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Sample records for non-conventional olfactory receptor

  1. Expression and evolutionary divergence of the non-conventional olfactory receptor in four species of fig wasp associated with one species of fig

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Wang, Nina; Xiao, Jinhua; Xu, Yongyu; Murphy, Robert W; Huang, Dawei

    2009-01-01

    Background The interactions of fig wasps and their host figs provide a model for investigating co-evolution. Fig wasps have specialized morphological characters and lifestyles thought to be adaptations to living in the fig's syconium. Although these aspects of natural history are well documented, the genetic mechanism(s) underlying these changes remain(s) unknown. Fig wasp olfaction is the key to host-specificity. The Or83b gene class, an unusual member of olfactory receptor family, plays a critical role in enabling the function of conventional olfactory receptors. Four Or83b orthologous genes from one pollinator (PFW) (Ceratosolen solmsi) and three non-pollinator fig wasps (NPFWs) (Apocrypta bakeri, Philotrypesis pilosa and Philotrypesis sp.) associated with one species of fig (Ficus hispida) can be used to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the fig wasp's adaptation to its host. We made a comparison of spatial tissue-specific expression patterns and substitution rates of one orthologous gene in these fig wasps and sought evidence for selection pressures. Results A newly identified Or83b orthologous gene was named Or2. Expressions of Or2 were restricted to the heads of all wingless male fig wasps, which usually live in the dark cavity of a fig throughout their life cycle. However, expressions were widely detected in the antennae, legs and abdomens of all female fig wasps that fly from one fig to another for oviposition, and secondarily pollination. Weak expression was also observed in the thorax of PFWs. Compared with NPFWs, the Or2 gene in C. solmsi had an elevated rate of substitutions and lower codon usage. Analyses using Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F* tests indicated a non-neutral pattern of nucleotide variation in all fig wasps. Unlike in NPFWs, this non-neutral pattern was also observed for synonymous sites of Or2 within PFWs. Conclusion The sex- and species-specific expression patterns of Or2 genes detected beyond the known primary

  2. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  3. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Corey, Elizabeth A; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  4. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  5. The olfactory receptor family album

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito; Singer, Michael S; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the human genome draft sequences has revealed a more complete portrait of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in humans than was available previously. The new information provides a basis for deeper analysis of the functions of the receptors, and promises new insights into the evolutionary history of the family. PMID:11597337

  6. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  7. Evolution of insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Christine; Dweck, Hany KM; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory sense detects a plethora of behaviorally relevant odor molecules; gene families involved in olfaction exhibit high diversity in different animal phyla. Insects detect volatile molecules using olfactory (OR) or ionotropic receptors (IR) and in some cases gustatory receptors (GRs). While IRs are expressed in olfactory organs across Protostomia, ORs have been hypothesized to be an adaptation to a terrestrial insect lifestyle. We investigated the olfactory system of the primary wingless bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata (Archaeognatha), the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma) and the neopteran leaf insect Phyllium siccifolium (Phasmatodea). ORs and the olfactory coreceptor (Orco) are with very high probability lacking in Lepismachilis; in Thermobia we have identified three Orco candidates, and in Phyllium a fully developed OR/Orco-based system. We suggest that ORs did not arise as an adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle, but evolved later in insect evolution, with Orco being present before the appearance of ORs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.001 PMID:24670956

  8. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  9. Human olfactory receptor responses to odorants

    PubMed Central

    Mainland, Joel D; Li, Yun R; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Wen Ling L; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the human olfactory system is capable of discriminating a vast number of odors, we do not currently understand what chemical features are encoded by olfactory receptors. In large part this is due to a paucity of data in a search space covering the interactions of hundreds of receptors with billions of odorous molecules. Of the approximately 400 intact human odorant receptors, only 10% have a published ligand. Here we used a heterologous luciferase assay to screen 73 odorants against a clone library of 511 human olfactory receptors. This dataset will allow other researchers to interrogate the combinatorial nature of olfactory coding. PMID:25977809

  10. Olfactory Receptor Neuron Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  11. Olfactory receptor neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  12. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Verbeurgt, Christophe; Wilkin, Françoise; Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  13. Profiling of Olfactory Receptor Gene Expression in Whole Human Olfactory Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E.; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  14. Olfactory receptor patterning in a higher primate.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Lisa F; Saraiva, Luis R; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Buck, Linda B

    2014-09-10

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  15. Olfactory Receptor Patterning in a Higher Primate

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa F.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  16. Nested expression domains for odorant receptors in zebrafish olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weth, F; Nadler, W; Korsching, S

    1996-11-12

    The mapping of high-dimensional olfactory stimuli onto the two-dimensional surface of the nasal sensory epithelium constitutes the first step in the neuronal encoding of olfactory input. We have used zebrafish as a model system to analyze the spatial distribution of odorant receptor molecules in the olfactory epithelium by quantitative in situ hybridization. To this end, we have cloned 10 very divergent zebrafish odorant receptor molecules by PCR. Individual genes are expressed in sparse olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of the position of labeled cells in a simplified coordinate system revealed three concentric, albeit overlapping, expression domains for the four odorant receptors analyzed in detail. Such regionalized expression should result in a corresponding segregation of functional response properties. This might represent the first step of spatial encoding of olfactory input or be essential for the development of the olfactory system. PMID:8917589

  17. Biophysical mechanisms underlying olfactory receptor neuron dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Katherine I.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2010-01-01

    Odor responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) exhibit complex dynamics. Using genetics and pharmacology, we show that these dynamics in Drosophila ORNs can be separated into sequential steps, corresponding to transduction and spike generation. Each of these steps contributes distinct dynamics. Transduction dynamics can be largely explained by a simple kinetic model of ligand-receptor interactions, together with an adaptive feedback mechanism that slows transduction onset. Spiking dynamics are well-described by a differentiating linear filter that is stereotyped across odors and cells. Genetic knock-down of sodium channels reshapes this filter, implying that it arises from the regulated balance of intrinsic conductances in ORNs. Complex responses can be understood as a consequence of how the stereotyped spike filter interacts with odor- and receptor-specific transduction dynamics. However, in the presence of rapidly fluctuating natural stimuli, spiking simply increases the speed and sensitivity of encoding. PMID:21217763

  18. Odor memories regulate olfactory receptor expression in the sensory periphery.

    PubMed

    Claudianos, Charles; Lim, Julianne; Young, Melanie; Yan, Shanzhi; Cristino, Alexandre S; Newcomb, Richard D; Gunasekaran, Nivetha; Reinhard, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Odor learning induces structural and functional modifications throughout the olfactory system, but it is currently unknown whether this plasticity extends to the olfactory receptors (Or) in the sensory periphery. Here, we demonstrate that odor learning induces plasticity in olfactory receptor expression in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Using quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we show that six putative floral scent receptors were differentially expressed in the bee antennae depending on the scent environment that the bees experienced. Or151, which we characterized using an in vitro cell expression system as a broadly tuned receptor binding floral odorants such as linalool, and Or11, the specific receptor for the queen pheromone 9-oxo-decenoic acid, were significantly down-regulated after honeybees were conditioned with the respective odorants in an olfactory learning paradigm. Electroantennogram recordings showed that the neural response of the antenna was similarly reduced after odor learning. Long-term odor memory was essential for inducing these changes, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms involved in olfactory memory also regulate olfactory receptor expression. Our study demonstrates for the first time that olfactory receptor expression is experience-dependent and modulated by scent conditioning, providing novel insight into how molecular regulation at the periphery contributes to plasticity in the olfactory system. PMID:24628891

  19. Unitary response of mouse olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, Yair; Cheng, Melody M.; Yau, King-Wai

    2011-01-01

    The sense of smell begins with odorant molecules binding to membrane receptors on the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), thereby activating a G protein, Golf, and the downstream effector enzyme, an adenylyl cyclase (ACIII). Recently, we have found in amphibian ORNs that an odorant-binding event has a low probability of activating sensory transduction at all; even when successful, the resulting unitary response apparently involves a single active Gαolf–ACIII molecular complex. This low amplification is in contrast to rod phototransduction in vision, the best-quantified G-protein signaling pathway, where each photoisomerized rhodopsin molecule is well known to produce substantial amplification by activating many G-protein, and hence effector-enzyme, molecules. We have now carried out similar experiments on mouse ORNs, which offer, additionally, the advantage of genetics. Indeed, we found the same low probability of transduction, based on the unitary olfactory response having a fairly constant amplitude and similar kinetics across different odorants and randomly encountered ORNs. Also, consistent with our picture, the unitary response of Gαolf+/− ORNs was similar to WT in amplitude, although their Gαolf-protein expression was only half of normal. Finally, from the action potential firing, we estimated that ≤19 odorant-binding events successfully triggering transduction in a WT mouse ORN will lead to signaling to the brain. PMID:21187398

  20. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein–coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. PMID:20974772

  1. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  2. Recordings from cultured newt olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kyohei; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Kurahashi, Takashi; Takeuchi, Hiroko

    2012-05-01

    Freshly dissociated olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) are commonly used in electrophysiological research investigations of the physicochemical mechanisms of olfactory signal transduction. Because the morphology of cultured cells clearly becomes worse over time, the ORCs are examined traditionally within several days after dissociation. However, there has been a major concern that cells are affected soon after dissociation. To gain a better understanding of the reliability of data obtained from solitary cells, we obtained electrical data during the lifetime of single ORCs dissociated from the newt. The time course for the deterioration could be revealed by monitoring the membrane properties during culture. Although the number of living cells that were identified by trypan blue extrusion declined day by day, the remaining cells retained morphology and their fundamental electrical features until day 19. In some cells, the cilia and dendrite were observed until day 21, and the bipolar morphology until day 31. The fundamental features of cell excitation were maintained during culture without showing remarkable changes when they retained morphological features. The results suggest that electrical properties of cells are almost unchanged within several days. Furthermore, the dissociated newt ORCs can be used for several weeks that are almost comparable to the intrinsic lifetime of the ORCs in vivo. PMID:22559969

  3. Intracellular trafficking of a tagged and functional mammalian olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Ivic, Lidija; Zhang, Cen; Zhang, Xinmin; Yoon, Sung Ok; Firestein, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Tagged G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been used to facilitate intracellular visualization of these receptors. We have used a combination of adenoviral vector gene transfer and tagged olfactory receptors to help visualize mammalian olfactory receptor proteins in the normal olfactory epithelium of rats, and in cell culture. Three recombinant adenoviral vectors were generated carrying variously tagged versions of rat olfactory receptor I7. The constructs include an N-terminal Flag epitope tag (Flag:I7), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein (EGFP:I7), and a C-terminal EGFP fusion (I7:EGFP). These receptor constructs were assayed in rat olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and in a heterologous system (HEK 293 cell line) for protein localization and functional expression. Functional expression of the tagged receptor proteins was tested by electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings in the infected rat olfactory epithelium, and by calcium imaging in single cells. Our results demonstrate that the I7:EGFP fusion protein and Flag:I7 are functionally expressed in OSNs while the EGFP:I7 fusion is not, probably due to inappropriate processing of the protein in the cells. These data suggest that a small epitope tag (Flag) at the N-terminus, or EGFP located at the C-terminus of the receptor, does not affect ligand binding or downstream signaling. In addition, both functional fusion proteins (Flag:I7 and I7:EGFP) are properly targeted to the plasma membrane of HEK 293 cells. PMID:11748633

  4. Spike encoding of olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, Kenji; Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2003-08-01

    Olfaction begins with the transduction of the information carried by odorants into electrical signals in olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). The binding of odor molecules to specific receptor proteins on the ciliary surface of ORCs induces the receptor potentials. This initial excitation causes a slow and graded depolarizing voltage change, which is encoded into a train of action potentials. Action potentials of ORCs are generated by voltage-gated Na+ currents and T-type Ca2+ currents in the somatic membrane. Isolated ORCs, which have lost their cilia during the dissociation procedure, are known to exhibit spike frequency accommodation by injecting the steady current. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs may serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, although odor adaptation is mainly accomplished by the ciliary transduction machinery. This review discusses current knowledge concerning the mechanisms of spike generation in ORCs. It also reviews how neurotransmitters and hormones modulate ionic currents and action potentials in ORCs. PMID:12871762

  5. Predicting olfactory receptor neuron responses from odorant structure

    PubMed Central

    Schmuker, Michael; de Bruyne, Marien; Hähnel, Melanie; Schneider, Gisbert

    2007-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors work at the interface between the chemical world of volatile molecules and the perception of scent in the brain. Their main purpose is to translate chemical space into information that can be processed by neural circuits. Assuming that these receptors have evolved to cope with this task, the analysis of their coding strategy promises to yield valuable insight in how to encode chemical information in an efficient way. Results We mimicked olfactory coding by modeling responses of primary olfactory neurons to small molecules using a large set of physicochemical molecular descriptors and artificial neural networks. We then tested these models by recording in vivo receptor neuron responses to a new set of odorants and successfully predicted the responses of five out of seven receptor neurons. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.66 to 0.85, demonstrating the applicability of our approach for the analysis of olfactory receptor activation data. The molecular descriptors that are best-suited for response prediction vary for different receptor neurons, implying that each receptor neuron detects a different aspect of chemical space. Finally, we demonstrate that receptor responses themselves can be used as descriptors in a predictive model of neuron activation. Conclusion The chemical meaning of molecular descriptors helps understand structure-response relationships for olfactory receptors and their "receptive fields". Moreover, it is possible to predict receptor neuron activation from chemical structure using machine-learning techniques, although this is still complicated by a lack of training data. PMID:17880742

  6. The Odorant Receptor-Dependent Role of Olfactory Marker Protein in Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Reisert, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the nasal cavity detect and transduce odorants into action potentials to be conveyed to the olfactory bulb. Odorants are delivered to ORNs via the inhaled air at breathing frequencies that can vary from 2 to 10 Hz in the mouse. Thus olfactory transduction should occur at sufficient speed such that it can accommodate repetitive and frequent stimulation. Activation of odorant receptors (ORs) leads to adenylyl cyclase III activation, cAMP increase, and opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. This makes the kinetic regulation of cAMP one of the important determinants for the response time course. We addressed the dynamic regulation of cAMP during the odorant response and examined how basal levels of cAMP are controlled. The latter is particularly relevant as basal cAMP depends on the basal activity of the expressed OR and thus varies across ORNs. We found that olfactory marker protein (OMP), a protein expressed in mature ORNs, controls both basal and odorant-induced cAMP levels in an OR-dependent manner. Lack of OMP increases basal cAMP, thus abolishing differences in basal cAMP levels between ORNs expressing different ORs. Moreover, OMP speeds up signal transduction for ORNs to better synchronize their output with high-frequency stimulation and to perceive brief stimuli. Last, OMP also steepens the dose-response relation to improve concentration coding although at the cost of losing responses to weak stimuli. We conclude that OMP plays a key regulatory role in ORN physiology by controlling multiple facets of the odorant response. PMID:26961953

  7. Stimulation of olfactory receptors alters regulation of [Cai] in olfactory neurons of the catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Restrepo, D; Boyle, A G

    1991-03-01

    Intracellular calcium was measured in single olfactory neurons from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2. In 5% of the cells, olfactory stimuli (amino acids) elicited an influx of calcium through the plasma membrane which led to a rapid transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Amino acids did not induce release of calcium from internal stores in these cells. Some cells responded specifically to one stimulus (L-alanine, L-arginine, L-norleucine and L-glutamate) while one cell responded to all stimuli. An increase in intracellular calcium could also be elicited in 50% of the cells by direct G-protein stimulation using aluminum fluoride. Because the fraction of cells which respond to direct G-protein stimulation is substantially larger than the fraction of cells responding to amino acids, we tested for possible damage of receptor proteins due to exposure of the olfactory neurons to papain during cell isolation. We find that pretreatment with papain does not alter specific binding of L-alanine and L-arginine to olfactory receptor sites in isolated olfactory cilia. The results are discussed in terms of their relevance to olfactory transduction. PMID:2051471

  8. Olfactory sensations produced by high-energy photon irradiation of the olfactory receptor mucosa in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Thomas, R.J.; Loverock, L.T.; Spittle, M.F. )

    1991-04-01

    During irradiation of volumes that incorporate the olfactory system, a proportion of patients have complained of a pungent smell. A retrospective study was carried out to determine the prevalence of this side-effect. A questionnaire was sent to 40 patients whose treatment volumes included the olfactory region and also to a control group treated away from this region. The irradiated tumor volumes included the frontal lobe, whole brain, nasopharynx, pituitary fossa, and maxillary antrum. Of the 25 patients who replied, 60% experienced odorous symptoms during irradiation. They described the odor as unpleasant and consistent with ozone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors is considered to be caused by the radiochemical formation of ozone and free radicals in the mucus overlying the olfactory mucosa.

  9. Olfactory deprivation increases dopamine D2 receptor density in the rat olfactory bulb

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, K.M.; Pullara, J.M.; Marshall, J.F.; Leon, M. )

    1991-05-01

    Unilateral olfactory deprivation during postnatal development results in significant anatomical and neurochemical changes in the deprived olfactory bulb. Perhaps the most dramatic neurochemical change is the loss of dopaminergic expression by neurons of the glomerular region. The authors describe here the effects of early olfactory deprivation on other elements of the bulb dopaminergic system, namely the dopamine receptors of the olfactory bulb. Rat pups had a single naris occluded on postnatal day 2 (PN2). On PN20 or PN60, animals were sacrificed and the bulbs were examined for catecholamine levels or D2 and D1 dopamine receptor binding. Receptor densities were quantified by in vitro autoradiography using the tritiated antagonists spiperone (D2) and SCH23390 (D1). Dopamine uptake sites were similarly examined using tritiated mazindol. No significant specific labeling of D1 or mazindol sites was observed in the olfactory bulbs of control or experimental animals at either age. Normal animals displayed prominent labeling of D2 sites in the glomerular and nerve layers. After 60 days of deprivation, deprived bulbs exhibited an average increase in D2 receptor density of 32%. As determined by Scatchard analysis, the mean values for Kd and Bmax were 0.134 nM and 293 fmol/mg protein in normal bulbs, and 0.136 nM and 403 fmol/mg protein in deprived bulbs. The results suggest that, as in the neostriatum, dopamine depletion in the olfactory bulb leads to an upregulation of D2 receptor sites. This change may represent an attempt by the system to adapt neurochemically to reduced dopaminergic activity and thereby maintain bulb function.

  10. Deep sequencing of the murine olfactory receptor neuron transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H; Neuhaus, Eva M; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  11. Deep Sequencing of the Murine Olfactory Receptor Neuron Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F.; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  12. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  13. Suppression of Odorant Responses by Odorants in Olfactory Receptor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, Takashi; Lowe, Graeme; Gold, Geoffrey H.

    1994-07-01

    Odorants activate an inward current in vertebrate olfactory receptor cells. Here it is shown, in receptor cells from the newt, that odorants can also suppress this current, by a mechanism that is distinct from inhibition and adaptation. Suppression provides a simple explanation for two seemingly unrelated phenomena: the anomalously long latency of olfactory transduction and the existence of an "off response" at the end of a prolonged stimulus. Suppression may influence the perception of odorants by masking odorant responses and by sharpening the odorant specificities of single cells.

  14. Studying Haloanisoles Interaction with Olfactory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Silva Teixeira, Carla S; Silva Ferreira, António C; Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A

    2016-07-20

    In this paper, computational means were used to explain and predict the interaction of several odorant molecules, including three haloanisoles, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), with three olfactory receptors (ORs): OR1A1, OR1A2, and OR3A1. As the X-ray structure of these ORs is not known, the three-dimensional structure of each OR was modeled by homology modeling. The structures of these ORs were stabilized by molecular dynamic simulations and the complexes of the odorant molecules with each ORs were generated by molecular docking. The theoretical results have shown that each OR has distinct but well-defined binding regions for each type of odorant molecules (aldehydes and alcohols). In OR3A1, the aldehydes bind in the bottom region of the binding pocket nearby Ser257 and Thr249. In the paralogues OR1A1 and OR1A2, the aldehydes tend to interact in the top region of the binding pocket and close to a positively charged lysine. On the other hand, the alcohols interact in the bottom region of the active site and close to a negatively charged aspartate. These results indicate that when aldehydes and alcohols odorants compete in these two ORs, the aldehydes can block the access of the alcohols odorants to their specific binding site. This observation goes in line with the experimental data that reveals that when the odorant is an aldehyde, a lower quantity of ligand is needed to cause 50% of the maximum response (lower EC50), when compared with the alcohols. The theoretical results have also allowed to explain the differences in the activity of (S)-(-)-citronellol in the wild-type and mutated OR1A1. The theoretical results show that Asn109 has a preponderant role in this matter, since when it is mutated, it leads to a conformational rearrangement of the binding pocket that prevents the interaction of (S)-(-)-citronellol with Asp111 that was shown to be important for the OR activation. The good agreement between

  15. Disruption of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Patterning in Scutoid mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tom, W.; de Bruyne, M.; Haehnel, M.; Carlson, J. R.; Ray, A.

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory neurons show an extreme diversity of cell types with each cell usually expressing one member from a large family of 60 Odorant receptor (Or)genes in Drosophila. Little is known about the developmental processes and transcription factors that generate this stereotyped pattern of cellular diversity. Here we investigate the molecular and cellular basis of defects in olfactory system function in an unusual dominant mutant, Scutoid. We show that the defects map to olfactory neurons innervating a specific morphological class of sensilla on the antenna, large basiconics. Molecular analysis indicates defects in neurons expressing specific classes of receptor genes that map to large basiconic sensilla. Previous studies have shown that in Scutoid mutants the coding region of the transcriptional repressor snail is translocated near the no-ocelli promoter, leading to misexpression of snail in the developing eye-antenna disc. We show that ectopic expression of snail in developing olfactory neurons leads to severe defects in neurons of the antennal large basiconics supporting the model that the dominant olfactory phenotype in Scutoid is caused by misexpression of snail. PMID:20875862

  16. Olfactory receptor response to CO2 in bullfrogs.

    PubMed

    Coates, E L; Ballam, G O

    1990-05-01

    In vivo electrophysiological recordings of olfactory receptor cells of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) exhibit a receptor response to CO2 concentrations as low as 0.5%. The amplitude of the electroolfactogram (EOG) increased with an increase in the CO2 concentration delivered to the olfactory epithelium. Likewise, there was a significant increase in the decay time (time from 90 to 10% peak EOG amplitude) with an increase in CO2. The EOG rise time (time from 10 to 90% peak EOG amplitude) and the EOG response latency (time from beginning of CO2 pulse to beginning of EOG response) significantly decreased, whereas the plateau time (time from 90% rising phase to 90% falling phase of the peak EOG amplitude) was not significantly altered by an increase in CO2. These results indicate that low concentrations of CO2, below normal end expiratory CO2 concentrations, stimulate olfactory receptor cells. These results support our proposal that the ventilatory depression observed in response to upper airway CO2 in reptiles and amphibians is mediated by CO2-sensitive olfactory receptor cells. PMID:2110785

  17. Central loop of non-conventional toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia is important for interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Kasheverov, Igor E; Chugunov, Anton O; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S; Myshkin, Mikhail Yu; Utkin, Yuri N; Efremov, Roman G; Tsetlin, Victor I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Dolgikh, Dmitry A

    2016-09-01

    'Three-finger' toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia interacts with nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and mAChRs). Mutagenesis and competition experiments with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin revealed that Arg31 and Arg32 residues from the WTX loop II are important for binding to Torpedo californica and human α7 nAChRs. Computer modeling suggested that loop II occupies the orthosteric binding site at α7 nAChR. The similar toxin interface was previously described as a major determinant of allosteric interactions with mAChRs. PMID:27343701

  18. Chromatin Modulatory Proteins and Olfactory Receptor Signaling in the Refinement and Maintenance of Fruitless Expression in Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingyun; Okuwa, Sumie; Peng, Bo; Wu, Jianni; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    During development, sensory neurons must choose identities that allow them to detect specific signals and connect with appropriate target neurons. Ultimately, these sensory neurons will successfully integrate into appropriate neural circuits to generate defined motor outputs, or behavior. This integration requires a developmental coordination between the identity of the neuron and the identity of the circuit. The mechanisms that underlie this coordination are currently unknown. Here, we describe two modes of regulation that coordinate the sensory identities of Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) involved in sex-specific behaviors with the sex-specific behavioral circuit identity marker fruitless (fru). The first mode involves a developmental program that coordinately restricts to appropriate ORNs the expression of fru and two olfactory receptors (Or47b and Ir84a) involved in sex-specific behaviors. This regulation requires the chromatin modulatory protein Alhambra (Alh). The second mode relies on the signaling from the olfactory receptors through CamK and histone acetyl transferase p300/CBP to maintain ORN-specific fru expression. Our results highlight two feed-forward regulatory mechanisms with both developmentally hardwired and olfactory receptor activity-dependent components that establish and maintain fru expression in ORNs. Such a dual mechanism of fru regulation in ORNs might be a trait of neurons driving plastic aspects of sex-specific behaviors. PMID:27093619

  19. Cross-adaptation to odor stimulation of olfactory receptor cells in the box turtle, Terrapene carolina.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K

    1993-01-01

    Electrical recording from small twigs of olfactory nerve and electro-olfactogram (EOG) from olfactory epithelium in a turtle shows that olfactory receptors in the nose are responsive to various odors. I have used the effects of cross-adaptation to odor stimulation on the olfactory receptors to investigate the stimulus-specific components of these responses and to provide information about the responsiveness of cells. The results of the cross-adaptation experiments strongly support the hypothesis that different categories of receptor cells exist in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:8386588

  20. Biomimetic Chemical Sensors Using Nanoelectronic Readout of Olfactory Receptor Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Brett R.; Mitala, Joseph J.; Josue, Jesusa; Castro, Ana; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Bayburt, Timothy H.; Khamis, Samuel M.; Jones, Ryan A.; Brand, Joseph G.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Luetje, Charles W.; Gelperin, Alan; Rhodes, Paul A.; Discher, Bohdana M.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a practical nanoelectronic interface to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a large family of membrane proteins whose roles in the detection of molecules outside eukaryotic cells make them important pharmaceutical targets. Specifically, we have coupled olfactory receptor proteins (ORs) with carbon nanotube transistors. The resulting devices transduce signals associated with odorant binding to ORs in the gas phase under ambient conditions and show responses that are in excellent agreement with results from established assays for OR–ligand binding. The work represents significant progress on a path toward a bioelectronic nose that can be directly compared to biological olfactory systems as well as a general method for the study of GPCR function in multiple domains using electronic readout. PMID:21696137

  1. Olfactory Receptor Subgenomes Linked with Broad Ecological Adaptations in Sauropsida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Yang, Zhikai; Maldonado, Emanuel; Li, Cai; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jarvis, Erich D; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-11-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) govern a prime sensory function. Extant birds have distinct olfactory abilities, but the molecular mechanisms underlining diversification and specialization remain mostly unknown. We explored OR diversity in 48 phylogenetic and ecologically diverse birds and 2 reptiles (alligator and green sea turtle). OR subgenomes showed species- and lineage-specific variation related with ecological requirements. Overall 1,953 OR genes were identified in reptiles and 16,503 in birds. The two reptiles had larger OR gene repertoires (989 and 964 genes, respectively) than birds (182-688 genes). Overall, birds had more pseudogenes (7,855) than intact genes (1,944). The alligator had significantly more functional genes than sea turtle, likely because of distinct foraging habits. We found rapid species-specific expansion and positive selection in OR14 (detects hydrophobic compounds) in birds and in OR51 and OR52 (detect hydrophilic compounds) in sea turtle, suggestive of terrestrial and aquatic adaptations, respectively. Ecological partitioning among birds of prey, water birds, land birds, and vocal learners showed that diverse ecological factors determined olfactory ability and influenced corresponding olfactory-receptor subgenome. OR5/8/9 was expanded in predatory birds and alligator, suggesting adaptive specialization for carnivory. OR families 2/13, 51, and 52 were correlated with aquatic adaptations (water birds), OR families 6 and 10 were more pronounced in vocal-learning birds, whereas most specialized land birds had an expanded OR family 14. Olfactory bulb ratio (OBR) and OR gene repertoire were correlated. Birds that forage for prey (carnivores/piscivores) had relatively complex OBR and OR gene repertoires compared with modern birds, including passerines, perhaps due to highly developed cognitive capacities facilitating foraging innovations. PMID:26219582

  2. Morphometry of olfactory lamellae and olfactory receptor neurons during the life history of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

    PubMed

    Kudo, Hideaki; Shinto, Masakazu; Sakurai, Yasunori; Kaeriyama, Masahide

    2009-09-01

    It is generally accepted that anadromous Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) imprint to odorants in their natal streams during their seaward migration and use olfaction to identify these during their homeward migration. Despite the importance of the olfactory organ during olfactory imprinting, the development of this structure is not well understood in Pacific salmon. Olfactory cues from the environment are relayed to the brain by the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the olfactory organ. Thus, we analyzed morphometric changes in olfactory lamellae of the peripheral olfactory organ and in the quantity of ORNs during life history from alevin to mature in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). The number of lamellae increased markedly during early development, reached 18 lamellae per unilateral peripheral olfactory organ in young salmon with a 200 mm in body size, and maintained this lamellar complement after young period. The number of ORNs per olfactory organ was about 180,000 and 14.2 million cells in fry and mature salmon, respectively. The relationship between the body size (fork length) and number of ORNs therefore revealed an allometric association. Our results represent the first quantitative analysis of the number of ORNs in Pacific salmon and suggest that the number of ORNs is synchronized with the fork length throughout its life history. PMID:19587025

  3. Specificity and distribution of receptor cells in the olfactory mucosa of char (Salmo alpinus L.).

    PubMed

    Thommesen, G

    1982-05-01

    Olfactory receptor activity was studied in the char by two methods: (a) recording of the electro-olfactogram (EOG) with two electrodes simultaneously in the olfactory pit and (b) recordings from the olfactory bulb during olfactory stimulation and progressive removal of lamellae in the olfactory rosette. As stimuli were used methionine representing the amino acids and dilute char bile representing the bile salts. By cross-adaptation studies it was demonstrated that receptors sensitive to each of these two stimuli re functionally independent. The results show further that both types of receptors may be found on all lamellae, but differentially distributed within each lamella. Receptors sensitive to methionine are located closer to the raphe than receptors sensitive to bile. The spatial differentiation persists regardless of stimulus concentration. The results are discussed in relation to the projection and growth of primary nerve fibres into the olfactory bulb, and the existence of receptor cells with microvilli and with cilia. PMID:7136804

  4. Olfactory receptor neuron responses coding for rapid odour sampling

    PubMed Central

    Ghatpande, Ambarish S; Reisert, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are stimulated in a rhythmic manner in vivo, driven by delivery of odorants to the nasal cavity carried by the inhaled air, making olfaction a sense where animals can control the frequency of stimulus delivery. How ORNs encode repeated stimulation at resting, low breathing frequencies and at increased sniffing frequencies is not known, nor is it known if the olfactory transduction cascade is accurate and fast enough to follow high frequency stimulation. We investigated mouse olfactory responses to stimulus frequencies mimicking odorant exposure during low (2 Hz) and high (5 Hz) frequency sniffing. ORNs reliably follow low frequency stimulations with high fidelity by generating bursts of action potentials at each stimulation at intermediate odorant concentrations, but fail to do so at high odorant concentrations. Higher stimulus frequencies across all odorant concentrations reduced the likelihood of action potential generation, increased the latency of response, and decreased the reliability of encoding the onset of stimulation. Thus an increase in stimulus frequency degrades and at high odorant concentrations entirely prevents action potential generation in individual ORNs, causing reduced signalling to the olfactory bulb. These results demonstrate that ORNs do not simply relay timing and concentration of an odorous stimulus, but also process and modulate the stimulus in a frequency-dependent manner which is controlled by the chosen sniffing rate. PMID:21486768

  5. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins. PMID:27527385

  6. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins. PMID:27527385

  7. Molecular Characterization of the Aphis gossypii Olfactory Receptor Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William B.; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, is a polyphagous pest that inflicts great damage to cotton yields worldwide. Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, our aim is to identify chemosensory receptors in the cotton aphid genome, as a means to uncover olfactory encoding of the polyphagous feeding habits as well as to aid the discovery of new targets for behavioral interference. We identified a total of 45 candidate ORs and 14 IRs in the cotton aphid genome. Among the candidate AgoORs, 9 are apparent pseudogenes, while 19 can be clustered with ORs from the pea aphid, forming 16 AgoOR/ApOR orthologous subgroups. Among the candidate IRs, we identified homologs of the two highly conserved co-receptors IR8a and IR25a; no AgoIR retain the complete glutamic acid binding domain, suggesting that putative AgoIRs bind different ligands. Our results provide the necessary information for functional characterization of the chemosensory receptors of A. gossypii, with potential for new or refined applications of semiochemicals-based control of this pest insect. PMID:24971460

  8. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Peng; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Wang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Li-Rong; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR). High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol) i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex (Pir), ventral tenia tecta (VTT), the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt). The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice. PMID:23614017

  9. Deorphanization and characterization of human olfactory receptors in heterologous cells.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Pierre; Veithen, Alex; Wilkin, Françoise; Philippeau, Magali

    2014-11-01

    Olfaction plays an indispensable role in human and animals in self and environmental recognition, as well as intra- and interspecific communication. Following the discovery of a family of olfactory receptors (ORs) by Buck and Axel in 1991, it has been established that the sense of smell begins with the molecular recognition of a chemical odorant by one or more ORs expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons. Therefore, characterization of the molecular interactions between odorant molecules and ORs is a key step in the elucidation of the general properties of the olfactory system and in the development of applications, i.e., design of new odorants, search for blockers, etc. The process putted in place at ChemCom to improve the expression of ORs at the cytoplasmic membrane of the HEK293 cell and assays enabling large-scale deorphanization, and to characterize the interaction between chemical odorants and ORs is described. The family of human ORs includes ca. 400 putatively functional ORs which are GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors); to date over 100 human ORs have been deorphanized. PMID:25408322

  10. Temporal coding of odor mixtures in an olfactory receptor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ying; Martelli, Carlotta; Emonet, Thierry; Carlson, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Most natural odors are mixtures and often elicit percepts distinct from those elicited by their constituents. This emergence of a unique odor quality has long been attributed to central processing. Here we show that sophisticated integration of olfactory information begins in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in Drosophila. Odor mixtures are encoded in the temporal dynamics as well as in the magnitudes of ORN responses. ORNs can respond to an inhibitory odorant with different durations depending on the level of background excitation. ORNs respond to mixtures with distinctive temporal dynamics that reflect the physicochemical properties of the constituent odorants. The insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), which attenuates odor responses of multiple ORNs, differs from an ORN-specific inhibitor in its effects on temporal dynamics. Our analysis reveals a means by which integration of information from odor mixtures begins in ORNs and provides insight into the contribution of inhibitory stimuli to sensory coding. PMID:21383179

  11. Receptor expression and sympatric speciation: unique olfactory receptor neuron responses in F1 hybrid Rhagoletis populations.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Shannon B; Linn, Charles E; Michel, Andrew; Dambroski, Hattie R; Berlocher, Stewart H; Feder, Jeffrey L; Roelofs, Wendell L

    2006-10-01

    The Rhagoletis pomonella species complex is one of the foremost examples supporting the occurrence of sympatric speciation. A recent study found that reciprocal F(1) hybrid offspring from different host plant-infesting populations in the complex displayed significantly reduced olfactory host preference in flight-tunnel assays. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies indicate that olfactory cues from host fruit are important chemosensory signals for flies to locate fruit for mating and oviposition. The reduced olfactory abilities of hybrids could therefore constitute a significant post-mating barrier to gene flow among fly populations. The present study investigated the source of changes in the hybrid olfactory system by examining peripheral chemoreception in F(1) hybrid flies, using behaviorally relevant volatiles from the parent host fruit. Single-sensillum electrophysiological analyses revealed significant changes in olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) response specificities in hybrid flies when compared to parent ORN responses. We report that flies from F(1) crosses of apple-, hawthorn- and flowering dogwood-origin populations of R. pomonella exhibited distinct ORN response profiles absent from any parent population. These peripheral alterations in ORN response profiles could result from misexpression of multiple receptors in hybrid neurons as a function of genomic incompatibilities in receptor-gene pathways in parent populations. We conclude that these changes in peripheral chemoreception could impact olfactory host preference and contribute directly to reproductive isolation in the Rhagoletis complex, or could be genetically coupled to other host-associated traits. PMID:16985190

  12. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  13. SNP genotypes of olfactory receptor genes associated with olfactory ability in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Geng, G-J; Zhang, W; Cui, L; Zhang, H-X; Zheng, J-L

    2016-04-01

    To find out the relationship between SNP genotypes of canine olfactory receptor genes and olfactory ability, 28 males and 20 females from German Shepherd dogs in police service were scored by odor detection tests and analyzed using the Beckman GenomeLab SNPstream. The representative 22 SNP loci from the exonic regions of 12 olfactory receptor genes were investigated, and three kinds of odor (human, ice drug and trinitrotoluene) were detected. The results showed that the SNP genotypes at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR2K2-like:c.518G>A, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci had a statistically significant effect on the scenting abilities (P < 0.001). The kind of odor influenced the performances of the dogs (P < 0.001). In addition, there were interactions between genotype and the kind of odor at the following loci: OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A (P < 0.001). The dogs with genotype CC at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, genotype AA at the OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, genotype TT at the OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and genotype GG at the OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci did better at detecting the ice drug. We concluded that there was linkage between certain SNP genotypes and the olfactory ability of dogs and that SNP genotypes might be useful in determining dogs' scenting potential. PMID:26582499

  14. Molecular Cooperativity Governs Diverse and Monoallelic Olfactory Receptor Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jianhua; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at organism level the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. The molecular mechanism of this Nobel-Prize winning puzzle remains unresolved after decades of extensive studies. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and proposed an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic and enhancer competition coupled to a negative feedback loop. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression. The model is validated by several experimental results, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle of multi-objective optimization in biology. The work is supported by the NIGMS/DMS Mathematical Biology program.

  15. [Ion channels and action potentials in olfactory receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2007-11-01

    The first step in olfactory sensation involves the binding of odorant molecules to specific receptor proteins on the ciliary surface of olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Odorant receptors coupled to G-proteins activate adenylyl cyclase leading to the generation of cAMP, which directly gates a cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic channel in the ciliary membrane. This initial excitation causes a slow and graded depolarizing voltage change, which is encoded into a train of action potentials. Action potentials of ORCs are generated by voltage-gated Na- currents and T-type Ca2- currents in the somatic membrane. Isolated ORCs that have lost their cilia during the dissociation procedure are known to exhibit spike frequency accommodation by injecting the steady current. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs may serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, although odor adaptation is mainly accomplished by the ciliary transduction machinery. This review discusses current knowledge concerning the mechanisms of spike generation in ORCs. It also reviews how neurotransmitters and hormones modulate ionic currents and action potentials in ORCs. PMID:18154041

  16. Differential Contributions of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in a Drosophila Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Newquist, Gunnar; Novenschi, Alexandra; Kohler, Donovan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability of an animal to detect, discriminate, and respond to odors depends on the functions of its olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). The extent to which each ORN, upon activation, contributes to chemotaxis is not well understood. We hypothesized that strong activation of each ORN elicits a different behavioral response in the Drosophila melanogaster larva by differentially affecting the composition of its navigational behavior. To test this hypothesis, we exposed Drosophila larvae to specific odorants to analyze the effect of individual ORN activity on chemotaxis. We used two different behavioral paradigms to analyze the chemotaxis response of larvae to odorants. When tested with five different odorants that elicit strong physiological responses from single ORNs, larval behavioral responses toward each odorant differed in the strength of attraction as well as in the composition of discrete navigational elements, such as runs and turns. Further, behavioral responses to odorants did not correlate with either the strength of odor gradients tested or the sensitivity of each ORN to its cognate odorant. Finally, we provide evidence that wild-type larvae with all ORNs intact exhibit higher behavioral variance than mutant larvae that have only a single pair of functional ORNs. We conclude that individual ORNs contribute differently to the olfactory circuit that instructs chemotactic responses. Our results, along with recent studies from other groups, suggest that ORNs are functionally nonequivalent units. These results have implications for understanding peripheral odor coding. PMID:27570823

  17. Differential Contributions of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in a Drosophila Olfactory Circuit.

    PubMed

    Newquist, Gunnar; Novenschi, Alexandra; Kohler, Donovan; Mathew, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The ability of an animal to detect, discriminate, and respond to odors depends on the functions of its olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). The extent to which each ORN, upon activation, contributes to chemotaxis is not well understood. We hypothesized that strong activation of each ORN elicits a different behavioral response in the Drosophila melanogaster larva by differentially affecting the composition of its navigational behavior. To test this hypothesis, we exposed Drosophila larvae to specific odorants to analyze the effect of individual ORN activity on chemotaxis. We used two different behavioral paradigms to analyze the chemotaxis response of larvae to odorants. When tested with five different odorants that elicit strong physiological responses from single ORNs, larval behavioral responses toward each odorant differed in the strength of attraction as well as in the composition of discrete navigational elements, such as runs and turns. Further, behavioral responses to odorants did not correlate with either the strength of odor gradients tested or the sensitivity of each ORN to its cognate odorant. Finally, we provide evidence that wild-type larvae with all ORNs intact exhibit higher behavioral variance than mutant larvae that have only a single pair of functional ORNs. We conclude that individual ORNs contribute differently to the olfactory circuit that instructs chemotactic responses. Our results, along with recent studies from other groups, suggest that ORNs are functionally nonequivalent units. These results have implications for understanding peripheral odor coding. PMID:27570823

  18. Specific repertoire of olfactory receptor genes in the male germ cells of several mammalian species

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaeghen, P.; Schurmans, S.; Vassart, G.; Parmentier, M.

    1997-02-01

    Olfactory receptors constitute the largest family among G protein-coupled receptors, with up to 1000 members expected. We have previously shown that genes belonging to this family were expressed in the male germ line from both dog and human. We have subsequently demonstrated the presence of one of the corresponding olfactory receptor proteins during dog spermatogenesis and in mature sperm cells. In this study, we investigated whether the unexpected pattern of expression of olfactory receptors in the male germ line was conserved in other mammalian species. Using reverse transcription-PCR with primers specific for the olfactory receptor gene family, about 20 olfactory receptor cDNA fragments were cloned from the testis of each mammalian species tested. As a whole, they displayed no sequence specificity compared to other olfactory receptors, but highly homologous, possibly orthologous, genes were amplified from different species. Finally, their pattern of expression, as determined by RNase protection assay, revealed that many but not all of these receptors were expressed predominantly in testis. The male germ line from each mammalian species tested is thus characterized by a specific repertoire of olfactory receptors, which display a pattern of expression suggestive of their potential implication in the control of sperm maturation, migration, or fertilization. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Loss of olfactory receptor function in hominin evolution.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Graham M; Teeling, Emma C; Higgins, Desmond G

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sense of smell is governed by the largest gene family, which encodes the olfactory receptors (ORs). The gain and loss of OR genes is typically correlated with adaptations to various ecological niches. Modern humans have 853 OR genes but 55% of these have lost their function. Here we show evidence of additional OR loss of function in the Neanderthal and Denisovan hominin genomes using comparative genomic methodologies. Ten Neanderthal and 8 Denisovan ORs show evidence of loss of function that differ from the reference modern human OR genome. Some of these losses are also present in a subset of modern humans, while some are unique to each lineage. Morphological changes in the cranium of Neanderthals suggest different sensory arrangements to that of modern humans. We identify differences in functional olfactory receptor genes among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, suggesting varied loss of function across all three taxa and we highlight the utility of using genomic information to elucidate the sensory niches of extinct species. PMID:24392153

  20. Loss of Olfactory Receptor Function in Hominin Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Graham M.; Teeling, Emma C.; Higgins, Desmond G.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sense of smell is governed by the largest gene family, which encodes the olfactory receptors (ORs). The gain and loss of OR genes is typically correlated with adaptations to various ecological niches. Modern humans have 853 OR genes but 55% of these have lost their function. Here we show evidence of additional OR loss of function in the Neanderthal and Denisovan hominin genomes using comparative genomic methodologies. Ten Neanderthal and 8 Denisovan ORs show evidence of loss of function that differ from the reference modern human OR genome. Some of these losses are also present in a subset of modern humans, while some are unique to each lineage. Morphological changes in the cranium of Neanderthals suggest different sensory arrangements to that of modern humans. We identify differences in functional olfactory receptor genes among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, suggesting varied loss of function across all three taxa and we highlight the utility of using genomic information to elucidate the sensory niches of extinct species. PMID:24392153

  1. Identification and functional analysis of olfactory receptor family reveal unusual characteristics of the olfactory system in the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifeng; Yang, Pengcheng; Chen, Dafeng; Jiang, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Xianhui; Kang, Le

    2015-11-01

    Locusts represent the excellent model of insect olfaction because the animals are equipped with an unusual olfactory system and display remarkable density-dependent olfactory plasticity. However, information regarding receptor molecules involved in the olfactory perception of locusts is very limited. On the basis of genome sequence and antennal transcriptome of the migratory locust, we conduct the identification and functional analysis of two olfactory receptor families: odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs). In the migratory locust, there is an expansion of OR family (142 ORs) while distinctly lower number of IR genes (32 IRs) compared to the repertoires of other insects. The number of the locust OR genes is much less than that of glomeruli in antennal lobe, challenging the general principle of the "one glomerulus-one receptor" observed in other insects. Most OR genes are found in tandem arrays, forming two large lineage-specific subfamilies in the phylogenetic tree. The "divergent IR" subfamily displays a significant contraction, and most of the IRs belong to the "antennal IR" subfamily in the locust. Most ORs/IRs have olfactory-specific expression while some broadly- or internal-expressed members are also found. Differing from holometabolous insects, the migratory locust contains very similar expression profiles of ORs/IRs between nymph and adult stages. RNA interference and behavioral assays indicate that an OR-based signaling pathway, not IR-based, mediates the attraction of locusts to aggregation pheromones. These discoveries provide insights into the unusual olfactory system of locusts and enhance our understanding of the evolution of insect olfaction. PMID:26265180

  2. Mini-review: Making scent of the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory axons

    PubMed Central

    Dubacq, Caroline; Fouquet, Coralie; Trembleau, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Rodents contain in their genome more than 1,000 functional odorant receptor genes, which are specifically expressed by the olfactory sensory neurons projecting from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Strong evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in the axon of olfactory sensory neurons was obtained, but no function has been assigned to these axonal mRNAs yet. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory sensory axons, and to speculate on their possible function in the wiring of the mouse olfactory sensory projections. PMID:23959692

  3. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  4. Olfactory Bulb Glomerular NMDA Receptors Mediate Olfactory Nerve Potentiation and Odor Preference Learning in the Neonate Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Rat pup odor preference learning follows pairing of bulbar beta-adrenoceptor activation with olfactory input. We hypothesize that NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated olfactory input to mitral cells is enhanced during training, such that increased calcium facilitates and shapes the critical cAMP pattern. Here, we demonstrate, in vitro, that olfactory nerve stimulation, at sniffing frequencies, paired with beta-adrenoceptor activation, potentiates olfactory nerve-evoked mitral cell firing. This potentiation is blocked by a NMDAR antagonist and by increased inhibition. Glomerular dishinhibtion also induces NMDAR-sensitive potentiation. In vivo, in parallel, behavioral learning is prevented by glomerular infusion of an NMDAR antagonist or a GABAA receptor agonist. A glomerular GABAA receptor antagonist paired with odor can induce NMDAR-dependent learning. The NMDA GluN1 subunit is phosphorylated in odor-specific glomeruli within 5 min of training suggesting early activation, and enhanced calcium entry, during acquisition. The GluN1 subunit is down-regulated 3 h after learning; and at 24 h post-training the GluN2B subunit is down-regulated. These events may assist memory stability. Ex vivo experiments using bulbs from trained rat pups reveal an increase in the AMPA/NMDA EPSC ratio post-training, consistent with an increase in AMPA receptor insertion and/or the decrease in NMDAR subunits. These results support a model of a cAMP/NMDA interaction in generating rat pup odor preference learning. PMID:22496886

  5. Olfactory receptor for prostaglandin F2α mediates male fish courtship behavior.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Yoichi; Koide, Tetsuya; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Wakisaka, Noriko; Masuda, Miwa; Ohkura, Masamichi; Nakai, Junichi; Tsuge, Kyoshiro; Tsuchiya, Soken; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Pheromones play vital roles for survival and reproduction in various organisms. In many fishes, prostaglandin F2α acts not only as a female reproductive hormone, facilitating ovulation and spawning, but also as a sex pheromone inducing male reproductive behaviors. Here, we unravel the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms underlying the pheromonal action of prostaglandin F2α in zebrafish. Prostaglandin F2α specifically activates two olfactory receptors with different sensitivities and expression in distinct populations of ciliated olfactory sensory neurons. Pheromone information is then transmitted to two ventromedial glomeruli in the olfactory bulb and further to four regions in higher olfactory centers. Mutant male zebrafish deficient in the high-affinity receptor exhibit loss of attractive response to prostaglandin F2α and impairment of courtship behaviors toward female fish. These findings demonstrate the functional significance and activation of selective neural circuitry for the sex pheromone prostaglandin F2α and its cognate olfactory receptor in fish reproductive behavior. PMID:27239939

  6. Role of a ubiquitously expressed receptor in the vertebrate olfactory system.

    PubMed

    DeMaria, Shannon; Berke, Allison P; Van Name, Eric; Heravian, Anisa; Ferreira, Todd; Ngai, John

    2013-09-18

    Odorant cues are recognized by receptors expressed on olfactory sensory neurons, the primary sensory neurons of the olfactory epithelium. Odorant receptors typically obey the "one receptor, one neuron" rule, in which the receptive field of the olfactory neuron is determined by the singular odorant receptor that it expresses. Odor-evoked receptor activity across the population of olfactory neurons is then interpreted by the brain to identify the molecular nature of the odorant stimulus. In the present study, we characterized the properties of a C family G-protein-coupled receptor that, unlike most other odorant receptors, is expressed in a large population of microvillous sensory neurons in the zebrafish olfactory epithelium and the mouse vomeronasal organ. We found that this receptor, OlfCc1 in zebrafish and its murine ortholog Vmn2r1, is a calcium-dependent, low-sensitivity receptor specific for the hydrophobic amino acids isoleucine, leucine, and valine. Loss-of-function experiments in zebrafish embryos demonstrate that OlfCc1 is required for olfactory responses to a diverse mixture of polar, nonpolar, acidic, and basic amino acids. OlfCc1 was also found to promote localization of other OlfC receptor family members to the plasma membrane in heterologous cells. Together, these results suggest that the broadly expressed OlfCc1 is required for amino acid detection by the olfactory system and suggest that it plays a role in the function and/or intracellular trafficking of other olfactory and vomeronasal receptors with which it is coexpressed. PMID:24048853

  7. Single-cell transcriptomics reveals receptor transformations during olfactory neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanchate, Naresh K; Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Kuang, Donghui; Ye, Xiaolan; Qiu, Xiaojie; Pachter, Lior; Trapnell, Cole; Buck, Linda B

    2015-12-01

    The sense of smell allows chemicals to be perceived as diverse scents. We used single-neuron RNA sequencing to explore the developmental mechanisms that shape this ability as nasal olfactory neurons mature in mice. Most mature neurons expressed only one of the ~1000 odorant receptor genes (Olfrs) available, and at a high level. However, many immature neurons expressed low levels of multiple Olfrs. Coexpressed Olfrs localized to overlapping zones of the nasal epithelium, suggesting regional biases, but not to single genomic loci. A single immature neuron could express Olfrs from up to seven different chromosomes. The mature state in which expression of Olfr genes is restricted to one per neuron emerges over a developmental progression that appears to be independent of neuronal activity involving sensory transduction molecules. PMID:26541607

  8. Analysis of the goldfish Carassius auratus olfactory epithelium transcriptome reveals the presence of numerous non-olfactory GPCR and putative receptors for progestin pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakov, Nikolay N; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Canario, Adelino VM

    2008-01-01

    Background The goldfish (Carassius auratus) uses steroids and prostaglandins as pheromone cues at different stages of the reproductive cycle to facilitate spawning synchronization. Steroid progestin pheromone binding has been detected in goldfish olfactory membranes but the receptors responsible for this specific binding remain unknown. In order to shed some light on the olfactory epithelium transcriptome and search for possible receptor candidates a large set of EST from this tissue were analysed and compared to and combined with a similar zebrafish (Danio rerio) resource. Results We generated 4,797 high quality sequences from a normalized cDNA library of the goldfish olfactory epithelium, which were clustered in 3,879 unique sequences, grouped in 668 contigs and 3,211 singletons. BLASTX searches produced 3,243 significant (E-value < e-10) hits and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis annotated a further 1,223 of these genes (37.7%). Comparative analysis with zebrafish olfactory epithelium ESTs revealed 1,088 identical unigenes. The transcriptome size of both species was estimated at about 16,400 unigenes, based on the proportion of genes identified involved in Glucose Metabolic Process. Of 124 G-protein coupled receptors identified in the olfactory epithelium of both species, 56 were olfactory receptors. Beta and gamma membrane progestin receptors were also isolated by subcloning of RT-PCR products from both species and an olfactory epithelium specific splice form identified. Conclusion The high similarity between the goldfish and zebrafish olfactory systems allowed the creation of a 'cyprinid' olfactory epithelium library estimated to represent circa 70% of the transcriptome. These results are an important resource for the identification of components of signalling pathways involved in olfaction as well as putative targets for pharmacological and histochemical studies. The possible function of the receptors identified in the olfactory system is described. Moreover, the

  9. Cloning and olfactory expression of progestin receptors in the Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Ting; Liu, Dong Teng; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Shi Xi; Hong, Wan Shu

    2016-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), an oocyte maturation inducing progestin, also acts as a sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. The electro-olfactogram response to DHP increased during the breeding season. In the present study, we cloned the cDNAs of the nine progestin receptors (pgr, paqr5, 6, 7(a, b), 8, 9, pgrmc1, 2) from B. sinensis, analyzed their tissue distribution, and determined the expression in the olfactory rosette during the reproductive cycle in female and male fish. The deduced amino acid sequences of the nine progestin receptors share high sequence identities with those of other fish species and relatively lower homology with their mammalian counterparts, and phylogenetic analyses classified the nine B. sinensis progestin receptors into their respective progestin receptor groups. Tissue distribution of B. sinensis progestin receptors showed differential expression patterns, but all these nine genes were expressed in the olfactory rosette. Interestingly, paqr5 mRNA was found in the intermediate and basal parts of the olfactory epithelium but not in the central core using in situ hybridization, and its expression level was the highest in the olfactory rosette among the tissues examined. These results suggested Paqr5 may have an important role for transmitting progestin signaling in the olfactory system. The expression levels of paqr7a and paqr7b, pgr and pgrmc2 mRNA peaked around the mid meiotic stage, and that of paqr8 peaked at late meiotic stage in the olfactory rosette in males, while the olfactory expression of paqr5 decreased gradually as spermatogenesis progressed. In contrast, the expression of the progestin receptors did not change significantly during the development of the ovary in the olfactory rosette in females, except that of pgr. Interestingly, the changes of paqr8 expression in

  10. Computational Approaches for Decoding Select Odorant-Olfactory Receptor Interactions Using Mini-Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Harini, K.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) belong to the class A G-Protein Coupled Receptor superfamily of proteins. Unlike G-Protein Coupled Receptors, ORs exhibit a combinatorial response to odors/ligands. ORs display an affinity towards a range of odor molecules rather than binding to a specific set of ligands and conversely a single odorant molecule may bind to a number of olfactory receptors with varying affinities. The diversity in odor recognition is linked to the highly variable transmembrane domains of these receptors. The purpose of this study is to decode the odor-olfactory receptor interactions using in silico docking studies. In this study, a ligand (odor molecules) dataset of 125 molecules was used to carry out in silico docking using the GLIDE docking tool (SCHRODINGER Inc Pvt LTD). Previous studies, with smaller datasets of ligands, have shown that orthologous olfactory receptors respond to similarly-tuned ligands, but are dramatically different in their efficacy and potency. Ligand docking results were applied on homologous pairs (with varying sequence identity) of ORs from human and mouse genomes and ligand binding residues and the ligand profile differed among such related olfactory receptor sequences. This study revealed that homologous sequences with high sequence identity need not bind to the same/ similar ligand with a given affinity. A ligand profile has been obtained for each of the 20 receptors in this analysis which will be useful for expression and mutation studies on these receptors. PMID:26221959

  11. Olfactory receptor-like genes are located in the human major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.; Liu, Y.C.; Parimoo, S.

    1995-05-01

    The murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) includes sequences that are responsible for haplotype-specific odor types that, in turn, influence mating preference. The authors report that there are several olfactory receptor genes or pseudogenes in the Class I region of the human MHC. At least one of these genes is intact, appears to encode an mRNA, and is quite homologous to a previously reported murine olfactory receptor. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Databases in SenseLab for the Genomics, Protemics, and Function of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marenco, Luis N.; Bahl, Gautam; Hyland, Lorra; Shi, Jing; Wang, Rixin; Lai, Peter C.; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Crasto, Chiquito J.

