their very high breakdown strengths (up to 170 V/μm) combined with their fast response, relatively high tear strength, acceptable Young's modulus as well as they can be filled with permittivity enhancing fillers. However, LSRs possess large viscosity, especially when additional fillers are added. Therefore both mixing and coating of the required thin films become difficult. The solution so far has been to use solvent to dilute the reaction mixture in order both to ensure better particle dispersion as well as allowing for film formation properties. We show that the mechanical properties of the films as well as the electrical breakdown strength can be affected, and that the control of the amount of solvent throughout the coating process is essential for solvent borne processes. Another problem encountered when adding solvent to the highly filled reaction mixture is the loss of tension in the material upon large deformations. These losses are shown to be irreversible and happen within the first large-strain cycle.

  6. Theory of epithelial elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    We propose an elastic theory of epithelial monolayers based on a two-dimensional discrete model of dropletlike cells characterized by differential surface tensions of their apical, basal, and lateral sides. We show that the effective tissue bending modulus depends on the apicobasal differential tension and changes sign at the transition from the flat to the fold morphology. We discuss three mechanisms that stabilize the finite-wavelength fold structures: Physical constraint on cell geometry, hard-core interaction between non-neighboring cells, and bending elasticity of the basement membrane. We show that the thickness of the monolayer changes along the waveform and thus needs to be considered as a variable rather than a parameter. Next we show that the coupling between the curvature and the thickness is governed by the apicobasal polarity and that the amplitude of thickness modulation along the waveform is proportional to the apicobasal differential tension. This suggests that intracellular stresses can be measured indirectly by observing easily measurable morphometric parameters. We also study the mechanics of three-dimensional structures with cylindrical symmetry.

  7. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  8. Design guidance for elastic followup

    SciTech Connect

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed.

  9. Interfacial separation between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces: comparison of experiment with theory.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2009-01-01

    We study the average separation between an elastic solid and a hard solid, with a nominally flat but randomly rough surface, as a function of the squeezing pressure. We present experimental results for a silicon rubber (PDMS) block with a flat surface squeezed against an asphalt road surface. The theory shows that an effective repulsive pressure acts between the surfaces of the form p∼exp(-u/u(0)), where u is the average separation between the surfaces and u(0) a constant of the order of the root-mean-square roughness, in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21817215

  10. Interfacial separation between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces: comparison of experiment with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2009-01-01

    We study the average separation between an elastic solid and a hard solid, with a nominally flat but randomly rough surface, as a function of the squeezing pressure. We present experimental results for a silicon rubber (PDMS) block with a flat surface squeezed against an asphalt road surface. The theory shows that an effective repulsive pressure acts between the surfaces of the form p~exp(-u/u0), where u is the average separation between the surfaces and u0 a constant of the order of the root-mean-square roughness, in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Tear energy and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber/styrene-butadiene rubber blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, F.; Akabori, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kawazura, T.; Kawahara, S.

    2009-08-01

    Strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR), dispersed in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), was investigated in relation to dimensional feature of a dispersoid and crosslink density of NR by measuring tear energy (G) of crosslinked NR/SBR blends. The crosslinked NR/SBR blends in ratios of 1/9 and 3/7 by weight were prepared by mixing masticated NR and SBR with an internal mixer at a rotor speed of 30 rpm, followed by crosslinking with dicumyl peroxide on a hot press at 444 K for 60 min. The G, measured in wide-ranges of temperature and tear rate, was superposed into a master curve with a Williams-Landel-Ferry shift factor. The G of the NR/SBR(3/7) blend abruptly decreased to a level comparable to that of SBR at about melting temperature of NR crystals formed on straining. The temperature, at which the dramatic decrease in the G occurred, was associated with the dimensional feature of the NR dispersoid and the crosslink density.

  12. About the cure kinetics in natural rubber/styrene Butadiene rubber blends at 433 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2012-08-01

    Vulcanized blends of elastomers are employed in several goods mainly to improve physical properties and reduce costs. One of the most used blends of this kind is that composed by natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). The cure kinetic of these blends depends mainly on the compound formulation and the cure temperature and time. The preparation method of the blends can influence the mechanical properties of the vulcanized compounds. In this work the cure kinetic at 433 K of NR/SBR blends vulcanized with the system sulfur/TBBS (N-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) is analyzed in samples prepared by mechanical mixing and solution blending. The two methods produce elastomer domains of NR and SBR, which present different microstructure due to the cure level attained during vulcanization. The cure kinetics is studied by means of rheometer tests and the model proposed by Kamal and Sourour. The analysis of the cure rate is presented and is related to the structure obtained during the vulcanization process.

