Science.gov

Sample records for non-contact stiffness measurement

  1. Non-Contact Stiffness Measurement of a Suspended Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yun; Su, Chanmin; Getty, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    A new nanoscale electric field sensor was developed for studying triboelectric charging in terrestrial and Martian dust devils. This sensor is capable to measure the large electric fields for large dust devils without saturation. However, to quantify the electric charges and the field strength it is critical to calibrate the mechanical stiffness of the sensor devices. We performed a technical feasibility study of the Nano E-field Sensor stiffness by a non-contact stiffness measurement method. The measurement is based on laser Doppler vibrometer measurement of the thermal noise due to energy flunctuations in the devices. The experiment method provides a novel approach to acquire data that is essential in analyzing the quantitative performance of the E-field Nano Sensor. To carry out the non-contact stiffness measurement, we fabricated a new Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) E-field sensor with different SWCNTs suspension conditions. The power spectra of the thermal induced displacement in the nano E-field sensor were measured at the accuracy of picometer. The power spectra were then used to derive the mechanical stiffness of the sensors. Effect of suspension conditions on stiffness and sensor sensitivty was discussed. After combined deformation and resistivity measurement, we can compare with our laboratory testing and field testing results. This new non-contact measurement technology can also help to explore to other nano and MEMS devices in the future.

  2. Non-contact measurement of carotid arterial stiffness by two-point heart-pulse laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M.; Favalli, V.; Mariano, A.; Rebrova, N.; Consoli, A.; Ayadi, J.; Gilardi, L.; Perna, M.; Minzioni, P.; Arbustini, E.; Giuliani, G.

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) is a recognized predictor of cardiovascular risk and mortality, and a potential marker for monitoring the beneficial effects of medical treatments for arterial diseases. AS is typically evaluated indirectly, by assessing the so called pulse wave velocity (PWV), i.e. the speed at which the pressure wave created by the heart contraction travels along the aorta and other arteries. PWV is generally measured using piezoelectric transducers, or via a complex ultrasound technique, but in both cases it requires a direct contact with the patient, which could also modify the measured parameters. In the EU project "NISTAS" (Non-invasive screening of the status of the vascular system) [1], we develop a contactless system allowing to measure the PWV thanks to a technology derived from laser triangulation devices. The measurement principle consists in the detection of the small (around 100μm) displacement of the neck skin, induced by the transit of the pressure wave in the carotid. By simultaneously measuring the displacement caused by the pulse wave in two distinct points along the carotid, the time required by the pressure wave to travel a certain distance can be measured, and the PWV can then be easily calculated. The chosen technique for the skin displacement measurement is laser triangulation in its 2D variant (i.e. "laser profilometry"), which is robust to slight movements of the target, it does not suffer from speckle-pattern signal fading, and it can be conveniently implemented using low-cost optical components. Two light lines, emitted by two blue LEDs are projected on the target (the patient's neck skin), and the skin displacement versus time is measured using a high-frame-rate CMOS camera. In this manuscript we present the results obtained by measuring the PWV of 10 volunteers. It is foreseen that this technique can become a simple and widespread point-of-care method for large-scale cardiovascular system screening over large populations.

  3. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, D. B.; Witherow, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is involved with levitation experiments for Spacelab, Space Station, and drop tube/tower operations. These experiments have temperature measurement requirements, that of course must be non-contact in nature. The experiment modules involved are the Acoustic Levitator Furnace (ALF), and the Modular Electromagnetic Levitator (MEL). User requirements of the ALF and drop tube are presented. The center also has temperature measurement needs that are not microgravity experiment oriented, but rather are related to the propulsion system for the STS. This requirement will also be discussed.

  4. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements for electronic materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for non-contact temperature measurement capabilities for electronic materials processing in space are assessed. Non-contact methods are probably incapable of sufficient accuracy for the actual absolute measurement of temperatures in most such applications but would be useful for imaging in some applications.

  5. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  6. Electronic Non-Contacting Linear Position Measuring System

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A non-contacting linear position location system employs a special transmission line to encode and transmit magnetic signals to a receiver on the object whose position is to be measured. The invention is useful as a non-contact linear locator of moving objects, e.g., to determine the location of a magnetic-levitation train for the operation of the linear-synchronous motor drive system.

  7. Non contact probing of interfacial stiffnesses between two plates by zero-group velocity Lamb modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezil, Sylvain; Laurent, Jérôme; Royer, Daniel; Prada, Claire

    2014-07-01

    A non contact technique using zero-group velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes is developed to probe the bonding between two solid plates coupled by a thin layer. The layer thickness is assumed to be negligible compared with the plate thickness and the acoustic wavelength. The coupling layer is modeled by a normal and a tangential spring to take into account the normal and shear interfacial stresses. Theoretical ZGV frequencies are determined for a symmetrical bi-layer structure and the effect of the interfacial stiffnesses on the cut-off and ZGV frequencies are evaluated. Experiments are conducted with two glass plates bonded by a drop of water, oil, or salol, leading to a few micrometer thick layer. An evaluation of normal and shear stiffnesses is obtained using ZGV resonances locally excited and detected with laser ultrasonic techniques.

  8. Non-contact thickness measurement using UTG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Hoa T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A measurement structure for determining the thickness of a specimen without mechanical contact but instead employing ultrasonic waves including an ultrasonic transducer and an ultrasonic delay line connected to the transducer by a retainer or collar. The specimen, whose thickness is to be measured, is positioned below the delay line. On the upper surface of the specimen a medium such as a drop of water is disposed which functions to couple the ultrasonic waves from the delay line to the specimen. A receiver device, which may be an ultrasonic thickness gauge, receives reflected ultrasonic waves reflected from the upper and lower surface of the specimen and determines the thickness of the specimen based on the time spacing of the reflected waves.

  9. Non-contact multiband method for emissivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazikowski, Adam; Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2003-04-01

    During the last decade an increasing interest in passive multiband systems for temperature measurement was noted and quite a few such systems have been developed. However, recent studies showed that multiband systems are capable of producing accurate results of non-contact temperature measurement only in limited number of applications and that multiband systems will not become a real rival for single band systems in temperature measurement applications. Available literature about passive multiband systems concentrated exclusively on the problem of temperature measurements with these systems in situation when these systems can be used for non-contact emissivity measurements too. A model of a passive multiband system for non-contact emissivity measurement has been developed in this paper. Simulations carried out using this model showed that it is possible to achieve reasonable accuracy of emissivity measurements with passive multiband systems and these systems can be considered as an attractive solution for emissivity measurements in industrial conditions.

  10. Method and apparatus for non-contact charge measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Lin, Kuan-Chan (Inventor); Hightower, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the accurate non-contact detection and measurement of static electric charge on an object using a reciprocating sensing probe that moves relative to the object. A monitor measures the signal generated as a result of this cyclical movement so as to detect the electrostatic charge on the object.

  11. Sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy for lateral force gradient measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atabak, Mehrdad; Ünverdi, Özhan; Özer, H. Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2009-12-01

    We report the first results from novel sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy developed for lateral force gradient measurements. Quantitative lateral force gradients between a tungsten tip and Si(1 1 1)-(7 × 7) surface can be measured using this microscope. Simultaneous lateral force gradient and scanning tunnelling microscope images of single and multi atomic steps are obtained. In our measurement, tunnel current is used as feedback. The lateral stiffness contrast has been observed to be 2.5 N/m at single atomic step, in contrast to 13 N/m at multi atomic step on Si(1 1 1) surface. We also carried out a series of lateral stiffness-distance spectroscopy. We observed lateral stiffness-distance curves exhibit sharp increase in the stiffness as the sample is approached towards the surface. We usually observed positive stiffness and sometimes going into slightly negative region.

  12. Measuring elastic constants using non-contact ultrasonic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Perry, R.; Cleanthous, D.; Backhouse, D. J.; Moore, I. J.; Clough, A. R.; Stone, D. I.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasound for measuring elastic constants and phase transitions is well established. Standard measurements use piezoelectric transducers requiring couplant and contact with the sample. Recently, non-destructive testing (NDT) has seen an increase in the use of non-contact ultrasonic techniques, for example electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) and laser ultrasound, due to their many benefits. For measurements of single crystals over a range of temperatures non-contact techniques could also bring many benefits. These techniques do not require couplant, and hence do not suffer from breaking of the bond between transducer and sample during thermal cycling, and will potentially lead to a simpler and more adaptable measurement system with lower risk of sample damage. We present recent work adapting EMAT advances from NDT to measurements of single crystals at cryogenic temperatures and illustrate this with measurements of magnetic phase transitions in Gd64Sc36 using both contact and non-contact transducers. We discuss the measurement techniques implemented to overcome noise problems, and a digital pulse-echo-overlap technique, using data analysis in the frequency domain to measure the velocity.

  13. Non-Contact Measurement Using A Laser Scanning Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modjarrad, Amir

    1989-03-01

    Traditional high accuracy touch-trigger probing can now be complemented by high speed, non-contact, profile scanning to give another "dimension" to the three-dimensional Co-ordinate Measuring Machines (CMMs). Some of the features of a specially developed laser scanning probe together with the trade-offs involved in the design of inspection systems that use triangulation are examined. Applications of such a laser probe on CMMs are numerous since high speed scanning allows inspection of many different components and surfaces. For example, car body panels, tyre moulds, aircraft wing skins, turbine blades, wax and clay models, plastics, etc. Other applications include in-process surveillance in manufacturing and food processing, robotics vision and many others. Some of these applications are discussed and practical examples, case studies and experimental results are given with particular reference to use on CMMs. In conclusion, future developments and market trends in high speed non-contact measurement are discussed.

  14. Non-contact heat flux measurement using a transparent sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    A working non-contact heat flux sensor was demonstrated using a transparent material (sapphire) and a multiwavelength pyrometer. The pyrometer is used to measure the temperatures of the two surfaces of the sensor from the spectrum of radiation originating from them. The heat conducted through the material is determined from the temperature difference of the two surfaces and the thermal conductivity of the material. The measured heat flux is equal to the incident heat flux within experimental error indicating that no calibration would be necessary. A steady state heat flux of 100 kW/sq m was easily achieved.

  15. Non-Contact Conductivity Measurement for Automated Sample Processing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kirby, James P.

    2012-01-01

    A new method has been developed for monitoring and control of automated sample processing and preparation especially focusing on desalting of samples before analytical analysis (described in more detail in Automated Desalting Apparatus, (NPO-45428), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 8 (August 2010), page 44). The use of non-contact conductivity probes, one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the solid phase sample preparation media, allows monitoring of the process, and acts as a trigger for the start of the next step in the sequence (see figure). At each step of the muti-step process, the system is flushed with low-conductivity water, which sets the system back to an overall low-conductivity state. This measurement then triggers the next stage of sample processing protocols, and greatly minimizes use of consumables. In the case of amino acid sample preparation for desalting, the conductivity measurement will define three key conditions for the sample preparation process. First, when the system is neutralized (low conductivity, by washing with excess de-ionized water); second, when the system is acidified, by washing with a strong acid (high conductivity); and third, when the system is at a basic condition of high pH (high conductivity). Taken together, this non-contact conductivity measurement for monitoring sample preparation will not only facilitate automation of the sample preparation and processing, but will also act as a way to optimize the operational time and use of consumables

  16. Non-Contact EDDY Current Hole Eccentricity and Diameter Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1998-01-01

    Precision holes are among the most critical features of a mechanical component. Deviations from permissible tolerances can impede operation and result in unexpected failure. We have developed an automated non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measuring system. The operating principle is based on the eddy current lift-off effect, which is the coil impedance as a function of the distance between the coil and the test object. An absolute eddy current probe rotates in the hole. The impedance of each angular position is acquired and input to the computer for integration and analysis. The eccentricity of the hole is the profile of the impedance as a function of angular position as compared to a straight line, an ideal hole. The diameter of the hole is the sum of the diameter of the probe and twice the distance-calibrated impedance. An eddy current image is generated by integrating angular scans for a plurality of depths between the top and bottom to display the eccentricity profile. This system can also detect and image defects in the hole. The method for non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measurement has been granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  17. Advances in Non-Contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Canepari, Stacy; White, Erica Bischoff; Cretegny, Laurent; Rogers, jan

    2009-01-01

    As the required service temperatures for superalloys increases, so do the demands on testing for development of these alloys. Non-contact measurement of creep of refractory metals using electrostatic levitation has been demonstrated at temperatures up to 2300 C using samples of only 20-40 mg. These measurements load the spherical specimen by inertial forces due to rapid rotation. However, the first measurements relied on photon pressure to accelerate the samples to the high rotational rates of thousands of rotations per second, limiting the applicability to low stresses and high temperatures. Recent advances in this area extend this measurement to higher stresses and lower-temperatures through the use of an induction motor to drive the sample to such high rotational speeds. Preliminary results on new measurements on new materials will be presented.

  18. A non-contact measurement technique at the micro scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Santaneel

    During their production and normal use, electronic packages experience large temperature excursions, leading to high thermo-mechanical stress gradients that cause fatigue failure of the solder joints. In order to prevent premature failure and prolong the fatigue life of solder joints, there is a pressing need for the characterization of the solder, especially lead-free solder, at the micro-level (joint size). The characterization and modeling of solder behavior at the appropriate scale is a major issue. However, direct measurement techniques are not applicable to characterize the deformation response of solder joints because of their micro scale dimensions. Therefore, a non-contact measurement technique utilizing a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in conjunction with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) has been developed. Validation was achieved by performing a four-point bending test in both an in-house optical system with DIC and inside the SEM. This non-contact measurement technique was then used to extract the stress-strain response of the solder. Mechanical tests were performed on solder joints that were created using the same type of solder balls used in the electronic industry and were representative of normal joint scales. The SEM-DIC technique has been proven to be applicable for the determining the stress-strain response of solder material at the micro-scale. This study resulted in a validated material characterization technique specifically designed for micro-scale material response. One of the main contributions of this study is that the method is a lot simpler and cheaper, yet highly effective, compared to the previous methods. This technique is also readily applicable to the measurement of the stress-strain response of any micro-scale specimen, such as other metals, polymers, etc. Also, the measured displacement field by obtained by DIC can be used as the base for calculating the strain field on the surface of a specimen.

  19. Non-contact measurement technique for enzymatic reaction of glucokinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staforelli, Juan P.; Gallardo, María. J.; Meza, Pablo; Torres, Sergio; Mella, Héctor; Reyes, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    A non-contact infrared imaging-based measurement technique is applied to quantify the enzymatic reaction of glucokinase. The method is implemented by a long-wave (8-12 [μm]) infrared microbolometer imaging array and a germanium-based infrared optical vision system adjusted to the size of a small biological sample. The enzymatic reaction is carried out by the glucokinase enzyme, which is representative of the internal dynamics of the cell. Such reactions produce a spontaneous exothermal release of energy detected by the infrared imaging system as a non-contact measurement technique. It is shown by stoichiometry computations and infrared thermal resolution metrics that the infrared imaging system can detect the energy release at the [mK] range. This allows to quantify the spontaneity of the enzymatic reaction in a three dimensional (surface and time) single and noncontact real- time measurement. The camera is characterized for disclosing its sensibility, and the fixed pattern noise is compensated by a two point calibration method. On the other hand, the glucokinase enzyme is isolated from Pyrococcus furiosus. Therefore, the experiment is carried out by manual injection with graduated micropipettes using 40 [μl] of glucokinase at the surface of the substrate contained in an eppendorf tube. For recording, the infrared camera is adjusted in-focus at 25.4 [mm] from the superficial level of the substrate. The obtained values of energy release are 139 +/- 22 [mK] at room temperature and 274 +/- 22 [mK] for a bath temperature of 334 [K].

  20. Combined non-contact coordinate measurement system and calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yiyan; Zhao, Bin

    2015-07-01

    A combined non-contact measurement system comprising attitude angle sensor, angle encoder, laser rangefinder, and total station is adopted to measure the spatial coordinate of the hidden zones in large-scale space. The laser from the total station is aimed at the optical system of the attitude angle sensor to obtain the spatial coordinate and the spatial attitude angles. Then, the angle encoder driven by a stepping motor is rotated to drive the laser rangefinder to direct at the measured point. This approach is used to obtain the distance from the rangefinder to the measured point and the angle of the angle encoder. Finally, the spatial coordinates of the measured point can be calculated by using these measured parameters. For the measurement system, we propose a weighted least squares (WLS) calibration method, in which weights are determined for the angular distribution density. Experimental results show that the measurement system could expand the scale and achieve reliable precision during combined measurement and the measurement error of the weighted least squares method is less than that of the ordinary least square (OLS) method.

  1. Anthropometry of external auditory canal by non-contactable measurement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Wang, Ren-Hung; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Fan, Chun-Chieh; Peng, Ying-Chin; Tu, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Ching-I; Lin, Kuei-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Human ear canals cannot be measured directly with existing general measurement tools. Furthermore, general non-contact optical methods can only conduct simple peripheral measurements of the auricle and cannot obtain the internal ear canal shape-related measurement data. Therefore, this study uses the computed tomography (CT) technology to measure the geometric shape of the ear canal and the shape of the ear canal using a non-invasive method, and to complete the anthropometry of external auditory canal. The results of the study show that the average height and width of ear canal openings, and the average depth of the first bend for men are generally longer, wider and deeper than those for women. In addition, the difference between the height and width of the ear canal opening is about 40% (p < 0.05). Hence, the circular cross-section shape of the earplugs should be replaced with an elliptical cross-section shape during manufacturing for better fitting. PMID:25959317

  2. Non-contact Laser-based Human Respiration Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.

    2011-08-01

    At present the majority of the instrumentation, used in clinical environments, to measure human respiration rate are based on invasive and contact devices. The gold standard instrument is considered the spirometer which is largely used; it needs a direct contact and requires a collaboration by the patient. Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) is an optical, non-contact measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. LDVi has already been used for the measurement of the cardiac activity and for the measurement of the chest-wall displacements. The aims of this work are to select the best measurement point on the thoracic surface for LDVi monitoring of the respiration rate (RR) and to compare measured data with the RR valued provided by the spirometer. The measurement system is composed by a LDV system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC. Tests were made on 10 different point of the thorax for each patient. Patients population was composed by 33 subjects (17 male and 16 female). The optimal measurement point was chosen considering the maximum peak-to-peak value of the displacement measured by LDV. Before extracting RR we have used a special wavelet decomposition for better selection of the expiration peaks. A standard spirometer was used for the validation of the data. From tests it results that the optimal measurement point, namely is located on the inferior part of the thoracic region (left, front side). From our tests we have obtained a close correlation between the RR values measured by the spirometer and those measured by the proposed method: a difference of 14±211 ms on the RR value is reported for the entire population of 33 subjects. Our method allows a no-contact measurement of lungs activity (respiration period), reducing the electric and biological risks. Moreover it allows to measure in critical environment like in RMN or in burned skin where is difficult or impossible to apply electrodes.

  3. Investigation of a non-contact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; Damiano, B.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new non-contact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components, however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  4. Non-Contact Measurements of Creep Properties of Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    State-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature (>2000 C) materials. At such high temperatures, creep rises as one of the most important design factors to be considered. Since conventional measurement techniques for creep resistance are limited to about 17OO0C, a new technique is in demand for higher temperatures. This paper presents a non-contact method using electrostatic levitation (ESL) which is applicable to both metallic and non-metallic materials. The samples were rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deformation of the samples was captured with a high speed camera and then the images were analyzed to estimate creep resistance. Finite element analyses were performed and compared to the experiments to verify the new method. Results are presented for niobium and tungsten, representative refractory materials at 2300 C and 2700 C respectively.

  5. Non-contact temperature measurements for biotechnology discipline working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In the biotechnology research areas, there is interest in measuring temperature changes over very small dimensions, such as the surface of a 10-micrometer diameter biological cell immersed in cell culture fluid. Non-interference measurements of other properties, such as chemical constituents and their concentrations, are also needed. Contacting probes for pH have recently been developed to penetrate a cell but questions have been raised about their accuracy and net value.

  6. Non-contact temperature measurement of a falling drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The 105 meter drop tube at NASA-Marshall has been used in a number of experiments to determine the effects of containerless, microgravity processing on the undercooling and solidification behavior of metals and alloys. These experiments have been limited, however, because direct temperature measurement of the falling drops has not been available. Undercooling and nucleation temperatures are calculated from thermophysical properties based on droplet cooling models. In most cases these properties are not well known, particularly in the undercooled state. This results in a large amount of uncertainty in the determination of nucleation temperatures. If temperature measurement can be accomplished then the thermal history of the drops could be well documented. This would lead to a better understanding of the thermophysical and thermal radiative properties of undercooled melts. An effort to measure the temperature of a falling drop is under way. The technique uses two color pyrometry and high speed data acquisition. The approach is presented along with some preliminary data from drop tube experiments. The results from droplet cooling models is compared with noncontact temperature measurements.

  7. Non-contact infrared temperature measurements in dry permafrost boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Ralf; Grigoriev, Mikhail N.; Kaul, Norbert

    2008-04-01

    While planning the COAST Expedition to the Siberian Laptev Sea in 2005, the question of how to make a short equilibrium temperature measurement in a dry borehole arose. As a result, an infrared borehole tool was developed and used in three dry boreholes (up to 60.2 m deep) in the coastal transition zone from terrestrial to sub-sea permafrost near Mamontovy Klyk in the western Laptev Sea. A depth versus temperature profile was acquired with equilibration times of 50 × 10-3 s at each depth interval. Comparison with a common resistor string revealed an offset due to limitations of accuracy of the infrared technique and the influence of the probe's massive steel housing. Therefore it was necessary to calibrate the infrared sensor with a high precision temperature logger in each borehole. The results of the temperature measurements show a highly dynamic transition zone with temperature gradients up to -0.092°C/m and heat flow of -218 mW/m. A period of submergence of only 600 years the drilled sub-sea permafrost is approaching the overlying seawater temperature at -1.61°C with a temperature gradient of 0.021°C/m and heat flow of 49 mW/m. Further offshore, 11 km from the coastline, a temperature gradient of 0.006°C/m and heat flow of 14 mW/m occur. Thus the sub-sea permafrost in the Mamontovy Klyk region has reached a critical temperature for the presence of interstitial ice. The aim of this article is to give a brief feasibility study of infrared downhole temperature measurements and to present experiences and results of its successful application.

  8. Non-contact true temperature measurements in the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Mansoor A.; Allemand, Charly; Eagar, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    The theory developed is shown to be capable of calculating true temperature of any material from radiance measurements at a number of different wavelengths. This theory was also shown to be capable of predicting the uncertainty in these calculated temperatures. An additional advantage of these techniques is that they can estimate the emissivity of the target simultaneously with the temperature. This aspect can prove to be very important when a fast method of generating reflectivity vs. wavelength or emissivity vs. wavelength data is required. Experiments performed on various materials over a range of temperatures and experimental conditions were used to verify the accuracy of this theory.

  9. Advances in Non-contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Canepari, Stacy; Rogers, Jan. R.

    2009-01-01

    Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300 C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400 C). High-precision machined spheres of the sample are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility, and heated with a laser. The laser is aligned off-center so that the absorbed photons transfer their momentum to the sample, causing it to rotate at up to 250,000+ RPM. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, causing it to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations are compared to finite element models to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the noncontact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test. This method was validated in collaboration with the University of Tennessee for niobium at 1985 C, with agreement within the uncertainty of the conventional measurements. A similar method is being employed on Ultra-High-Temperature ZrB2- SiC composites, which may see application in rocket nozzles and sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles.

  10. A method for non-contact drop charge measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. C.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for detecting point type of charge has been developed. This system is based on the principle of reciprocal motion of a grounded conductor near a point charge. The current induced through such a process can then be used to determine the static field strength of the point charge, hence the quantity of the charge. Experiments were done to understand the characteristics of this new device. Test case indicates that the results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. This device shows extremely good linearity with respect to the strength of the input static field. The resolution of the system is better than 10 V/m, which is about two orders of magnitude in sensitivity higher than other types of field measuring apparatus. The high sensitivity of this system makes it possible to conduct charged drop experiments under microgravity conditions.

  11. Proposal on Calculation of Ventilation Threshold Using Non-contact Respiration Measurement with Pattern Light Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Ichimura, Shiro; Fujiwara, Toyoki; Kiyooka, Satoru; Koshiji, Kohji; Tsuzuki, Keishi; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Fujimoto, Hideo

    We proposed a calculation method of the ventilation threshold using the non-contact respiration measurement with dot-matrix pattern light projection under pedaling exercise. The validity and effectiveness of our proposed method is examined by simultaneous measurement with the expiration gas analyzer. The experimental result showed that the correlation existed between the quasi ventilation thresholds calculated by our proposed method and the ventilation thresholds calculated by the expiration gas analyzer. This result indicates the possibility of the non-contact measurement of the ventilation threshold by the proposed method.

  12. Measuring graphene's bending stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Kevek, Joshua W.; Ruyack, Alexander; Wardini, Jenna; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Siping; McEuen, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's unusual combination of in-plane strength and out-of-plane flexibility makes it promising for mechanical applications. A key value is the bending stiffness, which microscopic theories and measurements of phonon modes in graphite put at κ0 = 1.2 eV.1 However, theories of the effects of thermal fluctuations in 2D membranes predict that the bending stiffness at longer length scales could be orders of magnitude higher.2,3 This macroscopic value has not been measured. Here we present the first direct measurement of monolayer graphene's bending stiffness, made by mechanically lifting graphene off a surface in a liquid and observing both motion induced by thermal fluctuations and the deflection caused by gravity's effect on added weights. These experiments reveal a value κeff = 12 keV at room temperature -- four orders of magnitude higher than κ0. These results closely match theoretical predictions of the effects of thermally-induced fluctuations which effectively thicken the membrane, dramatically increasing its bending stiffness at macroscopic length scales.

  13. A Novel, High Resolution, Non-Contact Channel Temperature Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Stark, B.; Kayali, S.

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ optical technique based on infrared emission spectroscopy has been developed for non-contact measurement of the temperature of a hot spot in the gate channel of a GaAs metal/semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET).