    2013-01-01

    We present here, the salient aspects of three databases: Olfactory Receptor Database (ORDB) is a repository of genomics and proteomics information of ORs; OdorDB stores information related to odorous compounds, specifically identitying those that have been shown to interact with olfactory rectors; and OdorModelDB disseminates information related to computational models of olfactory receptors (ORs). The data stored among these databases is integrated. Presented in this chapter are descriptions of these resources, which are part of the SenseLab suite of databases, a discussion of the computational infrastructure that enhances the efficacy of information storage, retrieval, dissemination, and automated data population from external sources. PMID:23585030

  13. Neuropeptide receptors provide a signalling pathway for trigeminal modulation of olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Philipp; Genovese, Federica; Schriever, Valentin A; Hummel, Thomas; Möhrlen, Frank; Frings, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    The mammalian olfactory epithelium contains olfactory receptor neurons and trigeminal sensory endings. The former mediate odor detection, the latter the detection of irritants. The two apparently parallel chemosensory systems are in reality interdependent in various well-documented ways. Psychophysical studies have shown that virtually all odorants can act as irritants, and that most irritants have an odor. Thus, the sensory perception of odorants and irritants is based on simultaneous input from the two systems. Moreover, functional interactions between the olfactory system and the trigeminal system exist on both peripheral and central levels. Here we examine the impact of trigeminal stimulation on the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons. Using an odorant with low trigeminal potency (phenylethyl alcohol) and a non-odorous irritant (CO(2) ), we have explored this interaction in psychophysical experiments with human subjects and in electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings from rats. We have demonstrated that simultaneous activation of the trigeminal system attenuates the perception of odor intensity and distorts the EOG response. On the molecular level, we have identified a route for this cross-modal interaction. The neuropeptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), which is released from trigeminal sensory fibres upon irritant stimulation, inhibits the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons. CGRP receptors expressed by these neurons mediate this neuromodulatory effect. This study demonstrates a site of trigeminal-olfactory interaction in the periphery. It reveals a pathway for trigeminal impact on olfactory signal processing that influences odor perception. PMID:23205840

  14. Structural activation pathways from dynamic olfactory receptor-odorant interactions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peter C; Singer, Michael S; Crasto, Chiquito J

    2005-11-01

    We have simulated an odor ligand's dynamic behavior in the binding region of an olfactory receptor (OR). Our short timescale computational studies (up to 200 ps) have helped identify unprecedented postdocking ligand behavior of ligands. From in vacuo molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between models of rat OR I7 and 10 aldehyde ligands, we have identified a dissociative pathway along which the ligand exits and enters the OR-binding pocket--a transit event. The ligand's transit through the receptor's binding region may mark the beginning of a signal transduction cascade leading to odor recognition. We have graphically traced the rotameric changes in key OR amino acid side chains during the transit. Our results have helped substantiate or refute previously held notions of amino acid contribution to ligand stability in the binding pocket. Our observations of ligand activity when compared to those of experimental (electroolfactogram response) OR-activation studies provide a view to predicting the stability of ligands in the binding pocket as a precursor to OR activation by the ligand. PMID:16243965

  15. Reproductive Status Regulates Expression of Sex Steroid and GnRH Receptors in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Fernald, Russell D.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromodulators including gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and sex steroids help integrate an animal's internal physiological state with incoming external cues, and can have profound effects on the processing of behaviorally-relevant information, particularly from the olfactory system. While GnRH and steroid receptors are present in olfactory processing regions across vertebrates, little is known about whether their expression levels change with internal physiological state or external social cues. We used qRT-PCR to measure mRNA levels of two GnRH receptors (GnRH-R1, GnRH-R2), five sex steroid receptors (estrogen receptors: ERα, ERβa, ERβb; androgen receptors: ARα, ARβ), and aromatase in the olfactory bulb of the highly social African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni. We asked whether these receptor levels changed with reproductive condition in females, or with social status, which regulates reproductive capacity in males. Our results reveal that mRNA levels of multiple sex steroid, GnRH receptor subtypes, and aromatase in the olfactory bulb vary with sex, social status in males, and reproductive condition in females, which highlights the potential importance of changing receptor levels in fine-tuning the olfactory system during the reproductive cycle. Further, steroid receptor mRNA levels were positively correlated with circulating steroid levels in males, but negatively correlated in females, suggesting different regulatory control between sexes. These results provide support for the hypothesis that the first-order olfactory relay station is a substrate for both GnRH and sex steroid modulation, and suggest that changes in receptor levels could be an important mechanism for regulating reproductive, social, and seasonal plasticity in olfactory perception observed across vertebrates. PMID:20466023

  16. Olfactory transduction in ciliated receptor neurons of the Cabinza grunt, Isacia conceptionis (Teleostei: Haemulidae).

    PubMed

    Schmachtenberg, Oliver; Bacigalupo, Juan

    2004-12-01

    The ciliated receptor neurons of fish olfactory organs are thought to transduce amino acids through a cAMP-dependent transduction pathway, but direct physiological evidence for this hypothesis remains scarce and is confined to catfish and trout. We investigated olfactory transduction in a marine fish, the Cabinza grunt Isacia conceptionis (Perciformes, Teleostei). The olfactory epithelium was characterized using light and electron microscopy, and isolated ciliated receptor neurons were recorded with the perforated patch-clamp technique. Cells were stimulated with puffer pipettes containing amino acid odourants, IBMX plus forskolin or 8 bromo-cAMP. All three stimuli triggered transient inward currents at a holding potential of -70 mV and responses with outward-rectifying current-voltage relationships. The characteristics of the transduction currents induced by each stimulus were similar across cells and indistinguishable within the same cell, supporting the hypothesis of a cAMP pathway mediating transduction of amino acids in ciliated olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:15610170

  17. Calcium permeable AMPA receptors and autoreceptors in external tufted cells of rat olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lowe, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    Glomeruli are functional units of the olfactory bulb responsible for early processing of odor information encoded by single olfactory receptor genes. Glomerular neural circuitry includes numerous external tufted (ET) cells whose rhythmic burst firing may mediate synchronization of bulbar activity with the inhalation cycle. Bursting is entrained by glutamatergic input from olfactory nerve terminals, so specific properties of ionotropic glutamate receptors on ET cells are likely to be important determinants of olfactory processing. Particularly intriguing is recent evidence that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors of juxta-glomerular neurons may permeate calcium. This could provide a novel pathway for regulating ET cell signaling. We tested the hypothesis that ET cells express functional calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. In rat olfactory bulb slices, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in ET cells were evoked by olfactory nerve shock, and by uncaging glutamate. We found attenuation of AMPA/kainate EPSCs by 1-naphthyl acetyl-spermine (NAS), an open-channel blocker specific for calcium permeable AMPA receptors. Cyclothiazide strongly potentiated EPSCs, indicating a major contribution from AMPA receptors. The current-voltage (I-V) relation of uncaging EPSCs showed weak inward rectification which was lost after > ~ 10 min of whole-cell dialysis, and was absent in NAS. In kainate-stimulated slices, Co2+ ions permeated cells of the glomerular layer. Large AMPA EPSCs were accompanied by fluorescence signals in fluo-4 loaded cells, suggesting calcium permeation. Depolarizing pulses evoked slow tail currents with pharmacology consistent with involvement of calcium permeable AMPA autoreceptors. Tail currents were abolished by Cd2+ and NBQX, and were sensitive to NAS block. Glutamate autoreceptors were confirmed by uncaging intracellular calcium to evoke a large inward current. Our results provide evidence that calcium permeable AMPA

  18. Functional Asymmetries in Cockroach ON and OFF Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antenna of the American cockroach respond to the same changes in the concentration of the odor of lemon oil, but in the opposite direction. The same jump in concentration raises impulse frequency in the ON and lowers it in the OFF ORN and, conversely, the same concentration drop raises impulse frequency in the OFF and lowers it in the ON ORN. When the new concentration level is maintained, it becomes a background concentration and affects the responses of the ON and OFF ORNs to superimposed changes. Raising the background concentration decreases both the ON-ORN's response to concentration jumps and the OFF-ORN's response to concentration drops. In addition, the slopes of the functions approximating the relationship of impulse frequency to concentration changes become flatter for both types of ORNs as the background concentration rises. The progressively compressed scaling optimizes the detection of concentration changes in the low concentration range. The loss of information caused by the lower differential sensitivity in the high concentration range is partially compensated by the higher discharge rates of the OFF ORNs. The functional asymmetry of the ON and OFF ORNs, which reflects nonlinearity in the detection of changes in the concentration of the lemon oil odor, improves information transfer for decrements in the high concentration range. PMID:21160009

  19. Characterization of the Olfactory Receptors Expressed in Human Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Osthold, Sandra; Veitinger, Sophie; Becker, Christian; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Muschol, Michael; Wennemuth, Gunther; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs) are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicates that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa. PMID:26779489

  20. Functional asymmetries in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2011-02-01

    The ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antenna of the American cockroach respond to the same changes in the concentration of the odor of lemon oil, but in the opposite direction. The same jump in concentration raises impulse frequency in the ON and lowers it in the OFF ORN and, conversely, the same concentration drop raises impulse frequency in the OFF and lowers it in the ON ORN. When the new concentration level is maintained, it becomes a background concentration and affects the responses of the ON and OFF ORNs to superimposed changes. Raising the background concentration decreases both the ON-ORN's response to concentration jumps and the OFF-ORN's response to concentration drops. In addition, the slopes of the functions approximating the relationship of impulse frequency to concentration changes become flatter for both types of ORNs as the background concentration rises. The progressively compressed scaling optimizes the detection of concentration changes in the low concentration range. The loss of information caused by the lower differential sensitivity in the high concentration range is partially compensated by the higher discharge rates of the OFF ORNs. The functional asymmetry of the ON and OFF ORNs, which reflects nonlinearity in the detection of changes in the concentration of the lemon oil odor, improves information transfer for decrements in the high concentration range. PMID:21160009

  1. Electrophysiological evidence for the broad distribution of specific odorant receptor molecules across the olfactory organ of the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Chang, Q; Caprio, J

    1996-10-01

    To determine if there is a spatial segregation of responsiveness to odorants within the olfactory epithelium, microelectrode recordings were obtained from small populations of olfactory receptor neurons located across different lamellar sensory regions of the olfactory organ of the channel catfish, lctalurus punctatus. Stimuli included L-alanine, L-methionine, L-arginine hydrochloride, L-glutamic acid, ATP and a mixture of bile salts-odorants previously reported to stimulate independent receptor sites in aquatic species. The peak integrated olfactory receptor responses at each recording site were standardized to the response to L-alanine. The relative stimulatory effectiveness of the stimuli was preserved across the 10 olfactory lamellae recording sites. These data support previous molecular biological results of a broad distribution of receptor neurons that express specific receptor genes across the olfactory organ of the channel catfish. PMID:8902281

  2. Detection of Volatile Indicators of Illicit Substances by the Olfactory Receptors of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Brenton; Warr, Coral G.

    2010-01-01

    Insects can detect a large range of odors with a numerically simple olfactory system that delivers high sensitivity and accurate discrimination. Therefore, insect olfactory receptors hold great promise as biosensors for detection of volatile organic chemicals in a range of applications. The array of olfactory receptor neurons of Drosophila melanogaster is rapidly becoming the best-characterized natural nose. We have investigated the suitability of Drosophila receptors as detectors for volatiles with applications in law enforcement, emergency response, and security. We first characterized responses of the majority of olfactory neuron types to a set of diagnostic odorants. Being thus able to correctly identify neurons, we then screened for responses from 38 different types of neurons to 35 agents. We identified 13 neuron types with responses to 13 agents. As individual Drosophila receptor genes have been mapped to neuron types, we can infer which genes confer responsiveness to the neurons. The responses were confirmed for one receptor by expressing it in a nonresponsive neuron. The fly olfactory system is mainly adapted to detect volatiles from fermenting fruits. However, our findings establish that volatiles associated with illicit substances, many of which are of nonnatural origin, are also detected by Drosophila receptors. PMID:20530374

  3. A novel surface acoustic wave-based biosensor for highly sensitive functional assays of olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Wang, Di; Wang, Le; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2011-04-01

    Olfactory receptors, which are responsible for sensing odor molecules, form the largest G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family in mammalian animals. These proteins play an important role in the detection of chemical signals and signal transduction to the brain. Currently, only a limited number of olfactory receptors have been characterized, which is mainly due to the lack of sensitive and efficient tools for performing functional assays of these receptors. This paper describes a novel surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based biosensor for highly sensitive functional assays of olfactory receptors. An olfactory receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans, ODR-10, was expressed on the plasma membrane of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was used as a model system for this study. For specific odorant response assays, the membrane fraction of MCF-7 cells containing ODR-10 was extracted and integrated with our SAW sensors. The response of ODR-10 to various odorants was monitored by recording the resonance frequency shifts of SAWs applied to the sensor. Our results show that heterologously expressed ODR-10 receptors can specifically respond to diacetyl, its natural ligand. Dose-dependent responses were obtained by performing measurements using various concentrations of diacetyl. The sensitivity of this biosensor is 2kHz/ng and can detect concentrations as low as 10(-10)mM, which is 10× lower than what has previously been reported. This biosensor can be used to characterize odorant response profiles of olfactory receptors and provide information rich data for functional assays of olfactory receptors. In addition to providing a greater understanding of the biological mechanisms of GPCRs, such data holds great potential in many other fields such as food industry, biomedicine, and environmental protection. PMID:21333624

  4. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins. PMID:18840687

  5. Modulatory Effects of Sex Steroids Progesterone and Estradiol on Odorant Evoked Responses in Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol on physiology and behavior during menstrual cycles and pregnancy is well known. Several studies indicate that olfactory performance changes with cyclically fluctuating steroid hormone levels in females. Knowledge of the exact mechanisms behind how female sex steroids modulate olfactory signaling is limited. A number of different known genomic and non-genomic actions that are mediated by progesterone and estradiol via interactions with different receptors may be responsible for this modulation. Next generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the murine olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) revealed the expression of several membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. These receptors are known to mediate rapid non-genomic effects through interactions with G proteins. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining results provide evidence for progestin and estradiol receptors in the ORNs. These data support the hypothesis that steroid hormones are capable of modulating the odorant-evoked activity of ORNs. Here, we validated this hypothesis through the investigation of steroid hormone effects by submerged electro-olfactogram and whole cell patch-clamp recordings of ORNs. For the first time, we demonstrate that the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol decrease odorant-evoked signals in the OE and ORNs of mice at low nanomolar concentrations. Thus, both of these sex steroids can rapidly modulate the odor responsiveness of ORNs through membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. PMID:27494699

  6. Olfactory Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Nonallergic Vasomotor Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Ge; Jin, Li; Abbott, Carol; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    We sought a genotype-phenotype association: between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in olfactory receptor (OR) genes from the two largest OR gene clusters and odor-triggered nonallergic vasomotor rhinitis (nVMR). In the initial pedigree screen, using transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis, six SNPs showed “significant” p-values between 0.0449 and 0.0043. In a second case-control population, the previously identified six SNPs did not re-emerge, whereas four new SNPs showed p-values between 0.0490 and 0.0001. Combining both studies, none of the SNPs in the TDT analysis survived the Bonferroni correction. In the population study, one SNP showed an empirical p-value of 0.0066 by shuffling cases and controls with 105 replicates; however, the p-value for this SNP was 0.83 in the pedigree study. This study emphasizes that underpowered studies having p-values between <0.05 and 0.0001 should be regarded as inconclusive and require further replication before concluding the study is “informative.” However, we believe that our hypothesis that an association between OR genotypes and the nVMR phenotype remains feasible. Future studies using either a genomewide association study of all OR gene-pseudogene regions throughout the genome—at the current recommended density of 2.5 to 5 kb per tag SNP—or studies incorporating microarray analyses of the entire “OR genome” in well-characterized nVMR patients are required. PMID:18446592

  7. Drosophila olfactory receptors as classifiers for volatiles from disparate real world applications.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Thomas; de Bruyne, Marien; Berna, Amalia Z; Warr, Coral G; Trowell, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors evolved to provide animals with ecologically and behaviourally relevant information. The resulting extreme sensitivity and discrimination has proven useful to humans, who have therefore co-opted some animals' sense of smell. One aim of machine olfaction research is to replace the use of animal noses and one avenue of such research aims to incorporate olfactory receptors into artificial noses. Here, we investigate how well the olfactory receptors of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, perform in classifying volatile odourants that they would not normally encounter. We collected a large number of in vivo recordings from individual Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons in response to an ecologically relevant set of 36 chemicals related to wine ('wine set') and an ecologically irrelevant set of 35 chemicals related to chemical hazards ('industrial set'), each chemical at a single concentration. Resampled response sets were used to classify the chemicals against all others within each set, using a standard linear support vector machine classifier and a wrapper approach. Drosophila receptors appear highly capable of distinguishing chemicals that they have not evolved to process. In contrast to previous work with metal oxide sensors, Drosophila receptors achieved the best recognition accuracy if the outputs of all 20 receptor types were used. PMID:25313522

  8. Evidence for increased olfactory receptor gene repertoire size in two nocturnal bird species with well-developed olfactory ability

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Silke S; Fidler, Andrew E; Kempenaers, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, the molecular basis of the sense of smell is encoded by members of a large gene family, namely olfactory receptor (OR) genes. Both the total number of OR genes and the proportion of intact OR genes in a genome may indicate the importance of the sense of smell for an animal. There is behavioral, physiological, and anatomical evidence that some bird species, in particular nocturnal birds, have a well developed sense of smell. Therefore, we hypothesized that nocturnal birds with good olfactory abilities have evolved (i) more OR genes and (ii) more intact OR genes than closely related and presumably less 'olfaction-dependent' day-active avian taxa. Results We used both non-radioactive Southern hybridization and PCR with degenerate primers to investigate whether two nocturnal bird species that are known to rely on olfactory cues, the brown kiwi (Apteryx australis) and the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), have evolved a larger OR gene repertoire than their day-active, closest living relatives (for kiwi the emu Dromaius novaehollandiae, rhea Rhea americana, and ostrich Struthio camelus and for kakapo the kaka Nestor meridionalis and kea Nestor notabilis). We show that the nocturnal birds did not have a significantly higher proportion of intact OR genes. However, the estimated total number of OR genes was larger in the two nocturnal birds than in their relatives. Conclusion Our results suggest that ecological niche adaptations such as daily activity patterns may have shaped avian OR gene repertoires. PMID:19467156

  9. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Alioto, Tyler S; Ngai, John

    2006-01-01

    Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s), these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms. PMID:17156446

  10. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  11. The Importance of Odorant Conformation to the Binding and Activation of a Representative Olfactory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Peterlin, Zita; Li, Yadi; Sun, Guangxing; Shah, Rohan; Firestein, Stuart; Ryan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory receptors (ORs) form a large family of G-protein coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs) responsible for sensing the ambient chemical environment. The molecular recognition strategies used by ORs to detect and distinguish odorant molecules are unclear. Here, we investigated the variable of odorant carbon chain conformation for an established odorant-OR pair: n-octanal and rat OR-I7. A series of conformationally restricted octanal mimics were tested on live olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Our results support a model in which unactivated OR-I7 binds aliphatic aldehydes indiscriminately, and then applies conformational and length filters to distinguish agonists from antagonists. Specific conformers are proposed to activate OR-I7 by steric buttressing of an OR activation pocket. Probing endogenously expressed rat OSNs with octanal and constrained mimics furnished evidence that odorant conformation contributes to an odorant’s unique olfactory code signature. PMID:19101476

  12. Olfactory neurons expressing transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) are involved in sensing semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weihong; Margolskee, Robert; Donnert, Gerald; Hell, Stefan W.; Restrepo, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium respond to environmental odorants. Recent studies reveal that these OSNs also respond to semiochemicals such as pheromones and that main olfactory input modulates animal reproduction, but the transduction mechanism for these chemosignals is not fully understood. Previously, we determined that responses to putative pheromones in the main olfactory system were reduced but not eliminated in mice defective for the canonical cAMP transduction pathway, and we suggested, on the basis of pharmacology, an involvement of phospholipase C. In the present study, we find that a downstream signaling component of the phospholipase C pathway, the transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5), is coexpressed with the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit A2 in a subset of mature OSNs. These neurons project axons primarily to the ventral olfactory bulb, where information from urine and other socially relevant signals is processed. We find that these chemosignals activate a subset of glomeruli targeted by TRPM5-expressing OSNs. Our data indicate that TRPM5-expressing OSNs that project axons to glomeruli in the ventral area of the main olfactory bulb are involved in processing of information from semiochemicals. PMID:17267604

  13. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.

  14. Role of topology in electrical properties of bacterio-rhodopsin and rat olfactory receptor I7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, E.; Reggiani, L.

    2010-03-01

    We report on electrical properties of the two sensing proteins: bacteriorhodopsin and rat olfactory receptor OR-I7. As relevant transport parameters we consider the small-signal impedance spectrum and the static current-voltage characteristics. Calculations are compared with available experimental results and the model predictability is tested for future perspectives.

  15. Age-related changes in p2 odorant receptor mapping in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Richard M; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2010-06-01

    The ability to identify odors is dependent on the spatial mapping of odorant receptors onto fixed positions within the olfactory bulb. In elderly adults, odor identification and discrimination is often impaired. The objective of this study was to determine if there are age-related changes in odorant receptor mapping. We studied 8 groups of mice ranging in age from 2 weeks to 2.5 years and mapped the projection of P2 odorant receptors onto targeted glomeruli within medial and lateral domains of the olfactory bulb. A total of 60 mice were used to measure the number of P2 glomeruli, bulb length, the position of each glomerulus, and the amount of P2 axons targeting each glomerulus. We found that over 70% of olfactory bulbs contained multiple P2 glomeruli, bulb length increased 42% between the ages of 2 and 13 weeks, and the position of P2 glomeruli shifted with bulb growth. In most cases, targeted glomeruli were either completely or partially filled with P2 axons. In some cases, targeting was diffuse, with glomeruli receiving only a few stray P2-labeled axons. The frequency of diffuse targeting was rare (<4%) in adult mice 3-6 months in age. However, significant increases in diffuse targeting were observed in older mice, reaching 10% at 1 year and 22% at 2 years of age. These findings suggest that odorant receptor mapping becomes more disrupted in old age and could account for impaired olfactory function in elderly adults. PMID:20231263

  16. Dialing Up an Embryo: Are Olfactory Receptors Digits in a Developmental Code?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1998-01-01

    Scientist William J. Dreyer has hypothesized that the cell surface proteins in the nose that detect odors also help assemble embryos. These olfactory receptors and related proteins act as identifiers, much like the last few digits of a telephone number, that help cells to find their intended neighbors in a developing embryo. Discusses the research…

  17. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  18. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of olfactory receptor neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dučić, T.; Breunig, E.; Schild, D.; Herbst, J.; Nováková, E.; Susini, J.; Tucoulu, R.; Salditt, T.

    2009-09-01

    We report a x-ray fluorescence microscopy study of cells and tissues from the olfactory system of Xenopus laevis. In this experiment we focus on sample preparation and experimental issues, and present first results of fluorescence maps of the elemental distribution of Cl, K, Ca, P, S and Na both in individual isolated neural cells and in cross-sections of the same tissue.

  19. Southern pine beetle: Olfactory receptor and behavior discrimination of enantiomers of the attractant pheromone frontalin

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.L.; Berisford, C.W.; Blum, M.S.; Dickens, J.C.; Hedden, R.L.; Mori, K.; Richerson, J.V.; Vite, J.P.; West, J.R.

    1982-05-01

    In a laboratory and field bioassays, the response of Dendroctonus frontalis was significantly greater to the mixture of (1S,55R)-(-)-frontalin and alpha-pinene than to (1R,5S)-(+)-frontalin and alpha-pinene. Electrophysiologrical studies revealed that antennal olfactory receptor cells were significantly more responsive to (1S,5R)-(-)-frontalin than to 1R,5S)-(+) -frontalin. Both enanitiomers stimulated the same olfactory cells which suggests that each cell possesses at least two types of enanitomer-specific acceptors.

  20. High-speed odor transduction and pulse tracking by insect olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szyszka, Paul; Gerkin, Richard C.; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Smith, Brian H.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory systems encode both the static quality of a stimulus (e.g., color or shape) and its kinetics (e.g., speed and direction). The limits with which stimulus kinetics can be resolved are well understood in vision, audition, and somatosensation. However, the maximum temporal resolution of olfactory systems has not been accurately determined. Here, we probe the limits of temporal resolution in insect olfaction by delivering high frequency odor pulses and measuring sensory responses in the antennae. We show that transduction times and pulse tracking capabilities of olfactory receptor neurons are faster than previously reported. Once an odorant arrives at the boundary layer of the antenna, odor transduction can occur within less than 2 ms and fluctuating odor stimuli can be resolved at frequencies more than 100 Hz. Thus, insect olfactory receptor neurons can track stimuli of very short duration, as occur when their antennae encounter narrow filaments in an odor plume. These results provide a new upper bound to the kinetics of odor tracking in insect olfactory receptor neurons and to the latency of initial transduction events in olfaction. PMID:25385618

  1. Expression of Nogo receptor 1 in the regeneration process of the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, He-Xin; Zeng, Xian-Ping; Sun, Yue-Qi; Fu, Qing-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) is the most important Nogo-A receptor. By its interaction with myelin-associated inhibitory proteins, NgR1 inhibits the regeneration of axons and is extensively expressed in the central nervous system. However, the expression of NgR1 in regenerable neurons, such as olfactory neurons, and its expression in the regeneration progress of olfactory neurons have not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated that NgR1 was expressed in the cell bodies of certain mature olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) but was not expressed in immature ORNs in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of normal adult mice. On day 21 after OE injury, NgR1 was expressed not only in the cell bodies of mature ORNs but also in the cell bodies of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in the top and submucosal layers of the OE. On day 48 after model establishment, NgR1 expression decreased in the cell bodies of the GFAP-positive cells. On day 56 after model establishment, no NgR1 expression was found in the cell bodies of the GFAP-positive cells, and NgR1 was again expressed only in the mature ORNs. Our results demonstrated that NgR1 expression is upregulated in the OE after injury, which suggests that NgR1 might be involved in the regeneration of the OE. PMID:27138950

  2. Deorphanizing vertebrate olfactory receptors: recent advances in odorant-response assays.

    PubMed

    Touhara, Kazushige

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) comprise the largest multigene G protein-coupled receptor families in organisms from fish to primates, and play a critical role in recognizing thousands of odorant molecules. Recent achievement of functional OR expression in heterologous cells led to identification of ligands for some ORs, revealing a combinatorial receptor coding scheme in the olfactory sensory system. Using the functional assay, the odorant-binding site in ORs has been elucidated, showing that a binding pocket constructed by transmembrane helices provides the molecular basis for agonist and antagonist specificity. To retrospectively identify ORs that recognize a particular odorant of interest, two functional cloning strategies have been developed: one is a strategy wherein OR genes are amplified from single olfactory neurons that show odorant responsiveness in Ca(2+) imaging, and another is an approach based on glomerular activity by combining in vivo bulbar Ca(2+) imaging and retrograde dye labeling of innervating olfactory neurons. The conventional ligand-screening approach and the functional cloning strategies in an odorant-directed manner have allowed us to match ORs to the cognate odorants both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17640771

  3. High-speed odor transduction and pulse tracking by insect olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Szyszka, Paul; Gerkin, Richard C; Galizia, C Giovanni; Smith, Brian H

    2014-11-25

    Sensory systems encode both the static quality of a stimulus (e.g., color or shape) and its kinetics (e.g., speed and direction). The limits with which stimulus kinetics can be resolved are well understood in vision, audition, and somatosensation. However, the maximum temporal resolution of olfactory systems has not been accurately determined. Here, we probe the limits of temporal resolution in insect olfaction by delivering high frequency odor pulses and measuring sensory responses in the antennae. We show that transduction times and pulse tracking capabilities of olfactory receptor neurons are faster than previously reported. Once an odorant arrives at the boundary layer of the antenna, odor transduction can occur within less than 2 ms and fluctuating odor stimuli can be resolved at frequencies more than 100 Hz. Thus, insect olfactory receptor neurons can track stimuli of very short duration, as occur when their antennae encounter narrow filaments in an odor plume. These results provide a new upper bound to the kinetics of odor tracking in insect olfactory receptor neurons and to the latency of initial transduction events in olfaction. PMID:25385618

  4. DOR – a Database of Olfactory Receptors – Integrated Repository for Sequence and Secondary Structural Information of Olfactory Receptors in Selected Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarathnam, Balasubramanian; Karpe, Snehal D; Harini, Krishnan; Sankar, Kannan; Iftekhar, Mohammed; Rajesh, Durairaj; Giji, Sadasivam; Archunan, Govidaraju; Balakrishnan, Veluchamy; Gromiha, M Michael; Nemoto, Wataru; Fukui, Kazhuhiko; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction is the response to odors and is mediated by a class of membrane-bound proteins called olfactory receptors (ORs). An understanding of these receptors serves as a good model for basic signal transduction mechanisms and also provides important clues for the strategies adopted by organisms for their ultimate survival using chemosensory perception in search of food or defense against predators. Prior research on cross-genome phylogenetic analyses from our group motivated the addressal of conserved evolutionary trends, clustering, and ortholog prediction of ORs. The database of olfactory receptors (DOR) is a repository that provides sequence and structural information on ORs of selected organisms (such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens). Users can download OR sequences, study predicted membrane topology, and obtain cross-genome sequence alignments and phylogeny, including three-dimensional (3D) structural models of 100 selected ORs and their predicted dimer interfaces. The database can be accessed from http://caps.ncbs.res.in/DOR. Such a database should be helpful in designing experiments on point mutations to probe into the possible dimerization modes of ORs and to even understand the evolutionary changes between different receptors. PMID:25002814

  5. Avian olfactory receptor gene repertoires: evidence for a well-developed sense of smell in birds?

    PubMed

    Steiger, Silke S; Fidler, Andrew E; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2008-10-22

    Among vertebrates, the sense of smell is mediated by olfactory receptors (ORs) expressed in sensory neurons within the olfactory epithelium. Comparative genomic studies suggest that the olfactory acuity of mammalian species correlates positively with both the total number and the proportion of functional OR genes encoded in their genomes. In contrast to mammals, avian olfaction is poorly understood, with birds widely regarded as relying primarily on visual and auditory inputs. Here, we show that in nine bird species from seven orders (blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus; black coucal, Centropus grillii; brown kiwi, Apteryx australis; canary, Serinus canaria; galah, Eolophus roseicapillus; red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus; kakapo, Strigops habroptilus; mallard, Anas platyrhynchos; snow petrel, Pagodroma nivea), the majority of amplified OR sequences are predicted to be from potentially functional genes. This finding is somewhat surprising as one previous report suggested that the majority of OR genes in an avian (red jungle fowl) genomic sequence are non-functional pseudogenes. We also show that it is not the estimated proportion of potentially functional OR genes, but rather the estimated total number of OR genes that correlates positively with relative olfactory bulb size, an anatomical correlate of olfactory capability. We further demonstrate that all the nine bird genomes examined encode OR genes belonging to a large gene clade, termed gamma-c, the expansion of which appears to be a shared characteristic of class Aves. In summary, our findings suggest that olfaction in birds may be a more important sense than generally believed. PMID:18628122

  6. Enhanced Odor Discrimination and Impaired Olfactory Memory by Spatially Controlled Switch of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Genetic perturbations of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors (AMPARs) are widely used to dissect molecular mechanisms of sensory coding, learning, and memory. In this study, we investigated the role of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in olfactory behavior. AMPAR modification was obtained by depletion of the GluR-B subunit or expression of unedited GluR-B(Q), both leading to increased Ca2+ permeability of AMPARs. Mice with this functional AMPAR switch, specifically in forebrain, showed enhanced olfactory discrimination and more rapid learning in a go/no-go operant conditioning task. Olfactory memory, however, was dramatically impaired. GluR-B depletion in forebrain was ectopically variable (“mosaic”) among individuals and strongly correlated with decreased olfactory memory in hippocampus and cortex. Accordingly, memory was rescued by transgenic GluR-B expression restricted to piriform cortex and hippocampus, while enhanced odor discrimination was independent of both GluR-B variability and transgenic GluR-B expression. Thus, correlated differences in behavior and levels of GluR-B expression allowed a mechanistic and spatial dissection of olfactory learning, discrimination, and memory capabilities. PMID:16216087

  7. An autoradiographic study of the mouse olfactory epithelium: evidence for long-lived receptors.

    PubMed

    Hinds, J W; Hinds, P L; McNelly, N A

    1984-10-01

    In order to try to determine whether differentiated olfactory receptors turn over (die and are replaced by newly differentiated cells) during adult life, mice were injected with a single dose of 3H-thymidine at either 2 or 4 months of age and allowed to survive for up to 12 months; they were caged in a laminar flow unit to prevent rhinitis. Counts of labeled receptor cells detected autoradiographically after injection at 2 months of age revealed that, following an initial decrease from 1 to 3 months of survival, numbers of labeled cells remained approximately constant, at least up to 12 months of survival. Cells still labeled at 12 months of survival were confirmed as receptor cells by electron microscopic examination of reembedded sections. The hypothesis is suggested that in the absence of disease-related destruction of the olfactory epithelium, most or all receptor cell turnover represents newly formed cells that fail to establish synapses with the olfactory bulb; fully differentiated receptor cells may be quite long-lived. PMID:6542328

  8. Molecular recognition of ketamine by a subset of olfactory G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Saven, Jeffery G.; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine elicits various neuropharmacological effects, including sedation, analgesia, general anesthesia, and antidepressant activity. Through an in vitro screen, we identified four mouse olfactory receptors (ORs) that responded to ketamine. In addition to their presence in the olfactory epithelium, these G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are distributed throughout the central nervous system. To better understand the molecular basis of the interactions between ketamine and ORs, we used sequence comparison and molecular modeling to design mutations that (i) increased, reduced, or abolished ketamine responsiveness in responding receptors, and (ii) rendered non-responding receptors responsive to ketamine. We showed that olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that expressed distinct ORs responded to ketamine in vivo, suggesting that ORs may serve as functional targets for ketamine. The ability to both abolish and introduce responsiveness to ketamine in GPCRs enabled us to identify and confirm distinct interaction loci in the binding site, which suggested a signature ketamine-binding pocket that may guide exploration of additional receptors for this general anesthetic drug. PMID:25829447

  9. Non-classical amine recognition evolved in a large clade of olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Tachie-Baffour, Yaw; Liu, Zhikai; Baldwin, Maude W; Kruse, Andrew C; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules, and the structural basis for their recognition by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) is well understood. Amines are also potent odors, with some activating olfactory trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Here, we report that teleost TAARs evolved a new way to recognize amines in a non-classical orientation. Chemical screens de-orphaned eleven zebrafish TAARs, with agonists including serotonin, histamine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, and agmatine. Receptors from different clades contact ligands through aspartates on transmembrane α-helices III (canonical Asp3.32) or V (non-canonical Asp5.42), and diamine receptors contain both aspartates. Non-classical monoamine recognition evolved in two steps: an ancestral TAAR acquired Asp5.42, gaining diamine sensitivity, and subsequently lost Asp3.32. Through this transformation, the fish olfactory system dramatically expanded its capacity to detect amines, ecologically significant aquatic odors. The evolution of a second, alternative solution for amine detection by olfactory receptors highlights the tremendous structural versatility intrinsic to GPCRs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10441.001 PMID:26519734

  10. Non-classical amine recognition evolved in a large clade of olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Tachie-Baffour, Yaw; Liu, Zhikai; Baldwin, Maude W; Kruse, Andrew C; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules, and the structural basis for their recognition by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) is well understood. Amines are also potent odors, with some activating olfactory trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Here, we report that teleost TAARs evolved a new way to recognize amines in a non-classical orientation. Chemical screens de-orphaned eleven zebrafish TAARs, with agonists including serotonin, histamine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, and agmatine. Receptors from different clades contact ligands through aspartates on transmembrane α-helices III (canonical Asp(3.32)) or V (non-canonical Asp(5.42)), and diamine receptors contain both aspartates. Non-classical monoamine recognition evolved in two steps: an ancestral TAAR acquired Asp(5.42), gaining diamine sensitivity, and subsequently lost Asp(3.32). Through this transformation, the fish olfactory system dramatically expanded its capacity to detect amines, ecologically significant aquatic odors. The evolution of a second, alternative solution for amine detection by olfactory receptors highlights the tremendous structural versatility intrinsic to GPCRs. PMID:26519734

  11. Characterization of solubilized atrial natriuretic peptide receptors from rat olfactory bulb and A10 cultured smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Zyskind, A.D.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1988-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from A10 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for 125I-ANP(99-126) was 12.7 pM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 pM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 125I-ANP(99-126) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) much greater than ANP(103-123). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) = ANP(103-123). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose column, a portion of the olfactory ANP receptor was retained on the column and could be eluted with 5 mM GTP, while the VSMC ANP receptor did not adsorb to the column. Since the olfactory bulb ANP receptor has been shown to contain a binding component of 116 kDa, while the VSMC ANP receptor binding component is 66 kDa, these receptors appear to be similar to the 2 receptor classes described recently in which the 120 kDa receptor that binds GTP is postulated to be coupled to guanylate cyclase, while the 60 kDa receptor does not bind GTP, is not coupled to guanylate cyclase, and may possess a hormone clearance function. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclic GMP appears to be a second messenger for ANP in the brain.

  12. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells’ own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  13. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells' own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  14. Probability model for molecular recognition in biological receptor repertoires: significance to the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Lancet, D; Sadovsky, E; Seidemann, E

    1993-04-15

    A generalized phenomenological model is presented for stereospecific recognition between biological receptors and their ligands. We ask what is the distribution of binding constants psi(K) between an arbitrary ligand and members of a large receptor repertoire, such as immunoglobulins or olfactory receptors. For binding surfaces with B potential subsite and S different types of subsite configurations, the number of successful elementary interactions obeys a binomial distribution. The discrete probability function psi(K) is then derived with assumptions on alpha, the free energy contribution per elementary interaction. The functional form of psi(K) may be universal, although the parameter values could vary for different ligand types. An estimate of the parameter values of psi(K) for iodovanillin, an analog of odorants and immunological haptens, is obtained by equilibrium dialysis experiments with nonimmune antibodies. Based on a simple relationship, predicted by the model, between the size of a receptor repertoire and its average maximal affinity toward an arbitrary ligand, the size of the olfactory receptor repertoire (Nolf) is calculated as 300-1000, in very good agreement with recent molecular biological studies. A very similar estimate, Nolf = 500, is independently derived by relating a theoretical distribution of maxima for psi(K) with published human olfactory threshold variations. The present model also has implications to the question of olfactory coding and to the analysis of specific anosmias, genetic deficits in perceiving particular odorants. More generally, the proposed model provides a better understanding of ligand specificity in biological receptors and could help in understanding their evolution. PMID:8475121

  15. Probability model for molecular recognition in biological receptor repertoires: significance to the olfactory system.

    PubMed Central

    Lancet, D; Sadovsky, E; Seidemann, E

    1993-01-01

    A generalized phenomenological model is presented for stereospecific recognition between biological receptors and their ligands. We ask what is the distribution of binding constants psi(K) between an arbitrary ligand and members of a large receptor repertoire, such as immunoglobulins or olfactory receptors. For binding surfaces with B potential subsite and S different types of subsite configurations, the number of successful elementary interactions obeys a binomial distribution. The discrete probability function psi(K) is then derived with assumptions on alpha, the free energy contribution per elementary interaction. The functional form of psi(K) may be universal, although the parameter values could vary for different ligand types. An estimate of the parameter values of psi(K) for iodovanillin, an analog of odorants and immunological haptens, is obtained by equilibrium dialysis experiments with nonimmune antibodies. Based on a simple relationship, predicted by the model, between the size of a receptor repertoire and its average maximal affinity toward an arbitrary ligand, the size of the olfactory receptor repertoire (Nolf) is calculated as 300-1000, in very good agreement with recent molecular biological studies. A very similar estimate, Nolf = 500, is independently derived by relating a theoretical distribution of maxima for psi(K) with published human olfactory threshold variations. The present model also has implications to the question of olfactory coding and to the analysis of specific anosmias, genetic deficits in perceiving particular odorants. More generally, the proposed model provides a better understanding of ligand specificity in biological receptors and could help in understanding their evolution. PMID:8475121

  16. Carnosine, nerve growth factor receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase expression during the ontogeny of the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Biffo, S; Martí, E; Fasolo, A

    1992-01-01

    The localizations of carnosine, nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were studied in the embryonic and postnatal rat olfactory bulb and epithelium by means of single- and double-immunostaining methods. Tyrosine hydroxylase ontogeny was also evaluated at the mRNA level by in situ hybridization. All these molecules were expressed in the olfactory bulb but with different developmental patterns and cellular localization: carnosine immunoreactivity is seen from embryonic day 17 in primary olfactory neurons scattered in the nasal cavity and in fibres projecting from them to the olfactory bulb. Nerve growth factor-receptor immunoreactivity associated with small glial-like cells is visible in some glomeruli starting from the second day of postnatal life. At postnatal day 10 NGF-receptor immunoreactivity is extended to all glomeruli. Periglomerular neurons expressing TH mRNA and protein are present prenatally and their number sharply increases during the early postnatal development. Double-staining methods show that TH and NGF-receptor immunoreactivity do not overlap in cell bodies and processes. In addition, NGF-receptor immunoreactivity is not colocalized with carnosine. These findings definitely exclude NGF-receptor expression in periglomerular and primary olfactory neurons, suggesting that at least part of NGF-receptor expression in the olfactory bulb is associated with glial cells. In addition, they provide the first immunohistochemical data on carnosine ontogeny and confirm at the mRNA level previous studies on the ontogeny of TH protein. PMID:1376608

  17. Enhancement of odorant-induced responses in olfactory receptor neurons by zinc nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Viswaprakash, Nilmini; Dennis, John C; Globa, Ludmila; Pustovyy, Oleg; Josephson, Eleanor M; Kanju, Patrick; Morrison, Edward E; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J

    2009-09-01

    Zinc metal nanoparticles in picomolar concentrations strongly enhance odorant responses of olfactory sensory neurons. One- to 2-nm metallic particles contain 40-300 zinc metal atoms, which are not in an ionic state. We exposed rat olfactory epithelium to metal nanoparticles and measured odorant responses by electroolfactogram and whole-cell patch clamp. A small amount of zinc nanoparticles added to an odorant or an extracellular/intracellular particle perfusion strongly increases the odorant response in a dose-dependent manner. Zinc nanoparticles alone produce no odor effects. Copper, gold, or silver nanoparticles do not produce effects similar to those of zinc. If zinc nanoparticles are replaced by Zn(+2) ions in the same concentration range, we observed a reduction of the olfactory receptor neuron odorant response. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that zinc nanoparticles are closely located to the interface between the guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the receptor proteins and are involved in transferring signals in the initial events of olfaction. Our results suggest that zinc metal nanoparticles can be used to enhance and sustain the initial olfactory events. PMID:19525316

  18. Highly specific olfactory receptor neurons for types of amino acids in the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Nikonov, Alexander A; Caprio, John

    2007-10-01

    Odorant specificity to l-alpha-amino acids was determined electrophysiologically for 93 single catfish olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) selected for their narrow excitatory molecular response range (EMRR) to only one type of amino acid (i.e., Group I units). These units were excited by either a basic amino acid, a neutral amino acid with a long side chain, or a neutral amino acid with a short side chain when tested at 10(-7) to 10(-5) M. Stimulus-induced inhibition, likely for contrast enhancement, was primarily observed in response to the types of amino acid stimuli different from that which activated a specific ORN. The high specificity of single Group I ORNs to type of amino acid was also previously observed for single Group I neurons in both the olfactory bulb and forebrain of the same species. These results indicate that for Group I neurons olfactory information concerning specific types of amino acids is processed from receptor neurons through mitral cells of the olfactory bulb to higher forebrain neurons without significant alteration in unit odorant specificity. PMID:17686913

  19. Achieving diverse and monoallelic olfactory receptor selection through dual-objective optimization design.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-05-24

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at the organism level, the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and constructed a comprehensive model that has all its components based on physical interactions. Analyzing the model reveals an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic barrier crossing coupled to a negative feedback loop that mechanistically differs from previous theoretical proposals, and a previously unidentified enhancer competition step. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression, and has multiple predictions validated by existing experimental results. Through making an analogy to a physical system with thermally activated barrier crossing and comparative reverse engineering analyses, the study reveals that the olfactory receptor selection system is optimally designed, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle for multiobjective optimization in biology. PMID:27162367

  20. Elimination of a ligand gating site generates a supersensitive olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kanika; Ahuja, Gaurav; Hussain, Ashiq; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction poses one of the most complex ligand-receptor matching problems in biology due to the unparalleled multitude of odor molecules facing a large number of cognate olfactory receptors. We have recently deorphanized an olfactory receptor, TAAR13c, as a specific receptor for the death-associated odor cadaverine. Here we have modeled the cadaverine/TAAR13c interaction, exchanged predicted binding residues by site-directed mutagenesis, and measured the activity of the mutant receptors. Unexpectedly we observed a binding site for cadaverine at the external surface of the receptor, in addition to an internal binding site, whose mutation resulted in complete loss of activity. In stark contrast, elimination of the external binding site generated supersensitive receptors. Modeling suggests this site to act as a gate, limiting access of the ligand to the internal binding site and thereby downregulating the affinity of the native receptor. This constitutes a novel mechanism to fine-tune physiological sensitivity to socially relevant odors. PMID:27323929

  1. Expression of ionotropic receptors in terrestrial hermit crab's olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Groh-Lunow, Katrin C.; Getahun, Merid N.; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    Coenobitidae are one out of at least five crustacean lineages which independently succeeded in the transition from water to land. This change in lifestyle required adaptation of the peripheral olfactory organs, the antennules, in order to sense chemical cues in the new terrestrial habitat. Hermit crab olfactory aesthetascs are arranged in a field on the distal segment of the antennular flagellum. Aesthetascs house approximately 300 dendrites with their cell bodies arranged in spindle-like complexes of ca. 150 cell bodies each. While the aesthetascs of aquatic crustaceans have been shown to be the place of odor uptake and previous studies identified ionotropic receptors (IRs) as the putative chemosensory receptors expressed in decapod antennules, the expression of IRs besides the IR co-receptors IR25a and IR93a in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) has not been documented yet. Our goal was to reveal the expression and distribution pattern of non-co-receptor IRs in OSNs of Coenobita clypeatus, a terrestrial hermit crab, with RNA in situ hybridization. We expanded our previously published RNAseq dataset, and revealed 22 novel IR candidates in the Coenobita antennules. We then used RNA probes directed against three different IRs to visualize their expression within the OSN cell body complexes. Furthermore we aimed to characterize ligand spectra of single aesthetascs by recording local field potentials and responses from individual dendrites. This also allowed comparison to functional data from insect OSNs expressing antennal IRs. We show that this orphan receptor subgroup with presumably non-olfactory function in insects is likely the basis of olfaction in terrestrial hermit crabs. PMID:25698921

  2. Cannabinoid receptor signaling induces proliferation but not neurogenesis in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hutch, Chelsea R; Hegg, Colleen C

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium actively generates neurons through adulthood, and this neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple factors that are not fully defined. Here, we examined the role of cannabinoids in the regulation of neurogenesis in the mouse olfactory epithelium. In vivo proliferation and cell lineage studies were performed in mice (C57BL/6 and cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptor deficient strains) treated with cannabinoids directly (WIN 55,212-2 or 2-arachidonylglycerol ether) or indirectly via inhibition of cannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes. Cannabinoids increased proliferation in neonatal and adult mice, and had no effect on proliferation in cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptor deficient adult mice. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid type1 receptor antagonist AM251 decreased cannabinoid-induced proliferation in adult mice. Despite a cannabinoid-induced increase in proliferation, there was no change in newly generated neurons or non-neuronal cells 16 d post-treatment. However, cannabinoid administration increased apoptotic cell death at 72 hours post-treatment and by 16 d the level of apoptosis dropped to control levels. Thus, cannabinoids induce proliferation, but do not induce neurogenesis nor non-neuronal cell generation. Cannabinoid receptor signaling may regulate the balance of progenitor cell survival and proliferation in adult mouse olfactory epithelium. PMID:27606334

  3. An inhibitor of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange blocks activation of insect olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Bobkov, Y; Corey, E; Ache, B

    2014-07-25

    Earlier we showed that the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor, KB-R7943, potently blocks the odor-evoked activity of lobster olfactory receptor neurons. Here we extend that finding to recombinant mosquito olfactory receptors stably expressed in HEK cells. Using whole-cell and outside-out patch clamping and calcium imaging, we demonstrate that KB-R7943 blocks both the odorant-gated current and the odorant-evoked calcium signal from two different OR complexes from the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, AgOr48+AgOrco and AgOr65+AgOrco. Both heteromeric and homomeric (Orco alone) OR complexes were susceptible to KB-R7943 blockade when activated by VUAA1, an agonist that targets the Orco channel subunit, suggesting the Orco subunit may be the target of the drug's action. KB-R7943 represents a valuable tool to further investigate the functional properties of arthropod olfactory receptors and raises the interesting specter that activation of these ionotropic receptors is directly or indirectly linked to a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, thereby providing a template for drug design potentially allowing improved control of insect pests and disease vectors. PMID:24996179

  4. Temporal response dynamics of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons depends on receptor type and response polarity

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Merid N.; Wicher, Dieter; Hansson, Bill S.; Olsson, Shannon B.

    2012-01-01

    Insect olfactory sensory neurons (OSN) express a diverse array of receptors from different protein families, i.e. ionotropic receptors (IR), gustatory receptors (GR) and odorant receptors (OR). It is well known that insects are exposed to a plethora of odor molecules that vary widely in both space and time under turbulent natural conditions. In addition to divergent ligand specificities, these different receptors might also provide an increased range of temporal dynamics and sensitivities for the olfactory system. To test this, we challenged different Drosophila OSNs with both varying stimulus durations (10–2000 ms), and repeated stimulus pulses of key ligands at various frequencies (1–10 Hz). Our results show that OR-expressing OSNs responded faster and with higher sensitivity to short stimulations as compared to IR- and Gr21a-expressing OSNs. In addition, OR-expressing OSNs could respond to repeated stimulations of excitatory ligands up to 5 Hz, while IR-expressing OSNs required ~5x longer stimulations and/or higher concentrations to respond to similar stimulus durations and frequencies. Nevertheless, IR-expressing OSNs did not exhibit adaptation to longer stimulations, unlike OR- and Gr21a-OSNs. Both OR- and IR-expressing OSNs were also unable to resolve repeated pulses of inhibitory ligands as fast as excitatory ligands. These differences were independent of the peri-receptor environment in which the receptors were expressed and suggest that the receptor expressed by a given OSN affects both its sensitivity and its response to transient, intermittent chemical stimuli. OR-expressing OSNs are better at resolving low dose, intermittent stimuli, while IR-expressing OSNs respond more accurately to long-lasting odor pulses. This diversity increases the capacity of the insect olfactory system to respond to the diverse spatiotemporal signals in the natural environment. PMID:23162431

  5. Expression of CD36 by Olfactory Receptor Cells and Its Abundance on the Epithelial Surface in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Fushiki, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane protein that is involved in the recognition of certain amphiphilic molecules such as polar lipids in various tissues and body fluids. So far, CD36 homologues in insects have been demonstrated to be present on the surface of olfactory dendrites and to participate in the perception of exogenous compounds. However, little is known about the relationship between CD36 and mammalian olfaction. Indeed, the detection of only CD36 mRNA in the mouse olfactory epithelium has been reported to date. In the present study, to provide potential pieces of evidence for the involvement of CD36 in mammalian olfactory perception, we extensively investigated the localisation of this protein in the mouse olfactory mucosa. In situ hybridisation analysis using antisense oligonucleotides to CD36 mRNA detected aggregated signals within the deeper epithelial layer of olfactory mucosa. The mRNA signals were also detected consistently in the superficial layer of the olfactory epithelium, which is occupied by supporting cells. Immunostaining with an anti-CD36 polyclonal antibody revealed that CD36 localises in the somata and dendrites of distinct olfactory receptor cells and that it occurs abundantly on the olfactory epithelial surface. However, immunoreactive CD36 was rarely detectable in the nerve bundles running in the lamina propria of olfactory mucosa, the axons forming the olfactory nerve layer in the outermost layer of the bulb and axon terminals in the glomeruli. We also obtained electron microscopic evidence for the association of CD36 protein with olfactory cilia. Altogether, we suggest that CD36 plays a role in the mammalian olfaction. In addition, signals for CD36 protein were also detected on or around the microvilli of olfactory supporting cells and the cilia of nasal respiratory epithelium, suggesting a role for this protein other than olfaction in the nasal cavity. PMID:26186589

  6. Lipid flippase modulates olfactory receptor expression and odorant sensitivity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tal Soo; Xia, Ruohan; Zhang, Haiying; Smith, Dean P.

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the male-specific pheromone cVA (11-cis-vaccenyl acetate) functions as a sex-specific social cue. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cVA pheromone transduction and its regulation are incomplete. Using a genetic screen combined with an electrophysiological assay to monitor pheromone-evoked activity in the cVA-sensing Or67d neurons, we identified an olfactory sensitivity factor encoded by the dATP8B gene, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian ATP8B. dATP8B is expressed in all olfactory neurons that express Orco, the odorant receptor coreceptor, and the odorant responses in most Orco-expressing neurons are reduced. Or67d neurons are severely affected, with strongly impaired cVA-induced responses and lacking spontaneous spiking in the mutants. The dATP8B locus encodes a member of the P4-type ATPase family thought to flip aminophospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine from one membrane leaflet to the other. dATP8B protein is concentrated in the cilia of olfactory neuron dendrites, the site of odorant transduction. Focusing on Or67d neuron function, we show that Or67d receptors are mislocalized in dATP8B mutants and that cVA responses can be restored to dATP8B mutants by misexpressing a wild-type dATP8B rescuing transgene, by expressing a vertebrate P4-type ATPase member in the pheromone-sensing neurons or by overexpressing Or67d receptor subunits. These findings reveal an unexpected role for lipid translocation in olfactory receptor expression and sensitivity to volatile odorants. PMID:24821794

  7. In vivo responses of single olfactory receptor neurons in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Caprio, J

    1995-01-01

    1. We report for the first time in any teleost, a quantitative in vivo study of recordings from single olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, with odorant stimuli. 2. Responses of 69 spontaneously active single ORNs were recorded simultaneously with the electroolfactogram (EOG). Recording times ranged from 10 to 72 min per receptor cell with an average of 24 +/- 15 (SD) min/cell. The averaged spontaneous frequency ranged from < 1 to 12 action potentials/s with a mean frequency of 4.7 +/- 2.5 action potentials/s. 3. Catfish ORNs responded to the odorant stimuli (amino acids, bile salts, and ATP) with either an excitation or suppression of the background neural activity. Suppressive responses were encountered more frequently than excitatory responses, suggesting that suppressive responses also play an important role in olfactory coding. 4. Excitatory and suppressive responses to the different odorants were elicited from the same ORN, suggesting that different olfactory receptor molecules and different transduction pathways exist in the same ORN. PMID:7714562

  8. Acetylcholine enhances excitability by lowering the threshold of spike generation in olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Mahito; Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2013-11-01

    Olfactory perception is influenced by behavioral states, presumably via efferent regulation. Using the whole cell version of patch-clamp recording technique, we discovered that acetylcholine, which is released from efferent fibers in the olfactory mucosa, can directly affect the signal encoding in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Under current-clamp conditions, application of carbachol, an acetylcholine receptor agonist, increased the spike frequency of ORCs and lowered their spike threshold. When a 3-pA current to induce near-threshold depolarization was injected into ORCs, 0.0 spikes/s were generated in control solution and 0.5 spikes/s in the presence of carbachol. By strong stimuli of injection of a 13-pA current into ORCs, 9.1 and 11.0 spikes/s were generated in control and carbachol solutions, respectively. A similar result was observed by bath application of 50 μM acetylcholine. Under voltage-clamp conditions, carbachol increased the peak amplitude of a voltage-gated sodium current by 32% and T-type calcium current by 39%. Atropine, the specific muscarinic receptor antagonist, blocked the enhancement by carbachol of the voltage-gated sodium current and T-type calcium current, suggesting that carbachol increases those currents via the muscarinic receptor rather than via the nicotinic receptor. In contrast, carbachol did not significantly change the amplitude of the L-type calcium current or the delayed rectifier potassium current in the ORCs. Because T-type calcium current is known to lower the threshold in ORCs, we suggest that acetylcholine enhance excitability by lowering the threshold of spike generation in ORCs via the muscarinic receptor. PMID:23926039

  9. Short-term memory trace mediated by termination kinetics of olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Sean Michael; McInally, Shane; Tharadra, Sana; Ray, Anandasankar

    2016-01-01

    Odorants activate receptors in the peripheral olfactory neurons, which sends information to higher brain centers where behavioral valence is determined. Movement and airflow continuously change what odor plumes an animal encounters and little is known about the effect one plume has on the detection of another. Using the simple Drosophila melanogaster larval model to study this relationship we identify an unexpected phenomenon: response to an attractant can be selectively blocked by previous exposure to some odorants that activates the same receptor. At a mechanistic level, we find that exposure to this type of odorant causes prolonged tonic responses from a receptor (Or42b), which can block subsequent detection of a strong activator of that same receptor. We identify naturally occurring odorants with prolonged tonic responses for other odorant receptors (Ors) as well, suggesting that termination-kinetics is a factor for olfactory coding mechanisms. This mechanism has implications for odor-coding in any system and for designing applications to modify odor-driven behaviors. PMID:26830661

  10. Short-term memory trace mediated by termination kinetics of olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Sean Michael; McInally, Shane; Tharadra, Sana; Ray, Anandasankar

    2016-01-01

    Odorants activate receptors in the peripheral olfactory neurons, which sends information to higher brain centers where behavioral valence is determined. Movement and airflow continuously change what odor plumes an animal encounters and little is known about the effect one plume has on the detection of another. Using the simple Drosophila melanogaster larval model to study this relationship we identify an unexpected phenomenon: response to an attractant can be selectively blocked by previous exposure to some odorants that activates the same receptor. At a mechanistic level, we find that exposure to this type of odorant causes prolonged tonic responses from a receptor (Or42b), which can block subsequent detection of a strong activator of that same receptor. We identify naturally occurring odorants with prolonged tonic responses for other odorant receptors (Ors) as well, suggesting that termination-kinetics is a factor for olfactory coding mechanisms. This mechanism has implications for odor-coding in any system and for designing applications to modify odor-driven behaviors. PMID:26830661

  11. Cyclic nucleotide-activated channels in carp olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, S S; Kosolapov, A V

    1993-07-25

    When applied from the cytoplasmic side, cyclic 3',5'-adenosine and guanosine monophosphates reversibly increased the ion permeability of inside-out patches of carp olfactory neuron plasma membrane. The cAMP (cGMP)-induced permeability via cAMP (cGMP) concentration was fitted by Hill's equation with the exponents of 1.07 +/- 0.15 (1.12 +/- 0.05) and EC50 = 1.3 +/- 0.6 microM (0.9 +/- 0.3 microM). Substitution of NaCl in the bathing solution by chlorides of other alkali metals resulted in a slight shift of reversal potential of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent (CN) current, which indicates a weak selectivity of the channels. Permeability coefficients calculated by Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz's equation corresponded to the following relation: PNa/PK/PLi/PRb/PCs = 1:0.98:0.94:0.70:0.61. Ca2+ and Mg2+ in physiological concentrations blocked the channels activated by cyclic nucleotides (CN-channels). In the absence of divalent cations the conductance of single CN-channels was equal to 51 +/- 9 pS in 100 mM NaCl solution. Channel density did not exceed 1 micron-2. The maximal open state probability of the channel (Po) tended towards 1.0 at a high concentration of cAMP or cGMP. Dichlorobenzamil decreased Po without changing the single CN-channel' conductance. CN-channels exhibited burst activity. Mean open and closed times as well as the burst duration depended on agonist concentration. A kinetic model with four states (an inactivated, a closed and two open ones) is suggested to explain the regularities of CN-channel gating and dose-response relations. PMID:8334139

  12. Efficient Olfactory Coding in the Pheromone Receptor Neuron of a Moth

    PubMed Central

    Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The concept of coding efficiency holds that sensory neurons are adapted, through both evolutionary and developmental processes, to the statistical characteristics of their natural stimulus. Encouraged by the successful invocation of this principle to predict how neurons encode natural auditory and visual stimuli, we attempted its application to olfactory neurons. The pheromone receptor neuron of the male moth Antheraea polyphemus, for which quantitative properties of both the natural stimulus and the reception processes are available, was selected. We predicted several characteristics that the pheromone plume should possess under the hypothesis that the receptors perform optimally, i.e., transfer as much information on the stimulus per unit time as possible. Our results demonstrate that the statistical characteristics of the predicted stimulus, e.g., the probability distribution function of the stimulus concentration, the spectral density function of the stimulation course, and the intermittency, are in good agreement with those measured experimentally in the field. These results should stimulate further quantitative studies on the evolutionary adaptation of olfactory nervous systems to odorant plumes and on the plume characteristics that are most informative for the ‘sniffer’. Both aspects are relevant to the design of olfactory sensors for odour-tracking robots. PMID:18437217

  13. Evolution of olfactory receptor in oriental fruit fly Dacus dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Robert L.; Metcalf, Esther R.; Mitchell, W. C.; Lee, Lena W. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Male oriental fruit flies (Dacus dorsalis) from colonies in Taiwan and Hawaii were evaluated for limit of response to various analogues of methyl eugenol. The results are interpreted in terms of the geometry and allosteric requirements of the antennal receptor that triggers the characteristic methyl eugenol reflex. This receptor has evolved for complementarity to all portions of the methyl eugenol molecule and responds only to ortho-substituted benzenes with adjacent oxygen atoms or isoelectronic equivalents. Substantial differences in responses of Taiwan and Hawaiian D. dorsalis suggest that perceptible evolution of the receptor protein has occurred during the past 50 years. A plausible scheme for the coevolution of dacini flies with plants containing phenylpropionoid essential oils is outlined. Images PMID:16592640

  14. Simulation analysis of effects of adrenaline on spike generation in olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kawai, F

    1999-12-01

    Adrenaline is known to affect action potentials induced by the step current injection in an olfactory receptor cell (ORC). It is unclear, however, whether it also modulates action potentials induced by odor stimuli. In the present study, the effects of adrenaline on action potentials in ORCs were investigated quantitatively using a computer simulation. Adrenaline suppressed simulated action potentials induced by step current injection near threshold, and increased spike frequency to strong stimuli by 8-25%. Similar effects were obtained by applying a pseudo-transduction current to a model cell. Surprisingly, adrenaline markedly increased spike frequency to strong stimuli by 30-140%, and increased the slope of the stimulus-response relation compared with that of the step current injection. This suggests that adrenaline enhances odorant contrast in olfactory perception by modulating signal encoding of ORCs. PMID:10587504

  15. Co-opting the unfolded protein response to elicit olfactory receptor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Ryan P.; Lyons, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Olfactory receptor (OR) expression requires the transcriptional activation of one out of thousands of OR alleles and a feedback signal that preserves this transcriptional choice. The mechanism by which olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect ORs to signal to the nucleus remains elusive. Here, we show that OR proteins generate this feedback by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR). OR expression induces Perk-mediated phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eif2α causing selective translation of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5). ATF5 induces the transcription of Adenylyl Cyclase 3 (Adcy3), which relieves the UPR. Our data provide a novel role for the UPR in defining neuronal identity and cell fate commitment and support a two-step model for the feedback signal: first OR protein, as a stress stimulus, alters the translational landscape of the OSN and induces Adcy3 expression; then, Adcy3 relieves that stress, restores global translation and makes OR choice permanent. PMID:24120133

  16. Predictive Assessments of Non-conventional Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In some situations, ecoepidemiological methods are the reasonable choice for setting effect benchmarks (e.g., protective criteria), especially for non-conventional pollutants. Ecoepidemiological methods are becoming more common because of advances in computational power and data...