  13. A novel use of bio-based natural fibers, polymers, and rubbers for composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Sunny Jitendra

    The composites, materials, and packaging industries are searching for alternative materials to attain environmental sustainability. Bio-plastics are highly desired and current microbially-derived bio-plastics, such as PHA (poly-(hydroxy alkanoate)), PHB (poly-(hydroxybutyrate)), and PHBV (poly-(beta-hydroxy butyrate-co-valerate)) could be engineered to have similar properties to conventional thermoplastics. Poly-(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a bio-degradable aliphatic polyester that is produced by a wide range of microorganisms. Basic PHB has relatively high glass transition and melting temperatures. To improve flexibility for potential packaging applications, PHB is synthesized with various co-polymers such as Poly-(3-hydroxyvalerate) (HV) to decrease the glass and melting temperatures and, since there is improved melt stability at lower processing temperatures, broaden the processing window. However, previous work has shown that this polymer is too brittle, temperature-sensitive, and hydrophilic to meet packaging material physical requirements. Therefore, the proposed work focuses on addressing the needs for bio-derived and bio-degradable materials by creating a range of composite materials using natural fibers as reinforcement agents in bio-polymers and bio- plastic-rubber matrices. The new materials should possess properties lacking in PHBV and broaden the processing capabilities, elasticity, and improve the mechanical properties. The first approach was to create novel composites using poly-(beta-hydroxy butyrate-co-valerate) (PHBV) combined with fibers from invasive plants such as common reed (Phragmites australis), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), and water celery ( Vallisneria americana). The composites were manufactured using traditional processing techniques of extrusion compounding followed by injection molding of ASTM type I parts. The effects of each bio-fiber at 2, 5, and 10% loading on the mechanical, morphological, rheological, and thermal

  14. The phenology pattern of rubber trees in plantation and its impacts on rubber tree structure, water and carbon cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Mudd, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    Commercial rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis) is originally native to the Amazon rainforest and it has become one of the important commercial crops in Mainland Southeast Asia. Similarly to some trees species in Amazon but quite distinctly from other native forests in Southeast Asia, rubber tree sheds its leaves in the middle of dry season and flushes new leaves before the onset of the wet season. Moreover, the mountane mainland Southeast Asia is heavily influenced by the monsoon climate which has most the precipitation in the wet season while almost no rainfall in the dry season. It is believed that the phenology pattern of rubber interacted with local climate would not only regulate the seasonal rubber plantation structures but also further alter the local energy and water budget. However, it is still lack of solid understandings of how the phenology patterns in terms of the leaf area index (LAI) changes of the rubber tree response to environmental drivers. The study tries to shed lights on the issue from analyses of a various types of in-situ field data combined with 3 years' tower flux measurements collected within the rubber plantations. It concludes that: 1) Both the monthly tree height increment and the monthly biomass accumulation are highly correlated with the LAI changes, which have the low rate of changes in the dry season versus the relative high rate of changes in the wet season; 2) the daily evapotranspiration (ET) of the rubber tree is very sensitive to the daily LAI changes in the dry season (R2 > 0.9); 3) the LAI changes, especially the leaf drops, are majorly determined by the accumulated precipitation in the past three months.

  15. Cancer mortality among male workers in the Polish rubber industry.

    PubMed

    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Wilczyńska, U; Kaczmarek, T; Szymczak, W

    1991-01-01

    The rubber industry, acknowledged by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to be a cancer risk technology is, because of difficulty in identifying causal factors, the subject of intensive epidemiological studies in many countries. In the presented study, cancer risk in the rubber industry was evaluated on the basis of long-term observation (1945-1985) of a cohort of 6978 male workers employed in a rubber goods factory, predominantly engaged in producing rubber footwear. The reference group was the general male population of Poland. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), calculated by means of the person-years method, were used in the evaluation of death risk. The observation of a whole cohort indicated an excess of cancer, in general (approx 12%), lung cancer (approx 40%) and gallbladder cancer (approx fourfold). In the subcohorts, distinguished according to peculiarities of individual production sections, cancer risk of the large intestine and larynx was significantly increased. The highest cancer risk was found in compounding, mixing, milling and vulcanizing sections. Hence, beta-naphthylamine, benzidine and solvents (benzene) were used in technological processes in the past, bladder cancer and leukemia were considered as most specific for the rubber industry. In the cohort observed, the risk of death from bladder cancer was significantly increased only in those who had been employed during the years 1945-1953, namely during the period when beta-naphthylamine was in use. No excess of deaths from leukemia was observed. PMID:1799640

  16. Occupational nitrosamine exposure. 1. Rubber and tire industry

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegelhalder, B.; Preussmann, R.

    1983-09-01

    To determine the role of N-nitrosamines in the known increased cancer risk of rubber workers, air concentrations of such carcinogens were measured by area sampling or personal monitoring in 19 factories. N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) were found regularly, the air concentrations varying between 0.1 and 380 micrograms/m/sup 3/ personal monitoring. The mean concentration was usually in the range of 1-10 micrograms/m/sup 3/. Several other nitrosamines could be detected in certain production branches. In retail shops and storage rooms of tires NDMA and NMOR were found. Most rubber chemicals based on amines are contaminated with N-nitrosamines, but this contamination cannot explain the air concentrations of nitrosamines found. The occurrence of nitrosamines mainly depends upon their formation during production of rubber and rubber products from used vulcanisation accelerators based on amines and the presence of nitrosating agents, such as diphenylnitrosamine (retarder A) and of nitrous gases, in products or production areas. Elimination of one or both precursors for nitrosamine formation resulted in significant reduction of aerial contamination of nitrosamines. The results are discussed in regard to the mechanisms of nitrosamine formation during rubber production, as basis for future epidemiological studies and their potential for exposure prevention.

  17. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    DOEpatents

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  18. Characterization of asphalt cements modified with crumbed rubber from discarded tires. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, W.H.; Negulescu, I.I.