  14. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  15. The Practical Implementation of Non-Contacting Laser Strain Measurements Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunis, Isam; Quinn, roger D.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of stress and strain in rotating turbomachinery is critical to many industries. The search for a non-contacting, non-interfering, non-degrading measurement system is on going and extensive. While several methods seem promising in theory, implementation has proven troublesome. This work uncovers and quantifies these implementation issues in the context of a laser measurement system. Both a Laser Doppler Velocimeter system and a displacement laser system are utilized. It is found that the key issues are signal to noise ratio, rigid body compensation, measurement location, and conversion of intermittent measurements to a continuous signal. Accounting for these factors leads to successful measurements. These results should lead to better ideas and more practical solutions to the non-contacting, non-degrading, non-interfering strain measurement system problem.

  16. Non-Contact Plant Growth Measurement Method and System Based on Ubiquitous Sensor Network Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jinweon; Kim, Seokhoon; Ryoo, Intae

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact plant growth measurement system using infrared sensors based on the ubiquitous sensor network (USN) technology. The proposed system measures plant growth parameters such as the stem radius of plants using real-time non-contact methods, and generates diameter, cross-sectional area and thickening form of plant stems using this measured data. Non-contact sensors have been used not to cause any damage to plants during measurement of the growth parameters. Once the growth parameters are measured, they are transmitted to a remote server using the sensor network technology and analyzed in the application program server. The analyzed data are then provided for administrators and a group of interested users. The proposed plant growth measurement system has been designed and implemented using fixed-type and rotary-type infrared sensor based measurement methods and devices. Finally, the system performance is compared and verified with the measurement data that have been obtained by practical field experiments. PMID:22163849

  17. A novel non-contact measurement method of the inner diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bingtian; Liu, Changjie; Li, Xingqiang; Fu, Luhua; Wang, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High accuracy automatic measurement of engine box is significant for enhancing the quality and performance of the engine. To complete the fast automatic measurement of the engine box shaft hole diameter, a new non-contact methods for inner hole diameter measuring is proposed in this paper, a mathematic model is built according to this method. A probe based on laser displacement sensors is developed to meet the method by distributing the laser displacement sensors in the probe cross-section uniformly. By this method, shaft hole diameter can be got with single measurement. This method eliminates some defects involved in existing shaft hole diameter non-contact measuring methods, it does not need the rotation of the probe and accurate locating of the probe center and the shaft hole center. Experiments proved that the methods can be used to complete the task of the shaft hole diameter measuring with simple operation and accurate result. Experiments have also shown that the proposed method is an effective method of non-contact high accuracy diameter measurement.

  18. Measuring stream discharge by non-contact methods: A proof-of-concept experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Spicer, K.R.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Thurman, E.M.; Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experiment to make a completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurement. A van-mounted, pulsed doppler (10GHz) radar collected surface-velocity data across the 183-m wide Skagit River, Washington at a USGS streamgaging station using Bragg scattering from short waves produced by turbulent boils on the surface of the river. Surface velocities were converted to mean velocities for 25 sub-sections by assuming a normal open-channel velocity profile (surface velocity times 0.85). Channel cross-sectional area was measured using a 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar antenna suspended from a cableway car over the river. Seven acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements and a conventional current-meter discharge measurement were also made. Three non-contact discharge measurements completed in about a 1-hour period were within 1 % of the gaging station rating curve discharge values. With further refinements, it is thought that open-channel flow can be measured reliably by non-contact methods.

  19. Contact and non-contact ultrasonic measurement in the food industry: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufiq Mohd Khairi, Mohd; Ibrahim, Sallehuddin; Yunus, Mohd Amri Md; Faramarzi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of the food manufacturing process is vital since it determines the safety and quality level of foods which directly affect the consumers’ health. Companies which produce high quality products will gain trust from consumers. This factor helps the companies to make profits. The use of efficient and appropriate sensors for the monitoring process can also reduce cost. The food assessing process based on an ultrasonic sensor has attracted the attention of the food industry due to its excellent capabilities in several applications. The utilization of low or high frequencies for the ultrasonic transducer has provided an enormous benefit for analysing, modifying and guaranteeing the quality of food. The contact and non-contact ultrasonic modes for measurement also contributed significantly to the food processing. This paper presents a review of the application of the contact and non-contact mode of ultrasonic measurement focusing on safety and quality control areas. The results from previous researches are shown and elaborated.

  20. Ultrahigh-resolution and non-contact diameter measurement of metallic wire using eddy current sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new method using eddy current sensor (ECS) for online non-contact diameter measurement of metallic wires with ultrahigh resolution. A prototype sensor was designed, fabricated, and tested for copper wires with diameters ranging from 1.12 mm to 1.30 mm. A solenoid coil with dimensions of 16 mm long and 2.1 mm in diameter is used as sensing element with a working frequency of 1.3 MHz. With a well-designed bridge, the sensing coil's inductance variation can be detected and the wire's diameter can be calculated. The ECS system demonstrated a dynamic resolution better than 2.2 μm and a static resolution better than 0.42 nm for a wire with a diameter of 1.3 mm. This non-contact method has competitive advantages over other methods in many aspects, especially in terms of measurement resolution. PMID:25173300

  1. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty-Dessus, D.; Ziani, A. C.; Petre, A.; Berquez, L.

    2015-04-01

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  2. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Marty-Dessus, D. Ziani, A. C.; Berquez, L.; Petre, A.

    2015-04-15

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  3. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement.

    PubMed

    Marty-Dessus, D; Ziani, A C; Petre, A; Berquez, L

    2015-04-01

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement. PMID:25933869

  4. A model undergraduate research institute for study of emerging non-contact measurement technologies and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvonch, Curt; Smith, Christopher; Bourne, Stefanie; Blandino, Joseph R.; Miles, Jonathan J.

    2006-04-01

    The Infrared Development and Thermal Structures Laboratory (IDTSL) is an undergraduate research laboratory in the College of Integrated Science and Technology (CISAT) at James Madison University (JMU) in Harrisonburg, Virginia. During the 1997-98 academic year, Dr. Jonathan Miles established the IDTSL at JMU with the support of a collaborative research grant from the NASA Langley Research Center and with additional support from the College of Integrated Science and Technology at JMU. The IDTSL supports research and development efforts that feature non-contact thermal and mechanical measurements and advance the state of the art. These efforts all entail undergraduate participation intended to significantly enrich their technical education. The IDTSL is funded by major government organizations and the private sector and provides a unique opportunity to undergraduates who wish to participate in projects that push the boundaries of non-contact measurement technologies, and provides a model for effective hands-on, project oriented, student-centered learning that reinforces concepts and skills introduced within the Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) curriculum. The lab also provides access to advanced topics and emerging measurement technologies; fosters development of teaming and communication skills in an interdisciplinary environment; and avails undergraduates of professional activities including writing papers, presentation at conferences, and participation in summer internships. This paper provides an overview of the Infrared Development and Thermal Structures Laboratory, its functionality, its record of achievements, and the important contribution it has made to the field of non-contact measurement and undergraduate education.

  5. Non-contact measurements of ultrasonic waves on paper webs using a photorefractive interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Brodeur, Pierre H.; Lafond, Emmanuel F.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for non-contact measurement of ultrasonic waves on moving paper webs employs a photorefractive interferometer. The photorefractive interferometer employs an optical head in which the incident beam and reflected beam are coaxial, thus enabling detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane waves with a single apparatus. The incident beam and reference beams are focused into a line enabling greater power to be used without damaging the paper.

  6. Non-contact angle measurement based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Lian

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel precise angle measurement scheme based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry (PLFI), which outputs two parallel laser beams and thus their displacement difference reflects the angle variation of the target. Due to its ultrahigh sensitivity to the feedback light, PLFI realizes the direct non-contact measurement of non-cooperative targets. Experimental results show that PLFI has an accuracy of 8″ within a range of 1400″. The yaw of a guide is also measured and the experimental results agree with those of the dual-frequency laser interferometer Agilent 5529A.

  7. Non-contact measurements of water jet spreading width with a laser instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funami, Yuki; Hasuya, Ryo; Tanabe, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Jet spreading width is one of the important characteristics of water jets discharging into the air. Many researchers have dealt with measuring this width, and contact measuring methods on the water jet surface were employed in a lot of the cases. In order to avoid undesirable effects caused by the contact on the jet surface, we introduce non-contact measuring methods with a laser instrument to the measurements of jet spreading width. In measurements, a transmitter emits sheet-like laser beam to a receiver. The water jet between the transmitter and the receiver interrupts the laser beam and makes a shadow. The minimum and maximum values of the shadow width are measured. In addition, pictures of the water jet are taken with a scale, and the shadow width is measured from the pictures. The experiments on various needle strokes were performed. Three kinds of width consistent with the jet structure were obtained. In the results, it can be concluded that our non-contact measuring methods are feasible. The data of jet spreading widths and jet taper were obtained and are useful for future applications.

  8. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys. PMID:27475604

  9. Looking to the Future: Non-contact Methods for Measuring Streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Spicer, K.R.; Plant, J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate whether it is possible to make completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurements. After an extensive evaluation of potential technologies, we concluded a combination of high-frequency (microwave) radar (for measuring surface velocity) and low-frequency radar (ground-penetrating radar) for measuring channel cross-section, had the best chance for success. The first experiment in 1999 on the Skagit River, Washington, using non-contact methods, produced a discharge value nearly exactly the same as from an ADCP and current meter. Surface-velocity data were converted to mean velocity based on measurements of the velocity profile (multiplied by 0.85), and radar signal speed in impure fresh water was measured to be 0.11-0.12 ft/ns. The weak link was thought to be the requirement to suspend the GPR antenna over the water, which required a bridge or cableway. Two contractors, expert with radar, were unsuccessful in field experiments to measure channel cross-section from the riverbank. Another series of experiments were designed to demonstrate whether both radar systems could be mounted on a helicopter, flown back and forth across a river, and provide data to compute flow. In Sept. 2000 and May 2001, a series of helicopter flights with mounted radar systems successfully measured surface velocity and channel cross-section of the Cowlitz River, Washington.

  10. Form, figure, and thickness measurement of freeform and conformal optics with non-contact sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFisher, Scott; Fess, Edward; Matthews, Greg

    2014-05-01

    Advancements in optical manufacturing technology allow optical designers to implement freeform and conformal shapes in their systems. Metrology of the shapes has traditionally been difficult, especially at the sub-micron level. Contact measuring systems typically lack the accuracy required for optical qualification and can damage the surface. Interferometric systems are unable to handle high spherical departures and may require complicated lateral calibration to generate feedback for deterministic grinding and polishing. OptiPro has developed UltraSurf, a noncontact coordinate measuring machine to determine the form, figure, and thickness of freeform and conformal optics. We integrated several non-contact sensors that acquire surface information through different optical principles. Each probe has strength and weaknesses relative to an optic's material properties, surface finish, and figure error. The measuring probe is scanned over the optical surface while maintaining perpendicularity and a constant focal offset. Measurements of freeform and conformal shapes will be presented. The scanning method of UltraSurf and the non-contact probes will also be shown. The form, figure, and thickness data will highlight the capabilities of UltraSurf to measure freeform surfaces. Comparisons between accuracy and measureable surface departure will be made with current metrology systems such as coordinate measuring machines, interferometers, and profilometers. Additionally, methods for defining a freeform or conformal surface for metrology analysis and manufacturing will be discussed.

  11. Non-Contact Measurement of Density and Thickness Variation in Dielectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This non-contact, single-sided terahertz electromagnetic measurement and imaging method characterizes micro structural (e.g., spatially-lateral density) and thickness variation in dielectric (insulating) materials. This method was demonstrated for space shuttle external tank sprayed-on foam insulation and has been designed for use as an inspection method for current and future NASA thermal protection systems and other dielectric material inspection applications where no contact can be made with the sample due to fragility and it is impractical to use ultrasonic methods

  12. Solid state lasers for use in non-contact temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The last decade has seen a series of dramatic developments in solid state laser technology. Prominent among these has been the emergence of high power semiconductor laser diode arrays and a deepening understanding of the dynamics of solid state lasers. Taken in tandem these two developments enable the design of laser diode pumped solid state lasers. Pumping solid state lasers with semiconductor diodes relieves the need for cumbersome and inefficient flashlamps and results in an efficient and stable laser with the compactness and reliability. It provides a laser source that can be reliably used in space. These new coherent sources are incorporated into the non-contact measurement of temperature. The primary focus is the development and characterization of new optical materials for use in active remote sensors of the atmosphere. In the course of this effort several new materials and new concepts were studied which can be used for other sensor applications. The general approach to the problem of new non-contact temperature measurements has had two components. The first component centers on passive sensors using optical fibers; an optical fiber temperature sensor for the drop tube was designed and tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Work on this problem has given insight into the use of optical fibers, especially new IR fibers, in thermal metrology. The second component of the effort is to utilize the experience gained in the study of passive sensors to examine new active sensor concepts. By active sensor are defined as a sensing device or mechanism which is interrogated in some way be radiation, usually from a laser. The status of solid state lasers as sources for active non-contact temperature sensors are summarized. Some specific electro-optic techniques are described which are applicable to the sensor problems at hand. Work on some of these ideas is in progress while other concepts are still being worked out.

  13. A non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Yun; Chang, Rong-Seng; Jwo, Ko-Wen; Hsu, Chung-Chi; Tsao, Chu-Pang

    2015-01-01

    This study is to construct a non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) using optical triangulation measurements. The system consists of a linear laser, a CMOS image sensor and image analysis software. The linear laser is projected on the pulse beat location on the wrists; the CMOS image sensor records the process and the software analyzes the images. The program mainly uses the optical centroid and fast Fourier transform (FFT) principles to calculate centroid changes (pulse amplitude changes) from the images taken by the CMOS image sensor. It returns the positions of cun, guan and chi pulses automatically in terms of the amplitudes and the signals are then transformed from the time domain (time-amplitude) into the frequency domain (frequency-amplitude) via FFT to obtain the waveforms and frequencies of the cun, guan and chi pulses. It successfully extracts the data from the TCM pulse reading and can be a medical aid system for TCM. Combining the advantages of optical measurement and computer automation, this system provides a non-contact, easy to operate, fast in detection and low-cost equipment design. PMID:25923936

  14. A non-contact technique for measuring eccrine sweat gland activity using passive thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Krzywicki, Alan T; Berntson, Gary G; O'Kane, Barbara L

    2014-10-01

    An approach for monitoring eccrine sweat gland activity using high resolution Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) imaging (3-5 μm wave band) is described. This technique is non-contact, passive, and provides high temporal and spatial resolution. Pore activity was monitored on the face and on the volar surfaces of the distal and medial phalanges of the index and middle fingers while participants performed a series of six deep inhalation and exhalation exercises. Two metrics called the Pore Activation Index (PAI) and Pore Count (PC) were defined as size-weighted and unweighted measures of active sweat gland counts respectively. PAI transient responses on the finger tips were found to be positively correlated to Skin Conductance Responses (SCRs). PAI responses were also observed on the face, although the finger sites appeared to be more responsive. Results indicate that thermal imaging of the pore response may provide a useful, non-contact, correlate measure for electrodermal responses recorded from related sites. PMID:24956027

  15. A non-contacting vertical alignment system for mass properties measuring instruments

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III; Suazo, J.E.; Varga, R.C.

    1993-11-01

    A non-contact system for alignment of objects on mass properties measuring instruments is described. Test parts can be aligned to within the capabilities of the user and the fixture to make the adjustments. The current implementation can align objects to less than .001 inches at two points with final requested adjustments of a few ten-thousands of an inch. The non-contact capability allows the alignment of objects which are too compliant or fragile for traditional contacting measurement methods. Also, this system allows the definition of a reference axis on objects which are not perfectly symmetric. The reference axis is defined at the top of the object by an appropriate marker and defined at the bottom by a best fit circle through the surface at a specified height. A general description of the hardware, procedures, and results are presented for the non-user. Appendices which contain a complete description of the software, usage, and mathematical implementation are provided for the reader who is interested in using or further developing the system.

  16. A non-contact real-time measurement of lamp dimension based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Wang, Peng-qiang; Chang, Yu-lan; Li, Xiao-jie; Xi, Jiang-tao; Guo, Qing-hua; Li, Bing-nan

    2015-03-01

    In order to realize the online measurement of lamp dimension, the bulb image dimension measurement based on vision (BIDMV) is proposed. The image of lamp is obtained by camera. After image processing, such as Otsu algorithm, median filter, ellipse fitting and envelope rectangle fitting, the dimension of lamp can be calculated. Based on this method, a non-contact real-time measurement system of the lamp's dimension is developed. The precision of the proposed method is 0.07 mm, and it can satisfy the tolerance of the National Standard GB15766.1-2008. The experiment results show that the proposed method has a faster measuring speed and a higher precision compared with other measurement methods.

  17. Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity using RGB cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Aoki, Yuta; Satoh, Ryota; Hoshi, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) using red, green, and blue (RGB) digital color images is proposed. Generally, PWV is used as the index of arteriosclerosis. In our method, changes in blood volume are calculated based on changes in the color information, and is estimated by combining multiple regression analysis (MRA) with a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) model of the transit of light in human skin. After two pulse waves of human skins were measured using RGB cameras, and the PWV was calculated from the difference of the pulse transit time and the distance between two measurement points. The measured forehead-finger PWV (ffPWV) was on the order of m/s and became faster as the values of vital signs raised. These results demonstrated the feasibility of this method.

  18. Non-contact direct measurement of the magnetocaloric effect in thin samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cugini, F. Porcari, G.; Solzi, M.

    2014-07-15

    An experimental setup, based on a non-contact temperature sensor, is proposed to directly measure the magnetocaloric effect of samples few micrometers thick. The measurement of the adiabatic temperature change of foils and ribbons is fundamental to design innovative devices based on magnetocaloric thin materials or micro-structuring bulk samples. The reliability of the proposed setup is demonstrated by comparing the measurements performed on a bulk gadolinium sample with the results obtained by an experimental setup based on a Cernox bare chip thermoresistance and by in-field differential scanning calorimetry. We show that this technique can measure the adiabatic temperature variation on gadolinium sheets as thin as 27 μm. Heat transfer simulations are added to describe the capability of the presented technique.

  19. Non-Contact Measurement of Stream Discharge from Land and Helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. E.; Plant, W. J.; Spicer, K. R.; Cheng, R. T.; Haeni, F. P.; Melcher, N.

    2001-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is seeking new technologies that could be used to make routine measurements of river discharge by direct measurement of river cross-sectional area, water surface elevation, and water velocity distribution using non-contact methods. If the non-contact approach is proven valid and accurate, it will reduce streamgaging costs, improve accuracy, and reduce hazards associated with traditional streamgaging methods. After evaluating laser, acoustic, particle-imaging, and radar technologies, radar technology for direct measurement of open-channel discharge seems to be the most promising. A proof-of-concept experiment for non-contact open-channel discharge was conducted at the Skagit River, Washington in April 1999. A van-mounted, side-looking microwave (10GHz) backscattering radar collected surface-velocity data across the 183-m wide river. Surface velocities were converted to mean velocities by assuming a normal open-channel velocity profile (surface velocity times 0.85). Channel cross-sectional area was measured using a 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar suspended from a cableway over the river. Results were excellent (within 1-2 percent of directly measured discharge). A new goal was established to measure both velocity and cross-sectional area from a single point on the side of the river. In 2000, two highly experienced contractors, using monostatic and bistatic radar systems of different frequencies, were unsuccessful in obtaining an image of the bed of a river from the riverbank. Lessons learned from those failures have pointed to an approach that is likely to be successful in a future experiment, namely a bankside-mounted highly directional antenna and a tall scan position. If imaging the bed of the river could not be done from the bank, to avoid the requirements of a bridge or cableway, another approach was tried. In 2001 we tested both the pulsed Doppler radar and ground-penetrating radars mounted on a helicopter. Prototype

  20. Non-contact measurement of linear external dimensions of the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Wisard, Jeffrey; Chrenek, Micah A.; Wright, Charles; Dalal, Nupur; Pardue, Machelle T.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Biometric analyses of quantitative traits in eyes of mice can reveal abnormalities related to refractive or ocular development. Due to the small size of the mouse eye, highly accurate and precise measurements are needed to detect meaningful differences. We sought a non-contact measuring technique to obtain highly accurate and precise linear dimensions of the mouse eye. Laser micrometry was validated with gauge block standards. Simple procedures to measure eye dimensions on three axes were devised. Mouse eyes from C57BL/6J and rd10 on a C57BL/6J background were dissected and extraocular muscle and fat removed. External eye dimensions of axial length (anterior-posterior (A-P) axis) and equatorial diameter (superior-inferior (S-I) and nasal-temporal (N-T) axes) were obtained with a laser micrometer. Several approaches to prevent or ameliorate evaporation due to room air were employed. The resolution of the laser micrometer was less than 0.77 microns, and it provided accurate and precise non-contact measurements of eye dimensions on three axes. External dimensions of the eye strongly correlated with eye weight. The N-T and S-I dimensions of the eye correlated with each other most closely from among the 28 pair-wise combinations of the several parameters that were collected. The equatorial axis measurements correlated well from the right and left eye of each mouse. The A-P measurements did not correlate or correlated poorly in each pair of eyes. The instrument is well suited for the measurement of enucleated eyes and other structures from most commonly used species in experimental vision research and ophthalmology. PMID:20067806

  1. Non-contact measurements of creep properties of niobium at 1985 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Wall, J. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Hyers, R. W.

    2015-01-01

    The stress exponent in the power-law creep of niobium at 1985 °C was measured by a non-contact technique using an electrostatic levitation facility at NASA MSFC. This method employs a distribution of stress to allow the stress exponent to be determined from each test, rather than from the curve fit through measurements from multiple samples that is required by conventional methods. The sample is deformed by the centripetal acceleration from the rapid rotation, and the deformed shapes are analyzed to determine the strain. Based on a mathematical proof, which revealed that the stress exponent was determined uniquely by the ratio of the polar to equatorial strains, a series of finite-element analyses with the models of different stress exponents were also performed to determine the stress exponent corresponding to the measured strain ratio. The stress exponent from the ESL experiment showed a good agreement with those from the literature and the conventional creep test.

  2. Enhancement to Non-Contacting Stress Measurement of Blade Vibration Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael; Jagodnik, John

    2011-01-01

    A system for turbo machinery blade vibration has been developed that combines time-of-arrival sensors for blade vibration amplitude measurement and radar sensors for vibration frequency and mode identification. The enabling technology for this continuous blade monitoring system is the radar sensor, which provides a continuous time series of blade displacement over a portion of a revolution. This allows the data reduction algorithms to directly calculate the blade vibration frequency and to correctly identify the active modes of vibration. The work in this project represents a significant enhancement in the mode identification and stress calculation accuracy in non-contacting stress measurement system (NSMS) technology when compared to time-of-arrival measurements alone.

  3. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying withmore » transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.« less

  4. Laser heating and detection of bilayer microcantilevers for non-contact thermodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Brian G.; LaVan, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method for optical detection (frequency and position) and heating of bilayer microcantilevers (BMCs) to high temperatures at fast heating rates (106°C/s to 109°C/s) for non-contact thermodynamic measurements of small quantities of materials in the femtogram range. The current experimental apparatus with a 2 μm × 10 μm BMC achieves a deflection sensitivity of 0.1 Å, heating rate of 3.0 × 106°C/s, and heat sensitivity of 18 pJ in a 3 kHz bandwidth in air. By measuring the resonant frequency shift after sample loading, we achieve a mass resolution of 2.67 fg.

  5. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants. PMID:26527099

  6. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, F; Mason, D R; Eliason, J K; Maznev, A A; Nelson, K A; Dudarev, S L

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants. PMID:26527099

  7. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  8. Non-contact passive temperature measuring system and method of operation using micro-mechanical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    2000-04-18

    A non-contact infrared thermometer measures target temperatures remotely without requiring the ratio of the target size to the target distance to the thermometer. A collection means collects and focuses target IR radiation on an IR detector. The detector measures thermal energy of the target over a spectrum using micromechanical sensors. A processor means calculates the collected thermal energy in at least two different spectral regions using a first algorithm in program form and further calculates the ratio of the thermal energy in the at least two different spectral regions to obtain the target temperature independent of the target size, distance to the target and emissivity using a second algorithm in program form.

  9. Non-contact passive temperature measuring system and method of operation using micro-mechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Oden, Patrick I.; Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2000-01-01

    A non-contact infrared thermometer measures target temperatures remotely without requiring the ratio of the target size to the target distance to the thermometer. A collection means collects and focusses target IR radiation on an IR detector. The detector measures thermal energy of the target over a spectrum using micromechanical sensors. A processor means calculates the collected thermal energy in at least two different spectral regions using a first algorithm in program form and further calculates the ratio of the thermal energy in the at least two different spectral regions to obtain the target temperature independent of the target size, distance to the target and emissivity using a second algorithm in program form.

  10. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  11. Non-contact measurement of linear thermal expansion coefficients of solid materials by infrared image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, R.; Freni, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new non-contact optical method (IIC, infrared image correlation) for the determination of the coefficients of thermal expansion of solid materials is presented. The proposed method is based on performing a digital image correlation between thermal images recorded at different temperatures by means of an infrared camera. It allows the coefficient of thermal expansion of both isotropic and anisotropic solid materials to be determined by measuring simultaneously the fractional increase in length and the actual thermal field over a small region of interest in which a dual-emissivity stochastic speckle pattern has been created. The results reported in this paper prove the effectiveness of the proposed method that can be applied either to carry out reference measurements in laboratory or to evaluate thermal stresses and strains on structural components in-field.