  17. Evidence for adaptive evolution of olfactory receptor genes in 9 bird species.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Silke S; Fidler, Andrew E; Mueller, Jakob C; Kempenaers, Bart

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that positive selection, in particular selection favoring a change in the protein sequence, plays a role in the evolution of olfactory receptor (OR) gene repertoires in fish and mammals. ORs are 7-transmembrane domain (TM) proteins, members of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily in vertebrate genomes, and responsible for odorant binding and discrimination. OR gene repertoires in birds are surprisingly large and diverse, suggesting that birds have a keen olfactory sense. The aim of this study is to investigate signatures of positive selection in an expanded OR clade (group-gamma-c) that seems to be a characteristic of avian genomes. Using maximum-likelihood methods that estimate the d(N)/d(S) ratios and account for the effects of recombination, we show here that there is evidence for positive selection in group-gamma-c partial OR coding sequences of 9 bird species that are likely to have different olfactory abilities: the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), the black coucal (Centropus grillii), the brown kiwi (Apteryx australis), the canary (Serinus canaria), the galah (Eolophus roseicapillus), the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), the red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), and the snow petrel (Pagodroma nivea). Positively selected codons were predominantly located in TMs, which in other vertebrates are involved in odorant binding. Our data suggest that 1) at least some avian OR genes have been subjected to adaptive evolution, 2) the extent of such adaptive evolution differs between bird species, and 3) positive selective pressures may have been stronger on the group-gamma-c OR genes of species that have well-developed olfactory abilities. PMID:19965911

  18. Temporal Structure of Receptor Neuron Input to the Olfactory Bulb Imaged in Behaving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Verhagen, Justus V.; Wesson, Daniel W.; Pírez, Nicolás; Wachowiak, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of sensory input to the nervous system play a critical role in shaping higher-level processing. In the olfactory system, the dynamics of input from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are poorly characterized and depend on multiple factors, including respiration-driven airflow through the nasal cavity, odorant sorption kinetics, receptor–ligand interactions between odorant and receptor, and the electrophysiological properties of ORNs. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the temporal organization of ORN input to the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) during natural respiration, using calcium imaging to monitor ORN input to the OB in awake, head-fixed rats expressing odor-guided behaviors. We report several key findings. First, across a population of homotypic ORNs, each inhalation of odorant evokes a burst of action potentials having a rise time of about 80 ms and a duration of about 100 ms. This rise time indicates a relatively slow, progressive increase in ORN activation as odorant flows through the nasal cavity. Second, the dynamics of ORN input differ among glomeruli and for different odorants and concentrations, but remain reliable across successive inhalations. Third, inhalation alone (in the absence of odorant) evokes ORN input to a significant fraction of OB glomeruli. Finally, high-frequency sniffing of odorant strongly reduces the temporal coupling between ORN inputs and the respiratory cycle. These results suggest that the dynamics of sensory input to the olfactory system may play a role in coding odor information and that, in the awake animal, strategies for processing odor information may change as a function of sampling behavior. PMID:19091924

  19. Modulation by cyclic GMP of the odour sensitivity of vertebrate olfactory receptor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated a significant role for the cGMP second messenger system in vertebrate olfactory transduction but no clear functions have been identified for cGMP so far. Here, we have examined the effects of 8-Br-cGMP and carbon monoxide (CO) on odour responses of salamander olfactory receptor neurons using perforated patch recordings. We report that 8-Br-cGMP strongly down-regulates the odour sensitivity of the cells, with a K1/2 of 460 nM. This adaptation-like effect can be mimicked by CO, an activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, with a K1/2 of 1 microM. Sensitivity modulation is achieved through a regulatory chain of events in which cGMP stimulates a persistent background current due to the activation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. This in turn leads to sustained Ca2+ entry providing a negative feedback signal. One consequence of the Ca2+ entry is a shift to the right of the stimulus-response curve and a reduction in saturating odour currents. Together, these two effects can reduce the sensory generator current by up to twenty-fold. Thus, cGMP functions to control the gain of the G-protein coupled cAMP pathway. Another consequence of the action of cGMP is a marked prolongation of the odour response kinetics. The effects of CO/cGMP are long-lasting and can continue for minutes. Hence, we propose that cGMP helps to prevent saturation of the cell's response by adjusting the operational range of the cAMP cascade and contributes to olfactory adaptation by decreasing the sensitivity of olfactory receptor cells to repeated odour stimuli.

  20. QM/MM model of the mouse olfactory receptor MOR244-3 validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Zhuang, Hanyi; Block, Eric; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Zhang, Ruina; Wei, Jennifer N; Pan, Yi; Batista, Victor S

    2014-09-01

    Understanding structure/function relationships of olfactory receptors is challenging due to the lack of x-ray structural models. Here, we introduce a QM/MM model of the mouse olfactory receptor MOR244-3, responsive to organosulfur odorants such as (methylthio)methanethiol. The binding site consists of a copper ion bound to the heteroatoms of amino-acid residues H105, C109, and N202. The model is consistent with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and biochemical measurements of the receptor activation, and thus provides a valuable framework for further studies of the sense of smell at the molecular level. PMID:25185561

  1. QM/MM Model of the Mouse Olfactory Receptor MOR244-3 Validated by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Zhuang, Hanyi; Block, Eric; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Zhang, Ruina; Wei, Jennifer N.; Pan, Yi; Batista, Victor S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding structure/function relationships of olfactory receptors is challenging due to the lack of x-ray structural models. Here, we introduce a QM/MM model of the mouse olfactory receptor MOR244-3, responsive to organosulfur odorants such as (methylthio)methanethiol. The binding site consists of a copper ion bound to the heteroatoms of amino-acid residues H105, C109, and N202. The model is consistent with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and biochemical measurements of the receptor activation, and thus provides a valuable framework for further studies of the sense of smell at the molecular level. PMID:25185561

  2. Supersensitive detection and discrimination of enantiomers by dorsal olfactory receptors: evidence for hierarchical odour coding

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takaaki; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko; Emura, Makoto; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Kizumi, Miwako; Hamana, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Akio; Hirono, Junzo

    2015-01-01

    Enantiomeric pairs of mirror-image molecular structures are difficult to resolve by instrumental analyses. The human olfactory system, however, discriminates (−)-wine lactone from its (+)-form rapidly within seconds. To gain insight into receptor coding of enantiomers, we compared behavioural detection and discrimination thresholds of wild-type mice with those of ΔD mice in which all dorsal olfactory receptors are genetically ablated. Surprisingly, wild-type mice displayed an exquisite “supersensitivity” to enantiomeric pairs of wine lactones and carvones. They were capable of supersensitive discrimination of enantiomers, consistent with their high detection sensitivity. In contrast, ΔD mice showed selective major loss of sensitivity to the (+)-enantiomers. The resulting 108-fold differential sensitivity of ΔD mice to (−)- vs. (+)-wine lactone matched that observed in humans. This suggests that humans lack highly sensitive orthologous dorsal receptors for the (+)-enantiomer, similarly to ΔD mice. Moreover, ΔD mice showed >1010-fold reductions in enantiomer discrimination sensitivity compared to wild-type mice. ΔD mice detected one or both of the (−)- and (+)-enantiomers over a wide concentration range, but were unable to discriminate them. This “enantiomer odour discrimination paradox” indicates that the most sensitive dorsal receptors play a critical role in hierarchical odour coding for enantiomer identification. PMID:26361056

  3. Odorant receptors regulate the final glomerular coalescence of olfactory sensory neuron axons

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J.; Bartel, Dianna L.; Jaspers, Austin W.; Mobley, Arie S.; Imamura, Fumiaki; Greer, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Odorant receptors (OR) are strongly implicated in coalescence of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axons and the formation of olfactory bulb (OB) glomeruli. However, when ORs are first expressed relative to basal cell division and OSN axon extension is unknown. We developed an in vivo fate-mapping strategy that enabled us to follow OSN maturation and axon extension beginning at basal cell division. In parallel, we mapped the molecular development of OSNs beginning at basal cell division, including the onset of OR expression. Our data show that ORs are first expressed around 4 d following basal cell division, 24 h after OSN axons have reached the OB. Over the next 6+ days the OSN axons navigate the OB nerve layer and ultimately coalesce in glomeruli. These data provide a previously unidentified perspective on the role of ORs in homophilic OSN axon adhesion and lead us to propose a new model dividing axon extension into two phases. Phase I is OR-independent and accounts for up to 50% of the time during which axons approach the OB and begin navigating the olfactory nerve layer. Phase II is OR-dependent and concludes as OSN axons coalesce in glomeruli. PMID:25902488

  4. Expression Patterns of Odorant Receptors and Response Properties of Olfactory Sensory Neurons in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anderson C.; Tian, Huikai; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    The sense of smell deteriorates in normal aging, but the underling mechanisms are still elusive. Here we investigated age-related alterations in expression patterns of odorant receptor (OR) genes and functional properties of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs)—2 critical factors that define the odor detection threshold in the olfactory epithelium. Using in situ hybridization for 9 representative OR genes, we compared the cell densities of each OR in coronal nose sections at different ages (3–27 months). The cell density for different ORs peaked at different time points and a decline was observed for 6 of 9 ORs at advanced ages. Using patch clamp recordings, we then examined the odorant responses of individual OSNs coexpressing a defined OR (MOR23) and green fluorescent protein. The MOR23 neurons recorded from aged animals maintained a similar sensitivity and dynamic range in response to the cognate odorant (lyral) as those from younger mice. The results indicate that although the cell densities of OSNs expressing certain types of ORs decline at advanced ages, individual OSNs can retain their sensitivity. The implications of these findings in age-related olfactory deterioration are discussed. PMID:19759360

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptors promote disinhibition of olfactory bulb glomeruli that scales with input strength

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Joseph D.; Whitesell, Jennifer D.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the neural circuitry within glomeruli of the olfactory bulb plays a major role in affecting information flow between olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and output mitral cells (MCs). Glutamatergic external tufted (ET) cells, located at glomeruli, can act as intermediary cells in excitation between OSNs and MCs, whereas activation of MCs by OSNs is, in turn, suppressed by inhibitory synapses onto ET cells. In this study, we used patch-clamp recordings in rat olfactory bulb slices to examine the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in altering these glomerular signaling mechanisms. We found that activation of group II mGluRs profoundly reduced inhibition onto ET cells evoked by OSN stimulation. The mGluRs that mediated disinhibition were located on presynaptic GABAergic periglomerular cells and appeared to be activated by glutamate transients derived from dendrites in glomeruli. In terms of glomerular output, the mGluR-mediated reduction in GABA release led to a robust increase in the number of action potentials evoked by OSN stimulation in both ET cells and MCs. Importantly, however, the enhanced excitation was specific to when a glomerulus was strongly activated by OSN inputs. By being selective for strong vs. weak glomerular activation, mGluR-mediated disinhibition provides a mechanism to enhance the contrast in odor signals that activate OSN inputs into a single glomerulus at varying intensities. PMID:25552635

  6. Transduction in Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons is invariant to air speed

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi

    2012-01-01

    In the vertebrate nose, increasing air speed tends to increase the magnitude of odor-evoked activity in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), given constant odor concentration and duration. It is often assumed that the same is true of insect olfactory organs, but this has not been directly tested. In this study, we examined the effect of air speed on ORN responses in Drosophila melanogaster. We constructed an odor delivery device that allowed us to independently vary concentration and air speed, and we used a fast photoionization detector to precisely measure the actual odor concentration at the antenna while simultaneously recording spikes from ORNs in vivo. Our results demonstrate that Drosophila ORN odor responses are invariant to air speed, as long as odor concentration is kept constant. This finding was true across a >100-fold range of air speeds. Because odor hydrophobicity has been proposed to affect the air speed dependence of olfactory transduction, we tested a >1,000-fold range of hydrophobicity values and found that ORN responses are invariant to air speed across this full range. These results have implications for the mechanisms of odor delivery to Drosophila ORNs. Our findings are also significant because flies have a limited ability to control air flow across their antennae, unlike terrestrial vertebrates, which can control air flow within their nasal cavity. Thus, for the fly, invariance to air speed may be adaptive because it confers robustness to changing wind conditions. PMID:22815404

  7. A role for the androgen receptor in the sexual differentiation of the olfactory system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bodo, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory signals play a central role in the identification of a mating partner in rodents, and the behavioral response to these cues varies markedly between the sexes. As several other sexually dimorphic traits, this response is thought to differentiate as a result of exposure of the developing individual to gonadal steroids, but both the identity of the specific steroid signal and the neural structures targeted for differentiation on this particular case are largely unknown. The present review summarizes results obtained in our lab using genetic males affected by the testicular feminization syndrome (Tfm) as experimental model, and that led to the identification of a role for non-aromatized gonadal steroids acting through the androgen receptor (AR) in the differentiation of olfactory cues processing in mice. The existing literature about AR-mediated sexual differentiation of the CNS in animal models is discussed, along with potential targets for the action of non-aromatized gonadal steroids in either one of the subsystems that detect and process olfactory information in rodents. PMID:17915335

  8. Temporally diverse firing patterns in olfactory receptor neurons underlie spatiotemporal neural codes for odors

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Baranidharan; Joseph, Joby; Tang, Jeff; Stopfer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Odorants are represented as spatiotemporal patterns of spikes in neurons of the antennal lobe (AL, insects) and olfactory bulb (OB, vertebrates). These response patterns have been thought to arise primarily from interactions within the AL/OB, an idea supported, in part, by the assumption that olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) respond to odorants with simple firing patterns. However, activating the AL directly with simple pulses of current evoked responses in AL neurons that were much less diverse, complex, and enduring than responses elicited by odorants. Similarly, models of the AL driven by simplistic inputs generated relatively simple output. How then are dynamic neural codes for odors generated? Consistent with recent results from several other species, our recordings from locust ORNs showed a great diversity of temporal structure. Further, we found that, viewed as a population, many response features of ORNs were remarkably similar to those observed within the AL. Using a set of computational models constrained by our electrophysiological recordings, we found that the temporal heterogeneity of responses of ORNs critically underlies the generation of spatiotemporal odor codes in the AL. A test then performed in vivo confirmed that, given temporally homogeneous input, the AL cannot create diverse spatiotemporal patterns on its own; however, given temporally heterogeneous input, the AL generated realistic firing patterns. Finally, given the temporally structured input provided by ORNs, we clarified several separate, additional contributions of the AL to olfactory information processing. Thus, our results demonstrate the origin and subsequent reformatting of spatiotemporal neural codes for odors. PMID:20147528

  9. Seasonal increase in olfactory receptor neurons of the Japanese toad, Bufo japonicus, is paralleled by an increase in olfactory sensitivity to isoamyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hideo; Ichikawa, Masumi; Nagai, Takatoshi

    2009-10-01

    Japanese toads (Bufo japonicus) migrate to and from breeding sites in the early spring, possibly guided by olfactory cues. We previously showed that the electrical activity of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the toads was enhanced in the breeding period. We undertook morphological and physiological studies of the olfactory epithelium to determine whether any cellular substrate of the epithelium underlies the enhanced electrical activity of ORNs. The ORNs of the toads were labeled by antiserum to olfactory marker protein (OMP), and the morphology of the labeled cells and their distribution in the epithelium were examined throughout the year. The OMP-positive cells, distributed mainly in the basal and intermediate layers of the epithelium, were most numerous in the early breeding period. Cell proliferation in the epithelium detected by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling was most elevated in this period. The electrical activity of ORNs was examined by recording the electroolfactogram (EOG) in the toads throughout the year. Statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between the density of OMP-positive cells in the epithelium and the amplitude of the EOG responses. A greater number of ORNs in the breeding period possibly aids the toads in migrating to their breeding sites. PMID:19643818

  10. Chemosensory signals and their receptors in the olfactory neural system.

    PubMed

    Ihara, S; Yoshikawa, K; Touhara, K

    2013-12-19

    Chemical communication is widely used among various organisms to obtain essential information from their environment required for life. Although a large variety of molecules have been shown to act as chemical cues, the molecular and neural basis underlying the behaviors elicited by these molecules has been revealed for only a limited number of molecules. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the signaling molecules whose flow from receptor to specific behavior has been characterized. Discussing the molecules utilized by mice, insects, and the worm, we focus on how each organism has optimized its reception system to suit its living style. We also highlight how the production of these signaling molecules is regulated, an area in which considerable progress has been recently made. PMID:24045101

  11. Comparison of olfactory receptor (EOG) and bulbar (EEG) responses to amino acids in the catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Byrd, R P; Caprio, J

    1982-10-01

    The olfactory bulb electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used as a method to imply receptor events12,13. However, experiments to correlate olfactory receptor and bulbar EEG activity in the same species of fish has not been performed. Reported here is the comparison between the simultaneously recorded receptor electroolfactogram (EOG) and the bulbar EEG in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. With amino acid stimulation of the olfactory mucosa, both the EOG and EEG exhibited an initial phasic response followed by a tonic level maintained throughout the stimulus duration. The relative magnitude of the tonic EEG activity (tonic level/phasic response), however, was significantly less than that for the EOG. Both EOG and integrated EEG responses increased exponentially with logarithmic increase in stimulus concentration from threshold to 10(-3) M. Estimated electrophysiological thresholds for 5 amino acids tested determined by both recording methods did not differ significantly and averaged 10(-9.3) +/- 0.2 M for the EOG and 10(-9.1) +/- 0.2 M for the EEG. There was also a significant correlation between the order of relative effectiveness for 11 amino acids determined by EOG and EEG recordings. These results indicate that in the catfish the olfactory bulb EEG is an indicator of olfactory receptor activity. PMID:7139300

  12. In vivo responses of single olfactory receptor neurons of channel catfish to binary mixtures of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Caprio, J

    1997-01-01

    For the first time in any vertebrate, in vivo responses of single olfactory receptor neurons to odorant mixtures were studied quantitatively. Extracellular electrophysiological response of 54 single olfactory receptor neurons from 23 channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, to binary mixtures of amino acids and to their components were recorded simultaneously with the electroolfactogram (EOG). For 57% (73 of 128) of the tests, no significant change (N) from spontaneous activity occurred. Responses to the remaining 55 tests of binary mixtures were excitatory (E; 13%) or suppressive (S; 30%). No response type was associated with any specific mixture across the neurons sampled. Eighty-six percent of the responses of catfish olfactory receptor neurons to binary mixtures were classified similar to at least one of the component responses, a percentage comparable (i.e., 89%) with that observed for single olfactory bulb neurons in the same species to equivalent binary mixtures. The responses of single olfactory receptor neurons to component-similar binary mixtures (i.e., component responses were both E, both S, and both N, respectively) were generally (80% of 59 tests) classified similar to the responses to the components. For E+N and S+N binary mixtures, the N component often (66% of 58 tests) reduced or concealed (i.e., "masked") the excitatory and suppressive responses, respectively. For the majority (6 of 11 tests) of E + S binary mixtures, null activity resulted. Responses to the remaining five tests were either excitatory (n = 3) or suppressive (n = 2). PMID:9120550

  13. Modification of Male Courtship Motivation by Olfactory Habituation via the GABAA Receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Touhara, Kazushige; Ejima, Aki

    2015-01-01

    A male-specific component, 11-cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) works as an anti-aphrodisiac pheromone in Drosophila melanogaster. The presence of cVA on a male suppresses the courtship motivation of other males and contributes to suppression of male-male homosexual courtship, while the absence of cVA on a female stimulates the sexual motivation of nearby males and enhances the male-female interaction. However, little is known how a male distinguishes the presence or absence of cVA on a target fly from either self-produced cVA or secondhand cVA from other males in the vicinity. In this study, we demonstrate that male flies have keen sensitivity to cVA; therefore, the presence of another male in the area reduces courtship toward a female. This reduced level of sexual motivation, however, could be overcome by pretest odor exposure via olfactory habituation to cVA. Real-time imaging of cVA-responsive sensory neurons using the neural activity sensor revealed that prolonged exposure to cVA decreased the levels of cVA responses in the primary olfactory center. Pharmacological and genetic screening revealed that signal transduction via GABAA receptors contributed to this olfactory habituation. We also found that the habituation experience increased the copulation success of wild-type males in a group. In contrast, transgenic males, in which GABA input in a small subset of local neurons was blocked by RNAi, failed to acquire the sexual advantage conferred by habituation. Thus, we illustrate a novel phenomenon in which olfactory habituation positively affects sexual capability in a competitive environment. PMID:26252206

  14. Calcium-stores mediate adaptation in axon terminals of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In vertebrates and invertebrates, sensory neurons adapt to variable ambient conditions, such as the duration or repetition of a stimulus, a physiological mechanism considered as a simple form of non-associative learning and neuronal plasticity. Although various signaling pathways, as cAMP, cGMP, and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R) play a role in adaptation, their precise mechanisms of action at the cellular level remain incompletely understood. Recently, in Drosophila, we reported that odor-induced Ca2+-response in axon terminals of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is related to odor duration. In particular, a relatively long odor stimulus (such as 5 s) triggers the induction of a second component involving intracellular Ca2+-stores. Results We used a recently developed in-vivo bioluminescence imaging approach to quantify the odor-induced Ca2+-activity in the axon terminals of ORNs. Using either a genetic approach to target specific RNAs, or a pharmacological approach, we show that the second component, relying on the intracellular Ca2+-stores, is responsible for the adaptation to repetitive stimuli. In the antennal lobes (a region analogous to the vertebrate olfactory bulb) ORNs make synaptic contacts with second-order neurons, the projection neurons (PNs). These synapses are modulated by GABA, through either GABAergic local interneurons (LNs) and/or some GABAergic PNs. Application of GABAergic receptor antagonists, both GABAA or GABAB, abolishes the adaptation, while RNAi targeting the GABABR (a metabotropic receptor) within the ORNs, blocks the Ca2+-store dependent component, and consequently disrupts the adaptation. These results indicate that GABA exerts a feedback control. Finally, at the behavioral level, using an olfactory test, genetically impairing the GABABR or its signaling pathway specifically in the ORNs disrupts olfactory adapted behavior. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that a relatively long lasting

  15. Electrophysiological evidence for acidic, basic, and neutral amino acid olfactory receptor sites in the catfish.

    PubMed

    Caprio, J; Byrd, R P

    1984-09-01

    Electrophysiological experiments indicate that olfactory receptors of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, contain different receptor sites for the acidic (A), basic (B), and neutral amino acids; further, at least two partially interacting neutral sites exist, one for the hydrophilic neutral amino acids containing short side chains (SCN), and the second for the hydrophobic amino acids containing long side chains (LCN). The extent of cross-adaptation was determined by comparing the electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses to 20 "test" amino acids during continuous bathing of the olfactory mucosa with water only (control) to those during each of the eight "adapting" amino acid regimes. Both the adapting and test amino acids were adjusted in concentrations to provide approximately equal response magnitudes in the unadapted state. Under all eight adapting regimes, the test EOG responses were reduced from those obtained in the unadapted state, but substantial quantitative differences resulted, depending upon the molecular structure of the adapting stimulus. Analyses of the patterns of EOG responses to the test stimuli identified and characterized the respective "transduction processes," a term used to describe membrane events initiated by a particular subset of amino acid stimuli that are intricately linked to the origin of the olfactory receptor potential. Only when the stimulus compounds interact with different transduction processes are the stimuli assumed to bind to different membrane "sites." Four relatively independent L-alpha-amino acid transduction processes (and thus at least four binding sites) identified in this report include: (a) the A process for aspartic and glutamic acids; (b) the B process for arginine and lysine; (c) the SCN process for glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and possibly cysteine; (d) the LCN process for methionine, ethionine, valine, norvaline, leucine, norleucine, glutamic acid-gamma-methyl ester, histidine, phenylalanine, and also

  16. How does your kidney smell? Emerging roles for olfactory receptors in renal function.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Blythe D; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are chemosensors that are responsible for one's sense of smell. In addition to this specialized role in the nose, recent evidence suggests that ORs are also found in a variety of additional tissues including the kidney. As this list of renal ORs continues to expand, it is becoming clear that they play important roles in renal and whole-body physiology, including a novel role in blood pressure regulation. In this review, we highlight important considerations that are crucial when studying ORs and present the current literature on renal ORs and their emerging relevance in maintaining renal function. PMID:26264790

  17. Interactions of odorants with olfactory receptors and receptor neurons match the perceptual dynamics observed for woody and fruity odorant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chaput, M A; El Mountassir, F; Atanasova, B; Thomas-Danguin, T; Le Bon, A M; Perrut, A; Ferry, B; Duchamp-Viret, P

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to create a direct bridge between observations on peripheral and central responses to odorant mixtures and their components. Three experiments were performed using mixtures of fruity (isoamyl acetate; ISO) and woody (whiskey lactone; WL) odorants known to contribute to some of the major notes in Burgundy red wine. These experiments consisted of (i) calcium imaging of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T) transfected with olfactory receptors (ORs); (ii) single-unit electrophysiological recordings from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and analyses of electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses in the rat nose in vivo; and (iii) psychophysical measurements of the perceived intensity of the mixtures as rated by human subjects. The calcium imaging and electrophysiological results revealed that ISO and WL can act simultaneously on single ORs or ORNs and confirm that receptor responses to mixtures are not the result of a simple sum of the effects of the individual mixture compounds. The addition of WL to ISO principally suppressed the ORN activation induced by ISO alone and was found to enhance this activation in a subset of cases. In the human studies, the addition of high concentrations of WL to ISO decreased the perceived intensity of the ISO. In contrast, the addition of low concentrations of WL enhanced the perceived intensity of the fruity note (ISO) in this mixture, as it enhanced EOG responses in ORNs. Thus, both OR and ORN responses to ISO + WL mixtures faithfully reflected perceptual response changes, so the odour mixture information is set up after the peripheral stage of the olfactory system. PMID:22304504

  18. Olfactory discrimination varies in mice with different levels of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, Jennifer L.; Arevalo, Nicole L.; Blatner, Megan J.; Dang, An K.; Clevenger, Amy C.; Adams, Catherine E.; Restrepo, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that schizophrenics have decreased expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine (α7) receptors in the hippocampus and other brain regions, paranoid delusions, disorganized speech, deficits in auditory gating (i.e., inability to inhibit neuronal responses to repetitive auditory stimuli), and difficulties in odor discrimination and detection. Here we use mice with decreased α7 expression that also show a deficit in auditory gating to determine if these mice have similar deficits in olfaction. In the adult mouse olfactory bulb (OB), α7 expression localizes in the glomerular layer; however, the functional role of α7 is unknown. We show that inbred mouse strains (i.e., C3H and C57) with varying α7 expression (e.g., α7 wild-type [α7+/+], α7 heterozygous knock-out [α7+/−] and α7 homozygous knockout mice [α7−/−]) significantly differ in odor discrimination and detection of chemically related odorant pairs. Using [125I] α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT) autoradiography, α7 expression was measured in the OB. As previously demonstrated, α-BGT binding was localized to the glomerular layer. Significantly more expression of α7 was observed in C57 α7+/+ mice compared to C3H α7+/+ mice. Furthermore, C57 α7+/+ mice were able to detect a significantly lower concentration of an odor in a mixture compared to C3H α7+/+ mice. Both C57 and C3H α7+/+ mice discriminated between chemically related odorants sooner than α7+/− or α7−/− mice. These data suggest that α7-nicotinic-receptors contribute strongly to olfactory discrimination and detection in mice and may be one of the mechanisms producing olfactory dysfunction in schizophrenics. PMID:20713028

  19. The influence of ensheathing cells on olfactory receptor cell neurite outgrowth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kafitz, K W; Greer, C A

    1998-11-30

    We previously reported that laminin substrates increased primary (1 degree) neurite outgrowth from olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) in vitro. To further explore mechanisms underlying the outgrowth of ORC neurites, we have cocultured ORCs with the ensheathing cells (ENSH) from the olfactory nerve. ORCs were plated either: (i) directly on monolayers of ENSH (prepared with minor modifications as reported by Doucette and Devon, or (ii) on coverslips suspended above the ENSH monolayer to investigate diffusible trophic influences of ENSH. In addition, ORCs were cocultured with either olfactory bulb glia (OBG) or hippocampal astrocytes (HG) or grown on either laminin (LN) substrates or poly-L-lysine (PLL) controls. The length of ORC neurites was determined after 48 hr in vitro. Immunocytochemical characterization of the ENSH cultures for p75 nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed that those cultures contained more than 80% ENSH. In OBG cultures approximately 10% and in HG cultures no cells with ENSH characteristics were found. All cells with ENSH characteristics were also LN-immunoreactive. After 48 hr in culture ORCs had the longest 1 degree neurites when they were cocultured with ENSH. No significant differences in the 1 degree neurite length were found comparing ORCs grown directly on ENSH and ORCs physically separated from ENSH. ORCs cultured on HG and on EHS-LN showed no significant differences in the ORC 1 degree neurite length, but on both substrates the ORC 1 degree neurites were significantly shorter than on ENSH. The length of the ORC secondary neurites did not vary significantly in the different culture conditions. Our results suggest that while LN appears to contribute to ORC neurite extension, additional diffusible factors released from ENSH are likely to be further determinants of neurite outgrowth. Because the OBG and HG cocultures did not influence ORC neurite outgrowth as significantly as did the ENSH, it

  20. Evolution of the "OR37" subfamily of olfactory receptors: a cross-species comparison.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Reiner; Lambert, Thomas D; Samollow, Paul B; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Joerg

    2006-04-01

    Genes encoding the olfactory receptors of the "OR37" subfamily of the mouse are characterized by special features including a clustered expression pattern, assembly in two distinct gene clusters, and highly conserved putative promoter motifs. Mining the rat and dog databases revealed that these two species possess highly conserved clusters of OR37 genes at two syntenic genomic loci. In a prototherian mammal, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), none of the characteristic OR37 genes were found. Examination of a metatherian mammal, the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) revealed seven canonical OR37 genes, all phylogenetically related to cluster II genes and also organized similar to cluster II of eutherian species. In addition, their 5' upstream regions comprised sequence motifs related to the putative regulatory sequences of cluster II genes. Typical cluster I OR37 genes were identified only in the eutherian mammals examined, including the evolutionary ancient anteater, wherein OR37 genes related to both clusters were present. Together, these results reveal novel information concerning the phylogenetic origin and important evolutionary steps of the mammalian-specific OR37 olfactory receptor family. PMID:16547640

  1. Anatomical and molecular consequences of Unilateral Naris Closure on two populations of olfactory sensory neurons expressing defined odorant receptors.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Adrien; Aoudé, Imad; Soubeyre, Vanessa; Tazir, Bassim; Cadiou, Hervé; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2016-07-28

    Mammalian olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary elements of the olfactory system, are located in the olfactory epithelium lining the nasal cavity. Exposed to the environment, their lifespan is short. Consequently, OSNs are regularly regenerated and several reports show that activity strongly modulates their development and regeneration: the peripheral olfactory system can adjust to the amount of stimulus through compensatory mechanisms. Unilateral naris occlusion (UNO) was frequently used to investigate this mechanism at the entire epithelium level. However, there is little data regarding the effects of UNO at the cellular level, especially on individual neuronal populations expressing a defined odorant receptor. Here, using UNO during the first three postnatal weeks, we analyzed the anatomical and molecular consequences of sensory deprivation in OSNs populations expressing the MOR23 and M71 receptors. The density of MOR23-expressing neurons is decreased in the closed side while UNO does not affect the density of M71-expressing neurons. Using Real Time qPCR on isolated neurons, we observed that UNO modulates the transcript levels for transduction pathway proteins (odorant receptors, CNGA2, PDE1c). The transcripts modulated by UNO will differ between populations depending on the receptor expressed. These results suggest that sensory deprivation will have different effects on different OSNs' populations. As a consequence, early experience will shape the functional properties of OSNs differently depending on the type of odorant receptor they express. PMID:27189720

  2. G protein-coupled odorant receptors underlie mechanosensitivity in mammalian olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Timothy; Yu, Yiqun; Grosmaitre, Xavier; Wang, Jue; Santarelli, Lindsey C.; Savigner, Agnes; Qiao, Xin; Wang, Zhenshan; Storm, Daniel R.; Ma, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive cells are essential for organisms to sense the external and internal environments, and a variety of molecules have been implicated as mechanical sensors. Here we report that odorant receptors (ORs), a large family of G protein-coupled receptors, underlie the responses to both chemical and mechanical stimuli in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Genetic ablation of key signaling proteins in odor transduction or disruption of OR–G protein coupling eliminates mechanical responses. Curiously, OSNs expressing different OR types display significantly different responses to mechanical stimuli. Genetic swap of putatively mechanosensitive ORs abolishes or reduces mechanical responses of OSNs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of an OR restores mechanosensitivity in loss-of-function OSNs. Lastly, heterologous expression of an OR confers mechanosensitivity to its host cells. These results indicate that certain ORs are both necessary and sufficient to cause mechanical responses, revealing a previously unidentified mechanism for mechanotransduction. PMID:25550517

  3. Axon Targeting of Olfactory Receptor Neurons is Patterned by Coupled Hedgehog Signaling at Two Distinct Steps

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ya-Hui; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Beachy, Philip A.; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We present evidence for a novel, coupled two-step action of Hedgehog signaling in patterning axon targeting of Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). In the first step, differential Hedgehog pathway activity in peripheral sensory organ precursors creates ORN populations with different levels of the Patched receptor. Different Patched levels in ORNs then determine axonal responsiveness to target-derived Hedgehog in the brain: only ORN axons that do not express high levels of Patched are responsive to and require a second-step of Hedgehog signaling for target selection. Hedgehog signaling in the imaginal sensory organ precursors thus confers differential ORN responsiveness to Hedgehog-mediated axon targeting in the brain. This mechanism contributes to the spatial coordination of ORN cell bodies in the periphery and their glomerular targets in the brain. Such coupled two-step signaling may be more generally used to coordinate other spatially and temporally segregated developmental events. PMID:20850015

  4. Olfaction in the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni. I: Identification of olfactory receptor neuron types responding to environmental odors.

    PubMed

    Hull, C D; Cribb, B W

    2001-05-01

    The electroantennogram method was used to investigate the number of distinct olfactory receptor neuron types responding to a range of behaviorally active volatile chemicals in gravid Queensland fruit flies, Bactrocera tryoni. Three receptor neuron types were identified. One type responds to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide; a second to ethanol; and a third to n-butyric acid and ammonia. The receptor neuron type responding to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide consists of three subtypes. The presence of a limited number of receptor neuron types responding to a diverse set of chemicals and the reception of carbon dioxide by a receptor neuron type that responds to other odorants are novel aspects of the peripheral olfactory discrimination process. PMID:11471941

  5. Olfactory receptor cells on the cockroach antennae: responses to the direction and rate of change in food odour concentration.

    PubMed

    Hinterwirth, Armin; Zeiner, Reinhard; Tichy, Harald

    2004-06-01

    In insects, information about food odour is encoded by olfactory receptor cells with characteristic response spectra, located in several types of cuticular sensilla. Within short, hair-like sensilla on the cockroach's antenna, antagonistic pairs of olfactory receptor cells shape information inflow to the CNS by providing excitatory responses for both increases and decreases in food odour concentration. The segregation of food odour information into parallel ON and OFF responses suggests that temporal concentration changes become enhanced in the sensory output. When food odour concentration changes slowly and continuously up and down with smooth transition from one direction to another, the ON and OFF olfactory cells not only signal a succession of odour concentrations but also the rate with which odour concentration happens to be changing. Access to the values of such cues is of great use to an insect orientating to an odour source. With them they may extract concentration gradients from odour plumes. PMID:15217396

  6. G-protein coupled Receptor Kinase 2 is required for rhythmic olfactory responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Shintaro; Krishnan, Parthasarathy; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Hardin, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background The Drosophila circadian clock controls rhythms in the amplitude of odor-induced electrophysiological responses that peak during the middle of night. These rhythms are dependent on clocks in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which suggests that odorant receptors(ORs) or OR-dependent processes are under clock control. Since responses to odors are initiated by heteromeric OR complexes that form odor-gated and cyclic-nucleotide-activated cation channels, we tested whether regulators of ORs were under circadian clock control. Results The levels of G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (Gprk2) mRNA and protein cycle in a circadian clock-dependent manner with a peak around mid-night in antennae. Gprk2 overexpression in OSNs from wild-type or cyc01 flies elicits constant high amplitude electroantennogram (EAG) responses to ethyl acetate, whereas Gprk mutants produce constant low amplitude EAG responses. Odorant receptors (ORs) accumulate to high levels in the dendrites of OSNs around mid-night, and this dendritic localization of ORs is enhanced by Gprk2 at times when ORs are primarily localized in the cell body. Conclusion These results support a model in which circadian clock-dependent rhythms in Gprk2 abundance control the rhythmic accumulation of ORs in OSN dendrites, which in turn control rhythms in olfactory responses. The enhancement of OR function by GPRK2 contrasts with the traditional role of Gprks in desensitizing activated receptors, and suggests that GPRK2 functions through a fundamentally different mechanism to modulate OR activity. PMID:18499458

  7. Expression of the NMDA receptor subunit GluN3A (NR3A) in the olfactory system and its regulatory role on olfaction in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Wei, Ling; Deveau, Todd C; Gu, Xiaohuan; Yu, Shan Ping

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the olfactory system and its N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA) receptor subunits [GluN1 (NR1), GluN2A (NR2A), and GluN2B (NR2B)] are expressed at synapses in the olfactory bulb and olfactory epithelium. Thus, glutamatergic neurons and NMDA receptors play key roles in olfaction. GluN3A (NR3A) is a unique inhibitory subunit in the NMDA receptor complex; however, the expression and functional role of GluN3A in the olfactory bulb and epithelium remain unclear. The present study examined the expression patterns of GluN3A in the olfactory bulb and epithelium and explored its functional role in the olfactory system. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses revealed that GluN3A is abundantly expressed in different cellular layers of the olfactory bulb and epithelium of the adult wild type (WT) mice. In littermate GluN3A knockout (GluN3A(-/-); KO) mice, the expression of olfactory marker protein normally found in mature olfactory sensory neurons was significantly reduced in the olfactory bulb and epithelium. A butyl alcohol stimulus increased immediate-early gene c-Fos expression in the olfactory system of WT mice, while this response was absent in GluN3A KO mice. The level of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II was significantly lower in GluN3A KO mice compared to WT mice. In buried food finding test, GluN3A mice took significantly longer time to find food compared to WT mice. Consistently, impaired odor distinguishing ability was seen in GluN3A KO mice. These findings suggest that GluN3A, expressed in the adult olfactory system, plays a significant regulatory role in olfactory development and functional activity. PMID:26334321

  8. Immunochemical strategy for quantification of G-coupled olfactory receptor proteins on natural nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Sanmartí-Espinal, Marta; Galve, Roger; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Persuy, Marie-Annick; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Marco, M-Pilar; Samitier, Josep

    2016-03-01

    Cell membrane proteins are involved in a variety of biochemical pathways and therefore constitute important targets for therapy and development of new drugs. Bioanalytical platforms and binding assays using these membrane protein receptors for drug screening or diagnostic require the construction of well-characterized liposome and lipid bilayer arrays that act as support to prevent protein denaturation during biochip processing. Quantification of the protein receptors in the lipid membrane arrays is a key issue in order to produce reproducible and well-characterized chips. Herein, we report a novel immunochemical analytical approach for the quantification of membrane proteins (i.e., G-protein-coupled receptor, GPCR) in nanovesicles (NVs). The procedure allows direct determination of tagged receptors (i.e., c-myc tag) without any previous protein purification or extraction steps. The immunochemical method is based on a microplate ELISA format and quantifies this tag on proteins embedded in NVs with detectability in the picomolar range, using protein bioconjugates as reference standards. The applicability of the method is demonstrated through the quantification of the c-myc-olfactory receptor (OR, c-myc-OR1740) in the cell membrane NVs. The reported method opens the possibility to develop well-characterized drug-screening platforms based on G-coupled proteins embedded on membranes. PMID:26724468

  9. Extracellular glutamate level and NMDA receptor subunit expression in mouse olfactory bulb following nanoparticle-rich diesel exhaust exposure.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Mitsushima, Dai; Yamamoto, Shoji; Fujitani, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Hirano, Seishiro; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2009-08-01

    In this present study, we aimed to investigate the extracellular glutamate level and memory function-related gene expression in the mouse olfactory bulb after exposure of the animals to nanoparticle-rich diesel exhaust (NRDE) with or without bacterial cell wall component. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a cell wall component derived from Staphylococcus aureus, was used to induce systemic inflammation. Male BALB/c mice were exposed to clean air (particle concentration, 4.58 microg/m(3)) or NRDE (148.86 microg/m(3)) 5 h per day on 5 consecutive days of the week for 4 wk with or without weekly intraperitoneal injection of LTA. We examined the extracellular glutamate levels in the olfactory bulb using in vivo microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography assay. Then, we collected the olfactory bulb to examine the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) IV and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)-1 using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). NRDE and/or LTA caused significantly increased extracellular glutamate levels in the olfactory bulb of mice. Moreover, the exposure of mice to NRDE upregulates NR1, NR2A, NR2B, and CaMKIV mRNAs in the olfactory bulb, while LTA upregulates only NR2B and CREB1 mRNAs. These findings suggest that NRDE and LTA cause glutamate-induced neurotoxicity separately and accompanied by changes in the expression of NMDA receptor subunits and related kinase and transcription factor in the mouse olfactory bulb. This is the first study to show the correlation between glutamate toxicity and memory function-related gene expressions in the mouse olfactory bulb following exposure to NRDE. PMID:19653804

  10. Molecular identification and expressive characterization of an olfactory co-receptor gene in the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiting; Gao, Pengfei; Zhang, Chunxiang; Ma, Weihua; Jiang, Yusuo

    2013-01-01

    Olfaction recognition process is extraordinarily complex in insects, and the olfactory receptors play an important function in the process. In this paper, a highly conserved olfactory co-receptor gene, AcerOr2 (ortholog to the Drosophila melanogaster Or83b), cloned from the antennae of the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana cerana Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Apidae), using reverse transcriptase PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length sequence of the gene was 1763 bp long, and the cDNA open reading frame encoded 478 amino acid residues, including 7 putative transmembrane domains. Alignment analysis revealed that AcerOr2 shares high homology (> 74%) with similar olfactory receptors found in other Hymenoptera species. The amino acid identity with the closely related species Apis mellifera reached 99.8%. The developmental expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR suggested that the AcerOr2 transcript was expressed at a relatively low level in the larval stage, whereas it was expressed broadly in the pupal and adult stages, with a significantly high level on the days just before and after eclosion. In situ hybridization showed that AcerOr2 mRNA was expressed in sensilla placodea and on the basal region of the worker antennal cuticle, in accordance with the previous conclusions that the conserved genes are expressed in most olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:24224665

  11. Mechanisms underlying odorant-induced and spontaneous calcium signals in olfactory receptor neurons of spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Tizeta; Derby, Charles D; Schmidt, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    We determined if a newly developed antennule slice preparation allows studying chemosensory properties of spiny lobster olfactory receptor neurons under in situ conditions with Ca(2+) imaging. We show that chemical stimuli reach the dendrites of olfactory receptor neurons but not their somata, and that odorant-induced Ca(2+) signals in the somata are sufficiently stable over time to allow stimulation with a substantial number of odorants. Pharmacological manipulations served to elucidate the source of odorant-induced Ca(2+) transients and spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in the somata of olfactory receptor neurons. Both Ca(2+) signals are primarily mediated by an influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels that can be blocked by CoCl2 and the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil. Intracellular Ca(2+) stores contribute little to odorant-induced Ca(2+) transients and spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations. The odorant-induced Ca(2+) transients as well as the spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations depend on action potentials mediated by Na(+) channels that are largely TTX-insensitive but blocked by the local anesthetics tetracaine and lidocaine. Collectively, these results corroborate the conclusion that odorant-induced Ca(2+) transients and spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in the somata of olfactory receptor neurons closely reflect action potential activity associated with odorant-induced phasic-tonic responses and spontaneous bursting, respectively. Therefore, both types of Ca(2+) signals represent experimentally accessible proxies of spiking. PMID:24178131

  12. Electro-olfactogram and multiunit olfactory receptor responses to complex mixtures of amino acids in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Kang, J S; Caprio, J

    1991-10-01

    In vivo electrophysiological recordings from populations of olfactory receptor neurons in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, clearly showed that both electro-olfactogram and integrated neural responses of olfactory receptor cells to complex mixtures consisting of up to 10 different amino acids were predictable with knowledge of (a) the responses to the individual components in the mixture and (b) the relative independence of the respective receptor sites for the component stimuli. All amino acid stimuli used to form the various mixtures were initially adjusted in concentration to provide approximately equal response magnitudes. Olfactory receptor responses to both multimixtures and binary mixtures were recorded. Multimixtures were formed by mixing equal aliquots of 3-10 different amino acids. Binary mixtures were formed by mixing equal aliquots of two equally stimulatory solutions. Solution 1 contained either one to nine different neutral amino acids with long side-chains (LCNs) or one to five different neutral amino acids with short side-chains (SCNs). Solution 2, comprising the binary mixture, consisted of only a single stimulus, either a LCN, SCN, basic, or acidic amino acid. The increasing magnitude of the olfactory receptor responses to mixtures consisting of an increasing number of neutral amino acids indicated that multiple receptor site types with highly overlapping specificities exist to these compounds. For both binary mixtures and multimixtures composed of neutral and basic or neutral and acidic amino acids, the receptor responses were significantly enhanced compared with those mixtures consisting of an equal number of only neutral amino acids. These results demonstrate that receptor sites for the basic and acidic amino acids, respectively, are highly independent of those for the neutral amino acids, and suggest that a mechanism for synergism is the simultaneous activation of relatively independent receptor sites by the components in the mixture

  13. Non-conventional mesons at PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Non-conventional mesons, such as glueballs and tetraquarks, will be in the focus of the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. In this lecture we recall the basic properties of QCD and describe some features of unconventional states. We focus on the search of the not-yet discovered glueballs and the use of the extended Linear Sigma Model for this purpose, and on the already discovered but not-yet understood X, Y, Z states.

  14. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene‐targeted strains of the OR‐IRES‐marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, “count every cell” strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain‐specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17‐fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene‐targeted strains. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:199–209, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26100963

  15. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona; Mombaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene-targeted strains of the OR-IRES-marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, "count every cell" strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain-specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17-fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene-targeted strains. PMID:26100963

  16. Contribution of the receptor guanylyl cyclase GC-D to chemosensory function in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Cockerham, Renee E.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Garbers, David L.; Reed, Randall R.; Zufall, Frank; Munger, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory epithelium (MOE) recognizes and transduces olfactory cues through a G protein-coupled, cAMP-dependent signaling cascade. Additional chemosensory transduction mechanisms have been suggested but remain controversial. We show that a subset of MOE neurons expressing the orphan receptor guanylyl cyclase GC-D and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit CNGA3 employ an excitatory cGMP-dependent transduction mechanism for chemodetection. By combining gene targeting of Gucy2d, which encodes GC-D, with patch clamp recording and confocal Ca2+ imaging from single dendritic knobs in situ, we find that GC-D cells recognize the peptide hormones uroguanylin and guanylin as well as natural urine stimuli. These molecules stimulate an excitatory, cGMP-dependent signaling cascade that increases intracellular Ca2+ and action potential firing. Responses are eliminated in both Gucy2d- and Cnga3-null mice, demonstrating the essential role of GC-D and CNGA3 in the transduction of these molecules. The sensitive and selective detection of two important natriuretic peptides by the GC-D neurons suggests the possibility that these cells contribute to the maintenance of salt and water homeostasis or the detection of cues related to hunger, satiety, or thirst. PMID:17724338

  17. Ca2+-activated K+ currents regulate odor adaptation by modulating spike encoding of olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Fusao

    2002-04-01

    The olfactory system is thought to accomplish odor adaptation through the ciliary transduction machinery in olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). However, ORCs that have lost their cilia can exhibit spike frequency accommodation in which the action potential frequency decreases with time despite a steady depolarizing stimulus. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs might serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, because spiking responses in ORCs encode the odor information. Here I investigate the adaptational mechanism at the somatic membrane using conventional and dynamic patch-clamp recording techniques, which enable the ciliary mechanism to be bypassed. A conditioning stimulus with an odorant-induced current markedly shifted the response range of action potentials induced by the same test stimulus to higher concentrations of the odorant, indicating odor adaptation. This effect was inhibited by charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin, Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers, suggesting that somatic Ca2+-activated K+ currents regulate odor adaptation by modulating spike encoding. I conclude that not only the ciliary machinery but also the somatic membrane currents are crucial to odor adaptation. PMID:11916858

  18. Evolutionary dynamics of olfactory and other chemosensory receptor genes in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Niimura, Yoshihito

    2007-01-01

    The numbers of functional olfactory receptor (OR) genes in humans and mice are about 400 and 1,000 respectively. In both humans and mice, these genes exist as genomic clusters and are scattered over almost all chromosomes. The difference in the number of genes between the two species is apparently caused by massive inactivation of OR genes in the human lineage and a substantial increase of OR genes in the mouse lineage after the human–mouse divergence. Compared with mammals, fishes have a much smaller number of OR genes. However, the OR gene family in fishes is much more divergent than that in mammals. Fishes have many different groups of genes that are absent in mammals, suggesting that the mammalian OR gene family is characterized by the loss of many group genes that existed in the ancestor of vertebrates and the subsequent expansion of specific groups of genes. Therefore, this gene family apparently changed dynamically depending on the evolutionary lineage and evolved under the birth-and-death model of evolution. Study of the evolutionary changes of two gene families for vomeronasal receptors and two gene families for taste receptors, which are structurally similar, but remotely related to OR genes, showed that some of the gene families evolved in the same fashion as the OR gene family. It appears that the number and types of genes in chemosensory receptor gene families have evolved in response to environmental needs, but they are also affected by fortuitous factors. PMID:16607462

  19. A kinetic model of the transient phase in the response of olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Getz, W M

    1999-10-01

    A model is presented that predicts the instantaneous spike rate of an olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) in response to the quality and concentration of an odor stimulus. The model accounts for the chemical kinetics of ligand-receptor binding and activation processes, and implicitly the initiation of second messenger cascades that lead to depolarization and/or hyperpolarization of the ORN membrane. Both of these polarizing processes are included in the most general form of the model, as well as a process that restores the voltage to its negative resting state. The spike rate is assumed to be linearly proportional to the level of voltage depolarization above a critical negative voltage level. The model includes the simplifying assumption that activation of bound ligand-receptor complexes by G-proteins and other enabling molecules follows a Monod function that has the ratio of enabling molecules to bound unactivated ligand-receptor complexes as its argument. Parameters are selected that provide an excellent fit of the model to previously published empirical data on the response of cockroach ORNs to pulsed 1-hexanol stimuli. The sensitivity of model output to various model parameters is investigated and changes to parameters are discussed that would improve the ability of ORNs to follow rapidly pulsed stimuli. PMID:10576257

  20. Cyclic GMP evoked calcium transients in olfactory receptor cell growth cones.

    PubMed

    Kafitz, K W; Leinders-Zufall, T; Zufall, F; Greer, C A

    2000-03-20

    Nitric oxide-induced calcium transients in growth cones are believed to be mediated by cyclic nucleotides. Because nitric oxide is thought to influence the development of olfactory receptor cells (ORCs), we have begun to explore the effect of cyclic nucleotides on ORC growth cones. Cultured ORCs were loaded with fluo-3 AM and confocal imaging was employed to monitor calcium transients following cyclic nucleotide-gated channel activation. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP at the growth cone caused transient increases in fluorescence which were restricted to the growth cone and lasted tens of seconds. The signal was abolished by LY83583, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. 8-Bromo-cGMP also inhibited further extension of growth cones. The data indicate that ORC growth cones exhibit cGMP-dependent calcium transients that are consistent with those generated by cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. PMID:10757499

  1. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  2. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  3. Study of a synthetic human olfactory receptor 17-4: expression and purification from an inducible mammalian cell line.