    1994-11-01

    The potential legislative requirement for incorporation of scrap rubber into asphalt blends mandated a thorough evaluation of the influence of scrap rubber additives on the physical properties and aging characteristics of rubber/asphalt blends. Blends with up to 20 percent ground vulcanized rubber (both crumb and 200 mesh powder particles) from recycled tires were prepared with asphalt cements of various grades (AC5 - AC30) and evaluated using DMA. Blends produced from powdered rubber particles exhibited Newtonian behavior at high temperatures; similar behavior was not observed with crumb rubber blends. The mechanical properties of asphalt-rubber blends depend upon the concentration of rubber additives, the particle dimensions, and the chemical composition of the asphalt.

  19. Microbial detoxification of waste rubber material by wood-rotting fungi.

    PubMed

    Bredberg, Katarina; Andersson, B Erik; Landfors, Eva; Holst, Olle

    2002-07-01

    The extensive use of rubber products, mainly tires, and the difficulties to recycle those products, has resulted in world wide environmental problems. Microbial devulcanisation is a promising way to increase the recycling of rubber materials. One obstacle is that several microorganisms tested for devulcanisation are sensitive to rubber additives. A way to overcome this might be to detoxify the rubber material with fungi prior to the devulcanisation. In this study, 15 species of white-rot and brown-rot fungi have been screened with regard to their capacity to degrade an aromatic model compound in the presence of ground waste tire rubber. The most effective fungus, Resinicium bicolor, was used for detoxification of rubber material. Increase in growth of the desulfurising bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in presence of the rubber treated with Resinicium bicolor compared to untreated rubber demonstrated that detoxification with fungi is possible. PMID:12094797

  20. Producing ground scrap tire rubber: A comparison between ambient and cryogenic technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    Prior to 1985, few, if any scrap tires were processed. The Minnesota program changed all that. The equipment first introduced to process scrap tires consisted of redesigned wood or metal shredders. The performance of these systems left much to be desired. In the past 10 years, many companies and equipment systems, designed especially for scrap tires, have come into existence. Until recently, scrap tires were typically processed by ambient systems. These systems consist of a mechanical process, which cuts and or grinds whole tire rubber into the desired sized particle at room temperatures. Historically, producing ground rubber, like all other rubber processing, was done by an ambient processes system. Within the last several years, cryogenic processing of scrap tires has been introduced for the preparation of ground rubber. In the cryogenic process, rubber is introduced into a bath of liquid nitrogen, instantly freezing the rubber. Once embrittled, the rubber is struck with an impact devise, effectively shattering the rubber.

  1. Recycling of gamma irradiated inner tubes in butyl based rubber compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaağaç, Bağdagül; Şen, Murat; Deniz, Veli; Güven, Olgun

    2007-12-01

    Recycling of gamma irradiated inner tubes made of butyl rubber in butyl based rubber compounds was studied. Gamma irradiated inner tube wastes and commercial butyl rubber crumbs devulcanized by conventional methods were replaced with butyl rubber up to 15 phr in the compound recipe. The rheological and mechanical properties and carbon black dispersion degree for both types of compounds were measured and then compared to those of virgin butyl rubber compound. It is well known that mechanical properties are deteriorated when rubber crumb is added to the virgin compound. The deterioration in the mechanical properties for the compounds prepared by recycling of irradiated inner tubes at 120 kGy is much lower than the compounds prepared by using commercial butyl crumbs. It has been observed that gamma irradiated used inner tubes were compatible with butyl rubber and could be recycled within butyl based rubber compounds.

  2. Scaling, elasticity, and CLPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, Eugene J.

    1994-01-01

    The first few viewgraphs describe the general solution properties of linear elasticity theory which are given by the following two statements: (1) for stress B.C. on S(sub sigma) and zero displacement B.C. on S(sub u) the altered displacements u(sub i)(*) and the actual stresses tau(sub ij) are elastically dependent on Poisson's ratio nu alone: thus the actual displacements are given by u(sub i) = mu(exp -1)u(sub i)(*); and (2) for zero stress B.C. on S(sub sigma) and displacement B.C. on S(sub u) the actual displacements u(sub i) and the altered stresses tau(sub ij)(*) are elastically dependent on Poisson's ratio nu alone: thus the actual stresses are given by tau(sub ij) = E tau(sub ij)(*). The remaining viewgraphs describe the minimum parameter formulation of the general classical laminate theory plate problem as follows: The general CLT plate problem is expressed as a 3 x 3 system of differential equations in the displacements u, v, and w. The eighteen (six each) A(sub ij), B(sub ij), and D(sub ij) system coefficients are ply-weighted sums of the transformed reduced stiffnesses (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k); the (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k) in turn depend on six reduced stiffnesses (Q(sub ij))(sub k) and the material and geometry properties of the k(sup th) layer. This paper develops a method for redefining the system coefficients, the displacement components (u,v,w), and the position components (x,y) such that a minimum parameter formulation is possible. The pivotal steps in this method are (1) the reduction of (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k) dependencies to just two constants Q(*) = (Q(12) + 2Q(66))/(Q(11)Q(22))(exp 1/2) and F(*) - (Q(22)/Q(11))(exp 1/2) in terms of ply-independent reference values Q(sub ij); (2) the reduction of the remaining portions of the A, B, and D coefficients to nondimensional ply-weighted sums (with 0 to 1 ranges) that are independent of Q(*) and F(*); and (3) the introduction of simple coordinate stretchings for u, v, w and x,y such that the process is