  12. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  13. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  14. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s. PMID:25933881

  15. Non-Contact Thermal Properties Measurement with Low-Power Laser and IR Camera System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Troy L.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    As shown by the Phoenix Mars Lander's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP), contact measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity (using a modified flux-plate or line-source heat-pulse method) are constrained by a number of factors. Robotic resources must be used to place the probe, making them unavailable for other operations for the duration of the measurement. The range of placement is also limited by mobility, particularly in the case of a lander. Placement is also subject to irregularities in contact quality, resulting in non-repeatable heat transfer to the material under test. Most important from a scientific perspective, the varieties of materials which can be measured are limited to unconsolidated or weakly-cohesive regolith materials, rocks, and ices being too hard for nominal insertion strengths. Accurately measuring thermal properties in the laboratory requires significant experimental finesse, involving sample preparation, controlled and repeatable procedures, and, practically, instrumentation much more voluminous than the sample being tested (heater plates, insulation, temperature sensors). Remote measurements (infrared images from orbiting spacecraft) can reveal composite properties like thermal inertia, but suffer both from a large footprint (low spatial resolution) and convolution of the thermal properties of a potentially layered medium. In situ measurement techniques (the Phoenix TECP is the only robotic measurement of thermal properties to date) suffer from problems of placement range, placement quality, occupation of robotic resources, and the ability to only measure materials of low mechanical strength. A spacecraft needs the ability to perform a non-contact thermal properties measurement in situ. Essential components include low power consumption, leveraging of existing or highly-developed flight technologies, and mechanical simplicity. This new in situ method, by virtue of its being non-contact, bypasses all of these

  16. A Non-Contact Measurement System for the Range of Motion of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Trieu; Pathirana, Pubudu N.; Trinh, Hieu; Fay, Pearse

    2015-01-01

    An accurate and standardised tool to measure the active range of motion (ROM) of the hand is essential to any progressive assessment scenario in hand therapy practice. Goniometers are widely used in clinical settings for measuring the ROM of the hand. However, such measurements have limitations with regard to inter-rater and intra-rater reliability and involve direct physical contact with the hand, possibly increasing the risk of transmitting infections. The system proposed in this paper is the first non-contact measurement system utilising Intel Perceptual Technology and a Senz3D Camera for measuring phalangeal joint angles. To enhance the accuracy of the system, we developed a new approach to achieve the total active movement without measuring three joint angles individually. An equation between the actual spacial position and measurement value of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint was established through the measurement values of the total active movement, so that its actual position can be inferred. Verified by computer simulations, experimental results demonstrated a significant improvement in the calculation of the total active movement and successfully recovered the actual position of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint angles. A trial that was conducted to examine the clinical applicability of the system involving 40 healthy subjects confirmed the practicability and consistency in the proposed system. The time efficiency conveyed a stronger argument for this system to replace the current practice of using goniometers. PMID:26225976

  17. Non-contact measurement of facial surface vibration patterns during singing by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of measuring the vibration patterns on facial surfaces by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The surfaces of the face, neck, and body vibrate during phonation and, according to Titze (2001), these vibrations occur when aerodynamic energy is efficiently converted into acoustic energy at the glottis. A vocalist's vibration velocity patterns may therefore indicate his or her phonatory status or singing skills. LDVs enable laser-based non-contact measurement of the vibration velocity and displacement of a certain point on a vibrating object, and scanning LDVs permit multipoint measurements. The benefits of scanning LDVs originate from the facts that they do not affect the vibrations of measured objects and that they can rapidly measure the vibration patterns across planes. A case study is presented herein to demonstrate the method of measuring vibration velocity patterns with a scanning LDV. The objective of the experiment was to measure the vibration velocity differences between the modal and falsetto registers while three professional soprano singers sang sustained vowels at four pitch frequencies. The results suggest that there is a possibility that pitch frequency are correlated with vibration velocity. However, further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationships between vibration velocity patterns and phonation status and singing skills. PMID:26579054

  18. Non-contacting Measurement of Oil Film Thickness Between Loaded Metallic Gear Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Daniel B.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.

    2013-11-01

    The mechanical power transmission efficiency of gears is depends on the lubrication condition between gear teeth. While the lubrication levels can be generally predicted, an effective in-situ non-contacting measurement of oil film thicknesses between loaded metallic gear teeth has proved elusive. This study explores a novel oil film thickness measurement technique based on optical fluence, the light energy transmitted between loaded gear teeth. A gear testing apparatus that allowed independent control of gear rotation rate, load torque, and oil flow was designed and built. Film thickness measurements made with 5-inch-pitch-diameter 60-tooth spur gears ranged from 0.3 to 10.2 mil. These results are compared with film thickness measurements made in an earlier investigation (MacConochie and Cameron, 1960), as well as with predictions from two film thickness models: a simple two-dimensional squeezed oil film and the industry-accepted model as described by the American Gear Manufacturers Association (AGMA 925, 2003). In each case, the measured film thicknesses were larger than the predicted thicknesses, though these discrepancies might be attributed to the specifics the experiments and to challenges associated with calibrating the fluence measurements. [Sponsored by General Electric].

  19. Non-contact ultrasonic spectroscopy measurement of elastic constants and ultrasonic attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Kuokkala, V.T.; Srinivasan, S.; Visscher, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed an ultrasonic spectroscopy method for measuring the elastic constants of solids in hostile environments and over a broad temperature regime. The sample is cut as a rectangular parallelepiped, approximately 1 mm{sup 3} in volume. One or two of the sample surfaces are coated with a thin film of a magnetostrictive material such as nickel. The sample is placed coaxially with two solenoids. One solenoid is used to generate an AC magnetic field of small amplitude which stretches the films. By sweeping the frequency of this field, the sample is excited successively into its various mechanical resonance modes. The second solenoid detects the mechanical resonances. The elastic constants are then deduced from the spectrum of mechanical resonances measured at constant temperature. The internal friction is deduced from the width of the resonance peaks. Because the technique is strictly non-contact (the sample may be encapsulated in a fused silica tube), it is deal for measuring elastic constants in hostile environments or under controlled atmospheres. In its present version the system allows us to measure the elastic constants and ultrasonic attenuation of a given sample between 80 and 100 K. The operation of the system is exemplified by measurements on amorphous Ni{sub 80}P{sub 20} and crystalline Ti{sub 60}Cr{sub 40}. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Non-contact C-V measurements of ultra thin dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, P.; Savtchouk, A.; Wilson, M.; D'Amico, J.; Kochey, J. N.; Marinskiy, D.; Lagowski, J.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we present a non-contact C-V technique for ultra-thin dielectrics on silicon. The technique uses incremental corona charging of dielectric and a measurement of the surface potential with a vibrating capacitive electrode. A differential quasistatic C-V curve is generated using time-resolved measurements. The technique incorporates transconductance corrections that enable corresponding ultra-low electrical oxide thickness (EOT) determination down to the sub-nanometer range. It also provides a means for monitoring the flat band voltage, V{FB}, the interface trap spectrum, D{IT}, and the total dielectric charge, Q{TOT}. This technique is seen as a replacement for not only MOS C-V measurements but also for mercury-probe C-V. In addition, EOT measurement by the corona C-V has a major advantage over optical thickness methods because it is not affected by water adsorption and molecular airborne contamination, MAC. These effects have been a problem for optical metrology of ultra-thin dielectrics.

  1. Non-contact sound speed measurement by optical probing of beam deflection due to sound wave.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Soo; Kim, Yong Tae; Pu, Yu Cheon; Kim, Min Gon; Kim, Ho Chul

    2006-01-01

    We report a non-contact and non-invasive method of sound speed measurement by optical probing of deflected laser beam due to normally incident degenerated shock wave. In this study the shock wave from an exploding wire was degenerated to an ordinary sound wave at the distance exceeding 0.23 m. Temporal resolution of the deflected beam signal was improved by passing through an adequate electronic high-pass filter, as a result we obtained a better temporal resolution than that of the acoustic pressure detection by PZT transducer in terms of rising time. The spatial resolution was improved by passing the refracted beam signal into the edge of focusing lens to make a larger deflection angle. Sound speed was calculated by monitoring the time of flight of transient deflected signal at the predetermined position. Sound speed has been measured in air, distilled water and acryl, agreed well with the published values. The sound speed measured in the solution of glycerin, magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), and dimethylformamide with various mole fractions also agrees within 3% of relative error with those measured in the present work by ultrasonic pulse echo method. The results suggest that the method proposed is to be reliable and reproducible. PMID:16122774

  2. Contact Versus Non-Contact Measurement of a Helicopter Main Rotor Composite Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Luczak, Marcin; Dziedziech, Kajetan; Peeters, Bart; Van der Auweraer, Herman; Vivolo, Marianna; Desmet, Wim

    2010-05-28

    The dynamic characterization of lightweight structures is particularly complex as the impact of the weight of sensors and instrumentation (cables, mounting of exciters...) can distort the results. Varying mass loading or constraint effects between partial measurements may determine several errors on the final conclusions. Frequency shifts can lead to erroneous interpretations of the dynamics parameters. Typically these errors remain limited to a few percent. Inconsistent data sets however can result in major processing errors, with all related consequences towards applications based on the consistency assumption, such as global modal parameter identification, model-based damage detection and FRF-based matrix inversion in substructuring, load identification and transfer path analysis [1]. This paper addresses the subject of accuracy in the context of the measurement of the dynamic properties of a particular lightweight structure. It presents a comprehensive comparative study between the use of accelerometer, laser vibrometer (scanning LDV) and PU-probe (acoustic particle velocity and pressure) measurements to measure the structural responses, with as final aim the comparison of modal model quality assessment. The object of the investigation is a composite material blade from the main rotor of a helicopter. The presented results are part of an extensive test campaign performed with application of SIMO, MIMO, random and harmonic excitation, and the use of the mentioned contact and non-contact measurement techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of the applied instrumentation are discussed. Presented are real-life measurement problems related to the different set up conditions. Finally an analysis of estimated models is made in view of assessing the applicability of the various measurement approaches for successful fault detection based on modal parameters observation as well as in uncertain non-deterministic numerical model updating.

  3. Contact Versus Non-Contact Measurement of a Helicopter Main Rotor Composite Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak, Marcin; Dziedziech, Kajetan; Vivolo, Marianna; Desmet, Wim; Peeters, Bart; Van der Auweraer, Herman

    2010-05-01

    The dynamic characterization of lightweight structures is particularly complex as the impact of the weight of sensors and instrumentation (cables, mounting of exciters…) can distort the results. Varying mass loading or constraint effects between partial measurements may determine several errors on the final conclusions. Frequency shifts can lead to erroneous interpretations of the dynamics parameters. Typically these errors remain limited to a few percent. Inconsistent data sets however can result in major processing errors, with all related consequences towards applications based on the consistency assumption, such as global modal parameter identification, model-based damage detection and FRF-based matrix inversion in substructuring, load identification and transfer path analysis [1]. This paper addresses the subject of accuracy in the context of the measurement of the dynamic properties of a particular lightweight structure. It presents a comprehensive comparative study between the use of accelerometer, laser vibrometer (scanning LDV) and PU-probe (acoustic particle velocity and pressure) measurements to measure the structural responses, with as final aim the comparison of modal model quality assessment. The object of the investigation is a composite material blade from the main rotor of a helicopter. The presented results are part of an extensive test campaign performed with application of SIMO, MIMO, random and harmonic excitation, and the use of the mentioned contact and non-contact measurement techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of the applied instrumentation are discussed. Presented are real-life measurement problems related to the different set up conditions. Finally an analysis of estimated models is made in view of assessing the applicability of the various measurement approaches for successful fault detection based on modal parameters observation as well as in uncertain non-deterministic numerical model updating.

  4. Non-contact strain measurement in the mouse forearm loading model using digital image correlation (DIC).

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Dallas, Mark; Vizcarra, Bruno; Liu, Ying; Johnson, Mark L; Thiagarajan, Ganesh

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the use of a non-contact method known as digital image correlation (DIC) to measure strains in the mouse forearm during axial compressive loading. A two camera system was adapted to analyze the medial and lateral forearm displacements simultaneously, and the derived DIC strain measurements were compared to strain gage readings from both the ulna and radius. Factors such as region-of-interest (ROI) location, lens magnification, noise, and out-of-plane motion were examined to determine their influence on the DIC strain measurements. We confirmed that our DIC system can differentiate ROI locations since it detected higher average strains in the ulna compared to the radius and detected compressive strains on medial bone surfaces vs. tensile strains on lateral bone surfaces. Interestingly, the DIC method also captured heterogeneity in surface strain fields which are not detectable by strain gage based methods. A separate analysis of the noise intrinsic to the DIC system also revealed that the noise constituted less than 4.5% of all DIC strain measurements. Furthermore, finite element (FE) simulations of the forearm showed that out-of-plane motion was not a significant factor that influenced DIC measurements. Finally, we observed that average DIC strain measurements can be up to 1.5-2 times greater than average strain gage readings on the medial bone surfaces. These findings suggest that strain experienced in the mouse forearm model by loading is better captured through DIC as opposed to strain gages, which as a result of being glued to the bone surface artificially stiffen the bone and lead to an underestimation of the strain response. PMID:26388521

  5. Advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Tian, Long

    2016-08-22

    We developed an advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement in material testing. In the established video extensometer, a "near perfect and ultra-stable" imaging system, combining the idea of active imaging with a high-quality bilateral telecentric lens, is constructed to acquire high-fidelity video images of the test sample surface, which is invariant to ambient lighting changes and small out-of-plane motions occurred between the object surface and image plane. In addition, an efficient and accurate inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm incorporating a temporal initial guess transfer scheme and a high-accuracy interpolation method is employed to achieve real-time, high-accuracy displacement tracking with negligible bias error. Tensile tests of an aluminum sample and a carbon fiber filament sample were performed to demonstrate the efficiency, repeatability and accuracy of the developed advanced video extensometer. The results indicate that longitudinal and transversal strains can be estimated and plotted at a rate of 117 fps and with a maximum strain error less than 30 microstrains. PMID:27557188

  6. Non-contact Real-time heart rate measurements based on high speed circuit technology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jizhe; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Shi, Cong; Liu, Ming; Hui, Mei; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, which threaten human health greatly, increased year by year. Heart rate is an important index of these diseases. To address this status, the paper puts forward a kind of simple structure, easy operation, suitable for large populations of daily monitoring non-contact heart rate measurement. In the method we use imaging equipment video sensitive areas. The changes of light intensity reflected through the image grayscale average. The light change is caused by changes in blood volume. We video the people face which include the sensitive areas (ROI), and use high-speed processing circuit to save the video as AVI format into memory. After processing the whole video of a period of time, we draw curve of each color channel with frame number as horizontal axis. Then get heart rate from the curve. We use independent component analysis (ICA) to restrain noise of sports interference, realized the accurate extraction of heart rate signal under the motion state. We design an algorithm, based on high-speed processing circuit, for face recognition and tracking to automatically get face region. We do grayscale average processing to the recognized image, get RGB three grayscale curves, and extract a clearer pulse wave curves through independent component analysis, and then we get the heart rate under the motion state. At last, by means of compare our system with Fingertip Pulse Oximeter, result show the system can realize a more accurate measurement, the error is less than 3 pats per minute.

  7. A non-contact temperature measurement system for controlling photothermal medical laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ã.-zgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal medical laser treatments are extremely dependent on the generated tissue temperature. It is necessary to reach a certain temperature threshold to achieve successful results, whereas preventing to exceed an upper temperature value is required to avoid thermal damage. One method to overcome this problem is to use previously conducted dosimetry studies as a reference. Nevertheless, these results are acquired in controlled environments using uniform subjects. In the clinical environment, the optical and thermal characteristics (tissue color, composition and hydration level) vary dramatically among different patients. Therefore, the most reliable solution is to use a closed-loop feedback system that monitors the target tissue temperature to control laser exposure. In this study, we present a compact, non-contact temperature measurement system for the control of photothermal medical laser applications that is cost-efficient and simple to use. The temperature measurement is achieved using a focused, commercially available MOEMS infrared thermocouple sensor embedded in an off-axis arrangement on the laser beam delivery hand probe. The spot size of the temperature sensor is ca. 2.5 mm, reasonably smaller than the laser spot sizes used in photothermal medical laser applications. The temperature readout and laser control is realized using a microcontroller for fast operation. The utilization of the developed system may enable the adaptation of several medical laser treatments that are currently conducted only in controlled laboratory environments into the clinic. Laser tissue welding and cartilage reshaping are two of the techniques that are limited to laboratory research at the moment. This system will also ensure the safety and success of laser treatments aiming hyperthermia, coagulation and ablation, as well as LLLT and PDT.

  8. Acoustic containerless experiment system: A non-contact surface tension measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.; Barmatz, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Acoustic Containerless Experiment System (ACES) was flown on STS 41-B in February 1984 and was scheduled to be reflown in 1986. The primary experiment that was to be conducted with the ACES module was the containerless melting and processing of a fluoride glass sample. A second experiment that was to be conducted was the verification of a non-contact surface tension measurement technique using the molten glass sample. The ACES module consisted of a three-axis acoustic positioning module that was inside an electric furnace capable of heating the system above the melting temperature of the sample. The acoustic module is able to hold the sample with acoustic forces in the center of the chamber and, in addition, has the capability of applying a modulating force on the sample along one axis of the chamber so that the molten sample or liquid drop could be driven into one of its normal oscillation modes. The acoustic module could also be adjusted so that it could place a torque on the molten drop and cause the drop to rotate. In the ACES, a modulating frequency was applied to the drop and swept through a range of frequencies that would include the n = 2 mode. A maximum amplitude of the drop oscillation would indicate when resonance was reached and from that data the surface tension could be calculated. For large viscosity samples, a second technique for measuring surface tension was developed. The results of the ACES experiment and some of the problems encountered during the actual flight of the experiment will be discussed.

  9. Non-contact laser/EMAT measurement systems for ultrasound B-scan imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, R. J.; Murray, P. R.

    2002-05-01

    For non-contact non-destructive evaluation (NDE), a laser/EMAT system is an alternative to a more expensive all optical laser-ultrasound system. Several design options of the electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) are available, permitting inspection of electrically conducting materials. In this paper, we describe a system capable of monitoring variation in either sample thickness or defects, with time-of-flight diffraction arising from mode-converted ultrasonic waves. In a B-scan imaging configuration, quantitative time-of-flight analysis of laser-generated acoustic waves is shown to be an effective method for measurement. Various images will be presented together with an interpretation of their features. For these images, transient laser pulses with typical energies of ˜18 mJ have been delivered to the material surface via an optical fiber and focused to a line source by a cylindrical lens. Acoustic waves arising from this excitation propagated through the sample to be reflected from the far surface. Waves returning to the surface, including L-S and S-L mode-converted waves, were detected using an EMAT sensitive to in-plane motion. B-scans have been generated as the sensor head moved along the material's surface, forming a 2-D intensity profile that made changes in plate thickness easy to visualize. Both L-S and S-L mode-converted waves provided a method of simultaneously monitoring two different points on the far surface enabling any changes in the material thickness to be clearly identified.

  10. Non-contact optical measurement of lens capsule thickness during simulated accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Noel; Manns, Fabrice; Acosta, Ana-Carolina; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To non-invasively measure the thickness of the anterior and posterior lens capsule, and to determine if it significantly changes during accommodation. Methods: Anterior and posterior capsule thickness was measured on post-mortem lenses using a non-contact optical system using a focus-detection technique. The optical system uses a 670nm laser beam delivered to a single-mode fiber coupler. The output of the fiber coupler is focused on the tissue surface using an aspheric lens (NA=0.68) mounted on a translation stage with a motorized actuator. Light reflected from the sample surface is collected by the fiber coupler and sent to a photoreceiver connected to a computer-controlled data acquisition system. Optical intensity peaks are detected when the aspheric lens is focused on the capsule boundaries. The capsule thickness is equal to the distance traveled between two peaks multiplied by the capsule refractive index. Anterior and posterior lens capsule thickness measurements were performed on 18 cynomolgus (age average: 6+/-1 years, range: 4-7 years) eyes, 1 rhesus (age: 2 years) eye, and 12 human (age average: 65+/-16, range: 47-92) eyes during simulated accommodation. The mounted sample was placed under the focusing objective of the optical system so that the light was incident on the center pole. Measurements were taken of the anterior lens capsule in the unstretched and the stretched 5mm states. The lens was flipped, and the same procedure was performed for the posterior lens capsule. Results: The precision of the optical system was determined to be +/-0.5um. The resolution is 4um and the sensitivity is 52dB. The human anterior lens capsule thickness was 6.0+/-1.2um unstretched and 4.9+/-0.9um stretched (p=0.008). The human posterior lens capsule was 5.7+/-1.2um unstretched and 5.7+/-1.4um stretched (p=0.974). The monkey anterior lens capsule thickness was 5.9+/-1.9um unstretched and 4.8+/-1.0um stretched (p=0.002). The monkey posterior lens capsule was 5

  11. Strategy for non-contact freeform measurements with a cylinder coordinate measuring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, A.

    2015-10-01

    The strategy for measuring and analyzing freeforms with a new high precision cylinder coordinate measuring instrument equipped with an optical point sensor is presented. As freeforms compared to aspheres are not rotationally symmetric considering outline and shape the measuring process has to be designed in new ways. In addition fiducials on the sample or fixture have to be measured to determine position and orientation, i.e. a coordinate system, of the sample. In the following analysis process this coordinate system has to be taken into account. The performance of the measuring instrument is demonstrated and measuring results of different samples are shown.

  12. Antennas for Terahertz Applications: Focal Plane Arrays and On-chip Non-contact Measurement Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichopoulos, Georgios C.

    . Additionally, a butterfly-shaped antenna layout is introduced that enables broadband imaging. The alternative design presented here, allows for video-rate imaging in the 0.6--1.2 THz band and maintains a small antenna footprint, resulting in densely packed FPAs. In both antenna designs, we optimize the impedance matching between the antennas and the integrated electronic devices, thus achieving optimum responsivity levels for high sensitivity and low noise performance. Subsequently, we present the design details of the first THz camera and the first THz camera images captured. With the realized THz camera, imaging of concealed objects is achieved with <1mm diffraction limited spatial resolution. Moreover, motivated by the THz camera's real-time image acquisition, we developed the first camera-based THz computer tomography system that allows rapid cross-sectional imaging (˜2 min). For the design and analysis of the THz camera performance, we developed an in-house hybrid electromagnetic model, combining full-wave and high-frequency computational methods. The antenna radiation and impedance computation is first carried out using full-wave modeling of the FPA. Subsequently, we employ scalar diffraction theory to compute the field distribution at any point in space. Thus, the hybrid electromagnetic model allows fast and accurate design of THz antennas and modeling of the complete THz imaging system. Finally, motivated by the novel THz antenna layouts and the quasioptical techniques, we developed a novel non-contact probe measurement method for on-chip device characterization. In the THz regime, traditional contact probes are too small and fragile, thus inhibiting accurate and reliable circuit measurements. By integrating the device under test (DUT) with THz antennas that act as the measurement probes, we may couple the incident and reflected signal from and to the network analyzer without residing to any physical connection.

  13. Locating of normal transitions in a Bi2223 high temperature superconducting coil by non-contact voltage measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Nishiyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    Locating of normal transitions in high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for protection and safety design of HTS apparatus. A general method to locate the normal transitions is to measure resistive voltages along HTS windings by many voltage taps directly soldered to the HTS coils. However, electrical insulation characteristics of the HTS coils are deteriorated because it is necessary to remove electrical insulations of the HTS wires for the soldering. It is a serious problem especially for AC HTS coils to which high voltages are applied. Therefore the authors have presented a non-contact voltage measurement method that can detect the resistive voltages without removing the insulations by voltage dividing capacitors. So far the authors have verified the principle of the non-contact method. In this paper, a method to locate the normal transitions in a Bi2223 HTS coil based on the non-contact method is proposed. The proposed method can not only detect the normal transitions but also locate their positions. It is experimentally confirmed that the proposed method is useful for locating the normal transitions.

  14. Measuring spatially distributed rheology of thin polymer films by non-contact shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mithun; Guo, Yunlong; Priestley, Rodney D.

    For nearly two decades, a great detail of research has been devoted to understand the impact of nanoscale confinement on the glassy and viscoelastic properties of thin polymer films. Prior works in supported films mostly used indirect mechano-rhelogical means, due to the complexity associated to probe such small volume. Here we present a non-contact shearing method `blow-off', induced by the laminar flow of an inert gas through a narrow channel in order to generate a well-defined shear stress on a rectangular edge of a properly placed polymer thin film on a solid substrate. By appropriate control of temperature/ time during shearing, we explored effective viscosity and shear mobility, spatially from free surface to the material interior. In general, we found film surface has higher shear mobility and lower effective viscosity in comparison to its interior.

  15. Non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement by using laser beam and laser distance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Fan, Bo; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2015-07-01

    Large-scale separated surface is very common in modern manufacturing industry. The measurement of the flatness of such surfaces is one of the most important procedures when evaluating the manufacturing quality. Usually, the measurement needs to be accomplished in an in-situ and non-contact way. Although there are many conventional approaches such as autocollimator, capacitance displacement sensor and even CMM, they can not meet the needs from the separated surfaces measurement either because of their contact-nature or inapplicable to separated surfaces. A non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement device utilizing laser beam and laser distance sensor (LDS) is proposed. The laser beam is rotated to form an optical reference plane. The LDS is used to measure the distance between the surface and the sensor accurately. A Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) is mounted with the LDS firmly to determine the distance between the LDS and the reference plane and then the distance between the surface and the reference plane can be obtained by subtracting the two distances. The device can be easily mounted on a machine-tool spindle and is moved to measure all the separated surfaces. Then all the data collected are used to evaluate the flatness of these separated surfaces. The accuracy analysis, the corresponding flatness evaluation algorithm, the prototype construction and experiments are also discussed. The proposed approach and device feature as high accuracy, in-situ usage and the higher degree of automatic measurement, and can be used in the areas that call for non-contact and separated surfaces measurement.

  16. High-precision Non-Contact Measurement of Creep of Ultra-High Temperature Materials for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For high-temperature applications (greater than 2,000 C) such as solid rocket motors, hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines, creep becomes one of the most important design factors to be considered. Conventional creep-testing methods, where the specimen and test apparatus are in contact with each other, are limited to temperatures approximately 1,700 C. Development of alloys for higher-temperature applications is limited by the availability of testing methods at temperatures above 2000 C. Development of alloys for applications requiring a long service life at temperatures as low as 1500 C, such as the next generation of jet turbine superalloys, is limited by the difficulty of accelerated testing at temperatures above 1700 C. For these reasons, a new, non-contact creep-measurement technique is needed for higher temperature applications. A new non-contact method for creep measurements of ultra-high-temperature metals and ceramics has been developed and validated. Using the electrostatic levitation (ESL) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, a spherical sample is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation due to centrifugal acceleration. Very accurate measurement of the deformed shape through digital image analysis allows the stress exponent n to be determined very precisely from a single test, rather than from numerous conventional tests. Validation tests on single-crystal niobium spheres showed excellent agreement with conventional tests at 1985 C; however the non-contact method provides much greater precision while using only about 40 milligrams of material. This method is being applied to materials including metals and ceramics for non-eroding throats in solid rockets and next-generation superalloys for turbine engines. Recent advances in the method and the current state of these new measurements will be presented.