    PubMed

    Cook, Brian L; Ernberg, Karin E; Chung, Hyeyoun; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    In order to begin to study the structural and functional mechanisms of olfactory receptors, methods for milligram-scale purification are required. Here we demonstrate the production and expression of a synthetically engineered human olfactory receptor hOR17-4 gene in a stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell line (HEK293S). The olfactory receptor gene was fabricated from scratch using PCR-based gene-assembly, which facilitated codon optimization and attachment of a 9-residue bovine rhodopsin affinity tag for detection and purification. Induction of adherent cultures with tetracycline together with sodium butyrate led to hOR17-4 expression levels of approximately 30 microg per 150 mm tissue culture plate. Fos-choline-based detergents proved highly capable of extracting the receptors, and fos-choline-14 (N-tetradecylphosphocholine) was selected for optimal solubilization and subsequent purification. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed both monomeric and dimeric receptor forms, as well as higher MW oligomeric species. A two-step purification method of immunoaffinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized which enabled 0.13 milligrams of hOR17-4 monomer to be obtained at >90% purity. This high purity of hOR17-4 is not only suitable for secondary structural and functional analyses but also for subsequent crystallization trials. Thus, this system demonstrates the feasibility of purifying milligram quantities of the GPCR membrane protein hOR17-4 for fabrication of olfactory receptor-based bionic sensing device. PMID:18682799

  4. Olfactory Receptor Multigene Family in Vertebrates: From the Viewpoint of Evolutionary Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Niimura, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    Olfaction is essential for the survival of animals. Diverse odor molecules in the environment are detected by the olfactory receptors (ORs) in the olfactory epithelium of the nasal cavity. There are ~400 and ~1,000 OR genes in the human and mouse genomes, respectively, forming the largest multigene family in mammals. The relationships between ORs and odorants are multiple-to-multiple, which allows for discriminating almost unlimited number of different odorants by a combination of ORs. However, the OR-ligand relationships are still largely unknown, and predicting the quality of odor from its molecular structure is unsuccessful. Extensive bioinformatic analyses using the whole genomes of various organisms revealed a great variation in number of OR genes among species, reflecting the diversity of their living environments. For example, higher primates equipped with a well-developed vision system and dolphins that are secondarily adapted to the aquatic life have considerably smaller numbers of OR genes than most of other mammals do. OR genes are characterized by extremely frequent gene duplications and losses. The OR gene repertories are also diverse among human individuals, explaining the diversity of odor perception such as the specific anosmia. OR genes are present in all vertebrates. The number of OR genes is smaller in teleost fishes than in mammals, while the diversity is higher in the former than the latter. Because the genome of amphioxus, the most basal chordate species, harbors vertebrate-like OR genes, the origin of OR genes can be traced back to the common ancestor of the phylum Chordata. PMID:23024602

  5. Importance of timing of olfactory receptor-axon outgrowth for glomerulus development in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Rössler, W; Tolbert, L P; Hildebrand, J G

    2000-09-18

    In the moth Manduca sexta, development of glomeruli in the antennal (olfactory) lobes (ALs) follows a precise timetable and involves interactions of olfactory receptor cell (ORC) axons with AL glial cells and neurons. To study the importance of timing for these intercellular interactions, we experimentally desynchronized the development of the ALs and the ORCs by altering the temperature of the developing antenna and brain for defined periods of time during development. Selective cooling of the antenna relative to the body resulted in a delay of ORC-axon outgrowth, and slightly warming the antenna while cooling the body caused precocious ingrowth of axons into the AL. Whereas cooling of the antenna for 24 hours caused only a delay in the formation of glomeruli, cooling for 48 hours led to significant disruption of glomerular development. Glial cells did not form normal glomerular borders, and glomeruli were shaped abnormally. Axons of pheromone-specific ORCs projected to their correct target, but terminal branches within the macroglomerular complex (MGC) were not clearly segregated. The results suggest that proper formation of glial glomerular borders requires interaction of ORC axons and glial cells within a sensitive period, whereas targeting of ORC axons appears to be effective over extended periods in development. Precocious ingrowth of ORC axons after warming the antenna and cooling the body for 48 hours resulted in enlarged protoglomeruli. Glial borders formed normally, but a subpopulation of MGC-specific ORC axons grew past the MGC. The decreased accuracy of targeting in these cases suggests that targeting mechanisms are not fully developed before the time when ORC axons normally would enter the brain. PMID:10954842

  6. Identification and Knockdown of the Olfactory Receptor (OrCo) in Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Yu, Yanxue; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Junhua; Dou, Liduo; Hao, Qin; Chen, Hongjun; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important economic pest that causes large-scale damage to forests worldwide. Because of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, olfaction-and olfaction-based pest management-has drawn increasing attention from entomologists. In this study, we identified the gene that encodes the olfactory receptor co-receptor (OrCo). Through amino acid sequence alignment, we found that LdisOrCo shares high identity with other OrCo proteins from different insect orders. Next, we performed RNA-interference (RNAi) to assess the role of OrCo in olfaction. Electroantennographic assays showed that after RNAi, the average value of males' response to sex pheromones was 0.636 mV, significantly lower than that of the positive control (average = 1.472 mV). Females showed no response to sex pheromones before or after RNAi. Finally, quantitative PCR showed a strong decrease in the expression of OrCo after RNAi, by ~74% in males and by 23% in females relative to the positive controls. These results indicate that OrCo is not only critical to odor recognition, but it may also represent a new target for development of semiochemicals that can influence insect behavior. PMID:26078719

  7. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, K; Bobkov, Y; Corey, E A; Ache, B W

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) release and/or Ca(2+) influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. PMID:25149566

  8. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, K.; Bobkov, Y.; Corey, E.A.; Ache, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release and/or Ca2+ influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5 mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. PMID:25149566

  9. Identification and Knockdown of the Olfactory Receptor (OrCo) in Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Yu, Yanxue; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Junhua; Dou, Liduo; Hao, Qin; Chen, Hongjun; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important economic pest that causes large-scale damage to forests worldwide. Because of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, olfaction—and olfaction-based pest management—has drawn increasing attention from entomologists. In this study, we identified the gene that encodes the olfactory receptor co-receptor (OrCo). Through amino acid sequence alignment, we found that LdisOrCo shares high identity with other OrCo proteins from different insect orders. Next, we performed RNA-interference (RNAi) to assess the role of OrCo in olfaction. Electroantennographic assays showed that after RNAi, the average value of males' response to sex pheromones was 0.636 mV, significantly lower than that of the positive control (average = 1.472 mV). Females showed no response to sex pheromones before or after RNAi. Finally, quantitative PCR showed a strong decrease in the expression of OrCo after RNAi, by ~74% in males and by 23% in females relative to the positive controls. These results indicate that OrCo is not only critical to odor recognition, but it may also represent a new target for development of semiochemicals that can influence insect behavior. PMID:26078719

  10. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  11. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Yan McCurdy, Li; Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Emonet, Thierry; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  12. Integrated Approaches for Genome-wide Interrogation of the Druggable Non-olfactory G Protein-coupled Receptor Superfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bryan L.; Kroeze, Wesley K.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequent and fruitful targets for drug discovery and development, as well as being off-targets for the side effects of a variety of medications. Much of the druggable non-olfactory human GPCR-ome remains under-interrogated, and we present here various approaches that we and others have used to shine light into these previously dark corners of the human genome. PMID:26100629

  13. Toll Receptors Instruct Axon and Dendrite Targeting and Participate in Synaptic Partner Matching in a Drosophila Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Alex; Hong, Weizhe; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Luo, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Our understanding of the mechanisms that establish wiring specificity of complex neural circuits is far from complete. During Drosophila olfactory circuit assembly, axons of 50 olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes and dendrites of 50 projection neuron (PN) classes precisely target to 50 discrete glomeruli, forming parallel information-processing pathways. Here we show that Toll-6 and Toll-7, members of the Toll receptor family best known for functions in innate immunity and embryonic patterning, cell-autonomously instruct the targeting of specific classes of PN dendrites and ORN axons, respectively. The canonical ligands and downstream partners of Toll receptors in embryonic patterning and innate immunity are not required for the function of Toll-6/Toll-7 in wiring specificity, nor are their cytoplasmic domains. Interestingly, both Toll-6 and Toll-7 participate in synaptic partner matching between ORN axons and PN dendrites. Our investigations reveal that olfactory circuit assembly involves dynamic and long-range interactions between PN dendrites and ORN axons. PMID:25741726

  14. Pre- and Postsynaptic Role of Dopamine D2 Receptor DD2R in Drosophila Olfactory Associative Learning.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cheng; Lee, Daewoo

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila play critical roles in diverse brain functions such as motor control, arousal, learning, and memory. Using genetic and behavioral approaches, it has been firmly established that proper dopamine signaling is required for olfactory classical conditioning (e.g., aversive and appetitive learning). Dopamine mediates its functions through interaction with its receptors. There are two different types of dopamine receptors in Drosophila: D1-like (dDA1, DAMB) and D2-like receptors (DD2R). Currently, no study has attempted to characterize the role of DD2R in Drosophila learning and memory. Using a DD2R-RNAi transgenic line, we have examined the role of DD2R, expressed in dopamine neurons (i.e., the presynaptic DD2R autoreceptor), in larval olfactory learning. The function of postsynaptic DD2R expressed in mushroom body (MB) was also studied as MB is the center for Drosophila learning, with a function analogous to that of the mammalian hippocampus. Our results showed that suppression of presynaptic DD2R autoreceptors impairs both appetitive and aversive learning. Similarly, postsynaptic DD2R in MB neurons appears to be involved in both appetitive and aversive learning. The data confirm, for the first time, that DD2R plays an important role in Drosophila olfactory learning. PMID:25422852

  15. Toll receptors instruct axon and dendrite targeting and participate in synaptic partner matching in a Drosophila olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex; Hong, Weizhe; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Luo, Liqun

    2015-03-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms that establish wiring specificity of complex neural circuits is far from complete. During Drosophila olfactory circuit assembly, axons of 50 olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes and dendrites of 50 projection neuron (PN) classes precisely target to 50 discrete glomeruli, forming parallel information-processing pathways. Here we show that Toll-6 and Toll-7, members of the Toll receptor family best known for functions in innate immunity and embryonic patterning, cell autonomously instruct the targeting of specific classes of PN dendrites and ORN axons, respectively. The canonical ligands and downstream partners of Toll receptors in embryonic patterning and innate immunity are not required for the function of Toll-6/Toll-7 in wiring specificity, nor are their cytoplasmic domains. Interestingly, both Toll-6 and Toll-7 participate in synaptic partner matching between ORN axons and PN dendrites. Our investigations reveal that olfactory circuit assembly involves dynamic and long-range interactions between PN dendrites and ORN axons. PMID:25741726

  16. Intensity invariant dynamics and odor-specific latencies in olfactory receptor neuron response

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Carlotta; Carlson, John R.; Emonet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Odors elicit spatio-temporal patterns of activity in the brain. Spatial patterns arise from the specificity of the interaction between odorants and odorant receptors expressed in different olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). But the origin of temporal patterns of activity and their role in odor coding remain unclear. We investigate how physiological aspects of ORN response and physical aspects of odor stimuli give rise to diverse responses in Drosophila ORNs. We show that odor stimuli have intrinsic dynamics that depend on odor type and strongly affect ORN response. Using linear-nonlinear modeling to remove the contribution of the stimulus dynamics from the ORN dynamics we study the physiological properties of the response to different odorants and concentrations. For several odorants and receptor types the ORN response dynamics normalized by the peak response are independent of stimulus intensity for a large portion of the neuron’s dynamic range. Adaptation to a background odor changes the gain and dynamic range of the response but does not affect normalized response dynamics. Stimulating ORNs with various odorants reveals significant odor-dependent delays in the ORN response functions. These differences however can be dominated by differences in stimulus dynamics. In one case the response of one ORN to two odorants is predicted solely from measurements of the odor signals. Within a large portion of their dynamic range ORNs can capture information about stimulus dynamics independently from intensity while introducing odor-dependent delays. How insects might use odor-specific stimulus dynamics and ORN dynamics in discrimination and navigation tasks remains an open question. PMID:23575828

  17. Temporal patterns and selectivity in the unitary responses of olfactory receptors in the tiger salamander to odor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baylin, F

    1979-07-01

    Temporal patterns and selectivity in unitary responses of 100 single olfactory receptors in the tiger salamander to odor stimulation were investigated. An olfactometer which permitted control of stimulus concentration, duration, and flow rate was calibrated with a gas chromatograph. Stimulus pulses were monitored by recording the electroolfactogram from the surface of the olfactory epithelium. Both diphasic and triphasic spikes were recorded extracellularly. No discernible differences in types of responses, reproducibility of responses, and cross-unit distribution of spontaneous rates distinguished diphasic from triphasic units. The cross-unit selectivity in responses to the seven olfactory stimulants used and the range of odorant concentrations which effectively evoked these responses suggest variations in types and number of types of receptive sites on each cell. Temporal patterns in the unitary responses were generally less complex than those observed in the olfactory bulb. Phasic stimulations evoked phasic patterns. Tonic stimulations evoked phasic/tonic patterns. Occasionally poststimulus depressions or elevations in firing rates were observed. The nature of these patterns varied somewhat with odorant concentration for a particular unit. PMID:479819

  18. Differential expression of olfactory genes in the southern house mosquito and insights into unique odorant receptor gene isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Walter S.; Choo, Young-Moo; Xu, Pingxi; da Silva, Cherre S. B.; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, has one of the most acute and eclectic olfactory systems of all mosquito species hitherto studied. Here, we used Illumina sequencing to identify olfactory genes expressed predominantly in antenna, mosquito’s main olfactory organ. Less than 50% of the trimmed reads generated by high-quality libraries aligned to a transcript, but approximately 70% of them aligned to the genome. Differential expression analysis, which was validated by quantitative real-time PCR on a subset of genes, showed that approximately half of the 48 odorant-binding protein genes were enriched in antennae, with the other half being predominantly expressed in legs. Similar patterns were observed with chemosensory proteins, “plus-C” odorant-binding proteins, and sensory neuron membrane proteins. Transcripts for as many as 43 ionotropic receptors were enriched in female antennae, thus making the ionotropic receptor family the largest of antennae-rich olfactory genes, second only to odorant receptor (OR) genes. As many as 177 OR genes have been identified, including 36 unique transcripts. The unique OR genes differed from previously annotated ORs in internal sequences, splice variants, and extended N or C terminus. One of the previously unknown transcripts was validated by cloning and functional expression. When challenged with a large panel of physiologically relevant compounds, CquiOR95b responded in a dose-dependent manner to ethyl 2-phenylacteate, which was demonstrated to repel Culex mosquitoes, and secondarily to citronellal, a known insect repellent. This transcriptome study led to identification of key molecular components and a repellent for the southern house mosquito. PMID:24167245

  19. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections

    PubMed Central

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, CW

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  20. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections.

    PubMed

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, C W

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  1. Odorant suppression of delayed rectifier potassium current in newt olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kawai, F

    1999-07-01

    Effects of odorants on a delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were investigated using the whole-cell version of the patch-clamp technique. Under voltage clamp, odorants (amyl acetate, limonene and acetophenone) reversibly suppressed I(K) without shifting its I-V curve. An amyl acetate puff completely suppressed I(K) induced by the first step pulse of repetitive depolarizations, suggesting that binding of an odorant molecule to the open channel is not required to block the channel. Although it is known that odorants suppress Na+ and Ca2+ currents (I(Na), I(Ca)) by shifting their inactivation curves to a negative voltage, odorants did not shift the inactivation curve of I(K) significantly. This suggests that odorants suppress I(K) without changing its voltage dependence. Therefore, the blocking mechanisms by odorants of I(K) in ORCs are different from those of I(Na) and I(Ca). PMID:10821641

  2. Effect of non-selective dopaminergic receptor agonist on disrupted maternal behavior in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Tan-No, Koichi; Onogi, Hiroshi; Niijima, Fukie; Tadano, Takeshi

    2010-07-11

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) animals are considered a putative model of depression that produces behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations resembling clinical depression. Depression is a critical cause of child abuse and neglect, and it has been reported that maternal behavior involves dopaminergic neurons of the mesolimbic pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of apomorphine, a non-selective dopaminergic receptor agonist, on maternal behavior to examine the influence of activated brain dopaminergic function in OBX mice. In addition, we conducted the sucrose preference test to examine the reward system which has a critical relationship to mesolimbic dopaminergic function and maternal behavior. Maternal behavior was observed on postnatal day (PND) 0 and 4. OBX female mice showed a reduction in sucrose preference 2 weeks post surgery. OBX dams showed maternal behavior deficits on PND 0, and these deficits were ameliorated by administration of apomorphine. These results suggest that maternal behavior deficits in OBX dams may involve brain hypodopaminergic function in the central nervous system induced by OBX. PMID:20219556

  3. Characterization of forskolin-induced Ca2+ signals in rat olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Gautam, Shree Hari; Ito, Shigeo; Habara, Yoshiaki; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2005-04-01

    Forskolin-induced Ca(2+) signals were examined in isolated rat olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) using a Ca(2+) indicator, fura-2. In the soma of the ORNs, forskolin caused an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) that was enhanced by a phosphodiesterase (PDE) 1 inhibitor, 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine, but not a PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram. Forskolin-induced Ca(2+) signals were abolished with the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and un-affected by treatment with thapsigargin or caffeine plus ryanodine. Niflumic acid, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel inhibitor, or nifedipine, an L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, slowed the initial rate of the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in response to forskolin. Nifedipine did not affect the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that was slowed by niflumic acid. In Ca(2+) measurements with a confocal microscope and a calcium indicator, Fluo-4, the onset of the response to forskolin in the knob region occurred simultaneously or earlier, but not later, than that in the soma. It is suggested that the forskolin-induced Ca(2+) signals are due to Ca(2+) influx, but not the release of Ca(2+) from Ca(2+) stores, and that the initial rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i) is associated with the activation of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in rat ORNs. PMID:15821339

  4. Oxygen control of breathing by an olfactory receptor activated by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J.; Ortega, Fabian E.; Riegler, Johannes; Madison, Daniel V.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals have evolved homeostatic responses to changes in oxygen availability that act on different time scales. Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway that controls long term responses to low oxygen (hypoxia) has been established1, the pathway that mediates acute responses to hypoxia in mammals is not well understood. Here we show that the olfactory receptor Olfr78 is highly and selectively expressed in oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body, a chemosensory organ at the carotid artery bifurcation that monitors blood oxygen and stimulates breathing within seconds when oxygen declines2. Olfr78 mutants fail to increase ventilation in hypoxia but respond normally to hypercapnia. Glomus cells are present in normal numbers and appear structurally intact, but hypoxia-induced carotid body activity is diminished. Lactate, a metabolite that rapidly accumulates in hypoxia and induces hyperventilation3–6, activates Olfr78 in heterologous expression experiments, induces calcium transients in glomus cells, and stimulates carotid sinus nerve activity through Olfr78. We propose that in addition to its role in olfaction, Olfr78 acts as a hypoxia sensor in the breathing circuit by sensing lactate produced when oxygen levels decline. PMID:26560302

  5. A cluster of olfactory receptor genes linked to frugivory in bats.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Sara; Bekaert, Michaël; Goodbla, Alisha; Murphy, William J; Dávalos, Liliana M; Teeling, Emma C

    2014-04-01

    Diversity of the mammalian olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire has been globally reshaped by niche specialization. However, little is known about the variability of the OR repertoire at a shallower evolutionary timeframe. The vast bat radiation exhibits an extraordinary variety of trophic and sensory specializations. Unlike other mammals, bats possess a unique and diverse OR gene repertoire. We elucidated whether the evolution of the OR gene repertoire can be linked to ecological niche specializations, such as sensory modalities and diet. The OR gene repertoires of 27 bat species spanning the chiropteran radiation were amplified and sequenced. For each species, intact and nonfunctional genes were assessed, and the OR gene abundances in each gene family were analyzed and compared. We identified a unique OR pattern linked to the frugivorous diet of New World fruit-eating bats and a similar convergent pattern in the Old World fruit-eating bats. Our results show a strong association between niche specialization and OR repertoire diversity even at a shallow evolutionary timeframe. PMID:24441035

  6. Adaptation as a mechanism for gain control in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2012-02-01

    In many sensory systems adaptation acts as a gain control mechanism that optimizes sensory performance by trading increased sensitivity to low stimulus intensity for decreased sensitivity to high stimulus intensity. Adaptation of insect antennal olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) has been studied for strong odour concentrations, either pulsed or constant. Here, we report that during slowly oscillating changes in the concentration of the odour of lemon oil, the ON and OFF ORNs on the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana adapt to the actual odour concentration and the rate at which concentration changes. When odour concentration oscillates rapidly with brief periods, adaptation improves gain for instantaneous odour concentration and reduces gain for the rate of concentration change. Conversely, when odour concentration oscillates slowly with long periods, adaptation increases gain for the rate of change at the expense of instantaneous concentration. Without this gain control the ON and OFF ORNs would, at brief oscillation periods, soon reach their saturation level and become insensitive to further concentration increments and decrements. At long oscillation periods, on the other hand, the cue would simply be that the discharge begins to change. Because of the high gain for the rate of change, the cockroach will receive creeping changes in odour concentration, even if they persist in one direction. Gain control permits a high degree of precision at small rates when it counts most, without sacrificing the range of detection and without extending the measuring scale. PMID:22304687

  7. Functional characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor 2AT4 in human myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Brauhoff, P; Möllmann, M; Petersen, L; Göthert, J R; Schmiegel, W; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) family was found to be expressed mainly in the nasal epithelium. In the last two decades members of the OR family were detected to be functional expressed in different parts of the human body such as in liver, prostate or intestine cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of several ORs in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cells of clinically diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. With calcium-imaging, we characterized in greater detail the cell biological role of one OR (OR2AT4) in leukemia. In both cell systems, the OR2AT4 agonist Sandalore-evoked strong Ca(2+) influx via the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-mediated pathway. The OR2AT4 antagonist Phenirat prevented the Sandalore-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase. Western blot and flow cytometric experiments revealed that stimulation of OR2AT4 reduced the proliferation by decreasing p38-MAPK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis via phosphorylation of p44/42-MAPK. Furthermore, Sandalore increased the number of hemoglobin-containing cells in culture. We described for the first time an OR-mediated pathway in CML and AML that can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation after activation. This mechanism offers novel therapeutic options for the treatment of AML. PMID:27551494

  8. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca(2+) increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  9. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  10. Functional characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor 2AT4 in human myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Brauhoff, P; Möllmann, M; Petersen, L; Göthert, JR; Schmiegel, W; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) family was found to be expressed mainly in the nasal epithelium. In the last two decades members of the OR family were detected to be functional expressed in different parts of the human body such as in liver, prostate or intestine cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of several ORs in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cells of clinically diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. With calcium-imaging, we characterized in greater detail the cell biological role of one OR (OR2AT4) in leukemia. In both cell systems, the OR2AT4 agonist Sandalore-evoked strong Ca2+ influx via the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-mediated pathway. The OR2AT4 antagonist Phenirat prevented the Sandalore-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase. Western blot and flow cytometric experiments revealed that stimulation of OR2AT4 reduced the proliferation by decreasing p38-MAPK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis via phosphorylation of p44/42-MAPK. Furthermore, Sandalore increased the number of hemoglobin-containing cells in culture. We described for the first time an OR-mediated pathway in CML and AML that can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation after activation. This mechanism offers novel therapeutic options for the treatment of AML. PMID:27551494

  11. Regulation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels and membrane excitability in olfactory receptor cells by carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of the putative neural messenger carbon monoxide (CO) and the role of the cGMP second-messenger system for olfactory signal generation was examined in isolated olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) of the tiger salamander. 2. With the use of whole cell voltage-clamp recordings in combination with a series of ionic and pharmological tests, it is demonstrated that exogenously applied CO is a potent activator (K1/2 = 2.9 microM) of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels previously described to mediate odor transduction. 3. Several lines of evidence suggest that CO mediates its effect through stimulation of a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) leading to formation of the second-messenger cGMP. This conclusion is based on the findings that CO responses show an absolute requirement for guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) in the internal solution, that no direct effect of CO on CNG currents in the absence of GTP is detectable, and that a blocker of sGC activation, LY85383 (10 microM), completely inhibits the CO response. 4. The dose-response curve for cGMP at CNG channels is used as a calibration to provide a quantitative estimate of the CO-stimulated cGMP formation. This analysis implies that CO is a potent activator of olfactory sGC. 5. Perforated patch recordings using amphotericin B demonstrate that low micromolar doses of CO effectively depolarize the membrane potential of ORNs through tonic activation of CNG channels. This effect in turn regulates excitable and adaptive properties of ORNs and modulates neuronal responsiveness. 6. These data argue for an important role of the cGMP pathway in olfactory signaling and support the idea that CO may function as a diffusible messenger in the olfactory system.

  12. Enhancement by T-type Ca2+ currents of odor sensitivity in olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kawai, F; Miyachi, E

    2001-05-15

    Mechanisms underlying action potential initiation in olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) during odor stimulation were investigated using conventional and dynamic patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, action potentials generated by a least effective odor-induced depolarization were almost completely blocked by 0.1 mm Ni(2+), a T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, but not by 0.1 mm Cd(2+), a high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel blocker. Under voltage-clamp conditions, depolarizing voltage steps induced a fast transient inward current, which consisted of Na(+) (I(Na)) and T-type Ca(2+) (I(Ca,T)) currents. The amplitude of I(Ca,T) was approximately one-fourth of that of I(Na) (0.23 +/- 0.03, mean +/- SEM). Because both I(Na) and I(Ca,T) are known to show rapid inactivation, we examined how much I(Na) and I(Ca,T) are activated during the gradually depolarizing initial phase of receptor potentials. The ratio of I(Ca,T)/I(Na) during a ramp depolarization at the slope of 0.5 mV/msec was 0.56 +/- 0.03. Using the dynamic patch-clamp recording technique, we also recorded I(Ca,T) and I(Na) during the generation of odor-induced action potentials. This ratio of I(Ca,T)/I(Na) was 0.54 +/- 0.04. These ratios were more than twice as large as that (0.23) obtained from the experiment using voltage steps, suggesting that I(Ca,T) carries significant amount of current to generate the action potentials. We conclude that I(Ca,T) contributes to enhance odor sensitivity by lowering the threshold of spike generation in ORCs. PMID:11319242

  13. A General Odorant Background Affects the Coding of Pheromone Stimulus Intermittency in Specialist Olfactory Receptor Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Rouyar, Angela; Party, Virginie; Prešern, Janez; Blejec, Andrej; Renou, Michel

    2011-01-01

    In nature the aerial trace of pheromone used by male moths to find a female appears as a train of discontinuous pulses separated by gaps among a complex odorant background constituted of plant volatiles. We investigated the effect of such background odor on behavior and coding of temporal parameters of pheromone pulse trains in the pheromone olfactory receptor neurons of Spodoptera littoralis. Effects of linalool background were tested by measuring walking behavior towards a source of pheromone. While velocity and orientation index did drop when linalool was turned on, both parameters recovered back to pre-background values after 40 s with linalool still present. Photo-ionization detector was used to characterize pulse delivery by our stimulator. The photo-ionization detector signal reached 71% of maximum amplitude at 50 ms pulses and followed the stimulus period at repetition rates up to 10 pulses/s. However, at high pulse rates the concentration of the odorant did not return to base level during inter-pulse intervals. Linalool decreased the intensity and shortened the response of receptor neurons to pulses. High contrast (>10 dB) in firing rate between pulses and inter-pulse intervals was observed for 1 and 4 pulses/s, both with and without background. Significantly more neurons followed the 4 pulses/s pattern when delivered over linalool; at the same time the information content was preserved almost to the control values. Rapid recovery of behavior shows that change of perceived intensity is more important than absolute stimulus intensity. While decreasing the response intensity, background odor preserved the temporal parameters of the specific signal. PMID:22028879

  14. Roles of Specific Membrane Lipid Domains in EGF Receptor Activation and Cell Adhesion Molecule Stabilization in a Developing Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Nicholas J.; Tolbert, Leslie P.; Oland, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Reciprocal interactions between glial cells and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) cause ORN axons entering the brain to sort, to fasciculate into bundles destined for specific glomeruli, and to form stable protoglomeruli in the developing olfactory system of an experimentally advantageous animal species, the moth Manduca sexta. Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and the cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs) neuroglian and fasciclin II are known to be important players in these processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We report in situ and cell-culture studies that suggest a role for glycosphingolipid-rich membrane subdomains in neuron-glia interactions. Disruption of these subdomains by the use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in loss of EGFR activation, depletion of fasciclin II in ORN axons, and loss of neuroglian stabilization in the membrane. At the cellular level, disruption leads to aberrant ORN axon trajectories, small antennal lobes, abnormal arrays of olfactory glomerul, and loss of normal glial cell migration. Conclusions/Significance We propose that glycosphingolipid-rich membrane subdomains (possible membrane rafts or platforms) are essential for IgCAM-mediated EGFR activation and for anchoring of neuroglian to the cytoskeleton, both required for normal extension and sorting of ORN axons. PMID:19787046

  15. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  16. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  17. The post-natal chemosensory environment induces epigenetic changes in vomeronasal receptor gene expression and a bias in olfactory preference.

    PubMed

    Broad, Kevin D; Keverne, Eric B

    2012-05-01

    Vomeronasal stem cells are generated throughout the life of a mouse and differentiate into neurons that express one vomeronasal type 1 (V1r), one or two vomeronasal type 2 (V2r), or one olfactory receptor. Vomeronasal stem cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by treatment with lipocalins from mouse urine or by epigenetic modification following treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. An important question is, do chemosensory signals, modify the detection capabilities of the vomeronasal organ and affect behaviour. Rearing mice in the presence of urine (and its pheromonal signals) derived from a different mouse strain, affected the behavioural preference for non-kin which were accompanied by changes in vomeronasal receptor expression. Significant changes in the expression of vomeronasal V1r, V2r and olfactory receptors, major urinary proteins, and a number of genes thought to be involved in transcriptional regulation were also observed following urine treatment. These results suggest that modification of a mouse's urinary environment may exert epigenetic effects on developing vomeronasal neurons, which modify the type of vomeronasal receptors that are expressed. This may provide a mechanism by which environmental changes are able to modify the detection capabilities of the vomeronasal organ to respond optimally to the most likely social environment that a mouse will encounter when mature. PMID:22179772

  18. NanoCAGE analysis of the mouse olfactory epithelium identifies the expression of vomeronasal receptors and of proximal LINE elements.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Giovanni; Lazarevic, Dejan; Plessy, Charles; Bertin, Nicolas; Akalin, Altuna; Vlachouli, Christina; Simone, Roberto; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Lenhard, Boris; Carninci, Piero; Gustincich, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    By coupling laser capture microdissection to nanoCAGE technology and next-generation sequencing we have identified the genome-wide collection of active promoters in the mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium (MOE). Transcription start sites (TSSs) for the large majority of Olfactory Receptors (ORs) have been previously mapped increasing our understanding of their promoter architecture. Here we show that in our nanoCAGE libraries of the mouse MOE we detect a large number of tags mapped in loci hosting Type-1 and Type-2 Vomeronasal Receptors genes (V1Rs and V2Rs). These loci also show a massive expression of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs). We have validated the expression of selected receptors detected by nanoCAGE with in situ hybridization, RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. This work extends the repertory of receptors capable of sensing chemical signals in the MOE, suggesting intriguing interplays between MOE and VNO for pheromone processing and positioning transcribed LINEs as candidate regulatory RNAs for VRs expression. PMID:24600346

  19. NanoCAGE analysis of the mouse olfactory epithelium identifies the expression of vomeronasal receptors and of proximal LINE elements

    PubMed Central

    Pascarella, Giovanni; Lazarevic, Dejan; Plessy, Charles; Bertin, Nicolas; Akalin, Altuna; Vlachouli, Christina; Simone, Roberto; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Lenhard, Boris; Carninci, Piero; Gustincich, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    By coupling laser capture microdissection to nanoCAGE technology and next-generation sequencing we have identified the genome-wide collection of active promoters in the mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium (MOE). Transcription start sites (TSSs) for the large majority of Olfactory Receptors (ORs) have been previously mapped increasing our understanding of their promoter architecture. Here we show that in our nanoCAGE libraries of the mouse MOE we detect a large number of tags mapped in loci hosting Type-1 and Type-2 Vomeronasal Receptors genes (V1Rs and V2Rs). These loci also show a massive expression of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs). We have validated the expression of selected receptors detected by nanoCAGE with in situ hybridization, RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. This work extends the repertory of receptors capable of sensing chemical signals in the MOE, suggesting intriguing interplays between MOE and VNO for pheromone processing and positioning transcribed LINEs as candidate regulatory RNAs for VRs expression. PMID:24600346

  20. An electroolfactogram study of odor response patterns from the mouse olfactory epithelium with reference to receptor zones and odor sorptiveness.

    PubMed

    Coppola, D M; Waggener, C T; Radwani, S M; Brooks, D A

    2013-04-01

    Olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) responses to odors, measured at the population level, tend to be spatially heterogeneous in the vertebrates that have been studied. These response patterns vary between odors but are similar across subjects for a given stimulus. However, few species have been studied making functional interpretation of these patterns problematic. One proximate explanation for the spatial heterogeneity of odor responses comes from evidence that olfactory receptor (OR) genes in rodents are expressed in OSN populations that are spatially restricted to a few zones in the olfactory epithelium (OE). A long-standing functional explanation for response anisotropy in the OE posits that it is the signature of a supplementary mechanism for quality coding, based on the sorptive properties of odor molecules. These theories are difficult to assess because most mapping studies have utilized few odors, provided little replication, or involved but a single species (rat). In fact, to our knowledge, a detailed olfactory response "map" has not been reported for mouse, the species used in most studies of gene localization. Here we report the results of a study of mouse OE response patterns using the electroolfactogram (EOG). We focused on the medial aspect of olfactory turbinates that are accessible in the midsagittal section. This limited approach still allowed us to test predictions derived from the zonal distribution of OSN types and the sorption hypothesis. In 3 separate experiments, 290 mice were used to record EOGs from a set of standard locations along each of 4 endoturbinates utilizing 11 different odors resulting in over 4,400 separate recordings. Our results confirmed a marked spatial heterogeneity in odor responses that varied with odor, as seen in other species. However, no discontinuities were found in the odor-specific response patterns across the OE as might have been predicted given the existence of classical receptor zones nor did we find clear support

  1. The spatial distributions of odorant sensitivity and odorant-induced currents in salamander olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, G; Gold, G H

    1991-01-01

    1. Suction electrode and whole-cell recording were used to record membrane currents from defined regions of solitary olfactory receptor cells from Ambystoma tigrinum. 2. Under whole-cell current clamp, stimulation of cells with odorants activated an inward current in the cilia, an outward current in the soma, and induced a membrane depolarization. Clamping the membrane potential at its resting value of -70 mV increased the inward ciliary current 5- to 10-fold and abolished the outward somatic current. 3. Local odorant stimulation was accomplished by ejecting an odorant solution into a steady flow of Ringer solution. A suction electrode was used to immobilize a cell in the flow and to record the odorant-induced somatic current. The amplitude of the odorant response increased approximately linearly with the length of cilia exposed to the stimulus, but was independent of the length of dendrite exposed to the stimulus, indicating that odorant sensitivity is predominantly localized to the cilia. 4. The latencies of responses recorded under flow did not vary with the region of the cilia which was exposed to the stimulus. Also, the magnitude of the inward ciliary current activated by odorants was equal to that of the whole-cell current recorded under voltage clamp. These observations indicate that the odorant-induced inward current is predominantly localized to the ciliary membrane. 5. Under whole-cell current clamp, local application of a high-K+ solution generated an outward somatic current when applied to the dendrite, but had no effect when applied to the cilia. This indicates that the density of the resting K+ conductance is lower in the ciliary membrane than in the dendritic membrane. 6. The results above are consistent with the hypothesis that all components of the transduction mechanism are uniformly distributed within the cilia, and that the cilia are electrotonically compact, even during an odorant-induced conductance increase. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1798028

  2. Mechanisms determining the dynamic range of the bullfrog olfactory receptor cell.

    PubMed

    Tomaru, Akihiro; Kurahashi, Takashi

    2005-04-01

    Spike discharges of single olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were recorded with the whole cell patch-clamp method applied to slice preparation. In parallel, activities of transduction channels were measured under the voltage-clamp condition. When cells were stimulated by odorants, 54 out of 306 cells exhibited inward current responses (10 mM cineole in the puffer pipette). The amplitude of the inward current was dependent on the stimulus period, reflecting the time integration for the stimulus dose, and the relation could be fitted by the Hill equation. Under the current-clamp condition, current injection induced spike discharges. In cells showing repetitive firings, the firing frequency was dependent on the amount of injected current. The relation was fitted by the Michaelis-Menten equation showing saturation. When cells were responsive to the odorant and had abilities to discharge repetitive spikes, the depolarizing responses were accompanied by repetitive spikes. In those cells, the spike frequency was dose-dependent, expressing saturation similar to the result obtained by current injection. Since both transduction channel and spike generative steps expressed saturation in their dose dependences, we explored what step(s) actually determines saturation in ORC signaling processes. By examining dose-response relations of both the current and spikes in the same cells, saturating dose was found to be dependent largely on that of the transduction step. This suggests that the dynamic range is fundamentally determined by the transduction system. In addition, a simple model derived from the nonlinearity of the plasma membrane could explain that a critical level of dynamic range was, at least in part, modified by the membrane nonlinearity. PMID:15548631

  3. Identification of olfactory receptor neurons in Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae) and its implications for host range.

    PubMed

    Park, Kye Chung; Withers, Toni M; Suckling, David Maxwell

    2015-07-01

    Phytophagous insects detect volatile compounds produced by host and non-host plants, using species-specific sets of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To investigate the relationship between the range of host plants and the profile of ORNs, single sensillum recordings were carried out to identify ORNs and corresponding active compounds in female Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae), an oligophagous eucalypt feeder. Based on the response profiles to 39 plant volatile compounds, 13 classes of sensilla containing 40 classes of ORNs were identified in female U. lugens. More than 95% (163 out of 171) of these sensilla contained 16 classes of ORNs with narrow response spectra, and 62.6% (107 out of 171) 18 classes of ORNs with broad response spectra. Among the specialized ORNs, seven classes of ORNs exhibited high specificity to 1,8-cineole, (±)-citronellal, myrcene, (±)-linalool and (E)-β-caryophyllene, major volatiles produced by eucalypts, while nine other classes of ORNs showed highly specialized responses to green leaf volatiles, germacrene D, (E)-β-farnesene and geranyl acetate that are not produced by most eucalypts. We hypothesize that female U. lugens can recognize their host plants by detecting key host volatile compounds, using a set of ORNs tuned to host volatiles, and discriminate them from non-host plants using another set of ORNs specialized for non-host volatiles. The ORNs with broad response spectra may enhance the discrimination between host and non-host plants by adding moderately selective sensitivity. Based on our finding, it is suggested that phytophagous insects use the combinational input from both host-specific and non-host specific ORNs for locating their host plants, and the electrophysiological characterization of ORN profiles would be useful in predicting the range of host plants in phytophagous insects. PMID:25937382

  4. Potential role of transient receptor potential channel M5 in sensing putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Oshimoto, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Garske, Anna; Lopez, Roberto; Rolen, Shane; Flowers, Michael; Arevalo, Nicole; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Based on pharmacological studies of chemosensory transduction in transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) knockout mice it was hypothesized that this channel is involved in transduction for a subset of putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Yet, in the same study an electroolfactogram (EOG) in the mouse olfactory epithelium showed no significant difference in the responses to pheromones (and odors) between wild type and TRPM5 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of OSNs expressing TRPM5 is increased by unilateral naris occlusion. Importantly, EOG experiments show that mice lacking TRPM5 show a decreased response in the occluded epithelia to putative pheromones as opposed to wild type mice that show no change upon unilateral naris occlusion. This evidence indicates that under decreased olfactory sensory input TRPM5 plays a role in mediating putative pheromone transduction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclic nucleotide gated channel A2 knockout (CNGA2-KO) mice that show substantially decreased or absent responses to odors and pheromones also have elevated levels of TRPM5 compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our evidence suggests that TRPM5 plays a role in mediating transduction for putative pheromones under conditions of reduced chemosensory input. PMID:23613997

  5. Potential Role of Transient Receptor Potential Channel M5 in Sensing Putative Pheromones in Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oshimoto, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Garske, Anna; Lopez, Roberto; Rolen, Shane; Flowers, Michael; Arevalo, Nicole; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Based on pharmacological studies of chemosensory transduction in transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) knockout mice it was hypothesized that this channel is involved in transduction for a subset of putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Yet, in the same study an electroolfactogram (EOG) in the mouse olfactory epithelium showed no significant difference in the responses to pheromones (and odors) between wild type and TRPM5 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of OSNs expressing TRPM5 is increased by unilateral naris occlusion. Importantly, EOG experiments show that mice lacking TRPM5 show a decreased response in the occluded epithelia to putative pheromones as opposed to wild type mice that show no change upon unilateral naris occlusion. This evidence indicates that under decreased olfactory sensory input TRPM5 plays a role in mediating putative pheromone transduction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclic nucleotide gated channel A2 knockout (CNGA2-KO) mice that show substantially decreased or absent responses to odors and pheromones also have elevated levels of TRPM5 compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our evidence suggests that TRPM5 plays a role in mediating transduction for putative pheromones under conditions of reduced chemosensory input. PMID:23613997

  6. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of olfactory receptor genes in the parasitic wasp, Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Gu, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ze-Wen; Wang, Shan-Ning; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (OR) are believed to fulfil an indispensable role in insects host-seeking, mating and ovipositing. We obtained 4785 high-quality expressed sequencing tags (EST) from the antennal cDNA library of the parasitic wasp Microplitis mediator, a natural enemy of crop pests. After assembling, 786 contigs and 2130 singletons were generated. Using BLAST searches, a number of olfactory-related genes were identified, including ESTs encoding for 25 ORs. 14 full-length OR genes were cloned and their expression profiles in the wasp olfactory organs were quantified by real-time qRT-PCR. The results indicated a diverse distribution between the tissues and genders, yet the majority of OR genes are highly expressed in antennae. Three OR genes (Or2, Or12 and Or13) are highly expressed in female antennae, eight OR genes (ORco, Or3, Or4, Or5, Or7, Or8, Or9 and Or11) are highly expressed in male antennae. This is the first report on tissue-specific expression of wasp OR genes. Our study provides a foundational knowledge to explore and understand the molecular basis of odorant reception in this parasitic wasp and for the study of trophic interactions of natural enemy. PMID:24291166

  7. Phylogeny of the vomeronasal system and of receptor cell types in the olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Eisthen, H L

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, the evolutionary origin of the vomeronasal system as a discrete sensory system separate from olfaction is examined. The presence of a discrete vomeronasal system appears to be a derived character in tetrapods, and its presence in larval amphibians indicates that the system did not arise as a terrestrial adaptation. The vomeronasal system has been lost independently in several taxa, including crocodilians, some bats, cetaceans, and some primates. The presence of microvillar receptor cells in the vomeronasal epithelium appears to be the ancestral condition for tetrapods, and alternative hypotheses concerning the ancestral condition for receptor cell types in the vertebrate olfactory epithelium are discussed. Finally, the possibility that the vomeronasal system is present in some fishes in a form that has not been recognized is discussed in relation to the phylogenetic distribution of receptor cell types in vertebrates. PMID:1392068

  8. Sensillum-specific, topographic projection patterns of olfactory receptor neurons in the antennal lobe of the cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Haupt, S Shuichi; Nishino, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Michiko; Yokohari, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    In vertebrates and many invertebrates, olfactory signals detected by peripheral olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are conveyed to a primary olfactory center with glomerular organization in which odor-specific activity patterns are generated. In the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, ORNs in antennal olfactory sensilla project to 205 unambiguously identifiable antennal lobe (AL) glomeruli that are classified into 10 glomerular clusters (T1-T10 glomeruli) innervated by distinct sensory tracts. In this study we employed single sensillum staining techniques and investigated the topographic projection patterns of individual ORNs to elucidate the relationship between sensillum types and glomerular organization in the AL. Axons of almost all ORNs projected to individual glomeruli. Axons of ORNs in perforated basiconic sensilla selectively innervated the anterodorsal T1-T4 glomeruli, whereas those in trichoid and grooved basiconic sensilla innervated the posteroventral T5-T9 glomeruli. About 90% of stained ORNs in trichoid sensilla sent axons to the T5 glomeruli and more than 90% of ORNs in grooved basiconic sensilla innervated the T6, T8, and T9 glomeruli. The T5 and T9 glomeruli exclusively receive sensory inputs from the trichoid and grooved basiconic sensilla, respectively. All investigated glomeruli received convergent input from a single type of sensillum except F11 glomerulus in the T6 glomeruli, which was innervated from both trichoid and grooved basiconic sensilla. These results suggest that ORNs in distinct sensillum types project to glomeruli in distinct glomerular clusters. Since ORNs in distinct sensillum types are each tuned to distinct subsets of odorant molecules, the AL is functionally compartmentalized into groups of glomeruli. PMID:22121009

  9. A Cleavable N-Terminal Signal Peptide Promotes Widespread Olfactory Receptor Surface Expression in HEK293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Natarajan, Niranjana; Protzko, Ryan J.; Acres, Omar W.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors that detect odorants in the olfactory epithelium, and comprise the largest gene family in the genome. Identification of OR ligands typically requires OR surface expression in heterologous cells; however, ORs rarely traffic to the cell surface when exogenously expressed. Therefore, most ORs are orphan receptors with no known ligands. To date, studies have utilized non-cleavable rhodopsin (Rho) tags and/or chaperones (i.e. Receptor Transporting Protein, RTP1S, Ric8b and Gαolf) to improve surface expression. However, even with these tools, many ORs still fail to reach the cell surface. We used a test set of fifteen ORs to examine the effect of a cleavable leucine-rich signal peptide sequence (Lucy tag) on OR surface expression in HEK293T cells. We report here that the addition of the Lucy tag to the N-terminus increases the number of ORs reaching the cell surface to 7 of the 15 ORs (as compared to 3/15 without Rho or Lucy tags). Moreover, when ORs tagged with both Lucy and Rho were co-expressed with previously reported chaperones (RTP1S, Ric8b and Gαolf), we observed surface expression for all 15 receptors examined. In fact, two-thirds of Lucy-tagged ORs are able to reach the cell surface synergistically with chaperones even when the Rho tag is removed (10/15 ORs), allowing for the potential assessment of OR function with only an 8-amino acid Flag tag on the mature protein. As expected for a signal peptide, the Lucy tag was cleaved from the mature protein and did not alter OR-ligand binding and signaling. Our studies demonstrate that widespread surface expression of ORs can be achieved in HEK293T cells, providing promise for future large-scale deorphanization studies. PMID:23840901

  10. Changes in Olfactory Receptor Expression Are Correlated With Odor Exposure During Early Development in the zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Calfún, Cristian; Domínguez, Calixto; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2016-05-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) causes an increase in the expression of the transcription factor otx2 in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of juvenile zebrafish, and this change is correlated with the formation of an odor memory of PEA. Here, we show that the changes in otx2 expression are specific to βPEA: exposure to αPEA did not affect otx2 expression. We identified 34 olfactory receptors (ORs) representing 16 families on 4 different chromosomes as candidates for direct regulation of OR expression via Otx2. Subsequent in silico analysis uncovered Hnf3b binding sites closely associated with Otx2 binding sites in the regions flanking the ORs. Analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and RNA-seq of OR expression in developing zebrafish exposed to different isoforms of PEA showed that a subset of ORs containing both Otx2/Hnf3b binding sites were downregulated only in βPEA-exposed juveniles and this change persisted through adult life. Localization of OR expression by in situ hybridization indicates the downregulation occurs at the level of RNA and not the number of cells expressing a given receptor. Finally, analysis of immediate early gene expression in the OE did not reveal changes in c-fos expression in response to either αPEA or βPEA. PMID:26892307

  11. Temporal target restriction of olfactory receptor neurons by Semaphorin-1a/PlexinA-mediated axon-axon interactions.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lora B; Couto, Africa; Chou, Ya-Hui; Berdnik, Daniela; Dickson, Barry J; Luo, Liqun; Komiyama, Takaki

    2007-01-18

    Axon-axon interactions have been implicated in neural circuit assembly, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that in the Drosophila antennal lobe, early-arriving axons of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) from the antenna are required for the proper targeting of late-arriving ORN axons from the maxillary palp (MP). Semaphorin-1a is required for targeting of all MP but only half of the antennal ORN classes examined. Sema-1a acts nonautonomously to control ORN axon-axon interactions, in contrast to its cell-autonomous function in olfactory projection neurons. Phenotypic and genetic interaction analyses implicate PlexinA as the Sema-1a receptor in ORN targeting. Sema-1a on antennal ORN axons is required for correct targeting of MP axons within the antennal lobe, while interactions amongst MP axons facilitate their entry into the antennal lobe. We propose that Sema-1a/PlexinA-mediated repulsion provides a mechanism by which early-arriving ORN axons constrain the target choices of late-arriving axons. PMID:17224402

  12. Local corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) signals to its receptor CRHR1 during postnatal development of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Isabella; Bhullar, Paramjit K; Tepe, Burak; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Alexander M; Chaboub, Lesley; Deneen, Benjamin; Justice, Nicholas J; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important physiological functions during distinct behaviors such as arousal, learning, memory, and reproduction. However, the role of local, extrahypothalamic neuropeptide signaling in shaping synapse formation and neuronal plasticity in the brain is not well understood. Here, we characterize the spatiotemporal expression profile of the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor CRHR1 in the mouse OB throughout development. We found that CRH-expressing interneurons are present in the external plexiform layer, that its cognate receptor is expressed by granule cells, and show that both CRH and CRHR1 expression enriches in the postnatal period when olfaction becomes important towards olfactory-related behaviors. Further, we provide electrophysiological evidence that CRHR1-expressing granule cells functionally respond to CRH ligand, and that the physiological circuitry of CRHR1 knockout mice is abnormal, leading to impaired olfactory behaviors. Together, these data suggest a physiologically relevant role for local CRH signaling towards shaping the neuronal circuitry within the mouse OB. PMID:25224546

  13. Global Survey of Variation in a Human Olfactory Receptor Gene Reveals Signatures of Non-Neutral Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Kara C; Gokcumen, Omer; Qureshy, Zoya; Bruguera, Elise; Savangsuksa, Aulaphan; Cobb, Matthew; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Allelic variation at 4 loci in the human olfactory receptor gene OR7D4 is associated with perceptual variation in the sex steroid-derived odorants, androstenone, and androstadienone. Androstadienone has been linked with chemosensory identification whereas androstenone makes pork from uncastrated pigs distasteful ("boar taint"). In a sample of 2224 individuals from 43 populations, we identified 45 OR7D4 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Coalescent modeling of frequency-site-spectrum-based statistics identified significant deviation from neutrality in human OR7D4; individual populations with statistically significant deviations from neutrality include Gujarati, Beijing Han, Great Britain, Iberia, and Puerto Rico. Analysis of molecular variation values indicated statistically significant population differentiation driven mainly by the 4 alleles associated with androstenone perception variation; however, fixation values were low suggesting that genetic structure may not have played a strong role in creating these group divisions. We also studied OR7D4 in the genomes of extinct members of the human lineage: Altai Neandertal and Denisovan. No variants were identified in Altai but 2 were in Denisova, one of which is shared by modern humans and one of which is novel. A functional test of modern human and a synthesized mutant Denisova OR7D4 indicated no statistically significant difference in responses to androstenone between the 2 species. Our results suggest non-neutral evolution for an olfactory receptor gene. PMID:26072518

  14. The extremely broad odorant response profile of mouse olfactory sensory neurons expressing the odorant receptor MOR256-17 includes trace amine-associated receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Tazir, Bassim; Khan, Mona; Mombaerts, Peter; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    The mouse olfactory system employs ~1100 G-protein-coupled odorant receptors (ORs). Each mature olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) is thought to express just one OR gene, and the expressed OR determines the odorant response properties of the OSN. The broadest odorant response profile thus far demonstrated in native mouse OSNs is for OSNs that express the OR gene SR1 (also known as Olfr124 and MOR256-3). Here we showed that the odorant responsiveness of native mouse OSNs expressing the OR gene MOR256-17 (also known as Olfr15 and OR3) is even broader than that of OSNs expressing SR1. We investigated the electrophysiological properties of green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ OSNs in a MOR256-17-IRES-tauGFP gene-targeted mouse strain, in parallel with GFP+ OSNs in the SR1-IRES-tauGFP gene-targeted mouse strain that we previously reported. Of 35 single chemical compounds belonging to distinct structural classes, MOR256-17+ OSNs responded to 31 chemicals, compared with 10 for SR1+ OSNs. The 10 compounds that activated SR1+ OSNs also activated MOR256-17+ OSNs. Interestingly, MOR256-17+ OSNs were activated by three amines (cyclohexylamine, isopenthylamine, and phenylethylamine) that are typically viewed as ligands for chemosensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium that express trace amine-associated receptor genes, a family of 15 genes encoding G-protein-coupled receptors unrelated in sequence to ORs. We did not observe differences in membrane properties, indicating that the differences in odorant response profiles between the two OSN populations were due to the expressed OR. MOR256-17+ OSNs appear to be at one extreme of odorant responsiveness among populations of OSNs expressing distinct OR genes in the mouse. PMID:26666691

  15. Role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and K(+)-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Zazpe, A; Artaiz, I; Del Río, J

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study was aimed at examining the role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and depolarization-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices. [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) release was measured in both brain regions and endogenous dopamine release from striatal slices was also studied. 2. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist 2-methyl-5-HT (0.5-10 microM) produced a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]-DA efflux evoked by K+ (20 mM) from slices of rat olfactory tubercle. 1-Phenylbiguanide (PBG) and 5-HT also increased K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux. 3. 5-HT (1-100 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner basal [3H]-DA release from olfactory tubercle and striatal slices as well as endogenous DA release from striatal slices. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonists 2-methyl-5-HT and 1-phenylbiguanide were weaker releasing agents. In all cases, the release was Ca2+ independent and tetrodotoxin insensitive. 4. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, granisetron and tropisetron (0.2 microM) significantly blocked the enhanced K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux from rat olfactory tubercle slices induced by 2-methyl-5HT. A ten fold higher concentration of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin was ineffective. 5. Much higher concentrations, up to 50 microM, of the same 5-HT3 receptor antagonists did not block the increase in basal [3H]-DA release from striatal or olfactory tubercle slices induced by 5-HT or the release of endogenous DA induced by 5-HT from striatal slices.2+ off PMID:7858893

  16. Functional promiscuity in a mammalian chemosensory system: extensive expression of vomeronasal receptors in the main olfactory epithelium of mouse lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Hohenbrink, Philipp; Dempewolf, Silke; Zimmermann, Elke; Mundy, Nicholas I.; Radespiel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is functional in most terrestrial mammals, though progressively reduced in the primate lineage, and is used for intraspecific communication and predator recognition. Vomeronasal receptor (VR) genes comprise two families of chemosensory genes (V1R and V2R) that have been considered to be specific for the VNO. However, recently a large number of VRs were reported to be expressed in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice, but there is little knowledge of the expression of these genes outside of rodents. To explore the function of VR genes in mammalian evolution, we analyzed and compared the expression of 64 V1R and 2 V2R genes in the VNO and the MOE of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), the primate with the largest known VR repertoire. We furthermore compared expression patterns in adults of both sexes and seasons, and in an infant. A large proportion (83–97%) of the VR loci was expressed in the VNO of all individuals. The repertoire in the infant was as rich as in adults, indicating reliance on olfactory communication from early postnatal development onwards. In concordance with mice, we also detected extensive expression of VRs in the MOE, with proportions of expressed loci in individuals ranging from 29 to 45%. TRPC2, which encodes a channel protein crucial for signal transduction via VRs, was co-expressed in the MOE in all individuals indicating likely functionality of expressed VR genes in the MOE. In summary, the large VR repertoire in mouse lemurs seems to be highly functional. Given the differences in the neural pathways of MOE and VNO signals, which project to higher cortical brain centers or the limbic system, respectively, this raises the intriguing possibility that the evolution of MOE-expression of VRs enabled mouse lemurs to adaptively diversify the processing of VR-encoded olfactory information. PMID:25309343

  17. Functional promiscuity in a mammalian chemosensory system: extensive expression of vomeronasal receptors in the main olfactory epithelium of mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Philipp; Dempewolf, Silke; Zimmermann, Elke; Mundy, Nicholas I; Radespiel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is functional in most terrestrial mammals, though progressively reduced in the primate lineage, and is used for intraspecific communication and predator recognition. Vomeronasal receptor (VR) genes comprise two families of chemosensory genes (V1R and V2R) that have been considered to be specific for the VNO. However, recently a large number of VRs were reported to be expressed in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice, but there is little knowledge of the expression of these genes outside of rodents. To explore the function of VR genes in mammalian evolution, we analyzed and compared the expression of 64 V1R and 2 V2R genes in the VNO and the MOE of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), the primate with the largest known VR repertoire. We furthermore compared expression patterns in adults of both sexes and seasons, and in an infant. A large proportion (83-97%) of the VR loci was expressed in the VNO of all individuals. The repertoire in the infant was as rich as in adults, indicating reliance on olfactory communication from early postnatal development onwards. In concordance with mice, we also detected extensive expression of VRs in the MOE, with proportions of expressed loci in individuals ranging from 29 to 45%. TRPC2, which encodes a channel protein crucial for signal transduction via VRs, was co-expressed in the MOE in all individuals indicating likely functionality of expressed VR genes in the MOE. In summary, the large VR repertoire in mouse lemurs seems to be highly functional. Given the differences in the neural pathways of MOE and VNO signals, which project to higher cortical brain centers or the limbic system, respectively, this raises the intriguing possibility that the evolution of MOE-expression of VRs enabled mouse lemurs to adaptively diversify the processing of VR-encoded olfactory information. PMID:25309343

  18. Neonatal olfactory bulbectomy enhances locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and binding of NMDA receptors in pre-pubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, G; Ibañez-Sandoval, O; Silva-Gómez, A B; Camacho-Abrego, I; Rodríguez-Moreno, A; Morales-Medina, J C

    2014-02-14

    In this study, we investigated the effect of neonatal olfactory bulbectomy (nOBX) on behavioral paradigms related to olfaction such as exploratory behavior, locomotor activity in a novel environment and social interaction. We also studied the effect of nOBX on the activity of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors during development. The behavioral effects of nOBX (postnatal day 7, PD7) were investigated in pre- (PD30) and post-pubertal (PD60) Wistar rats. NMDA receptor activity was measured with [(125)I]MK-801 in the brain regions associated with the olfactory circuitry. A significant increase in the novelty-induced locomotion was seen in the pre-pubertal nOBX rats. Although the locomotor effect was less marked than in pre-pubertal rats, the nOBX rats tested post-pubertally failed to habituate to the novel situation as quickly as the sham- and normal- controls. Pre-pubertally, the head-dipping behavior was enhanced in nOBX rats compared with sham-operated and normal controls, while normal exploratory behavior was observed between groups in adulthood. In contrast, social interaction was increased in post-pubertal animals that underwent nOBX. Both pre- and post-pubertal nOBX rats recovered olfaction. Interestingly, pre-pubertal rats showed a significant increase in the [(125)I]MK-801 binding in the piriform cortex, dorsal hippocampus, inner and outer layers of the frontal cortex and outer layer of the cingulate cortex. At post-pubertal age, no significant differences in [(125)I]MK-801 binding were observed between groups at any of the brain regions analyzed. These results suggest that nOBX produces pre-pubertal behavioral disturbances and NMDA receptor changes that are transitory with recovery of olfaction early in adulthood. PMID:24295633

  19. Neuropeptide S ameliorates olfactory spatial memory impairment induced by scopolamine and MK801 through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the subiculum complex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Can; Xie, Jun-Fan; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Xin, Le; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Ren, Wen-Ting; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that neuropeptide S (NPS), via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPS receptor (NPSR) in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function. High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the subiculum complex of hippocampal formation suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory spatial memory. The present study was undertaken to investigate effects of NPS on the scopolamine- or MK801-induced impairment of olfactory spatial memory using computer-assisted 4-hole-board spatial memory test, and by monitoring Fos expression in the subiculum complex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence microscopy was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos-immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. Intracerebroventricular administration of NPS (0.5 nmol) significantly increased the number of visits to switched odorants in recall trial in mice suffering from odor-discriminating inability induced by scopolamine, a selective muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, or MK801, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, after training trials. The improvement of olfactory spatial memory by NPS was abolished by the NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS (40 nmol). Ex vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced Fos expression in the subiculum complex encompassing the subiculum (S), presubiculum (PrS) and parasubiculum (PaS). The percentages of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 91.3, 86.5 and 90.0 % in the S, PrS and PaS, respectively. The present findings demonstrate that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the subiculum complex, ameliorates olfactory spatial memory impairment induced by scopolamine and MK801 in mice. PMID:26323488

  20. Differential Octopaminergic Modulation of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Responses to Sex Pheromones in Heliothis virescens.