  3. Studies on nitrile rubber degradation in zinc bromide completion fluid and its prevention by surface fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Cantu, Yadira Itzel

    Poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) or nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) is frequently used as an O-ring material in the oil extraction industry due to its excellent chemical properties and resistance to oil. However, degradation of NBR gaskets is known to occur during the well completion and oil extraction process where packers are exposed to completion fluids such as ZnBr2 brine. Under these conditions NBR exhibits accelerated chemical degradation resulting in embrittlement and cracking. Samples of NBR, poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) and poly(butadiene) (PB) have been exposed to ZnBr2 based completion fluid, and analyzed by ATR and diffuse reflectance IR. Analysis shows the ZnBr2 based completion fluid promotes hydrolysis of the nitrile group to form amides and carboxylic groups. Analysis also shows that carbon-carbon double bonds in NBR are unaffected after short exposure to zinc bromide based completion fluid, but are quickly hydrolyzed in acidic bromide mixtures. Although fluoropolymers have excellent chemical resistance, their strength is less than nitrile rubber and replacing the usual gasket materials with fluoroelastomers is expensive. However, a fluoropolymer surface on a nitrile elastomer can provide the needed chemical resistance while retaining their strength. In this study, we have shown that this can be achieved by direct fluorination, a rather easy and inexpensive process. Samples of NBR O-rings have been fluorinated by exposure to F2 and F2/HF mixtures at various temperatures. Fluorination with F 2 produces the desired fluoropolymer layer; however, fluorination by F2/HF mixtures gave a smoother fluorinated layer at lower temperatures and shorter times. Fluorinated samples were exposed to ZnBr2 drilling fluid and solvents. Elemental analysis shows that the fluorinated layer eliminates ZnBr2 diffusion into the NBR polymeric matrix. It was also found that surface fluorination significantly retards the loss of mechanical properties such as elasticity, tensile

  4. Elastic recoil detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, W. M. A.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    1993-07-01

    In elastic recoil detection (ERD) one determines the yield and energy of particles ejected out of the surface region of samples under MeV ion bombardment. By application of this surface and thin film analysis technique one can obtain quantitative information concerning the depth distribution of light elements in a sample to be analysed. The quantitativity and the depth resolving power are based on knowledge of the recoil cross section and the stopping power of high-energy ions in matter. This paper reviews the fundamentals of this technique and the various experimental methods for recoil identification. Furthermore, important features for material analysis, such as detection limits, depth resolution and elemental range are discussed. Some emphasis is put on the conversion of the spectral contribution of the elements to atomic concentrations in the films for several representative cases. Throughout the review numerous examples are given to illustrate the features of ERD and to demonstrate empirically the accuracy of the quantification method.

  5. Study on mechanical properties of laminated rubber bearing with small shape factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mazda, T.; Ootori, Y.; Yabana, S.; Hirata, K.; Ishida, K.

    1995-12-01

    Laminated rubber bearings with a small shape factor are regarded as one of the most promising isolation devices to reduce the vertical seismic load of a nuclear power plant. In this study, three types of natural rubber bearings with different aspect ratios (diameter/total thickness of rubber) and one high-damping rubber bearing are tested under varied loading conditions. Basic characteristics and ultimate characteristics of the bearings are made clear, and applicability of estimation formula and analysis method are verified.

  6. Elastomeric optical fiber sensors and method for detecting and measuring events occurring in elastic materials

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Capps, Gary J.; Smith, David B.; White, Clifford P.

    1994-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing means for the detection and measurement of events such as dynamic loadings imposed upon elastic materials including cementitious materials, elastomers, and animal body components and/or the attrition of such elastic materials are provided. One or more optical fibers each having a deformable core and cladding formed of an elastomeric material such as silicone rubber are embedded in the elastic material. Changes in light transmission through any of the optical fibers due the deformation of the optical fiber by the application of dynamic loads such as compression, tension, or bending loadings imposed on the elastic material or by the attrition of the elastic material such as by cracking, deterioration, aggregate break-up, and muscle, tendon, or organ atrophy provide a measurement of the dynamic loadings and attrition. The fiber optic sensors can be embedded in elastomers subject to dynamic loadings and attrition such as commonly used automobiles and in shoes for determining the amount and frequency of the dynamic loadings and the extent of attrition. The fiber optic sensors are also useable in cementitious material for determining the maturation thereof.

  7. Design of Self-Healing Supramolecular Rubbers by Introducing Ionic Cross-Links into Natural Rubber via a Controlled Vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Liming; Lin, Baofeng; Liang, Xingquan; Chen, Yukun

    2016-07-13

    Introducing ionic associations is one of the most effective approaches to realize a self-healing behavior for rubbers. However, most of commercial rubbers are nonpolar rubbers without now available functional groups to be converted into ionic groups. In this paper, our strategy was based on a controlled peroxide-induced vulcanization to generate massive ionic cross-links via polymerization of zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) in natural rubber (NR) and exploited it as a potential self-healable material. We controlled vulcanization process to retard the formation of covalent cross-link network, and successfully generated a reversible supramolecular network mainly constructed by ionic cross-links. Without the restriction of covalent cross-linkings, the NR chains in ionic supramolecular network had good flexibility and mobility. The nature that the ionic cross-links was easily reconstructed and rearranged facilitating the self-healing behavior, thereby enabling a fully cut sample to rejoin and retain to its original properties after a suitable self-healing process at ambient temperature. This study thus demonstrates a feasible approach to impart an ionic association induced self-healing function to commercial rubbers without ionic functional groups. PMID:27337545