  17. 3D Blade Vibration Measurements on an 80 m Diameter Wind Turbine by Using Non-contact Remote Measurement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Non-contact optical measurement systems photogrammetry and laser interferometry are introduced as cost efficient alternatives to the conventional wind turbine/farm monitoring systems that are currently in use. The proposed techniques are proven to provide an accurate measurement of the dynamic behavior of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine. Several measurements are taken on the test turbine by using 4 CCD cameras and 1 laser vibrometer and the response of the turbine is monitored from a distance of 220 m. The results of the infield tests and the corresponding analyses show that photogrammetry (also can be called as videogrammetry or computer vision technique) enable the 3D deformations of the rotor to be measured at 33 different points simultaneously with an average accuracy of ±25 mm, while the turbine is rotating. Several important turbine modes can also be extracted from the recorded data. Similarly, laser interferometry (used for the parked turbine only) provides very valuable information on the dynamic properties of the turbine structure. Twelve different turbine modes can be identified from the obtained response data.

  18. Assessment of non-contacting optical methods to measure wear and surface roughness in ceramic total disc replacements.

    PubMed

    Green, Naomi C; Bowen, James; Hukins, David W L; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a method for measuring the low volumetric wear expected in ceramic total disc replacements, which can be used to replace intervertebral discs in the spine, using non-contacting optical methods. Alumina-on-alumina ball-on-disc tests were conducted with test conditions approximating those of cervical (neck region of the spine) total disc replacement wear tests. The samples were then scanned using a three-dimensional non-contacting optical profilometer and the data used to measure surface roughness and develop a method for measuring the wear volume. The results showed that the magnification of the optical lens affected the accuracy of both the surface roughness and wear volume measurements. The method was able to successfully measure wear volumes of 0.0001 mm(3), which corresponds to a mass of 0.0001 mg, which would have been undetectable using the gravimetric method. A further advantage of this method is that with one scan the user can measure changes in surface topography, volumetric wear and the location of the wear on the implant surface. This method could also be applied to more severe wear, other types of orthopaedic implants and different materials. PMID:25834000

  19. Experimental Methodology for Determining Turbomachinery Blade Damping Using Magnetic Bearing Excitation and Non-Contacting Optical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments to determine the effects of turbomachinery fan blade damping concepts such as passively shunted piezoelectric materials on blade response are ongoing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A vertical rotor is suspended and excited with active magnetic bearings (AMBs) usually in a vacuum chamber to eliminate aerodynamic forces. Electromagnetic rotor excitation is superimposed onto rotor PD-controlled support and can be fixed to either a stationary or rotating frame of reference. The rotor speed is controlled with an air turbine system. Blade vibrations are measured using optical probes as part of a Non-Contacting Stress Measurement System (NSMS). Damping is calculated from these measurements. It can be difficult to get accurate damping measurements using this experimental setup and some of the details of how to obtain quality results are seemingly nontrivial. The intent of this paper is to present those details.

  20. Application of the HHT Method to the Non-contact Thickness Measurement of an Axially Moving Thin Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yangfang; Lu, Qianqian; Xia, Chunlin; Ding, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Non-contact thickness measuring systems can be found in a wide spectrum of technologies. In this paper, Hilbert-Huang transform method is used to analyze the real time signals of a measuring system which includes two round conveyor strings carrying a thin plate, a solar wafer as a sample under test. The vibrations of moving strings and the plate, which are sensitive to moving speed and initial tension in the string, are introduced briefly; the relevant analyses should be helpful for the system design. Using EMD-based time-domain filtering and complementary method, thickness variations and error bands are estimated for different cases. The results show that HHT method as an adaptive time-frequency method, should be potential in measurement engineering applications.

  1. Flexible, non-contact and high-precision measurements of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, A.

    2016-06-01

    A high-accuracy cylindrical coordinate measuring instrument developed for the measurement of optical components is presented. It is equipped with an optical point sensor system including a high aperture probe. This setup allows measurements to be performed with high accuracy in a flexible way. Applications include the measurement of the topography of high-precision aspheric and freeform lenses and diffractive structures. High measuring speeds guarantee the implementation in a closed-loop production process.

  2. Non-contact temperature measurement. [in containerless space-based experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. R.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Three methods for noncontact temperature measurement are presented. Ideal gas thermometry is realized by using laser-induced fluorescence to measure the concentration of mercury atoms in a Hg-Ar mixture in the vicinity of hot specimens. Emission polarimetry is investigated by measuring the spatially resolved intensities of polarized light from a hot tungsten sphere. Laser polarimetry is used to measure the optical properties, emissivity, and, in combination with optical pyrometry, the temperature of electromagnetically levitated liquid aluminum. The precision of temperature measurements based on the ideal gas law is + or - 2.6 percent at 1500-2000 K. The polarized emission technique is found to have the capability to determine optical properties and/or spectral emissivities of specimens over a wide range of wavelengths with quite simple instruments.

  3. High-speed non-contact measuring apparatus for gauging the thickness of moving sheet material

    DOEpatents

    Grann, Eric B.; Holcomb, David E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical measurement apparatus is provided for measuring the thickness of a moving sheet material (18). The apparatus has a pair of optical measurement systems (21, 31) attached to opposing surfaces (14, 16) of a rigid support structure (10). A pair of high-power laser diodes (20,30) and a pair of photodetector arrays (22,32) are attached to the opposing surfaces. Light emitted from the laser diodes is reflected off of the sheet material surfaces (17, 19) and received by the respective photodetector arrays. An associated method for implementing the apparatus is also provided.

  4. Non-contact high precision measurement of surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ying

    2010-10-01

    The traditional contact measuring methods could not satisfy the current optical elements measuring requirements. Noncontact high precision measuring theory, principle and instrument of the surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements were studied in the paper. In comparison with other types of interferometers, such as Twyman-Green and Mach-Zehnder, a Fizeau interferometer has the advantages of having fewer optical components, greater accuracy, and is easier to use. Some relations among the 3/A(B/C), POWER/PV and N/ΔN were studied. The PV with POWER removed can be the reference number of ΔN. The chromatic longitudinal aberration of a special optical probe can be used for non-contanct central thickness measurement.

  5. Non-contact profiling for high precision fast asphere topology measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petter, Jürgen; Berger, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    Quality control in the fabrication of high precision optics these days needs nanometer accuracy. However, the fast growing number of optics with complex aspheric shapes demands an adapted measurement method as existing metrology systems more and more reach their limits. In this contribution the authors present a unique and highly flexible approach for measuring spheric and aspheric optics with diameters from 2mm up to 420mm and with almost unlimited spheric departures. Based on a scanning point interferometer the system combines the high precision and the speed of an optical interferometer with the high form flexibility of a classical tactile scanning system. This enables the measurement of objects with steep or strongly changing slopes such as "pancake" or "gull wing" objects. The high accuracy of ±50nm over the whole surface is achieved by using a full reference concept ensuring the position control even over long scanning paths. The core of the technology is a multiwavelength interferometer (MWLI); by use of several wavelengths this sensor system allows for the measurement of objects with polished as well as with ground surfaces. Furthermore, a large absolute measurement range facilitates measuring surfaces with steps or discontinuities like diffractive structures or even segmented objects. As all the measurements can be done using one and the same system, a direct comparison is possible during production and after finishing an object. The contribution gives an insight into the functionality of the MWLI-sensor as well as into the concept of the reference system of the scanning metrology system. Furthermore, samples of application are discussed.

  6. A non-contact optical procedure for precise measurement of respiration rate and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria

    2010-04-01

    The use of standard instrumentation for the assessment of the respiration rate as of flow is an important goal in medicine. Spirometers, textile-based capacitive sensors or photopletismography are standard contact instrumentations used for such aim; the main drawback in the use of such instrumentations is the necessity to have a direct contact of the instrument with the patient. In this paper, we present an optical no-contact method for monitoring of both the respiration rate and flow. This method is based on the measurement of external chest wall movement by a laser Doppler vibrometer. The measurement procedure has already been demonstrated to be extremely well performing for what concern the monitoring of the cardiac activity. The proposed method can be operated at a distance of 1.5 m, on different point of the patient thoracic and abdominal area. We have monitored respiration rate and flow on 8 patients with a spirometer and simultaneously with the proposed noncontact measurement procedure. Bland-Altman analysis of the respiration rate measured with both instruments demonstrate a mean error on the determination of the respiration rate of < 1% and of the < 4% for the instantaneous flow. We also report a study on the optimal position on the thoracic area based on quality of the signal measured on the same population of subject.

  7. NPL freeform artefact for verification of non-contact measuring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael B.; Brown, Stephen B.; Evenden, Anthony; Robinson, Andy D.

    2011-03-01

    For decades three-dimensional (3D) measurements of engineering components have been made using fixed metrologyroom based coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) fitted most commonly with single point or to a much lesser extent, scanning tactile probes. Over the past decade there has been a rapid uptake in development and subsequent use of portable optical-based 3D coordinate measuring systems. These optical based systems capture vast quantities of point data in a very short time, often permitting freeform surfaces to be digitised. Documented standards for the verification of fixed CMMs fitted with tactile probes are now widely available, whereas verification procedures and more specifically verification artefacts for optical-based systems are still in their infancy. To assist industry in the verification of optical based coordinates systems, this paper describes a freeform verification artefact that has been developed, calibrated and used to support a measurement intercomparison between a fixed CMM and a number of optical based systems. These systems employ technologies involving laser triangulation scanning, photogrammetry and fringe projection. The NPL freeform verification artefact is presented and a measurement intercomparison is reported which identifies that the accuracy of the optical-based systems tested is not as good as tactile probing systems.

  8. Non-contact measurement of respiratory function and deduction of tidal volume.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Siong; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This paper further the investigation of Doppler radar feasibility in measuring the flow in and out due to inhalation and exhalation under different conditions of breathing activities. Three different experiment conditions were designed to investigate the feasibility and consistency of Doppler radar which includes the combination of the states of normal breathing, deep breathing and apnoea state were demonstrated. The obtained Doppler radar signals were correlated and compared with the gold standard medical device, spirometer, yielding a good correlations between both devices. We also demonstrated the calibration of the Doppler radar signal can be performed in a simple manner in order to have a good agreements with the spirometer readings. The measurement of the flow in and out during the breathing activities can be measured accurately under different dynamics of breathing as long as the calibration is performed correctly. PMID:25570029

  9. Combined Amplitude and Frequency Measurements for Non-Contacting Turbomachinery Blade Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J. (Inventor); Jagodnik, John J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the vibration of rotating blades, such as turbines, compressors, fans, or pumps, including sensing the return signal from projected energy and/or field changes from a plurality of sensors mounted on the machine housing. One or more of the sensors has a narrow field of measurement and the data is processed to provide the referenced time of arrival of each blade, and therefore the blade tip deflection due to vibration. One or more of the sensors has a wide field of measurement, providing a time history of the approaching and receding blades, and the data is processed to provide frequency content and relative magnitudes of the active mode(s) of blade vibration. By combining the overall tip deflection magnitude with the relative magnitudes of the active modes, the total vibratory stress state of the blade can be determined.

  10. Non-contact measurement of the stress within granular materials via neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensrich, C. M.; Kisi, E. H.; Luzin, V.; Kirstein, O.

    2013-06-01

    For some time neutron diffraction approaches have provided the ability to look within solid materials in order to make accurate measurements of stress and strain. More recently this technique has been applied to granular materials with some very promising results. Measurements of this type provide detailed information on the distribution of the full triaxial stress state at all points within a sample; something that is not yet achievable using any other method. In this paper we outline the basic principles behind the method and provide an example of the type of data that it can provide.

  11. Non-Contact Measurements of Thermophysical Properties of Titanium at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.; Paradis, P.

    1999-01-01

    Four thermophysical properties of both the solid and the liquid titanium measured using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator at JPL are presented. These properties are the density, the thermal expansion coefficient, the constant pressure heat capacity, and the hemispherical total emissivity.

  12. Non-contact current-phase measurements of topological weak links with scanning SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C. A.; Sochnikov, I.; Kirtley, J. R.; Moler, K. A.; Deng, M.; Chang, W.; Krogstrup, P.; Jespersen, T. S.; Nygard, J.; Marcus, C. M.; Maier, L.; Gould, C.; Tkachov, G.; Hankiewicz, E. M.; Brüne, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2015-03-01

    Topological superconductivity has recently generated substantial interest as a pathway to Majorana physics in the solid state. Experimental efforts have focused on the superconducting proximity effect in topologically non-trivial junctions, but proof of the topological nature of the induced superconductivity remains elusive. We employ scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) susceptometry to study conventional superconducting Nb rings interrupted by weak links of 3D topological insulator HgTe and Al rings with InAs nanowire junctions. Varying the flux through each ring, we directly measure the current-phase relation (CPR) of the junction. Forward skewness in the CPR of 3D-HgTe which persists even in junctions long compared to the mean free path suggests that helicity may play a role in the high transmittance of Andreev Bound States that carry the Josephson current. Progress in InAs nanowire junction CPR measurements is also discussed. These measurements showcase the CPR as a fundamental characteristic of superconducting weak links and establish scanning SQUID microscopy as a powerful probe for performing such measurements.

  13. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  14. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-high temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghuyn; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Rogers, Jan; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Continuing pressures for higher performance and efficiency in propulsion are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature materials. Some immediate applications in spaceflight include combustion chambers for advanced chemical rockets and turbomachinery for jet engines and power conversion in nuclear-electric propulsion. In the case of rockets, the combination of high stresses and high temperatures make the characterization of creep properties very important. Creep is even more important in the turbomachinery, where a long service life is an additional constraint. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed, including platinum group metals, carbides, borides, and silicides. But the measurement of creep properties at very high temperatures is itself problematic, because the testing instrument must operate at such high temperatures. Conventional techniques are limited to about 1700 C. A new, containerless technique for measuring creep deformation has been developed. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is heated to the measurement temperature and rotated at a rate such that the centrifugal acceleration causes creep deformation. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  15. Research on key technologies of non-contact measurement system of optical aspheric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gujin; Guo, Yinbiao; Liu, Jianchun

    2007-12-01

    According to the requirement of high precision measurement of optical aspheric surface, 4D measurement platform is under development. Open motion control system is adapted and multi-axes motion control card is mounted in IPC. Repeatability accuracy and positioning accuracy of the full travel of the driving unit of the platform can reach to 0.3μm and 1μm respectively. Laser sensor is droven by the ultrasonic LM (USLM) to the position needed to be tested. The fine positioning of the unit is achieved by USLM with its DC drive mode, which can perform nanometer steps proportional to the input voltages. The positioning error of the driving unit can not be prevented. In this paper, the mathematic model of error compensation of the USLM driving unit is found and software compensation is introduced. Results of compensation show that the position accuracy of this driving unit is greatly improved and can fulfill the task of optical aspheric mirror surface measurement.

  16. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Bradshaw, C.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Wall, J. J.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Hyers, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional techniques for measuring creep are limited to about 1700 C, so a new technique is required for higher temperatures. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  17. Graphics modelling of non-contact thickness measuring robotics work cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Charles W.

    1990-01-01

    A system was developed for measuring, in real time, the thickness of a sprayable insulation during its application. The system was graphically modelled, off-line, using a state-of-the-art graphics workstation and associated software. This model was to contain a 3D color model of a workcell containing a robot and an air bearing turntable. A communication link was established between the graphics workstations and the robot's controller. Sequences of robot motion generated by the computer simulation are transmitted to the robot for execution.

  18. ExpertVision - A video-based non-contact system for motion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James S.

    1988-01-01

    A system known as ExpertVision for obtaining noncontact kinematic measurements using standard video signals is described. In the system, a video processor extracts edge information from video images using a proprietary thresholding technique. Images can be examined in real time at up to 200 fields/s, and as many as four synchronized inputs can be treated simultaneously by buffering the edge coordinates for each view in dedicated RAM memory. Mechanical applications for ExpertVision include the study of simple impacts, ballistics, wing flutter, the kinematics of helicopter rotor blades, and fluid and gas flow problems.

  19. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements of ground-based research and flight programs at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    The Modular Containerless Processing Facility project is responsible for the development of flight equipment and of the accompanying scientific and technological research necessary to carry out containerless investigations in the low gravity of earth orbit. The requirement for sample temperature measurement is just one of the many physical properties determination needs that must be satisfied before the useful exploitation of low gravity and containerless experimentation techniques can be achieved. The specific implementation of temperature measurement for the ground-based research program is different from that of the flight hardware development project. The needs of the latter must also be differentiated according to the chronological order of the relevant space flight missions. Immediate demands of Spacelab instruments must be addressed by the adaptation of existing reliable technology to the special and restrictive on-orbit environment, while more advanced and yet unperfected techniques will be assigned to enterprises further in the future. The wide range of application of the containerless methods to the study of phenomena involving different states of matter and environmental conditions requires the satisfaction of a variety of boundary conditions through different approaches. An important issue to be resolved will be whether an integrated program dedicated to solve the problems of all the microgravity experimental effort will allow the solution of specific demands of existing as well as future flight equipment.

  20. Non-contact sound velocities and attenuation measurements of several ceramics at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Singh, K J; Matsuda, Y; Hattori, K; Nakano, H; Nagai, S

    2003-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic technique has been employed to carry out the sound velocities and attenuation measurements as a function of temperature in alumina, two kinds of silicon nitride and partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) samples. Accuracy of the laser technique used has been checked in terms of the diffraction effect and reproducibility of the results. Results of attenuation at room temperature have been compared with quartz transducer technique. In PSZ, velocity behavior has become non-linear and also, a peak in attenuation has been observed around 500 degrees C. In one of the silicon nitride sample, which uses glassy sintering agent, attenuation has shown a sharp peak around 950 degrees C. Interestingly, when the experiment was repeated from 800 to 1000 degrees C, this anomalous attenuation peak has disappeared, leaving a background increasing towards higher temperatures. PMID:12464408

  1. Non-contact temperature measurements in support of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent conceptual advances in the understanding of combustion science fundamentals in the context of microgravity processes and phenomenology have resulted in an increased demand for diagnostic systems of greater sophistication. Owing primarily to the severe operational constraints that accompany the space flight environment, measurement systems to date remain fairly primative in nature. Qualitative pictures provided by photographic recording media comprise the majority of the existing data, the remainder consisting of the output of conventional transducers, such as thermocouples, hot wires, and pressure transducers. The absence of the rather strong influence of buoyant convection renders microgravity combustion phenomena more fragile than their 1-G counterparts. The emphasis was placed on nonperturbing optical diagnostics. Other factors such as limited supplies of expendable reactants, and periods of microgravity time of sufficient duration, coupled with more fundamental questions regarding inherent length and time scales and reproducibility have favored multipoint or multidimensional techniques. While the development of optical diagnostics for application to combustion science is an extremely active area at present, the peculiarities of space flight hardware severely restrict the feasibility of implementing the majority of techniques which are being utilized in terrestrial applications. The additional requirements for system reliability and operational simplicity have tended to promote somewhat less commonly emphasized techniques such as refractive index mapping and molecular Rayleigh scattering, which are briefly discussed.

  2. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun

    2015-04-15

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10{sup −6}(K{sup −1}) at the range of 298 K–598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K–748 K.

  3. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-04-01

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10-6(K-1) at the range of 298 K-598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K-748 K.

  4. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-04-01

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10(-6)(K(-1)) at the range of 298 K-598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K-748 K. PMID:25933843

  5. Kinematic self-calibration of non-contact five-axis measuring machine using improved genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Zhigen; Xu, Xiaojie; Xiao, Yanqiu; Meier, Nicolas; Georgiadis, Anthimos

    2016-02-01

    A novel non-contact, five-axis measuring machine with high measurement accuracy of workpiece dimensions is introduced in this paper. The kinematic model, as well as the kinematic error model, is developed. A self-calibration method using a steel ball is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy in the workspace. The calibration process is low-budget and easy-to-operate due to the fact there is no need to rely on other instruments or devices except for the laser probe carried by the measuring machine itself. The objective function is defined in terms of center-to-center distance deviation, namely the theoretical ball center and tested ball center, and to improve the speed of the convergence rate and to increase the optimization accuracy of the genetic algorithm. The simulation and practical experiments both illustrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed kinematic model and self-calibration method. Finally, the actual measurement results of a Φ12 sphere illustrate that the measurement accuracy of this machine has improved greatly by using calibrated parameters against nominal parameters.

  6. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation.

  7. The non-contact measure of the heart rate variability by laser Doppler vibrometry: comparison with electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosoli, G.; Casacanditella, L.; Tomasini, E. P.; Scalise, L.

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of the heart rate variability (HRV) is of utmost importance, being one of the most promising markers of the activity of the autonomic nervous system and associated to cardiovascular mortality. Different signals can be used to perform HRV, primarily electrocardiography (ECG), photoplethysmography (PPG), phonocardiography (PCG) or vibrocardiography (VCG), since the fundamental aspect is the individuation of a periodic feature strictly correlated with cardiac activity (i.e. R-peak in ECG or the first sound in PCG). In this work, the authors demonstrate that the VCG performances in HRV analysis are sufficiently accurate if compared to the ones measured by ECG (i.e. standard methodology); moreover, the authors want to prove the feasibility of such measurement in correspondence of different measurement points (i.e. carotid artery—which is the typical VCG measurement point—and the radial artery on the wrist)1. Results show that VCG has a mean deviation of  <1 bpm with respect to ECG in heart rate (HR) measurement; carotid artery is the most accurate site for the assessment, but also the radial artery is a valid site, even if with a reduced SNR. With regards to HRV parameters, the mean percentage deviation is  <10% in correspondence of carotid artery, and  ≈16% for the radial artery. So, VCG allows for non-contact monitoring of the cardiac activity.

  8. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation. PMID:27131700

  9. Evaluating a Radar-Based, Non Contact Streamflow Measurement System in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Costa, John E.; Plant, William J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Haeni, F. Peter; Melcher, Nick B.; Keller, William C.; Hayes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Accurate measurement of flow in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California, is vital to a wide range of Federal and State agencies, environmental interests, and water contractors. The U.S. Geological Survey uses a conventional stage-discharge rating technique to determine flows at Vernalis. Since the flood of January 1997, the channel has scoured and filled as much as 20 feet in some sections near the measurement site resulting in an unstable stage-discharge rating. In response to recent advances in measurement techniques and the need for more accurate measurement methods, the Geological Survey has undertaken a technology demonstration project to develop and deploy a radar-based streamflow measuring system on the bank of the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California. The proposed flow-measurement system consists of a ground-penetrating radar system for mapping channel geometries, a microwave radar system for measuring surface velocities, and other necessary infrastructure. Cross-section information derived from ground penetrating radar provided depths similar to those measured by other instruments during the study. Likewise, surface-velocity patterns and magnitudes measured by the pulsed Doppler radar system are consistent with near surface current measurements derived from acoustic velocity instruments. Since the ratio of surface velocity to mean velocity falls to within a small range of theoretical value, using surface velocity as an index velocity to compute river discharge is feasable. Ultimately, the non-contact radar system may be used to make continuous, near-real-time flow measurements during high and medium flows. This report documents the data collected between April 14, 2002 and May 17, 2002 for the purposes of testing this radar based system. Further analyses of the data collected during this field effort will lead to further development and improvement of the system.

  10. Non-contact multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy system for industrial-scale bio-impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, M. D.; Marsh, L. A.; Davidson, J. L.; Tan, Y. M.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Biological tissues have a complex impedance, or bio-impedance, profile which changes with respect to frequency. This is caused by dispersion mechanisms which govern how the electromagnetic field interacts with the tissue at the cellular and molecular level. Measuring the bio-impedance spectra of a biological sample can potentially provide insight into the sample’s properties and its cellular structure. This has obvious applications in the medical, pharmaceutical and food-based industrial domains. However, measuring the bio-impedance spectra non-destructively and in a way which is practical at an industrial scale presents substantial challenges. The low conductivity of the sample requires a highly sensitive instrument, while the demands of industrial-scale operation require a fast high-throughput sensor of rugged design. In this paper, we describe a multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) system suitable for industrial-scale, non-contact, spectroscopic bio-impedance measurement over a bandwidth of 156 kHz-2.5 MHz. The system sensitivity and performance are investigated using calibration and known reference samples. It is shown to yield rapid and consistently sensitive results with good long-term stability. The system is then used to obtain conductivity spectra of a number of biological test samples, including yeast suspensions of varying concentration and a range of agricultural produce, such as apples, pears, nectarines, kiwis, potatoes, oranges and tomatoes.

  11. Non-contact Measurement of Electrostatic Fields: Verification of Modeled Potentials within Ion Mobility Spectrometer Drift Tube Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Jill R. Scott; Paul L. Tremblay

    2007-03-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where the ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: 1) a traditional “stacked” alternating electrodes and insulators and 2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the stacked electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of semiconducting ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated using a non-contact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe. The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked IMS drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube can approach perfect linearity.

  12. Validating mass spectrometry measurements of nuclear materials via a non-contact volume analysis method of ion sputter craters

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry, optical profilometry and a statistically-driven algorithm was used to develop a non-contact volume analysis method to validate the useful yields of nuclear materials. The volume analysis methodology was applied to ion sputter craters created in silicon and uranium substrates sputtered by 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ions. Sputter yield measurements were determined from the volume calculations and were shown to be comparable to Monte Carlo calculations and previously reported experimental observations. Additionally, the volume calculations were used to determine the useful yields of Si+, SiO+ and SiO2+ ions from the silicon substrate and U+, UO+ and UO2+ ions from the uranium substrate under 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ion bombardment. This work represents the first steps toward validating the interlaboratory and cross-platform performance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of nuclear materials.