    PubMed

    Hillier, N Kirk; Kavanagh, Rhys M B

    2015-01-01

    Octopamine is an important neuromodulator of neural function in invertebrates. Octopamine increases male moth sensitivity to female sex pheromones, however, relatively little is known as to the role of octopamine in the female olfactory system, nor its possible effects on the reception of non-pheromone odorants. The purpose of this study was to determine relative effects of octopamine on the sensitivity of the peripheral olfactory system in male and female Heliothis virescens. Single sensillum recording was conducted in both sexes following injection with octopamine or Ringer solution, and during odorant stimulation with conspecific female sex pheromone or host plant volatiles. Results indicate that octopamine plays a significant modulatory role in female sex pheromone detection in female moths; and that male and female pheromone detection neurons share distinct pharmacological and physiological similarities in H. virescens despite sexual dimorphism at the antennal level. PMID:26650832

  1. Reading Out Olfactory Receptors: Feedforward Circuits Detect Odors in Mixtures without Demixing.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Alexander; Rokni, Dan; Kapoor, Vikrant; Bethge, Matthias; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-09-01

    The olfactory system, like other sensory systems, can detect specific stimuli of interest amidst complex, varying backgrounds. To gain insight into the neural mechanisms underlying this ability, we imaged responses of mouse olfactory bulb glomeruli to mixtures. We used this data to build a model of mixture responses that incorporated nonlinear interactions and trial-to-trial variability and explored potential decoding mechanisms that can mimic mouse performance when given glomerular responses as input. We find that a linear decoder with sparse weights could match mouse performance using just a small subset of the glomeruli (∼15). However, when such a decoder is trained only with single odors, it generalizes poorly to mixture stimuli due to nonlinear mixture responses. We show that mice similarly fail to generalize, suggesting that they learn this segregation task discriminatively by adjusting task-specific decision boundaries without taking advantage of a demixed representation of odors. PMID:27593177

  2. Differential Octopaminergic Modulation of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Responses to Sex Pheromones in Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, N. Kirk; Kavanagh, Rhys M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Octopamine is an important neuromodulator of neural function in invertebrates. Octopamine increases male moth sensitivity to female sex pheromones, however, relatively little is known as to the role of octopamine in the female olfactory system, nor its possible effects on the reception of non-pheromone odorants. The purpose of this study was to determine relative effects of octopamine on the sensitivity of the peripheral olfactory system in male and female Heliothis virescens. Single sensillum recording was conducted in both sexes following injection with octopamine or Ringer solution, and during odorant stimulation with conspecific female sex pheromone or host plant volatiles. Results indicate that octopamine plays a significant modulatory role in female sex pheromone detection in female moths; and that male and female pheromone detection neurons share distinct pharmacological and physiological similarities in H. virescens despite sexual dimorphism at the antennal level. PMID:26650832

  3. Sensillar expression and responses of olfactory receptors reveal different peripheral coding in two Helicoverpa species using the same pheromone components

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hetan; Guo, Mengbo; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yang; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2016-01-01

    Male moths efficiently recognize conspecific sex pheromones thanks to their highly accurate and specific olfactory system. The Heliothis/Helicoverpa species are regarded as good models for studying the perception of sex pheromones. In this study, we performed a series of experiments to investigate the peripheral mechanisms of pheromone coding in two-closely related species, Helicoverpa armigera and H. assulta. The morphology and distribution patterns of sensilla trichoidea are similar between the two species when observed at the scanning electron microscope, but their performances are different. In H. armigera, three functional types of sensilla trichoidea (A, B and C) were found to respond to different pheromone components, while in H. assulta only two types of such sensilla (A and C) could be detected. The response profiles of all types of sensilla trichoidea in the two species well matched the specificities of the pheromone receptors (PRs) expressed in the same sensilla, as measured in voltage-clamp experiments. The expressions of PRs in neighboring olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) within the same trichoid sensillum were further confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our results show how the same pheromone components can code for different messages at the periphery of two Helicoverpa species. PMID:26744070

  4. Morpho-functional identification of abdominal olfactory receptors in the midge Culicoides imicola.

    PubMed

    Sollai, Giorgia; Solari, Paolo; Loy, Francesco; Masala, Carla; Crnjar, Roberto; Liscia, Anna

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the presence and the possible role of abdominal olfactory sensilla in Culicoides imicola mediating the search for potential hosts and oviposition sites, by means of a morphological, electrophysiological and behavioural approach. The results reported here show that in the midge C. imicola the whole abdomen, comprising the ovipositor, are endowed with three morphotypes of multiporous sensilla that display olfactory sensitivity towards kairomones related to the host-animal skin such as L: -(+)-lactic acid and 1-octen-3-ol, to the host-animal urine such as 3-ethylphenol and 4-propylphenol, and to the potent attractant sesame seed oil. Electrophysiological and behavioural data for the first time suggest in the midge the involvement of abdominal olfactory structures in the choice of the oviposition sites and allow in discussing their possible role in the host-animal localisation. Field experiments showed that light traps baited with the aforementioned compounds elicited a stronger degree of attractiveness on midges with respect to the unbaited traps (control), although to a different extent. Our results, while implying a number of considerations concerning the role of molecules tested as kairomones, also suggest their use in the control of the midge C. imicola population. PMID:20658345

  5. On the Origin and Evolution of Vertebrate Olfactory Receptor Genes: Comparative Genome Analysis Among 23 Chordate Species

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Olfaction is a primitive sense in organisms. Both vertebrates and insects have receptors for detecting odor molecules in the environment, but the evolutionary origins of these genes are different. Among studied vertebrates, mammals have ∼1,000 olfactory receptor (OR) genes, whereas teleost fishes have much smaller (∼100) numbers of OR genes. To investigate the origin and evolution of vertebrate OR genes, I attempted to determine near-complete OR gene repertoires by searching whole-genome sequences of 14 nonmammalian chordates, including cephalochordates (amphioxus), urochordates (ascidian and larvacean), and vertebrates (sea lamprey, elephant shark, five teleost fishes, frog, lizard, and chicken), followed by a large-scale phylogenetic analysis in conjunction with mammalian OR genes identified from nine species. This analysis showed that the amphioxus has >30 vertebrate-type OR genes though it lacks distinctive olfactory organs, whereas all OR genes appear to have been lost in the urochordate lineage. Some groups of genes (θ, κ, and λ) that are phylogenetically nested within vertebrate OR genes showed few gene gains and losses, which is in sharp contrast to the evolutionary pattern of OR genes, suggesting that they are actually non-OR genes. Moreover, the analysis demonstrated a great difference in OR gene repertoires between aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates, reflecting the necessity for the detection of water-soluble and airborne odorants, respectively. However, a minor group (β) of genes that are atypically present in both aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates was also found. These findings should provide a critical foundation for further physiological, behavioral, and evolutionary studies of olfaction in various organisms. PMID:20333175

  6. A comparison of reptilian and avian olfactory receptor gene repertoires: Species-specific expansion of group γ genes in birds

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Silke S; Kuryshev, Vladimir Y; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Kempenaers, Bart; Mueller, Jakob C

    2009-01-01

    Background The detection of odorants is mediated by olfactory receptors (ORs). ORs are G-protein coupled receptors that form a remarkably large protein superfamily in vertebrate genomes. We used data that became available through recent sequencing efforts of reptilian and avian genomes to identify the complete OR gene repertoires in a lizard, the green anole (Anolis carolinensis), and in two birds, the chicken (Gallus gallus) and the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). Results We identified 156 green anole OR genes, including 42 pseudogenes. The OR gene repertoire of the two bird species was substantially larger with 479 and 553 OR gene homologs in the chicken and zebra finch, respectively (including 111 and 221 pseudogenes, respectively). We show that the green anole has a higher fraction of intact OR genes (~72%) compared with the chicken (~66%) and the zebra finch (~38%). We identified a larger number and a substantially higher proportion of intact OR gene homologs in the chicken genome than previously reported (214 versus 82 genes and 66% versus 15%, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis showed that lizard and bird OR gene repertoires consist of group α, θ and γ genes. Interestingly, the vast majority of the avian OR genes are confined to a large expansion of a single branch (the so called γ-c clade). An analysis of the selective pressure on the paralogous genes of each γ-c clade revealed that they have been subjected to adaptive evolution. This expansion appears to be bird-specific and not sauropsid-specific, as it is lacking from the lizard genome. The γ-c expansions of the two birds do not intermix, i.e., they are lineage-specific. Almost all (group γ-c) OR genes mapped to the unknown chromosome. The remaining OR genes mapped to six homologous chromosomes plus three to four additional chromosomes in the zebra finch and chicken. Conclusion We identified a surprisingly large number of potentially functional avian OR genes. Our data supports recent

  7. Kinetics of olfactory responses might largely depend on the odorant-receptor interaction and the odorant deactivation postulated for flux detectors.

    PubMed

    Kaissling, Karl-Ernst

    2013-11-01

    Experimental data together with modeling of pheromone perireceptor and receptor events in moths (Bombyx mori, Antheraea polyphemus) suggest that the kinetics of olfactory receptor potentials largely depend on the association of the odorant with the neuronal receptor molecules and the deactivation of the odorant accumulated around the receptor neuron. The first process could be responsible for the reaction times (mean about 400 ms) of the nerve impulses at threshold. The second process has been postulated for flux detectors such as olfactory sensilla of moths. The odorant deactivation could involve a modification of the pheromone-binding protein (PBP) that "locks" the pheromone inside the inner binding cavity of the protein. The model combines seemingly contradictory functions of the PBP such as pheromone transport, protection of the pheromone from enzymatic degradation, pheromone deactivation, and pheromone-receptor interaction. Model calculations reveal a density of at least 6,000 receptor molecules per µm(2) of neuronal membrane. The volatile decanoyl-thio-1,1,1-trifluoropropanone specifically blocks pheromone receptor neurons, probably when bound to the PBP and by competitive binding to the receptor molecules. The shallow dose-response curve of the receptor potential and altered response properties observed with pheromone derivatives or after adaptation may indicate shortened opening of ion channels. PMID:23563709

  8. Expression of G proteins in the olfactory receptor neurons of the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster: their unique projection into the olfactory bulbs.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Tomoaki; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Koki; Yokosuka, Makoto; Saito, Toru R; Toyoda, Fumiyo; Hasunuma, Itaru; Nakakura, Takashi; Kikuyama, Sakae

    2014-10-15

    We analyzed the expression of G protein α subunits and the axonal projection into the brain in the olfactory system of the semiaquatic newt Cynops pyrrhogaster by immunostaining with antibodies against Gαolf and Gαo , by in situ hybridization using probes for Gαolf , Gαo , and Gαi2 , and by neuronal tracing with DiI and DiA. The main olfactory epithelium (OE) consists of two parts, the ventral OE and dorsal OE. In the ventral OE, the Gαolf - and Gαo -expressing neurons are located in the apical and basal zone of the OE, respectively. This zonal expression was similar to that of the OE in the middle cavity of the fully aquatic toad Xenopus laevis. However, the Gαolf - and Gαo -expressing neurons in the newt ventral OE project their axons toward the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), respectively, whereas in Xenopus, the axons of both neurons project solely toward the MOB. In the dorsal OE of the newt, as in the principal cavity of Xenopus, the majority of the neurons express Gαolf and extend their axons into the MOB. In the vomeronasal organ (VNO), the neurons mostly express Gαo . These neurons and quite a few Gαolf -expressing neurons project their axons toward the AOB. This feature is similar to that in the terrestrial toad Bufo japonicus and is different from that in Xenopus, in which VNO neurons express solely Gαo , although their axons invariably project toward the AOB. We discuss the findings in the light of diversification and evolution of the vertebrate olfactory system. PMID:24771457

  9. Electro-olfactogram and multiunit olfactory receptor responses to binary and trinary mixtures of amino acids in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Caprio, J; Dudek, J; Robinson, J J

    1989-02-01

    In vivo electrophysiological recordings from populations of olfactory receptor neurons in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, clearly showed that responses to binary and trinary mixtures of amino acids were predictable with knowledge obtained from previous cross-adaptation studies of the relative independence of the respective binding sites of the component stimuli. All component stimuli, from which equal aliquots were drawn to form the mixtures, were adjusted in concentration to provide for approximately equal response magnitudes. The magnitude of the response to a mixture whose component amino acids showed significant cross-reactivity was equivalent to the response to any single component used to form that mixture. A mixture whose component amino acids showed minimal cross-adaptation produced a significantly larger relative response than a mixture whose components exhibited considerable cross-reactivity. This larger response approached the sum of the responses to the individual component amino acids tested at the resulting concentrations in the mixture, even though olfactory receptor dose-response functions for amino acids in this species are characterized by extreme sensory compression (i.e., successive concentration increments produce progressively smaller physiological responses). Thus, the present study indicates that the response to sensory stimulation of olfactory receptor sites is more enhanced by the activation of different receptor site types than by stimulus interaction at a single site type. PMID:2703818

  10. Molecular Characterization and Differential Expression of an Olfactory Receptor Gene Family in the White-Backed Planthopper Sogatella furcifera Based on Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming; Zhang, Ya-Nan; He, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera, a notorious rice pest in Asia, employs host plant volatiles as cues for host location. In insects, odor detection is mediated by two types of olfactory receptors: odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs). In this study, we identified 63 SfurORs and 14 SfurIRs in S. furcifera based on sequences obtained from the head transcriptome and bioinformatics analysis. The motif-pattern of 130 hemiptera ORs indicated an apparent differentiation in this order. Phylogenetic trees of the ORs and IRs were constructed using neighbor-joining estimates. Most of the ORs had orthologous genes, but a specific OR clade was identified in S. furcifera, which suggests that these ORs may have specific olfactory functions in this species. Our results provide a basis for further investigations of how S. furcifera coordinates its olfactory receptor genes with its plant hosts, thereby providing a foundation for novel pest management approaches based on these genes. PMID:26540266

  11. Chromosomal localization and genomic organization of genes encoding guanylyl cyclase receptors expressed in olfactory sensory neurons and retina

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ruey-Bing; Fuelle, H.J.; Garbers, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    We recently cloned three membrane guanylyl cyclases, designated GC-D, CG-E, and GC-F, from rat olfactory tissue and eye. Amino acid sequence homology suggests that they may compose a new gene subfamily of guanylyl cyclase receptors specifically expressed in sensory tissues. Their chromosomal localization was determined by mouse interspecific backcross analysis. The GC-D, CG-E, and GC-F genes (Gucy2d, Gucy2e, and Gucy2f) are dispersed through the mouse genome in that they map to chromosomes 7, 11, and X, respectively. Close proximity of the mouse GC-D gene to Omp (olfactory marker protein) and Hbb (hemoglobin {beta}-chain complex) suggests that the human homolog gene maps to 11p15.4 or 11q13.4-q14.1. The human GC-F gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome Xq22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The genomic organization of the mouse GC-E, and GC-F genomic clones contain identical exon-intron boundaries within their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains, demonstrating the conservation of the gene structures. With respect to human genetic diseases, GC-E mapped to mouse chromosome 11 within a syntenic region on human chromosome 17p13 that has been linked with loci for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis. No apparent disease loci have been yet linked to the locations of the GC-D or GC-F genes. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Aversive odorant causing appetite decrease downregulates tyrosine decarboxylase gene expression in the olfactory receptor neuron of the blowfly, Phormia regina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Yuko; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2012-01-01

    In the blowfly Phormia regina, exposure to d-limonene for 5 days during feeding inhibits proboscis extension reflex behavior due to decreasing tyramine (TA) titer in the brain. TA is synthesized by tyrosine decarboxylase (Tdc) and catalyzed into octopamine (OA) by TA ß-hydroxylase (Tbh). To address the mechanisms of TA titer regulation in the blowfly, we cloned Tdc and Tbh cDNAs from P. regina (PregTdc and PregTbh). The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high identity to those of the corresponding proteins from Drosophila melanogaster at the amino acid level. PregTdc was expressed in the antenna, labellum, and tarsus whereas PregTbh was expressed in the head, indicating that TA is mainly synthesized in the sensory organs whereas OA is primarily synthesized in the brain. d-Limonene exposure significantly decreased PregTdc expression in the antenna but not in the labellum and the tarsus, indicating that PregTdc expressed in the antenna is responsible for decreasing TA titer. PregTdc-like immunoreactive material was localized in the thin-walled sensillum. In contrast, the OA/TA receptor (PregOAR/TAR) was localized to the thick-walled sensillum. The results indicated that d-limonene inhibits PregTdc expression in the olfactory receptor neurons in the thin-walled sensilla, likely resulting in reduced TA levels in the receptor neurons in the antenna. TA may be transferred from the receptor neuron to the specific synaptic junction in the antennal lobe of the brain through the projection neurons and play a role in conveying the aversive odorant information to the projection and local neurons.

  13. Homomeric RDL and heteromeric RDL/LCCH3 GABA receptors in the honeybee antennal lobes: two candidates for inhibitory transmission in olfactory processing.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Julien Pierre; Bazelot, Michaël; Barbara, Guillaume Stéphane; Paute, Sandrine; Gauthier, Monique; Raymond-Delpech, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel receptors are abundant in the CNS, where their physiological role is to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission. In insects, this inhibitory transmission plays a crucial role in olfactory information processing. In an effort to understand the nature and properties of the ionotropic receptors involved in these processes in the honeybee Apis mellifera, we performed a pharmacological and molecular characterization of GABA-gated channels in the primary olfactory neuropile of the honeybee brain-the antennal lobe (AL)-using whole cell patch-clamp recordings coupled with single-cell RT-PCR. Application of GABA onto AL cells at -110 mV elicited fast inward currents, demonstrating the existence of ionotropic GABA-gated chloride channels. Molecular analysis of the GABA-responding cells revealed that both subunits RDL and LCCH3 were expressed out of the three orthologs of Drosophila melanogaster GABA-receptor subunits encoded within the honeybee genome (RDL, resistant to dieldrin; GRD, GABA/glycine-like receptor of Drosophila; LCCH3, ligand-gated chloride channel homologue 3), opening the door to possible homo- and/or heteromeric associations. The resulting receptors were activated by insect GABA-receptor agonists muscimol and CACA and blocked by antagonists fipronil, dieldrin, and picrotoxin, but not bicuculline, displaying a typical RDL-like pharmacology. Interestingly, increasing the intracellular calcium concentration potentiated GABA-elicited currents, suggesting a modulating effect of calcium on GABA receptors possibly through phosphorylation processes that remain to be determined. These results indicate that adult honeybee AL cells express typical RDL-like GABA receptors whose properties support a major role in synaptic inhibitory transmission during olfactory information processing. PMID:19906878

  14. Topological change and impedance spectrum of rat olfactory receptor I7: A comparative analysis with bovine rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Pennetta, Cecilia; Reggiani, Lino

    2009-04-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on possible selection of olfactory receptors (ORs) as sensing components of nanobiosensors. Accordingly, we generate the impedance spectra of the rat OR I7 in the native and activated states and analyze their differences. In this way, we connect the protein morphological transformation, caused by the sensing action, with its change in electrical impedance. The results are compared with those obtained by studying the best known protein of the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family: bovine rhodopsin. Our investigations indicate that a change in morphology goes with a change in impedance spectrum mostly associated with a decrease in the static impedance up to about 60% of the initial value, in qualitative agreement with existing experiments on rat OR I7. The predictiveness of the model is tested successfully for the case of recent experiments on bacteriorhodopsin. The present results point to a promising development of a new class of nanobiosensors based on the electrical properties of GPCR and other sensing proteins.

  15. Smoke, pheromone and kairomone olfactory receptor neurons in males and females of the pine sawyer Monochamus galloprovincialis (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo; Ammagarahalli, Byrappa; Hall, David R; Pajares, Juan A; Gemeno, César

    2015-11-01

    The response of antennal olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) of Monochamus galloprovincialis to several odourants was tested using single sensillum electrophysiology. Behaviourally active pheromone, and kairomone (host and sympatric bark beetle pheromone) odours were tested alongside smoke compounds released by burnt wood that are potentially attractive to the insect. The antennae bore several types of sensilla. Two plate areas in the proximal and distal ends of each antennal segment were covered with basiconic sensilla that responded to the odour stimuli. Sensilla basiconica contained one or two cells of different spike amplitude. The 32 male and 38 female ORNs tested responded with excitations or inhibitions to the different plant odours. In general the response of male and female receptors was very similar so they were pooled to perform a cluster analysis on ORN responses. Six ORNs were clearly specialised for pheromone reception. Responses to kairomone and smoke odours were less specific than those of pheromone, but a group of 9 cells was clearly excited by smoke compounds (mainly eugenol and 4-methyl 2-methoxyphenol), a group of 8 cells was very responsive to α-pinene, β-pinene and cis-verbenol, and a group of 14 cells responded to a wider range of compounds. The rest of the cells (47%) were either non-responsive or slightly inhibited by smoke compounds. Dose-response curves were obtained for several compounds. Different compounds induced significantly different latencies and these appeared to be unrelated to their boiling point. PMID:26296453

  16. InsP3 causes an increase in apical [Ca2+]i by activating two distinct current components in vertebrate olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Schild, D; Lischka, F W; Restrepo, D

    1995-02-01

    1. Effects of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) applied through a patch pipette to Xenopus laevis olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using the patch-clamp technique in conjunction with calcium imaging with fura-2. 2. InsP3 activated, first, a novel voltage-independent Ca2+ current (ICa) and, second, a nonselective cation current (Icat). 3. The activation of these currents occurred at different intracellular calcium concentrations, and the activation of either current led to a marked increase of [Ca2+]i in the dendritic knob. 4. The results suggest that InsP3 might act as a second messenger in vertebrate olfactory receptor cells by activating, through different mechanisms, a plasma membrane Ca2+ conductance (ICa) and a nonselective cation conductance (Icat). PMID:7760140

  17. Parametric Investigations of Non-Conventional Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-12

    Hall thrusters might better scale to low power with non-conventional geometry. A 9 cm cylindrical, ceramic-channel, Hall thruster with a cusp-type magnetic field distribution has been investigated. It exhibits discharge characteristics similar to conventional coaxial Hall thrusters, but does not expose as much channel surface. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations.

  18. Electronic structures of topological insulators with non-conventional terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiegang; Zhang, Yun; Feng, Wei; Yuan, Bingkai; Lai, Xinchun

    Until now, most works on topological insulators focus on the natural cleaving surfaces, i.e., conventional terminations. However, researches on the non-conventional surfaces of TIs are hindered due to the difficulties in preparation of those surfaces and the existence of large number of dangling bonds on those surfaces. What is more, due to the complications in the surface lattice structures, DFT calculations on the non-conventional surfaces are not favorable. In this work, by adopting the tight binding method based Green's Function, we systematically studied the surface states of non-conventional terminations of topological insulator Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3. By using MBE, we manage to prepare topological insulator Bi2Te3 thin films with fractional quintuple layer (FQL) termination. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) reveals that the as-grown Bi2Te3 thin films may not necessarily terminate at the Van der Waals gap between two adjacent quintuple layers. The electronic structures of the FQL surfaces are studied in combination with quasi-particle interference (QPI) by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Our results suggest that the topological nature of SSs be preserved on non-conventional terminations. The robustness of the topological SSs is also demonstrated. Work supported by Grants from NSFC11404298, CAEP2014B0302045.

  19. Evaluation of the Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 in Desensitization of Mouse Odorant Receptors in a Mammalian Cell Line and in Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Aya; Reisert, Johannes; Ihara, Sayoko; Yoshikawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of odors are sensed and discriminated by G protein-coupled odorant receptors (ORs) expressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) may have a role in desensitization of ORs. However, whether ORs are susceptible to agonist-dependent desensitization and whether GRKs affect odorant responsiveness of OSNs are currently unknown. Here we show that GRK3 attenuated the agonist responsiveness of a specific mouse odorant receptor for eugenol (mOR-EG) upon agonist pretreatment in HEK293 cells, but GRK3 did not affect the response amplitude or the recovery kinetics upon repeated agonist stimulation. We performed electrophysiological recordings of single OSNs which expressed mOR-EG and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence or absence of GRK3. The kinetics and amplitude of agonist responsiveness of individual GFP-labeled mOR-EG neurons were not significantly affected by the absence of GRK3. These results indicate that the role of GRK3 in attenuating ORs responsiveness in OSNs may have been overestimated. PMID:25313015

  20. A Characterization of the Manduca sexta Serotonin Receptors in the Context of Olfactory Neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Andrew M.; Reale, Vincenzina; Pi, Yeli; Zhang, Wujie; Dacks, Joel B.; Nighorn, Alan J.; Evans, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromodulation, the alteration of individual neuron response properties, has dramatic consequences for neural network function and is a phenomenon observed across all brain regions and taxa. However, the mechanisms underlying neuromodulation are made complex by the diversity of neuromodulatory receptors expressed within a neural network. In this study we begin to examine the receptor basis for serotonergic neuromodulation in the antennal lobe of Manduca sexta. To this end we cloned all four known insect serotonin receptor types from Manduca (the Ms5HTRs). We used phylogenetic analyses to classify the Ms5HTRs and to establish their relationships to other insect serotonin receptors, other insect amine receptors and the vertebrate serotonin receptors. Pharmacological assays demonstrated that each Ms5HTR was selective for serotonin over other endogenous amines and that serotonin had a similar potency at all four Ms5HTRs. The pharmacological assays also identified several agonists and antagonists of the different Ms5HTRs. Finally, we found that the Ms5HT1A receptor was expressed in a subpopulation of GABAergic local interneurons suggesting that the Ms5HTRs are likely expressed heterogeneously within the antennal lobe based on functional neuronal subtype. PMID:23922709

  1. Olfactory receptors on the cockroach antenna signal odour ON and odour OFF by excitation.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Harald; Hinterwirth, Armin; Gingl, Ewald

    2005-12-01

    A morphologically identifiable type of olfactory sensillum on the antenna of the American cockroach contains a pair of ON and OFF cells that responds oppositely to changes in the concentration of fruit odours. The odour of lemon oil was used to study the accuracy with which these cells can discriminate between rapid step-like, ramp-like and oscillating changes in odour concentration. The discharge rates of both cells are not only affected by the actual concentration at particular instants in time (instantaneous concentration) but also by the rate at which concentration changes. The impulse frequency of the fruit odour ON cell is high when odour concentration is high, but higher still when odour concentration is also rising. Conversely, the impulse frequency of the fruit odour OFF cell is high when odour concentration is low and higher still when odour concentration is also falling. Thus, the effect of odour concentration on the responses of both cells is reinforced by the rate of change. Sensitivity to the rate of concentration change becomes greater when the rate is low. Because of the high sensitivity to low rates of change, these cells are optimized to detect fluctuations in fruit odour concentration. Whereas the ON cell signals the arrival and presence of fruit odour, the OFF cell detects its termination and absence. These cells provide excitatory responses for both increase and decrease in fruit odour concentration and may therefore reinforce contrast information. PMID:16367781

  2. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  3. Unravelling the Complexity of Human Olfactory Receptor Repertoire by Copy Number Analysis across Population Using High Resolution Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Veerappa, Avinash M.; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Murthy, Megha; Manjegowda, Dinesh S.; Nayaka, Radhika; Ramachandra, Nallur B.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (OR), responsible for detection of odor molecules, belong to the largest family of genes and are highly polymorphic in nature having distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Since there are no reports on the presence of copy number variations in OR repertoire of Indian population, the present investigation in 43 Indians along with 270 HapMap and 31 Tibetan samples was undertaken to study genome variability and evolution. Analysis was performed using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip, Affymterix CytoScan® High-Density array, HD-CNV, and MAFFT program. We observed a total of 1527 OR genes in 503 CNV events from 81.3% of the study group, which includes 67.6% duplications and 32.4% deletions encompassing more of genes than pseudogenes. We report human genotypic variation in functional OR repertoire size across populations and it was found that the combinatorial effect of both “orthologous obtained from closely related species” and “paralogous derived sequences” provide the complexity to the continuously occurring OR CNVs. PMID:23843967

  4. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Is the Primary Mediator of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Inhibition in Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    Odorants inhibit as well as excite primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in many animal species. Growing evidence suggests that inhibition of mammalian ORNs is mediated by phosphoinositide (PI) signaling through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and that canonical adenylyl cyclase III signaling and PI3K signaling interact to provide the basis for ligand-induced selective signaling. As PI3K is known to act in concert with phospholipase C (PLC) in some cellular systems, the question arises as to whether they work together to mediate inhibitory transduction in mammalian ORNs. The present study is designed to test this hypothesis. While we establish that multiple PLC isoforms are expressed in the transduction zone of rat ORNs, that odorants can activate PLC in ORNs in situ, and that pharmacological blockade of PLC enhances the excitatory response to an odorant mixture in some ORNs in conjunction with PI3K blockade, we find that by itself PLC does not account for an inhibitory response. We conclude that PLC does not make a measurable independent contribution to odor-evoked inhibition, and that PI3K is the primary mediator of PI-dependent inhibition in mammalian ORNs. PMID:27147969

  5. Increased migration of olfactory ensheathing cells secreting the Nogo receptor ectodomain over inhibitory substrates and lesioned spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Reginensi, Diego; Carulla, Patricia; Nocentini, Sara; Seira, Oscar; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Torres-Espín, Abel; Matamoros-Angles, Andreu; Gavín, Rosalina; Moreno-Flores, María Teresa; Wandosell, Francisco; Samitier, Josep; Trepat, Xavier; Navarro, Xavier; del Río, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation emerged some years ago as a promising therapeutic strategy to repair injured spinal cord. However, inhibitory molecules are present for long periods of time in lesioned spinal cord, inhibiting both OEC migration and axonal regrowth. Two families of these molecules, chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPG) and myelin-derived inhibitors (MAIs), are able to trigger inhibitory responses in lesioned axons. Mounting evidence suggests that OEC migration is inhibited by myelin. Here we demonstrate that OEC migration is largely inhibited by CSPGs and that inhibition can be overcome by the bacterial enzyme Chondroitinase ABC. In parallel, we have generated a stable OEC cell line overexpressing the Nogo receptor (NgR) ectodomain to reduce MAI-associated inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Results indicate that engineered cells migrate longer distances than unmodified OECs over myelin or oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp)-coated substrates. In addition, they also show improved migration in lesioned spinal cord. Our results provide new insights toward the improvement of the mechanisms of action and optimization of OEC-based cell therapy for spinal cord lesion. PMID:25708702

  6. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent inhibition as a broad basis for opponent coding in Mammalian olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth A; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling has been implicated in mediating inhibitory odorant input to mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To better understand the breadth of such inhibition in odor coding, we screened a panel of odorants representing different chemical classes, as well as odorants known to occur in a natural odor object (tomato), for their ability to rapidly activate PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling. Odorants were screened on dissociated native rat ORNs before and after pre-incubation with the PI3K-isoform specific blockers AS252424 and TGX221. Many different odorants increased their excitatory strength for particular ORNs following PI3K blockade in a manner consistent with activating PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling in those cells. The PI3K-dependent inhibitory odorants overlapped with conventional excitatory odorants, but did not share the same bias, indicating partial partitioning of the odor space. Finding that PI3K-dependent inhibition can be activated by a wide range of otherwise conventional excitatory odorants strongly implies PI3K-dependent inhibition provides a broad basis for opponent coding in mammalian ORNs. PMID:23585911

  7. ORA1, a Zebrafish Olfactory Receptor Ancestral to All Mammalian V1R Genes, Recognizes 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid, a Putative Reproductive Pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Maik; Frank, Oliver; Rawel, Harshadrai; Ahuja, Gaurav; Potting, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Korsching, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    The teleost v1r-related ora genes are a small, highly conserved olfactory receptor gene family of only six genes, whose direct orthologues can be identified in lineages as far as that of cartilaginous fish. However, no ligands for fish olfactory receptor class A related genes (ORA) had been uncovered so far. Here we have deorphanized the ORA1 receptor using heterologous expression and calcium imaging. We report that zebrafish ORA1 recognizes with high specificity and sensitivity 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The carboxyl group of this compound is required in a particular distance from the aromatic ring, whereas the hydroxyl group in the para-position is not essential, but strongly enhances the binding efficacy. Low concentrations of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid elicit increases in oviposition frequency in zebrafish mating pairs. This effect is abolished by naris closure. We hypothesize that 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid might function as a pheromone for reproductive behavior in zebrafish. ORA1 is ancestral to mammalian V1Rs, and its putative function as pheromone receptor is reminiscent of the role of several mammalian V1Rs as pheromone receptors. PMID:24831010

  8. Advances in Gene Expression in Non-Conventional Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, Sanet; Labuschagne, Michel; Albertyn, Jacobus

    Yeast has been a favoured lower eukaryotic system for the expression and production of recombinant proteins for both basic research and practical applications, and the demand for foreign-gene expression systems is increasing rapidly. Despite the vast amount of information on the molecular biology and physiology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has consequently been the first choice as host system for recombinant protein production in the past, several limitations have been identified in this expression system. These limitations have recently been relieved by the development of expression systems in other yeast species known as ‘ non-conventional yeasts’ or ‘non-Saccharomyces ’ yeasts. With the increasing interest in the biotechnological applications of these yeasts in applied and fundamental studies and processes, the term ‘ non-conventional ’ yeast may well soon become redundant. As there is no universal expression system for heterologous protein production, it is necessary to recognize the merits and demerits of each system in order to make a right choice. This chapter will evaluate the competitive environment of non-conventional expression platforms represented by some of the best-known alternative yeasts systems including Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris and more recently, Arxula adeninivorans.

  9. Non-conventional hydrogen bonds: pterins-metal anions.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rubicelia; Martínez, Ana

    2011-07-28

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the interaction of metal ions (Cu, Ag and Au) with three different pterins (pterin, isoxanthopterin and sepiapterin) to provide insights concerning the formation of conventional and non-conventional H bonds. Density functional theory calculations were performed in order to reveal the optimized structures of pterin molecules, dimers and tetramers compounds, both with and without metal anions (M). The interaction with small metal clusters (M(3)) is also considered. The formation of different systems is characterized in terms of the structural parameters and hydrogen binding energies (HBE). The HBE values for pterin-M systems presented in this study lie between 22 and 60 kcal mol(-1) and can therefore be classified as strong conventional and strong non-conventional hydrogen bonds. The HBE with small metal clusters (pterin-M(3)) are smaller than the HBE with metal atoms. Vertical electron detachment energies (VEDEs) are also reported in order to analyze the influence of the hydrogen bond on electronic properties. A direct correlation between VEDEs and HBE was found for pterin-M and pterin-M(3) complexes; i.e. as the VEDEs increase, the HBE also augment. The only exception is with Ag(3). The main conclusion derived from this study is that the strong non-conventional hydrogen bonds formed between pterins, dimers and tetramers do not affect the formation of conventional hydrogen bonds between pterins but they do influence the VEDEs. PMID:21695329

  10. Neuromodulation of Olfactory Sensitivity in the Peripheral Olfactory Organs of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Je Won; Kim, Jin-Hee; Pfeiffer, Rita; Ahn, Young-Joon; Page, Terry L.; Kwon, Hyung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory sensitivity exhibits daily fluctuations. Several studies have suggested that the olfactory system in insects is modulated by both biogenic amines and neuropeptides. However, molecular and neural mechanisms underlying olfactory modulation in the periphery remain unclear since neuronal circuits regulating olfactory sensitivity have not been identified. Here, we investigated the structure and function of these signaling pathways in the peripheral olfactory system of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, utilizing in situ hybridization, qRT-PCR, and electrophysiological approaches. We showed that tachykinin was co-localized with the octopamine receptor in antennal neurons located near the antennal nerves. In addition, the tachykinin receptor was found to be expressed in most of the olfactory receptor neurons in antennae. Functionally, the effects of direct injection of tachykinin peptides, dsRNAs of tachykinin, tachykinin receptors, and octopamine receptors provided further support for the view that both octopamine and tachykinin modulate olfactory sensitivity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that octopamine and tachykinin in antennal neurons are olfactory regulators in the periphery. We propose here the hypothesis that octopamine released from neurons in the brain regulates the release of tachykinin from the octopamine receptor neurons in antennae, which in turn modulates the olfactory sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons, which house tachykinin receptors. PMID:24244739

  11. Olfactory receptor responses of the nymphal American cockroach to sex pheromones and their mimics.

    PubMed

    Nishino, C; Kimura, R

    1982-01-01

    1. EAG responses to highly purified sex pheromones (periplanone-A and -B), sex pheromone mimics [germacrene-D, (+)-verbanyl acetate and (+)-trans-verbenyl acetate] and general odor (camphor) were recorded from both sexes of adult and three nymphal stages (7, 10 and 11th instars) of the American cockroach. 2. The M/F ratios were evaluated for each stage by stimulation with the above chemicals. 3. The ratio values indicated undeveloped sex pheromone receptor on the antennae of 7th male instar and females of all the stages. On the other hand, precursory development of the receptor was expected on the antennae of males of the old-aged nymphal instars and full development on the adult male antennae. PMID:6124360

  12. Immunization Against Specific Fragments of Neurotrophin p75 Receptor Protects Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons in the Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bobkova, Natalia; Vorobyov, Vasily; Medvinskaya, Natalia; Nesterova, Inna; Tatarnikova, Olga; Nekrasov, Pavel; Samokhin, Alexander; Deev, Alexander; Sengpiel, Frank; Koroev, Dmitry; Volpina, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive impairment associated with marked cholinergic neuron loss and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brain. The cytotoxicity in AD is mediated, at least in part, by Aβ binding with the extracellular domain of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), localized predominantly in the membranes of acetylcholine-producing neurons in the basal forebrain. Hypothesizing that an open unstructured loop of p75NTR might be the effective site for Aβ binding, we have immunized both olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) and sham-operated (SO) mice (n = 82 and 49, respectively) with synthetic peptides, structurally similar to different parts of the loops, aiming to block them by specific antibodies. OBX-mice have been shown in previous studies, and confirmed in the present one, to be characterized by typical behavioral, morphological, and biochemical AD hallmarks, including cholinergic deficits in forebrain neurons. Immunization of OBX- or SO-mice with KLH conjugated fragments of p75NTR induced high titers of specific serum antibodies for each of nine chosen fragments. However, maximal protective effects on spatial memory, evaluated in a Morris water maze, and on activity of choline acetyltransferase in forebrain neurons, detected by immunoreactivity to specific antibodies, were revealed only for peptides with amino acid residue sequences of 155–164 and 167–176. We conclude that the approach based on immunological blockade of specific p75NTR sites, linked with the cytotoxicity, is a useful and effective tool for study of AD-associated mechanisms and for development of highly selective therapy of cholinergic malfunctioning in AD patients. PMID:27163825

  13. Deorphanization and characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor OR51B5 in myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Göthert, J R; Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The ectopic expression of olfactory receptors (ORs) in the human body has been of major interest in the past decade. Several studies have reported the expression of ORs not only in healthy tissues such as heart, sperm or skin cells, but also in cancerous tissues of the liver, prostate or intestine. In the present study, we detected the expression of OR51B5 in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cell samples of clinically diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients by reverse transcription-PCR and immunocytochemical staining. The known OR51B5 ligand isononyl alcohol increased the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in both AML patient blood cells and K562 cells. With calcium imaging experiments, we characterized in greater detail the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we observed an involvement of adenylate cyclase and the downstream L-type and T-type calcium channels. In addition, the activation of OR51B5 leads to an inhibition of cell proliferation in K562 cells. In western blot experiments, we found that incubation with isononyl alcohol led to a reduction in p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation that might be responsible for the decreased cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway downstream of the activation with isononyl alcohol, which leads to reduced proliferation and therefore provide a novel pharmacological target for CML and AML, the latter of which remains difficult to treat. PMID:27551504

  14. Gap junctions in olfactory neurons modulate olfactory sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the fundamental questions in olfaction is whether olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) behave as independent entities within the olfactory epithelium. On the basis that mature ORNs express multiple connexins, I postulated that gap junctional communication modulates olfactory responses in the periphery and that disruption of gap junctions in ORNs reduces olfactory sensitivity. The data collected from characterizing connexin 43 (Cx43) dominant negative transgenic mice OlfDNCX, and from calcium imaging of wild type mice (WT) support my hypothesis. Results I generated OlfDNCX mice that express a dominant negative Cx43 protein, Cx43/β-gal, in mature ORNs to inactivate gap junctions and hemichannels composed of Cx43 or other structurally related connexins. Characterization of OlfDNCX revealed that Cx43/β-gal was exclusively expressed in areas where mature ORNs resided. Real time quantitative PCR indicated that cellular machineries of OlfDNCX were normal in comparison to WT. Electroolfactogram recordings showed decreased olfactory responses to octaldehyde, heptaldehyde and acetyl acetate in OlfDNCX compared to WT. Octaldehyde-elicited glomerular activity in the olfactory bulb, measured according to odor-elicited c-fos mRNA upregulation in juxtaglomerular cells, was confined to smaller areas of the glomerular layer in OlfDNCX compared to WT. In WT mice, octaldehyde sensitive neurons exhibited reduced response magnitudes after application of gap junction uncoupling reagents and the effects were specific to subsets of neurons. Conclusions My study has demonstrated that altered assembly of Cx43 or structurally related connexins in ORNs modulates olfactory responses and changes olfactory activation maps in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, pharmacologically uncoupling of gap junctions reduces olfactory activity in subsets of ORNs. These data suggest that gap junctional communication or hemichannel activity plays a critical role in maintaining olfactory

  15. Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Valley, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Most organisms use their olfactory system to detect and analyze chemical cues from the external world to guide essential behaviors. From worms to vertebrates, chemicals are detected by odorant receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons, which in vertebrates send an axon to the primary processing center called the olfactory bulb (OB). Within the OB, sensory neurons form excitatory synapses with projection neurons and with inhibitory interneurons. Thus, because of complex synaptic interactions, the output of a given projection neuron is determined not only by the sensory input, but also by the activity of local inhibitory interneurons that are regenerated throughout life in the process of adult neurogenesis. Herein, we discuss how it is optimized and why. PMID:27235474

  16. Silencing the Olfactory Co-Receptor RferOrco Reduces the Response to Pheromones in the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.

    PubMed

    Soffan, Alan; Antony, Binu; Abdelazim, Mahmoud; Shukla, Paraj; Witjaksono, Witjaksono; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    The red palm weevil (RPW, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus), one of the most widespread of all invasive insect pest species, is a major cause of severe damage to economically important palm trees. RPW exhibits behaviors very similar to those of its sympatric species, the Asian palm weevil (R. vulneratus), which is restricted geographically to the southern part of Southeast Asia. Although efficient and sustainable control of these pests remains challenging, olfactory-system disruption has been proposed as a promising approach for controlling palm weevils. Here, we report the cloning and sequencing of an olfactory co-receptor (Orco) from R. ferrugineus (RferOrco) and R. vulneratus (RvulOrco) and examine the effects of RferOrco silencing (RNAi) on odorant detection. RferOrco and RvulOrco encoding 482 amino acids showing 99.58% identity. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from RferOrco into R. ferrugineus pupae significantly reduced RferOrco gene expression and led to the failure of odor-stimulus detection, as confirmed through olfactometer and electroantennography (EAG) assays. These results suggest that olfactory-system disruption leading to reduced pheromone detection holds great potential for RPW pest-control strategies. PMID:27606688

  17. Olfactory receptors for a smell sensor: a comparative study of the electrical responses of rat I7 and human 17-40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, E.; Millithaler, J.-F.; Reggiani, L.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the relevant electrical properties of two olfactory receptors (ORs), one from rat, OR I7, and the other from human, OR 17-40, which are of interest for the realization of smell nanobiosensors. The investigation compares existing experiments, coming from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with the theoretical expectations obtained from an impedance network protein analogue, recently developed. The changes in the response due to the sensing action of the proteins are correlated with the conformational change undergone by the single protein. The satisfactory agreement between theory and experiments points to a promising development of a new class of nanobiosensors based on the electrical properties of sensing proteins.

  18. The Olfactory Transcriptomes of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Levitin, Maria O.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Logan, Darren W.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory (OR) and vomeronasal receptor (VR) repertoires are collectively encoded by 1700 genes and pseudogenes in the mouse genome. Most OR and VR genes were identified by comparative genomic techniques and therefore, in many of those cases, only their protein coding sequences are defined. Some also lack experimental support, due in part to the similarity between them and their monogenic, cell-specific expression in olfactory tissues. Here we use deep RNA sequencing, expression microarray and quantitative RT-PCR in both the vomeronasal organ and whole olfactory mucosa to quantify their full transcriptomes in multiple male and female mice. We find evidence of expression for all VR, and almost all OR genes that are annotated as functional in the reference genome, and use the data to generate over 1100 new, multi-exonic, significantly extended receptor gene annotations. We find that OR and VR genes are neither equally nor randomly expressed, but have reproducible distributions of abundance in both tissues. The olfactory transcriptomes are only minimally different between males and females, suggesting altered gene expression at the periphery is unlikely to underpin the striking sexual dimorphism in olfactory-mediated behavior. Finally, we present evidence that hundreds of novel, putatively protein-coding genes are expressed in these highly specialized olfactory tissues, and carry out a proof-of-principle validation. Taken together, these data provide a comprehensive, quantitative catalog of the genes that mediate olfactory perception and pheromone-evoked behavior at the periphery. PMID:25187969

  19. The olfactory transcriptomes of mice.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Levitin, Maria O; Saraiva, Luis R; Logan, Darren W

    2014-09-01

    The olfactory (OR) and vomeronasal receptor (VR) repertoires are collectively encoded by 1700 genes and pseudogenes in the mouse genome. Most OR and VR genes were identified by comparative genomic techniques and therefore, in many of those cases, only their protein coding sequences are defined. Some also lack experimental support, due in part to the similarity between them and their monogenic, cell-specific expression in olfactory tissues. Here we use deep RNA sequencing, expression microarray and quantitative RT-PCR in both the vomeronasal organ and whole olfactory mucosa to quantify their full transcriptomes in multiple male and female mice. We find evidence of expression for all VR, and almost all OR genes that are annotated as functional in the reference genome, and use the data to generate over 1100 new, multi-exonic, significantly extended receptor gene annotations. We find that OR and VR genes are neither equally nor randomly expressed, but have reproducible distributions of abundance in both tissues. The olfactory transcriptomes are only minimally different between males and females, suggesting altered gene expression at the periphery is unlikely to underpin the striking sexual dimorphism in olfactory-mediated behavior. Finally, we present evidence that hundreds of novel, putatively protein-coding genes are expressed in these highly specialized olfactory tissues, and carry out a proof-of-principle validation. Taken together, these data provide a comprehensive, quantitative catalog of the genes that mediate olfactory perception and pheromone-evoked behavior at the periphery. PMID:25187969

  20. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach. PMID:26310773

  1. Velocity Map Imaging Studies of Non-Conventional Methanethiol Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulson, Benjamin W.; Alaniz, Jonathan; Murray, Craig

    2014-06-01

    Velocity map imaging (VMI) in combination with state-selective resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) has been used to study the photodissociation dynamics of methanethiol following excitation to the first and second singlet electronically excited states. Formation of sulfur atoms, in both the singlet and triplet manifolds, is observed and can be attributed to primary dissociation of the parent molecule. We will report the nascent photofragment velocity distributions, and hence the internal energy of the methane co-fragment. Sulfur atom quantum yields are benchmarked against a known standard to evaluate the significance of this pathway. The role of non-conventional photochemical mechanisms such as roaming-mediated intersystem crossing, previously observed in methylamine photochemistry, will be discussed. James O. Thomas, Katherine E. Lower, and Craig Murray, The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 2012, 3 (10), 1341-1345.

  2. T-type Ca2+ channels mediate propagation of odor-induced Ca2+ transients in rat olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Gautam, S H; Otsuguro, K-I; Ito, S; Saito, T; Habara, Y

    2007-01-19

    Propagation of odor-induced Ca(2+) transients from the cilia/knob to the soma in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is thought to be mediated exclusively by high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. However, using confocal Ca(2+) imaging and immunocytochemistry we identified functional T-type Ca(2+) channels in rat ORNs. Here we show that T-type Ca(2+) channels in ORNs also mediate propagation of odor-induced Ca(2+) transients from the knob to the soma. In the presence of the selective inhibitor of T-type Ca(2+) channels mibefradil (10-15 microM) or Ni(2+) (100 microM), odor- and forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX)-induced Ca(2+) transients in the soma and dendrite were either strongly inhibited or abolished. The percentage of inhibition of the Ca(2+) transients in the knob, however, was 40-50% less than that in the soma. Ca(2+) transients induced by 30 mM K(+) were partially inhibited by mibefradil, but without a significant difference in the extent of inhibition between the knob and soma. Furthermore, an increase of as little as 2.5 mM in the extracellular K(+) concentration (7.5 mM K(+)) was found to induce Ca(2+) transients in ORNs, and such responses were completely inhibited by mibefradil or Ni(2+). Total replacement of extracellular Na(+) with N-methyl-d-glutamate inhibited none of the odor-, forskolin/IBMX- or 7.5 mM K(+)-induced Ca(2+) transients. Positive immunoreactivity to the Ca(v)3.1, Ca(v)3.2 and Ca(v)3.3 subunits of the T-type Ca(2+) channel was observed throughout the soma, dendrite and knob. These data suggest that involvement of T-type Ca(2+) channels in the propagation of odor-induced Ca(2+) transients in ORNs may contribute to signal transduction and odor sensitivity. PMID:17110049

  3. Enhanced self-administration of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 in olfactory bulbectomized rats: evaluation of possible serotonergic and dopaminergic underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Amchova, Petra; Kucerova, Jana; Giugliano, Valentina; Babinska, Zuzana; Zanda, Mary T.; Scherma, Maria; Dusek, Ladislav; Fadda, Paola; Micale, Vincenzo; Sulcova, Alexandra; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Depression has been associated with drug consumption, including heavy or problematic cannabis use. According to an animal model of depression and substance use disorder comorbidity, we combined the olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) model of depression with intravenous drug self-administration procedure to verify whether depressive-like rats displayed altered voluntary intake of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN, 12.5 μg/kg/infusion). To this aim, olfactory-bulbectomized (OBX) and sham-operated (SHAM) Lister Hooded rats were allowed to self-administer WIN by lever-pressing under a continuous [fixed ratio 1 (FR-1)] schedule of reinforcement in 2 h daily sessions. Data showed that both OBX and SHAM rats developed stable WIN intake; yet, responses in OBX were constantly higher than in SHAM rats soon after the first week of training. In addition, OBX rats took significantly longer to extinguish the drug-seeking behavior after vehicle substitution. Acute pre-treatment with serotonin 5HT1B receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (2.5–10 mg/kg), did not significantly modify WIN intake in OBX and SHAM Lister Hooded rats. Furthermore, acute pre-treatment with CGS-12066B (10 and 15 mg/kg) did not alter responses in parallel groups of OBX and SHAM Sprague Dawley rats self-administering methamphetamine under higher (FR-2) reinforcement schedule with nose-poking as operandum. Finally, dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of OBX rats did not increase in response to a WIN challenge, as in SHAM rats, indicating a dopaminergic dysfunction in bulbectomized rats. Altogether, our findings suggest that a depressive-like state may alter cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist-induced brain reward function and that a dopaminergic rather than a 5-HT1B mechanism is likely to underlie enhanced WIN self-administration in OBX rats. PMID:24688470

  4. Regenerative thermal oxidation for non-conventional applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gosselin, G.; Gravel, J.J.O.

    1999-07-01

    Regenerative Thermal Oxidation has been applied by Biothermica to treat non-conventional emissions. These emissions include pollutants as VOC, COC, TRS, PAH, PCB, HCl and odors. In the kraft pulping industry, environmental requirements for reduced emissions of total reduced sulfur (TRS) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) from pulping operations are leading to incinerators of high destruction efficiency and thermal performance. The first installation in Canada of a Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) was placed in service early in 1997 at a kraft pulp mill in the province of Quebec. Tests have shown a TRS reduction of 99.6% with a thermal efficiency of 88.5% in the RTO. It can be considered the best method to comply with the new norms for TRS atmospheric emissions in the pulp and paper industry. In the primary aluminum process, a marked improvement in anode properties can be gained by preparing the paste at high temperature, followed by cooling with a water addition in an intensive mixer. However, the addition of cooling water results in a large increase in the emissions of VOC and PAH which can prejudice the process. A number of emission control processes were evaluated. An improved Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) unit was installed in a modern aluminum plant in Canada. The emissions of VOCs and PAHs from an EIRICH intensive mixer-cooler were reduced by more than 99.9% while all troublesome deposits in the fumes collection system were eliminated. This enabled the plant to remain well within the emission levels allowed by the environmental authority while enjoying considerable benefits from improved anode qualities. In the asphalt roofing industry, RTO was applied to treat the VOC and COC emissions and several units have been in operation since 1990. In the United States two units were installed in asphalt shingle plants and new features in the process show a VOC and COC reduction of 99%.

  5. Involvement of glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the expression of increased head-dipping behaviors in the hole-board tests of olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Noritaka; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Kamei, Junzo

    2016-10-01

    Olfactory bulbectomized (OB) mice produce agitated anxiety-like behaviors in the hole-board test, which was expressed by an increase in head-dipping counts and a decrease in head-dipping latencies. However, the associated mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, MK-801 (10, 100μg/kg), a selective N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, significantly and dose-dependently suppressed the increased head-dipping behaviors in OB mice, without affecting sham mice. Similar results were obtained with another selective NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 treatment in OB mice. On the other hand, muscimol, a selective aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor agonist produced no effects on these hyperemotional behaviors in OB mice at a dose (100μg/kg) that produced anxiolytic-like effects in sham mice. Interestingly, glutamine contents and glutamine/glutamate ratios were significantly increased in the amygdala and frontal cortex of OB mice compared to sham mice. Based on these results, we concluded that the glutamatergic NMDA receptors are involved in the expression of increased head-dipping behaviors in the hole-board tests of OB mice. Accordingly, the changes in glutamatergic transmission in frontal cortex and amygdala may play important roles in the expression of these abnormal behaviors in OB mice. PMID:27353857

  6. Individual olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information

    PubMed Central

    Secundo, Lavi; Snitz, Kobi; Weissler, Kineret; Pinchover, Liron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Loewenthal, Ron; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Frumin, Idan; Bar-Zvi, Dana; Shushan, Sagit; Sobel, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Each person expresses a potentially unique subset of ∼400 different olfactory receptor subtypes. Given that the receptors we express partially determine the odors we smell, it follows that each person may have a unique nose; to capture this, we devised a sensitive test of olfactory perception we termed the “olfactory fingerprint.” Olfactory fingerprints relied on matrices of perceived odorant similarity derived from descriptors applied to the odorants. We initially fingerprinted 89 individuals using 28 odors and 54 descriptors. We found that each person had a unique olfactory fingerprint (P < 10−10), which was odor specific but descriptor independent. We could identify individuals from this pool using randomly selected sets of 7 odors and 11 descriptors alone. Extrapolating from this data, we determined that using 34 odors and 35 descriptors we could individually identify each of the 7 billion people on earth. Olfactory perception, however, fluctuates over time, calling into question our proposed perceptual readout of presumably stable genetic makeup. To test whether fingerprints remain informative despite this temporal fluctuation, building on the linkage between olfactory receptors and HLA, we hypothesized that olfactory perception may relate to HLA. We obtained olfactory fingerprints and HLA typing for 130 individuals, and found that olfactory fingerprint matching using only four odorants was significantly related to HLA matching (P < 10−4), such that olfactory fingerprints can save 32% of HLA tests in a population screen (P < 10−6). In conclusion, a precise measure of olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information. PMID:26100865

  7. Brain Insulin Receptor Causes Activity-Dependent Current Suppression in the Olfactory Bulb Through Multiple Phosphorylation of Kv1.3

    PubMed Central

    FADOOL, D. A.; TUCKER, K.; PHILLIPS, J. J.; SIMMEN, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin and insulin receptor (IR) kinase are found in abundance in discrete brain regions yet insulin signaling in the CNS is not understood. Because it is known that the highest brain insulin-binding affinities, insulin-receptor density, and IR kinase activity are localized to the olfactory bulb, we sought to explore the downstream substrates for IR kinase in this region of the brain to better elucidate the function of insulin signaling in the CNS. First, we demonstrate that IR is postnatally and developmentally expressed in specific lamina of the highly plastic olfactory bulb (OB). ELISA testing confirms that insulin is present in the developing and adult OB. Plasma insulin levels are elevated above that found in the OB, which perhaps suggests a differential insulin pool. Olfactory bulb insulin levels appear not to be static, however, but are elevated as much as 15-fold after a 72-h fasting period. Bath application of insulin to cultured OB neurons acutely induces outward current suppression as studied by the use of traditional whole-cell and single-channel patchclamp recording techniques. Modulation of OB neurons is restricted to current magnitude; IR kinase activation does not modulate current kinetics of inactivation or deactivation. Transient transfection of human embryonic kidney cells with cloned Kv1.3 ion channel, which carries a large proportion of the outward current in these neurons, revealed that current suppression was the result of multiple tyrosine phosphorylation of Kv1.3 channel. Y to F single-point mutations in the channel or deletion of the kinase domain in IR blocks insulininduced modulation and phosphorylation of Kv1.3. Neuromodulation of Kv1.3 current in OB neurons is activity dependent and is eliminated after 20 days of odor/sensory deprivation induced by unilateral naris occlusion at postnatal day 1. IR kinase but not Kv1.3 expression is downregulated in the OB ipsilateral to the occlusion, as demonstrated in cryosections of right (control

  8. Detection of explosives by olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Dibattista, Michele; Araneda, Ricardo; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-03-15

    The response of olfactory sensory neurons to TNT and RDX as well as to some volatile organic compounds present in the vapors of antipersonnel landmines has been studied both in the pig and in the rat. GC/MS analyses of different plastic components of six different kinds of landmines were performed in order to identify the components of the "perfume" of mines. Studies on rat olfactory mucosa were carried out with electro-olfactogram and calcium imaging techniques, while changes in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels following exposure to odorants and explosives were used as a criterion to evaluate the interaction of TNT and RDX with olfactory receptors in a preparation of isolated pig olfactory cilia. These studies indicate that chemical compounds associated with explosives and explosive devices can activate mammalian olfactory receptors. PMID:19913995

  9. Non-conventional trafficking of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator through the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-San; Moyer, Bryan D; Bannykh, Sergei; Yoo, Hyeon-Mi; Riordan, John R; Balch, William E

    2002-03-29

    The mechanism(s) of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the Golgi apparatus, the step impaired in individuals afflicted with the prevalent CFTR-DeltaF508 mutation leading to cystic fibrosis, is largely unknown. Recent morphological observations suggested that CFTR is largely absent from the Golgi in situ (Bannykh, S. I., Bannykh, G. I., Fish, K. N., Moyer, B. D., Riordan, J. R., and Balch, W. E. (2000) Traffic 1, 852-870), raising the possibility of a novel trafficking pathway through the early secretory pathway. We now report that export of CFTR from the ER is regulated by the conventional coat protein complex II (COPII) in all cell types tested. Remarkably, in a cell type-specific manner, processing of CFTR from the core-glycosylated (band B) ER form to the complex-glycosylated (band C) isoform followed a non-conventional pathway that was insensitive to dominant negative Arf1, Rab1a/Rab2 GTPases, or the SNAp REceptor (SNARE) component syntaxin 5, all of which block the conventional trafficking pathway from the ER to the Golgi. Moreover, CFTR transport through the non-conventional pathway was potently blocked by overexpression of the late endosomal target-SNARE syntaxin 13, suggesting that recycling through a late Golgi/endosomal system was a prerequisite for CFTR maturation. We conclude that CFTR transport in the early secretory pathway can involve a novel pathway between the ER and late Golgi/endosomal compartments that may influence developmental expression of CFTR on the cell surface in polarized epithelial cells. PMID:11799116

  10. Angiotensinergic involvement in olfactory function

    SciTech Connect

    Speth, R.C.; Parker, J.L.; Wright, J.W.; Harding, J.W.

    1986-03-05

    The olfactory bulbs (OB) from Sprague-Dawley and Wistar-Kyoto rats were frozen and sectioned in a sagittal plane, 20 ..mu.. thick. Sections incubated with /sup 125/-Sar/sup 1/, Ile/sup 8/-AII indicated a high density of AII receptor binding sites in the external layers of the OB. Since the primary olfactory neurons synapse with the mitral cells in these layers, this suggests that AII may affect olfactory input to the OB. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats, 9-12 weeks of age, n = 8, were administered 0.2 ml of 0.17 M ZnSO/sub 4/ into each nostril to lesion the primary olfactory neurons and their axon terminals in the OB. Rats treated with ZnSO/sub 4/ showed an impairment in their ability to find a buried food pellet, P = 0.041, Mann-Whitney test. Nine days post-treatment, the rats were sacrificed and AII receptors binding in homogenates of the OB was determined. There was a 23% increase (P < 0.05) in AII receptor density in the ZnSO/sub 4/ treated rat OB; it was correlated with the extent of the olfactory deficit, r/sub s/ = .91, Spearman Rank Order Test, P < .01. However, there was a 24% decrease in OB weight in the ZnSO/sub 4/ group, so the number of AII receptors per OB was unchanged. These data suggest that AII plays a role in olfaction. Localizing AII receptor changes within the OB by quantitative autoradiography will characterize the changes in AII receptor density caused by ZnSO/sub 4/.