  8. The First Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girill, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Boyle-Mariotte gas law was formulated in terms of pneumatic springs," subsumed by Hooke under his own stress-strain relation, and generally regarded as a law of elasticity. The subsequent development of Boyle's principle and elasticity provide thought-provoking test cases for Kuhn's notations of paradigm and puzzle solving in physics.…

  9. Ethylene-Propylene Terpolymer Rubber Processing by Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaila, Elena N.; Zuga, Maria Daniela T.; Martin, Diana I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Matei, Constantin I.

    2007-04-01

    The investigations on the cross-linking by accelerated electrons of 6.23 MeV in lowly unsaturated elastomers of EPDM (ethylene-propylene terpolymer rubber) type are presented. Two rubber blends based EPDM were prepared and irradiated at different doses up to 250kGy: blend A - based on EPDM maleinized with polyethylene, zinc oxide, plasticizers, filler, and blend B - based on EPDM / PE (50 % EPDM and 50% polyethylene). Blends were prepared on a laboratory electrically heated rubber mill at temperatures of 150-160°C to enable the polyethylene (PE) melting to be reached. Plates of 150 × 150 × 2 mm were obtained in a laboratory electrical press at 170°C.

  10. Morphology development of rubber-modified epoxy thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.; Ward, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy thermosets have been widely used as high performance adhesives and matrix resins for composites due to their outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, such as high modulus and tensile strength, high glass transition temperature, high thermal stability, and moisture resistance. Incorporation of a secondary rubbery phase into the glassy epoxy matrix can improve impact and fracture toughness of epoxy thermosets without sacrificing the other desirable properties of the neat epoxy thermoset. During the curing process, the initial homogeneous solution of epoxy resin-curing agent-rubber generally forms rubber-rich and epoxy-rich phases by a phase separation process which is arrested by gelation or vitrification. The final morphology developed by the cure depends on relative rates of cure reaction and phase separation. Cure conditions and the initial rubber composition control the morphology of the system and thus control the mechanical properties of the system.

  11. Stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, O.; Taya, M.

    1995-12-31

    Thermo-mechanical properties of a composite of rubber embedded by carbon fill has been studied from the viewpoint of developing an electric device. The objective of the present study is to show stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber by using a mixed-type finite element method. Based on the condition o plane strain, the geometry of composite material is taken as the two types of orientation of carbon fiber, which are distributed regularly according the specified volume fraction along the horizontal and vertical directions in the base material of rubber. The loading condition is assumed to be the two types of axial and shearing deformations. Through the calculated results of equivalent and mean stress distributions and the load-deflection curve, effects of the geometry size, the carbon fiber orientation and the loading condition are clarified. The results for the typical axial deformation is compared with the experimental results.

  12. EB-promoted recycling of waste tire rubber with polyolefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Bárány, Tamás; Czvikovszky, Tibor

    2012-09-01

    Despite the fact that more and more methods and solutions are used in the recycling of polymers, there are still some problems, especially in the recycling of cross-linked materials such as rubber. Usually the biggest problem is the lack of compatibility between the cross-linked rubber and the thermoplastic matrix. In this study we applied ground tire rubber (GTR) as recycled material. The GTR was embedded into polyethylene (PE) and polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (PE/EVA) matrices. In order to increase the compatibility of the components electron beam (EB) irradiation was applied. The results showed that the irradiation has a beneficial effect on the polymer-GTR interfacial connection. The EB treatment increased not only the tensile strength but also the elongation at break. The irradiation had also positive effect on the impact strength properties.

  13. Modulus enhancement of natural rubber through the dispersion size reduction of protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved mechanical properties of natural rubber are required for various rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced aggregates ...

  14. 75 FR 51981 - Polychloroprene Rubber from Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation of Finding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... polychloroprene rubber from Japan. See Polychloroprene Rubber from Japan, 38 FR 33593 (December 6, 1973). On... Antidumping Duty Order; Polychloroprene Rubber from Japan, 70 FR 44893 (August 4, 2005). On July 9, 2010, the Department initiated a sunset review of this finding. See Initiation of Five-year (``Sunset'') Review, 75...

  15. Occupational vitiligo due to unsuspected presence of phenolic antioxidant byproducts in commercial bulk rubber

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.A.; Mathias, C.G.; Priddy, M.; Molina, D.; Grote, A.A.; Halperin, W.E.

    1988-06-01

    We investigated the occurrence of cutaneous depigmentation (vitiligo) among employees of a company that manufactured hydraulic pumps. The interiors of these pumps were injection-molded with rubber. We identified a small but significant cluster of vitiligo cases among a group of employees who frequently handled the rubber used in this injection molding process. Although none of the additives specified in the rubber formulations was a phenolic or catecholic derivative, known to be potential causes of chemically induced vitiligo, gas chromatographic analysis identified a para-substituted phenol (2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, DTBP) in solid samples of the most frequently used rubber. Surface wipe analysis confirmed that workers could be exposed to DTBP from simple handling of the rubber. We subsequently established that the solid bulk rubber used as the base in these stock rubber formulations contained both DTBP and smaller quantities of p-tert-butylphenol. Both had formed as unsuspected byproducts during chemical synthesis of two antioxidants added to the solid bulk rubber by a major rubber supplier. We conclude that the unsuspected presence of potential chemical depigmenting agents in solid bulk rubber, from which industrial rubber products are formulated, may contribute to the occurrence of occupational vitiligo, and that a simple review of ingredients in rubber formulations is inadequate to detect their presence.