  13. Measurement of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials by a Novel Non-Contact Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghyun; Rogers, Jan R.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    A non-contact technique for measuring the creep properties of materials has been developed and validated as part of a collaboration among the University of Massachusetts, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Electrostatic Levitation Facility (ESL), and the University of Tennessee. This novel method has several advantages over conventional creep testing. The sample is deformed by the centripetal acceleration from the rapid rotation, and the deformed shapes are analyzed to determine the strain. Since there is no contact with grips, there is no theoretical maximum temperature and no concern about chemical compatibility. Materials may be tested at the service temperature even for extreme environments such as rocket nozzles, or above the service temperature for accelerated testing of materials for applications such as jet engines or turbopumps for liquid-fueled engines. The creep measurements have been demonstrated to 2400 C with niobium, while the test facility, the NASA MSFC ESL, has processed materials up to 3400 C. Furthermore, the ESL creep method employs a distribution of stress to determine the stress exponent from a single test, versus the many tests required by conventional methods. Determination of the stress exponent from the ESL creep tests requires very precise measurement of the surface shape of the deformed sample for comparison to deformations predicted by finite element models for different stress exponents. An error analysis shows that the stress exponent can be determined to about 1% accuracy with the current methods and apparatus. The creep properties of single-crystal niobium at 1985 C showed excellent agreement with conventional tests performed according to ASTM Standard E-139. Tests on other metals, ceramics, and composites relevant to rocket propulsion and turbine engines are underway.

  14. Large-scale and non-contact surface topography measurement using scanning ion conductance microscopy and sub-aperture stitching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jian; Guo, Renfei; Li, Fei; Yu, Dehong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a large-scale and non-contact surface topography measurement method using a non-contact scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), combined with the sub-aperture stitching technique. The phase correlation techniques were first applied to the three-dimensional (3D) images measured by the SICM to acquire an initially coarse stitching position. Then the tip–tilt compensated sub-aperture stitching algorithm is utilized to eliminate tilts and translations among adjacent images and expand the lateral measuring range of the existing hopping mode SICM system. This SICM and the stitching based method has been used to measure some large-scale samples (micrometer to millimeter scale) in a non-contact, quantitative and high resolution way. Simulation and experimental results on these samples verify the feasibility of this method and the effectiveness of the stitching algorithm. A measuring range of 1.08 mm  ×  0.55 mm and a lateral resolution of 100 nm or even higher were obtained in these experiments. Compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM), the non-contact feature of the proposed method ensures less damage to the surface topography. The non-optical feature makes the data stitching simpler than the existing optical microscopic methods, which need consider how to compensate the vignetting effect caused by the inhomogeneity of light.

  15. Non-contact laser speckle sensor for measuring one- and two-dimensional angular displacement Capteur non-contact de laser speckle pour mesurer le déplacement angulaire à une ou deux dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Bjarke; Imam, Husain; Hanson, Steen G.

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for measurement of angular displacement in one or two dimensions for arbitrarily shaped objects is presented. The method is based on Fourier transforming the scattered field from a single laser beam that illuminates the target. The angular distribution of the light field at the target is linearly mapped onto an array image sensor placed in the Fourier plane. Measuring this displacement facilitates the determination of the angular displacement. It is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the angular displacement sensor is insensitive to object shape, target distance and any longitudinal or transverse movement of the target, if the image sensor is placed in the Fourier plane. A straightforward procedure to place the image sensor in the Fourier plane is presented here. Theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the method has a resolution of 0.3 mdeg for small angular displacements, and methods for further improvement in resolution are discussed. No special surface treatment is required for surfaces having irregularities of the order of or larger than the wavelength of the incident light. It is shown that this is the case for most surfaces of practical interest. Furthermore, it is shown that robust, non-contact optical systems for industrial applications can be produced.

  16. The applicability of correction factor for corneal thickness on non-contact tonometer measured intraocular pressure in LASIK treated eyes

    PubMed Central

    Jethani, Jitendra; Dave, Paaraj; Jethani, Monica; Desai, Yogesh; Patel, Purvi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the applicability of central corneal thickness (CCT) based correction factor for non-contact tonometer (NCT) measured intraocular pressure (IOP) readings. Method A prospective, non-randomized study involved 346 eyes of 173 consecutive patients with age ⩾21 years undergoing laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia and/or myopic astigmatism. The CCT and IOP were measured before and after the LASIK procedure. The IOP pre and post-LASIK was compared after applying the correction factor for CCT. Patients not completing the 3 month postoperative follow-up were excluded. Results The median spherical equivalent before undergoing LASIK was −4.25D (inter-quartile range, −3.25D). The mean preoperative CCT was 536.82 ± 33.71 μm which reduced to 477.55 ± 39.3 μm (p < 0.01) post-LASIK. The mean IOP reduced from a preoperative value of 14.6 ± 2.32 mmHg to 10.64 ± 2.45 mmHg postoperatively (p < 0.01). On applying correction for the corneal thickness, the pre and postoperative IOP was 15.14 ± 2.8 mmHg and 15.37 ± 2.65 mmHg (p = 0.06) respectively with a strong positive correlation (r = 0.7, p < 0.01). Three hundred eyes (86.7%) had an absolute difference in IOP of less than 3.0 mmHg post-CCT correction which is within the retest variability of NCT. Only 46 eyes (13.3%) had an absolute difference of more than 3.0 mmHg. Conclusion The modified Ehler’s correction algorithm used in this study can be effectively applied in the normal IOP range in a majority of patients. PMID:26949354

  17. Robust, accurate, and non-contacting vibration measurement systems: Summary of comparison measurements of the robust laser interferometer and typical accelerometer systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goodenow, T.C.; Shipman, R.L.; Holland, H.M.

    1995-06-01

    Epoch Engineering, Incorporated (EEI) has completed a series of vibration measurements comparing their newly-developed Robust Laser Interferometer (RLI) with accelerometer-based instrumentation systems. EEI has successfully demonstrated, on several pieces of commonplace machinery, that non-contact, line-of-sight measurements are practical and yield results equal to or, in some cases, better than customary field implementations of accelerometers. The demonstration included analysis and comparison of such phenomena as nonlinearity, transverse sensitivity, harmonics, and signal-to-noise ratio. Fast Fourier Transformations were performed on the accelerometer and the laser system outputs to provide a comparison basis. The RLI was demonstrated, within the limits of the task, to be a viable, line-of-sight, non-contact alternative to accelerometer systems. Several different kinds of machinery were instrumented and compared, including a small pump, a gear-driven cement mixer, a rotor kit, and two small fans. Known machinery vibration sources were verified and RLI system output file formats were verified to be compatible with commercial computer programs used for vibration monitoring and trend analysis. The RLI was also observed to be less subject to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and more capable at very low frequencies.

  18. Robust, accurate, and non-contacting vibration measurement systems: Supplemental appendices presenting comparison measurements of the robust laser interferometer and typical accelerometer systems. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Goodenow, T.C.; Shipman, R.L.; Holland, H.M.

    1995-06-01

    Epoch Engineering, Incorporated (EEI) has completed a series of vibration measurements comparing their newly-developed Robust Laser Interferometer (RLI) with accelerometer-based instrumentation systems. EEI has successfully demonstrated, on several pieces of commonplace machinery, that non-contact, line-of-sight measurements are practical and yield results equal to or, in some cases, better than customary field implementations of accelerometers. The demonstration included analysis and comparison of such phenomena as nonlinearity, transverse sensitivity, harmonics, and signal-to-noise ratio. Fast Fourier Transformations were performed on the accelerometer and the laser system outputs to provide a comparison basis. The RLI was demonstrated, within the limits o the task, to be a viable, line-of-sight, non-contact alternative to accelerometer systems. Several different kinds of machinery were instrumented and. compared, including a small pump, a gear-driven cement mixer, a rotor kit, and two small fans. Known machinery vibration sources were verified and RLI system output file formats were verified to be compatible with commercial computer programs used for vibration monitoring and trend analysis. The RLI was also observed to be less subject to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and more capable at very low frequencies. This document, Volume 2, provides the appendices to this report.

  19. Profile measurement of a bent neutron mirror using an ultrahigh precision non-contact measurement system with an auto focus laser probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Guo, J.; Yamada, N. L.; Torikai, N.; Takeda, S.; Furusaka, M.; Yamagata, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A bent neutron mirror has been considered as one of the best solutions for focusing neutron beams from the viewpoint of cost-benefit performance. Although the form deviation of the bent profile is expected because of the large spot size, it is difficult to measure due to its geometric limitation. Here, we propose a non-contact measurement system using an auto focus (AF) laser probe on an ultrahigh precision machine tool to precisely evaluate the form deviation of the bent mirror. The AF laser probe is composed of a diode laser, a position sensitive sensor, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a microscope objective lens which is actuated by an electromagnetic motor with 1 nm resolution for position sensing and control. The sensor enables a non-contact profile measurement of a high precision surface without any surface damage in contrast with contact-type ultrahigh precision coordinate measurement machines with ruby styli. In the on-machine measurement system, a personal computer simultaneously acquires a displacement signal from the AF laser probe and 3-axis positional coordinates of the ultrahigh machine tool branched between the linear laser scales and the numerical controller. The acquisition rate of the 4-axis positional data in 1 nm resolution is more than 10 Hz and the simultaneity between the axes is negligible. The profile of a neutron bent mirror was measured from a transparent side using the developed system, and the result proves that the form deviation of the mirror enlarged the the spot size of focused neuron beam.

  20. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  1. Laser application on haptics: Tactile stiffness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Memeo, M.; Cannella, F.; Valente, M.; Caldwell, D. G.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-06-01

    There is a great interest in exploring the proprieties of the sense of the touch, its detailed knowledge in fact is a key issue in the area of robotics, haptics and human-machine interaction. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a novel measurement method for the assessment of the tactile stiffness based on a original test rig; tactile stiffness is defined as the ratio between force, exerted by the finger, and the displacement of the finger tip operated during the test. To reach this scope, the paper describes a specific experimental test-rig used for the evaluation of subject tactile sensitivity, where finger force applied during tests as well as displacement and velocity of displacement, operated by the subject under investigation, are measured. Results show that tactile stiffness is linear respect to stimuli spatial difference (which is proportional to the difficulty to detect the variation of them). In particular, it has been possible to relate the force and displacement measured during the tests. The relationship between the response of the subject to the grating, velocity and force is determined. These results permit to carry out the further experimental tests on the same subject avoiding the use of a load cell and therefore simplifying the measurement test rig and data post-processing. Indeed, the first aspect (use of a load cell) can be relevant, because the grating positions are different, requiring a specific re-calibration and setting before each trial; while the second aspect allows simplify the test rig complexity and the processing algorithm.

  2. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Langewisch, Gernot; Schurig, Philipp; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the “qPlus” design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process. PMID:24778977

  3. Thermographic and oxygenation imaging system for non-contact skin measurements to determine the effects of regional block anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Landman, Mattijs; de Roode, Rowland; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2010-02-01

    Regional anesthetic blocks are performed on patients who will undergo surgery of the hand. In this study, thermal and oxygenation imaging techniques were applied to observe the region affected by the peripheral block as a fast objective, non-contact, method compared to the standard pinpricks or cold sensation tests. The temperature images were acquired with an IR thermal camera (FLIR ThermoCam SC640). The data were recorded and analyzed with the ThermaCamTM Researcher software. Images at selected wavelengths were obtained with a CCD camera combined with a Liquid Crystal Tunable Filter (420-730 nm). The concentration changes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the dermis of the skin were calculated using the modified Lambert Beer equation. In 10 patients an anesthetic block was placed by administering 20-30 ml Ropivacaine 7,5 mg/ml around the plexus brachialis. The anesthetic block of the axillary, ulnar, median and radial nerve causes dilatation of the blood vessels inducing an increase of blood flow and, consequently, an increase of the skin temperature and skin oxygenation in the lower arm. Both imaging methods showed distinct oxygenation and temperature differences at the surface of the skin of the hand with a good correlation with the areas with the nerve blocks. For oxygenation imaging a CCD camera with LED light source of selected wavelengths might be a relative inexpensive method to observe the effectiveness of regional blocks.

  4. OroSTIFF: Face-referenced measurement of perioral stiffness in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Kieweg, Douglas; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-01-01

    A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects. The OroSTIFF device incorporates a pneumatic glass air cylinder actuator instrumented for pressure, and an integrated subminiature displacement sensor to encode lip aperture. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm passive muscle state for the superior and inferior divisions of the orbicularis oris muscles. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (ΔF) and interangle span (ΔX), was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force. This stiffness growth function also differed significantly between males and females. This study demonstrates the OroSTIFF ‘proof-of-concept’ for cost-effective non-invasive stimulus generation and derivation of perioral stiffness in a group of healthy unrestrained adults, and a case study to illustrate the dose-dependent effects of Levodopa on perioral stiffness in an individual with advanced Parkinson’s disease who exhibited marked dyskinesia and rigidity. PMID:20185131

  5. Direct measurement of the intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing.

    PubMed

    Vlutters, M; Boonstra, T A; Schouten, A C; van der Kooij, H

    2015-05-01

    Ankle stiffness contributes to standing balance, counteracting the destabilizing effect of gravity. The ankle stiffness together with the compliance between the foot and the support surface make up the ankle-foot stiffness, which is relevant to quiet standing. The contribution of the intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness to balance, and the ankle-foot stiffness amplitude dependency remain a topic of debate in the literature. We therefore developed an experimental protocol to directly measure the bilateral intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness during standing balance, and determine its amplitude dependency. By applying fast (40 ms) ramp-and-hold support surface rotations (0.005-0.08 rad) during standing, reflexive contributions could be excluded, and the amplitude dependency of the intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness was investigated. Results showed that reflexive activity could not have biased the torque used for estimating the intrinsic stiffness. Furthermore, subjects required less recovery action to restore balance after bilateral rotations in opposite directions compared to rotations in the same direction. The intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness appears insufficient to ensure balance, ranging from 0.93±0.09 to 0.44±0.06 (normalized to critical stiffness 'mgh'). This implies that changes in muscle activation are required to maintain balance. The non-linear stiffness decrease with increasing rotation amplitude supports the previous published research. With the proposed method reflexive effects can be ruled out from the measured torque without any model assumptions, allowing direct estimation of intrinsic stiffness during standing. PMID:25843262

  6. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection.

    PubMed

    Bechet, P; Mitran, R; Munteanu, M

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact. PMID:24007088

  7. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechet, P.; Mitran, R.; Munteanu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact.

  8. Comments on containerless bulk crystal growth and epitaxy in space and on their implications regarding non-contact temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1989-01-01

    Containerless methods are sought for bulk crystal growth and epitaxy which thus far are a less visible component of materials science in space efforts. In the opinion of the author, this is an anomaly which ought to be corrected, because container interactions are a major problem in earth bound materials processing, including crystal growth, and can be avoided or at least significantly reduced in space. The space environment is unique in solving some of these problems, e.g., memory effects in the integration of different classes of materials in high resolution multilayer heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy or organometallic molecular beam epitaxy. Spectroscopic method of noncontact temperature measurements exist that could be developed in this context. The error in the absolute temperature measurement achieved by these techniques decreases with decreasing substrate temperature and supplements pyrometric measurements that are better suited for high temperature measurements.

  9. Pulse electrochemical machining on Invar alloy: Optical microscopic/SEM and non-contact 3D measurement study of surface analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Choi, S. G.; Choi, W. K.; Yang, B. Y.; Lee, E. S.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, Invar alloy (Fe 63.5%, Ni 36.5%) was electrochemically polished by PECM (Pulse Electro Chemical Machining) in a mixture of NaCl, glycerin, and distilled water. A series of PECM experiments were carried out with different voltages and different electrode shapes, and then the surfaces of polished Invar alloy were investigated. The polished Invar alloy surfaces were investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and non-contact 3D measurement (white light microscopes) and it was found that different applied voltages produced different surface characteristics on the Invar alloy surface because of the locally concentrated applied voltage on the Invar alloy surface. Moreover, we found that the shapes of electrode also have an effect on the surface characteristics on Invar alloy surface by influencing the applied voltage. These experimental findings provide fundamental knowledge for PECM of Invar alloy by surface analysis.

  10. Non-contact main cable NDE technique for suspension bridge using magnetic flux-based B-H loop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Kim, Ju-Won; Moon, Dae-Joong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a noncontact main cable NDE method has been developed. This cable NDE method utilizes the direct current (DC) magnetization and a searching coil-based total flux measurement. A total flux sensor head prototype was fabricated that consists of an electro-magnet yoke and a searching coil sensor. To obtain a B-H loop, a magnetic field was generated by applying a cycle of low frequency direct current to the electro-magnet yoke. During the magnetization, a search coil sensor measures the electromotive force from magnetized cable. During the magnetization process, a search coil sensor was measured the magnetic flux density. Total flux was calculated by integrating the measured magnetic flux using a fluxmeter. A B-H loop is obtained by using relationship between a cycle of input DC voltage and measured total flux. The B-H loop can reflect the property of the ferromagnetic materials. Therefore, the cross-sectional loss of cable can be detected using variation of features from the B-H curve. To verify the feasibility of the proposed steel cable NDE method, a series of experimental studies using a main-cable mock-up specimen has been performed in this study.

  11. Report on the multicolor pyrometry session at the Second NASA Non-Contact Temperature-Measurement Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjut, R. Erik

    1989-01-01

    The session met jointly with the other special sessions. Due to time constraints, the concerns of multicolor pyrometry were not addressed in depth. Multicolor pyrometry attempts to determine an object's temperature and emittance as a function of wavelength from simultaneous measurement of the spectral radiance of the object at multiple wavelengths. The main issues are those of the most appropriate model for the wavelength dependence of the emittance, the number of undetermined parameters, and the error in the measured temperature. It has long been known that it is inappropriate to attempt to model the emittance with a functional form that contains as many unknowns as wavelengths. Such attempts will lead to gross errors in the measured temperature. However, more recent work by Hunter and Khan has indicated that emittance can be modeled by a function with many fewer degrees of freedom than sampled wavelengths (e.g., it may be appropriate to use a second order polynomial to fit data from a forty-color pyrometer). In a platform lecture, Khan described algorithms for determination of the parameters by minimization of the errors between the model and the data in a least-squares sense. The first was a linear method and the second was a non-linear method where the emittance could assume any functional form. Both methods were shown to be very sensitive to random noise and non-linearity in the measurement system.

  12. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2 > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2 = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  13. Non-contact, Ultrasound-based Indentation Method for Measuring Elastic Properties of Biological Tissues Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    PubMed Central

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking RF signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the actual Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2>0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2=0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI=2.62±0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting=4.2±2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens. PMID:25776065

  14. The Effect of Electrode Designs Based on the Anatomical Heart Location for the Non-Contact Heart Activity Measurement.

    PubMed

    Gi, Sun Ok; Lee, Young-Jae; Koo, Hye Ran; Lee, Seung Pyo; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kim, Kyeng-Nam; Kang, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2015-12-01

    This research is an extension of a previous research [1] on the different effects of sensor location that is relatively suitable for heart rate sensing. This research aimed to elucidate the causes of wide variations in heart rate measurements from the same sensor position among subjects, as observed in previous research [1], and to enhance designs of the inductive textile electrode to overcome these variations. To achieve this, this study comprised two parts: In part 1, X-ray examinations were performed to determine the cause of the wide variations noted in the findings from previous research [1], and we found that at the same sensor position, the heart activity signal differed with slight differences in the positions of the heart of each subject owing to individual differences in the anatomical heart location. In part 2, three types of dual-loop-type textile electrodes were devised to overcome variations in heart location that were confirmed in part 1 of the study. The variations with three types of sensor designs were compared with that with a single-round type of electrode design, by using computer simulation and by performing a t-test on the data obtained from the experiments. We found that the oval-oval shaped, dual-loop-type textile electrode was more suitable than the single round type for determining morphological characteristics as well as for measuring appropriate heart activity signals. Based on these results, the oval-oval, dual-loop-type was a better inductive textile electrode that more effectively overcomes individual differences in heart location during heart activity sensing based on the magnetic-induced conductivity principle. PMID:26490149

  15. Non-contact distance measurement and profilometry using thermal near-field radiation towards a high resolution inspection and metrology solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijster, Roy; Sadeghian, Hamed; van Keulen, Fred

    2016-03-01

    Optical near-field technologies such as solid immersion lenses and hyperlenses are candidate solutions for high resolution and high throughput wafer inspection and metrology for the next technology nodes. Besides sub-diffraction limited optical performance, these concepts share the necessity of extreme proximity to the sample at distances that are measured in tens of nanometers. For the instrument this poses two major challenges: 1) how to measure the distance to the sample? and 2) how to position accurately and at high speed? For the first challenge near-field thermal radiation is proposed as a mechanism for an integrated distance sensor (patent pending). This sensor is realized by making a sensitive calorimeter (accuracy of 2:31nW root sum squared). When used for distance measurement an equivalent uncertainty of 1nm can be achieved for distances smaller than 100 nm. By scanning the distance sensor over the sample, thermal profilometry is realized, which can be used to inspect surfaces in a non-intrusive and non-contact way. This reduces wear of the probe and minimizes the likelihood of damaging the sample.

  16. Analytical, Numerical, and Experimental Investigation on a Non-Contact Method for the Measurements of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Responsive access to space requires re-use of components such as rocket nozzles that operate at extremely high temperatures. For such applications, new ultra-hightemperature materials that can operate over 2,000 C are required. At the temperatures higher than the fifty percent of the melting temperature, the characterization of creep properties is indispensable. Since conventional methods for the measurement of creep is limited below 1,700 C, a new technique that can be applied at higher temperatures is strongly demanded. This research develops a non-contact method for the measurement of creep at the temperatures over 2,300 C. Using the electrostatic levitator in NASA MSFC, a spherical sample was rotated to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deforming sample was captured with a digital camera and analyzed to measure creep deformation. Numerical and analytical analyses have also been conducted to compare the experimental results. Analytical, numerical, and experimental results showed a good agreement with one another.

  17. Exploring Alternative Non-contact temperature measurements for 99Mo production facility NorthStar FY14 Activity 5, Deliverable 2

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Michael Andrew; Dalmas, Dale

    2015-03-04

    We have conducted an experiment to explore an alternative non-contact method of measuring the Inconel target window temperature. This experiment involves using a standard color camera to observe the visible light emitted from the Inconel target window at high heat in order to estimate the window temperature. The safety limit to prevent target window failure is 700 °C and therefore we need a reliable and accurate method of measuring temperature especially in the range of 600 °C to 700 °C if it is to replace the IR camera. In this temperature range the window will emit a significant amount of black body radiation within the visible range and hence the idea of using a color camera. The goal is to see if the shift in window color (determined by the RBG pixel values of the camera) as the target window is heated to 700 °C can be calibrated to the temperature.The reasons for exploring this as an alternative to an IR are camera are: significant cost reduction and potentially less complicated to calibrate.

  18. Non-Contact Gaging with Laser Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Clinesmith, Mike

    2009-03-20

    A gage has been constructed using conventional (high end) components for the application of measuring fragile syntactic foam parts in a non-contact mode. Success with this approach has been achieved through a novel method of transferring (mapping) high accuracy local measurements of a coated aluminum master, taken on a Leitz Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM), to the gage software system. The mapped data is then associated with local voltage readings from two (inner and outer) laser triangulating probes. This couples discreet laser probe offset and linearity characteristics to the measured master geometry. The gage software compares real part measured data against the master data to provide non-contact part inspection that results in a high accuracy and low uncertainty performance. Uncertainty from the part surface becomes the prevailing contributor to the gaging process. The gaging process provides a high speed, hands off measurement with nearly zero impedance.

  19. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  20. Time-resolved non-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography measurements with ultra-fast time-correlated single photon counting avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves; Robichaud, Vincent; Lapointe, Éric

    2007-07-01

    The design and fabrication of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and associated quenching circuits have made significant progresses in recent years. APDs with temporal resolutions comparable to microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs) are now available. MCP-PMTs were until these progresses the best TCSPC detectors with timing resolutions down to 30ps. APDs can now achieve these resolutions at a fraction of the cost. Work is under way to make the manufacturing of TCSPC APDs compatible with standard electronics fabrication practices. This should allow to further reduce their cost and render them easier to integrate in complex multi-channel TCSPC electronics, as needed in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems. Even if their sensitive area is much smaller than that of the ubiquitous PMT used in TCSPC, we show that with appropriate selection of optical components, TCSPC APDs can be used in time-domain DOT. To support this, we present experimental data and calculations clearly demonstrating that comparable measurements can be obtained with APDs and PMTs. We are, to our knowledge, the first group using APDs in TD DOT, in particular in non-contact TD fluorescence DOT.

  1. Non-contact ECG monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexey S.; Erlikh, Vadim V.; Kodkin, Vladimir L.; Keller, Andrei V.; Epishev, Vitaly V.

    2016-03-01

    The research is dedicated to non-contact methods of electrocardiography. The authors describe the routine of experimental procedure and suggest the approach to solving the problems which arise at indirect signal recording. The paper presents the results of experiments conducted by the authors, covers the flow charts of ECG recorders and reviews the drawbacks of filtering methods used in foreign equivalents.

  2. Tilting pad journal bearings - Measured and predicted stiffness coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, D.W.; Horner, D. Michell Bearings, Newcastle-upon-Tyne )

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents measured and calculated characteristics of a tilting pad journal bearing suitable for high speed machinery. Descriptions are given of the experimental techniques used with this variety of bearing and the theoretical model for predicting performance. Measured values of pad temperature, eccentricity, attitude angle, and the four stiffness coefficients are given for a range of loads and rotational speeds. Data are given for both load on pad and between pad configurations, the two principal loading arrangements. Comparisons are made between the measured and predicted bearing temperatures and stiffness coefficients over a wide range of values. 11 refs.

  3. Tilting pad journal bearings - Measured and predicted stiffness coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkins, D. W.; Horner, D.

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents measured and calculated characteristics of a tilting pad journal bearing suitable for high speed machinery. Descriptions are given of the experimental techniques used with this variety of bearing and the theoretical model for predicting performance. Measured values of pad temperature, eccentricity, attitude angle, and the four stiffness coefficients are given for a range of loads and rotational speeds. Data are given for both load on pad and between pad configurations, the two principal loading arrangements. Comparisons are made between the measured and predicted bearing temperatures and stiffness coefficients over a wide range of values.