  11. Reduction in host-finding behaviour in fungus-infected mosquitoes is correlated with reduction in olfactory receptor neuron responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemical insecticides against mosquitoes are a major component of malaria control worldwide. Fungal entomopathogens formulated as biopesticides and applied as insecticide residual sprays could augment current control strategies and mitigate the evolution of resistance to chemical-based insecticides. Methods Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes were exposed to Beauveria bassiana or Metarhizium acridum fungal spores and sub-lethal effects of exposure to fungal infection were studied, especially the potential for reductions in feeding and host location behaviours related to olfaction. Electrophysiological techniques, such as electroantennogram, electropalpogram and single sensillum recording techniques were then employed to investigate how fungal exposure affected the olfactory responses in mosquitoes. Results Exposure to B. bassiana caused significant mortality and reduced the propensity of mosquitoes to respond and fly to a feeding stimulus. Exposure to M. acridum spores induced a similar decline in feeding propensity, albeit more slowly than B. bassiana exposure. Reduced host-seeking responses following fungal exposure corresponded to reduced olfactory neuron responsiveness in both antennal electroantennogram and maxillary palp electropalpogram recordings. Single cell recordings from neurons on the palps confirmed that fungal-exposed behavioural non-responders exhibited significantly impaired responsiveness of neurons tuned specifically to 1-octen-3-ol and to a lesser degree, to CO2. Conclusions Fungal infection reduces the responsiveness of mosquitoes to host odour cues, both behaviourally and neuronally. These pre-lethal effects are likely to synergize with fungal-induced mortality to further reduce the capacity of mosquito populations exposed to fungal biopesticides to transmit malaria. PMID:21812944

  12. Biochemical Large-Scale Interaction Analysis of Murine Olfactory Receptors and Associated Signaling Proteins with Post-Synaptic Density 95, Drosophila Discs Large, Zona-Occludens 1 (PDZ) Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Scholz, Paul; Fränzel, Benjamin; Osterloh, Markus; Wolters, Dirk; Hatt, Hanns; Neuhaus, Eva Maria; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family among mammalian membrane proteins and are capable of initiating numerous essential signaling cascades. Various GPCR-mediated pathways are organized into protein microdomains that can be orchestrated and regulated through scaffolding proteins, such as PSD-95/discs-large/ZO1 (PDZ) domain proteins. However, detailed binding characteristics of PDZ–GPCR interactions remain elusive because these interactions seem to be more complex than previously thought. To address this issue, we analyzed binding modalities using our established model system. This system includes the 13 individual PDZ domains of the multiple PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1; the largest PDZ protein), a broad range of murine olfactory receptors (a multifaceted gene cluster within the family of GPCRs), and associated olfactory signaling proteins. These proteins were analyzed in a large-scale peptide microarray approach and continuative interaction studies. As a result, we demonstrate that canonical binding motifs were not overrepresented among the interaction partners of MUPP1. Furthermore, C-terminal phosphorylation and distinct amino acid replacements abolished PDZ binding promiscuity. In addition to the described in vitro experiments, we identified new interaction partners within the murine olfactory epithelium using pull-down-based interactomics and could verify the partners through co-immunoprecipitation. In summary, the present study provides important insight into the complexity of the binding characteristics of PDZ–GPCR interactions based on olfactory signaling proteins, which could identify novel clinical targets for GPCR-associated diseases in the future. PMID:25979994

  13. Multiplex assessment of the positions of odorant receptor-specific glomeruli in the mouse olfactory bulb by serial two-photon tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zapiec, Bolek; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the mouse, axons of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that express the same odorant receptor (OR) gene coalesce into one or a few glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. The positions of OR-specific glomeruli are traditionally described as stereotyped. Here, we have assessed quantitatively the positions of OR-specific glomeruli using serial two-photon tomography, an automated method for whole-organ fluorescence imaging that integrates two-photon microscopy with serial microtome sectioning. Our strategy is multiplexed. By repeated crossing, we generated two strains of mice with gene-targeted mutations at four or five OR loci for a total of six ORs: MOR23 (Olfr16), mOR37A (Olfr155), M72 (Olfr160), P2 (Olfr17), MOR256-17 (Olfr15), and MOR28 (Olfr1507). Glomerular imaging relied on intrinsic fluorescence of GFP or DsRed, or on whole-mount immunofluorescence with antibodies against GFP, DsRed, or β-gal using the method of immunolabeling-enabled three-dimensional imaging of solvent-cleared organs (iDISCO). The high-resolution 3D-reconstructed datasets were segmented to identify the labeled glomeruli and to assess glomerular positional variability between the bulbs of one mouse (intraindividual) and among the bulbs of different mice (interindividual). In 26 mice aged 21 or 50 d or 10 wk, we made measurements of the positions of 352 glomeruli. We find that positional variability of glomeruli correlates with the OR: For instance, the medial MOR28 glomerular domain occupies a surface area that is an order of magnitude larger than the surface area of the medial MOR23 glomerular domain. Our results quantify the level of precision that is delivered by the mechanisms of OSN axon wiring, differentially for the various OSN populations expressing distinct OR genes. PMID:26450880

  14. The Co-Expression Pattern of Odorant Binding Proteins and Olfactory Receptors Identify Distinct Trichoid Sensilla on the Antenna of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, Anna; Pregitzer, Pablo; Walter, Marika F.; Woods, Daniel F.; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The initial steps of odorant recognition in the insect olfactory system involve odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs). While large families of OBPs have been identified in the malaria vector A. gambiae, little is known about their expression pattern in the numerous sensory hairs of the female antenna. We applied whole mount fluorescence in Situ hybridization (WM-FISH) and fluorescence immunohistochemistry (WM-FIHC) to investigate the sensilla co-expression of eight A. gambiae OBPs (AgOBPs), most notably AgOBP1 and AgOBP4, which all have abundant transcripts in female antenna. WM-FISH analysis of female antennae using AgOBP-specific probes revealed marked differences in the number of cells expressing each various AgOBPs. Testing combinations of AgOBP probes in two-color WM-FISH resulted in distinct cellular labeling patterns, indicating a combinatorial expression of AgOBPs and revealing distinct AgOBP requirements for various functional sensilla types. WM-FIHC with antisera to AgOBP1 and AgOBP4 confirmed expression of the respective proteins by support cells and demonstrated a location of OBPs within sensilla trichodea. Based on the finding that AgOBP1 and AgOBP4 as well as the receptor type AgOR2 are involved in the recognition of indole, experiments were performed to explore if the AgOBP-types and AgOR2 are co-expressed in distinct olfactory sensilla. Applying two-color WM-FISH with AgOBP-specific probes and probes specific for AgOR2 revealed a close association of support cells bearing transcripts for AgOBP1 and AgOBP4 and neurons with a transcript for the receptor AgOR2. Moreover, combined WM-FISH/-FIHC approaches using an AgOR2-specific riboprobe and AgOBP-specific antisera revealed the expression of the “ligand-matched” AgOBP1, AgOBP4 and AgOR2 to single trichoid hairs. This result substantiates the notion that a specific response to indole is mediated by an interplay of the proteins. PMID:23861970

  15. Long-term recording of olfactory and vomeronasal stimulant-induced waves from the turtle main olfactory bulb and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kashiwayanagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Shoji, T; Kurihara, K

    1997-08-01

    Recording of stimulant-induced waves (bulbar responses) from the main olfactory bulb is a useful tool for measuring quantitative stable olfactory responses. There is a good relationship between the olfactory bulbar response, olfactory nerve response and electroolfactogram (EOG), suggesting that the bulbar response reflects events in receptor cells. The modern whole-cell recording technique offers direct information on olfactory transduction in single cells, but it requires long experimental periods and many animals. On the other hand, analysis of bulbar responses provides useful information and requires the use of few animals. For example, we found that cAMP-increasing and IP3-increasing odorants were not distinctly received by the turtle olfactory organ by measuring olfactory bulbar responses and analyzed with a multidimensional scaling from about 60 animals. However, to record similar odor responses from isolated turtle olfactory neurons, at least 200 animals would be necessary. Bulbar responses are recorded with electrodes implanted into or located on the main olfactory bulb. When electrodes are located on the olfactory bulb surface, it is possible to record stable responses over a period of 3 days. These methods were applied successfully to the accessory olfactory bulb. In this paper, we describe the protocols used for recording of the stimulant-induced waves from the main and accessory olfactory bulb. PMID:9385067

  16. Mechanisms of permanent loss of olfactory receptor neurons induced by the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile: Effects on stem cells and noninvolvement of acute induction of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Fang, Cheng; Schnittke, Nikolai; Schwob, James E.; Ding, Xinxin

    2013-11-01

    We explored the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of two olfactory toxicants, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCBN) and the anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMZ), on olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) regeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE). DCBN, but not MMZ, induced inflammation-like pathological changes in OE, and DCBN increased interleukin IL-6 levels in nasal-wash fluid to much greater magnitude and duration than did MMZ. At 24 h after DCBN injection, the population of horizontal basal cells (HBCs; reserve, normally quiescent OE stem cells) lining the DMM became severely depleted as some of them detached from the basal lamina, and sloughed into the nasal cavity along with the globose basal cells (GBCs; heterogeneous population of stem and progenitor cells), neurons, and sustentacular cells of the neuroepithelium. In contrast, the layer of HBCs remained intact in MMZ-treated mice, as only the mature elements of the neuroepithelium were shed. Despite the respiratory metaplasia accompanying the greater severity of the DCBN lesion, residual HBCs that survived intoxication were activated by the injury and contributed to the metaplastic respiratory epithelium, as shown by tracing their descendants in a K5CreEr{sup T2}::fl(stop)TdTomato strain of mice in which recombination causes HBCs to express TdTomato in advance of the lesion. But, contrary to published observations with MMZ, the HBCs failed to form ORNs. A role for IL-6 in suppressing ORN regeneration in DCBN-treated mice was rejected by the failure of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone to prevent the subsequent respiratory metaplasia in the DMM, suggesting that other factors lead to HBC neuro-incompetence. - Highlights: • The herbicide dichlobenil (DCBN) can damage olfactory epithelium stem cells. • Another olfactory toxicant, methimazole, leaves the olfactory stem cells intact. • DCBN, but not methimazole, induces a prolonged increase in nasal IL-6 levels. • Dexamethasone

  17. Olfactory neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.A.; McLean, P.; Juillard, G.J.; Parker, R.G.

    1989-06-15

    Fifteen patients with olfactory neuroblastoma were treated during the 17-year period of 1969 to 1986. Data was analyzed with respect to age at presentation, sex, presenting signs and symptoms, stage, and results of treatment. Age ranged from 4 to 67 years with the median age being 27 years. Median follow-up was 8 years. Local control was achieved in nine of nine patients or 100% with successful surgical resection, i.e., minimal residual disease, followed by postoperative radiation therapy (45 to 65 Gy) was employed. There were no distant failures when the primary site was controlled. Regional lymph node metastases were infrequent: only 13% (two of 15 patients) presented with positive nodes. Three of four patients treated initially with surgery alone had a local recurrence, two of which were successfully salvaged by combined therapy. There were four patients treated with radiation therapy alone: three had persistent disease after radiation therapy, and one patient was controlled with 65 Gy. Olfactory neuroblastoma has a propensity to recur locally when treated with surgery alone. The authors' experience suggests excellent local control can be achieved with surgery immediately followed by radiation therapy. Thus the authors recommend planned combined treatment for all resectable lesions.

  18. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species—reflecting the respective species' lifestyles—and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (∼2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  19. Odorants suppress T- and L-type Ca2+ currents in olfactory receptor cells by shifting their inactivation curves to a negative voltage.

    PubMed

    Kawai, F

    1999-12-30

    Mechanisms underlying suppression of T- and L-type Ca2+ currents (I(Ca,T) and I(Ca,L)) by odorants were investigated in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) using the whole-cell version of the patch-clamp technique. Under voltage clamp, odorants (amyl acetate, limonene and acetophenone) reversibly suppressed I(Ca,T) and I(Ca, L). These currents disappeared completely within 150 ms following amyl acetate puffs, and recovered in approximately 1 s after the washout. Hyperpolarization of the membrane greatly relieved the odorant block of I(Ca,T) and I(Ca,L). The activation curves of both currents were not changed significantly by odorants, while their inactivation curves were shifted to negative voltages. Half-inactivation voltages of I(Ca,T) were - 66 mV (control), - 102 mV (amyl acetate), - 101 mV (limonene) and - 105 mV (acetophenone) (all 0.3 mM); those of I(Ca,L) were -33 mV (control), - 61 mV (amyl acetate), - 59 mV (limonene), and - 63 mV (acetophenone) (all 0.3 mM). These phenomena are similar to the effects of local anesthetics on I(Ca) in various preparations and also similar to the effects of odorants on I(Na) in ORCs, suggesting that these types of suppression are caused by the same mechanism. PMID:10617316

  20. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Yoshihito; Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species--reflecting the respective species' lifestyles--and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (∼ 2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  1. The Genetics of Non-conventional Wine Yeasts: Current Knowledge and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Albertin, Warren

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is by far the most widely used yeast in oenology. However, during the last decade, several other yeasts species has been purposed for winemaking as they could positively impact wine quality. Some of these non-conventional yeasts (Torulaspora delbrueckii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, Lachancea thermotolerans, etc.) are now proposed as starters culture for winemakers in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae, and several others are the subject of various studies (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Starmerella bacillaris, etc.). Along with their biotechnological use, the knowledge of these non-conventional yeasts greatly increased these last 10 years. The aim of this review is to describe the last updates and the current state-of-art of the genetics of non-conventional yeasts (including S. uvarum, T. delbrueckii, S. bacillaris, etc.). We describe how genomics and genetics tools provide new data into the population structure and biodiversity of non-conventional yeasts in winemaking environments. Future challenges will lie on the development of selection programs and/or genetic improvement of these non-conventional species. We discuss how genetics, genomics and the advances in next-generation sequencing will help the wine industry to develop the biotechnological use of non-conventional yeasts to improve the quality and differentiation of wines. PMID:26793188

  2. Immunohistochemical demonstration of salmon olfactory glutathione S-transferase class pi (N24) in the olfactory system of lacustrine sockeye salmon during ontogenesis and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, S; Kudo, H; Doi, Y; Yamauchi, K; Ueda, H

    2004-06-01

    In mammals, glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the olfactory epithelium is involved in assistance of the olfactory reception by the xenobiotic metabolism. We previously reported the protein and gene expressions of salmon olfactory GST class pi (soGST) in the olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) of the salmonid fish. However, the chronological appearances of soGST in ORCs during ontogeny and cell proliferation are still unknown in this species. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry of soGST using an antibody specific to soGST in the olfactory system (olfactory placode, olfactory pit, olfactory epithelium, olfactory nerve and olfactory bulb) of lacustrine sockeye salmon ( Oncorhynchus nerka) embryos and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) experimental fish. The projection of olfactory nerve bundles from the olfactory pit to the presumptive olfactory bulb was identified at embryonic day 28 after fertilization. The olfactory cilia were first detected on the apical surface of ORCs at day 43. soGST-immunoreactivity was first detected within the olfactory pit cells at day 55. At 58 day, the number of soGST-immunoreactive cells increased markedly in the olfactory epithelia, and soGST-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the olfactory nerves and olfactory bulbs. By in vivo uptake of BrdU in 1-year-old fish, we observed for the first time at day 7 after labeling that the olfactory epithelia showed ORCs in which both soGST-immunoreactivity and BrdU coexisted. These results indicate that soGST is synthesized in the mature ORCs of lacustrine sockeye salmon after cell formation and differentiation. PMID:15156400

  3. Olfactory adventures of elephantine pheromones.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L E; Lazar, J; Greenwood, D R

    2003-02-01

    Understanding the linkage between behaviour of mammals in their natural environment and the molecular basis of their sensory modalities presents challenges to biologists. Our olfactory investigations that involve the largest extant land mammal, the elephant, offer some clues of how these events mesh in sequence. Proboscideans have developed a sophisticatedly organized society and they rank with primates and cetaceans with respect to cognitive abilities. Our studies of discrete, quantifiable pheromone-elicited behaviours demonstrate that Asian elephants utilize their olfactory senses during fundamental, life-strategy decisions, including mate choice, female bonding and male hierarchical sorting. How biologically relevant odorants traverse mucous interfaces to interact with cognate odorant receptors remains a basic question in vertebrate olfaction. We have partially tracked the molecular odour reception trail of behaviourally distinct pheromones, ( Z )-7-dodecenyl acetate and frontalin (1,5-dimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane), using approaches developed for insect studies and taking advantage of the extensive, highly mucoidal olfactory and vomeronasal systems that permit detailed investigations of pheromone-binding proteins. We have combined studies of quantifiable responses and behaviours with biochemical and biophysical investigations of the properties of protein-ligand complexes, their sequential pathways and associated protein-ligand fluxes. In the delineation of these sequential integrations of behavioural, biochemical and molecular events, we have discovered novel spatial and temporal adaptations in both the main olfactory and vomeronasal systems. PMID:12546671

  4. Paradoxical mineralocorticoid receptor-mediated effect in fear memory encoding and expression of rats submitted to an olfactory fear conditioning task.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rimenez R; Dal Bó, Silvia; de Kloet, E Ronald; Oitzl, Melly S; Carobrez, Antonio P

    2014-04-01

    There is general agreement that the substantial modification in memory and motivational states exerted by corticosteroids after a traumatic experience is mediated in complementary manner by the mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors. Here we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological manipulation of MR activity would affect behavioral strategy and information storage in an olfactory fear conditioning (OFC) task. Male Wistar rats were submitted to the OFC with different training intensities. We observed that following high intensity OFC acquisition, a set of defensive coping strategies, which includes avoidance and risk assessment behaviors, was elicited when subjects were exposed to the conditioned stimulus (CS) 48 h later. In addition, following either OFC acquisition or retrieval (CS-I test) a profound corticosterone secretion was also detected. Systemic administration of the MR antagonist spironolactone altered the behavioral coping style irrespective the antagonist was administered 60 min prior to the acquisition or before the retrieval session. Surprisingly, the MR agonist fludrocortisone given 60 min prior to acquisition or retrieval of OFC had similar effects as the antagonist. In addition, post-training administration of fludrocortisone, following a weak training procedure, facilitated the consolidation of OFC. Fludrocortisone rather than spironolactone reduced serum corticosterone levels, suggesting that, at least in part, the effects of the MR agonist may derive from additional GR-mediated HPA-axis suppression. In conclusion, the present study suggests the involvement of the MR in the fine-tuning of behavioral adaptation necessary for optimal information storage and expression, as revealed by the marked alterations in the risk assessment behavior. PMID:24296155

  5. BE360, a new selective estrogen receptor modulator, produces antidepressant and antidementia effects through the enhancement of hippocampal cell proliferation in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagawasai, Osamu; Nemoto, Wataru; Onogi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Takahiro; Lin, Jia-Rong; Odaira, Takayo; Yaoita, Fukie; Ogawa, Takumi; Ohta, Kiminori; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-01-15

    We have reported that the carborane compound BE360 is a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator and new therapy option for osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to explore the effects and underlying mechanisms of BE360 on depressive-like behavior and memory impairment in the olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice, an experimental animal model of depression and dementia. BE360 was administered subcutaneously to mice using a mini-osmotic pump for 2 weeks. Depressive-like behavior was measured as the reduced intake of a sweet solution in the sucrose preference test. Short-term memory was assessed using the Y-maze test. Cell proliferation was assessed by the analysis of cells expressing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. The expression of phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (pCREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured by immunoblot. The depressive-like behavior and memory impairment in OBX mice were improved by the chronic treatment with BE360. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus significantly decreased in OBX mice whereas they increased after the chronic treatment with BE360. Immunoblotting studies revealed that pCREB and BDNF were significantly increased in the hippocampus of OBX mice treated with BE360. The present study has shown that BE360 has antidepressant and antidementia effects characterized by hippocampal cell proliferation potentially activated via CREB/BDNF signaling pathways. These results indicate that BE360 may have valuable therapeutic potential against depression and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26497104

  6. Cell-free expression, purification, and ligand-binding analysis of Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptors DmOR67a, DmOR85b and DmORCO

    PubMed Central

    Tegler, Lotta Tollstoy; Corin, Karolina; Hillger, Julia; Wassie, Brooke; Yu, Yanmei; Zhang, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Insects transmit numerous devastating diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, and sleeping sickness. Olfactory cues guide insects to their hosts, and are thus responsible for disease transmission. Understanding the molecular basis of insect olfaction could facilitate the development of interventions. The first step is to heterologously overexpress and purify insect olfactory receptors (ORs). This is challenging, as ORs are membrane proteins. Here, we show that insect ORs and their co-receptor can be expressed in an E. coli cell-free system. After immunoaffinity chromatography, the ORs are ~95% pure, and up to 1 mg/10 ml reaction is obtained. Circular dichroism together with microscale thermophoresis indicate that each receptor is properly folded, and can bind its respective ligand. This is the first time insect ORs have been expressed in an E. coli system. The methods described here could facilitate future structure-function studies, which may aid in developments to alleviate the suffering of millions caused by insect-transmitted diseases. PMID:25597985

  7. Genetic tracing reveals a stereotyped sensory map in the olfactory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhihua; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Snapper, Scott; Buck, Linda B.

    2001-11-01

    The olfactory system translates myriad chemical structures into diverse odour perceptions. To gain insight into how this is accomplished, we prepared mice that coexpressed a transneuronal tracer with only one of about 1,000 different odorant receptors. The tracer travelled from nasal neurons expressing that receptor to the olfactory bulb and then to the olfactory cortex, allowing visualization of cortical neurons that receive input from a particular odorant receptor. These studies revealed a stereotyped sensory map in the olfactory cortex in which signals from a particular receptor are targeted to specific clusters of neurons. Inputs from different receptors overlap spatially and could be combined in single neurons, potentially allowing for an integration of the components of an odorant's combinatorial receptor code. Signals from the same receptor are targeted to multiple olfactory cortical areas, permitting the parallel, and perhaps differential, processing of inputs from a single receptor before delivery to the neocortex and limbic system.

  8. Sex hormone binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ploss, V; Gebhart, V M; Dölz, W; Jirikowski, G F

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian steroids are known to act on the olfactory system. Their mode of action, however, is mostly unclear to date since nuclear receptors are lacking in sensory neurons. Here we used immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR to study expression and distribution of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in the rat olfactory system. Single sensory cells in the olfactory mucosa and their projections in the olfactory bulb showed specific SHBG immunostaining as determined by double immunofluorescence with olfactory marker protein OMP. Larger groups of SHBG stained sensory cells occurred in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). A portion of the olfactory glomeruli in the accessory olfactory bulb showed large networks of SHBG positive nerve fibres. Some of the mitral cells showed SHBG immune fluorescence. RT-PCR revealed SHBG encoding mRNA in the olfactory mucosa, in the VNO and in the olfactory bulbs indicating intrinsic expression of the binding globulin. The VNO and its related projections within the limbic system are known to be sensitive to gonadal steroid hormones. We conclude that SHBG may be of functional importance for rapid effects of olfactory steroids on limbic functions including the control of reproductive behaviours through pheromones. PMID:24681170

  9. Non-conventional methods and media for the activation and manipulation of carbon nanoforms.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ester; Giacalone, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Very often, chemical transformations require tedious and long procedures, which, sometimes, can be avoided using alternative methods and media. New protocols, enabling us to save time and solvents, allow us also to explore new reaction profiles. This Tutorial Review focuses on the physical and chemical behavior of carbon nanoforms, CNFs (fullerenes, nanotubes, nanohorns, graphene, etc.) when non-conventional methods and techniques, such as microwave irradiation, mechano-chemistry or highly ionizing radiations are employed. In addition, the reactivity of CNFs in non-conventional media such as water, fluorinated solvents, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids is also discussed. PMID:23945754

  10. Inhibition of Inflammation-Associated Olfactory Loss by Etanercept in an Inducible Olfactory Inflammation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong Gi; Lane, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a soluble human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) receptor blocker (Etanercept) on an inducible olfactory inflammation (IOI) mouse model Study Design An in vivo study using a transgenic mouse model Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods To study the impact of chronic inflammation on the olfactory system, a transgenic mouse model of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)-associated olfactory loss was utilized (IOI mouse), expressing TNF-α in a temporally-controlled fashion specifically within the olfactory epithelium. In one group of mice (n=4), Etanercept was injected intraperitoneally (100 µg/dose, 3 times/week) concurrent with a 2-week period of TNF-α expression. A second group of mice (n=2) underwent induction of TNF-α expression for 8 weeks, with Etanercept treatment administered during the final 2 weeks of inflammation. Olfactory function was assayed by elecro-olfactogram (EOG), and olfactory tissue was processed for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Each group was compared with equal number of control group. Results Compared to non-treated IOI mice, Etanercept -treated IOI mice showed significantly improved EOG responses after 2 weeks (p<0.001). After 8 weeks of induced inflammation, there was massive loss of olfactory epithelium and no EOG response in non-treated IOI mice. However, in Etanercept - treated mice, regeneration of olfactory epithelium was observed. Conclusion Concomitant administration of Etanercept in IOI mice results in interruption of TNF-α-induced olfactory loss and induction of neuroepithelial regeneration. This demonstrates that Etanercept has potential utility as a tool for elucidating the role of TNF-α in other olfactory inflammation models. PMID:26932943

  11. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche. PMID:25376305

  12. Olfactory Mucosa Tissue Based Biosensor for Bioelectronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Ye, Weiwei; Yu, Hui; Hu, Ning; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    Biological olfactory system can distinguish thousands of odors. In order to realize the biomimetic design of electronic nose on the principle of mammalian olfactory system, we have reported bioelectronic nose based on cultured olfactory cells. In this study, the electrical property of the tissue-semiconductor interface was analyzed by the volume conductor theory and the sheet conductor model. Olfactory mucosa tissue of rat was isolated and fixed on the surface of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), with the natural stations of the neuronal populations and functional receptor unit of the cilia well reserved. By the extracellular potentials of the olfactory receptor cells of the mucosa tissue monitored, both the simulation and the experimental results suggested that this tissue-semiconductor hybrid system was sensitive to odorants stimulation.

  13. Vapor Sensors Using Olfactory Proteins Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Mitala, Joe; Discher, Bohdana; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2010-03-01

    We have constructed bio-nano devices which combine mammalian olfactory proteins with carbon nanotubes to create a new class of vapor sensors. Olfactory proteins are a specific class of G-protein coupled receptors, and require a cell membrane or similar environment for proper function. Functionalization procedures have been developed to meet the challenges of routinely coupling such membrane proteins to nanotubes, while preserving the function of the protein. We have successfully isolated olfactory proteins and attached them to carbon nanotube transistors, which provide fast, all-electronic readout of analyte binding by the olfactory receptor. Several different olfactory proteins have been tested, each showing a different sensing response. This work opens the way for future coupling of biology to nanoelectronics and improved biomimetic chemical sensing. This work is supported by the DARPA RealNose Project and the Nano/Bio Interface Center

  14. Female mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors have compromised neurogenesis, and fewer dopaminergic cells in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yi; Vermeulen, Rob; Hökfelt, Tomas; Horne, Malcolm K.; Stanić, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult rodent brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG). We examined whether cholecystokinin (CCK) through actions mediated by CCK1 receptors (CCK1R) is involved in regulating neurogenesis. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) injected 2 h prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 37 and 42%, respectively, in female (but not male) mice lacking CCK1Rs (CCK1R−/−) compared to wild-type (WT). Generation of neuroblasts in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream (RMS) was also affected, since the number of doublecortin (DCX)-immunoreactive (ir) neuroblasts in these regions decreased by 29%. In the SGZ of female CCK1R−/− mice, BrdU-positive (+), and Ki67-ir cells were reduced by 38 and 56%, respectively, while DCX-ir neuroblasts were down 80%. Subsequently, the effect of reduced SVZ/SGZ proliferation on the generation and survival of mature adult-born cells in female CCK1R−/− mice was examined. In the OB granule cell layer (GCL), the number of neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-ir and calretinin-ir cells was stable compared to WT, and 42 days after BrdU injections, the number of BrdU+ cells co-expressing GABA- or NeuN-like immunoreactivity (LI) was similar. Compared to WT, the granule cell layer of the DG in female CCK1R−/− mice had a similar number of calbindin-ir cells and BrdU+ cells co-expressing calbindin-LI 42 days after BrdU injections. However, the OB glomerular layer (GL) of CCK1R−/− female mice had 11% fewer NeuN-ir cells, 23% less TH-ir cells, and a 38% and 29% reduction in BrdU+ cells that co-expressed TH-LI or GABA-LI, respectively. We conclude that CCK, via CCK1Rs, is involved in regulating the generation of proliferating cells and neuroblasts in the adult female mouse brain, and mechanisms are in place to maintain steady neuronal populations in the OB and DG when the rate of

  15. Achievement Evaluation within a Non-Conventional Framework: Some Experiences in Physics and Humour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worner, C. H.; Romero, A.; Bustamante, G.

    2010-01-01

    An achievement evaluation of a non-conventional physics course for liberal arts students is presented. The theoretical ground for this course focuses on the use of humour as a teaching tool. Preliminary evidence shows that a learning process is accomplished. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  16. Microbial Terroir in Chilean Valleys: Diversity of Non-conventional Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jara, Carla; Laurie, V Felipe; Mas, Albert; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the presence of non-conventional yeast associated with vineyards located between latitudes 30°S and 36°S was examined, including the valleys of Limarí, Casablanca, Maipo, Colchagua, Maule, and Itata. The microbial fingerprinting in each valley was examined based on the specific quantification of yeast of enological interest. Grape-berries were sampled to evaluate the presence and load of non-conventional yeast with enological potential, such as Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora, Torulaspora, Debaryomyces, Meyerozyma, and Rhodotorula. These yeasts were present in all vineyards studied but with varying loads depending on the valley sampled. No identical fingerprints were observed; however, similarities and differences could be observed among the microbial profiles of each valley. A co-variation in the loads of Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora with latitude was observed, showing high loads in the Casablanca and Itata valleys, which was coincident with the higher relative humidity or rainfall of those areas. Non-conventional yeasts were also isolated and identified after sequencing molecular markers. Potentially good aromatic properties were also screened among the isolates, resulting in the selection of mostly Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora isolates. Finally, our results suggest that microbial terroir might be affected by climatic conditions such as relative humidity and rainfall, especially impacting the load of non-conventional yeast. In this study, the microbial fingerprint for yeast in Chilean vineyards is reported for the first time revealing an opportunity to study the contribution of this assembly of microorganisms to the final product. PMID:27242693

  17. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  18. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

    2001-08-23

    Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

  19. Microbial Terroir in Chilean Valleys: Diversity of Non-conventional Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Carla; Laurie, V. Felipe; Mas, Albert; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the presence of non-conventional yeast associated with vineyards located between latitudes 30°S and 36°S was examined, including the valleys of Limarí, Casablanca, Maipo, Colchagua, Maule, and Itata. The microbial fingerprinting in each valley was examined based on the specific quantification of yeast of enological interest. Grape–berries were sampled to evaluate the presence and load of non-conventional yeast with enological potential, such as Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora, Torulaspora, Debaryomyces, Meyerozyma, and Rhodotorula. These yeasts were present in all vineyards studied but with varying loads depending on the valley sampled. No identical fingerprints were observed; however, similarities and differences could be observed among the microbial profiles of each valley. A co-variation in the loads of Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora with latitude was observed, showing high loads in the Casablanca and Itata valleys, which was coincident with the higher relative humidity or rainfall of those areas. Non-conventional yeasts were also isolated and identified after sequencing molecular markers. Potentially good aromatic properties were also screened among the isolates, resulting in the selection of mostly Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora isolates. Finally, our results suggest that microbial terroir might be affected by climatic conditions such as relative humidity and rainfall, especially impacting the load of non-conventional yeast. In this study, the microbial fingerprint for yeast in Chilean vineyards is reported for the first time revealing an opportunity to study the contribution of this assembly of microorganisms to the final product. PMID:27242693

  20. The Olfactory Receptor OR51E1 Is Present along the Gastrointestinal Tract of Pigs, Co-Localizes with Enteroendocrine Cells and Is Modulated by Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Priori, Davide; Colombo, Michela; Clavenzani, Paolo; Jansman, Alfons J. M.; Lallès, Jean-Paul; Trevisi, Paolo; Bosi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of the butyrate-sensing olfactory receptor OR51E1 for gastrointestinal (GIT) functioning has not been considered so far. We investigated in young pigs the distribution of OR51E1 along the GIT, its relation with some endocrine markers, its variation with age and after interventions affecting the gut environment and intestinal microbiota. Immuno-reactive cells for OR51E1 and chromogranin A (CgA) were counted in cardial (CA), fundic (FU), pyloric (PL) duodenal (DU), jejunal (JE), ileal (IL), cecal (CE), colonic (CO) and rectal (RE) mucosae. OR51E1 co-localization with serotonin (5HT) and peptide YY (PYY) were evaluated in PL and CO respectively. FU and PL tissues were also sampled from 84 piglets reared from sows receiving either or not oral antibiotics (amoxicillin) around parturition, and sacrificed at days 14, 21, 28 (weaning) and 42 of age. JE samples were also obtained from 12 caesarean-derived piglets that were orally associated with simple (SA) or complex (CA) microbiota in the postnatal phase, and of which on days 26–37 of age jejunal loops were perfused for 8 h with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4 (ETEC), Lactobacillus amylovorus or saline (CTRL). Tissue densities of OR51E1+ cells were in decreasing order: PL=DU>FU=CA>JE=IL=CE=CO=RE. OR51E1+ cells showed an enteroendocrine nature containing gastrointestinal hormones such as PYY or 5HT. OR51E1 gene expression in PL and FU increased during and after the suckling period (p<0.05). It was marginally reduced in offspring from antibiotic-treated sows (tendency, p=0.073), vs. control. Jejunal OR51E1 gene expression was reduced in piglets early associated with SA, compared with CA, and in ETEC-perfused loops vs. CTRL (p<0.01). Our results indicate that OR51E1 is related to GIT enteroendocrine activity. Moreover age, pathogen challenge and dietary manipulations influencing the gastrointestinal luminal microenvironment significantly affect the OR51E1 gene expression in GIT tissues presumably in

  1. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients. PMID:21879170

  2. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Frings, S

    1993-02-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  3. Unique Neural Circuitry for Neonatal Olfactory Learning

    PubMed Central

    Moriceau, Stephanie; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2007-01-01

    Imprinting ensures that the infant forms the caregiver attachment necessary for altricial species survival. In our mammalian model of imprinting, neonatal rats rapidly learn the odor-based maternal attachment. This rapid learning requires reward-evoked locus ceruleus (LC) release of copious amounts of norepinephrine (NE) into the olfactory bulb. This imprinting ends at postnatal day 10 (P10) and is associated with a dramatic reduction in reward-evoked LC NE release. Here we assess whether the functional emergence of LC α2 inhibitory autoreceptors and the downregulation of LC α1 excitatory autoreceptors underlie the dramatic reduction in NE release associated with termination of the sensitive period. Postsensitive period pups (P12) were implanted with either LC or olfactory bulb cannulas, classically conditioned with intracranial drug infusions (P14), and tested for an odor preference (P15). During conditioning, a novel odor was paired with either olfactory bulb infusion of a β-receptor agonist (isoproterenol) to assess the target effects of NE or direct LC cholinergic stimulation combined with α2 antagonists and α1 agonists in a mixture to reinstate neonatal levels of LC autoreceptor activity to assess the source of NE. Pups learned an odor preference when the odor was paired with either olfactory bulb isoproterenol infusion or reinstatement of neonatal LC receptor activity. These results suggest that LC autoreceptor functional changes rather than olfactory bulb changes underlie sensitive period termination. PMID:14762136

  4. Glutamate Receptor Antagonist Infusions into the Basolateral and Medial Amygdala Reveal Differential Contributions to Olfactory vs. Context Fear Conditioning and Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Paschall, Gayla Y.; Davis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala's involvement in fear acquisition and expression to visual and auditory stimuli is well known. The involvement of the basolateral and other amygdala areas in fear acquisition and expression to stimuli of other modalities is less certain. We evaluated the contribution of the basolateral and medial amygdala to olfactory and…

  5. Identification of the western tarnished plant bug (lygus hesperus) olfactory co-receptor orco: expression profile and confirmation of atypical membrane topology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lygus hesperus (western tarnished plant bug) is an agronomically important pest species of numerous cropping systems. Similar to other insects, a critical component underlying behaviors is the perception and discrimination of olfactory cues. Consequently, the molecular basis of olfaction in this spe...

  6. Netrin/DCC signaling guides olfactory sensory axons to their correct location in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Marcaccio, Christina L.; Shao, Xin; Lush, Mark E.; Jain, Roshan A.; Fujimoto, Esther; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Granato, Michael; Raper, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons expressing particular olfactory receptors project to specific reproducible locations within the bulb. The axonal guidance cues that organize this precise projection pattern are only beginning to be identified. To aid in their identification and characterization, we generated a transgenic zebrafish line, OR111-7:IRES:Gal4, in which a small subset of olfactory sensory neurons is labeled. Most sensory neurons expressing the OR111-7 transgene project to a specific location within the bulb, the central zone protoglomerulus, while a smaller number project to the LG1 protoglomerulus. Inhibiting netrin/DCC signaling perturbs the ability of OR111-7 expressing axons to enter the olfactory bulb and alters their patterns of termination within the bulb. The netrin receptor DCC is expressed in olfactory sensory neurons around the time that they elaborate their axons, netrin1a is expressed near the medial-most margin of the olfactory bulb, and netrin1b is expressed within the ventral region of the bulb. Loss of netrin/DCC signaling components causes some OR111-7 expressing sensory axons to wander posteriorly after exiting the olfactory pit, away from netrin expressing areas in the bulb. OR111-7 expressing axons that enter the bulb target the central zone less precisely than normal, spreading away from netrin expressing regions. These pathfinding errors can be corrected by the re-expression of DCC within OR111-7 transgene expressing neurons in DCC morphant embryos. These findings implicate netrins as the only known attractants for olfactory sensory neurons, first drawing OR111-7 expressing axons into the bulb and then into the ventromedially positioned central zone protoglomerulus. PMID:22457493

  7. A Screen for Genes Expressed in the Olfactory Organs of Drosophila melanogaster Identifies Genes Involved in Olfactory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Narelle E.; Herr, Anabel; de Bruyne, Marien; Warr, Coral G.

    2012-01-01

    Background For insects the sense of smell and associated olfactory-driven behaviours are essential for survival. Insects detect odorants with families of olfactory receptor proteins that are very different to those of mammals, and there are likely to be other unique genes and genetic pathways involved in the function and development of the insect olfactory system. Methodology/Principal Findings We have performed a genetic screen of a set of 505 Drosophila melanogaster gene trap insertion lines to identify novel genes expressed in the adult olfactory organs. We identified 16 lines with expression in the olfactory organs, many of which exhibited expression of the trapped genes in olfactory receptor neurons. Phenotypic analysis showed that six of the lines have decreased olfactory responses in a behavioural assay, and for one of these we showed that precise excision of the P element reverts the phenotype to wild type, confirming a role for the trapped gene in olfaction. To confirm the identity of the genes trapped in the lines we performed molecular analysis of some of the insertion sites. While for many lines the reported insertion sites were correct, we also demonstrated that for a number of lines the reported location of the element was incorrect, and in three lines there were in fact two pGT element insertions. Conclusions/Significance We identified 16 new genes expressed in the Drosophila olfactory organs, the majority in neurons, and for several of the gene trap lines demonstrated a defect in olfactory-driven behaviour. Further characterisation of these genes and their roles in olfactory system function and development will increase our understanding of how the insect olfactory system has evolved to perform the same essential function to that of mammals, but using very different molecular genetic mechanisms. PMID:22530061

  8. Differences between conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Baglieri, Annalisa; Marino, Maria Adele; Morabito, Rosa; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an in vivo assessment of cortical and subcortical regions affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review summarizes the most important conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques applied in this field. Standard neuroimaging techniques have played a marginal role in the diagnosis and follow-up of PD, essentially being used only to discriminate atypical syndromes from PD, to exclude secondary causes such as vascular lesions, and to confirm the absence of specific imaging features found in atypical parkinsonisms. However, non-conventional MRI techniques, i.e. new neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI, may allow the detection of structural, functional and metabolic changes useful not only for differential diagnosis, but also for early diagnosis and outcome and treatment monitoring in PD. In addition, we illustrate the advantages of high-field MRI over lower magnetic fields, highlighting the great potential of advanced neuroimaging techniques. PMID:24125556

  9. Awareness and Use of Non-conventional Tobacco Products Among U.S. Students, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoguang; King, Brian A.; Corey, Catherine G.; Arrazola, René A.; Johnson, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing diversity of the tobacco product landscape, including electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), hookah, snus, and dissolvable tobacco products (dissolvables), raises concerns about the public health impact of these non-conventional tobacco products among youth. Purpose This study assessed awareness, ever use, and current use of non-conventional tobacco products among U.S. students in 2012, overall and by demographic and tobacco use characteristics. Methods Data from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey, a nationally representative survey of U.S. middle and high school students, were analyzed in 2013. Prevalence of awareness, ever use, and current use of e-cigarettes, hookah, snus, and dissolvables were calculated overall and by sex, school level, race/ethnicity, and conventional tobacco product use, including cigarettes, cigars, or smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip). Results Overall, 50.3% of students were aware of e-cigarettes; prevalence of ever and current use of e-cigarettes was 6.8% and 2.1%, respectively. Awareness of hookah was 41.2% among all students, and that of ever and current use were 8.9% and 3.6%, respectively. Overall awareness; ever; and current use of snus (32%, 5.3%, 1.7%, respectively) and dissolvables (19.3%, 2.0%, 0.7%, respectively) were generally lower than those of e-cigarettes or hookah. Conventional tobacco product users were more likely to be aware of and to use non-conventional tobacco products. Conclusions Many U.S. students are aware of and use non-conventional tobacco products. Evidence-based interventions should be implemented to prevent and reduce all tobacco use among youth. PMID:25044194

  10. Application of Gaussia luciferase in bicistronic and non-conventional secretion reporter constructs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Secreted luciferases are highly useful bioluminescent reporters for cell-based assays and drug discovery. A variety of secreted luciferases from marine organisms have been described that harbor an N-terminal signal peptide for release along the classical secretory pathway. Here, we have characterized the secretion of Gaussia luciferase in more detail. Results We describe three basic mechanisms by which GLUC can be released from cells: first, classical secretion by virtue of the N-terminal signal peptide; second, internal signal peptide-mediated secretion and third, non-conventional secretion in the absence of an N-terminal signal peptide. Non-conventional release of dNGLUC is not stress-induced, does not require autophagy and can be enhanced by growth factor stimulation. Furthermore, we have identified the golgi-associated, gamma adaptin ear containing, ARF binding protein 1 (GGA1) as a suppressor of release of dNGLUC. Conclusions Due to its secretion via multiple secretion pathways GLUC can find multiple applications as a research tool to study classical and non-conventional secretion. As GLUC can also be released from a reporter construct by internal signal peptide-mediated secretion it can be incorporated in a novel bicistronic secretion system. PMID:25007711

  11. Histochemical study of the olfactory mucosae of the horse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hyup; Park, Changnam; Bang, Hyojin; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Seungjoon; Shin, Taekyun

    2016-05-01

    The olfactory mucosae of the horse were examined by using histology and lectin histochemistry to characterize the carbohydrate sugar residues therein. Histological findings revealed that olfactory epithelium (OE) consisted of both olfactory marker protein (OMP)- and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-positive receptor cells, supporting cells and basal cells with intervening secretory ducts from Bowman's glands. Mucus histochemistry showed that Bowman's gland acini contain periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent-positive neutral mucins and alcian blue pH 2.5-positive mucosubstances. Lectin histochemistry revealed that a variety of carbohydrate sugar residues, including N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose and complex type N-glycan groups, are present in the various cell types in the olfactory mucosa at varying levels. Collectively, this is the first descriptive study of horse olfactory mucosa to characterize carbohydrate sugar residues in the OE and Bowman's glands. PMID:27040092

  12. Humans can discriminate more than 1 trillion olfactory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bushdid, C; Magnasco, M O; Vosshall, L B; Keller, A

    2014-03-21

    Humans can discriminate several million different colors and almost half a million different tones, but the number of discriminable olfactory stimuli remains unknown. The lay and scientific literature typically claims that humans can discriminate 10,000 odors, but this number has never been empirically validated. We determined the resolution of the human sense of smell by testing the capacity of humans to discriminate odor mixtures with varying numbers of shared components. On the basis of the results of psychophysical testing, we calculated that humans can discriminate at least 1 trillion olfactory stimuli. This is far more than previous estimates of distinguishable olfactory stimuli. It demonstrates that the human olfactory system, with its hundreds of different olfactory receptors, far outperforms the other senses in the number of physically different stimuli it can discriminate. PMID:24653035

  13. Developmental, tract-tracing and immunohistochemical study of the peripheral olfactory system in a basal vertebrate: insights on Pax6 neurons migrating along the olfactory nerve.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Urzainqui, Idoia; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Candal, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system represents an excellent model for studying different aspects of the development of the nervous system ranging from neurogenesis to mechanisms of axon growth and guidance. Important findings in this field come from comparative studies. We have analyzed key events in the development of the olfactory system of the shark Scyliorhinus canicula by combining immunohistochemical and tract-tracing methods. We describe for the first time in a cartilaginous fish an early population of pioneer HuC/D-immunoreactive (ir) neurons that seemed to delaminate from the olfactory pit epithelium and migrate toward the telencephalon before the olfactory nerve was identifiable. A distinct, transient cell population, namely the migratory mass, courses later on in apposition to the developing olfactory nerve. It contains olfactory ensheathing glial (GFAP-ir) cells and HuC/D-ir neurons, some of which course toward an extrabulbar region. We also demonstrate that Pax6-ir cells coursing along the developing olfactory pathways in S. canicula are young migrating (HuC/D and DCX-ir) neurons of the migratory mass that do not form part of the terminal nerve pathway. Evidences that these Pax6 neurons originate in the olfactory epithelium are also reported. As Pax6 neurons in the olfactory epithelium show characteristics of olfactory receptor neurons, and migrating Pax6-ir neurons formed transient corridors along the course of olfactory axons at the entrance of the olfactory bulb, we propose that these neurons could play a role as guideposts for axons of olfactory receptor neurons growing toward the olfactory bulb. PMID:23224251

  14. Identification of G protein α subunits in the main olfactory system and vomeronasal system of the Japanese Striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Koshi, Katsuo; Ono, Hisaya K; Sasaki, Kuniaki; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the olfactory system, G proteins couple to the olfactory receptors, and G proteins expressed in the main olfactory system and vomeronasal system vary according to animal species. In this study, G protein α subunits expressed in the main olfactory system and vomeronasal system of the snake were identified by immunohistochemistry. In the olfactory epithelium, only anti-Gαolf/s antibody labeled the cilia of the receptor cells. In the vomeronasal epithelium, only anti-Gαo antibody labeled the microvilli of the receptor cells. In the accessory olfactory bulb, anti-Gαo antibody stained the whole glomerular layer. These results suggest that the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system of the snake express Gαolf and Gαo as G proteins coupling to the olfactory receptors, respectively. PMID:23090693

  15. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  16. Odorant Metabolism Catalyzed by Olfactory Mucosal Enzymes Influences Peripheral Olfactory Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Veloso Da Silva, Stéphanie; Jakob, Ingrid; Sicard, Gilles; Chevalier, Joëlle; Ménétrier, Franck; Berdeaux, Olivier; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie; Le Bon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    A large set of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), esterases and transferases, are highly expressed in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM). These enzymes are known to catalyze the biotransformation of exogenous compounds to facilitate elimination. However, the functions of these enzymes in the olfactory epithelium are not clearly understood. In addition to protecting against inhaled toxic compounds, these enzymes could also metabolize odorant molecules, and thus modify their stimulating properties or inactivate them. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro biotransformation of odorant molecules in the rat OM and assessed the impact of this metabolism on peripheral olfactory responses. Rat OM was found to efficiently metabolize quinoline, coumarin and isoamyl acetate. Quinoline and coumarin are metabolized by CYPs whereas isoamyl acetate is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases. Electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings revealed that the hydroxylated metabolites derived from these odorants elicited lower olfactory response amplitudes than the parent molecules. We also observed that glucurono-conjugated derivatives induced no olfactory signal. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the local application of a CYP inhibitor on rat olfactory epithelium increased EOG responses elicited by quinoline and coumarin. Similarly, the application of a carboxylesterase inhibitor increased the EOG response elicited by isoamyl acetate. This increase in EOG amplitude provoked by XME inhibitors is likely due to enhanced olfactory sensory neuron activation in response to odorant accumulation. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that biotransformation of odorant molecules by enzymes localized to the olfactory mucosa may change the odorant’s stimulating properties and may facilitate the clearance of odorants to avoid receptor saturation. PMID:23555703

  17. Expression of Olfactory Signaling Genes in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Velmeshev, Dmitry; Faghihi, Mohammad; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Slepak, Vladlen Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To advance our understanding how the outer eye interacts with its environment, we asked which cellular receptors are expressed in the cornea, focusing on G protein-coupled receptors. Methods Total RNA from the mouse cornea was subjected to next-generation sequencing using the Illumina platform. The data was analyzed with TopHat and CuffLinks software packages. Expression of a representative group of genes detected by RNA-seq was further analyzed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization using RNAscope technology and fluorescent microscopy. Results We generated more than 46 million pair-end reads from mouse corneal RNA. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the mouse corneal transcriptome reconstructed from these reads represents over 10,000 gene transcripts. We identified 194 GPCR transcripts, of which 96 were putative olfactory receptors. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the presence of several olfactory receptors and related genes, including olfactory marker protein and the G protein associated with olfaction, Gαolf. In situ hybridization showed that mRNA for olfactory marker protein, Gαolf and possibly some olfactory receptors were found in the corneal epithelial cells. In addition to the corneal epithelium, Gαolf was present in the ganglionic and inner nuclear layers of the retina. One of the olfactory receptors, Olfr558, was present primarily in vessels of the eye co-stained with antibodies against alpha-smooth muscle actin, indicating expression in arterioles. Conclusions Several species of mRNA encoding putative olfactory receptors and related genes are expressed in the mouse cornea and other parts of the eye indicating they may play a role in sensing chemicals in the ocular environment. PMID:24789354

  18. Cellular Basis for the Olfactory Response to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Smokers regulate their smoking behavior on the basis of sensory stimuli independently of the pharmacological effects of nicotine (RoseJ. E., et al. (1993) Pharmacol., Biochem. Behav.1 (3), 891−9008469698). A better understanding of sensory mechanisms underlying smoking behavior may help to develop more effective smoking alternatives. Olfactory stimulation by nicotine makes up a considerable part of the flavor of tobacco smoke, yet our understanding of the cellular mechanisms responsible for olfactory detection of nicotine remains incomplete. We used biophysical methods to characterize the nicotine sensitivity and response mechanisms of neurons from olfactory epithelium. In view of substantial differences in the olfactory receptor repertoire between rodent and human (MombaertsP. (1999) Annu. Rev. Neurosci.1, 487−50910202546), we studied biopsied human olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), cultured human olfactory cells (GomezG., et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. Res.1 (3), 737−74911104513), and rat olfactory neurons. Rat and human OSNs responded to S(−)-nicotine with a concentration dependent influx of calcium and activation of adenylate cyclase. Some rat OSNs displayed some stereoselectivity, with neurons responding to either enantiomer alone or to both. Freshly biopsied and primary cultured human olfactory neurons were less stereoselective. Nicotinic cholinergic antagonists had no effect on the responses of rat or human OSNs to nicotine. Patch clamp recording of rat OSNs revealed a nicotine-activated, calcium-sensitive nonspecific cation channel. These results indicate that nicotine activates a canonical olfactory receptor pathway rather than nicotinic cholinergic receptors on OSNs. Further, because the nicotine-sensitive mechanisms of rodents appear generally similar to those of humans, this animal model is an appropriate one for studies of nicotine sensation. PMID:22777075

  19. Cellular basis for the olfactory response to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Bruce; Xu, Jiang; Audige, Valery; Lischka, Fritz W; Rawson, Nancy E

    2010-03-17

    Smokers regulate their smoking behavior on the basis of sensory stimuli independently of the pharmacological effects of nicotine (Rose J. E., et al. (1993) Pharmacol., Biochem. Behav.44 (4), 891-900). A better understanding of sensory mechanisms underlying smoking behavior may help to develop more effective smoking alternatives. Olfactory stimulation by nicotine makes up a considerable part of the flavor of tobacco smoke, yet our understanding of the cellular mechanisms responsible for olfactory detection of nicotine remains incomplete. We used biophysical methods to characterize the nicotine sensitivity and response mechanisms of neurons from olfactory epithelium. In view of substantial differences in the olfactory receptor repertoire between rodent and human (Mombaerts P. (1999) Annu. Rev. Neurosci.22, 487-509), we studied biopsied human olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), cultured human olfactory cells (Gomez G., et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. Res.62 (5), 737-749), and rat olfactory neurons. Rat and human OSNs responded to S(-)-nicotine with a concentration dependent influx of calcium and activation of adenylate cyclase. Some rat OSNs displayed some stereoselectivity, with neurons responding to either enantiomer alone or to both. Freshly biopsied and primary cultured human olfactory neurons were less stereoselective. Nicotinic cholinergic antagonists had no effect on the responses of rat or human OSNs to nicotine. Patch clamp recording of rat OSNs revealed a nicotine-activated, calcium-sensitive nonspecific cation channel. These results indicate that nicotine activates a canonical olfactory receptor pathway rather than nicotinic cholinergic receptors on OSNs. Further, because the nicotine-sensitive mechanisms of rodents appear generally similar to those of humans, this animal model is an appropriate one for studies of nicotine sensation. PMID:22777075

  20. Integrating temperature with odor processing in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kludt, Eugen; Okom, Camille; Brinkmann, Alexander; Schild, Detlev

    2015-05-20

    Temperature perception has long been classified as a somesthetic function solely. However, in recent years several studies brought evidence that temperature perception also takes place in the olfactory system of rodents. Temperature has been described as an effective stimulus for sensory neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nose. Here, we investigate whether a neuronal trace of temperature stimulation can be observed in the glomeruli and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, using calcium imaging and fast line-scanning microscopy. We show in the Xenopus tadpole system that the γ-glomerulus, which receives input from olfactory neurons, is highly sensitive to temperature drops at the olfactory epithelium. We observed that thermo-induced activity in the γ-glomerulus is conveyed to the mitral cells innervating this specific neuropil. Surprisingly, a substantial number of thermosensitive mitral cells were also chemosensitive. Moreover, we report another unique feature of the γ-glomerulus: it receives ipsilateral and contralateral afferents. The latter fibers pass through the contralateral bulb, cross the anterior commissure, and then run to the ipsilateral olfactory bulb, where they target the γ-glomerulus. Temperature drops at the contralateral olfactory epithelium also induced responses in the γ-glomerulus and in mitral cells. Temperature thus appears to be a relevant physiological input to the Xenopus olfactory system. Each olfactory bulb integrates and codes temperature signals originating from receptor neurons of the ipsilateral and contralateral nasal cavities. Finally, temperature and chemical information is processed in shared cellular networks. PMID:25995474

  1. Probing complementary memristive characteristics in oxide based memory device via non-conventional chronoamperometry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Adnan; Zhang, Lepeng; Chu, Dewei; Li, Sean

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, the resistive switching characteristics of CeO2 based memristor are investigated by utilizing an unusual, non-conventional, and a unique approach of "chronoamperometry." This methodology provides useful insights into memristive characterization for achieving configurable device functionalities such as categorization of minimum threshold potential to prompt switching behaviour, tuneable on/off ratios with accessible multi-level data storage states, etc. Moreover, the analytical studies on carrier drift/diffusion controlled-memristor response and the estimation of time constants at various applied fixed potentials provide tangible evidence to support valence change mechanism in CeO2 based memristors.

  2. Effects of disorder on properties of non-conventionally prepared barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.; Sarkar, S.; Roychowdhury, A.; Das, D.

    2015-06-24

    Barium titanaten (BaTiO{sub 3}) nanoparticles were prepared by non-conventional as well as conventional solid state reaction. A better response about the grain size distribution was obtained in the former. The former was then milled to get grains of successive reduced sizes. The defects induced within the samples were studies by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The effect of defects on dielectric property of sample with finest grains was measured. Dielectric stability with temperature was increased with decreasing grain size and the peak was shifted towards the lower value due to the enhancement of grain boundary defects generated due to milling for long time.

  3. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population. PMID:26441369

  4. The role of the olfactory recess in olfactory airflow.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Smith, Timothy D; Perot, J Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-15

    The olfactory recess - a blind pocket at the back of the nasal airway - is thought to play an important role in mammalian olfaction by sequestering air outside of the main airstream, thus giving odorants time to re-circulate. Several studies have shown that species with large olfactory recesses tend to have a well-developed sense of smell. However, no study has investigated how the size of the olfactory recess relates to air circulation near the olfactory epithelium. Here we used a computer model of the nasal cavity from a bat (Carollia perspicillata) to test the hypothesis that a larger olfactory recess improves olfactory airflow. We predicted that during inhalation, models with an enlarged olfactory recess would have slower rates of flow through the olfactory region (i.e. the olfactory recess plus airspace around the olfactory epithelium), while during exhalation these models would have little to no flow through the olfactory recess. To test these predictions, we experimentally modified the size of the olfactory recess while holding the rest of the morphology constant. During inhalation, we found that an enlarged olfactory recess resulted in lower rates of flow in the olfactory region. Upon exhalation, air flowed through the olfactory recess at a lower rate in the model with an enlarged olfactory recess. Taken together, these results indicate that an enlarged olfactory recess improves olfactory airflow during both inhalation and exhalation. These findings add to our growing understanding of how the morphology of the nasal cavity may relate to function in this understudied region of the skull. PMID:24577441

  5. Carbohydrate and energy-yielding metabolism in non-conventional yeasts.

    PubMed

    Flores, C L; Rodríguez, C; Petit, T; Gancedo, C

    2000-10-01

    Sugars are excellent carbon sources for all yeasts. Since a vast amount of information is available on the components of the pathways of sugar utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae it has been tacitly assumed that other yeasts use sugars in the same way. However, although the pathways of sugar utilization follow the same theme in all yeasts, important biochemical and genetic variations on it exist. Basically, in most non-conventional yeasts, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, respiration in the presence of oxygen is prominent for the use of sugars. This review provides comparative information on the different steps of the fundamental pathways of sugar utilization in non-conventional yeasts: glycolysis, fermentation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and respiration. We consider also gluconeogenesis and, briefly, catabolite repression. We have centered our attention in the genera Kluyveromyces, Candida, Pichia, Yarrowia and Schizosaccharomyces, although occasional reference to other genera is made. The review shows that basic knowledge is missing on many components of these pathways and also that studies on regulation of critical steps are scarce. Information on these points would be important to generate genetically engineered yeast strains for certain industrial uses. PMID:10978549

  6. Thermal control of a lidar laser system using a non-conventional ram air heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D.; Alexander, William, Jr.; Swofford, Doyle P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and performance testing of a uniquely designed external heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is attached externally to an aircraft and is used to cool a laser system within the fuselage. Estimates showed insufficient cooling capacity with a conventional staggered tube array in the limited space available. Thus, a non-conventional design wes developed with larger tube and fin area exposed to the ram air to increase the heat transfer performance. The basic design consists of 28 circular finned aluminum tubes arranged in two parallel banks. Wind tunnel tests were performed to simulate air and liquid flight conditions for the non-conventional parallel bank arrangement and the conventional staggered tube arrangement. Performance comparisons of each of the two designs are presented. Test results are used in a computer model of the heat exchanger to predict the operating performance for the entire flight profile. These analyses predict significantly improved performance over the conventional design and show adequate thermal control margins.