  16. 40 CFR 428.80 - Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. 428.80 Section 428.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Wet Digestion Reclaimed Rubber Subcategory § 428.80 Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to process waste...

  17. 40 CFR 428.80 - Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. 428.80 Section 428.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Wet Digestion Reclaimed Rubber Subcategory § 428.80 Applicability; description of the wet digestion... discharges resulting from the production of reclaimed rubber by use of the wet digestion process....

  18. 40 CFR 428.80 - Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. 428.80 Section 428.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Wet Digestion Reclaimed Rubber Subcategory § 428.80 Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to process waste...

  19. 40 CFR 428.80 - Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. 428.80 Section 428.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Wet Digestion Reclaimed Rubber Subcategory § 428.80 Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to process waste...

  20. 40 CFR 428.80 - Applicability; description of the wet digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... digestion reclaimed rubber subcategory. 428.80 Section 428.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Wet Digestion Reclaimed Rubber Subcategory § 428.80 Applicability; description of the wet digestion... discharges resulting from the production of reclaimed rubber by use of the wet digestion process....

  1. 21 CFR 177.1640 - Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1640 Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene identified in...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1640 - Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1640 Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene identified in...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1640 - Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1640 Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene identified in...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1640 - Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1640 Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene identified in...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1640 - Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. 177... Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1640 Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene. Polystyrene and rubber-modified polystyrene identified in this section may be safely used as components of...

  6. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb...

  7. Toughness of natural rubber composites reinforced with hydrolyzed and modified wheat gluten aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The toughness of natural rubber can be improved by using fillers for various rubber applications. Dry wheat gluten is a protein from wheat flour and is sufficiently rigid for rubber reinforcement. The wheat gluten was hydrolyzed to reduce its particle size and microfluidized to reduce and homogenize...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10579 - Carbon black derived from the pyrolysis of rubber tire shreds (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pyrolysis of rubber tire shreds (generic). 721.10579 Section 721.10579 Protection of Environment... pyrolysis of rubber tire shreds (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... rubber tire shreds (PMN P-10-367) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  9. 40 CFR 428.30 - Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... solution crumb rubber subcategory. 428.30 Section 428.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.30 Applicability; description of the solution crumb...

  10. 77 FR 31875 - Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same, DN 2897; the Commission is... importation of certain rubber resins and processes for manufacturing same. The complaint names as...

  11. 7 CFR 3201.93 - Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products. 3201.93... FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.93 Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products. (a) Definition. Products that help clean, nourish, protect, and restore leather, vinyl, and rubber surfaces,...

  12. 40 CFR 428.30 - Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... solution crumb rubber subcategory. 428.30 Section 428.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.30 Applicability; description of the solution crumb...

  13. 77 FR 38083 - Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same Institution of Investigation Pursuant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same Institution of Investigation Pursuant... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain rubber resins and processes... rubber resins and processes for manufacturing same by reason of misappropriation of trade secrets,...

  14. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb...

  15. 40 CFR 428.30 - Applicability; description of the solution crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... solution crumb rubber subcategory. 428.30 Section 428.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.30 Applicability; description of the solution crumb...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10579 - Carbon black derived from the pyrolysis of rubber tire shreds (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pyrolysis of rubber tire shreds (generic). 721.10579 Section 721.10579 Protection of Environment... pyrolysis of rubber tire shreds (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... rubber tire shreds (PMN P-10-367) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.93 - Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products. 3201.93... FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.93 Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products. (a) Definition. Products that help clean, nourish, protect, and restore leather, vinyl, and rubber surfaces,...

  18. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb...

  19. The Potential for Sunflower as a Rubber-Producing Crop for the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are strategic as well as economic incentives to develop a renewable, United States-based supply of natural rubber. Currently, nearly all commercial natural rubber comes from a single species, the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and the US is almost completely dependent on imports ...

  20. Transcriptome and gene expression analysis in cold-acclimated guayule (Parthenium argentatum)rubber-producing tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber biosynthesis in guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is associated with moderately cold night temperatures. To begin to dissect the molecular events triggered by cold temperatures that govern rubber synthesis induction in guayule, the transcriptome of bark tissue, where rubber is produced...

  1. Valveless pumping in a fluid-filled closed elastic tube-system: one-dimensional theory with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, J T

    2003-04-01

    An elastic rubber tube is connected with a stiffer rubber tube forming two halves of a torus and filled with water. Compressing one of the rubber tubes symmetrically and periodic at a point of asymmetry creates a remarkable unidirectional mean flow in the system. The size and the direction of the mean flow depend on the frequency of compression, the elasticity of the tubes, the compression ratio, and the type of compression with respect to time in a complicated manner. The system is modelled using a one-dimensional theory derived by averaging the Navier-Stokes equations ignoring higher order terms in a certain small quantity. The one-dimensional model is analysed partly analytically and partly numerically. A series of experiments on a physical realisation of the system are described. The theoretical findings and experimental results are compared; They show a remarkable agreement between the experiments and the predictions of the model. Frequencies at which the mean flow change direction are predicted numerically as well as analytically and the two results are compared. PMID:12673509

  2. Fracture Behavior of Silica- and Rubber-Nanoparticle-Toughed Epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, Amelia K.