  4. Damage detection using experimentally measured mass and stiffness matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, L. D.; Alvin, K. F.; Doebling, S. W.; Park, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for locating physical damage or change in a structure using experimentally measured mass and stiffness matrices. The approach uses a recently developed algorithm for transforming a state-space realization into a second order structural model with physical displacements as the generalized coordinates. This is accomplished by first rotating a state-space model of the identified structural dynamics into modal coordinates and approximating the mass normalized modal vectors for the output measurement set. Next, the physical mass, damping and stiffness matrices are synthesized directly from the measured modal parameters. This yields experimental mass and stiffness matrices for the structure without the use of a finite element model or a numerical search. The computed mass and stiffness are asymptotically equivalent to a static condensation of the global physical coordinate model. Techniques for solving the inverse connectivity problem are then developed whereby it is possible to assess the stiffness in a region of the structure bounded by several sensors. Applications to both simulated data and experimental data are used to discuss the effectiveness of the approach.

  5. Method of measurement of optical cable stiffness at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the new method of determination of optical cable stiffness at low temperatures is offered. The method is allows to simplify process of measurements. Thus presence of technicians at climatic chamber in the course of measurements is not required.

  6. Non- contacting capacitive diagnostic device

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Timothy

    2005-07-12

    A non-contacting capacitive diagnostic device includes a pulsed light source for producing an electric field in a semiconductor or photovoltaic device or material to be evaluated and a circuit responsive to the electric field. The circuit is not in physical contact with the device or material being evaluated and produces an electrical signal characteristic of the electric field produced in the device or material. The diagnostic device permits quality control and evaluation of semiconductor or photovoltaic device properties in continuous manufacturing processes.

  7. The interday reliability of leg and ankle musculotendinous stiffness measures.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Ken A; Murphy, Aron J; Watsford, Mark L; Rees, Sven

    2006-11-01

    Two popular methods of assessing lower body musculotendinous stiffness include the hopping and oscillation tests. The disparity and paucity of reliability data prompted this investigation into leg musculotendinous stiffness (Kleg) and ankle musculotendinous stiffness (Kank) measures. Kleg and Kank were assessed on three separate occasions in 20 female subjects. Kleg was determined using bilateral hopping procedures conducted at 2.2 Hz and 3.2 Hz frequencies. Kank was assessed by perturbation of the subject's ankle musculotendinous unit on an instrumented calf raise apparatus at 70% of maximum isometric force (MIF). Excellent reliability was produced for all Kleg measures between all days, whereas Kank exhibited acceptable reliability after one session of familiarization. No relationship was evident between Kleg and Kank. It was concluded that no familiarization session was required for Kleg at the test frequencies and conditions tested, whereas at least one familiarization session was needed to ensure the reliable assessment of Kank. PMID:17293626

  8. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    PubMed

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

  9. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  10. Non-contact transportation using near-field acoustic levitation

    PubMed

    Ueha; Hashimoto; Koike

    2000-03-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation, where planar objects 10 kg in weight can levitate stably near the vibrating plate, is successfully applied both to non-contact transportation of objects and to a non-contact ultrasonic motor. Transporting apparatuses and an ultrasonic motor have been fabricated and their characteristics measured. The theory of near-field acoustic levitation both for a piston-like sound source and a flexural vibration source is also briefly described. PMID:10829622

  11. A novel assessment technique for measuring ankle orientation and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Nandakumar, Anoop; Quan Xie, Sheng

    2015-09-18

    The measurement of ankle orientation and stiffness can provide insight into improvements and allows for effective monitoring during a rehabilitation program. Existing assessment techniques have a variety of limitations. Dynamometer based methods rely on manual manipulation. The use of torque meter is usually for single degree-of-freedom (DOF) devices. This study proposes a novel ankle assessment technique that can be used for multiple DOFs devices working in both manual and automatic modes using the position sensor and the multi-axis load cell. As a preliminary evaluation, an assessment device for ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion was constructed. Nine subjects participated to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment device in determining ankle orientation and stiffness. The measured ankle orientation was consistent with that from the NDI Polaris optical tracking system. The measured ankle torque and stiffness compared well with published data. The test-retest reliability was high with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) values greater than 0.846 and standard error of measurement (SEM) less than 1.38. PMID:26159061

  12. Direct measurement of human ankle stiffness during quiet standing: the intrinsic mechanical stiffness is insufficient for stability

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D; Lakie, Martin

    2002-01-01

    During quiet standing the human ‘inverted pendulum’ sways irregularly. In previous work where subjects balanced a real inverted pendulum, we investigated what contribution the intrinsic mechanical ankle stiffness makes to achieve stability. Using the results of a plausible model, we suggested that intrinsic ankle stiffness is inadequate for providing stability. Here, using a piezo-electric translator we applied small, unobtrusive mechanical perturbations to the foot while the subject was standing freely. These short duration perturbations had a similar size and velocity to movements which occur naturally during quiet standing, and they produced no evidence of any stretch reflex response in soleus, or gastrocnemius. Direct measurement confirms our earlier conclusion; intrinsic ankle stiffness is not quite sufficient to stabilise the body or pendulum. On average the directly determined intrinsic stiffness is 91 ± 23 % (mean ± s.d.) of that necessary to provide minimal stabilisation. The stiffness was substantially constant, increasing only slightly with ankle torque. This stiffness cannot be neurally regulated in quiet standing. Thus we attribute this stiffness to the foot, Achilles’ tendon and aponeurosis rather than the activated calf muscle fibres. Our measurements suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance via a spring-like element which is itself too compliant to guarantee stability. The implication is that the brain cannot set ankle stiffness and then ignore the control task because additional modulation of torque is required to maintain balance. We suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance by predictively controlling the proximal offset of the spring-like element in a ballistic-like manner. PMID:12482906

  13. A method for measuring exchange stiffness in ferromagnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Girt, Erol; Huttema, W.; Montoya, E.; Kardasz, B.; Eyrich, C.; Heinrich, B.; Mryasov, O. N.; Dobin, A. Yu.; Karis, O.

    2011-04-01

    An exchange stiffness, A{sub ex}, in ferromagnetic films is obtained by fitting the M(H) dependence of two ferromagnetic layers antiferromagnetically coupled across a nonmagnetic spacer layer with a simple micromagnetic model. In epitaxial and textured structures this method allows measuring A{sub ex} between the crystallographic planes perpendicular to the growth direction of ferromagnetic films. Our results show that A{sub ex} between [0001] planes in textured Co grains is 1.54 {+-} 0.12 x 10{sup -11} J/m.

  14. A novel stress monitoring method through stress-induced respiratory alterations: non-contact measurement of respiratory V(T)/T(I) alterations induced by stressful sound using a 10 GHz microwave radar.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, S; Sun, G; Kagawa, M; Matsui, T

    2011-11-01

    We have developed a non-contact stress monitoring system which measures respiratory V(T)/T(I) (tidal volume/inspiration time) alterations using a 10 GHz microwave radar. The measurable distance of the system is 50 cm, which is 10 times longer than our previously developed stress monitoring system which measures heart rate variability using a 24-GHz microwave-radar. The study was conducted with eight subjects (23 ± 1 years old) to evaluate the efficacy of the system. An audio stimulus at 95 dB sound pressure level was presented to the subjects following a silent period of 120 seconds. During the silent period, V(T)/T(I) averaged 826 ± 384 ml s(-1), while it increased significantly (p < 0.05) with an average of 1227 ± 704?ml s(-1) during audio stimulus low frequency component (LF)/high frequency component (HF), which reflects sympatho-vagal valance, showed a peak during audio stimuli. This paper aims to study the efficacy of the non-contact stress monitoring system for its future applications in many fields including health and safety. PMID:22059799

  15. Non-contact contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1990-12-18

    A fluid probe for measuring the surface contour of a machined part is provided whereby the machined part can remain on the machining apparatus during surface contour measurement. A measuring nozzle in a measuring probe directs a measuring fluid flow onto the surface. The measuring nozzle is on the probe situated midway between two guide nozzles that direct guide fluid flows onto the surface. When the guide fluid flows interact with the surface, they cause the measuring flow and measuring probe to be oriented perpendicular to the surface. The measuring probe includes a pressure chamber whose pressure is monitored. As the measuring fluid flow encounters changes in surface contour, pressure changes occur in the pressure chamber. The surface contour is represented as data corresponding to pressure changes in the pressure chamber as the surface is scanned.

  16. Muscle stiffness measured under conditions simulating natural sound production.

    PubMed

    Dobrunz, L E; Pelletier, D G; McMahon, T A

    1990-08-01

    Isolated whole frog gastrocnemius muscles were electrically stimulated to peak twitch tension while held isometrically in a bath at 4 degrees C. A quartz hydrophone detected vibrations of the muscle by measuring the pressure fluctuations caused by muscle movement. A small steel collar was slipped over the belly of the muscle. Transient forces including plucks and steady sinusoidal driving were applied to the collar by causing currents to flow in a coil held near the collar. The instantaneous resonant frequencies measured by the pluck and driving techniques were the same at various times during a twitch contraction cycle. The strain produced by the plucking technique in the outermost fibers was less than 1.6 x 10(-4%), a strain three orders of magnitude less than that required to drop the tension to zero in quick-length-change experiments. Because the pressure transients recorded by the hydrophone during plucks and naturally occurring sounds were of comparable amplitude, strains in the muscle due to naturally occurring sound must also be of the order 10(-3%). A simple model assuming that the muscle is an elastic bar under tension was used to calculate the instantaneous elastic modulus E as a function of time during a twitch, given the tension and resonant frequency. The result for Emax, the peak value of E during a twitch, was typically 2.8 x 10(6) N/m2. The methods used here for measuring muscle stiffness are unusual in that the apparatus used for measuring stiffness is separate from the apparatus controlling and measuring force and length. PMID:2207252

  17. Comparing the Bending Stiffness Measurements of Brittle Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Andrea; McGath, Molly; McGuiggan, Patricia

    It has been estimated that one third of the paper materials in libraries are too brittle to handle. A typical paper sheet is comprised of semi-rigid cellulose fibers that are more than ten times longer than the sheet thickness and can be considered a two dimensional random fiber network. The main pathways of degradation, acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and oxidation, cause depolymerization of the cellulose chains and breaking of the intrafiber bonds. Conventional mechanical measurements of aged paper are destructive and often too severe to understand the true extent of deterioration. By comparing the roll test, folding endurance tests, tensile tests and stiffness tests of naturally aged papers with varying amounts of brittleness, we intend to show the limits of each test and relate the state of the paper degradation to the mechanical test results. We thank the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for funding this research.

  18. Measurement of energy dissipation between tungsten tip and Si(1 0 0)-(2×1) using sub-Ångström oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgür Özer, H.; Atabak, Mehrdad; Oral, Ahmet

    2003-03-01

    Energy dissipation plays an important role in non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM), atomic manipulation and friction. In this work, we studied atomic scale energy dissipation between a tungsten tip and Si(1 0 0)-(2×1) surface. Dissipation measurements are performed with a high sensitivity nc-AFM using sub-Ångström oscillation amplitudes below resonance. We observed an increase in the dissipation as the tip is approached closer to the surface, followed by an unexpected decrease as we pass the inflection point in the energy-distance curve. This dissipation is most probably due to transformation of the kinetic energy of the tip into phonons and heat.

  19. Non-contact scanning electrical impedance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongze; Hawkins, Aaron; Schultz, Stephen; Oliphant, Travis

    2004-01-01

    We are interested in applying electrical impedance imaging to a single cell because it has potential to reveal both cell anatomy and cell function. Unfortunately, classic impedance imaging techniques are not applicable to this small scale measurement due to their low resolution. In this paper, a different method of impedance imaging is developed based on a non-contact scanning system. In this system, the imaging sample is immersed in an aqueous solution allowing for the use of various probe designs. Among those designs, we discuss a novel shield-probe design that has the advantage of better signal-to-noise ratio with higher resolution compared to other probes. Images showing the magnitude of current for each scanned point were obtained using this configuration. A low-frequency linear physical model helps to relate the current to the conductivity at each point. Line-scan data of high impedance contrast structures can be shown to be a good fit to this model. The first two-dimensional impedance image of biological tissues generated by this technique is shown with resolution on the order of 100 mum. The image reveals details not present in the optical image. PMID:17271931

  20. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics. PMID:26936543

  1. Measuring Age-Dependent Myocardial Stiffness across the Cardiac Cycle using MR Elastography: A Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wassenaar, Peter A; Eleswarpu, Chethanya N; Schroeder, Samuel A; Mo, Xiaokui; Raterman, Brian D; White, Richard D; Kolipaka, Arunark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess reproducibility in measuring left ventricular (LV) myocardial stiffness in volunteers throughout the cardiac cycle using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and to determine its correlation with age. Methods Cardiac MRE (CMRE) was performed on 29 normal volunteers, with ages ranging from 21 to 73 years. For assessing reproducibility of CMRE-derived stiffness measurements, scans were repeated per volunteer. Wave images were acquired throughout the LV myocardium, and were analyzed to obtain mean stiffness during the cardiac cycle. CMRE-derived stiffness values were correlated to age. Results Concordance correlation coefficient revealed good inter-scan agreement with rc of 0.77, with p-value<0.0001. Significantly higher myocardial stiffness was observed during end-systole (ES) compared to end-diastole (ED) across all subjects. Additionally, increased deviation between ES and ED stiffness was observed with increased age. Conclusion CMRE-derived stiffness is reproducible, with myocardial stiffness changing cyclically across the cardiac cycle. Stiffness is significantly higher during ES compared to ED. With age, ES myocardial stiffness increases more than ED, giving rise to an increased deviation between the two. PMID:26010456

  2. A novel method to estimate changes in stress-induced salivary α-amylase using heart rate variability and respiratory rate, as measured in a non-contact manner using a single radar attached to the back of a chair.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Katayose, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The authors have developed a non-contact system which estimates changes in salivary α-amylase (sAA ratio) induced by stress. Before and after stressful sound exposure, a single 24 GHz compact radar which is attached to the back of a chair measures the low frequency (LF) component of heart rate variability and respiratory rate, α-amylase in the subjects' buccal secretions was measured by using an α-amylase assay kit. Using multiple regression analysis, sAA ratio was estimated using stress-induced LF change (LF ratio) and stress-induced respiratory rate change (respiratory rate ratio). Twelve healthy subjects were tested (12 males, 22 ± 2 years), who were exposed to audio stimuli with a composite tone of 2120 Hz and 2130 Hz sine waves at a sound pressure level of 95 dB after a silent period through a headphone. The result showed that sAA ratio estimated using multiple regression analysis significantly correlated with measured sAA ratio (R = 0.76, p < 0.01). This indicates that the system may serve for a stress management in the future. PMID:24936962

  3. PolyMUMPs MEMS device to measure mechanical stiffness of single cells in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Forbrigger, C.; Hubbard, T.

    2015-02-01

    A method of experimentally determining the mechanical stiffness of single cells by using differential displacement measurements in a two stage spring system is presented. The spring system consists of a known MEMS reference spring and an unknown cellular stiffness: the ratio of displacements is related to the ratio of stiffness. A polyMUMPs implementation for aqueous media is presented and displacement measurements made from optical microphotographs using a FFT based displacement method with a repeatability of ~20 nm. The approach was first validated on a MEMS two stage spring system of known stiffness. The measured stiffness ratios of control structures (i) MEMS spring systems and (ii) polystyrene microspheres were found to agree with theoretical values. Mechanical tests were then performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) in aqueous media. Cells were placed (using a micropipette) inside MEMS measuring structures and compressed between two jaws using an electrostatic actuator and displacements measured. Tested cells showed stiffness values between 5.4 and 8.4 N m-1 with an uncertainty of 11%. In addition, non-viable cells were tested by exposing viable cells to methanol. The resultant mean cell stiffness dropped by factor of 3 × and an explicit discrimination between viable and non-viable cells based on mechanical stiffness was seen.

  4. Critical issues in making small-depth mechanical property measurements by nanoindentation with continuous stiffness measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, George Mathews; Strader, Jeremy H.; Oliver, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a (100) copper single crystal to examine the influences that small displacement oscillations used in continuous stiffness measurement techniques have on hardness and elastic-modulus measurements in nanoindentation experiments. For the commonly used 2-nm oscillation, significant errors were observed in the measured properties, especially the hardness, at penetration depths as large as 100 nm. The errors originate from the large amount of dynamic unloading that occurs in materials like copper that have high contact stiffness resulting from their high modulus-to-hardness ratios. A simple model for the loading and unloading behavior of an elastic-plastic material is presented that quantitatively describes the errors and can be used to partially correct for them. By correcting the data in accordance with model and performing measurements at smaller displacement oscillation amplitudes, the errors can be reduced. The observations have important implications for the interpretation of the indentation size effect.

  5. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  6. A new method of measuring the stiffness of astronauts' EVA gloves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Mehdi; Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Bonanno, Alberto; Chen Chen, Fai; Crepaldi, Marco; Demarchi, Danilo; Favetto, Alain; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Hand fatigue is one of the most important problems of astronauts during their missions to space. This fatigue is due to the stiffness of the astronauts' gloves known as Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves. The EVA glove has a multilayered, bulky structure and is pressurized against the vacuum of space. In order to evaluate the stiffness of EVA gloves, different methods have been proposed in the past. In particular, the effects of wearing an EVA glove on the performance of the hands have been published by many researchers to represent the stiffness of the EVA glove. In this paper, a new method for measuring the stiffness of EVA gloves is proposed. A tendon-actuated finger probe is designed and used as an alternative to the human index finger in order to be placed inside an EVA glove and measure its stiffness. The finger probe is equipped with accelerometers, which work as tilt sensors, to measure the angles of its phalanges. The phalanges are actuated by applying different amount of torque using the tendons of the finger probe. Moreover, a hypobaric glove box is designed and realized to simulate the actual operating pressure of the EVA glove and to measure its stiffness in both pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. In order to prove the right performance of the proposed finger probe, an Orlam-DM EVA glove is used to perform a number of tests. The equation of stiffness for the PIP joint of this glove is extracted from the results acquired from the tests. This equation presents the torque required to flex the middle phalanx of the glove. Then, the effect of pressurization on the stiffness is highlighted in the last section. This setup can be used to measure the stiffness of different kinds of EVA gloves and allows direct, numerical comparison of their stiffness.

  7. Photonic non-contact estimation of blood lactate level.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Chen; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Ozana, Nisan; Tenner, Felix; Schmidt, Michael; Sanz, Martin; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-10-01

    The ability to measure the blood lactate level in a non-invasive, non-contact manner is very appealing to the sports industry as well as the home care field. That is mainly because this substance level is an imperative parameter in the course of devolving a personal workout programs. Moreover, the blood lactate level is also a pivotal means in estimation of muscles' performance capability. In this manuscript we propose an optical non-contact approach to estimate the concentration level of this parameter. Firstly, we introduce the connection between the physiological muscle tremor and the lactate blood levels. Secondly, we suggest a photonic optical method to estimate the physiological tremor. Lastly, we present the results of tests conducted to establish proof of concept to this connection. PMID:26504661

  8. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Kennedy, Guy G.; Warshaw, David M.; Ali, M. Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  9. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Arthur J; Kennedy, Guy G; Warshaw, David M; Ali, M Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  10. In vivo and in vitro measurements of pulmonary arterial stiffness: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2012-01-01

    During the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH), proximal pulmonary arteries (PAs) undergo remodeling such that they become thicker and the elastic modulus increases. Both of these changes increase the vascular stiffness. The increase in pulmonary vascular stiffness contributes to increased right ventricular (RV) afterload, which causes RV hypertrophy and eventually failure. Studies have found that proximal PA stiffness or its inverse, compliance, is strongly related to morbidity and mortality in patients with PH. Therefore, accurate in vivo measurement of PA stiffness is useful for prognoses in patients with PH. It is also important to understand the structural changes in PAs that occur with PH that are responsible for stiffening. Here, we briefly review the most common parameters used to quantify stiffness and in vivo and in vitro methods for measuring PA stiffness in human and animal models. For in vivo approaches, we review invasive and noninvasive approaches that are based on measurements of pressure and inner or outer diameter or cross-sectional area. For in vitro techniques, we review several different testing methods that mimic one, two or several aspects of physiological loading (e.g., uniaxial and biaxial testing, dynamic inflation-force testing). Many in vivo and in vitro measurement methods exist in the literature, and it is important to carefully choose an appropriate method to measure PA stiffness accurately. Therefore, advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed. PMID:23372936

  11. Report on Non-Contact DC Electric Field Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Bond, T; Meyer, G

    2009-06-16

    This document reports on methods used to measure DC electrostatic fields in the range of 100 to 4000 V/m using a non-contact method. The project for which this report is written requires this capability. Non-contact measurements of DC fields is complicated by the effect of the accumulation of random space-charges near the sensors which interfere with the measurement of the field-of-interest and consequently, many forms of field measurements are either limited to AC measurements or use oscillating devices to create pseudo-AC fields. The intent of this document is to report on methods discussed in the literature for non-contact measurement of DC fields. Electric field meters report either the electric field expressed in volts per distance or the voltage measured with respect to a ground reference. Common commercial applications for measuring static (DC) electric fields include measurement of surface charge on materials near electronic equipment to prevent arcing which can destroy sensitive electronic components, measurement of the potential for lightning to strike buildings or other exposed assets, measurement of the electric fields under power lines to investigate potential health risks from exposure to EM fields and measurement of fields emanating from the brain for brain diagnostic purposes. Companies that make electric field sensors include Trek (Medina, NY), MKS Instruments, Boltek, Campbell Systems, Mission Instruments, Monroe Electronics, AlphaLab, Inc. and others. In addition to commercial vendors, there are research activities continuing in the MEMS and optical arenas to make compact devices using the principles applied to the larger commercial sensors.

  12. Non-contact FBG sensing based steam turbine rotor dynamic balance vibration detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Cai, Lin

    2015-10-01

    This paper has proposed a non-contact vibration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating sensing, and applied to detect vibration of steam turbine rotor dynamic balance experimental platform. The principle of the sensor has been introduced, as well as the experimental analysis; performance of non-contact FBG vibration sensor has been analyzed in the experiment; in addition, turbine rotor dynamic vibration detection system based on eddy current displacement sensor and non-contact FBG vibration sensor have built; finally, compared with results of signals under analysis of the time domain and frequency domain. The analysis of experimental data contrast shows that: the vibration signal analysis of non-contact FBG vibration sensor is basically the same as the result of eddy current displacement sensor; it verified that the sensor can be used for non-contact measurement of steam turbine rotor dynamic balance vibration.

  13. Precision non-contact polishing tool

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, John S.

    1997-01-01

    A non-contact polishing tool that combines two orthogonal slurry flow geometries to provide flexibility in altering the shape of the removal footprint. By varying the relative contributions of the two flow geometries, the footprint shape can be varied between the characteristic shapes corresponding to the two independent flow regimes. In addition, the tool can include a pressure activated means by which the shape of the brim of the tool can be varied. The tool can be utilized in various applications, such as x-ray optical surfaces, x-ray lithography, lenses, etc., where stringent shape and finish tolerances are required.

  14. Precision non-contact polishing tool

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, J.S.

    1997-01-07

    A non-contact polishing tool is disclosed that combines two orthogonal slurry flow geometries to provide flexibility in altering the shape of the removal footprint. By varying the relative contributions of the two flow geometries, the footprint shape can be varied between the characteristic shapes corresponding to the two independent flow regimes. In addition, the tool can include a pressure activated means by which the shape of the brim of the tool can be varied. The tool can be utilized in various applications, such as x-ray optical surfaces, x-ray lithography, lenses, etc., where stringent shape and finish tolerances are required. 5 figs.

  15. Non-Contact Detection of Breathing Using a Microwave Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dei, Devis; Grazzini, Gilberto; Luzi, Guido; Pieraccini, Massimiliano; Atzeni, Carlo; Boncinelli, Sergio; Camiciottoli, Gianna; Castellani, Walter; Marsili, Massimo; Dico, Juri Lo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the use of a continuous-wave microwave sensor as a non-contact tool for quantitative measurement of respiratory tidal volume has been evaluated by experimentation in seventeen healthy volunteers. The sensor working principle is reported and several causes that can affect its response are analyzed. A suitable data processing has been devised able to reject the majority of breath measurements taken under non suitable conditions. Furthermore, a relationship between microwave sensor measurements and volume inspired and expired at quiet breathing (tidal volume) has been found. PMID:22574033

  16. Flow visualization of a non-contact transport device by Coanda effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iki, Norihiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Okada, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    AIST proposes new technology of non-contact transport device utilizing Coanda effect. A proposed non-contact transport device has a cylindrical body and circular slit for air. The air flow around non-contact device is turbulent and its flow pattern depends on the injection condition. Therefore we tried visualization of the air flow around non -contact device as the first step of PIV measurement. Several tracer particles were tried such as TiO2 particles, water droplets, potatoes starch, rice starch, corn starch. Hot-wire anemometer is employed to velocity measurement. TiO2 particles deposit inside of a slit and clogging of a slit occurs frequently. Potato starch particles do not clog a slit but they are too heavy to trace slow flow area. Water droplets by ultrasonic atomization also deposit inside of slit but they are useful to visualize flow pattern around a non-contact transport device by being supplied from circumference. Coanda effect of proposed non-contact transport device was confirmed and injected air flow pattern switches by a work. Air flow around non-contact trance port device is turbulent and its velocity range is wide. Therefore flow measurement by tracer part icle has traceability issue. Suitable tracer and exposure condition depends on target area.