  7. Nasal toxicity, carcinogenicity, and olfactory uptake of metals.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposures to inhalation of certain metal dusts or aerosols can cause loss of olfactory acuity, atrophy of the nasal mucosa, mucosal ulcers, perforated nasal septum, or sinonasal cancer. Anosmia and hyposmia have been observed in workers exposed to Ni- or Cd-containing dusts in alkaline battery factories, nickel refineries, and cadmium industries. Ulcers of the nasal mucosa and perforated nasal septum have been reported in workers exposed to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating, or to As(III) in arsenic smelters. Atrophy of the olfactory epithelium has been observed in rodents following inhalation of NiSO4 or alphaNi3S2. Cancers of the nose and nasal sinuses have been reported in workers exposed to Ni compounds in nickel refining, cutlery factories, and alkaline battery manufacture, or to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating. In animals, several metals (eg, Al, Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Zn) have been shown to pass via olfactory receptor neurons from the nasal lumen through the cribriform plate to the olfactory bulb. Some metals (eg, Mn, Ni, Zn) can cross synapses in the olfactory bulb and migrate via secondary olfactory neurons to distant nuclei of the brain. After nasal instillation of a metal-containing solution, transport of the metal via olfactory axons can occur rapidly, within hours or a few days (eg, Mn), or slowly over days or weeks (eg, Ni). The olfactory bulb tends to accumulate certain metals (eg, Al, Bi, Cu, Mn, Zn) with greater avidity than other regions of the brain. The molecular mechanisms responsible for metal translocation in olfactory neurons and deposition in the olfactory bulb are unclear, but complexation by metal-binding molecules such as carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) may be involved. PMID:11314863

  8. Electrophysiological Measurements from a Moth Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Zainulabeuddin; Leal, Walter S.

    2011-01-01

    Insect olfactory systems provide unique opportunities for recording odorant-induced responses in the forms of electroantennograms (EAG) and single sensillum recordings (SSR), which are summed responses from all odorant receptor neurons (ORNs) located on the antenna and from those housed in individual sensilla, respectively. These approaches have been exploited for getting a better understanding of insect chemical communication. The identified stimuli can then be used as either attractants or repellents in management strategies for insect pests. PMID:21490575

  9. Synthetic biology and molecular genetics in non-conventional yeasts: Current tools and future advances.

    PubMed

    Wagner, James M; Alper, Hal S

    2016-04-01

    Coupling the tools of synthetic biology with traditional molecular genetic techniques can enable the rapid prototyping and optimization of yeast strains. While the era of yeast synthetic biology began in the well-characterized model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is swiftly expanding to include non-conventional yeast production systems such as Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. These yeasts already have roles in the manufacture of vaccines, therapeutic proteins, food additives, and biorenewable chemicals, but recent synthetic biology advances have the potential to greatly expand and diversify their impact on biotechnology. In this review, we summarize the development of synthetic biological tools (including promoters and terminators) and enabling molecular genetics approaches that have been applied in these four promising alternative biomanufacturing platforms. An emphasis is placed on synthetic parts and genome editing tools. Finally, we discuss examples of synthetic tools developed in other organisms that can be adapted or optimized for these hosts in the near future. PMID:26701310

  10. Ratcheting Behavior of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Associated Microstructural Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Lopamudra; Mishra, Awanish Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2014-11-01

    Ratcheting fatigue behavior of a non-conventional stainless steel X12CrMnNiN17-7-5 has been investigated with varying combinations of mean stress (σm) and stress amplitude (σa) at room temperature using a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. X-ray diffraction profile analysis has been carried out for assessing possible martensitic phase transformation in the steel subjected to ratcheting deformation. The results indicate that ratcheting strain as well as volume fraction of martensite increases with increasing σm and/or σa; the phenomenon of strain accumulation is considered to be governed by the associated mechanics of cyclic loading, increased plastic damage as well as martensitic transformation. A correlation between strain produced by ratcheting deformation and martensitic transformation has been established.

  11. Ratcheting Behavior of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Associated Microstructural Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Lopamudra; Mishra, Awanish Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2014-09-01

    Ratcheting fatigue behavior of a non-conventional stainless steel X12CrMnNiN17-7-5 has been investigated with varying combinations of mean stress (σm) and stress amplitude (σa) at room temperature using a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. X-ray diffraction profile analysis has been carried out for assessing possible martensitic phase transformation in the steel subjected to ratcheting deformation. The results indicate that ratcheting strain as well as volume fraction of martensite increases with increasing σm and/or σa; the phenomenon of strain accumulation is considered to be governed by the associated mechanics of cyclic loading, increased plastic damage as well as martensitic transformation. A correlation between strain produced by ratcheting deformation and martensitic transformation has been established.

  12. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose Jr.; Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar

    2010-05-21

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 mum was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  13. Morphology and mechanical properties relationships in non-conventional melt manipulation injection moulding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyumdzhiev, Anton D.; Viana, Júlio C.

    2007-04-01

    Shear Controlled Orientation in Injection Moulding and Push-Pull Injection Moulding with abbreviations respectively SCORIM and PPIM, are two non-conventional injection moulding techniques based on the concept of in-mould shear manipulation of the melt during the solidification phase. In this work a diversity of microstructures were developed by SCORIM and PPIM by systematic variations of the processing conditions (total of 16 moulding conditions). The microstructures were observed by polarized light microscopy, being assessed the multi-laminated skin-to-core ratio. The level of molecular orientation of the skin and the relative degree of crystallinity of the core were evaluated by Wide-Angle X-ray scattering. The mechanical behaviour was assessed by flexural, tensile and fracture tests. The relationships between the morphology and the mechanical properties of the mouldings were established, regardless the processing technique, combining the results of both SCORIM and PPIM.

  14. Opportunities for utilization of non-conventional energy sources for biomass pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rawel; Krishna, Bhavya B; Kumar, Jitendra; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2016-01-01

    The increasing concerns over the depletion of fossil resources and its associated geo-political issues have driven the entire world to move toward sustainable forms of energy. Pretreatment is the first step in any biochemical conversion process for the production of valuable fuels/chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass to eliminate the lignin and produce fermentable sugars by hydrolysis. Conventional techniques have several limitations which can be addressed by using them in tandem with non-conventional methods for biomass pretreatment. Electron beam and γ (gamma)-irradiation, microwave and ultrasound energies have certain advantages over conventional source of energy and there is an opportunity that these energies can be exploited for biomass pretreatment. PMID:26350883

  15. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, José Martins; Germano Martins, Antonio César

    2010-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 μm was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  16. Use of non-conventional yeast improves the wine aroma profile of Ribolla Gialla.

    PubMed

    Dashko, Sofia; Zhou, Nerve; Tinta, Tinkara; Sivilotti, Paolo; Lemut, Melita Sternad; Trost, Kajetan; Gamero, Amparo; Boekhout, Teun; Butinar, Lorena; Vrhovsek, Urska; Piskur, Jure

    2015-07-01

    Consumer wine preferences are changing rapidly towards exotic flavours and tastes. In this work, we tested five non-conventional yeast strains for their potential to improve Ribolla Gialla wine quality. These strains were previously selected from numerous yeasts interesting as food production candidates. Sequential fermentation of Ribolla Gialla grape juice with the addition of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae T73 Lalvin industrial strain was performed. Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis CBS8849 and Kazachstania gamospora CBS10400 demonstrated positive organoleptic properties and suitable fermentation dynamics, rapid sugar consumption and industrial strain compatibility. At the same time, Torulaspora microellipsoides CBS6641, Dekkera bruxellensis CBS2796 and Dekkera anomala CBS77 were unsuitable for wine production because of poor fermentation dynamics, inefficient sugar consumption and ethanol production levels and major organoleptic defects. Thus, we selected strains of K. gamospora and Z. kombuchaensis that significantly improved the usually plain taste of Ribolla wine by providing additional aromatic complexity in a controlled and reproducible manner. PMID:25903098

  17. Non Conventional Seismic Events Along the Himalayan Arc Detected in the Hi-Climb Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Nàbĕlek, J. L.; Rivera, L.; Bollinger, L.; Burtin, A.

    2008-12-01

    From September 2002 to August 2005, more than 200 broadband seismic stations were operated across the Himalayan arc and the southern Tibetan plateau in the framework of the Hi-Climb project. Here, we take advantage of the high density of stations along the main profile to look for coherent seismic wave arrivals that can not be attributed to ordinary tectonic events. An automatic detection algorithm is applied to the continuous data streams filtered between 1 and 10 Hz, followed by a visual inspection of all detections. We discovered about one hundred coherent signals that cannot be attributed to local, regional or teleseismic earthquakes and which are characterized by emergent arrivals and long durations ranging from one minute to several hours. Most of these non conventional seismic events have a low signal to noise ratio and are thus only observed above 1 Hz in the frequency band where the seismic noise is the lowest. However, a small subset of them are strong enough to be observed in a larger frequency band and show an enhancement of long periods compared to standard earthquakes. Based on the analysis of the relative amplitude measured at each station or, when possible, on the correlation of the low frequency part of the signals, most of these events appear to be located along the High Himalayan range. But, because of their emergent character and the main orientation of the seismic profile, their longitude and depth remain poorly constrained. The origin of these non conventional seismic events is still unsealed but their seismic signature shares several characteristics with non volcanic tremors, glacial earthquakes and/or debris avalanches. All these phenomena may occur along the Himalayan range but were not seismically detected before. Here we discuss the pros and cons for each of these postulated candidates based on the analysis of the recorded waveforms and slip models.

  18. miRepress: modelling gene expression regulation by microRNA with non-conventional binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Suman; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Shaoli; Sen, Rituparno; Goswami, Swagata; Jana, Siddhartha S.; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2016-01-01

    Some earlier studies have reported an alternative mode of microRNA-target interaction. We detected target regions within mRNA transcripts from AGO PAR-CLIP that did not contain any conventional microRNA seed pairing but only had non-conventional binding sites with microRNA 3′ end. Our study from 7 set of data that measured global protein fold change after microRNA transfection pointed towards the association of target protein fold change with 6-mer and 7-mer target sites involving microRNA 3′ end. We developed a model to predict the degree of microRNA target regulation in terms of protein fold changes from the number of different conventional and non-conventional target sites present in the target, and found significant correlation of its output with protein expression changes. We validated the effect of non-conventional interactions with target by modulating the abundance of microRNA in a human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The validation was done using luciferase assay and immunoblot analysis for our predicted non-conventional microRNA-target pair WNT1 (3′ UTR) and miR-367-5p and immunoblot analysis for another predicted non-conventional microRNA-target pair MYH10 (coding region) and miR-181a-5p. Both experiments showed inhibition of targets by transfection of microRNA mimics that were predicted to have only non-conventional sites. PMID:26923536

  19. Expression of corticosteroid binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Dölz, Wilfried; Eitner, Annett; Caldwell, Jack D; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to act on the olfactory system although their mode of action is still unclear since nuclear glucocorticoid receptors are mostly absent in the olfactory mucosa. In this study we used immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR to study the expression and distribution of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) in the rat olfactory system. Mucosal goblet cells could be immunostained for CBG. Nasal secretion contained measurable amounts of CBG suggesting that CBG is liberated. CBG immunoreactivity was localized in many of the basal cells of the olfactory mucosa, while mature sensory cells contained CBG only in processes as determined by double immunostaining with the olfactory marker protein OMP. This staining was most pronounced in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The appearance of CBG in the non-sensory and sensory parts of the VNO and in nerve terminals in the accessory bulb indicated axonal transport. Portions of the periglomerular cells, the mitral cells and the tufted cells were also CBG positive. CBG encoding transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR in homogenates of the olfactory mucosa and VNO. Olfactory CBG may be significant for uptake, accumulation and transport of glucocorticoids, including aerosolic cortisol. PMID:23141917

  20. Electrophysiological responses of the olfactory receptors of the tick Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae) to host-related and tick pheromone-related synthetic compounds.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sara Fernandes; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, host-related and tick pheromone-related chemical compounds were tested by means of the tip-recording technique in order to obtain electrophysiological responses in olfactory sensilla of non-fed Amblyomma cajennense ticks. The following chemicals were tested on the multiporose sensilla DI.1, located anterior to Haller's organ, and the sensillum DII.1, in the anterior pit of this organ: isobutyric acid, butyric acid, valeric acid, trans-2-heptenal, heptanal, benzaldehyde, salicylaldehyde, nonanal, m-, o- and p-tolualdehyde, 2-furaldehyde, 3-pentanone, γ-valerolactone and 1-octen-3-ol (which are all vertebrate-associated volatiles); and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), 2-nitrophenol, methyl salicylate and nonanoic acid (tick pheromone components). These were used at 10(-3)M and 10(-2)M on at least 10 ticks per substance, and the chemicals that were found to be active at these concentrations were then tested as a series from 10(-6)M to 10(-2)M, in decadic steps, on at least 15 ticks per substance. 2,6-DCP was active on both sensilla, with detection thresholds of 10(-6)M on the DI.1 sensillum and 10(-4)M on the DII.1 sensillum. The olfactory neurons of this sensillum also responded to nonanal at the highest concentration used (10(-2)M), while those of DII.1 responded not only to 2.6 DCP but also to 2-nitrophenol (to the same extent as to 2,6-DCP) and to 1-octen-3-ol. These results confirm the importance of 2,6-DCP in the chemical ecology of A. cajennense and indicate other compounds that may interfere with the behavior of this tick and which should be investigated. PMID:22925715

  1. Functional Evidence of Multidrug Resistance Transporters (MDR) in Rodent Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Molinas, Adrien; Sicard, Gilles; Jakob, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) are membrane transporter proteins which function as efflux pumps at cell membranes and are considered to exert a protective function against the entry of xenobiotics. While evidence for Pgp and MRP transporter activity is reported for olfactory tissue, their possible interaction and participation in the olfactory response has not been investigated. Principal Findings Functional activity of putative MDR transporters was assessed by means of the fluorometric calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein-AM) accumulation assay on acute rat and mouse olfactory tissue slices. Calcein-AM uptake was measured as fluorescence intensity changes in the presence of Pgp or MRP specific inhibitors. Epifluorescence microscopy measured time course analysis in the olfactory epithelium revealed significant inhibitor-dependent calcein uptake in the presence of each of the selected inhibitors. Furthermore, intracellular calcein accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons was also significantly increased in the presence of either one of the Pgp or MRP inhibitors. The presence of Pgp or MRP1 encoding genes in the olfactory mucosa of rat and mouse was confirmed by RT-PCR with appropriate pairs of species-specific primers. Both transporters were expressed in both newborn and adult olfactory mucosa of both species. To assess a possible involvement of MDR transporters in the olfactory response, we examined the electrophysiological response to odorants in the presence of the selected MDR inhibitors by recording electroolfactograms (EOG). In both animal species, MRPs inhibitors induced a marked reduction of the EOG magnitude, while Pgp inhibitors had only a minor or no measurable effect. Conclusions The findings suggest that both Pgp and MRP transporters are functional in the olfactory mucosa and in olfactory receptor neurons. Pgp and MRPs may be cellular constituents of olfactory receptor neurons and represent potential

  2. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform…

  3. From the Cover: Odor maps in the olfactory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhihua; Li, Fusheng; Buck, Linda B.

    2005-05-01

    In the olfactory system, environmental chemicals are deconstructed into neural signals and then reconstructed to form odor perceptions. Much has been learned about odor coding in the olfactory epithelium and bulb, but little is known about how odors are subsequently encoded in the cortex to yield diverse perceptions. Here, we report that the representation of odors by fixed glomeruli in the olfactory bulb is transformed in the cortex into highly distributed and multiplexed odor maps. In the mouse olfactory cortex, individual odorants are represented by subsets of sparsely distributed neurons. Different odorants elicit distinct, but partially overlapping, patterns that are strikingly similar among individuals. With increases in odorant concentration, the representations expand spatially and include additional cortical neurons. Structurally related odorants have highly related representations, suggesting an underlying logic to the mapping of odor identities in the cortex. odorant receptor | smell

  4. Unravelling the Olfactory Sense: From the Gene to Odor Perception.

    PubMed

    Silva Teixeira, Carla S; Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Silva Ferreira, António C

    2016-02-01

    Although neglected by science for a long time, the olfactory sense is now the focus of a panoply of studies that bring new insights and raises interesting questions regarding its functioning. The importance in the clarification of this process is of interest for science, but also motivated by the food and perfume industries boosted by a consumer society with increasingly demands for higher quality standards. In this review, a general overview of the state of art of science regarding the olfactory sense is presented with the main focus on the peripheral olfactory system. Special emphasis will be given to the deorphanization of the olfactory receptors (ORs), a critical issue because the specificity and functional properties of about 90% of human ORs remain unknown mainly due to the difficulties associated with the functional expression of ORs in high yields. PMID:26688501

  5. Properties of odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, E E; Novoselov, V I; Bystrova, M F

    1988-01-22

    The specific membrane glycoproteins with high affinity for camphor and decanal were isolated from rat olfactory epithelium. Antibodies to these glycoproteins inhibited both the electroolfactogram and the binding of odorants. The enzyme immunoassay has shown these glycoproteins to be present in the olfactory epithelium of rat, mouse, guinea-pig and hamster but not in that of frog and carp. The molecular mass of the odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium solubilized by Triton X-100 was approx. 140 kDa. They consisted of two subunits (88 and 55 kDa). The 88 kDa subunit was capable of binding odorants. The data obtained suggest that the glycoproteins isolated have some properties that make them plausible candidates for olfactory receptor molecules. PMID:3337807

  6. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal’s first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins) integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif –YXFGLamide. Results We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip)-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae). Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir) was widely distributed in the animal’s brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory glomeruli are also mostly

  7. Adiponectin enhances the responsiveness of the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Loch, Diana; Heidel, Christian; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone adiponectin is secreted by adipose tissue and the circulating concentration is reversely correlated with body fat mass; it is considered as starvation signal. The observation that mature sensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelium express the adiponectin receptor 1 has led to the concept that adiponectin may affect the responsiveness of the olfactory system. In fact, electroolfactogram recordings from olfactory epithelium incubated with exogenous adiponectin resulted in large amplitudes upon odor stimulation. To determine whether the responsiveness of the olfactory sensory neurons was enhanced, we have monitored the odorant-induced expression of the immediate early gene Egr1. It was found that in an olfactory epithelium incubated with nasally applied adiponectin the number of Egr1 positive cells was significantly higher compared to controls, suggesting that adiponectin rendered the olfactory neurons more responsive to an odorant stimulus. To analyze whether the augmented responsiveness of sensory neurons was strong enough to elicit a higher neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb, the number of activated periglomerular cells of a distinct glomerulus was determined by monitoring the stimulus-induced expression of c-fos. The studies were performed using the transgenic mOR256-17-IRES-tauGFP mice which allowed to visualize the corresponding glomerulus and to stimulate with a known ligand. The data indicate that upon exposure to 2,3-hexanedione in adiponectin-treated mice the number of activated periglomerular neurons was significantly increased compared to controls. The results of this study indicate that adiponectin increases the responsiveness of the olfactory system, probably due to a higher responsiveness of olfactory sensory neurons. PMID:24130737

  8. Adiponectin Enhances the Responsiveness of the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Loch, Diana; Heidel, Christian; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone adiponectin is secreted by adipose tissue and the circulating concentration is reversely correlated with body fat mass; it is considered as starvation signal. The observation that mature sensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelium express the adiponectin receptor 1 has led to the concept that adiponectin may affect the responsiveness of the olfactory system. In fact, electroolfactogram recordings from olfactory epithelium incubated with exogenous adiponectin resulted in large amplitudes upon odor stimulation. To determine whether the responsiveness of the olfactory sensory neurons was enhanced, we have monitored the odorant-induced expression of the immediate early gene Egr1. It was found that in an olfactory epithelium incubated with nasally applied adiponectin the number of Egr1 positive cells was significantly higher compared to controls, suggesting that adiponectin rendered the olfactory neurons more responsive to an odorant stimulus. To analyze whether the augmented responsiveness of sensory neurons was strong enough to elicit a higher neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb, the number of activated periglomerular cells of a distinct glomerulus was determined by monitoring the stimulus-induced expression of c-fos. The studies were performed using the transgenic mOR256-17-IRES-tauGFP mice which allowed to visualize the corresponding glomerulus and to stimulate with a known ligand. The data indicate that upon exposure to 2,3-hexanedione in adiponectin-treated mice the number of activated periglomerular neurons was significantly increased compared to controls. The results of this study indicate that adiponectin increases the responsiveness of the olfactory system, probably due to a higher responsiveness of olfactory sensory neurons. PMID:24130737

  9. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  10. Neural crest and placode contributions to olfactory development.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun; Osumi, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is the sense of smell that influences many primitive behaviors for survival, e.g., feeding, reproduction, social interaction, and fear response. The olfactory system is an evolutionarily ancient sensory system and composed of the olfactory epithelium (OE), the olfactory bulb (OB), and the olfactory cortex. The OE gives rise to olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), i.e., primary sensory receptor cells whose axons project directly to the OB. The ORNs are unique in the way that they are continuously replaced during physiological turnover or following injury throughout life. In the OE, horizontal basal cells, i.e., flat and quiescent cells attached to the basal lamina, are now thought to be tissue stem cells. Although OE cells, especially ORNs, were hypothesized to be derived from the olfactory placode (OP), recent genetic fate-mapping studies using Cre reporter mice indicate a dual origin, i.e., the OP and neural crest (NC), of the olfactory system. The NC is a transient embryonic tissue that is formed between the dorsal neuroepithelium and epidermis. Neural crest cells (NCCs) are multipotent cells that migrate into various target tissues and differentiate into various cell types, including neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, cranial cartilage and bone, and melanocytes. Recent studies have revealed that neural crest-derived cells (NCDCs) are widely distributed in adult tissues, and that a subset of NCDCs still possesses NCC-like multipotency. Here, we review classical and recent studies of the olfactory system, especially focusing on the contribution of the NC and OP to the OE development. PMID:25662265

  11. Direct transport of inhaled xylene and its metabolites from the olfactory mucosa to the glomeruli of the olfactory bulbs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.L.; Dahl, A.R.; Kracko, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The olfactory epithelium is a unique tissue in that single receptor neurons have dendrites in contact with the external environment at the nasal airway, and axon terminals that penetrate the cribriform plate and synapse in the olfactory bulb. The Central Nervous System (CNS) is protected from systematically circulating toxicants by a blood-brain barrier primarily composed of tight junctions between endothelial cells in cerebral vessels and a high metabolic capacity within these cells. No such barrier has yet been defined to protect the CNS from inhaled toxicants. Because all inhalants do not seem to access the CNS directly, a nose-brain barrier seems plausible. The purpose of the work described here is to determine whether or not a nose-brain barrier exists and to define its components. Although such a barrier is likely to be multi-faceted, the present work focuses only on the importance of gross histologic and metabolic characteristics of the olfactory epithelium in olfactory transport.

  12. Peripheral olfactory signaling in insects

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Eunho; Bohbot, Jonathan; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory signaling is a crucial component in the life history of insects. The development of precise and parallel mechanisms to analyze the tremendous amount of chemical information from the environment and other sources has been essential to their evolutionary success. Considerable progress has been made in the study of insect olfaction fueled by bioinformatics- based utilization of genomics along with rapid advances in functional analyses. Here we review recent progress in our rapidly emerging understanding of insect peripheral sensory reception and signal transduction. These studies reveal that the nearly unlimited chemical space insects encounter is covered by distinct chemosensory receptor repertoires that are generally derived by species-specific, rapid gene gain and loss, reflecting the evolutionary consequences of adaptation to meet their specific biological needs. While diverse molecular mechanisms have been put forth, often in the context of controversial models, the characterization of the ubiquitous, highly conserved and insect-specific Orco odorant receptor co-receptor has opened the door to the design and development of novel insect control methods to target agricultural pests, disease vectors and even nuisance insects. PMID:25584200

  13. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  14. Selective imaging of presynaptic activity in the mouse olfactory bulb shows concentration and structure dependence of odor responses in identified glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Hans U.; Fuss, Stefan H.; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2002-01-01

    More chemicals can be smelled than there are olfactory receptors for them, necessitating a combinatorial representation by somewhat broadly tuned receptors. To understand the perception of odor quality and concentration, it is essential to establish the nature of the receptor repertoires that are activated by particular odorants at particular concentrations. We have taken advantage of the one-to-one correspondence of glomeruli and olfactory receptor molecules in the mouse olfactory bulb to analyze the tuning properties of a major receptor population by high resolution calcium imaging of odor responses selectively in the presynaptic compartment of glomeruli. We show that eighty different olfactory receptors projecting to the dorsal olfactory bulb respond to high concentrations of aldehydes with limited specificity. Varying ensembles of about 10 to 20 receptors encode any particular aldehyde at low stimulus concentrations with high specificity. Even normalized odor response patterns are markedly concentration dependent, caused by pronounced differences in affinity within the aldehyde receptor repertoire. PMID:11854464

  15. Olfactory and solitary chemosensory cells: two different chemosensory systems in the nasal cavity of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background The nasal cavity of all vertebrates houses multiple chemosensors, either innervated by the Ist (olfactory) or the Vth (trigeminal) cranial nerve. Various types of receptor cells are present, either segregated in different compartments (e.g. in rodents) or mingled in one epithelium (e.g. fish). In addition, solitary chemosensory cells have been reported for several species. Alligators which seek their prey both above and under water have only one nasal compartment. Information about their olfactory epithelium is limited. Since alligators seem to detect both volatile and water-soluble odour cues, I tested whether different sensory cell types are present in the olfactory epithelium. Results Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the sensory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the American alligator. Almost the entire nasal cavity is lined with olfactory (sensory) epithelium. Two types of olfactory sensory neurons are present. Both types bear cilia as well as microvilli at their apical endings and express the typical markers for olfactory neurons. The density of these olfactory neurons varies along the nasal cavity. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells innervated by trigeminal nerve fibres, are intermingled with olfactory sensory neurons. Solitary chemosensory cells express components of the PLC-transduction cascade found in solitary chemosensory cells in rodents. Conclusion The nasal cavity of the American alligator contains two different chemosensory systems incorporated in the same sensory epithelium: the olfactory system proper and solitary chemosensory cells. The olfactory system contains two morphological distinct types of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17683564

  16. Oxytocin Enhances Social Recognition by Modulating Cortical Control of Early Olfactory Processing.

    PubMed

    Oettl, Lars-Lennart; Ravi, Namasivayam; Schneider, Miriam; Scheller, Max F; Schneider, Peggy; Mitre, Mariela; da Silva Gouveia, Miriam; Froemke, Robert C; Chao, Moses V; Young, W Scott; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Grinevich, Valery; Shusterman, Roman; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Oxytocin promotes social interactions and recognition of conspecifics that rely on olfaction in most species. The circuit mechanisms through which oxytocin modifies olfactory processing are incompletely understood. Here, we observed that optogenetically induced oxytocin release enhanced olfactory exploration and same-sex recognition of adult rats. Consistent with oxytocin's function in the anterior olfactory cortex, particularly in social cue processing, region-selective receptor deletion impaired social recognition but left odor discrimination and recognition intact outside a social context. Oxytocin transiently increased the drive of the anterior olfactory cortex projecting to olfactory bulb interneurons. Cortical top-down recruitment of interneurons dynamically enhanced the inhibitory input to olfactory bulb projection neurons and increased the signal-to-noise of their output. In summary, oxytocin generates states for optimized information extraction in an early cortical top-down network that is required for social interactions with potential implications for sensory processing deficits in autism spectrum disorders. PMID:27112498

  17. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  18. Effects of Yttrium-90 selective internal radiation therapy on non-conventional liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuei, Andrew; Saab, Sammy; Cho, Sung-Ki; Kee, Stephen T; Lee, Edward Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a common site of metastasis, with essentially all metastatic malignancies having been known to spread to the liver. Nearly half of all patients with extrahepatic primary cancer have hepatic metastases. The severe prognostic implications of hepatic metastases have made surgical resection an important first line treatment in management. However, limitations such as the presence of extrahepatic spread or poor functional hepatic reserve exclude the majority of patients as surgical candidates, leaving chemotherapy and locoregional therapies as next best options. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a form of catheter-based locoregional cancer treatment modality for unresectable tumors, involving trans-arterial injection of microspheres embedded with a radio-isotope Yttrium-90. The therapeutic radiation dose is selectively delivered as the microspheres permanently embed themselves within the tumor vascular bed. Use of SIRT has been conventionally aimed at treating primary hepatic tumors (hepatocellular carcinoma) or colorectal and neuroendocrine metastases. Numerous reviews are available for these tumor types. However, little is known or reviewed on non-colorectal or non-neuroendocrine primaries. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to systematically review the current literature to evaluate the effects of Yttrium-90 radioembolization on non-conventional liver tumors including those secondary to breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ocular and percutaneous melanoma, pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and lung cancer. PMID:26217079

  19. Oil shale, shale oil, shale gas and non-conventional hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerici, A.; Alimonti, G.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years there has been a world "revolution" in the field of unconventional hydrocarbon reserves, which goes by the name of "shale gas", gas contained inside clay sediments micropores. Shale gas finds particular development in the United States, which are now independent of imports and see a price reduction to less than one third of that in Europe. With the high oil prices, in addition to the non-conventional gas also "oil shales" (fine-grained sedimentary rocks that contain a large amount of organic material to be used both to be directly burned or to extract liquid fuels which go under the name of shale oil), extra heavy oils and bitumen are becoming an industrial reality. Both unconventional gas and oil reserves far exceed in the world the conventional oil and gas reserves, subverting the theory of fossil fuels scarcity. Values and location of these new fossil reserves in different countries and their production by comparison with conventional resources are presented. In view of the clear advantages of unconventional fossil resources, the potential environmental risks associated with their extraction and processing are also highlighted.

  20. Experience in non-conventional wastewater treatment techniques used in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Felberova, L; Kucera, J; Mlejnska, E

    2007-01-01

    Among the most common non-conventional wastewater treatment techniques used in the Czech Republic are waste stabilisation ponds (WSP), subsurface horizontal flow constructed wetlands (CW) and vertical flow groundfilters (GF). These extensive systems can be advantageously used for treatment of waters coming from sewerages where the ballast weighting commonly makes more than half of dry-weather flow. The monitoring was focused at 14 different extensive systems. Organics removal efficiencies were favourable (CW-82%; GF-88%); in the case of WSP only 57% due to the algal bloom. Total nitrogen removal efficiencies were 43 and 47% for WSP and GF; in the case of CW only 32% due to often occurring anaerobic conditions in filter beds. Total phosphorus removal efficiencies were 37, 35 and 22% for WSP, GF and CW, respectively. Often occurring problems are the ice-blockage of surface aerators at WSP during wintertimes, the pond duckweed-cover or the algal bloom at WSP during summers; a gradual colmatage of filter systems; and the oxygen deficiency in beds of subsurface horizontal flow constructed wetlands. Czech legal regulations do not allow treated wastewater disposal into underground waters. There is only an exception for individual family houses. Up to now, knowledge gained by monitoring of a village (which uses the infiltration upon a permission issued according to earlier legal regulations) have not shown an unacceptable groundwater quality deterioration into the infiltration areas. PMID:17881848

  1. Application of anhydrobiosis and dehydration of yeasts for non-conventional biotechnological goals.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alexander; Turchetti, Benedetta; Buzzini, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Dehydration of yeast cells causes them to enter a state of anhydrobiosis in which their metabolism is temporarily and reversibly suspended. This unique state among organisms is currently used in the production of active dry yeasts, mainly used in baking and winemaking. In recent decades non-conventional applications of yeast dehydration have been proposed for various modern biotechnologies. This mini-review briefly summarises current information on the application of dry yeasts in traditional and innovative fields. It has been shown that dry yeast preparations can be used for the efficient protection, purification and bioremediation of the environment from heavy metals. The high sorption activity of dehydrated yeasts can be used as an interesting tool in winemaking due to their effects on quality and taste. Dry yeasts are also used in agricultural animal feed. Another interesting application of yeast dehydration is as an additional stage in new methods for the stable immobilisation of microorganisms, especially in cases when biotechnologically important strains have no affinity with the carrier. Such immobilisation methods also provide a new approach for the successful conservation of yeast strains that are very sensitive to dehydration. In addition, the application of dehydration procedures opens up new possibilities for the use of yeast as a model system. Separate sections of this review also discuss possible uses of dry yeasts in biocontrol, bioprotection and biotransformations, in analytical methods as well as in some other areas. PMID:27116970

  2. Proteomic analysis of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa: dealing with the issues of a non-conventional yeast.

    PubMed

    Addis, Maria Filippa; Tanca, Alessandro; Landolfo, Sara; Abbondio, Marcello; Cutzu, Raffaela; Biosa, Grazia; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Uzzau, Sergio; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    Red yeasts ascribed to the species Rhodotorula mucilaginosa are gaining increasing attention, due to their numerous biotechnological applications, spanning carotenoid production, liquid bioremediation, heavy metal biotransformation and antifungal and plant growth-promoting actions, but also for their role as opportunistic pathogens. Nevertheless, their characterization at the 'omic' level is still scarce. Here, we applied different proteomic workflows to R. mucilaginosa with the aim of assessing their potential in generating information on proteins and functions of biotechnological interest, with a particular focus on the carotenogenic pathway. After optimization of protein extraction, we tested several gel-based (including 2D-DIGE) and gel-free sample preparation techniques, followed by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Contextually, we evaluated different bioinformatic strategies for protein identification and interpretation of the biological significance of the dataset. When 2D-DIGE analysis was applied, not all spots returned a unambiguous identification and no carotenogenic enzymes were identified, even upon the application of different database search strategies. Then, the application of shotgun proteomic workflows with varying levels of sensitivity provided a picture of the information depth that can be reached with different analytical resources, and resulted in a plethora of information on R. mucilaginosa metabolism. However, also in these cases no proteins related to the carotenogenic pathway were identified, thus indicating that further improvements in sequence databases and functional annotations are strictly needed for increasing the outcome of proteomic analysis of this and other non-conventional yeasts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26987668

  3. Chemical composition and starch digestibility of tortillas prepared with non-conventional commercial nixtamalized maize flours.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salazar, M; Agama-Acevedo, E; Sáyago-Ayerdi, S G; Tovar, J; Bello-Pérez, L A

    2006-01-01

    Non-conventional nixtamalized maize flours elaborated by a factory in Mexico were used for tortilla preparation. Tortillas were stored at 4 degrees C for up to 72 h and the total starch, available starch, resistant starch and retrograded resistant starch were assessed. The traditional white tortilla, used as a control, showed higher protein and fat contents than blue maize tortilla, whereas a maize-bean mixed tortilla had the highest protein, ash and fat contents. Lower total starch was obtained in the maize-bean tortilla than in white and blue maize tortillas. The available starch content in all tortillas decreased with the cold-storage, although the change was more marked for blue-maize tortillas. The maize-bean mixed tortillas exhibited the lowest in vitro digestibility, which is consistent with the relatively high resistant starch levels in the bean. Differences in resistant starch content were found between the two maize tortillas, which might be related to the softer texture of blue-maize tortilla. The starch digestibility features of these new types of nixtamalized maize flours open up the possibility of producing tortillas with variable nutritional properties. PMID:16849122

  4. Growth and metabolic activity of conventional and non-conventional yeasts immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-09-10

    The aim of this research was to study how the cell immobilization technique of forming foamed alginate gels influences the growth, vitality and metabolic activity of different yeasts. Two distinct strains were used, namely conventional yeast (exemplified by Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and a non-conventional strain (exemplified by Debaryomyces occidentalis). The encapsulation of the yeast cells was performed by the traditional process of droplet formation, but from a foamed alginate solution. The activities of two key enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase, together with the ATP content were measured in both the free and immobilized cells. This novel method of yeast cell entrapment had some notable effects. The number of living immobilized cells reached the level of 10(6)-10(7) per single bead, and was stable during the fermentation process. Reductions in both enzyme activity and ATP content were observed in all immobilized yeasts. However, S. cerevisiae showed higher levels of ATP and enzymatic activity than D. occidentalis. Fermentation trials with immobilized repitching cells showed that the tested yeasts adapted to the specific conditions. Nevertheless, the mechanical endurance of the carriers and the internal structure of the gel need to be improved to enable broad applications of alginate gels in industrial fermentation processes, especially with conventional yeasts. This is one of the few papers and patents that describe the technique of cell immobilization in foamed alginate and shows the fermentative capacities and activities of key enzymes in immobilized yeast cells. PMID:23931687

  5. Martensitic Transformation During Compressive Deformation of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Its Quantitative Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreethi, R.; Sampark, P.; Majhi, Goutam Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2015-11-01

    This report aims to examine the extent of deformation-induced phase transformation in a non-conventional austenitic stainless steel known as ISO/TR 15510 X12CrMnNiN17-7-5, upon compressive loading at room temperature. Experiments were carried out under varying length to diameter ratios (0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6). TFE (Tetrafluoroethylene)-fluorocarbon tapes were used at specimen-platen interfaces to reduce the effect of friction. The results indicate that the lubrication was effective up to 15% of strain. Optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated martensitic phase transformation in the deformed specimens. The extent of phase transformation was determined by analyzing the XRD peaks using integrated intensity of the corresponding phases. The results are correlated with the extent of deformation in the respective samples. The presence of γ and α'-martensite on the deformed samples has been substantiated by some limited experiments using transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Mechanisms of regulation of olfactory transduction and adaptation in the olfactory cilium.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca(2+))-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca(2+), and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca(2+) response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control

  7. Mechanisms of Regulation of Olfactory Transduction and Adaptation in the Olfactory Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca2+)-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca2+, and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca2+ response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control GPCR

  8. Immunohistochemical and lectin histochemical studies on the developing olfactory organs of fetal camel.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Nakamuta, Nobuaki

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the development of the olfactory organs of camel. In this study, prenatal development and neuronal differentiation of the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and the olfactory epithelium (OE) of the one-humped camel were studied by immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry. A neuronal marker, protein gene product (PGP) 9.5, but not a marker of fully differentiated olfactory receptor cells, olfactory marker protein, intensely labeled the olfactory receptor cells of the VNO and OE at 395 mm, 510 mm, and 530 mm fetal ages, indicating that the olfactory receptor cells are differentiated, but not fully matured both in the VNO and the OE. In 187 mm and 190 mm fetuses, PGP 9.5 yielded faint immunoreactive signals in the VNO, but not in the OE, although the presence of olfactory receptor cells were demonstrated in both tissues by intense WGA and LEL stainings. We conclude that the camel VNO and OE bear differentiated, but still immature receptor cells; in addition, the onset of neuronal differentiation seems to be somewhat earlier in the VNO than in the OE till half of the prenatal life. PMID:25950169

  9. Improving ITC studies of cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by global analysis of conventional and non-conventional experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bertaut, Eléonore

    2014-01-01

    Summary The study of 1:1 cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry was explored in a theoretical and experimental point of view to compare the efficiency of conventional and non-conventional experiments. All direct and competitive protocols were described and evaluated in terms of accuracy on both binding constant and inclusion enthalpy. Significant improvement in the calorimetric characterization may be obtained by means of the global analysis of non-conventional experiments coupled to the standard titration protocol. While the titration-release approach proved to be the most accurate strategy for classical complexations, the valuable contribution of other non-conventional experiments was demonstrated for issues concerning weak stability, enthalpy, or solubility. PMID:25550724

  10. The Mouse Olfactory Peduncle

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C; Kay, Rachel B; Arrivillaga, J. P

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory peduncle, the region connecting the olfactory bulb with the basal forebrain, contains several neural areas that have received relatively little attention. The present work includes studies that provide an overview of the region in the mouse. An analysis of cell soma size in pars principalis (pP) of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) revealed considerable differences in tissue organization between mice and rats. An unbiased stereological study of neuron number in the cell-dense regions of pars externa (pE) and pP of the AON of 3, 12 and 24 month-old mice indicated that pE has about 16,500 cells in 0.043 mm3and pP about 58,300 cells in 0.307 mm3. Quantitative Golgi studies of pyramidal neurons in pP suggested that mouse neurons are similar though smaller to those of the rat. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that all peduncular regions (pE, pP, the dorsal peduncular cortex, ventral tenia tecta, and anterior olfactory tubercle and piriform cortex) have cells that express either calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, neuropeptide Y or cholecystokinin (antigens commonly co-expressed by subspecies of GABAergic neurons), though the relative numbers of each cell type differs between zones. Finally, an electron microscopic comparison of the organization of myelinated fibers in lateral olfactory tract in the anterior and posterior peduncle indicated that the region is less orderly in mice than in the rat. The results provide a caveat for investigators who generalize data between species as both similarities and differences between the laboratory mouse and rat were observed. PMID:21618219

  11. Effects of Odor Stimulation on Antidromic Spikes in Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Sherrill, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Spikes were evoked in rat olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) populations by electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb nerve layer in pentobarbital anesthetized rats. The latencies and recording positions for these compound spikes showed that they originated in olfactory epithelium. Dual simultaneous recordings indicated conduction velocities in the C-fiber range, around 0.5 m/s. These spikes are concluded to arise from antidromically activated olfactory sensory neurons. Electrical stimulation at 5 Hz was used to track changes in the size and latency of the antidromic compound population spike during the odor response. Strong odorant stimuli suppressed the spike size and prolonged its latency. The latency was prolonged throughout long odor stimuli, indicating continued activation of olfactory receptor neuron axons. The amounts of spike suppression and latency change were strongly correlated with the electroolfactogram (EOG) peak size evoked at the same site across odorants and across stimulus intensities. We conclude that the curve of antidromic spike suppression gives a reasonable representation of spiking activity in olfactory sensory neurons driven by odorants and that the correlation of peak spike suppression with the peak EOG shows the accuracy of the EOG as an estimate of intracellular potential in the population of olfactory sensory neurons. In addition, these results have important implications about traffic in olfactory nerve bundles. We did not observe multiple peaks corresponding to stimulated and unstimulated receptor neurons. This suggests synchronization of spikes in olfactory nerve, perhaps by ephaptic interactions. The long-lasting effect on spike latency shows that action potentials continue in the nerve throughout the duration of an odor stimulus in spite of many reports of depolarization block in olfactory receptor neuron cell bodies. Finally, strong odor stimulation caused almost complete block of antidromic spikes. This indicates that a very

  12. Effects of odor stimulation on antidromic spikes in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Sherrill, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Spikes were evoked in rat olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) populations by electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb nerve layer in pentobarbital anesthetized rats. The latencies and recording positions for these compound spikes showed that they originated in olfactory epithelium. Dual simultaneous recordings indicated conduction velocities in the C-fiber range, around 0.5 m/s. These spikes are concluded to arise from antidromically activated olfactory sensory neurons. Electrical stimulation at 5 Hz was used to track changes in the size and latency of the antidromic compound population spike during the odor response. Strong odorant stimuli suppressed the spike size and prolonged its latency. The latency was prolonged throughout long odor stimuli, indicating continued activation of olfactory receptor neuron axons. The amounts of spike suppression and latency change were strongly correlated with the electroolfactogram (EOG) peak size evoked at the same site across odorants and across stimulus intensities. We conclude that the curve of antidromic spike suppression gives a reasonable representation of spiking activity in olfactory sensory neurons driven by odorants and that the correlation of peak spike suppression with the peak EOG shows the accuracy of the EOG as an estimate of intracellular potential in the population of olfactory sensory neurons. In addition, these results have important implications about traffic in olfactory nerve bundles. We did not observe multiple peaks corresponding to stimulated and unstimulated receptor neurons. This suggests synchronization of spikes in olfactory nerve, perhaps by ephaptic interactions. The long-lasting effect on spike latency shows that action potentials continue in the nerve throughout the duration of an odor stimulus in spite of many reports of depolarization block in olfactory receptor neuron cell bodies. Finally, strong odor stimulation caused almost complete block of antidromic spikes. This indicates that a very

  13. Olfactory Deficits in an Alpha-Synuclein Fly Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alex Y.; Xia, Shouzhen; Wilburn, Paul; Tully, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most common motor neurodegenerative disorder. Olfactory dysfunction is a prevalent feature of PD. It often precedes motor symptoms by several years and is used in assisting PD diagnosis. However, the cellular and molecular bases of olfactory dysfunction in PD are not known. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, expressing human alpha-synuclein protein or its mutant, A30P, captures several hallmarks of PD and has been successfully used to model PD in numerous studies. First, we report olfactory deficits in fly expressing A30P (A30P), showing deficits in two out of three olfactory modalities, tested – olfactory acuity and odor discrimination. The remaining third modality is odor identification/naming. Second, oxidative stress is an important environmental risk factor of PD. We show that oxidative stress exacerbated the two affected olfactory modalities in younger A30P flies. Third, different olfactory receptor neurons are activated differentially by different odors in flies. In a separate experiment, we show that the odor discrimination deficit in A30P flies is general and not restricted to a specific class of chemical structure. Lastly, by restricting A30P expression to dopamine, serotonin or olfactory receptor neurons, we show that A30P expression in dopamine neurons is necessary for development of both acuity and discrimination deficits, while serotonin and olfactory receptor neurons appeared not involved. Our data demonstrate olfactory deficits in a synuclein fly PD model for exploring olfactory pathology and physiology, and for monitoring PD progression and treatment. PMID:24879013

  14. Evidence for a Peripheral Olfactory Memory in Imprinted Salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, Gabrielle A.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Moody, William J., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The remarkable homing ability of salmon relies on olfactory cues, but its cellular basis is unknown. To test the role of peripheral olfactory receptors in odorant memory retention, we imprinted coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to micromolar concentrations of phenyl ethyl alcohol during parr-smolt transformation. The following year, we measured phenyl ethyl alcohol responses in the peripheral receptor cells using patch clamp. Cells from imprinted fish showed increased sensitivity to phenyl ethyl alcohol compared either to cells from naive fish or to sensitivity to another behaviorally important odorant (L-serine). Field experiments verified an increased behavioral preference for phenyl ethyl alcohol by imprinted salmon as adults. Thus, some component of the imprinted olfactory homestream memory appears to be retained peripherally.

  15. Bimodal processing of olfactory information in an amphibian nose: odor responses segregate into a medial and a lateral stream.

    PubMed

    Gliem, Sebastian; Syed, Adnan S; Sansone, Alfredo; Kludt, Eugen; Tantalaki, Evangelia; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Korsching, Sigrun I; Manzini, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to the single sensory surface present in teleost fishes, several spatially segregated subsystems with distinct molecular and functional characteristics define the mammalian olfactory system. However, the evolutionary steps of that transition remain unknown. Here we analyzed the olfactory system of an early diverging tetrapod, the amphibian Xenopus laevis, and report for the first time the existence of two odor-processing streams, sharply segregated in the main olfactory bulb and partially segregated in the olfactory epithelium of pre-metamorphic larvae. A lateral odor-processing stream is formed by microvillous receptor neurons and is characterized by amino acid responses and Gαo/Gαi as probable signal transducers, whereas a medial stream formed by ciliated receptor neurons is characterized by responses to alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones, and Gαolf/cAMP as probable signal transducers. To reveal candidates for the olfactory receptors underlying these two streams, the spatial distribution of 12 genes from four olfactory receptor gene families was determined. Several class II and some class I odorant receptors (ORs) mimic the spatial distribution observed for the medial stream, whereas a trace amine-associated receptor closely parallels the spatial pattern of the lateral odor-processing stream. Other olfactory receptors (some class I odorant receptors and vomeronasal type 1 receptors) and odor responses (to bile acids, amines) were not lateralized, the latter not even in the olfactory bulb, suggesting an incomplete segregation. Thus, the olfactory system of X. laevis exhibits an intermediate stage of segregation and as such appears well suited to investigate the molecular driving forces behind olfactory regionalization. PMID:23269434

  16. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities

    PubMed Central

    Grimaud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout. PMID:27194792

  17. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, Julien; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2016-06-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout. PMID:27194792

  18. Glomerular interactions in olfactory processing channels of the antennal lobes

    PubMed Central

    Heinbockel, Thomas; Shields, Vonnie D. C.; Reisenman, Carolina E.

    2014-01-01

    An open question in olfactory coding is the extent of interglomerular connectivity: do olfactory glomeruli and their neurons regulate the odorant responses of neurons innervating other glomeruli? In the olfactory system of the moth Manduca sexta, the response properties of different types of antennal olfactory receptor cells are known. Likewise, a subset of antennal lobe glomeruli has been functionally characterized and the olfactory tuning of their innervating neurons identified. This provides a unique opportunity to determine functional interactions between glomeruli of known input, specifically, (1) glomeruli processing plant odors and (2) glomeruli activated by antennal stimulation with pheromone components of conspecific females. Several studies describe reciprocal inhibitory effects between different types of pheromone-responsive projection neurons suggesting lateral inhibitory interactions between pheromone component-selective glomerular neural circuits. Furthermore, antennal lobe projection neurons that respond to host plant volatiles and innervate single, ordinary glomeruli are inhibited during antennal stimulation with the female’s sex pheromone. The studies demonstrate the existence of lateral inhibitory effects in response to behaviorally significant odorant stimuli and irrespective of glomerular location in the antennal lobe. Inhibitory interactions are present within and between olfactory subsystems (pheromonal and non-pheromonal subsystems), potentially to enhance contrast and strengthen odorant discrimination. PMID:23893248

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Simple models of protein folding and of non-conventional drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, R. A.; Tiana, G.; Provasi, D.

    2004-02-01

    While all the information required for the folding of a protein is contained in its amino acid sequence, one has not yet learned how to extract this information in order to predict the three-dimensional, biologically active, native conformation of a protein whose sequence is known. Using insights obtained from simple model simulations of the folding of proteins, in particular the fact that this phenomenon is essentially controlled by conserved (native) contacts among (few) strongly interacting ('hot'), as a rule hydrophobic, amino acids, which also stabilize local elementary structures (LES, hidden, incipient secondary structures such as agr-helices and bgr-sheets) formed early in the folding process and leading to the postcritical folding nucleus (i.e. the minimum set of native contacts which brings the system beyond the highest free-energy barrier found in the whole folding process) it is possible to work out a successful strategy for reading the native structure of designed proteins from a knowledge of only their amino acid sequence and of the contact energies among the amino acids. Because LES have undergone millions of years of evolution to selectively dock to their complementary structures, small peptides made out of the same amino acids as the LES are expected to selectively attach to the newly expressed (unfolded) protein and inhibit its folding, or to the native (fluctuating) native conformation and denature it. These peptides, or their mimetic molecules, can thus be used as effective non-conventional drugs to those already existing (and directed at neutralizing the active site of enzymes), displaying the advantage of not suffering from the increase in resistance.

  20. Non-conventional Yeast Species for Lowering Ethanol Content of Wines

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Morales, Pilar; Comitini, Francesca; Tronchoni, Jordi; Canonico, Laura; Curiel, José A.; Oro, Lucia; Rodrigues, Alda J.; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Rising sugar content in grape must, and the concomitant increase in alcohol levels in wine, are some of the main challenges affecting the winemaking industry nowadays. Among the several alternative solutions currently under study, the use of non-conventional yeasts during fermentation holds good promise for contributing to relieve this problem. Non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species comprise a high number or species, so encompassing a wider physiological diversity than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Indeed, the current oenological interest of these microorganisms was initially triggered by their potential positive contribution to the sensorial complexity of quality wines, through the production of aroma and other sensory-active compounds. This diversity also involves ethanol yield on sugar, one of the most invariant metabolic traits of S. cerevisiae. This review gathers recent research on non-Saccharomyces yeasts, aiming to produce wines with lower alcohol content than those from pure Saccharomyces starters. Critical aspects discussed include the selection of suitable yeast strains (considering there is a noticeable intra-species diversity for ethanol yield, as shown for other fermentation traits), identification of key environmental parameters influencing ethanol yields (including the use of controlled oxygenation conditions), and managing mixed fermentations, by either the sequential or simultaneous inoculation of S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. The feasibility, at the industrial level, of using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for reducing alcohol levels in wine will require an improved understanding of the metabolism of these alternative yeast species, as well as of the interactions between different yeast starters during the fermentation of grape must. PMID:27199967

  1. Non-conventional Yeast Species for Lowering Ethanol Content of Wines.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Maurizio; Morales, Pilar; Comitini, Francesca; Tronchoni, Jordi; Canonico, Laura; Curiel, José A; Oro, Lucia; Rodrigues, Alda J; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Rising sugar content in grape must, and the concomitant increase in alcohol levels in wine, are some of the main challenges affecting the winemaking industry nowadays. Among the several alternative solutions currently under study, the use of non-conventional yeasts during fermentation holds good promise for contributing to relieve this problem. Non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species comprise a high number or species, so encompassing a wider physiological diversity than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Indeed, the current oenological interest of these microorganisms was initially triggered by their potential positive contribution to the sensorial complexity of quality wines, through the production of aroma and other sensory-active compounds. This diversity also involves ethanol yield on sugar, one of the most invariant metabolic traits of S. cerevisiae. This review gathers recent research on non-Saccharomyces yeasts, aiming to produce wines with lower alcohol content than those from pure Saccharomyces starters. Critical aspects discussed include the selection of suitable yeast strains (considering there is a noticeable intra-species diversity for ethanol yield, as shown for other fermentation traits), identification of key environmental parameters influencing ethanol yields (including the use of controlled oxygenation conditions), and managing mixed fermentations, by either the sequential or simultaneous inoculation of S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. The feasibility, at the industrial level, of using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for reducing alcohol levels in wine will require an improved understanding of the metabolism of these alternative yeast species, as well as of the interactions between different yeast starters during the fermentation of grape must. PMID:27199967

  2. Comprehensive review of conventional and non-conventional methods of management of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Cathy; Calabretto, Helen

    2007-08-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a condition what causes women a great deal of discomfort, inconvenience, and sometimes has psychological sequelae.(1) This condition is notoriously difficult to manage. Conventional management is generally favoured by medical practitioners. Some practitioners prefer not to offer other options because of significant possible side-effects and the lack of research supporting alternative treatments. There are many studies and much available information surrounding uncomplicated VVC, including two systematic reviews.(2,3) In the area of recurrent VVC however, quality conclusive studies are scarce, and recurrent VVC is featured infrequently in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Systematic reviews that strongly support a particular pharmacological method of conventional management of recurrent VVC over another are absent from medical literature. Recommendations are largely formed on the basis of scanty RCTs and expert opinion. There is even less conclusive evidence in the area of alternative therapies; yet despite this, anecdotally many practitioners (both alternative and mainstream) continue to advocate certain treatments in the absence of any reliable cure that can be confidently prescribed. As the use of methods other than mainstream medicine becomes more widespread, it is important to be aware of both conventional and non-conventional management of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Practitioners need to ascertain their patient's preference and treatment history. It is difficult to find comprehensive literature assessing both approaches. Giving women the most up-to-date and relevant information, and different management options, is essential in allowing them to make informed decisions. This review critically assesses both mainstream and less conventional approaches in the management of recurrent VVC. PMID:17627679

  3. Olfactory System Involvement in Natural Scrapie Disease ▿

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Cristiano; Porcario, Chiara; Martucci, Francesca; Iulini, Barbara; Manea, Barbara; Gallo, Marina; Palmitessa, Claudia; Maurella, Cristiana; Mazza, Maria; Pezzolato, Marzia; Acutis, Pierluigi; Casalone, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory system (OS) is involved in many infectious and neurodegenerative diseases, both human and animal, and it has recently been investigated in regard to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Previous assessments of nasal mucosa infection by prions following intracerebral challenge suggested a potential centrifugal spread along the olfactory nerve fibers of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Whether the nasal cavity may be a route for centripetal prion infection to the brain has also been experimentally studied. With the present study, we wanted to determine whether prion deposition in the OS occurs also under field conditions and what type of anatomical localization PrPSc might display there. We report here on detection by different techniques of PrPSc in the nasal mucosa and in the OS-related brain areas of sheep affected by natural scrapie. PrPSc was detected in the perineurium of the olfactory nerve bundles in the medial nasal concha and in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Olfactory receptor neurons did not show PrPSc immunostaining. PrPSc deposition was found in the brain areas of olfactory fiber projection, chiefly in the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex. The prevalent PrPSc deposition patterns were subependymal, perivascular, and submeningeal. This finding, together with the discovery of an intense PrPSc immunostaining in the meningeal layer of the olfactory nerve perineurium, at the border with the subdural space extension surrounding the nerve rootlets, strongly suggests a probable role of cerebrospinal fluid in conveying prion infectivity to the nasal submucosa. PMID:19158242

  4. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Luis R; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S; Marioni, John C; Korsching, Sigrun I; Logan, Darren W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  5. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S.; Marioni, John C.; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  6. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex. These changes include enhanced representation of the molecular features of familiar odors by mitral cells in the olfactory bulb, and synthetic coding of multiple coincident odorant features into odor objects by cortical neurons. In this paper, data are reviewed that show the critical role of acetylcholine (Ach) in olfactory system function and plasticity, and cholinergic modulation of olfactory perceptual learning at both the behavioral and cortical level. PMID:14747514

  7. The Seductive Power of an Innovation: Enrolling Non-Conventional Actors in a Drip Irrigation Community in Morocco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benouniche, Maya; Errahj, Mostafa; Kuper, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the motivations of non-conventional innovation actors to engage in innovation processes, how their involvement changed the technology and their own social-professional status, and to analyze their role in the diffusion of the innovation. Design/methodology/approach: We studied the innovation process of…

  8. Non-Conventional File Structure Data Collecting Projects in the Smithsonian Institution: A Survey, Winter 1968 - Spring 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Caroline Arden; Shank, Russell

    The purpose of this survey is to identify and describe existing and contemplated projects in the Smithsonian Institution which make use of non-conventional means to store and retrieve information. These techniques range from electronic machine processed to a simple visual, color-coded system or a key-sort device. The 49 projects investigated were…

  9. Olfactory perceptual stability and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Dylan C; Hofacer, Rylon D; Zaman, Ashiq R; Rennaker, Robert L; Wilson, Donald A

    2008-12-01

    No two roses smell exactly alike, but our brain accurately bundles these variations into a single percept 'rose'. We found that ensembles of rat olfactory bulb neurons decorrelate complex mixtures that vary by as little as a single missing component, whereas olfactory (piriform) cortical neural ensembles perform pattern completion in response to an absent component, essentially filling in the missing information and allowing perceptual stability. This piriform cortical ensemble activity predicts olfactory perception. PMID:18978781

  10. Attention and olfactory consciousness.

    PubMed

    Keller, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relation between attention and consciousness is an important part of our understanding of consciousness. Attention, unlike consciousness, can be systematically manipulated in psychophysical experiments and a law-like relation between attention and consciousness is waiting to be discovered. Most attempts to discover the nature of this relation are focused on a special type of attention: spatial visual attention. In this review I want to introduce another type of attention to the discussion: attention to the olfactory modality. I will first clarify the position of attention to smells in a general taxonomy of attention. I will then review the mechanisms and neuroanatomy of attention and consciousness in the olfactory system before using the newly introduced system to provide evidence that attention is necessary for consciousness. PMID:22203813

  11. Recent Trend in Development of Olfactory Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Yasuyuki

    An olfactory display is a device that generates scented air with desired concentration of aroma, and delivers it to the user's olfactory organ. In this article, the nature of olfaction is briefly described from the view point of how to configure olfactory displays. Next, component technologies to compose olfactory displays, i.e., making scents and delivering scents, are categorized. Several existing olfactory display systems are introduced to show the current status of research and development of olfactory displays.