    Particle-toughened crosslinked epoxies are popular materials for a variety of applications, including the microelectronics industry. For this application, the properties of these materials, such as a high fracture toughness and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, are highly appealing. In order to achieve these properties, inorganic particles are often added into the matrix. For this study, both inorganic and organic particles-toughened epoxies are investigated in the hopes of finding an optimized system. In particular, in this study, micron-sized silica and nano-sized rubbery block copolymers are added to an amine-cured epoxy matrix. A series of rubber-only and silica-only systems are investigated for their contribution to the fracture toughness. Then, a series of hybrid systems are investigated. The hypothesis is that the rubber will contribute toughness through rubber particle cavitation and matrix void growth and the silica will contribute toughness through crack pinning and bridging and particle debonding. In the hybrid systems, these mechanisms will take place at a different scale. Therefore, the nanoscale mechanisms of the rubber will be able to function at the same time as the micron sized mechanisms of the silica and the resultant toughness will be synergistically higher. The results from this study show an interesting contribution from the rubber particles both in the rubber-only systems and the hybrid system. Ultimately, there was a marked increase in the fracture toughness of the hybrid systems, although not synergistic. This increase indicates that it would be possible to create an optimized hybrid system from the combined addition of these particles.

  3. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

  4. Crack analysis of unfilled natural rubber using infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeister, L.A.; Koenig, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The characterization and analysis of the crack tip region in unfilled natural rubber is crucial in developing a fatigue resistant material. Therefore, the molecular structure and orientation of the material in the crack tip region has been compared to the bulk. Cracks formed by different methods were evaluated using both transmission and reflection techniques of infrared microspectroscopy. The material around the crack tip and edges shows much higher absorbances than the bulk material for stressed rubber. This is due to more material and predominantly, from residual orientation effects. For unstressed material the crack tip region exhibits identical characteristics to the bulk material.

  5. Shape Optimization of Rubber Bushing Using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design rubber bushing at desired level of stiffness characteristics in order to achieve the ride quality of the vehicle. A differential evolution algorithm based approach is developed to optimize the rubber bushing through integrating a finite element code running in batch mode to compute the objective function values for each generation. Two case studies were given to illustrate the application of proposed approach. Optimum shape parameters of 2D bushing model were determined by shape optimization using differential evolution algorithm. PMID:25276848

  6. Fast-Acting Rubber-To-Coated-Aluminum Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comer, Dawn A.; Novak, Howard; Vazquez, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Cyanoacrylate adhesive used to join rubber to coated aluminum easier to apply and more effective. One-part material applied in single coat to aluminum treated previously with epoxy primer and top coat. Parts mated as soon as adhesive applied; no drying necessary. Sets in 5 minutes. Optionally, accelerator brushed onto aluminum to reduce setting time to 30 seconds. Clamping parts together unnecessary. Adhesive comes in four formulations, all based on ethyl cyanoacrylate with various amounts of ethylene copolymer rubber, poly(methyl methacrylate), silicon dioxide, hydroquinone, and phthalic anhydride.

  7. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix.

    PubMed

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-28

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation. PMID:26133455

  8. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation.

  9. Structural Proteins from Whelk Egg Capsule with Long Range Elasticity Associated with a Solid-state Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Wasko, S. Scott; Tay, Gavin; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Nowak, Christoph; Waite, J. Herbert; Miserez, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The robust, proteinaceous egg capsules of marine prosobranch gastropods (genus Busycotypus) exhibit unique biomechanical properties such as high elastic strain recovery and elastic energy dissipation capability. Capsule material possesses long-range extensibility that is fully recoverable and is the result of a secondary structure phase transition from α-helix to extended β-sheet rather than of entropic (rubber) elasticity. We report here the characterization of the precursor proteins that make up this material. Three different proteins have been purified and analyzed, and complete protein sequences deduced from messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) transcripts. Circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicate that the proteins are strongly α-helical in solution and primary sequence analysis suggests that these proteins have a propensity to form coiled-coils. This is in agreement with previous wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and solid-state Raman spectroscopic analysis of mature egg capsules. PMID:24350603

  10. Use of tire rubber in asphalt material and evaluation of asphalt rubber binders in porous friction courses

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, G.L.; Salami, M.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this research by Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was to evaluate the effectiveness of using asphalt rubber binders in porous friction course`s (PFC`s). This research provides a sound basis for using asphalt rubber binders in order to provide a more durable, cost-effective PFC. The information provided by this research has the potential to increase the volume of PFC`s constructed in the future and to make these future pavements longer lasting. The objectives of this research were: (1) to determine the potential benefits of asphalt rubber binders when used in PFC`s and (2) to recommend the asphalt cement grades and mix design procedure required to achieve optimum field performance. The scope of this study included a review of available literature and existing data, a three-phase laboratory study, and an analysis of all collected data.

  11. Food Preferences of the Rubber Plantation Litter Beetle, Luprops tristis, a Nuisance Pest in Rubber Tree Plantations

    PubMed Central

    Sabu, Thomas K.; Vinod, K.V.

    2009-01-01

    Massive invasion of the litter dwelling beetle, Luprops tristis Fabricius (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), numbering about 0.5 to 4 million per residential building following summer showers, and their prolonged stay in a state of dormancy, make them an extreme nuisance in rubber tree plantation belts of the Western Ghats in south India. Food preference of post-dormancy adults, larvae and teneral adults stages towards tender, mature and senescent leaves were assessed in three choice and no choice leaf disc tests. All stages have strong preference towards fallen tender leaves and lowest preference towards senescent leaves indicating that leaf age is a major attribute determining food selection and food preference of L. tristis. Ready availability of the preferred, prematurely fallen, tender rubber tree leaves as a food resource is suggested as being responsible for the exceptionally high abundance of L. tristis in rubber tree plantation belts. PMID:20050783

  12. Temperature dependence on free volume in cured natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, W.; Somoza, A.; Silva, L.; Consolati, G.; Quasso, F.; Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    A systematic study on the evolution of free volume as a function of the temperature in vulcanized at 433 K natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 NR-SBR (percent content of pure NR and SBR, respectively) blends was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. All samples were prepared with sulfur and TBBS (n-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) as accelerator. The glass transition temperatures of the samples studied were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and from lifetime data. In general, a sigmoidal-like complex behavior of the long-lived lifetime component, linked to the nanohole free volume, as a function of the temperature was found. For SBR, the slope of the ortho-positronium lifetime against temperature curves could be well-fitted using a linear function. For blends and also for NR, two different linear functions were necessary. This last behavior is explained in terms of the supercooled process involving a reconfiguration of the elastomeric chains. In the case of blends, the state of cure of NR and SBR in each NR-SBR sample was also taken into account in the discussion of the results obtained. Besides, thermal expansion coefficients of the free volumes in the transition and glassy region of all compounds were estimated. The differences observed in the values of this parameter are discussed by taking into account the morphology and formulation of each blend, the crosslink densities, and the role of the interphases formed between both NR and SBR elastomers.

  13. A new model of water-lubricated rubber bearings for vibration analysis of flexible multistage rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibing; Yang, Bingen

    2015-08-01

    Flexible multistage rotating systems that are supported or guided by long water-lubricated rubber bearings (WLRBs) have a variety of engineering applications. Vibration analysis of this type of machinery for performance and duality requires accurate modeling of WLRBs and related rotor-bearing assemblies. This work presents a new model of WLRBs, with attention given to the determination of bearing dynamic coefficients. Due to its large length-to-diameter ratio, a WLRB cannot be described by conventional pointwise bearing models with good fidelity. The bearing model proposed in this paper considers spatially distributed bearing forces. For the first time in the literature, the current study addresses the issue of mixed lubrication in the operation of WLRBs, which involves interactions of shaft vibration, elastic deformation of rubber material and fluid film pressure, and validates the WLRB model in experiments. Additionally, with the new bearing model, vibration analysis of WLRB-supported flexible multistage rotating systems is performed through use of a distributed transfer function method, which delivers accurate and closed-form analytical solutions of steady-state responses without discretization.

  14. Scaling of crack propagation in rubber sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Zhang, H. P.; Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Marder, M.

    2011-11-01

    We have conducted experiments and numerical simulations to investigate supersonic cracks. The experiments are performed at 85 °C to suppress strain-induced crystallites that complicate experiments at lower temperature. Calibration experiments were performed to obtain the parameters needed to compare with a theory including viscous dissipation. We find that both experiments and numerical simulations support supersonic cracks, and we discover a transition from subsonic to supersonic as we plot experimental crack speed curves vs. extension ratio for different sized samples. Both experiments and simulations show two different scaling regimes: the speed of subsonic cracks scales with the elastic energy density while the speed of supersonic cracks scales with the extension ratio. Crack openings have qualitatively different shapes in the two scaling regimes.

  15. Biolubricant induced phase inversion and superhydrophobicity in rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Steele, Adam; Martorana, Philip; Loth, Eric; Robinson, Scott J.; Stevenson, Darren

    2009-08-01

    We present a simple technique to fabricate rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposite coatings with highly water repellent surface wetting characteristics and strong adhesion to metal surfaces. The technique combines the principles of phase inversion and atomization of multicomponent polymer/organoclay suspensions containing a biolubricant as the nonsolvent. The biolubricant was a blend of cyclomethicone/dimethiconol oil with fruit kernel oils. The ternary system of cellulose nitrate/solvent/biolubricant was blended with rubber dispersed organoclay nanofluids. Natural, synthetic, and fluoroacrylic latex rubbers were used for the purpose. Self-cleaning superhydrophobic coatings were obtained from synthetic and fluoroacrylic rubbers whereas natural rubber containing formulations resulted in sticky superhydrophobic coatings.

  16. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber... fabricated rubber plants subcategory. The following provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  17. 40 CFR 428.70 - Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.70 Section 428.70... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Large-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber... fabricated rubber plants subcategory. The following provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  18. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber... fabricated rubber plants subcategory. The following provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.50 Section 428.50... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Small-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber... fabricated rubber plants subcategory. The following provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  20. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.50 Section 428.50... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Small-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber... fabricated rubber plants subcategory. The following provisions of this subpart are applicable to...