  17. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  18. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  19. Experimental measure of arm stiffness during single reaching movements with a time-frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We tested an innovative method to estimate joint stiffness and damping during multijoint unfettered arm movements. The technique employs impulsive perturbations and a time-frequency analysis to estimate the arm's mechanical properties along a reaching trajectory. Each single impulsive perturbation provides a continuous estimation on a single-reach basis, making our method ideal to investigate motor adaptation in the presence of force fields and to study the control of movement in impaired individuals with limited kinematic repeatability. In contrast with previous dynamic stiffness studies, we found that stiffness varies during movement, achieving levels higher than during static postural control. High stiffness was associated with elevated reflexive activity. We observed a decrease in stiffness and a marked reduction in long-latency reflexes around the reaching movement velocity peak. This pattern could partly explain the difference between the high stiffness reported in postural studies and the low stiffness measured in dynamic estimation studies, where perturbations are typically applied near the peak velocity point. PMID:23945781

  20. Stiffness matrix determination of composite materials using lamb wave group velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putkis, O.; Croxford, A. J.

    2013-04-01

    The use of Lamb waves in Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is gaining popularity due to their ability to travel long distances without significant attenuation, therefore offering large area inspections with a small number of sensors. The design of a Lamb-wave-based NDE/SHM system for composite materials is more complicated than for metallic materials due to the directional dependence of Lamb wave propagation characteristics such as dispersion and group velocity. Propagation parameters can be theoretically predicted from known material properties, specifically the stiffness matrix and density. However, in practice it is difficult to obtain the stiffness matrix of a particular material or structure with high accuracy, hence introducing errors in theoretical predictions and inaccuracies in the resulting propagation parameters. Measured Lamb wave phase velocities can be used to infer the stiffness matrix, but the measurements are limited to the principal directions due to the steering effect (different propagation directions of phase and corresponding group velocities). This paper proposes determination of the stiffness matrix from the measured group velocities, which can be unambiguously measured in any direction. A highly anisotropic carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer plate is chosen for the study. The influence of different stiffness matrix elements on the directional group velocity profile is investigated. Thermodynamic Simulated Annealing (TSA) is used as a tool for inverse, multi variable inference of the stiffness matrix. A good estimation is achieved for particular matrix elements.

  1. NDT applications of non-contact thermosonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Feng, Lichun; Zhang, Cunlin

    2014-02-01

    Thermosonics or SonicIR has been proven an effective NDT method, in which ultrasonic welding horn is pushed against the tested sample under certain force through a piece of coupling material. Due to the mechanical contact between horn and sample, it may damage the contacted surface, especially for some brittle or fragile samples. In this study, the conventional horn in a small size was replaced by a much bigger horn to avoid the direct contact of horn with the sample. The tested sample could be positioned up to several centimeters away from the bottom or beside of the horn, heat is generated at the defect location under the excitation of ultrasonic field, its heating mechanism is similar with contact thermosonics, the infrared camera could be positioned wherever is convenient to monitor the variation of the surface temperature. The presented experimental results show that the non-contact thermosonics has some potential in NDT application.

  2. “An Impediment to Living Life”: Why and How Should We Measure Stiffness in Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Sarah Louise; Hughes, Rodney; Walsh, Margaret; Day, John; Newton, Marion; Pease, Colin; Kirwan, John; Morris, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore patients’ concepts of stiffness in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), and how they think stiffness should be measured. Methods Eight focus groups were held at three centres involving 50 patients with current/previous PMR. Each group had at least one facilitator and one rapporteur making field notes. An interview schedule was used to stimulate discussion. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using an inductive thematic approach. Results Major themes identified were: symptoms: pain, stiffness and fatigue; functional impact; impact on daily schedule; and approaches to measurement. The common subtheme for the experience of stiffness was “difficulty in moving”, and usually considered as distinct from the experience of pain, albeit with a variable overlap. Some participants felt stiffness was the “overwhelming” symptom, in that it prevented them carrying out “fundamental activities” and “generally living life”. Diurnal variation in stiffness was generally described in relation to the daily schedule but was not the same as stiffness severity. Some participants suggested measuring stiffness using a numeric rating scale or a Likert scale, while others felt that it was more relevant and straightforward to measure difficulty in performing everyday activities rather than about stiffness itself. Conclusions A conceptual model of stiffness in PMR is presented where stiffness is an important part of the patient experience and impacts on their ability to live their lives. Stiffness is closely related to function and often regarded as interchangeable with pain. From the patients’ perspective, visual analogue scales measuring pain and stiffness were not the most useful method for reporting stiffness; participants preferred numerical rating scales, or assessments of function to reflect how stiffness impacts on their daily lives. Assessing function may be a pragmatic solution to difficulties in quantifying stiffness. PMID:25955770

  3. Accuracy and reproducibility of bending stiffness measurements by mechanical response tissue analysis in artificial human ulnas.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Patricia A; Ellerbrock, Emily R; Bowman, Lyn; Loucks, Anne B

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone strength, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone strength. Bone strength is strongly associated with bone stiffness, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone stiffness either. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) is a non-significant risk, non-invasive, radiation-free, vibration analysis technique for making immediate, direct functional measurements of the bending stiffness of long bones in humans in vivo. MRTA has been used for research purposes for more than 20 years, but little has been published about its accuracy. To begin to investigate its accuracy, we compared MRTA measurements of bending stiffness in 39 artificial human ulna bones to measurements made by Quasistatic Mechanical Testing (QMT). In the process, we also quantified the reproducibility (i.e., precision and repeatability) of both methods. MRTA precision (1.0±1.0%) and repeatability (3.1 ± 3.1%) were not as high as those of QMT (0.2 ± 0.2% and 1.3+1.7%, respectively; both p<10(-4)). The relationship between MRTA and QMT measurements of ulna bending stiffness was indistinguishable from the identity line (p=0.44) and paired measurements by the two methods agreed within a 95% confidence interval of ± 5%. If such accuracy can be achieved on real human ulnas in situ, and if the ulna is representative of the appendicular skeleton, MRTA may prove clinically useful. PMID:25261885

  4. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  5. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  6. A non-contact fiber Bragg grating vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Wei, Li; Zhou, Zude; Zheng, Kai; Guo, Yongxing

    2014-01-01

    A non-contact vibration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing has been proposed and studied in this paper. The principle of the sensor as well as simulation and experimental analyses are introduced. When the distance between the movable head and the measured shaft changed, the diaphragm deformed under magnetic coupling of the permanent magnet on the measured magnetic shaft. As a result, the center wavelength of the FBG connected to the diaphragm changed, based on which the vibration displacement of the rotating shaft could be obtained. Experimental results show that the resonant frequency of the sensor is about 1500 Hz and the working band ranges within 0-1300 Hz, which is consistent with the simulation analysis result; the sensitivity is -1.694 pm/μm and the linearity is 2.92% within a range of 2-2.4 mm. It can be used to conduct non-contact measurement on the vibration of the rotating shaft system. PMID:24517801

  7. Non-Contact Laser Based Ultrasound Evaluation of Canned Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, David

    2005-03-01

    Laser-Based Ultrasound detection was used to measure the velocity of compression waves transmitted through canned foods. Condensed broth, canned pasta, and non-condensed soup were evaluated in these experiments. Homodyne adaptive optics resulted in measurements that were more accurate than the traditional heterodyne method, as well as yielding a 10 dB gain in signal to noise. A-Scans measured the velocity of ultrasound sent through the center of the can and were able to distinguish the quantity of food stuff in its path, as well as distinguish between meat and potato. B-Scans investigated the heterogeneity of the sample’s contents. The evaluation of canned foods was completely non-contact and would be suitable for continuous monitoring in production. These results were verified by conducting the same experiments with a contact piezo transducer. Although the contact method yields a higher signal to noise ratio than the non-contact method, Laser-Based Ultrasound was able to detect surface waves the contact transducer could not.

  8. Non-Contact Ultrasound Imaging Applied to Cortical Bone Phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halcrow, Peter; Ganezer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to take the initial steps towards applying Non-Contact Ultrasound (NCU) to the in-vivo monitoring of osteoporosis and to quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of the skeleton using cortical bone. This project was also undertaken to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. With an NCU imaging system, a pair of specially designed broadband 1.5 MHz non-contact transducers and cortical bone phantoms we determined bone mineral density, speed of sound (SOS), integrated acoustical response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were used to collect data from phantoms of known mass density and bone mineral density (BMD). Significant correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 14 phantoms. At least thirty to forty repeated measurements were collected over a period of 1.5 years of the SOS, thickness, and IR for our phantom set, extending through most of the in-vivo range of BMD found in cortical bone. The collected data showed a small variation in the range of measurements of plus or minus 1-2 %. These NCU results were shown to be in agreement with similar results from contact ultrasound to within 1-2%. This study suggests that NCU might find additional applications in a clinical setting in the near future in medical imaging.

  9. Ferroelectret non-contact ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovtun, V.; Döring, J.; Bartusch, J.; Beck, U.; Erhard, A.; Yakymenko, Y.

    2007-09-01

    Dielectric and electromechanical properties of the cellular polypropylene ferroelectret films (EMFIT), combining strong piezoelectric response with a low density and softness, evidence their high potential for the air-coupled ultrasonic applications. The disadvantage of the low coupling factor is compensated by the extremely low acoustic impedance, which provides excellent matching to air and promises efficient sound transmission through the air transducer interface. The influence of the electrodes on the electromechanical properties was investigated. Electron beam evaporation technology was adapted to the EMFIT films, and films with both-sided Au and Al electrodes were prepared without reducing or suppressing of the electromechanical properties. Finally, prototype transducers based on the EMFIT films were developed. In spite of the simple construction and absence of matching layers, high sensitivity of the EMFIT transducers was proved in the air-coupled ultrasonic experiment. Amplitude and delay time scanned images of the polyethylene step wedge with holes, obtained in both pulse-echo and transmission modes, demonstrate that non-contact ultrasonic imaging and testing with EMFIT transducers is possible.

  10. Non-Contact Heart Rate Monitoring Using Lab Color Space.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Hamidur; Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin; Begum, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Research progressing during the last decade focuses more on non-contact based systems to monitor Heart Rate (HR) which are simple, low-cost and comfortable to use. Most of the non-contact based systems are using RGB videos which is suitable for lab environment. However, it needs to progress considerably before they can be applied in real life applications. As luminance (light) has significance contribution on RGB videos HR monitoring using RGB videos are not efficient enough in real life applications in outdoor environment. This paper presents a HR monitoring method using Lab color facial video captured by a webcam of a laptop computer. Lab color space is device independent and HR can be extracted through facial skin color variation caused by blood circulation considering variable environmental light. Here, three different signal processing methods i.e., Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) have been applied on the color channels in video recordings and blood volume pulse (BVP) has been extracted from the facial regions. In this study, HR is subsequently quantified and compare with a reference measurement. The result shows that high degrees of accuracy have been achieved compared to the reference measurements. Thus, this technology has significant potential for advancing personal health care, telemedicine and many real life applications such as driver monitoring. PMID:27225552

  11. Turtle utricle dynamic behavior using a combined anatomically accurate model and experimentally measured hair bundle stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J.L.; Grant, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomically correct turtle utricle geometry was incorporated into two finite element models. The geometrically accurate model included appropriately shaped macular surface and otoconial layer, compact gel and column filament (or shear) layer thicknesses and thickness distributions. The first model included a shear layer where the effects of hair bundle stiffness was included as part of the shear layer modulus. This solid model’s undamped natural frequency was matched to an experimentally measured value. This frequency match established a realistic value of the effective shear layer Young’s modulus of 16 Pascals. We feel this is the most accurate prediction of this shear layer modulus and fits with other estimates (Kondrachuk, 2001b). The second model incorporated only beam elements in the shear layer to represent hair cell bundle stiffness. The beam element stiffness’s were further distributed to represent their location on the neuroepithelial surface. Experimentally measured striola hair cell bundles mean stiffness values were used in the striolar region and the mean extrastriola hair cell bundles stiffness values were used in this region. The results from this second model indicated that hair cell bundle stiffness contributes approximately 40% to the overall stiffness of the shear layer– hair cell bundle complex. This analysis shows that high mass saccules, in general, achieve high gain at the sacrifice of frequency bandwidth. We propose the mechanism by which this can be achieved is through increase the otoconial layer mass. The theoretical difference in gain (deflection per acceleration) is shown for saccules with large otoconial layer mass relative to saccules and utricles with small otoconial layer mass. Also discussed is the necessity of these high mass saccules to increase their overall system shear layer stiffness. Undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes for these sensors are shown. PMID:25445820

  12. Piezoelectric Sensor to Measure Soft and Hard Stiffness with High Sensitivity for Ultrasonic Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Rui; Su, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Jin; Chang, Shuo-Hung

    2015-01-01

    During dental sinus lift surgery, it is important to monitor the thickness of the remaining maxilla to avoid perforating the sinus membrane. Therefore, a sensor should be integrated into ultrasonic dental tools to prevent undesirable damage. This paper presents a piezoelectric (PZT) sensor installed in an ultrasonic transducer to measure the stiffness of high and low materials. Four design types using three PZT ring materials and a split PZT for actuator and sensor ring materials were studied. Three sensor locations were also examined. The voltage signals of the sensor and the displacement of the actuator were analyzed to distinguish the low and high stiffness. Using sensor type T1 made of the PZT-1 material and the front location A1 provided a high sensitivity of 2.47 Vm/kN. The experimental results demonstrated that our design can measure soft and hard stiffness. PMID:26110400

  13. Measurement of the UH-60A Hub Large Rotor Test Apparatus Control System Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kufeld, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    This purpose of this report is to provides details of the measurement of the control system stiffness of the UH-60A rotor hub mounted on the Large Rotor Test Apparatus (UH-60A/LRTA). The UH-60A/LRTA was used in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel to complete the full-scale wind tunnel test portion of the NASA / ARMY UH-60A Airloads Program. This report describes the LRTA control system and highlights the differences between the LRTA and UH-60A aircraft. The test hardware, test setup, and test procedures are also described. Sample results are shown, including the azimuthal variation of the measured control system stiffness for three different loadings and two different dynamic actuator settings. Finally, the azimuthal stiffness is converted to fixed system values using multi-blade transformations for input to comprehensive rotorcraft prediction codes.

  14. Piezoelectric Sensor to Measure Soft and Hard Stiffness with High Sensitivity for Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Rui; Su, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Jin; Chang, Shuo-Hung

    2015-01-01

    During dental sinus lift surgery, it is important to monitor the thickness of the remaining maxilla to avoid perforating the sinus membrane. Therefore, a sensor should be integrated into ultrasonic dental tools to prevent undesirable damage. This paper presents a piezoelectric (PZT) sensor installed in an ultrasonic transducer to measure the stiffness of high and low materials. Four design types using three PZT ring materials and a split PZT for actuator and sensor ring materials were studied. Three sensor locations were also examined. The voltage signals of the sensor and the displacement of the actuator were analyzed to distinguish the low and high stiffness. Using sensor type T1 made of the PZT-1 material and the front location A1 provided a high sensitivity of 2.47 Vm/kN. The experimental results demonstrated that our design can measure soft and hard stiffness. PMID:26110400

  15. Non-Contact Electromagnetic Exciter Design with Linear Control Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Xiong, Xianzhi; Xu, Hua

    2016-04-01

    A non-contact type force actuator is necessary for studying the dynamic performance of a high-speed spindle system owing to its high-speed operating conditions. A non-contact electromagnetic exciter is designed for identifying the dynamic coefficients of journal bearings in high-speed grinding spindles. A linear force control method is developed based on PID controller. The influence of amplitude and frequency of current, misalignment and rotational speed on magnetic field and excitation force is investigated based on two-dimensional finite element analysis. The electromagnetic excitation force is measured with the auxiliary coils and calibrated by load cells. The design is validated by the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental investigations show that the proposed design can accurately generate linear excitation force with sufficiently large amplitude and higher signal to noise ratio. Moreover, the fluctuations in force amplitude are reduced to a greater extent with the designed linear control method even when the air gap changes due to the rotor vibration at high-speed conditions. Besides, it is possible to apply various types of excitations: constant, synchronous, and non-synchronous excitation forces based on the proposed linear control method. This exciter can be used as linear-force exciting and controlling system for dynamic performance study of different high-speed rotor-bearing systems.

  16. Optoelectronic tweezers for the measurement of the relative stiffness of erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Steven L.; Mody, Nimesh; Selman, Colin; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we describe the first use of Optoelectronic Tweezers (OET), an optically controlled micromanipulation method, to measure the relative stiffness of erythrocytes in mice. Cell stiffness is an important measure of cell health and in the case of erythrocytes, the most elastic cells in the body, an increase in cell stiffness can indicate pathologies such as type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension (high blood pressure). OET uses a photoconductive device to convert an optical pattern into and electrical pattern. The electrical fields will create a dipole within any polarisable particles in the device, such as cells, and non-uniformities of the field can be used to place unequal forces onto each side of the dipole thus moving the particle. In areas of the device where there are no field gradients, areas of constant illumination, the force on each side of the dipole will be equal, keeping the cell stationary, but as there are opposing forces on each side of the cell it will be stretched. The force each cell will experience will differ slightly so the stretching will depend on the cells polarisability as well as its stiffness. Because of this a relative stiffness rather than absolute stiffness is measured. We show that with standard conditions (20Vpp, 1.5MHz, 10mSm-1 medium conductivity) the cell's diameter changes by around 10% for healthy mouse erythrocytes and we show that due to the low light intensities required for OET, relative to conventional optical tweezers, multiple cells can be measured simultaneously.

  17. Contact-flatted measurement of eye stiffness based on force-displacement relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Ma, Jianguo; Zhang, Xueyong

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a noninvasive approach in vivo measurement of eye stiffness based on a force-displacement relationship, which is based on a new contact-probe method of simultaneously measuring the static force and displacement. First, a simple spherical eye model is introduced for deriving analytical eye stiffness when a static force is applied to an eye. Next, a measurement system for simultaneously measuring force and displacement when a probe is pressed onto the eye is presented. Static eye stiffness is defined which based on the measured force-displacement relationship. A photoelectric probe transducer acts as displacement detector. A 16-bit single-chip microprocessor with E2PROM in the electronic circuit played the role of a nucleus, which stored the program instructions and the interrelated data. Laboratory experiments were carried out on a simulated eyeball connected to a hydraulic manometer to obtain intraocular pressure at different levels. The experimental results show that the measured eye stiffness nicely matches the analytical result.

  18. Liver Stiffness Measurement-Based Scoring System for Significant Inflammation Related to Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei-Zhu; Zhang, Ru-Mian; Chen, Guo-Liang; Huang, Wen-Qi; Min, Feng; Chen, Tian; Xu, Jin-Chao; Pan, Jin-Shui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Liver biopsy is indispensable because liver stiffness measurement alone cannot provide information on intrahepatic inflammation. However, the presence of fibrosis highly correlates with inflammation. We constructed a noninvasive model to determine significant inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients by using liver stiffness measurement and serum markers. Methods The training set included chronic hepatitis B patients (n = 327), and the validation set included 106 patients; liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored, and serum markers were investigated. All patients underwent liver stiffness measurement. Results An inflammation activity scoring system for significant inflammation was constructed. In the training set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.964, 91.9%, and 90.8% in the HBeAg(+) patients and 0.978, 85.0%, and 94.0% in the HBeAg(−) patients, respectively. In the validation set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.971, 90.5%, and 92.5% in the HBeAg(+) patients and 0.977, 95.2%, and 95.8% in the HBeAg(−) patients. The liver stiffness measurement-based activity score was comparable to that of the fibrosis-based activity score in both HBeAg(+) and HBeAg(−) patients for recognizing significant inflammation (G ≥3). Conclusions Significant inflammation can be accurately predicted by this novel method. The liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system can be used without the aid of computers and provides a noninvasive alternative for the prediction of chronic hepatitis B-related significant inflammation. PMID:25360742

  19. Assessment of impact factors on shear wave based liver stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wenwu; Lu, Qiang; Quan, Jierong; Ma, Lin; Luo, Yan

    2013-02-01

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastographies have been implemented as non-invasive methods for quantitative assessment of liver stiffness. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies that have investigated impact factors on liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Moreover, standard examination protocols for LSM are still lacking in clinical practice. Our study aimed to assess the impact factors on LSM to establish its standard examination protocols in clinical practice. We applied shear wave based elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in 21 healthy individuals to determine the impact of liver location (segments I-VIII), breathing phase (end-inspiration and end-expiration), probe position (sub-costal and inter-costal position) and examiner on LSM. Additional studies in 175 healthy individuals were also performed to determine the influence of gender and age on liver stiffness. We found significant impact of liver location on LSM, while the liver segment V displayed the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 21%). The liver stiffness at the end-expiration was significantly higher than that at the end-inspiration (P=2.1E-05). The liver stiffness was 8% higher in men than in women (3.8 ± 0.7 kPa vs. 3.5 ± 0.4 kPa, P=0.0168). In contrast, the liver stiffness was comparable in the different probe positions, examiners and age groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals significant impact from liver location, breathing phase and gender on LSM, while furthermore strengthening the necessity for the development of standard examination protocols on LSM. PMID:23116805

  20. Usefulness of liver stiffness measurement during acute cellular rejection in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gonzalo; Castro-Narro, Graciela; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Benítez, Carlos; Ruiz, Pablo; Sastre, Lydia; Colmenero, Jordi; Miquel, Rosa; Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Forns, Xavier; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is a useful method to estimate liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. The inflammatory process that takes place in post-liver transplant acute cellular rejection (ACR) may also increase liver stiffness. We aimed to explore the association between liver stiffness and the severity of ACR, as well as to assess the relationship between liver stiffness and response to rejection treatment in a prospective study that included 27 liver recipients with biopsy-proven ACR, 30 stable recipients with normal liver tests, and 30 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected LT recipients with histologically diagnosed HCV recurrence. Patients with rejection were stratified into 2 groups (mild and moderate/severe) according to the severity of rejection evaluated with the Banff score. Routine biomarkers and LSM with FibroScan were performed at the time of liver biopsy (baseline) and at 7, 30, and 90 days in patients with rejection and at baseline in control patients. Median baseline liver stiffness was 5.9 kPa in the mild rejection group, 11 kPa in the moderate/severe group (P = 0.001), 4.2 kPa in stable recipients (P = 0.02 versus mild rejection), and 13.6 kPa in patients with recurrent HCV (P = 0.17 versus moderate/severe rejection). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of LSM to discriminate mild versus moderate/severe ACR was 0.924, and a LSM value of 8.5 kPa yielded a positive predictive value of 100% to diagnose moderate/severe rejection. Liver stiffness improved in 7%, 21%, and 64% of patients with moderate/severe rejection at 7, 30, and 90 days. In conclusion, according to the results of this exploratory study, LSM is associated with the severity of ACR in liver transplantation and thus may be of help in its assessment. PMID:26609794

  1. Non-contact feature detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2011-06-28

    Apparatus and method for non-contact ultrasonic detection of features on or within the walls of hollow pipes are described. An air-coupled, high-power ultrasonic transducer for generating guided waves in the pipe wall, and a high-sensitivity, air-coupled transducer for detecting these waves, are disposed at a distance apart and at chosen angle with respect to the surface of the pipe, either inside of or outside of the pipe. Measurements may be made in reflection or transmission modes depending on the relative position of the transducers and the pipe. Data are taken by sweeping the frequency of the incident ultrasonic waves, using a tracking narrow-band filter to reduce detected noise, and transforming the frequency domain data into the time domain using fast Fourier transformation, if required.

  2. Increased osteopontin and liver stiffness measurement by transient elastography in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Honsawek, Sittisak; Chayanupatkul, Maneerat; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Vejchapipat, Paisarn; Poovorawan, Yong

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze plasma osteopontin levels and liver stiffness using transient elastography in postoperative biliary atresia (BA) children compared with healthy controls. METHODS: Thirty children with postoperative BA and 10 normal controls were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups according to their jaundice status. Plasma levels of osteopontin were determined using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Liver stiffness was measured by using transient elastography (Fibroscan). Ten validated Fibroscan measurements were performed in each patient and control with the result expressed in kilopascals (kPa). RESULTS: Plasma osteopontin was significantly elevated in BA children compared with that of healthy controls (47.0 ± 56.4 ng/mL vs 15.1 ± 15.0 ng/mL, P = 0.01). The liver stiffness measurement was markedly elevated in the patients with BA compared with that of controls (26.9 ± 24.6 kPa vs 3.9 ± 0.7 kPa, P = 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that the BA patients with jaundice had more pronounced plasma osteopontin levels than those without jaundice (87.1 ± 61.6 ng/mL vs 11.9 ± 6.1 ng/mL, P = 0.001). Furthermore, the mean liver stiffness was significantly greater in the jaundiced BA patients compared with non-jaundiced patients (47.7 ± 21.8 kPa vs 8.7 ± 3.0 kPa, P = 0.001). Additionally, plasma osteopontin was positively related to serum total bilirubin (r = 0.64, P < 0.001). There was also a correlation between plasma osteopontin and liver stiffness values (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: High plasma osteopontin positively correlated with degree of hepatic fibrosis and could be used as a biochemical parameter reflecting disease severity in postoperative BA children. PMID:21086566

  3. An Imageless Ultrasound Device to Measure Local and Regional Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Ashish Kumar; Shah, Malay Ilesh; Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) has been shown to be an important marker for risk assessment of cardiovascular events. Local arterial stiffness (LAS) is conventionally measured by evaluating arterial distensibility at particular arterial sites through ultrasound imaging systems. Regional arterial stiffness (RAS) is generally obtained by evaluating carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) through tonometric devices. RAS has a better prognostic value than LAS and cfPWV is considered as the gold standard of AS. Over the past few years our group has been developing ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Non-Invasive Screening (ARTSENS), an inexpensive and portable device to measure the LAS. It uses a single element ultrasound transducer to obtain A-Mode frames from the desired artery and is fully automated to enable a non-expert to perform measurements. In this work, we report an extension of ARTSENS to enable measurement of cfPWV that now makes it the only fully automatic device that can measure both LAS and RAS. In this paper, we provide a general review of the ARTSENS and compare it with other state-of-the-art AS measurement systems. cfPWV measurement using ARTSENS was cross-validated against SphygmoCor by successive measurements with both devices on 41 human subjects and excellent agreement between both devices was demonstrated (Coefficient of determination and, limits of agreement m/s). The inter-device correlation between ARTSENS and SphygmoCor was found to be better than other similar studies reported in the literature. PMID:25775498

  4. Differentiating untreated and cross-linked porcine corneas of the same measured stiffness with optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Singh, Manmohan; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-11-01

    Structurally degenerative diseases, such as keratoconus, can significantly alter the stiffness of the cornea, directly affecting the quality of vision. Ultraviolet-induced collagen cross-linking (CXL) effectively increases corneal stiffness and is applied clinically to treat keratoconus. However, measured corneal stiffness is also influenced by intraocular pressure (IOP). Therefore, experimentally measured changes in corneal stiffness may be attributable to the effects of CXL, changes in IOP, or both. We present a noninvasive measurement method using phase-stabilized swept-source optical coherence elastography to distinguish between CXL and IOP effects on measured corneal stiffness. This method compared the displacement amplitude attenuation of a focused air-pulse-induced elastic wave. The damping speed of the displacement amplitudes at each measurement position along the wave propagation were compared for different materials. This method was initially tested on gelatin and agar phantoms of the same stiffness for validation. Consequently, untreated and CXL-treated porcine corneas of the same measured stiffness, but at different IOPs, were also evaluated. The results suggest that this noninvasive method may have the potential to detect the early stages of ocular diseases such as keratoconus or may be applied during CLX procedures by factoring in the effects of IOP on the measured corneal stiffness.