  12. Participation of non-conventional energy resources in power system frequency control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mehriar

    Frequency control is one of the key issues in designing, planning and reliably operating a power system and is becoming more challenging as new complexities and uncertainties are introduced into the modern power systems. Traditionally, power system frequency has been controlled using conventional generation units' capabilities namely inertial, primary and secondary frequency responses. Limited fossil-based fuel resources, ever-increasing energy consumption and rising public awareness for environmental protection have created growing interest in use of non-conventional energy resources such as Wind Generation Resources (WGRs) and Solar Generation Resources (SGRs) which have unfavorable characteristics in comparison with conventional generation units such as lack of frequency response. The more conventional generation units are replaced by these resources, the more challenges power system operators will face in terms of power system frequency control. These challenges are further compounded due to less system inertia during off-peak hours or within small power systems. This dissertation mainly focuses on participation of SGRs and Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (IPMSG) based WGRs in power system frequency control. Detailed information regarding dynamic modeling of power system including conventional generation units, SGRs and IPMSG based WGRs is provided. The frequency response of conventional generation units is compared with that of SGRs and IPMSG based WGRs. The control systems associated with IPMSG based WGR and SGR are modified in order to improve their frequency response capabilities. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategies is evaluated and confirmed via MATLAB based time-domain simulations for different scenarios. Moreover, application of Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESSs) in power system frequency regulation is discussed. The detailed dynamic model of BESSs is utilized to develop a simplified model suitable for Automatic

  13. Differential Muscarinic Modulation in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard S.; Hu, Ruilong; DeSouza, Andre; Eberly, Christian L.; Krahe, Krista; Chan, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation of olfactory circuits by acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in odor discrimination and learning. Early processing of chemosensory signals occurs in two functionally and anatomically distinct regions, the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOB and AOB), which receive extensive cholinergic input from the basal forebrain. Here, we explore the regulation of AOB and MOB circuits by ACh, and how cholinergic modulation influences olfactory-mediated behaviors in mice. Surprisingly, despite the presence of a conserved circuit, activation of muscarinic ACh receptors revealed marked differences in cholinergic modulation of output neurons: excitation in the AOB and inhibition in the MOB. Granule cells (GCs), the most abundant intrinsic neuron in the OB, also exhibited a complex muscarinic response. While GCs in the AOB were excited, MOB GCs exhibited a dual muscarinic action in the form of a hyperpolarization and an increase in excitability uncovered by cell depolarization. Furthermore, ACh influenced the input–output relationship of mitral cells in the AOB and MOB differently showing a net effect on gain in mitral cells of the MOB, but not in the AOB. Interestingly, despite the striking differences in neuromodulatory actions on output neurons, chemogenetic inhibition of cholinergic neurons produced similar perturbations in olfactory behaviors mediated by these two regions. Decreasing ACh in the OB disrupted the natural discrimination of molecularly related odors and the natural investigation of odors associated with social behaviors. Thus, the distinct neuromodulation by ACh in these circuits could underlie different solutions to the processing of general odors and semiochemicals, and the diverse olfactory behaviors they trigger. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT State-dependent cholinergic modulation of brain circuits is critical for several high-level cognitive functions, including attention and memory. Here, we provide new evidence that cholinergic

  14. Sensitization of olfactory guanylyl cyclase to a specific imprinted odorant in coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Dittman, A H; Quinn, T P; Nevitt, G A; Hacker, B; Storm, D R

    1997-08-01

    The role of cGMP in olfactory signaling is not fully understood, but it is believed to play a modulatory role in intracellular signaling in vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). Here, we present evidence that cGMP in ORNs may play an important role in recognition of biologically relevant odors and olfactory learning. Specifically, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying olfactory imprinting in salmon. Salmon learn odors associated with their natal site as juveniles and later use these odors to guide their homing migration. This imprinting is believed to involve sensitization of the peripheral olfactory system to specific homestream odorants. We imprinted juvenile salmon to the odorant beta-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) and examined the sensitivity of olfactory adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases to PEA during development. Stimulation of guanylyl cyclase activity by PEA was significantly greater in olfactory cilia isolated from PEA-imprinted salmon compared with PEA-naive fish only at the time of the homing migration, 2 years after PEA exposure. These results suggest that sensitization of olfactory guanylyl cyclase may play an important role in olfactory imprinting by salmon. PMID:9292727

  15. Evolutionary Genomics of Genes Involved in Olfactory Behavior in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Nicolás; Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Hasson, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Previous comparative genomic studies of genes involved in olfactory behavior in Drosophila focused only on particular gene families such as odorant receptor and/or odorant binding proteins. However, olfactory behavior has a complex genetic architecture that is orchestrated by many interacting genes. In this paper, we present a comparative genomic study of olfactory behavior in Drosophila including an extended set of genes known to affect olfactory behavior. We took advantage of the recent burst of whole genome sequences and the development of powerful statistical tools to analyze genomic data and test evolutionary and functional hypotheses of olfactory genes in the six species of the Drosophila melanogaster species group for which whole genome sequences are available. Our study reveals widespread purifying selection and limited incidence of positive selection on olfactory genes. We show that the pace of evolution of olfactory genes is mostly independent of the life cycle stage, and of the number of life cycle stages, in which they participate in olfaction. However, we detected a relationship between evolutionary rates and the position that the gene products occupy in the olfactory system, genes occupying central positions tend to be more constrained than peripheral genes. Finally, we demonstrate that specialization to one host does not seem to be associated with bursts of adaptive evolution in olfactory genes in D. sechellia and D. erecta, the two specialists species analyzed, but rather different lineages have idiosyncratic evolutionary histories in which both historical and ecological factors have been involved. PMID:22346339

  16. Identification and Comparison of Candidate Olfactory Genes in the Olfactory and Non-Olfactory Organs of Elm Pest Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Based on Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinliang; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Hanbo; Ren, Bingzhong

    2016-01-01

    The leaf beetle Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a predominant forest pest that causes substantial damage to the lumber industry and city management. However, no effective and environmentally friendly chemical method has been discovered to control this pest. Until recently, the molecular basis of the olfactory system in A. quadriimpressum was completely unknown. In this study, antennae and leg transcriptomes were analyzed and compared using deep sequencing data to identify the olfactory genes in A. quadriimpressum. Moreover, the expression profiles of both male and female candidate olfactory genes were analyzed and validated by bioinformatics, motif analysis, homology analysis, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and RT-qPCR experiments in antennal and non-olfactory organs to explore the candidate olfactory genes that might play key roles in the life cycle of A. quadriimpressum. As a result, approximately 102.9 million and 97.3 million clean reads were obtained from the libraries created from the antennas and legs, respectively. Annotation led to 34344 Unigenes, which were matched to known proteins. Annotation data revealed that the number of genes in antenna with binding functions and receptor activity was greater than that of legs. Furthermore, many pathway genes were differentially expressed in the two organs. Sixteen candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 10 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 34 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 inotropic receptors [1] and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and their isoforms were identified. Additionally, 15 OBPs, 9 CSPs, 18 ORs, 6 IRs and 2 SNMPs were predicted to be complete ORFs. Using RT-PCR, RT-qPCR and homology analysis, AquaOBP1/2/4/7/C1/C6, AquaCSP3/9, AquaOR8/9/10/14/15/18/20/26/29/33, AquaIR8a/13/25a showed olfactory-specific expression, indicating that these genes might play a key role in olfaction-related behaviors in A. quadriimpressum such as foraging and seeking. AquaOBP4/C5, AquaOBP4/C5, AquaCSP7

  17. Identification and Comparison of Candidate Olfactory Genes in the Olfactory and Non-Olfactory Organs of Elm Pest Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Based on Transcriptome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinliang; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Hanbo; Ren, Bingzhong

    2016-01-01

    The leaf beetle Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a predominant forest pest that causes substantial damage to the lumber industry and city management. However, no effective and environmentally friendly chemical method has been discovered to control this pest. Until recently, the molecular basis of the olfactory system in A. quadriimpressum was completely unknown. In this study, antennae and leg transcriptomes were analyzed and compared using deep sequencing data to identify the olfactory genes in A. quadriimpressum. Moreover, the expression profiles of both male and female candidate olfactory genes were analyzed and validated by bioinformatics, motif analysis, homology analysis, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and RT-qPCR experiments in antennal and non-olfactory organs to explore the candidate olfactory genes that might play key roles in the life cycle of A. quadriimpressum. As a result, approximately 102.9 million and 97.3 million clean reads were obtained from the libraries created from the antennas and legs, respectively. Annotation led to 34344 Unigenes, which were matched to known proteins. Annotation data revealed that the number of genes in antenna with binding functions and receptor activity was greater than that of legs. Furthermore, many pathway genes were differentially expressed in the two organs. Sixteen candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 10 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 34 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 inotropic receptors [1] and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and their isoforms were identified. Additionally, 15 OBPs, 9 CSPs, 18 ORs, 6 IRs and 2 SNMPs were predicted to be complete ORFs. Using RT-PCR, RT-qPCR and homology analysis, AquaOBP1/2/4/7/C1/C6, AquaCSP3/9, AquaOR8/9/10/14/15/18/20/26/29/33, AquaIR8a/13/25a showed olfactory-specific expression, indicating that these genes might play a key role in olfaction-related behaviors in A. quadriimpressum such as foraging and seeking. AquaOBP4/C5, AquaOBP4/C5, AquaCSP7

  18. Ultrastructural and histochemical properties of the olfactory system in the japanese jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Nashimoto, Mai; Kanayama, Shunsaku; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Although it has been commonly believed that birds are more dependent on the vision and audition than the olfaction, recent studies indicate that the olfaction of birds is related to the reproductive, homing, and predatory behaviors. In an attempt to reveal the dependence on the olfactory system in crows, we examined the olfactory system of the Japanese jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) by histological, ultrastructural, and lectin histochemical methods. The olfactory epithelium (OE) of the crow occupied remarkably a small area of the nasal cavity (NC) and had the histological and ultrastructural features like other birds. The olfactory bulb (OB) of the crow was remarkably small and did not possess the olfactory ventricle. The left and right halves of the OB were fused in many cases. In the lectin histochemistry, soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) stained a small number of the receptor cells (RCs) in the OE and the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) and glomerular layer (GL) on the dorsocaudal region of the OB. Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) stained several RCs in the OE and the ONL and GL on the ventral region of the OB. These results suggest that 1) the crow has less-developed olfactory system than other birds, and 2) the dedicated olfactory receptor cells project their axons to the specific regions of the OB in the crow. PMID:21478653

  19. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl− efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl− against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl− accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl− efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl− accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl− transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl− transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl− transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl−/HCO3− exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na+–Cl− cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl−/HCO3− exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl− component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl− accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  20. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-09-15

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl(-) efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl(-) against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl(-) accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl(-) efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl(-) accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl(-) transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl(-) transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl(-) transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl(-) component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl(-) accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  1. Profound Olfactory Dysfunction in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Bayona, Edgardo A.; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Osman, Allen; Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease strongly identified with deficient acetylcholine receptor transmission at the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction, is accompanied by a profound loss of olfactory function. Twenty-seven MG patients, 27 matched healthy controls, and 11 patients with polymiositis, a disease with peripheral neuromuscular symptoms analogous to myasthenia gravis with no known central nervous system involvement, were tested. All were administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Picture Identification Test (PIT), a test analogous in content and form to the UPSIT designed to control for non-olfactory cognitive confounds. The UPSIT scores of the myasthenia gravis patients were markedly lower than those of the age- and sex-matched normal controls [respective means (SDs) = 20.15 (6.40) & 35.67 (4.95); p<0.0001], as well as those of the polymiositis patients who scored slightly below the normal range [33.30 (1.42); p<0.0001]. The latter finding, along with direct monitoring of the inhalation of the patients during testing, implies that the MG-related olfactory deficit is unlikely due to difficulties sniffing, per se. All PIT scores were within or near the normal range, although subtle deficits were apparent in both the MG and PM patients, conceivably reflecting influences of mild cognitive impairment. No relationships between performance on the UPSIT and thymectomy, time since diagnosis, type of treatment regimen, or the presence or absence of serum anti-nicotinic or muscarinic antibodies were apparent. Our findings suggest that MG influences olfactory function to the same degree as observed in a number of neurodegenerative diseases in which central nervous system cholinergic dysfunction has been documented. PMID:23082113

  2. Early Olfactory Processing in Drosophila: Mechanisms and Principles

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rachel I.

    2014-01-01

    In the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster, it is relatively straightforward to make in vivo measurements of activity in neurons corresponding to targeted processing. This, together with the numerical simplicity of the Drosophila olfactory system, has produced rapid gains in our understanding of Drosophila olfaction. This review summarizes the neurophysiology of the first two layers of this system: the peripheral olfactory receptor neurons and their postsynaptic targets in the antennal lobe. We now understand in some detail the cellular and synaptic mechanisms that shape odor representations in these neurons. Together, these mechanisms imply that interesting neural adaptations to environmental statistics have occurred and place some fundamental constraints on early sensory processing that pose challenges for higher brain regions. These findings suggest some general principles with broad relevance to early sensory processing in other modalities. PMID:23841839

  3. Presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid responses in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, H G

    1979-01-01

    1. Potential changes were recorded from the lateral olfactory tract in slices of rat olfactory cortex in vitro at room temperature. 2. Superfused gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) usually produced dose-related depolarization of the lateral olfactory tract. Muscimol and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid appeared more potent depolarizing agents than GABA, and glycine and taurine appeared less potent. Carbachol and glutamate were virtually ineffective. 3. The GABA responses were at least partially Cl- dependent. 4. (+)-Bicuculline and higher concentrations of strychnine antagonized the GABA but not the glycine-induced depolarizations. Paradoxically, responses to high doses of GABA were sometimes potentiated by both bicuculline and strychnine. 5. It is suggested that GABA receptors could occur as widely on nerve terminals as they do postsynaptically in the CNS, where GABA could be involved in the modulation of transmitter output. PMID:760898

  4. Genetic architecture of olfactory behavior in Drosophila melanogaster: differences and similarities across development

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, N.J.; Arya, G.H.; Korovaichuk, A.; Fanara, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the holometabolous insect Drosophila melanogaster, genetic, physiological and anatomical aspects of olfaction are well known in the adult stage, while larval stages olfactory behavior has received some attention it has been less studied than its adult counterpart. Most of these studies focus on olfactory receptors (Or) genes that produce peripheral odor recognition. In this paper, through a loss-of-function screen using P-element inserted lines and also by means of expression analyses of larval olfaction candidate genes, we extended the uncovering of the genetic underpinnings of D. melanogaster larval olfactory behavior by demonstrating that larval olfactory behavior is, in addition to Or genes, orchestrated by numerous genes with diverse functions. Also, our results points out that the genetic architecture of olfactory behavior in D. melanogaster presents a dynamic and changing organization across environments and ontogeny. PMID:23563598

  5. Visual arrestins in olfactory pathways of Drosophila and the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, C. E.; Riesgo-Escovar, J.; Pitts, R. J.; Kafatos, F. C.; Carlson, J. R.; Zwiebel, L. J.

    2002-01-01

    Arrestins are important components for desensitization of G protein-coupled receptor cascades that mediate neurotransmission as well as olfactory and visual sensory reception. We have isolated AgArr1, an arrestin-encoding cDNA from the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, where olfaction is critical for vectorial capacity. Analysis of AgArr1 expression revealed an overlap between chemosensory and photoreceptor neurons. Furthermore, an examination of previously identified arrestins from Drosophila melanogaster exposed similar bimodal expression, and Drosophila arrestin mutants demonstrate impaired electrophysiological responses to olfactory stimuli. Thus, we show that arrestins in Drosophila are required for normal olfactory physiology in addition to their previously described role in visual signaling. These findings suggest that individual arrestins function in both olfactory and visual pathways in Dipteran insects; these genes may prove useful in the design of control strategies that target olfactory-dependent behaviors of insect disease vectors. PMID:11792843

  6. Neuroblast long-term cell cultures from human fetal olfactory epithelium respond to odors.

    PubMed

    Vannelli, G B; Ensoli, F; Zonefrati, R; Kubota, Y; Arcangeli, A; Becchetti, A; Camici, G; Barni, T; Thiele, C J; Balboni, G C

    1995-06-01

    Primary cell cultures from human fetal olfactory neuroepithelium have been isolated, cloned, and propagated in continuous in vitro culture for approximately 1 year. The two clones we report here synthesize both neuronal proteins and olfactory-specific markers as well as the putative olfactory neurotransmitter, carnosine. In addition, patchclamp experiments reveal that these cells are electrically excitable. Following exposure to a panel of aromatic chemicals one of the cell cultures shows a specific increase in intracellular cAMP, indicating that some degree of functional maturity is expressed in vitro. The results suggest that these cells originate from the "stem cell" compartment that gives rise to mature olfactory receptor neurons. These long-term cell cultures represent models that will be useful in studying the mechanism(s) of olfaction and the regulation of olfactory neurogenesis and differentiation. PMID:7790915

  7. Olfactory Basis of Homing Behavior in the Giant Garden Slug, Limax maximus

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, Alan

    1974-01-01

    Time lapse photography of slugs living in an experimental enclosure shows that these animals can return to a homesite from over 90 cm by a direct route. Slime trail following and vision are not involved in this behavior. In the presence of a low velocity wind, homing occurs upwind. Surgical disconnection of the presumptive olfactory apparatus (digitate ganglion) from the central nervous system eliminates homing. Neurophysiological recordings from the receptor surface associated with the digitate ganglion and the olfactory nerve demonstrate the olfactory function of the digitate ganglion. The olfactory acuity and capacity for directed locomotion via olfactory cues are also relevant to studies of slug feeding behavior, ecology, and learning ability. Images PMID:16592149

  8. Calcium and olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Winegar, B D; Rosick, E R; Schafer, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Inorganic cations, organic calcium antagonists, and calmodulin antagonists were applied to olfactory epithelia of frogs (Rana pipiens) while recording electroolfactogram (EOG) responses. 2. Inorganic cations inhibited EOGs in a rank order, reflecting their calcium channel blocking potency: La3+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Al3+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mg2+. Barium ion significantly enhanced EOGs immediately following application. 3. Diltiazem and verapamil produced dose-dependent EOG inhibition. 4. Calmodulin antagonists inhibited EOGs without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. PMID:2904344

  9. The Role of Dopamine in Drosophila Larval Classical Olfactory Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung-An; Stocker, Reinhard F.; Thum, Andreas S.

    2009-01-01

    Learning and memory is not an attribute of higher animals. Even Drosophila larvae are able to form and recall an association of a given odor with an aversive or appetitive gustatory reinforcer. As the Drosophila larva has turned into a particularly simple model for studying odor processing, a detailed neuronal and functional map of the olfactory pathway is available up to the third order neurons in the mushroom bodies. At this point, a convergence of olfactory processing and gustatory reinforcement is suggested to underlie associative memory formation. The dopaminergic system was shown to be involved in mammalian and insect olfactory conditioning. To analyze the anatomy and function of the larval dopaminergic system, we first characterize dopaminergic neurons immunohistochemically up to the single cell level and subsequent test for the effects of distortions in the dopamine system upon aversive (odor-salt) as well as appetitive (odor-sugar) associative learning. Single cell analysis suggests that dopaminergic neurons do not directly connect gustatory input in the larval suboesophageal ganglion to olfactory information in the mushroom bodies. However, a number of dopaminergic neurons innervate different regions of the brain, including protocerebra, mushroom bodies and suboesophageal ganglion. We found that dopamine receptors are highly enriched in the mushroom bodies and that aversive and appetitive olfactory learning is strongly impaired in dopamine receptor mutants. Genetically interfering with dopaminergic signaling supports this finding, although our data do not exclude on naïve odor and sugar preferences of the larvae. Our data suggest that dopaminergic neurons provide input to different brain regions including protocerebra, suboesophageal ganglion and mushroom bodies by more than one route. We therefore propose that different types of dopaminergic neurons might be involved in different types of signaling necessary for aversive and appetitive olfactory memory

  10. Phylogenic studies on the olfactory system in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    The olfactory receptor organs and their primary centers are classified into several types. The receptor organs are divided into fish-type olfactory epithelium (OE), mammal-type OE, middle chamber epithelium (MCE), lower chamber epithelium (LCE), recess epithelium, septal olfactory organ of Masera (SO), mammal-type vomeronasal organ (VNO) and snake-type VNO. The fish-type OE is observed in flatfish and lungfish, while the mammal-type OE is observed in amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The MCE and LCE are unique to Xenopus and turtles, respectively. The recess epithelium is unique to lungfish. The SO is observed only in mammals. The mammal-type VNO is widely observed in amphibians, lizards and mammals, while the snake-type VNO is unique to snakes. The VNO itself is absent in turtles and birds. The mammal-type OE, MCE, LCE and recess epithelium seem to be descendants of the fish-type OE that is derived from the putative primitive OE. The VNO may be derived from the recess epithelium or fish-type OE and differentiate into the mammal-type VNO and snake-type VNO. The primary olfactory centers are divided into mammal-type main olfactory bulbs (MOB), fish-type MOB and mammal-type accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB). The mammal-type MOB first appears in amphibians and succeeds to reptiles, birds and mammals. The fish-type MOB, which is unique to fish, may be the ancestor of the mammal-type MOB. The mammal-type AOB is observed in amphibians, lizards, snakes and mammals and may be the remnant of the fish-type MOB. PMID:24531771

  11. Phylogenic Studies on the Olfactory System in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    TANIGUCHI, Kazuyuki; TANIGUCHI, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The olfactory receptor organs and their primary centers are classified into several types. The receptor organs are divided into fish-type olfactory epithelium (OE), mammal-type OE, middle chamber epithelium (MCE), lower chamber epithelium (LCE), recess epithelium, septal olfactory organ of Masera (SO), mammal-type vomeronasal organ (VNO) and snake-type VNO. The fish-type OE is observed in flatfish and lungfish, while the mammal-type OE is observed in amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The MCE and LCE are unique to Xenopus and turtles, respectively. The recess epithelium is unique to lungfish. The SO is observed only in mammals. The mammal-type VNO is widely observed in amphibians, lizards and mammals, while the snake-type VNO is unique to snakes. The VNO itself is absent in turtles and birds. The mammal-type OE, MCE, LCE and recess epithelium seem to be descendants of the fish-type OE that is derived from the putative primitive OE. The VNO may be derived from the recess epithelium or fish-type OE and differentiate into the mammal-type VNO and snake-type VNO. The primary olfactory centers are divided into mammal-type main olfactory bulbs (MOB), fish-type MOB and mammal-type accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB). The mammal-type MOB first appears in amphibians and succeeds to reptiles, birds and mammals. The fish-type MOB, which is unique to fish, may be the ancestor of the mammal-type MOB. The mammal-type AOB is observed in amphibians, lizards, snakes and mammals and may be the remnant of the fish-type MOB. PMID:24531771

  12. From chemical neuroanatomy to an understanding of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oboti, L.; Peretto, P.; De Marchis, S.; Fasolo, A.

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory system of mammals is the appropriate model for studying several aspects of neuronal physiology spanning from the developmental stage to neural network remodelling in the adult brain. Both the morphological and physiological understanding of this system were strongly supported by classical histochemistry. It is emblematic the case of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) staining, the first, powerful marker for fully differentiated olfactory receptor neurons and a key tool to investigate the dynamic relations between peripheral sensory epithelia and central relay regions given its presence within olfactory fibers reaching the olfactory bulb (OB). Similarly, the use of thymidine analogues was able to show neurogenesis in an adult mammalian brain far before modern virus labelling and lipophilic tracers based methods. Nowadays, a wealth of new histochemical techniques combining cell and molecular biology approaches is available, giving stance to move from the analysis of the chemically identified circuitries to functional research. The study of adult neurogenesis is indeed one of the best explanatory examples of this statement. After defining the cell types involved and the basic physiology of this phenomenon in the OB plasticity, we can now analyze the role of neurogenesis in well testable behaviours related to socio-chemical communication in rodents. PMID:22297441

  13. Olfactory sensitivity to bile acids in salmonid fishes.

    PubMed

    Døving, K B; Selset, R; Thommesen, G

    1980-02-01

    Monopolar DC-recordings were made simultaneously from two positions on the olfactory bulb of chars (Salmo alpinus L.) and graylings (Thymallus thymallu L.) using bile acids and amino acids as olfactory stimulants. The bile acids induced responses with characteristic spatial differences from those of the amino acids. The distribution of responses to bile acids indicated a neuronal activity in the medial part of the bulb. In contrast, amino acids elicit responses in the lateral part of the bulb. Taurine conjugated bile acids were up to 1 000 times more potent as olfactory stimuli than methionine. The results suggest that olfactory receptors are of two types, one responding to bile acids, the other to amino acids. 3 -alpha-hydroxysteroids are released from the fish into the water in quantities that suffice for detection by their olfactory system. The odorant potency of the bile acids, their evolutionary history and variability, together with their renowned adherent properties made them interesting candidates for specific signals in the acquatic environment. PMID:7376910

  14. From chemical neuroanatomy to an understanding of the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Oboti, L; Peretto, P; Marchis, S De; Fasolo, A

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory system is the appropriate model for studying several aspects of neuronal physiology spanning from the developmental stage to neural network remodelling in the adult brain. Both the morphological and physiological understanding of this system were strongly supported by classical histochemistry. It is emblematic the case of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) staining, the first, powerful marker for fully differentiated olfactory receptor neurons and a key tool to investigate the dynamic relations between peripheral sensory epithelia and central relay regions given its presence within olfactory fibers reaching the olfactory bulb (OB). Similarly, the use of thymidine analogues was able to show neurogenesis in an adult mammalian brain far before modern virus labelling and lipophilic tracers based methods. Nowadays, a wealth of new histochemical techniques combining cell and molecular biology approaches is available, giving stance to move from the analysis of the chemically identified circuitries to functional research. The study of adult neurogenesis is indeed one of the best explanatory examples of this statement. After defining the cell types involved and the basic physiology of this phenomenon in the OB plasticity, we can now analyze the role of neurogenesis in well testable behaviours related to socio-chemical communication in rodents. PMID:22297441

  15. Morphological study on the olfactory systems of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Nakamuta, Shoko; Kato, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the olfactory system of a semi-aquatic turtle, the snapping turtle, has been morphologically investigated by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and lectin histochemistry. The nasal cavity of snapping turtle was divided into the upper and lower chambers, lined by the sensory epithelium containing ciliated and non-ciliated olfactory receptor neurons, respectively. Each neuron expressed both Gαolf, the α-subunit of G-proteins coupling to the odorant receptors, and Gαo, the α-subunit of G-proteins coupling to the type 2 vomeronasal receptors. The axons originating from the upper chamber epithelium projected to the ventral part of the olfactory bulb, while those from the lower chamber epithelium to the dorsal part of the olfactory bulb. Despite the identical expression of G-protein α-subunits in the olfactory receptor neurons, these two projections were clearly distinguished from each other by the differential expression of glycoconjugates. In conclusion, these data indicate the presence of two types of olfactory systems in the snapping turtle. Topographic arrangement of the upper and lower chambers and lack of the associated glands in the lower chamber epithelium suggest their possible involvement in the detection of odorants: upper chamber epithelium in the air and the lower chamber epithelium in the water. PMID:27059760

  16. Ecological adaptation determines functional mammalian olfactory subgenomes

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Sara; Bekaert, Michaël; Crider, Tess A.; Mariani, Stefano; Murphy, William J.; Teeling, Emma C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to smell is governed by the largest gene family in mammalian genomes, the olfactory receptor (OR) genes. Although these genes are well annotated in the finished human and mouse genomes, we still do not understand which receptors bind specific odorants or how they fully function. Previous comparative studies have been taxonomically limited and mostly focused on the percentage of OR pseudogenes within species. No study has investigated the adaptive changes of functional OR gene families across phylogenetically and ecologically diverse mammals. To determine the extent to which OR gene repertoires have been influenced by habitat, sensory specialization, and other ecological traits, to better understand the functional importance of specific OR gene families and thus the odorants they bind, we compared the functional OR gene repertoires from 50 mammalian genomes. We amplified more than 2000 OR genes in aquatic, semi-aquatic, and flying mammals and coupled these data with 48,000 OR genes from mostly terrestrial mammals, extracted from genomic projects. Phylogenomic, Bayesian assignment, and principle component analyses partitioned species by ecotype (aquatic, semi-aquatic, terrestrial, flying) rather than phylogenetic relatedness, and identified OR families important for each habitat. Functional OR gene repertoires were reduced independently in the multiple origins of aquatic mammals and were significantly divergent in bats. We reject recent neutralist views of olfactory subgenome evolution and correlate specific OR gene families with physiological requirements, a preliminary step toward unraveling the relationship between specific odors and respective OR gene families. PMID:19952139

  17. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Hutch, Chelsea; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Jia, Cuihong; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium has not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1 and CB2 receptor deficient (CB1−/−/CB2−/−) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1−/−/CB2−/− mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1−/−/CB2−/− mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted. PMID:26037800

  18. Calcium-activated chloride currents in olfactory sensory neurons from mice lacking bestrophin-2

    PubMed Central

    Pifferi, Simone; Dibattista, Michele; Sagheddu, Claudia; Boccaccio, Anna; Al Qteishat, Ahmed; Ghirardi, Filippo; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons use a chloride-based signal amplification mechanism to detect odorants. The binding of odorants to receptors in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons activates a transduction cascade that involves the opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels and the entry of Ca2+ into the cilia. Ca2+ activates a Cl− current that produces an efflux of Cl− ions and amplifies the depolarization. The molecular identity of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels is still elusive, although some bestrophins have been shown to function as Ca2+-activated Cl− channels when expressed in heterologous systems. In the olfactory epithelium, bestrophin-2 (Best2) has been indicated as a candidate for being a molecular component of the olfactory Ca2+-activated Cl− channel. In this study, we have analysed mice lacking Best2. We compared the electrophysiological responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorant stimulation, as well as the properties of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents in wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice for Best2. Our results confirm that Best2 is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, while odorant responses and Ca2+-activated Cl− currents were not significantly different between WT and KO mice. Thus, Best2 does not appear to be the main molecular component of the olfactory channel. Further studies are required to determine the function of Best2 in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. PMID:19622610

  19. Extinction reverses olfactory fear-conditioned increases in neuron number and glomerular size.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Filomene G; Dias, Brian G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-10-13

    Although much work has investigated the contribution of brain regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex to the processing of fear learning and memory, fewer studies have examined the role of sensory systems, in particular the olfactory system, in the detection and perception of cues involved in learning and memory. The primary sensory receptive field maps of the olfactory system are exquisitely organized and respond dynamically to cues in the environment, remaining plastic from development through adulthood. We have previously demonstrated that olfactory fear conditioning leads to increased odorant-specific receptor representation in the main olfactory epithelium and in glomeruli within the olfactory bulb. We now demonstrate that olfactory extinction training specific to the conditioned odor stimulus reverses the conditioning-associated freezing behavior and odor learning-induced structural changes in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb in an odorant ligand-specific manner. These data suggest that learning-induced freezing behavior, structural alterations, and enhanced neural sensory representation can be reversed in adult mice following extinction training. PMID:26420875

  20. Extinction reverses olfactory fear-conditioned increases in neuron number and glomerular size

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Filomene G.; Dias, Brian G.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Although much work has investigated the contribution of brain regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex to the processing of fear learning and memory, fewer studies have examined the role of sensory systems, in particular the olfactory system, in the detection and perception of cues involved in learning and memory. The primary sensory receptive field maps of the olfactory system are exquisitely organized and respond dynamically to cues in the environment, remaining plastic from development through adulthood. We have previously demonstrated that olfactory fear conditioning leads to increased odorant-specific receptor representation in the main olfactory epithelium and in glomeruli within the olfactory bulb. We now demonstrate that olfactory extinction training specific to the conditioned odor stimulus reverses the conditioning-associated freezing behavior and odor learning-induced structural changes in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb in an odorant ligand-specific manner. These data suggest that learning-induced freezing behavior, structural alterations, and enhanced neural sensory representation can be reversed in adult mice following extinction training. PMID:26420875

  1. Olfactory maps, circuits and computations.

    PubMed

    Giessel, Andrew J; Datta, Sandeep Robert

    2014-02-01

    Sensory information in the visual, auditory and somatosensory systems is organized topographically, with key sensory features ordered in space across neural sheets. Despite the existence of a spatially stereotyped map of odor identity within the olfactory bulb, it is unclear whether the higher olfactory cortex uses topography to organize information about smells. Here, we review recent work on the anatomy, microcircuitry and neuromodulation of two higher-order olfactory areas: the piriform cortex and the olfactory tubercle. The piriform is an archicortical region with an extensive local associational network that constructs representations of odor identity. The olfactory tubercle is an extension of the ventral striatum that may use reward-based learning rules to encode odor valence. We argue that in contrast to brain circuits for other sensory modalities, both the piriform and the olfactory tubercle largely discard any topography present in the bulb and instead use distributive afferent connectivity, local learning rules and input from neuromodulatory centers to build behaviorally relevant representations of olfactory stimuli. PMID:24492088

  2. Olfactory marker protein gene: its structure and olfactory neuron-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Danciger, E; Mettling, C; Vidal, M; Morris, R; Margolis, F

    1989-01-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) genomic clones were isolated from a Charon 4A phage lambda rat genomic library. A 16.5-kilobase (kb) fragment of the rat genome containing the gene was isolated and characterized. Sequence analysis of the gene showed the absence of introns and the lack of CAAT and TATA boxes in the 5' flanking region. The transcription initiation site was mapped, and two sites 55 and 58 base pairs upstream of the ATG were observed. The 5' flanking region is rich in G+C residues and contains a G+C-rich motif as well as direct and inverted repeats. Functional OMP regulatory sequences were demonstrated in transgenic mice. An 11-kb chimeric gene was constructed in which the coding region for OMP was replaced with that for Thy-1.1. In Thy-1.2 mice carrying this transgene, Thy-1.1 was expressed solely by olfactory receptor neurons and their axons and terminals in the olfactory bulb. Images PMID:2701951

  3. Identification of Candidate Olfactory Genes in Chilo suppressalis by Antennal Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Wei, Jinjin; Liao, Xinyan; Walker, William B.; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by multiple proteins in the antenna, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, an economically important agricultural pest, which inflicts great damage to the rice yield in south and east part of Asia, especially in Southern China. By Illumina sequencing of male and female antennal transcriptomes, we identified 47 odorant receptors, 20 ionotropic receptors, 26 odorant binding proteins, 21 chemosensory proteins and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins. Our findings make it possible for future research of the olfactory system of C. suppressalis at the molecular level. PMID:25076861

  4. Assessment of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Welge-Lüessen, Antje

    2006-01-01

    Numerous techniques are available for the investigation of chemosensory functions in humans. They include psychophysical measures of chemosensory function, e.g. odor identification, odor discrimination, odor thresholds, odor memory, and retronasal perception of odors. In order to assess changes related to the patients' quality of life or effects of qualitative olfactory dysfunction, questionnaires are being used. Measures relying to a lesser degree on the subjects' cooperation are e.g. chemosensory event-related potentials, odor-induced changes of the EEG, the electroolfactogram, imaging techniques, or measures of respiration. In a clinical context, however, psychophysical techniques are most frequently used, e.g. tests for odor identification, and odor thresholds. Interpretation of results from these measures is frequently supported by the assessment of chemosensory event-related potentials. Other techniques await further standardization before they will become useful in a clinical context. PMID:16733334

  5. Farnesol-Detecting Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ronderos, David S.; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Potter, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to deorphanize a subset of putative Drosophila odorant receptors expressed in trichoid sensilla using a transgenic in vivo misexpression approach. We identified farnesol as a potent and specific activator for the orphan odorant receptor Or83c. Farnesol is an intermediate in juvenile hormone biosynthesis, but is also produced by ripe citrus fruit peels. Here, we show that farnesol stimulates robust activation of Or83c-expressing olfactory neurons, even at high dilutions. The CD36 homolog Snmp1 is required for normal farnesol response kinetics. The neurons expressing Or83c are found in a subset of poorly characterized intermediate sensilla. We show that these neurons mediate attraction behavior to low concentrations of farnesol and that Or83c receptor mutants are defective for this behavior. Or83c neurons innervate the DC3 glomerulus in the antennal lobe and projection neurons relaying information from this glomerulus to higher brain centers target a region of the lateral horn previously implicated in pheromone perception. Our findings identify a sensitive, narrowly tuned receptor that mediates attraction behavior to farnesol and demonstrates an effective approach to deorphanizing odorant receptors expressed in neurons located in intermediate and trichoid sensilla that may not function in the classical “empty basiconic neuron” system. PMID:24623773

  6. PACAP protects against TNFα-induced cell death in olfactory epithelium and olfactory placodal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Shami; Gandham, Mahendra; Lucero, Mary T

    2010-01-01

    In mouse olfactory epithelium (OE), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) protects against axotomy-induced apoptosis. We used mouse OE to determine whether PACAP protects neurons during exposure to the inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Live slices of neonatal mouse OE were treated with 40 ng/ml TNFα ± 40 nM PACAP for 6 hours and dying cells were live-labeled with 0.5% propidium iodide. TNFα significantly increased the percentage of dying cells while co-incubation with PACAP prevented cell death. PACAP also prevented TNFα-mediated cell death in the olfactory placodal (OP) cell lines, OP6 and OP27. Although OP cell lines express all three PACAP receptors (PAC1, VPAC1,VPAC2), PACAP’s protection of these cells from TNFα was mimicked by the specific PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan and abolished by the PAC1 antagonist PACAP6–38. Treatment of OP cell lines with blockers or activators of the PLC and AC/MAPKK pathways revealed that PACAP-mediated protection from TNFα involved both pathways. PACAP may therefore function through PAC1 receptors to protect neurons from cell death during inflammatory cytokine release in vivo as would occur upon viral infection or allergic rhinitis-associated injury. PMID:20654718

  7. Morphometric and ultrastructural comparison of the olfactory system in elasmobranchs: the significance of structure-function relationships based on phylogeny and ecology.

    PubMed

    Schluessel, Vera; Bennett, Michael B; Bleckmann, Horst; Blomberg, Simon; Collin, Shaun P

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the relationship between olfactory morphology, habitat occupancy, and lifestyle in 21 elasmobranch species in a phylogenetic context. Four measures of olfactory capability, that is, the number of olfactory lamellae, the surface area of the olfactory epithelium, the mass of the olfactory bulb, and the mass of the olfactory rosette were compared between individual species and groups, comprised of species with similar habitat and/or lifestyle. Statistical analyses using generalized least squares phylogenetic regression revealed that bentho-pelagic sharks and rays possess significantly more olfactory lamellae and larger sensory epithelial surface areas than benthic species. There was no significant correlation between either olfactory bulb or rosette mass and habitat type. There was also no significant difference between the number of lamellae or the size of the sensory surface area in groups comprised of species with similar diets, that is, groups preying predominantly on crustaceans, cephalopods, echinoderms, polychaetes, molluscs, or teleosts. However, some groups had significantly larger olfactory bulb or rosette masses than others. There was little evidence to support a correlation between phylogeny and morphology, indicating that differences in olfactory capabilities are the result of functional rather than phylogenetic adaptations. All olfactory epithelia exhibited microvilli and cilia, with microvilli in both nonsensory and sensory areas, and cilia only in sensory areas. Cilia over the sensory epithelia originated from supporting cells. In contrast to teleosts, which possess ciliated and microvillous olfactory receptor types, no ciliated olfactory receptor cells were observed. This is the first comprehensive study comparing olfactory morphology to several aspects of elasmobranch ecology in a phylogenetic context. PMID:18777568

  8. Axon fasciculation in the developing olfactory nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axons exit the olfactory epithelium (OE) and extend toward the olfactory bulb (OB) where they coalesce into glomeruli. Each OSN expresses only 1 of approximately 1,200 odor receptors (ORs). OSNs expressing the same OR are distributed in restricted zones of the OE. However, within a zone, the OSNs expressing a specific OR are not contiguous - distribution appears stochastic. Upon reaching the OB the OSN axons expressing the same OR reproducibly coalesce into two to three glomeruli. While ORs appear necessary for appropriate convergence of axons, a variety of adhesion associated molecules and activity-dependent mechanisms are also implicated. Recent data suggest pre-target OSN axon sorting may influence glomerular convergence. Here, using regional and OR-specific markers, we addressed the spatio-temporal properties associated with the onset of homotypic fasciculation in embryonic mice and assessed the degree to which subpopulations of axons remain segregated as they extend toward the nascent OB. We show that immediately upon crossing the basal lamina, axons uniformly turn sharply, usually at an approximately 90° angle toward the OB. Molecularly defined subpopulations of axons show evidence of spatial segregation within the nascent nerve by embryonic day 12, within 48 hours of the first OSN axons crossing the basal lamina, but at least 72 hours before synapse formation in the developing OB. Homotypic fasciculation of OSN axons expressing the same OR appears to be a hierarchical process. While regional segregation occurs in the mesenchyme, the final convergence of OR-specific subpopulations does not occur until the axons reach the inner nerve layer of the OB. PMID:20723208

  9. The Sox gene Dichaete is expressed in local interneurons and functions in development of the Drosophila adult olfactory circuit

    PubMed Central

    Melnattur, Krishna V.; Berdnik, Daniela; Rusan, Zeid; Ferreira, Christopher J.; Nambu, John R.

    2012-01-01

    In insects, the primary sites of integration for olfactory sensory input are the glomeruli in the antennal lobes. Here, axons of olfactory receptor neurons synapse with dendrites of the projection neurons that relay olfactory input to higher brain centers, such as the mushroom bodies and lateral horn. Interactions between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons are modulated by excitatory and inhibitory input from a group of local interneurons. While significant insight has been gleaned into the differentiation of olfactory receptor and projection neurons, much less is known about the development and function of the local interneurons. We have found that Dichaete, a conserved Sox HMG box gene, is strongly expressed in a cluster of LAAL cells located adjacent to each antennal lobe in the adult brain. Within these clusters, Dichaete protein expression is detected in both cholinergic and GABAergic local interneurons. In contrast, Dichaete expression is not detected in mature or developing projection neurons, or developing olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of novel viable Dichaete mutant alleles revealed misrouting of specific projection neuron dendrites and axons, and alterations in glomeruli organization. These results suggest non-cell autonomous functions of Dichaete in projection neuron differentiation as well as a potential role for Dichaete-expressing local interneurons in development of the adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:22648855

  10. The sox gene Dichaete is expressed in local interneurons and functions in development of the Drosophila adult olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Melnattur, Krishna V; Berdnik, Daniela; Rusan, Zeid; Ferreira, Christopher J; Nambu, John R

    2013-02-01

    In insects, the primary sites of integration for olfactory sensory input are the glomeruli in the antennal lobes. Here, axons of olfactory receptor neurons synapse with dendrites of the projection neurons that relay olfactory input to higher brain centers, such as the mushroom bodies and lateral horn. Interactions between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons are modulated by excitatory and inhibitory input from a group of local interneurons. While significant insight has been gleaned into the differentiation of olfactory receptor and projection neurons, much less is known about the development and function of the local interneurons. We have found that Dichaete, a conserved Sox HMG box gene, is strongly expressed in a cluster of LAAL cells located adjacent to each antennal lobe in the adult brain. Within these clusters, Dichaete protein expression is detected in both cholinergic and GABAergic local interneurons. In contrast, Dichaete expression is not detected in mature or developing projection neurons, or developing olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of novel viable Dichaete mutant alleles revealed misrouting of specific projection neuron dendrites and axons, and alterations in glomeruli organization. These results suggest noncell autonomous functions of Dichaete in projection neuron differentiation as well as a potential role for Dichaete-expressing local interneurons in development of the adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:22648855

  11. Olfactory and gustatory disturbances caused by digitalism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Tadashi; Yokogawa, Hideaki

    2006-12-01

    It is known that an overdose of digoxin causes visual disturbance, but the effect on the senses of smell and taste is not known. A case of olfactory and gustatory disturbance caused by digitalism is reported. In a 62-year-old male patient suffering from chronic digitalism, the serum digoxin level rose to 6.0 ng/ml. The patient was diagnosed not only with visual disturbance but also hyposmia and hypogeusia. The patient recovered from visual and chemosensory disturbances after the serum digoxin concentration returned to normal. Because the similarity of intracellular signal transduction between photoreceptor cells and olfactory and/or taste receptor cells is known, it is suspected that the influence of digoxin to chemosensory organs was caused by intermediation of sodium-potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na-K-ATPase) of the chemosensory receptor cells. PMID:16730151

  12. Probing Formability Improvement of Ultra-thin Ferritic Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate of PEMFC in Non-conventional Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Hyuk Jong; Barlat, Frédéric; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Formability increase in non-conventional forming profiles programmed in the servo-press was investigated using finite element analysis. As an application, forming experiment on a 0.15-mm-thick ferritic stainless steel sheet for a bipolar plate, a primary component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, was conducted. Four different forming profiles were considered to investigate the effects of forming profiles on formability and shape accuracy. The four motions included conventional V motion, holding motion, W motion, and oscillating motion. Among the four motions, the holding motion, in which the slide was held for a certain period at the bottom dead point, led to the best formability. Finite element simulations were conducted to validate the experimental results and to probe the formability improvement in the non-conventional forming profiles. A creep model to address stress relaxation effect along with tool elastic recovery was implemented using a user-material subroutine, CREEP in ABAQUS finite element software. The stress relaxation and variable contact conditions during the holding and oscillating profiles were found to be the main mechanism of formability improvement.

  13. Probing Formability Improvement of Ultra-thin Ferritic Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate of PEMFC in Non-conventional Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Hyuk Jong; Barlat, Frédéric; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Formability increase in non-conventional forming profiles programmed in the servo-press was investigated using finite element analysis. As an application, forming experiment on a 0.15-mm-thick ferritic stainless steel sheet for a bipolar plate, a primary component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, was conducted. Four different forming profiles were considered to investigate the effects of forming profiles on formability and shape accuracy. The four motions included conventional V motion, holding motion, W motion, and oscillating motion. Among the four motions, the holding motion, in which the slide was held for a certain period at the bottom dead point, led to the best formability. Finite element simulations were conducted to validate the experimental results and to probe the formability improvement in the non-conventional forming profiles. A creep model to address stress relaxation effect along with tool elastic recovery was implemented using a user-material subroutine, CREEP in ABAQUS finite element software. The stress relaxation and variable contact conditions during the holding and oscillating profiles were found to be the main mechanism of formability improvement.

  14. Olfactory input increases visual sensitivity in zebrafish: a possible function for the terminal nerve and dopaminergic interplexiform cells.

    PubMed

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Li, Lei

    2003-07-01

    Centrifugal innervation of the neural retina has been documented in many species. In zebrafish Danio rerio, the only so-far described centrifugal pathway originates from terminal nerve (TN) cell bodies that are located in the olfactory bulb. Most of the TN axons terminate in the forebrain and midbrain, but some project via the optic nerve to the neural retina, where they synapse onto dopaminergic interplexiform cells (DA-IPCs). While the anatomical pathway between the olfactory and visual organs has been described, it is unknown if and how olfactory signals influence visual system functions. We demonstrate here that olfactory input is involved in the modulation of visual sensitivity in zebrafish. As determined by a behavioral assay and by electroretinographic (ERG) recording, zebrafish visual sensitivity was increased upon presentation of amino acids as olfactory stimuli. This effect, however, was observed only in the early morning hours when zebrafish are least sensitive to light. The effect of olfactory input on vision was eliminated after lesion of the olfactory bulbs or after the destruction of DA-IPCs. Intraocular injections of a dopamine D(2) but not a D(1) receptor antagonist blocked the effect of olfactory input on visual sensitivity. Although we cannot exclude the involvement of other anatomical pathways, our data suggest that the TN and DA-IPCs are the prime candidates for olfactory modulation of visual sensitivity. PMID:12771169

  15. Cigarette Smoke Delays Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ueha, Rumi; Ueha, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kanaya, Kaori; Suzukawa, Keigo; Nishijima, Hironobu; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Matsushima, Kouji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system is a unique part of the mammalian nervous system due to its capacity for neurogenesis and the replacement of degenerating receptor neurons. Cigarette smoking is a major cause of olfactory dysfunction. However, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke impairs the regenerative olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) remain unclear. Here, we investigated the influence of cigarette smoke on ORN regeneration following methimazole-induced ORN injury. Administration of methimazole caused detachment of the olfactory epithelium from the basement membrane and induced olfactory dysfunction, thus enabling us to analyze the process of ORN regeneration. We found that intranasal administration of cigarette smoke solution (CSS) suppressed the recovery of ORNs and olfaction following ORN injury. Defective ORN recovery in CSS-treated mice was not associated with any change in the number of SOX2(+) ORN progenitor cells in the basal layer of the OE, but was associated with impaired recovery of GAP43(+) immature ORNs. In the nasal mucosa, mRNA expression levels of neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, neurotrophin-5, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were increased following OE injury, whereas CSS administration decreased the ORN injury-induced IGF-1 expression. Administration of recombinant human IGF-1 prevented the CSS-induced suppression of ORN recovery following injury. These results suggest that CSS impairs regeneration of ORNs by suppressing the development of immature ORNs from ORN progenitors, at least partly by reducing IGF-1 in the nasal mucosa. PMID:27003941

  16. Multi-unit Recording Methods to Characterize Neural Activity in the Locust (Schistocerca Americana) Olfactory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debajit; Leong, Kevin; Katta, Nalin; Raman, Baranidharan

    2013-01-01

    Detection and interpretation of olfactory cues are critical for the survival of many organisms. Remarkably, species across phyla have strikingly similar olfactory systems suggesting that the biological approach to chemical sensing has been optimized over evolutionary time1. In the insect olfactory system, odorants are transduced by olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) in the antenna, which convert chemical stimuli into trains of action potentials. Sensory input from the ORNs is then relayed to the antennal lobe (AL; a structure analogous to the vertebrate olfactory bulb). In the AL, neural representations for odors take the form of spatiotemporal firing patterns distributed across ensembles of principal neurons (PNs; also referred to as projection neurons)2,3. The AL output is subsequently processed by Kenyon cells (KCs) in the downstream mushroom body (MB), a structure associated with olfactory memory and learning4,5. Here, we present electrophysiological recording techniques to monitor odor-evoked neural responses in these olfactory circuits. First, we present a single sensillum recording method to study odor-evoked responses at the level of populations of ORNs6,7. We discuss the use of saline filled sharpened glass pipettes as electrodes to extracellularly monitor ORN responses. Next, we present a method to extracellularly monitor PN responses using a commercial 16-channel electrode3. A similar approach using a custom-made 8-channel twisted wire tetrode is demonstrated for Kenyon cell recordings8. We provide details of our experimental setup and present representative recording traces for each of these techniques. PMID:23380828

  17. Wiring stability of the adult Drosophila olfactory circuit after lesion.

    PubMed

    Berdnik, Daniela; Chihara, Takahiro; Couto, Africa; Luo, Liqun

    2006-03-29

    Neuronal wiring plasticity in response to experience or injury has been reported in many parts of the adult nervous system. For instance, visual or somatosensory cortical maps can reorganize significantly in response to peripheral lesions, yet a certain degree of stability is essential for neuronal circuits to perform their dedicated functions. Previous studies on lesion-induced neuronal reorganization have primarily focused on systems that use continuous neural maps. Here, we assess wiring plasticity in a discrete neural map represented by the adult Drosophila olfactory circuit. Using conditional expression of toxins, we genetically ablated specific classes of neurons and examined the consequences on their synaptic partners or neighboring classes in the adult antennal lobe. We find no alteration of connection specificity between olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and their postsynaptic targets, the projection neurons (PNs). Ablating an ORN class maintains PN dendrites within their glomerular borders, and ORN axons normally innervating an adjacent target do not expand. Likewise, ablating PN classes does not alter their partner ORN axon connectivity. Interestingly, an increase in the contralateral ORN axon terminal density occurs in response to the removal of competing ipsilateral ORNs. Therefore, plasticity in this circuit can occur but is confined within a glomerulus, thereby retaining the wiring specificity of ORNs and PNs. We conclude that, although adult olfactory neurons can undergo plastic changes in response to the loss of competition, the olfactory circuit overall is extremely stable in preserving segregated information channels in this discrete map. PMID:16571743

  18. Postnatal Experience Modulates Functional Properties of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiwei; Tian, Huikai; Lee, Anderson C.; Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Early experience considerably modulates the organization and function of all sensory systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, deprivation of the sensory inputs via neonatal, unilateral naris closure has been shown to induce structural, molecular, and functional changes from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb and cortex. However, it remains unknown how early experience shapes functional properties of individual olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary odor detectors in the nose. To address this question, we examined odorant response properties of mouse OSNs in both the closed and open nostril after four weeks of unilateral naris closure with age-matched untreated animals as control. Using patch-clamp technique on genetically-tagged OSNs with defined odorant receptors (ORs), we found that sensory deprivation increased the sensitivity of MOR23 neurons in the closed side while overexposure caused the opposite effect in the open side. We next analyzed the response properties including rise time, decay time, and adaptation induced by repeated stimulation in MOR23 and M71 neurons. Even though these two types of neurons showed distinct properties in dynamic range and response kinetics, sensory deprivation significantly slowed down the decay phase of odorant-induced transduction events in both types. Using western blotting and antibody staining, we confirmed upregulation of several signaling proteins in the closed side as compared with the open side. This study suggests that early experience modulates functional properties of OSNs, probably via modifying the signal transduction cascade. PMID:22703547

  19. Evolution of the olfactory code in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed Central

    Stensmyr, Marcus C; Dekker, Teun; Hansson, Bill S

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster subgroup has been the focus of numerous studies about evolution. We address the question of how the olfactory code has evolved among the nine sister species. By using in vivo electrophysiological measurements, so called single-cell recordings, we have established the ligand affinity of a defined subset of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) across all nine species. We show that the olfactory code as relayed by the investigated subset of ORNs is conserved to a striking degree. Distinct shifts in the code have occurred only within the simulans clade. However, these shifts are restricted to an altered tuning profile of the same single ORN type in all three of the simulans siblings and a more drastic change unique to D. sechellia, involving a complete loss of one sensillum type in favour of another. The alterations observed in D. sechellia may represent a novel host-specific adaptation to its sole host, morinda fruit (Morinda citrifolia). The overall high degree of similarity of the code within the subgroup is intriguing when considering the great variety in distributions as well as in habitat and host choice of the siblings, factors that could greatly affect the olfactory system. PMID:14667348

  20. Peripheral and Central Olfactory Tuning in a Moth

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Rose C.

    2012-01-01

    Animals can be innately attracted to certain odorants. Because these attractants are particularly salient, they might be expected to induce relatively strong responses throughout the olfactory pathway, helping animals detect the most relevant odors but limiting flexibility to respond to other odors. Alternatively, specific neural wiring might link innately preferred odors to appropriate behaviors without a need for intensity biases. How nonpheromonal attractants are processed by the general olfactory system remains largely unknown. In the moth Manduca sexta, we studied this with a set of innately preferred host plant odors and other, neutral odors. Electroantennogram recordings showed that, as a population, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) did not respond with greater intensity to host plant odors, and further local field potential recordings showed that no specific amplification of signals induced by host plant odors occurred between the first olfactory center and the second. Moreover, when odorants were mutually diluted to elicit equally intense output from the ORNs, moths were able to learn to associate all tested odorants equally well with food reward. Together, these results suggest that, although nonpheromonal host plant odors activate broadly distributed responses, they may be linked to attractive behaviors mainly through specific wiring in the brain. PMID:22362866

  1. Peripheral and central olfactory tuning in a moth.

    PubMed

    Ong, Rose C; Stopfer, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Animals can be innately attracted to certain odorants. Because these attractants are particularly salient, they might be expected to induce relatively strong responses throughout the olfactory pathway, helping animals detect the most relevant odors but limiting flexibility to respond to other odors. Alternatively, specific neural wiring might link innately preferred odors to appropriate behaviors without a need for intensity biases. How nonpheromonal attractants are processed by the general olfactory system remains largely unknown. In the moth Manduca sexta, we studied this with a set of innately preferred host plant odors and other, neutral odors. Electroantennogram recordings showed that, as a population, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) did not respond with greater intensity to host plant odors, and further local field potential recordings showed that no specific amplification of signals induced by host plant odors occurred between the first olfactory center and the second. Moreover, when odorants were mutually diluted to elicit equally intense output from the ORNs, moths were able to learn to associate all tested odorants equally well with food reward. Together, these results suggest that, although nonpheromonal host plant odors activate broadly distributed responses, they may be linked to attractive behaviors mainly through specific wiring in the brain. PMID:22362866

  2. Odor Memory Stability after Reinnervation of the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Hernández, Eduardo; Valle-Leija, Pablo; Zomosa-Signoret, Viviana; Drucker-Colín, René; Vidaltamayo, Román

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory system, particularly the olfactory epithelium, presents a unique opportunity to study the regenerative capabilities of the brain, because of its ability to recover after damage. In this study, we ablated olfactory sensory neurons with methimazole and followed the anatomical and functional recovery of circuits expressing genetic markers for I7 and M72 receptors (M72-IRES-tau-LacZ and I7-IRES-tau-GFP). Our results show that 45 days after methimazole-induced lesion, axonal projections to the bulb of M72 and I7 populations are largely reestablished. Furthermore, regenerated glomeruli are re-formed within the same areas as those of control, unexposed mice. This anatomical regeneration correlates with functional recovery of a previously learned odorant-discrimination task, dependent on the cognate ligands for M72 and I7. Following regeneration, mice also recover innate responsiveness to TMT and urine. Our findings show that regeneration of neuronal circuits in the olfactory system can be achieved with remarkable precision and underscore the importance of glomerular organization to evoke memory traces stored in the brain. PMID:23071557

  3. A two-layer biophysical model of cholinergic neuromodulation in olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoshi; Cleland, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain regulate multiple olfactory bulb (OB) functions including odor discrimination, perceptual learning, and short term memory. Previous studies have shown that nicotinic cholinergic receptor activation sharpens mitral cell chemoreceptive fields, likely via intraglomerular circuitry. Muscarinic cholinergic activation is less well understood, though muscarinic receptors are implicated in olfactory learning and in the regulation of synchronized oscillatory dynamics in hippocampus and cortex. To understand the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neuromodulation in OB, we developed a biophysical model of the OB neuronal network including both glomerular layer and external plexiform layer (EPL) computations and incorporating both nicotinic and muscarinic neuromodulatory effects. Our simulations show how nicotinic activation within glomerular circuits sharpens mitral cell chemoreceptive fields, even in the absence of EPL circuitry, but does not facilitate intrinsic oscillations or spike synchronization. In contrast, muscarinic receptor activation increases mitral cell spike synchronization and field oscillatory power by potentiating granule cell excitability and lateral