  5. Contact stiffness and damping identification for hardware-in-the-loop contact simulator with measurement delay compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chenkun; Zhao, Xianchao; Gao, Feng; Ren, Anye; Sun, Qiao

    2016-06-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) contact simulator is to simulate the contact process of two flying objects in space. The contact stiffness and damping are important parameters used for the process monitoring, compliant contact control and force compensation control. In this study, a contact stiffness and damping identification approach is proposed for the HIL contact simulation with the force measurement delay. The actual relative position of two flying objects can be accurately measured. However, the force measurement delay needs to be compensated because it will lead to incorrect stiffness and damping identification. Here, the phase lead compensation is used to reconstruct the actual contact force from the delayed force measurement. From the force and position data, the contact stiffness and damping are identified in real time using the recursive least squares (RLS) method. The simulations and experiments are used to verify that the proposed stiffness and damping identification approach is effective.

  6. Non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging at null source-detector separation.

    PubMed

    Mazurenka, M; Jelzow, A; Wabnitz, H; Contini, D; Spinelli, L; Pifferi, A; Cubeddu, R; Mora, A Dalla; Tosi, A; Zappa, F; Macdonald, R

    2012-01-01

    We report results of the proof-of-principle tests of a novel non-contact tissue imaging system. The system utilizes a quasi-null source-detector separation approach for time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy, taking advantage of an innovative state-of-the-art fast-gated single photon counting detector. Measurements on phantoms demonstrate the feasibility of the non-contact approach for the detection of optically absorbing perturbations buried up to a few centimeters beneath the surface of a tissue-like turbid medium. The measured depth sensitivity and spatial resolution of the new system are close to the values predicted by Monte Carlo simulations for the inhomogeneous medium and an ideal fast-gated detector, thus proving the feasibility of the non-contact approach for high density diffuse reflectance measurements on tissue. Potential applications of the system are also discussed. PMID:22274351

  7. A non-contact measurement technique to measure micro-surface stress and obtain deformation profiles of the order of 1nm in microcantilever-based structures by single image optical diffraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phani, Arindam

    2010-06-01

    A new method based on analysis of a single diffraction pattern is proposed to measure deflections in micro-cantilever (MC) based sensor probes, achieving typical deflection resolutions of 1nm and surface stress changes of 50μN/m. The proposed method employs a double MC structure where the deflection of one of the micro-cantilevers relative to the other due to surface stress changes results in a linear shift of intensity maxima of the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the transilluminated MC. Measurement of such shifts in the intensity maxima of a particular order along the length of the structure can be done to an accuracy of 0.01mm leading to the proposed sensitivity of deflection measurement in a typical microcantilever. This method can overcome the fundamental measurement sensitivity limit set by diffraction and pointing stability of laser beam in the widely used Optical Beam Deflection method (OBDM).

  8. A simple indentation device for measuring micrometer-scale tissue stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levental, I.; Levental, K. R.; Klein, E. A.; Assoian, R.; Miller, R. T.; Wells, R. G.; Janmey, P. A.

    2010-05-01

    Mechanical properties of cells and extracellular matrices are critical determinants of function in contexts including oncogenic transformation, neuronal synapse formation, hepatic fibrosis and stem cell differentiation. The size and heterogeneity of biological specimens and the importance of measuring their mechanical properties under conditions that resemble their environments in vivo present a challenge for quantitative measurement. Centimeter-scale tissue samples can be measured by commercial instruments, whereas properties at the subcellular (nm) scale are accessible by atomic force microscopy, optical trapping, or magnetic bead microrheometry; however many tissues are heterogeneous on a length scale between micrometers and millimeters which is not accessible to most current instrumentation. The device described here combines two commercially available technologies, a micronewton resolution force probe and a micromanipulator for probing soft biological samples at sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Several applications of the device are described. These include the first measurement of the stiffness of an intact, isolated mouse glomerulus, quantification of the inner wall stiffness of healthy and diseased mouse aortas, and evaluation of the lateral heterogeneity in the stiffness of mouse mammary glands and rat livers with correlation of this heterogeneity with malignant or fibrotic pathology as evaluated by histology.

  9. A non-contact mouse for surgeon-computer interaction.

    PubMed

    Grätzel, C; Fong, T; Grange, S; Baur, C

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a system that uses computer vision to replace standard computer mouse functions with hand gestures. The system is designed to enable non-contact human-computer interaction (HCI), so that surgeons will be able to make more effective use of computers during surgery. In this paper, we begin by discussing the need for non-contact computer interfaces in the operating room. We then describe the design of our non-contact mouse system, focusing on the techniques used for hand detection, tracking, and gesture recognition. Finally, we present preliminary results from testing and planned future work. PMID:15328453

  10. Ultrasound Elastography: The New Frontier in Direct Measurement of Muscle Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Joline E.; Eby, Sarah F.; Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Brault, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Shigao; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The use of brightness-mode ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation has increased dramatically. The continuing evolution of ultrasound technology has also produced ultrasound elastography, a cutting-edge technology that can directly measure the mechanical properties of tissue, including muscle stiffness. Its real-time and direct measurements of muscle stiffness can aid the diagnosis and rehabilitation of acute musculoskeletal injuries and chronic myofascial pain. It can also help monitor outcomes of interventions affecting muscle in neuromuscular and musculoskeletal diseases, and it can better inform the functional prognosis. This technology has implications for even broader use of ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation practice, but more knowledge about its uses and limitations is essential to its appropriate clinical implementation. In this review, we describe different ultrasound elastography techniques for studying muscle stiffness, including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and shear-wave elastography. We discuss the basic principles of these techniques, including the strengths and limitations of their measurement capabilities. We review the current muscle research, discuss physiatric clinical applications of these techniques, and note directions for future research. PMID:25064780

  11. Pulmonary Vascular Stiffness: Measurement, Modeling, and Implications in Normal and Hypertensive Pulmonary Circulations

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lammers, Steven R.; Shandas, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  12. Pulmonary vascular stiffness: measurement, modeling, and implications in normal and hypertensive pulmonary circulations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Kendall S; Lammers, Steven R; Shandas, Robin

    2011-07-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  13. Non-contact phosphor thermometry for process control

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.; Beshears, D.L.; Allison, S.W.

    1996-08-01

    Manufacturing and other industrial processes often require monitoring and control of temperature. Thermometry based on fluorescence properties of surface-bonded phosphors offers a number of advantages over traditional methods. The method is non-contact, remote, and independent of surface optical properties such as emissivity. Only a thin layer, less than 50 microns thick, is required of fluorescent materials that are temperature-active and chemically stable up to temperatures in excess of 1600 C. Phosphor thermometry has been developed from these high temperature extremes all the way down to cryogenic temperatures within liquid helium dewars. The fluorescence effects are stable in time, not subject to drift and repeated need for recalibration. Measurement techniques often involve use of optical fibers and other components that allow access into confined geometries and environments with high vibration, electromagnetic fields, or other extreme conditions. Uses include thermal management of cutting or shaping tools, monitoring of furnace and combustor walls or internal components, assembly components in automated lines, sheet metal surface thermometry, measurement of rotating components in motors, generators, turbine engines, and similar systems, fiber temperature measurement in textile fiber spinning, etc. Fluorescence measurement yields absolute temperatures, not dependent on references, and can have accuracies of less than 1 K, with precisions well below 0.1 K, providing opportunity for ultra high precision process control, life testing, and quality control.

  14. Sex-specific association of anthropometric measures of body composition with arterial stiffness in a healthy population

    PubMed Central

    Budimir, Danijela; Jeroncic, Ana; Gunjaca, Grgo; Rudan, Igor; Polasek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Anthropometric measures of body composition and arterial stiffness are commonly used as indicators of cardiovascular risk. Little is known, however, about the association of the anthropometric measures with arterial stiffness, especially in a healthy, generally non-obese population. Material/Methods In a sample of 352 healthy subjects (200 premenopausal women), 3 arterial stiffness indices were analyzed (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index and central systolic blood pressure) in relation to 5 anthropometric measures of body composition (body mass index – BMI, body fat percentage by skinfold measurements –%BF, waist circumference – WC, waist-hip ratio – WHpR, and waist-height ratio – WHtR). Data were analyzed using correlation and regression analyses, with adjustment for the following confounders: age, blood pressures, height, heart rate, blood lipids and smoking. Results Most correlations between anthropometric measures and arterial stiffness indices were significant and positive in both sex groups (r=0.14–0.40, P<0.05). After adjustment for confounding effects, BMI, WC and WHtR remained significant (but inverse) predictors of arterial stiffness (β from −0.06 to −0.16; P<0.05) in the females, while in the males BMI was the only measure inversely predicting arterial stiffness (β from −0.09 to −0.13; P<0.05). Conclusions Measures of body composition are weak and inverse predictors of arterial stiffness and their influence is sex-dependent. BMI, WC and WHtR were key predictors of arterial stiffness in the females, while BMI was the principal predictor in the males. The associations of anthropometric measures with arterial stiffness are strongly and differently confounded by various factors that have to be taken into account when explaining results of similar studies. PMID:22293879

  15. Simultaneous measurement of real contact area and fault normal stiffness during frictional sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, N. M.; Nagata, K.; Kilgore, B. D.; Nakatani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The tectonic stresses that lead to earthquake slip are concentrated in small regions of solid contact between asperities or gouge particles within the fault. Fault strength is proportional to the contact area within the shearing portion of the fault zone and many fault properties of interest to earthquake hazard research, e.g., occurrence time, recurrence interval, precursory slip, triggered earthquake slip, are controlled by processes acting at the highly stressed contact regions. Unfortunately the contact-scale physical processes controlling earthquake occurrence cannot be easily observed or measured directly. In this pilot study we simultaneously directly measure contact area using transmitted light intensity (LI) [Dieterich and Kilgore, 1994; 1996] and continuously monitor the normal stiffness of the fault using acoustic wave transmission (AT) [Nagata et al., 2008]. The objective of our study is to determine relations amongst contacting area, stiffness, strength, normal stress, shear displacement, and time of contact during sliding. Interface stiffness is monitored using acoustic compressive waves transmitted across the fault. Because the fault is more compliant in compression than the surrounding rock, the fault has an elastic wave transmission coefficient that depends on the fault normal stiffness. Contact area is measured by LI: regions in contact transmit light efficiently while light is scattered elsewhere; therefore transmitted light intensity is presumed proportional to contact area. LI and AT are expected to be correlated; e.g., an elastic contact model suggests that stiffness goes as the square root of contact area. We observe LI and AT for sliding at slip speeds between 0.01 and 10 microns/s and normal stresses between 1 and 2.5 MPa while conducting standard velocity-step, normal stress-step and slide-hold-slide tests. AT and LI correlate during all tests, at all conditions. If the physical relationship, or even an empirical calibration between AT and

  16. Inductive Non-Contact Position Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Garcia, Alyssa; Simmons, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Optical hardware has been developed to measure the depth of defects in the Space Shuttle Orbiter's windows. In this hardware, a mirror is translated such that its position corresponds to the defect's depth, so the depth measurement problem is transferred to a mirror-position measurement problem. This is preferable because the mirror is internal to the optical system and thus accessible. Based on requirements supplied by the window inspectors, the depth of the defects needs to be measured over a range of 200 microns with a resolution of about 100 nm and an accuracy of about 400 nm. These same requirements then apply to measuring the position of the mirror, and in addition, since this is a scanning system, a response time of about 10 ms is needed. A market search was conducted and no sensor that met these requirements that also fit into the available housing volume (less than one cubic inch) was found, so a novel sensor configuration was constructed to meet the requirements. This new sensor generates a nearly linearly varying magnetic field over a small region of space, which can easily be sampled, resulting in a voltage proportional to position. Experiments were done with a range of inductor values, drive voltages, drive frequencies, and inductor shapes. A rough mathematical model was developed for the device that, in most aspects, describes how it operates and what electrical parameters should be chosen for best performance. The final configuration met all the requirements, yielding a small rugged sensor that was easy to use and had nanometer resolution over more than the 200-micron range required. The inductive position sensor is a compact device (potentially as small as 2 cubic centimeters), which offers nanometer-position resolution over a demonstrated range of nearly 1 mm. One of its advantages is the simplicity of its electrical design. Also, the sensor resolution is nearly uniform across its operational range, which is in contrast to eddy current and

  17. Non-contact current and voltage sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Gary D; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C; Schappert, Michael A

    2014-03-25

    A detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient device to measure current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  18. Barriers to Predicting the Mechanisms and Risk Factors of Non-Contact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nicholas; Rouhi, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    High incidences of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, frequent requirements for ACL reconstruction, and limited understanding of ACL mechanics have engendered considerable interest in quantifying the ACL loading mechanisms. Although some progress has been made to better understand non-contact ACL injuries, information on how and why non-contact ACL injuries occur is still largely unavailable. In other words, research is yet to yield consensus on injury mechanisms and risk factors. Biomechanics, video analysis, and related study approaches have elucidated to some extent how ACL injuries occur. However, these approaches are limited because they provide estimates, rather than precise measurements of knee - and more specifically ACL - kinematics at the time of injury. These study approaches are also limited in their inability to simultaneously capture many of the contributing factors to injury. This paper aims at elucidating and summarizing the key challenges that confound our understanding in predicting the mechanisms and subsequently identifying risk factors of non-contact ACL injury. This work also appraise the methodological rigor of existing study approaches, review testing protocols employed in published studies, as well as presents a possible coupled approach to better understand injury mechanisms and risk factors of non-contact ACL injury. Three comprehensive electronic databases and hand search of journal papers, covering numerous full text published English articles were utilized to find studies on the association between ACL and injury mechanisms, ACL and risk factors, as well as, ACL and investigative approaches. This review unveils that new research modalities and/or coupled research methods are required to better understand how and why the ACL gets injured. Only by achieving a better understanding of ACL loading mechanisms and the associated contributing factors, one will be able to develop robust prevention strategies and exercise

  19. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules.

    PubMed

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature. PMID:26329215

  20. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature.

  1. Cardiovascular outcome associations among cardiovascular magnetic resonance measures of arterial stiffness: the Dallas heart study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated for the noninvasive assessment of total arterial compliance and aortic stiffness, but their associations with cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of CMR measures of total arterial compliance and two CMR measures of aortic stiffness with respect to future cardiovascular events. Methods The study consisted of 2122 Dallas Heart Study participants without cardiovascular disease who underwent CMR at 1.5 Tesla. Aortic stiffness was measured by CMR-derived ascending aortic distensibility and aortic arch pulse wave velocity. Total arterial compliance was calculated by dividing left ventricular stroke volume by pulse pressure. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, non-fatal cardiac events, and non-fatal extra-cardiac vascular events over 7.8 ± 1.5 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess for associations between CMR measures and cardiovascular events. Results Age, systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate were independently associated with changes in ascending aortic distensibility, arch pulse wave velocity, and total arterial compliance (all p < .0001). A total of 153 participants (6.9%) experienced a cardiovascular event. After adjusting for traditional risk factors, total arterial compliance was modestly associated with increased risk for composite events (HR 1.07 per 1SD, p = 0.03) while the association between ascending aortic distensibility and composite events trended towards significance (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0.08). Total arterial compliance and aortic distensibility were independently associated with nonfatal cardiac events (HR 1.11 per 1SD, p = 0.001 and HR 1.45 per 1SD, p = 0.0005, respectively), but not with cardiovascular death or nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events. Arch pulse wave velocity was independently associated with nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events (HR

  2. A Novel Multidirectional, Non-Contact Strain-Sensing Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Paul; Vemuru, Srivishnu; Bachilo, Sergei; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been successfully dispersed in a polymeric host resulting in the development of a novel strain-sensitive nanocomposite material with promise for scalability. Dubbed ``strain paint'' this new material when coated onto a surface becomes a smart-skin sensor that can detect strain through load transfer from the polymeric host to embedded SWCNTs. Strain is easily measured in a non-contact manner via laser excitation and detection of the unique near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectrum of semiconducting SWCNTs. When strained, each (n , m) SWCNT type exhibits a predictable shift in its NIR fluorescence peak. SWCNTs with high intensity are easily detected in the bulk fluorescence spectrum of raw, unsorted SWCNTs embedded in the polymer. Thin films of the polymer/SWCNT nanocomposite were spin-coated onto substrates, strains typically up to 1% were applied, and strain magnitudes were determined by resistive strain gauges bonded to the coating and substrate. Spectral shifts reveal a linear response to strain with little hysteresis. Two SWCNT types exhibiting opposite spectral shifts with strain were used to improve sensitivity. Strain along any direction is determined simply by adjusting the polarization of the excitation laser.

  3. Non-contact imaging of thermal properties of the skin.

    PubMed

    Togawa, T; Saito, H

    1994-08-01

    Non-contact measurement of thermal properties of the skin was performed by using a thermovision camera and a mechanical system that provides a step change in ambient radiation temperature. A hood maintained at 20 degrees C was initially placed so as to cover the object surface towards which a thermovision camera was directed. Then the hood was quickly replaced by another hood maintained at 40 degrees C. Thermograms before, immediately after and 20 s after switching the hoods were taken. Then the image of emissivity was computed from thermograms taken before and immediately after hood switching, and the emissivity-corrected thermograms were computed by using the emissivity value obtained at each pixel. The images of the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density and specific heat were computed from thermograms taken immediately after and 20 s after hood switching. While images of the emissivity obtained and the thermal parameter defined above contained significant noise, differences in these quantities between sites could be clearly demonstrated. PMID:7994207

  4. Non-contact determination of parasympathetic activation induced by a full stomach using microwave radar.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Shinji; Suzuki, Satoshi; Imuta, Hayato; Kagawa, Masayuki; Badarch, Zorig; Matsui, Takemi

    2009-09-01

    In order to evaluate parasympathetic activation which causes driving errors, without placing any burden on the monitored individuals, we conducted a non-contact parasympathetic activation monitoring through the back of a chair using a compact 24-GHz microwave-radar. We measured the high-frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz) power spectrum of heart rate variability (HRV) which reflects parasympathetic activation, induced by a full stomach. All participants had a large all-you-can-eat meal with beverages for lunch within 20 min. Before and after the large meals for durations of 10 min, the non-contact measurement was conducted for seven healthy male volunteers (mean age: 23 +/- 1-year-old). In both non-contact (microwave radar) and contact (ECG as a reference) measurement, HF shows similar variations before and after large meal. Large meal significantly (p < 0.05) increased non-contact-derived HF from 1,026 +/- 510 to 1,893 +/- 613 ms(2) (922 +/- 628 to 1,861 +/- 940 ms(2), p < 0.05). This technique allows parasympathetic activation monitoring for safety precautions. PMID:19579041

  5. Arterial pressure measurement: Is the envelope curve of the oscillometric method influenced by arterial stiffness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelido, G.; Angiletta, S.; Pujalte, A.; Quiroga, P.; Cornes, P.; Craiem, D.

    2007-11-01

    Measurement of peripheral arterial pressure using the oscillometric method is commonly used by professionals as well as by patients in their homes. This non invasive automatic method is fast, efficient and the required equipment is affordable with a low cost. The measurement method consists of obtaining parameters from a calibrated decreasing curve that is modulated by heart beats witch appear when arterial pressure reaches the cuff pressure. Diastolic, mean and systolic pressures are obtained calculating particular instants from the heart beats envelope curve. In this article we analyze the envelope of this amplified curve to find out if its morphology is related to arterial stiffness in patients. We found, in 33 volunteers, that the envelope waveform width correlates to systolic pressure (r=0.4, p<0.05), to pulse pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05) and to pulse pressure normalized to systolic pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05). We believe that the morphology of the heart beats envelope curve obtained with the oscillometric method for peripheral pressure measurement depends on arterial stiffness and can be used to enhance pressure measurements.

  6. Simultaneous mechanical stiffness and electrical potential measurements of living vascular endothelial cells using combined atomic force and epifluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callies, Chiara; Schön, Peter; Liashkovich, Ivan; Stock, Christian; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Fels, Johannes; Sträter, Alexandra S.; Oberleithner, Hans

    2009-04-01

    The degree of mechanical stiffness of vascular endothelial cells determines the endogenous production of the vasodilating gas nitric oxide (NO). However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. Experiments on vascular endothelial cells suggest that the electrical plasma membrane potential is involved in this regulatory process. To test this hypothesis we developed a technique that simultaneously measures the electrical membrane potential and stiffness of vascular endothelial cells (GM7373 cell line derived from bovine aortic endothelium) under continuous perfusion with physiological electrolyte solution. The cellular stiffness was determined by nano-indentation using an atomic force microscope (AFM) while the electrical membrane potential was measured with bis-oxonol, a voltage-reporting fluorescent dye. These two methods were combined using an AFM attached to an epifluorescence microscope. The electrical membrane potential and mechanical stiffness of the same cell were continuously recorded for a time span of 5 min. Fast fluctuations (in the range of seconds) of both the electrical membrane potential and mechanical stiffness could be observed that were not related to each other. In contrast, slow cell depolarizations (in the range of minutes) were paralleled by significant increases in mechanical stiffness. In conclusion, using the combined AFM-fluorescence technique we monitored for the first time simultaneously the electrical plasma membrane potential and mechanical stiffness in a living cell. Vascular endothelial cells exhibit oscillatory non-synchronized waves of electrical potential and mechanical stiffness. The sustained membrane depolarization, however, is paralleled by a concomitant increase of cell stiffness. The described method is applicable for any fluorophore, which opens new perspectives in biomedical research.

  7. Development of Novel Non-Contact Electrodes for Mobile Electrocardiogram Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Willy; Wang, Hsing-Yu; Huang, Yan-Jun; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of cardiac health is helpful for patients with cardiovascular disease. Many telemedicine systems based on ubiquitous computing and communication techniques have been proposed for monitoring the user's electrocardiogram (ECG) anywhere and anytime. Usually, wet electrodes are used in these telemedicine systems. However, wet electrodes require conduction gels and skin preparation that can be inconvenient and uncomfortable for users. In order to overcome this issue, a new non-contact electrode circuit was proposed and applied in developing a mobile electrocardiogram monitoring system. The proposed non-contact electrode can measure bio-potentials across thin clothing, allowing it to be embedded in a user's normal clothing to monitor ECG in daily life. We attempted to simplify the design of these non-contact electrodes to reduce power consumption while continuing to provide good signal quality. The electrical specifications and the performance of monitoring arrhythmia in clinical settings were also validated to investigate the reliability of the proposed design. Experimental results show that the proposed non-contact electrode provides good signal quality for measuring ECG across thin clothes. PMID:27170853

  8. Measuring multi-joint stiffness during single movements: numerical validation of a novel time-frequency approach.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2012-01-01

    This study presents and validates a Time-Frequency technique for measuring 2-dimensional multijoint arm stiffness throughout a single planar movement as well as during static posture. It is proposed as an alternative to current regressive methods which require numerous repetitions to obtain average stiffness on a small segment of the hand trajectory. The method is based on the analysis of the reassigned spectrogram of the arm's response to impulsive perturbations and can estimate arm stiffness on a trial-by-trial basis. Analytic and empirical methods are first derived and tested through modal analysis on synthetic data. The technique's accuracy and robustness are assessed by modeling the estimation of stiffness time profiles changing at different rates and affected by different noise levels. Our method obtains results comparable with two well-known regressive techniques. We also test how the technique can identify the viscoelastic component of non-linear and higher than second order systems with a non-parametrical approach. The technique proposed here is very impervious to noise and can be used easily for both postural and movement tasks. Estimations of stiffness profiles are possible with only one perturbation, making our method a useful tool for estimating limb stiffness during motor learning and adaptation tasks, and for understanding the modulation of stiffness in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22448233

  9. Measuring Multi-Joint Stiffness during Single Movements: Numerical Validation of a Novel Time-Frequency Approach

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents and validates a Time-Frequency technique for measuring 2-dimensional multijoint arm stiffness throughout a single planar movement as well as during static posture. It is proposed as an alternative to current regressive methods which require numerous repetitions to obtain average stiffness on a small segment of the hand trajectory. The method is based on the analysis of the reassigned spectrogram of the arm's response to impulsive perturbations and can estimate arm stiffness on a trial-by-trial basis. Analytic and empirical methods are first derived and tested through modal analysis on synthetic data. The technique's accuracy and robustness are assessed by modeling the estimation of stiffness time profiles changing at different rates and affected by different noise levels. Our method obtains results comparable with two well-known regressive techniques. We also test how the technique can identify the viscoelastic component of non-linear and higher than second order systems with a non-parametrical approach. The technique proposed here is very impervious to noise and can be used easily for both postural and movement tasks. Estimations of stiffness profiles are possible with only one perturbation, making our method a useful tool for estimating limb stiffness during motor learning and adaptation tasks, and for understanding the modulation of stiffness in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22448233

  10. Simultaneous non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM imaging and force spectroscopy of Si(1 0 0)(2×1) with small oscillation amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özer, H. Özgür; Atabak, Mehrdad; Ellialtıoğlu, Recai M.; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-03-01

    Si(1 0 0)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM with sub-Ångström oscillation amplitudes using stiff tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and STM images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance ( f- d) curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM.