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Sample records for non-destructive compositional analysis

  1. Non-destructive compositional analysis of historic organ reed pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manescu, A.; Fiori, F.; Giuliani, A.; Kardjilov, N.; Kasztovszky, Z.; Rustichelli, F.; Straumal, B.

    2008-03-01

    In order to be able to reproduce historic organ reed pipes, a bulk non-destructive chemical composition analysis was performed on the tongues and shallots, focusing mainly on the ratio between copper and zinc and on the presence of lead. Prompt gamma activation analysis results allowed us to observe for the first time that the ratio between the two main components of the brass alloy changed from Cu:Zn = 3:1 for the old tongues and shallots to Cu:Zn = 2:1 around the middle of the 18th century, which is typical also for the modern alloys offered to the organ builders nowadays. We also discovered that the Pb content in the old historic brass alloy diminished until the middle of 18th century when the brass alloy became mainly Pb free. The non-uniform lead distribution inside one of the shallots obtained from a prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) experiment was studied by neutron tomography. It gave us a three-dimensonal (3D) distribution of the lead inclusions inside the shallots. The lead particles are concentrated towards the base of the shallot.

  2. Non-destructive evaluation of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1996-01-01

    The composite materials have been used in aerospace industries for quite some time. Several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been developed to inspect composites in order to detect flaws, matrix cracking, and delamination. These methods include ultrasonics, acoustic emission, shearography, thermography, X-ray, and digital image correlation. The NDE Branch of Marshall Space Flight Center has recently acquired a thermal imaging NDE system. The same system has been used at NASA Langley Research Center for detecting disbonds. In order to compare different NDE methods, three carbon/carbon composite panels were used for experiment using ultrasonic C-scan, shearography, and thermography methods. These panels have teflon inserts to simulate the delamination between plies in a composite panel. All three methods have successfully located the insert. The experiment and results are presented in the following sections.

  3. Non-destructive metallurgical analysis of astrolabes utilizing synchrotron radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Newbury, B.; Stephenson, B.; Almer, J. D.; Notis, M.; Haeffner, D. R.; Slade Cargill, G., III

    2002-05-22

    From the experiments performed it is possible to determine a wide range of information about the metallurgy of the astrolabes studied. It was found that different brass alloys were used for components that were cast and those that were mechanically deformed. Chemical composition, forming history, and thickness measurements are all determined non-destructively, illustrating that this technique could be useful for many applications with metal artifact analysis where non-intrusive methods are required.

  4. Low frequency electrical and magnetic methods for non-destructive analysis of fiber dispersion in fiber reinforced cementitious composites: an overview.

    PubMed

    Faifer, Marco; Ferrara, Liberato; Ottoboni, Roberto; Toscani, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive analysis of fiber dispersion in structural elements made of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) and Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites (FRCCs) plays a significant role in the framework of quality control and performance prediction. In this paper, the research activity of the authors in the aforementioned field all over the last lustrum will be reviewed. A method based on the measurement of the inductance of a probe to be placed on the specimen will be presented and its progressive development will be described. Obtained correlation with actual fiber dispersion, as checked by means of destructive methods, as well as with the mechanical performance of the composite will also be presented, in an attempt to address the significance of the method from an engineering application perspective. PMID:23337334

  5. Low Frequency Electrical and Magnetic Methods for Non-Destructive Analysis of Fiber Dispersion in Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Faifer, Marco; Ferrara, Liberato; Ottoboni, Roberto; Toscani, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive analysis of fiber dispersion in structural elements made of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) and Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites (FRCCs) plays a significant role in the framework of quality control and performance prediction. In this paper, the research activity of the authors in the aforementioned field all over the last lustrum will be reviewed. A method based on the measurement of the inductance of a probe to be placed on the specimen will be presented and its progressive development will be described. Obtained correlation with actual fiber dispersion, as checked by means of destructive methods, as well as with the mechanical performance of the composite will also be presented, in an attempt to address the significance of the method from an engineering application perspective. PMID:23337334

  6. Non-destructive investigation of thermoplastic reinforced composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hassen, Ahmed; Taheri, Hossein; Vaidya, Uday

    2016-05-09

    This paper studies various manufacturing defects in glass fiber/Polypropylene (PP) composite parts and their methods of detection. Foreign Object Inclusion (FOI) of different shapes, sizes, and materials were placed in a glass fiber/PP panel made by compression molding. The paper aims to characterize the fiber orientation and fiber related defects such as fiber waviness in the composite specimen. Comprehensive investigation for different Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques, namely X-ray radiography and Ultrasonic Testing (UT) techniques to trace and characterize the embedded defects and the composite texture are presented. Conventional X-ray radiography successfully identified the fiber orientation in two dimension (2-D)more » plane; however, information for the sample depth was not captured. The radiography techniques showed low relative errors for the defect size measurements (maximum error was below 9.5%) when compared to the ultrasonic techniques. Ultrasonic techniques were able to map all the embedded artificial defects. Phase Array (PA) ultrasonic technique was able to precisely locate the FOI in the glass fiber/PP specimen. Nerveless, the shape and size of the defects were not accurately determined due to the high signal attenuation and distortion characteristics of the E-glass fiber.« less

  7. Non-destructive investigation of thermoplastic reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hassen, Ahmed; Vaidya, Uday

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies various manufacturing defects in glass fiber/Polypropylene (PP) composite parts and their methods of detection. Foreign Object Inclusion (FOI) of different shapes, sizes, and materials were placed in a glass fiber/PP panel made by compression molding. The paper aims to characterize the fiber orientation and fiber related defects such as fiber waviness in the composite specimen. Comprehensive investigation for different Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques, namely X-ray radiography and Ultrasonic Testing (UT) techniques to trace and characterize the embedded defects and the composite texture are presented. Conventional X-ray radiography successfully identified the fiber orientation in two dimension (2-D) plane; however, information for the sample depth was not captured. The radiography techniques showed low relative errors for the defect size measurements (maximum error was below 9.5%) when compared to the ultrasonic techniques. Ultrasonic techniques were able to map all the embedded artificial defects. Phase Array (PA) ultrasonic technique was able to precisely locate the FOI in the glass fiber/PP specimen. Nerveless, the shape and size of the defects were not accurately determined due to the high signal attenuation and distortion characteristics of the E-glass fiber.

  8. Non destructive testing of works of art by terahertz analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Metayer, Jean-Jacques; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Detalle, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Improvements in technologies and the growing security needs in airport terminals lead to the development of non destructive testing devices using terahertz waves. Indeed, these waves have the advantage of being, on one hand, relatively penetrating. They also have the asset of not being ionizing. It is thus potentially an interesting contribution in the non destructive testing field. With the help of the VISIOM Company, the possibilities of this new industrial analysis method in assisting the restoration of works of art were then approached. The results obtained within this framework are presented here and compared with those obtained by infrared thermography. The results obtained show first that the THZ method, like the stimulated infrared thermography allows the detection of delamination located in murals paintings or in marquetries. They show then that the THZ method seems to allow detecting defects located relatively deeply (10 mm) and defects potentially concealed by other defects. It is an advantage compared to the stimulated infra-red thermography which does not make it possible to obtain these results. Furthermore, they show that the method does not seem sensitive to the various pigments constituting the pictorial layer, to the presence of a layer of "Japan paper" and to the presence of a layer of whitewash. It is not the case of the stimulated infrared thermography. It is another advantage of the THZ method. Finally, they show that the THZ method is limited in the detection of low-size defects. It is a disadvantage compared to the stimulated infrared thermography.

  9. Computed tomography for non-destructive evaluation of composites: Applications and correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B.; Hediger, L.; Noel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The state-of-the-art fabrication techniques for composite materials are such that stringent species-specific acceptance criteria must be generated to insure product reliability. Non-destructive evaluation techniques including computed tomography (CT), X-ray radiography (RT), and ultrasonic scanning (UT) are investigated and compared to determine their applicability and limitations to graphite epoxy, carbon-carbon, and carbon-phenolic materials. While the techniques appear complementary, CT is shown to provide significant, heretofore unattainable data. Finally, a correlation of NDE techniques to destructive analysis is presented.

  10. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  11. Non-destructive NIR FT Raman analysis of plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, B.; Klump, H. H.; Schenzel, K.; Schulz, H.

    1999-10-01

    Non-destructive analyses of animal and plant cells and tissues by 'classical' Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the visible range have not been possible since the samples are destroyed photochemically or their fluorescence conceals the Raman spectra completely. When excited with the Nd:YAG laser line at 1064 nm fluorescence-free Raman spectra of animal or plant cells and tissues can be recorded without special preparation. In this paper we concentrate on plants and its constituents: essential oils, natural dyes, flavors, spices, alkaloids and fibers can be characterized. The spectra allow the observation of biochemical processes, to observe the distribution of natural products, application to taxonomy, optimizing plant breeding, the harvesting time and control of food—everything non-destructively in living plants!

  12. Non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation of the nondestructive evaluation of advanced composite-laminates is summarized. Indices derived from the measurement of fundamental acoustic parameters are used in order to quantitatively estimate the local material properties of the laminate. The following sections describe ongoing studies of phase insensitive attenuation measurements, and discuss several phenomena which influences the previously reported technique of polar backscatter. A simple and effective programmable gate circuit designed for use in estimating attenuation from backscatter is described.

  13. Non-destructive testing of composite materials by means of active thermography-based tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizaranzu, Miguel; Lario, Alberto; Chiminelli, Agustín; Amenabar, Ibán

    2015-07-01

    Infrared analysis tools are nowadays widely used for the non-destructive testing of components made up in composite materials, belonging to many different industrial sectors. Being a non-contact method, its capability for the inspection of large areas in short periods of time justifies the great number of works and technical studies that can be found in this field. The growing interest in the technique is also supported by the development, during recent years, of increasingly powerful equipment and data analysis tools. In order to establish a base of knowledge to assist defect identification in real components inspections, the design and manufacturing of inspection samples including controlled defects, is a frequently used strategy. This paper deals with the analysis, by means of transient active thermography, of a set of inspection patterns made out of different composite materials and configurations that can be found in the wind turbine blade manufacturing industry. The design and manufacturing of these patterns are described, including different types of representative defects, stack configurations and composite manufacturing techniques. Reference samples are then inspected by means of active thermography analysis tools and the results obtained are discussed.

  14. Non-destructive Evaluation of Bonds Between Fiberglass Composite and Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Selina; Sonta, Kestutis; Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. E.; Berger, Libby

    2015-01-01

    To assess the integrity and reliability of an adhesive joint in an automotive composite component, several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies are correlated to lap shear bond strengths. A glass-fabric-reinforced composite structure was bonded to a metallic structure with a two-part epoxy adhesive. Samples were subsequently cut and tested in shear, and flaws were found in some areas. This study aims to develop a reliable and portable NDE system for service-level adhesive inspection in the automotive industry. The results of the experimental investigation using several NDE methods are presented and discussed. Fiberglass-to-metal bonding is the ideal configuration for NDE via thermography using excitation with induction heating, due to the conductive metal and non-conductive glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Excitation can be either by a research-grade induction heater of highly defined frequency and intensity, or by a service-level heater, such as would be used for sealing windshields in a body shop. The thermographs thus produced can be captured via a high-resolution infrared camera, with principal component analysis and 2D spatial Laplacian processing. Alternatively, the thermographs can be captured by low resolution thermochromic microencapsulated liquid crystal film imaging, which needs no post-processing and can be very inexpensive. These samples were also examined with phased-array ultrasound. The NDE methods are compared to the lap shear values and to each other for approximate cost, accuracy, and time and level of expertise needed.

  15. Non-destructive evaluation of cylindrical composite structures using photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Mandelis, A.; Liu, Y.

    2005-06-01

    Thermal-wave diagnostics by means of infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) has been used for quantitative non-destructive evaluation of cylindrical composite structures. To quantitatively evaluate the thermal-wave field of a cylindrical composite material, the Green function corresponding to the composite structure has been developed and subsequently the thermal-wave field has been derived. Furthermore, the characteristics of the thermal-wave field for a cylindrical material with a surface coating are discussed. Experimental results from a stainless steel (AISI 302) tube are used to validate the theoretical model.

  16. Non-destructive infrared spectroscopic analysis of IMPROVE aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthenburg, T. C.; Dillner, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is of increasing interest for determining organic functional group composition of aerosols. The organic fraction of aerosols is thought to affect visibility, climate and toxicity. Organic functional group composition can provide insights into aerosol sources and aging. The Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program, established in 1985, operates a long term particulate matter monitoring network primarily in National Parks and Wilderness Areas. IMRPROVE samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters are analyzed via IR spectroscopy to determine organic functional group composition. Organic carbon (OC) mass determined by MIR spectroscopy is compared to OC derived from a thermal-optical method.

  17. Non Destructive Defect Detection by Spectral Density Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krejcar, Ondrej; Frischer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The potential nondestructive diagnostics of solid objects is discussed in this article. The whole process is accomplished by consecutive steps involving software analysis of the vibration power spectrum (eventually acoustic emissions) created during the normal operation of the diagnosed device or under unexpected situations. Another option is to create an artificial pulse, which can help us to determine the actual state of the diagnosed device. The main idea of this method is based on the analysis of the current power spectrum density of the received signal and its postprocessing in the Matlab environment with a following sample comparison in the Statistica software environment. The last step, which is comparison of samples, is the most important, because it is possible to determine the status of the examined object at a given time. Nowadays samples are compared only visually, but this method can’t produce good results. Further the presented filter can choose relevant data from a huge group of data, which originate from applying FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). On the other hand, using this approach they can be subjected to analysis with the assistance of a neural network. If correct and high-quality starting data are provided to the initial network, we are able to analyze other samples and state in which condition a certain object is. The success rate of this approximation, based on our testing of the solution, is now 85.7%. With further improvement of the filter, it could be even greater. Finally it is possible to detect defective conditions or upcoming limiting states of examined objects/materials by using only one device which contains HW and SW parts. This kind of detection can provide significant financial savings in certain cases (such as continuous casting of iron where it could save hundreds of thousands of USD). PMID:22163742

  18. Novel, non-destructive cereal quality analysis: potential for triticale.

    PubMed

    Manley, Marena

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, NIR hyperspectral imaging and X-ray computed technology (XCT) can each in its own way contribute to the effective analysis of whole grain triticale. With NIR spectroscopy only giving an average result, NIR hyperspectral imaging gives spatial as well as spectral information of a sample. Chemical information as well as the localisation of the chemical compounds is thus obtained. XCT advanced on these two techniques in that it allows three dimensional (3D) visualisation of the internal structure of a sample. The availability of X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT) instruments and now also nanoCT instruments allow high resolution images of the microstructure of samples to be obtained. These techniques, reviewed in this paper, can be used in association, each with their own advantages and disadvantages, to most effectively analyse whole grain triticale. PMID:26072581

  19. A multi-inspection non-destructive testing method for quality evaluation of composite riveted structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weihan; He, Jingjing; Yang, Jingsong; Liu, Shengwang; Zhang, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon fiber composites have excellent mechanical properties, which are widely used in aerospace industry. However, 60% to 80% damages in composite occur in riveted structures. This research focuses on the quality evaluation of three major riveted structures used in mechanical connection: pressure riveted connection, hammer riveted connection and pull riveted connection. The non-destructive testing results show that the pull riveting technology introduces minimal damage to the composite, but the hammer riveted structure can be seriously damaged by the riveting technology. The pull riveted structure is an interference fit, which makes the composite plate firmly fixed. However, the fix is weak in the pressure riveted structure and the hammer riveted structure, due to the small gap between the rivets and plate. The results show that the pull riveted structure has a higher tensile strength compared with the pressure riveted structure and hammer riveted structure. The hammer riveted structure has a large dispersion in mechanical properties caused by the impact loading used in the hammer riveting technology.

  20. Destructive and Non-Destructive Analysis Techniques for Failure Detection of QFN Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhila, M. N.; Wedianti, S.; Suhaimi, W. S. W. M.; Aishah, I.

    2010-03-01

    One of the latest developments in packaging technology is the QFN (Quad Flat Non-Lead) packages, which is both a chip scale package and plastic encapsulated package with lead pad at the bottom. In this paper, different type of commercial QFN single die packages were characterized by using destructive and non-destructive techniques. Non-destructive techniques such as Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM) and X-Ray analysis were used to observe package cracking, delamination and other failure mode. Application of SAM include detection of delaminations between lead frame, die face, paddle, heat sink, cracks and plastic encapsulant. In comparison to other techniques, SAM is sensitive to detect beneath the surface of devices which would be inaccessible otherwise by both conventional optical and electron microscopy inspection methods. Destructive technique such as Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was implemented to address the failures of the QFN single die packages such as die cracking, lifted ball bonds and other failure mode.

  1. Metal composite as backing for ultrasonic transducers dedicated to non-destructive measurements in hostile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubenia, R.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Despetis, F.; P, P.; Ferrandis, J.-Y.

    2016-03-01

    Our team is specialized in ultrasonic measurements in hostile environment especially under high temperatures. There is a need for acoustic transducers capable of continuous measurement at temperatures up to 700°C. To improve the performances of acoustic sensors we focus our works on the realisation and characterisation of transducer backings able to operate under very high temperature. Commercially, they are produced by the incorporation of tungsten powder in a plastic matrix, which limits the working temperature. The realisation of ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive measures at high temperatures requires adequate materials, manufacturing and assembly processes. To produce the backings, composites were made using very ductile metals such as tin and tungsten. These composites are manufactured by uniaxial hot pressing. First, we studied the influence of temperature and pressure on the densification of tin pellets. Then, several specimens made of tin/W were made and characterised by measuring the specific weight, speed and attenuation of sound. The acoustic measures were realised by ultrasonic spectroscopy. This test-bench was designed and tested on control samples of PMMA and on standard backings (epoxy / tungsten).

  2. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    oxygen isotope composition of ambient CO2. This non-destructive approach was tested through laboratory incubations of air-dried soils that were re-wetted with water of known isotopic composition. Performance was assessed by comparing estimates of the soil water oxygen isotope composition derived from open chamber flux measurements with those measured in the irrigation water and soil water extracted following incubations. The influence of soil pH and bovine carbonic anhydrase additions on these estimates was also investigated. Coherent values were found between the soil water composition estimates obtained from the dual steady state approach and those measured for irrigation waters. Estimates of carbonic anhydrase activity made using this approach also reflected well artificial increases to the concentration of carbonic anhydrase and indicated that this activity was sensitive to soil pH.

  3. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  4. Non-destructive evaluation of metal-to-metal adhesive joints using vibration analysis: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandurangan, Pradeep; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2006-03-01

    Vibration based non-destructive evaluation shows promise for damage detection in metal-to-metal adhesive joints. This research investigates an experimental technique to diagnose damage in single-lap adhesive joints subject to cyclical tensile loading. Vibration analysis reveals that damage can be correlated with changes in identified modal damping ratios. Constant amplitude forcing functions are employed to eliminate amplitude-dependent nonlinearities in the dynamic response profiles. Damping estimates obtained from time-domain analyses correlate well with damage magnitudes. Finite element modal analysis of the lap joints supports the experimental results.

  5. Photothermal Analysis Applied To Non-Destructive Evaluation Of Paint On Polymer Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, D.; Busse, G.

    1988-10-01

    The decoration and protection quality of coatings on polymers is of considerable interest for industrial applications. However, at present there is no non-destructive (NDE) method to monitor the quality of these coatings during the manufacturing process or while they are in use. As an approach for such a method we use photothermal analysis where the propagation and reflection of optically generated thermal waves is investigated. We found that one can monitor the drying process, the effect of surface temperature treatment, and coating thickness (accuracy + 2 μm in 50 μm thickness). The information obtained with this remote NDE method is adequate for most industrial applications, eg car manufacturing.

  6. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  7. Non destructive FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy studies on carbon fiber reinforced polyimide composite and water diffusion in epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Ravikumar

    Photo-acoustic (PA) detection is a non-destructive, non-disruptive mode of sample analysis. The principle of PA detection is monitoring the change in thermal properties of the material as a result of optical absorption. The ability to use with any incident radiation source makes it an attractive technique to study molecular excitations, vibrations and defects in any sample. Given the need for non-destructive analysis, the tool can be employed to study plethora of samples ranging from organic to inorganic. In the polymeric domain, there is a significant need for studying samples non-destructively with the architecture intact. For instance, molecular characterization in carbon fiber reinforced polymer, chemical diffusion in polymer resin/membrane and particulate/fillers incorporated thermosets suffer in characterization due to sample make-up. These samples are affected by opacity and thickness, which make them a very difficult set-up to study using conventional spectroscopic tools. We have employed PA mode of detection in tandem with a FTIR source to study the molecular vibrations to get an understanding of the systems considered. The first part of the work involved employing PA spectroscopy to study the curing in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). Phenyl-ethynyl terminated oligoamic acid impregnated composite system was studied. The curing of composite and resin was monitored using PAS and compared with Transmission FTIR on resin and dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC). The composite showed two distinct reactions as a function of thermal treatment. (1) Imidization at low temperatures due to cyclo-dehydration and (2) at high temperatures, crosslinking due to ethynyl addition reaction. Composite exhibited enhanced curing trends compared to neat resin. Our results indicate that the thermal conductivity of the carbon fiber might play a role in heat transfer facilitating the reaction. The activation energy was found to be 23kcal/mol for the crosslinking step. The

  8. Optimization of ISOCS Parameters for Quantitative Non-Destructive Analysis of Uranium in Bulk Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutniy, D.; Vanzha, S.; Mikhaylov, V.; Belkin, F.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative calculation of the isotopic masses of fissionable U and Pu is important for forensic analysis of nuclear materials. γ-spectrometry is the most commonly applied tool for qualitative detection and analysis of key radionuclides in nuclear materials. Relative isotopic measurement of U and Pu may be obtained from γ-spectra through application of special software such as MGAU (Multi-Group Analysis for Uranium, LLNL) or FRAM (Fixed-Energy Response Function Analysis with Multiple Efficiency, LANL). If the concentration of U/Pu in the matrix is unknown, however, isotopic masses cannot be calculated. At present, active neutron interrogation is the only practical alternative for non-destructive quantification of fissionable isotopes of U and Pu. An active well coincidence counter (AWCC), an alternative for analyses of uranium materials, has the following disadvantages: 1) The detection of small quantities (≤100 g) of 235U is not possible in many models; 2) Representative standards that capture the geometry, density and chemical composition of the analyzed unknown are required for precise analysis; and 3) Specimen size is severely restricted by the size of the measuring chamber. These problems may be addressed using modified γ-spectrometry techniques based on a coaxial HPGe-detector and ISOCS software (In Situ Object Counting System software, Canberra). We present data testing a new gamma-spectrometry method uniting actinide detection with commonly utilized software, modified for application in determining the masses of the fissionable isotopes in unknown samples of nuclear materials. The ISOCS software, widely used in radiation monitoring, calculates the detector efficiency curve in a specified geometry and range of photon energies. In describing the geometry of the source-detector, it is necessary to clearly describe the distance between the source and the detector, the material and the thickness of the walls of the container, as well as material, density

  9. Portable generator-based XRF instrument for non-destructive analysis at crime scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.; Trombka, Jacob I.; Floyd, Samuel; Selavka, Carl; Zeosky, Gerald; Gahn, Norman; McClanahan, Timothy; Burbine, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Unattended and remote detection systems find applications in space exploration, telemedicine, teleforensics, homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation programs. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals investigate crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ, together with state and local forensic laboratories. A general-purpose X-ray fluorescence system has been built for non-destructive analyses of trace and invisible material at crime scenes. This portable instrument is based on a generator that can operate to 60 kV and a Schottky CdTe detector. The instrument has been shown to be successful for the analysis of gunshot residue and a number of bodily fluids at crime scenes.

  10. Non-destructive quantitative analysis of risperidone in film-coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G

    2008-07-15

    A simple, non-destructive, methodology based on FT-Raman spectroscopy was developed for the quantitative analysis of risperidone in commercially available film-coated tablets. A simple linear regression model was constructed based on standard tablets, prepared using the same manufacturing process as the commercially available. The tablets contained 0.27, 0.54, 1.08, 1.62, 2.16, 3.24 and 4.32 wt% risperidone. The most prominent Raman vibration of the active pharmaceutical ingredient at 1533 cm(-1), recorded using a home-made rotating system, was plotted against concentration. The model was tested on commercial film-coated tablets. The results were compared against those obtained by application of HPLC on the same samples. PMID:18359600

  11. μ-XRF analysis of glasses: a non-destructive utility for Cultural Heritage applications.

    PubMed

    Vaggelli, G; Cossio, R

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a μ-XRF analytical approach for a non-destructive study of Cultural Heritage glass finds. This technique can be used for quantitative analysis of small volumes of solid samples, with a sensitivity that is superior to the electron microprobe but inferior to an ICP-MS system. An experimental set-up with natural and synthetic glass standards is proposed here for the quantitative analyses of major and trace elements on glass objects which cannot be sampled such as small archaeological or historical artefacts from Cultural Heritage. The described method, performed by means of the commercial μ-XRF Eagle III-XPL, was applied to Islamic glass specimens of Sasanian production (III-VII century A.D.) previously analyzed by ICP-MS and SEM-EDS techniques (P. Mirti, M. Pace, M. Negro Ponzi and M. Aceto, Archaeometry, 2008, 50(3), 429-450; P. Mirti, M. Pace, M. Malandrino and M. Negro Ponzi, J. Archaeol. Sci., 36, 1061-1069; and M. Gulmini, M. Pace, G. Ivaldi, M. Negro Ponzi and P. Mirti, J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 2009, 355, 1613-1621) and coming from the archaeological site of Veh Ardasir in modern Iraq. Major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe) of glass specimens show an accuracy better than 5%. Trace elements (Cr, Mn, Sr and Zr) display an accuracy better than 5% when the checked elements have a concentration >100 ppm by weight, whereas it is around 10% with a concentration <100 ppm by weight. μ-XRF is, therefore, a suitable elemental analysis technique for the non-destructive study of small glass finds due to its relatively good accuracy, reproducibility and low detection limits (∼tens ppm). PMID:22163367

  12. Complementary use of the Raman and XRF techniques for non-destructive analysis of historical paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawczak, M.; Kamińska, A.; Rabczuk, G.; Ferretti, M.; Jendrzejewski, R.; Śliwiński, G.

    2009-03-01

    The portable XRF spectrometer has been applied in situ for the non-destructive elemental mapping of the pigment components of the XV c. mural painting and frescos of the Little Christopher chamber in the Main Town Hall of Gdańsk, Poland. For a sufficiently large data collection the principal component analysis (PCA) was applied in order to associate the most intense lines of the elements Ca, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Hg in the XRF spectra with the palette of colors: white, brown, green, blue, red, yellow, and black observed in the painting. This allowed to limit the number of extractions of the micro-samples for the complementary Raman measurements thus assuring the practically non-destructive character of the entire analysis. The reliable identification of the pigment compositions was based on coincidence of the XRF, PCA and the Raman results which confirmed the presence of the chalk, malachite, azurite, red lead, mars red, mars yellow and candle black in the historical paints, except of the carbon-based black pigment being out of the XRF detection range. Different hues of the green paint were specified and the variety of the red and brown ones was ascribed to compositions of the Pb- and Fe-based red pigments (Fe 2O 3 and Pb 3O 4) with addition of the vermilion (HgS) and carbon black, in agreement with literature. The traces of elements: Ba and Sr, Sb and Mo, and also Cd, were ascribed to the impurities of Ca, those of some ochre pigments, and to the soluble Cd salts, respectively.

  13. Spatial distribution pattern analysis of subtidal macroalgae assemblages by a non-destructive rapid assessment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinda, Xabier; Juanes, José Antonio; Puente, Araceli; Echavarri-Erasun, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    The extensive field work carried out over the last century has allowed the worldwide description of general distribution patterns and specific composition of rocky intertidal communities. However, the information concerning subtidal communities on hard substrates is more recent and scarce due to the difficulties associated with working in such environments. In this work, a non-destructive method is applied to the study and mapping of subtidal rocky bottom macroalgae assemblages on the coast of Cantabria (N Spain) which is quick, easy and economical. Gelidium corneum and Cystoseira baccata were the dominant species, however, the composition and coverage of macroalgae assemblages varied significantly at different locations and depth ranges. The high presence of Laminaria ochroleuca and Saccorhiza polyschides, characteristic of colder waters, shows the transitional character of this coastal area. The results obtained throughout this study have been very useful to the application of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60/EC) and could be of great interest for the future conservation and management of these ecosystems (e.g. Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC).

  14. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  15. Rapid and non-destructive identification of water-injected beef samples using multispectral imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxia; Cao, Yue; Wang, Qiu; Pan, Wenjuan; Ma, Fei; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Water-injected beef has aroused public concern as a major food-safety issue in meat products. In the study, the potential of multispectral imaging analysis in the visible and near-infrared (405-970 nm) regions was evaluated for identifying water-injected beef. A multispectral vision system was used to acquire images of beef injected with up to 21% content of water, and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm was employed to establish prediction model, leading to quantitative estimations of actual water increase with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.923. Subsequently, an optimized model was achieved by integrating spectral data with feature information extracted from ordinary RGB data, yielding better predictions (r = 0.946). Moreover, the prediction equation was transferred to each pixel within the images for visualizing the distribution of actual water increase. These results demonstrate the capability of multispectral imaging technology as a rapid and non-destructive tool for the identification of water-injected beef. PMID:26213059

  16. Novel application of X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) for the non-destructive micro-elemental analysis of natural mineral pigments on Aboriginal Australian objects.

    PubMed

    Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel S; Lenehan, Claire E; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Howard, Daryl L; de Jonge, Martin D; Paterson, David; Walshe, Keryn; Pring, Allan

    2016-06-01

    This manuscript presents the first non-destructive synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence study of natural mineral pigments on Aboriginal Australian objects. Our results demonstrate the advantage of XFM (X-ray fluorescence microscopy) of Aboriginal Australian objects for optimum sensitivity, elemental analysis, micron-resolution mapping of pigment areas and the method also has the advantage of being non-destructive to the cultural heritage objects. Estimates of pigment thickness can be calculated. In addition, based on the elemental maps of the pigments, further conclusions can be drawn on the composition and mixtures and uses of natural mineral pigments and whether the objects were made using traditional or modern methods and materials. This manuscript highlights the results of this first application of XFM to investigate complex mineral pigments used on Aboriginal Australian objects. PMID:26999774

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging: non-destructive analysis of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Manley, Marena

    2014-12-21

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has come of age and is now prominent among major analytical technologies after the NIR region was discovered in 1800, revived and developed in the early 1950s and put into practice in the 1970s. Since its first use in the cereal industry, it has become the quality control method of choice for many more applications due to the advancement in instrumentation, computing power and multivariate data analysis. NIR spectroscopy is also increasingly used during basic research performed to better understand complex biological systems, e.g. by means of studying characteristic water absorption bands. The shorter NIR wavelengths (800-2500 nm), compared to those in the mid-infrared (MIR) range (2500-15 000 nm) enable increased penetration depth and subsequent non-destructive, non-invasive, chemical-free, rapid analysis possibilities for a wide range of biological materials. A disadvantage of NIR spectroscopy is its reliance on reference methods and model development using chemometrics. NIR measurements and predictions are, however, considered more reproducible than the usually more accurate and precise reference methods. The advantages of NIR spectroscopy contribute to it now often being favoured over other spectroscopic (colourimetry and MIR) and analytical methods, using chemicals and producing chemical waste, such as gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This tutorial review intends to provide a brief overview of the basic theoretical principles and most investigated applications of NIR spectroscopy. In addition, it considers the recent development, principles and applications of NIR hyperspectral imaging. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides NIR spectral data as a set of images, each representing a narrow wavelength range or spectral band. The advantage compared to NIR spectroscopy is that, due to the additional spatial dimension provided by this technology, the images can be analysed and visualised as

  18. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of composite materials based on ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Research into the nondestructive evaluation of advanced reinforced composite laminates is summarized. The applicability of the Framers-Kronig equations to the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials is described.

  19. Non-destructive analysis in a study of the religious art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vornicu, Nicoleta; Geba, Maria; Bibire, Cristina

    2009-08-01

    The icon Descending of the Saint Spirit from Bucium Church, dating in the year 1814 and was done in tempera on wood technology. The characterization of cultural heritage materials is essential for the comprehension of their degradation mechanisms. The present study aims at identifying the pigments in the various layers, establishing the possible existence of an organic binder and scientifically evaluating the state of preservation. To this end, were used non-destructive methods, as: microscopic (SEM), XRF and spectroscopic (FTIR).

  20. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of porous composite materials based on ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Porosity in composite media using ultrasonic waves is characterized. The derivation of local approximations to the Kramers-Kronig relations are presented and it is shown that they may also be applicable to systems that could conceivably exhibit considerable dispersion such as composite laminates containing porosity.

  1. Method and apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials with cloth surface impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madras, Eric I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and related apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by determination of the quantity known as Integrated Polar Backscatter, which avoids errors caused by surface texture left by cloth impressions by identifying frequency ranges associated with peaks in a power spectrum for the backscattered signal, and removing such frequency ranges from the calculation of Integrated Polar Backscatter for all scan sites on the composite material is presented.

  2. Non-destructive analysis of extracellular matrix development in cardiovascular tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Tuemen, M; Nguyen, D V A; Raffius, J; Flanagan, T C; Dietrich, M; Frese, J; Schmitz-Rode, T; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-05-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, there is an increasing demand for non-destructive methods to quantify the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagens, elastin or sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) in vitro as a quality control before clinical use. In this study, procollagen I carboxyterminal peptide (PICP), procollagen III aminoterminal peptide (PIIINP), tropoelastin and sGAGs are investigated for their potential use as non-destructive markers in culture medium of statically cultivated cell-seeded fibrin gels. Measurement of PICP as marker for type I collagen synthesis, and PIIINP as marker of type III collagen turnover, correlated well with the hydroxyproline content of the fibrin gels, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. The measurement of tropoelastin as marker of elastin synthesis correlated with the amount of elastin retained in fibrin gels with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99. sGAGs were retained in fibrin gels, but were not detectable in culture medium at any time of measurement. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential of PICP and tropoelastin as non-destructive culture medium markers for collagen and elastin synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first study in cardiovascular tissue engineering investigating the whole of here proposed biomarkers of ECM synthesis to monitor the maturation process of developing tissue non-invasively, but for comprehensive assessment of ECM development, these biomarkers need to be investigated in further studies, employing dynamic cultivation conditions and more complex tissue constructs. PMID:23307024

  3. In-process, non-destructive, dynamic testing of high-speed polymer composite rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschmierz, Robert; Filippatos, Angelos; Günther, Philipp; Langkamp, Albert; Hufenbach, Werner; Czarske, Jürgen; Fischer, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Polymer composite rotors are lightweight and offer great perspectives in high-speed applications such as turbo machinery. Currently, novel rotor structures and materials are investigated for the purpose of increasing machine efficiency and lifetime, as well as allowing for higher dynamic loads. However, due to the complexity of the composite materials an in-process measurement system is required. This allows for monitoring the evolution of damages under dynamic loads, for testing and predicting the structural integrity of composite rotors in process. In rotor design, it can be used for calibrating and improving models, simulating the dynamic behaviour of polymer composite rotors. The measurement system is to work non-invasive, offer micron uncertainty, as well as a high measurement rate of several tens of kHz. Furthermore, it must be applicable at high surface speeds and under technical vacuum. In order to fulfil these demands a novel laser distance measurement system was developed. It provides the angle resolved measurement of the biaxial deformation of a fibre-reinforced polymer composite rotor with micron uncertainty at surface speeds of more than 300 m/s. Furthermore, a simulation procedure combining a finite element model and a damage mechanics model is applied. A comparison of the measured data and the numerically calculated data is performed to validate the simulation towards rotor expansion. This validating procedure can be used for a model calibration in the future. The simulation procedure could be used to investigate different damage-test cases of the rotor, in order to define its structural behaviour without further experiments.

  4. Non-destructive evaluation of delamination growth in glass fiber composites using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Groves, Roger M.; Benedictus, Rinze

    2014-03-01

    Based on low coherence interferometry, a robust optical coherence tomography (OCT) system has been built. The system was used to monitor the growth of a delamination between the middle layers of a glass fiber composite under a static loading. Firstly specimens of the material used for the spar webs in wind turbines were prepared with an interlaminar crack from free edges. Then they were statically loaded by a customized tensile test stage to extend the delamination length and simultaneously scanned by the OCT system. To process the acquired data, an optimized signal processing algorithm was developed. The cross-sectional images clearly show the microstructure and the crack within the specimen. The 3D crack profiles show the application of OCT to determine the evolution of the crack structure inside the composite material during the propagation of the delamination, for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  5. Non-destructive analysis for the investigation of decomposition phenomena of historical manuscripts and prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, Werner; Staub, Susanne; Simon, Rolf; Heissler, Stefan; Pataki, Andrea; Banik, Gerhard

    2007-07-01

    As a contribution to the increasing efforts to preserve cultural heritage, historical books as well as illuminated manuscripts endangered by corrosive writing and printing materials or destructive coloring matters, non-destructive analytical methods are highly desirable enabling an in-situ examination of the surface status of an object. The development and application of a novel combination of non-destructive analytic methods based on (a) synchrotron radiation induced micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) and (b) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscope allows to investigate the state as well as the effectiveness of conservation procedures for historical manuscripts. Examples of measurements include (1) an iron gall ink manuscript of a historical memo on legal land description of the year 1769, (2) an original hand colored herbal of the years 1536/38 from the Senckenbergische Bibliothek, Frankfurt, and (3) the incunabula Johannes von Saaz: "Der Ackermann aus Boehmen" fated from 1463 and printed by Albrecht Pfister, Bamberg, owned by the Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbuettel.

  6. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of porous composite materials based on ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Two complementary ultrasonic techniques for characterizing porosity in fiber-reinforced composite laminates are evaluated. Five uniaxial graphite-fiber/epoxy-matrix composites having a range of 1 to 8 percent volume fraction of solid glass inclusions to model porosity were investigated. In one technique, signal loss was measured in transmission mode and slope of attenuation, obtained from the first order coefficient of a two-parameter polynomial fit about the center frequency of the useful bandwidth, was used as the ultrasonic parameter to characterize the porosity. The results of these transmission mode measurements displayed a good correlation between the volume fraction of porosity and the slope of attenuation. Integrated polar backscatter was used as a second ultrasonic parameter for the characterization of the porosity in these samples. A single transducer insonified the samples and measured the resulting backscatter at a polar angle of 30 deg with respect to the normal of the sample surface with the azimuthal angles centered at 0 deg with respect to the fiber orientation (i.e., along the fibers). Integrated polar backscatter also displayed good correlation with the volume fraction of porosity.

  7. Non-destructive measurements in advanced composite materials and structures using a fiber optic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeby, Ian

    1989-06-01

    The implementation of a distributed fiber optic sensing system for monitoring strain, temperature, and absorbed moisture at multiple discrete locations throughout an organic matrix composite structure is discussed. The system consists of a network of passive fiber optic sensors fabricated along a continuous single or dual channel waveguide that is embedded within the composite part during manufacture. The single channel sensor networks are interrogated by a conventional optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) while the dual channel networks are operated as coupled mode systems. In either case, physical information is encoded as relative changes in the amplitude of the signal returned from individual sensors. Operational theory, design and experimentally observed characteristics of each of the sensor types as well as the overall system are presented. Distributed sensors capable of measuring strain in the range of 1.8 microstrain to tens of millistrain, temperature from zero to 170 C with one tenth of a degree C resolution, and absorbed moisture from zero to two weight percent at up to ten discrete locations have been achieved.

  8. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of composite materials based on ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The size, shape, and orientation of damage correlates well between the polar backscatter technique and the deply technique. There is good quantitative correlation between the areas of damage indicated by the two techniques. These results suggest that the polar backscatter technique is sensitive to specific orientations of damage. The polar backscatter technique provides a good qualitative image of the size and shape of the largest zone of damage in each of the principal orientations. A quantitative estimate of the extent of these largest damage zones is obtained from the polar backscatter technique. The selective sensitivity of polar backscatter provides a useful tool for further studies of the mechanisms of impact damage in graphite fiber reinforced composite laminates.

  9. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Depth of Surface Cracks Using Ultrasonic Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Sheng-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic is one of the most common uses of a non-destructive evaluation method for crack detection and characterization. The effectiveness of the acoustic-ultrasound Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technique for the determination of the depth of the surface crack was presented. A method for ultrasonic sizing of surface cracks combined with the time domain and frequency spectrum was adopted. The ultrasonic frequency spectrum was obtained by Fourier transform technique. A series of test specimens with various depths of surface crack ranging from 1 mm to 8 mm was fabricated. The depth of the surface crack was evaluated using the pulse-echo technique. In this work, three different longitudinal waves with frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz were employed to investigate the effect of frequency on the sizing detection of surface cracks. Reasonable accuracies were achieved with measurement errors less than 7%. PMID:25225875

  10. MCNP ESTIMATE OF THE SAMPLED VOLUME IN A NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; DIOSZEGI, I.; MITRA, S.

    2004-05-03

    Global warming, promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission into the atmosphere, is partially mitigated by the photosynthesis processes of the terrestrial echo systems that act as atmospheric CO{sub 2} scrubbers and sequester carbon in soil. Switching from till to no till soils management practices in agriculture further augments this process. Carbon sequestration is also advanced by putting forward a carbon ''credit'' system whereby these can be traded between CO{sub 2} producers and sequesters. Implementation of carbon ''credit'' trade will be further promulgated by recent development of a non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring system based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Volumes and depth distributions defined by the 0.1, 1.0, 10, 50, and 90 percent neutron isofluxes, from a point source located at either 5 or 30 cm above the surface, were estimated using Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. Non-destructive evaluation of depth of surface cracks using ultrasonic frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Sheng-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic is one of the most common uses of a non-destructive evaluation method for crack detection and characterization. The effectiveness of the acoustic-ultrasound Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technique for the determination of the depth of the surface crack was presented. A method for ultrasonic sizing of surface cracks combined with the time domain and frequency spectrum was adopted. The ultrasonic frequency spectrum was obtained by Fourier transform technique. A series of test specimens with various depths of surface crack ranging from 1 mm to 8 mm was fabricated. The depth of the surface crack was evaluated using the pulse-echo technique. In this work, three different longitudinal waves with frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz were employed to investigate the effect of frequency on the sizing detection of surface cracks. Reasonable accuracies were achieved with measurement errors less than 7%. PMID:25225875

  12. In-process, non-destructive multimodal dynamic testing of high-speed composite rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschmierz, Robert; Filippatos, Angelos; Langkamp, Albert; Hufenbach, Werner; Czarske, Jürgern W.; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) rotors are lightweight and offer great perspectives in high-speed applications such as turbo machinery. Currently, novel rotor structures and materials are investigated for the purpose of increasing machine efficiency, lifetime and loading limits. Due to complex rotor structures, high anisotropy and non-linear behavior of FRP under dynamic loads, an in-process measurement system is necessary to monitor and to investigate the evolution of damages under real operation conditions. A non-invasive, optical laser Doppler distance sensor measurement system is applied to determine the biaxial deformation of a bladed FRP rotor with micron uncertainty as well as the tangential blade vibrations at surface speeds above 300 m/s. The laser Doppler distance sensor is applicable under vacuum conditions. Measurements at varying loading conditions are used to determine elastic and plastic deformations. Furthermore they allow to determine hysteresis, fatigue, Eigenfrequency shifts and loading limits. The deformation measurements show a highly anisotropic and nonlinear behavior and offer a deeper understanding of the damage evolution in FRP rotors. The experimental results are used to validate and to calibrate a simulation model of the deformation. The simulation combines finite element analysis and a damage mechanics model. The combination of simulation and measurement system enables the monitoring and prediction of damage evolutions of FRP rotors in process.

  13. Flat nose low velocity drop-weight impact response of carbon fibre composites using non-destructive damage detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umar; Myler, Peter

    2015-03-01

    This work is mainly concerned with the nondestructive post-impact damage evaluation of carbon fibre reinforced laminated composite panels subject to low velocity drop-weight impact by flat and round nose impactors. Quasi-isotropic laminates consisting of eight-, sixteen-, and twenty-four plies were impacted by flat and round nose impactors at different velocity levels. Load-time history data were recorded and plotted to correlate loaddrop as damage level to the impactor nose profiles. Test produced data, non-destructive damage detection techniques: visual, ultrasonic, and eddy- current, and computer simulations were utilised to identify and quantify status of the impact induced damage. To evaluate damage in relatively thick laminates (consisting of 24-Ply), the damage ratios and deflection quantities were correlated to the corresponding impactor nose profiles. Damage induced by the flat nose impactor to thick laminates was compared against the data produced by the round nose impactor. Results show that relatively thin laminates were largely affected by the impactor nose. Reasonable difference was observed in damage caused by flat and round impactor nose profiles to thick laminates impacted at relatively higher velocity impacts. Resultswere compared and validated against simulation produced data.

  14. Non-destructive analysis of DU content in the NIF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Gharibyan, Narek; Moody, Ken J.; Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2015-12-16

    The advantage of using depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums in high-yield deuterium-tritium (DT) shots at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is addressed by Döppner, et al., in great detail [1]. This DU based hohlraum incorporates a thin layer of DU, ~7 μm thick, on the inner surface along with a thin layer of a gold coating, ~0.7 μm thick, while the outer layer is ~22 μm thick gold. A thickness measurement of the DU layer can be performed using an optical microscope where the total DU weight can be computed provided a uniform DU layer. However, the uniformity of the thickness is not constant throughout the hohlraum since CAD drawing calculations of the DU weight do not agree with the computed values from optical measurements [2]. Therefore, a non-destructive method for quantifying the DU content in hohlraums has been established by utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy. The details of this method, along with results from several hohlraums, are presented in this report.

  15. From local to global analysis of defect detectability in infrared non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez-Ospina, J. F.; Benitez, H. D.

    2014-03-01

    Several image processing techniques are employed in Infrared Non-Destructive Testing (IRNDT) to enhance defect detectability. To date, there is no adequate global measurement that objectively assesses defect visibility in processed frames. In this work, a Global Signal to Noise Ratio (GSNR) that comprehensively evaluates defect detectability in processed infrared (IR) images is proposed, as well as a defect visibility measure named Infrared Image Quality Index (IRIQI) that compares the structural information of defective and sound areas. In addition, GSNR and IRIQI are validated by using the area under ROC curve (AUC). AUC quantitatively assesses defect visibility by comparing the outcomes of processing techniques to human judgements. The remarkable benefit of this global approach is that it allows one to determine the frame at which processing techniques reveals the majority of the defects by evaluating the times at which AUC curves reach their maxima. The test pieces were a Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) sample containing delaminations and a honeycomb specimen with delaminations, skin unbonds, excessive adhesive, and crushed core.

  16. A technical study of alloy compositions of "brass" wind musical instruments (1651-1867) utilizing non-destructive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Alice Louise

    This thesis represents a new interdisciplinary approach to the conservation, care and curatorial study of 'brass' wind musical instruments. It attempts to combine metallurgical, chronological and historical aspects for a selection of instruments. The research consists of the systematic study of seventy-seven musical instruments, by known makers, using standardised non-destructive energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (XRF). Such compositional data are virtually non-existent for historical 'brass' instruments in Britain and what few technical data that do exist are sporadic in quantity and quality. The development of brass instruments is interwoven with the history of brass making, but because there are a limited number of appropriate examples such links can be difficult to identify. This thesis describes the development of brass production from the cementation process to the commercial production of zinc and modern brass. Its relationship to the musical instrument industry in Britain is linked with historical evidence. It will be shown that innovation and known historical metallurgical achievements are reflected in the compositional changes of the alloys used for musical instruments. This thesis focuses on specific named brass wind musical instrument makers. This thesis sets out to investigate the extent to which a single analytical technique such as non-destructive analysis utilising XRF could be useful in the curatorial and conservation care of musical instruments. The results of the analyses revealed new aspects to the use of metals for making musical instruments. They give new information on approximate alloy compositions and, in particular, the results have shown that in the seventeenth-century in England, a ternary alloy of copper/tin/zinc was used, and that it was, perhaps, only superseded by brass (copper/zinc alloy) in the eighteenth century. It has been possible to arrange the results into a chronology of alloys particularly reflecting the change from the

  17. Analysis of Microstructure Using Thermoelectric Diagnostics for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. D.; Kaydanov, V. I.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D. L.

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of Thermoelectric power (TEP) were used to evaluate microstructural analysis in HSLA steel weldments and retained austenite volume fraction for TRIP steel. First, the measurements of TEP for weld microstructure across weldment have shown good correlation with hardness profile. The different TEP values indicated that changes in weld microstructure can be correlated with TEP values measured. Second, it was demonstrated that retained austenite volume fraction were well correlated to TEP measurements for transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. The results suggest that TEP measurements can be correlated to retained austenite volume fraction for TRIP steels, which do not have same chemical composition and thermal heat treatment processes. The retained austenite volume fraction also was measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. With the introduction of these advanced TEP coefficient measurement techniques, the welding and steel industry will be using analytical tools similar to those instruments applied in the semiconductor industry.

  18. Analysis of Microstructure Using Thermoelectric Diagnostics for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.D.; Kaydanov, V.I.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    2005-04-09

    Measurements of Thermoelectric power (TEP) were used to evaluate microstructural analysis in HSLA steel weldments and retained austenite volume fraction for TRIP steel. First, the measurements of TEP for weld microstructure across weldment have shown good correlation with hardness profile. The different TEP values indicated that changes in weld microstructure can be correlated with TEP values measured. Second, it was demonstrated that retained austenite volume fraction were well correlated to TEP measurements for transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. The results suggest that TEP measurements can be correlated to retained austenite volume fraction for TRIP steels, which do not have same chemical composition and thermal heat treatment processes. The retained austenite volume fraction also was measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. With the introduction of these advanced TEP coefficient measurement techniques, the welding and steel industry will be using analytical tools similar to those instruments applied in the semiconductor industry.

  19. Long Term and High Frequency Non-Destructive Monitoring of Soil Water Stable Isotope Compositions in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Y.; Merz, S.; Pohlmeier, A. J.; Vereecken, H.; Brueggemann, N.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and dynamics of water stable isotopologues (1H2H16O and 1H218O) are currently well implemented into physically based Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) models (e.g. Hydrus 1D, SiSPAT-I, Soil-Litter iso, TOUGHREACT). However, contrary to other state variables (e.g., water content and tension) that can be monitored over long periods (e.g., by time-domain reflectometry, capacitive sensing, tensiometry or micro-psychrometry), water stable isotope compositions (δ2H and δ18O) are analyzed following destructive sampling, and thus are available only at a given time. Thus, there are important discrepancies in time resolution between soil water and stable isotope information which greatly limit the insight potential of the latter. Recently however, a technique based on direct infrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed that allows simultaneous and direct measurements of δ2H and δ18O in water vapor. Here, we present a non-destructive method for monitoring soil liquid δ2H and δ18O by sampling and measuring water vapor equilibrated with soil water using gas-permeable polypropylene tubing and a Cavity Ring-Down laser Spectrometer (CRDS). An acrylic glass column (d=11 cm, h=60 cm) was (i) equipped with temperature and soil water probes in addition to gas-permeable tubing sections at eight different depths, (ii) filled with pure quartz sand, (iii) saturated from the bottom, and (iv) installed on weighing balances and let dry for 250 days. Each day, soil vapor δ2H and δ18O were measured for each depth by purging the soil water vapor sampled in the tubing sections with dry air and analyzing it with a CRDS. Soil liquid water δ2H and δ18O were then inferred from the values measured in the vapor. The experimental setup allowed following the evolution of the soil water δ2H and δ18O profile, which developed as a result of isotope convective capillary rise and back-diffusion of the stable isotope excess at the soil surface due to fractionating soil

  20. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  1. Optical coherence tomography for non-destructive analysis of coatings in pharmaceutical tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Daniel; Hannesschläger, Günther; Sacher, Stephan; Khinast, Johannes G.; Leitner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Tablet coating is a common pharmaceutical technique to apply a thin continuous layer of solid on the top of a tablet or a granule containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Coating thickness and homogeneity are critical parameters regarding the drug release rate, and consequently a direct or indirect monitoring strategy of these critical process parameters is essential. With the aid of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) it is not only possible to measure the absolute coating thickness, but also to detect inhomogeneities in the coating or substrate material. In this work the possible application of OCT as in-line method for monitoring pharmaceutical tablet film coating is studied. Firstly, the feasibility of OCT for analysis tablet coating is examined. Seven different commercially available film-coated tablets with different shapes, formulations and coating thicknesses were investigated off-line. OCT images were acquired by two different spectral-domain OCT systems operating at center wavelengths of 830 and 1325 nm. Since the images of both systems allow the analysis of the coatings, the OCT system employing the shorter wavelength and thus providing a higher axial resolution was selected for the further experiments. The influence of a moving tablet bed on OCT images was analyzed by considering a static tablet bed and moving the sensor head along the tablet bed. The ability to analyze the coating homogeneity is limited to a speed up to 0.3 m/s. However, determining the coating thickness and inter-coating uniformity is still possible up to a speed of 0.7 m/s.

  2. Seismic joint analysis for non-destructive testing of asphalt and concrete slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    A seismic approach is used to estimate the thickness and elastic stiffness constants of asphalt or concrete slabs. The overall concept of the approach utilizes the robustness of the multichannel seismic method. A multichannel-equivalent data set is compiled from multiple time series recorded from multiple hammer impacts at progressively different offsets from a fixed receiver. This multichannel simulation with one receiver (MSOR) replaces the true multichannel recording in a cost-effective and convenient manner. A recorded data set is first processed to evaluate the shear wave velocity through a wave field transformation, normally used in the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method, followed by a Lambwave inversion. Then, the same data set is used to evaluate compression wave velocity from a combined processing of the first-arrival picking and a linear regression. Finally, the amplitude spectra of the time series are used to evaluate the thickness by following the concepts utilized in the Impact Echo (IE) method. Due to the powerful signal extraction capabilities ensured by the multichannel processing schemes used, the entire procedure for all three evaluations can be fully automated and results can be obtained directly in the field. A field data set is used to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  3. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis, FY14 Extended Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S.

    2015-02-06

    Cryogenic gamma (γ) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K or below offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. We are developing cryogenic γ–detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), which have the potential of higher resolution, faster count rates and better linearity than other cryogenic detector technologies. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. Here we discuss the fabrication of a new generation of MMC γ–detectors in FY2014, and the resulting improvements in energy resolution and linearity of the new design. As an example of the type of NDA that cryogenic detectors enable, we demonstrate the direct detection of Pu-242 emissions with our MMC γ–detectors in the presence of Pu-240, and show that a quantitative NDA analysis agrees with the mass spectrometry

  4. "Dry-state" surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS): toward non-destructive analysis of dyes on textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, Chiara; Ngo, Hoan Thanh; Register, Janna; Bruni, Silvia; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we report the proof of concept of the possibility to identify natural dyes on textiles using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection by means of a simple "dry-state" SERS approach, i.e., exploiting the interactions between a solid nanometallic substrate and dye molecules present on textiles, thus avoiding any extraction or necessity to remove samples. The challenges associated with instrumental constraints related to SERS analysis of bulk materials and possible contamination of artworks with metallic nanoparticles were approached. Different silver nanosubstrates, i.e., nanoislands and films obtained starting from two different metal colloids, were tested for this aim. The study also investigates different parameters associated with the synthesis of nanosubstrates influencing the enhancement of the "dry-state" SERS signals obtained. SERS spectra of anthraquinone red dyes were successfully recorded from reference wool threads using this simple approach. The results illustrate the usefulness of the practical and rapid "dry-state" SERS approach that could open new opportunities toward the non-destructive analysis of dyes in artefacts.

  5. Non-destructive X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) Analysis of Sediment Variance in Marine Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Dipre, G.; Sawyer, D.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Benthic activity within marine sediments can alter the physical properties of the sediment as well as indicate nutrient flux and ocean temperatures. We examine burrowing features in sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean collected during the 2005 Healy-Oden TransArctic Expedition (HOTRAX) and from the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 308. While traditional methods for studying bioturbation require physical dissection of the cores, we assess burrowing using an X-ray computed tomography (XCT) scanner. XCT noninvasively images the sediment cores in three dimensions and produces density sensitive images suitable for quantitative analysis. XCT units are recorded as Hounsfield Units (HU), where -999 is air, 0 is water, and 4000-5000 would be a higher density mineral, such as pyrite. We rely on the fundamental assumption that sediments are deposited horizontally, and we analyze the variance over each flat-lying slice. The variance describes the spread of pixel values over a slice. When sediments are reworked, drawing higher and lower density matrix into a layer, the variance increases. Examples of this can be seen in two slices in core 19H-3A from Site U1324 of IODP Expedition 308. The first slice, located 165.6 meters below sea floor consists of relatively undisturbed sediment. Because of this, the majority of the sediment values fall between 1406 and 1497 HU, thus giving the slice a comparatively small variance of 819.7. The second slice, located 166.1 meters below sea floor, features a lower density sediment matrix disturbed by burrow tubes and the inclusion of a high density mineral. As a result, the Hounsfield Units have a larger variance of 1,197.5, which is a result of sediment matrix values that range from 1220 to 1260 HU, the high-density mineral value of 1920 HU and the burrow tubes that range from 1300 to 1410 HU. Analyzing this variance allows us to observe changes in the sediment matrix and more specifically capture

  6. Non-destructive mapping of doping and structural composition of MOVPE-grown high current density resonant tunnelling diodes through photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. J. P.; Stevens, B. J.; Mukai, T.; Ohnishi, D.; Hogg, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    We report on photoluminescence (PL) characterisation of metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown high current density (~700 kA/cm2) InGaAs/AlAs/InP based resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs) for terahertz emission. The PL mapping we describe allows important information about doping level and uniformity, ternary alloy composition and uniformity, and uniformity of quantum well thickness to be deduced. PL as a function of doping concentration is studied for InGaAs test layers at low temperatures and correlated to secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and electrochemical capacitance-voltage (eCV) profiling to provide non-destructive mapping of doping over the wafer. For the RTD structures, we utilise eCV as a selective etch tool to identify the origin of low temperature PL emission from the quantum well (QW) and the highly doped contact layers. PL mapping of the RTD wafer at low temperatures is shown to allow the assessment of variations in InGaAs alloy composition and QW thickness. Details of the growth process are discussed and confirmed using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) crystallography. The rapid non-destructive characterisation and wafer mapping of these structures promises a route to future growth optimisation of such structures.

  7. Geochemical evidence of multistage retrogressive failure during the 160,000ka Icod landslide from turbidite facies analysis: multidisciplinary investigative approaches using destructive and non-destructive methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, James; Wynn, Russell; Masson, Doug; Croudace, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The study of modern deep-sea systems through targeted piston coring has enabled detailed investigations into the process mechanics of turbidity currents. In complex systems such as the Moroccan Turbidite System the derivation of provenance is of vital importance, since flows from different sources in this system have been found to behave differently. Early provenance studies in the Madeira Abyssal Plain found that bulk sand-fraction geochemical analysis through ICP-AES could enable successful attribution of provenance to specific turbidites alongside electron microprobe analysis (de Lange, Jarvis & Kuijpers, 1987; Pearce & Jarvis, 1992). These sources including the Moroccan siliclastic shelf, Tenerife, Las Palma, El Hierro and Madeira. ICP-AES, MC-ICP-MS and XRF have been utilised here, however these present destructive methodologies, using 0.1-5g of material >63µm. Deep-sea piston cores are also expensive to collect, and often there is not enough material to remove for analysis without compromising the core. Furthermore, routine sampling, preparation and analysis using the destructive methods stated above are undertaken at considerable cost and analytical time. The successful use of non-destructive instruments to yield quantitative geochemical has become paramount at the NOC. This presentation serves to show the successful application of the TM-1000 tabletop SEM EDS analyser, ITRAX micro-XRF analyser and the GEOTEK XYZ logger, in coincidence with traditional destructive methods. These instruments can only supply semi-quantitative data, unless correct calibration can be achieved, and will be shown here. The 160,000ka Icod landslide from Tenerife generated a 150km3 debris avalanche with a runout of 105km and a >180km3 turbidity, which will form the case study for application of these instruments. The vertically stacked subunit facies of the Icod turbidite has been attributed to generation from a multistage retrogressive failure (Wynn & Masson, 2003). Here there

  8. The RAMANITA method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts.

    PubMed

    Smith, David C

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is quite different. PMID:16029851

  9. 3D Non-destructive Imaging of Punctures in Polyethylene Composite Armor by THz Time Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, N.; Panowicz, R.; Ospald, F.; Beigang, R.

    2015-08-01

    An ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene composite sample totally punctured by a projectile was examined by THz TDS raster scanning method in reflection configuration. The scanning results correctly match the distribution of delaminations inside the sample, which was proven with cross-sectional and frontal views after waterjet cutting. For further analysis, a signal-processing algorithm based on the deconvolution method was developed and the modified reference signal was used to reduce disturbances. The complex refractive index of the sample was determined by transmission TDS technique and was later used for the simulation of pulse propagation by the finite difference time domain method. These simulations verified the correctness of the proposed method and showed its constraints. Using the proposed algorithm, the ambiguous raw THz image was converted into a binary 3D image of the sample, which consists only of two areas: sample—polyethylene and delamination—air. As a result, a clear image of the distribution of delaminations with their spatial extent was obtained which can be used for further comparative analysis. The limitation of the proposed method is that parts of the central area of the puncture cannot be analyzed because tilted layers deflect the incident signal.

  10. Non-destructive Analysis of Oil-Contaminated Soil Core Samples by X-ray Computed Tomography and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Nishiwaki, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Utsuzawa, Shin; Jinguuji, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Non-destructive measurements of contaminated soil core samples are desirable prior to destructive measurements because they allow obtaining gross information from the core samples without touching harmful chemical species. Medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) and time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry were applied to non-destructive measurements of sandy soil core samples from a real site contaminated with heavy oil. The medical CT visualized the spatial distribution of the bulk density averaged over the voxel of 0.31 × 0.31 × 2 mm3. The obtained CT images clearly showed an increase in the bulk density with increasing depth. Coupled analysis with in situ time-domain reflectometry logging suggests that this increase is derived from an increase in the water volume fraction of soils with depth (i.e., unsaturated to saturated transition). This was confirmed by supplementary analysis using high-resolution micro-focus X-ray CT at a resolution of ∼10 μm, which directly imaged the increase in pore water with depth. NMR transverse relaxation waveforms of protons were acquired non-destructively at 2.7 MHz by the Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The nature of viscous petroleum molecules having short transverse relaxation times (T2) compared to water molecules enabled us to distinguish the water-saturated portion from the oil-contaminated portion in the core sample using an M0–T2 plot, where M0 is the initial amplitude of the CPMG signal. The present study demonstrates that non-destructive core measurements by medical X-ray CT and low-field NMR provide information on the groundwater saturation level and oil-contaminated intervals, which is useful for constructing an adequate plan for subsequent destructive laboratory measurements of cores. PMID:21258437

  11. Non-destructive evaluation of porosity and its effect on mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, M. R.; Binoy, M. P.; Surya, N. M.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Engelbart, R. W.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, an attempt is made to induce porosity of varied levels in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based polymer composite laminates fabricated using prepregs by varying the fabrication parameters such as applied vacuum, autoclave pressure and curing temperature. Different NDE tools have been utilized to evaluate the porosity content and correlate with measurable parameters of different NDE techniques. Primarily, ultrasonic imaging and real time digital X-ray imaging have been tried to obtain a measurable parameter which can represent or reflect the amount of porosity contained in the composite laminate. Also, effect of varied porosity content on mechanical properties of the CFRP composite materials is investigated through a series of experimental investigations. The outcome of the experimental approach has yielded interesting and encouraging trend as a first step towards developing an NDE tool for quantification of effect of varied porosity in the polymer composite materials.

  12. A new fiber-optic non-contact compact laser-ultrasound scanner for fast non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites

    PubMed Central

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample with known defects. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed fiber laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate up to 76 kHz rate with a pulse energy of 0.6 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals at the same point on the composite surface. A- and B-scans obtained with the Sagnac interferometer are compared to those made with a contact wide-band polyvinylidene fluoride transducer. PMID:24737921

  13. A new fiber-optic non-contact compact laser-ultrasound scanner for fast non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-21

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample with known defects. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed fiber laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate up to 76 kHz rate with a pulse energy of 0.6 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals at the same point on the composite surface. A- and B-scans obtained with the Sagnac interferometer are compared to those made with a contact wide-band polyvinylidene fluoride transducer. PMID:24737921

  14. The RAMANITA © method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA ©" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, by M. Pinet and D.C. Smith in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA ©, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA © method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. from gemstones or other crystalline artworks of the cultural heritage (especially by Mobile Raman Microscopy (MRM)) in situ in museums or at archaeological sites, including under water for subaquatic archaeometry; from scientifically precious mineral microinclusions (such as garnet or pyroxene within diamond); from minerals in rocks analysed in situ on planetary bodies by a rover (especially "at distance" by telescopy). Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is

  15. Elemental X-ray mapping of agglutinated foraminifer tests: a non- destructive technique for determining compositional characteristics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Commeau, R.F.; Reynolds, Leslie A.; Poag, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The composition of agglutinated foraminiferal tests vary remarkably in response to local substrate characteristics, physiochemical properties of the water column and species- dependant selectivity of test components. We have employed a technique that combines a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer system to identify major and minor elemental constituents of agglutinated foraminiferal walls. As a sample is bombarded with a beam of high energy electrons, X-rays are generated that are characteristic of the elements present. As a result, X- ray density maps can be produced for each of several elements present in the tests of agglutinated foraminifers. -Authors

  16. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy/Monte Carlo simulation approach for the non-destructive analysis of corrosion patina-bearing alloys in archaeological bronzes: The case of the bowl from the Fareleira 3 site (Vidigueira, South Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottaini, C.; Mirão, J.; Figuereido, M.; Candeias, A.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-known technique for non-destructive and in situ analysis of archaeological artifacts both in terms of the qualitative and quantitative elemental composition because of its rapidity and non-destructiveness. In this study EDXRF and realistic Monte Carlo simulation using the X-ray Monte Carlo (XRMC) code package have been combined to characterize a Cu-based bowl from the Iron Age burial from Fareleira 3 (Southern Portugal). The artifact displays a multilayered structure made up of three distinct layers: a) alloy substrate; b) green oxidized corrosion patina; and c) brownish carbonate soil-derived crust. To assess the reliability of Monte Carlo simulation in reproducing the composition of the bulk metal of the objects without recurring to potentially damaging patina's and crust's removal, portable EDXRF analysis was performed on cleaned and patina/crust coated areas of the artifact. Patina has been characterized by micro X-ray Diffractometry (μXRD) and Back-Scattered Scanning Electron Microscopy + Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (BSEM + EDS). Results indicate that the EDXRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + crust surface coating is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample.

  17. Non-destructive visualization of linear explosive-induced Pyroshock using phase arrayed laser-induced shock in a space launcher composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kyeong Jang, Jae; Ryul Lee, Jung

    2015-07-01

    Separation mechanism of Space launch vehicles are used in various separation systems and pyrotechnic devices. The operation of these pyrotechnic devices generates Pyroshock that can cause failures in electronic components. The prediction of high frequency structural response, especially the shock response spectrum (SRS), is important. This paper presents a non-destructive visualization and simulation of linear explosive-induced Pyroshock using phase arrayed Laser-induced shock. The proposed method includes a laser shock test based on laser beam and filtering zone conditioning to predict the SRS of Pyroshock. A ballistic test based on linear explosive and non-contact Laser Doppler Vibrometers and a nondestructive Laser shock measurement using laser excitation and several PZT sensors, are performed using a carbon composite sandwich panel. The similarity of the SRS of the conditioned laser shock to that of the real explosive Pyroshock is evaluated with the Mean Acceleration Difference. The average of MADs over the two training points was 33.64%. And, MAD at verification point was improved to 31.99%. After that, experimentally found optimal conditions are applied to any arbitrary points in laser scanning area. Finally, it is shown that linear explosive-induced real Pyroshock wave propagation can be visualized with high similarity based on the proposed laser technology.

  18. Validation of a direct non-destructive quantitative analysis of amiodarone hydrochloride in Angoron((R)) formulations using FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G; Markopoulou, C K; Koundourellis, J E

    2007-09-15

    Raman spectroscopy was applied for the direct non-destructive analysis of amiodarone hydrochloride (ADH), the active ingredient of the liquid formulation Angoron((R)). The FT-Raman spectra were obtained through the un-broken as-received ampoules of Angoron((R)). Using the most intense vibration of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) at 1568cm(-1), a calibration model, based on solutions with known concentrations, was developed. The model was applied to the Raman spectra recorded from three as-purchased commercial formulations of Angoron((R)) having nominal strength of 50mgml(-1) ADH. The average value of the API in these samples was found to be 48.56+/-0.64mgml(-1) while the detection limit of the proposed technique was found to be 2.11mgml(-1). The results were compared to those obtained from the application of HPLC using the methodology described in the European Pharmacopoeia and found to be in excellent agreement. The proposed analytical methodology was also validated by evaluating the linearity of the calibration line as well as its accuracy and precision. The main advantage of Raman spectroscopy over HPLC method during routine analysis is that it is considerably faster and no solvent consuming. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy is non-destructive for the sample. However, the detection limit for Raman spectroscopy is much higher than the corresponding for the HPLC methodology. PMID:19073025

  19. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence analysis for non-destructive determination of In and Ga depth profiles in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber films

    SciTech Connect

    Streeck, C.; Brunken, S.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Weber, A.; Schock, H.-W.; Mainz, R.; Gerlach, M.; Hönicke, P.; Lubeck, J.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Herzog, C.; Kanngießer, B.

    2013-09-09

    Development of highly efficient thin film solar cells involves band gap engineering by tuning their elemental composition with depth. Here we show that grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and well-characterized instrumentation is suitable for a non-destructive and reference-free analysis of compositional depth profiles in thin films. Variation of the incidence angle provides quantitative access to the in-depth distribution of the elements, which are retrieved from measured fluorescence intensities by modeling parameterized gradients and fitting calculated to measured fluorescence intensities. Our results show that double Ga gradients in Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} can be resolved by GIXRF.

  20. Evaluation of the veracity of one work by the artist Di Cavalcanti through non-destructive techniques: XRF, imaging and brush stroke analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, E. A. M.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Appoloni, C. R.; Lopes, F.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents systematic studies and analysis that contributed to the identification of the forgery of a work by the artist Emiliano Augusto Cavalcanti de Albuquerque e Melo, known as Di Cavalcanti. The use of several areas of expertise such as brush stroke analysis ("pinacologia"), applied physics, and art history resulted in an accurate diagnosis for ascertaining the authenticity of the work entitled "Violeiro" (1950). For this work we used non-destructive methods such as techniques of infrared, ultraviolet, visible and tangential light imaging combined with chemical analysis of the pigments by portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and graphic gesture analysis. Each applied method of analysis produced specific information that made possible the identification of materials and techniques employed and we concluded that this work is not consistent with patterns characteristic of the artist Di Cavalcanti.

  1. Non-invasive and non-destructive micro-XRF and micro-Raman analysis of a decorative wallpaper from the beginning of the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Castro, Kepa; Pérez-Alonso, Maite; Rodríguez-Laso, María Dolores; Etxebarria, Nestor; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2007-02-01

    Non-destructive and non-invasive micro-Raman fibre optic and micro-XRF analyses were performed to study a wallpaper from the beginning of the 19th century. The complementarity of these two non-destructive techniques is shown in this work. The analysed artwork is considered one of the most beautiful wallpapers ever manufactured according to the catalogues and books; it is known as Chasse de Compiègne, manufactured by Jacquemart, Paris, in 1812. During the analysis, an unexpected pigment was detected by both analytical techniques: lead-tin yellow type II. This pigment was used until ca. 1750, when other yellow pigments replaced it, thus it is very difficult to find it in paintings afterwards. Together with this pigment, red lead, Prussian blue, brochantite, yellow iron oxide, calcium carbonate, vermilion, carbon black of animal origin (bone black), lead white, and raw and burnt sienna were also determined by combining the analytical information provided by both techniques. A possible degradation of brochantite to antlerite is also discussed. PMID:16838156

  2. Acoustic emission and dilatometry for non-destructive characterization of microstructural changes in Mg based metal matrix composites submitted to thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelik, R.; Lukac, P.; Kiehn, J.; Kainer, K.U.; Mordike, B.L.

    1997-12-18

    Many Mg-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been developed and manufactured during the last decade as prospective light high-performance constructional materials. When a MMC is submitted to temperature changes (cooling down from the temperature of fabrication, cyclic temperature changes during operation of structural parts) thermal stresses arise at the interfaces owing to a considerable mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficient of the matrix and that of the reinforcement. Even slight temperature changes may produce thermal stresses which exceed the matrix yield stress, consequently, generating new dislocations at the interfaces causing microstructural changes and plastic deformation of the matrix. Long-term exposure may also result in fatigue damage. It is noteworthy that the effect of temperature variations is similar to creep under non-stationary loading conditions. Acoustic emission (AE) has been observed during thermal cycling of Mg based MMCs. Since dislocation motion and microstructural damage are generally accepted to produce AE, it is possible by AE measurements to identify and to characterize the microstructural changes and to correlate them with temperature or other parameters. The dilatometry technique enables the degree of matrix plastic deformation which superposing the thermal expansion to be determined by measuring the shape changes during testing. The combination of both methods yields non-destructively, at any instant of the test, information on the structure and operating processes over the entire volume of the specimen. This can also provide valuable information for subsequent investigations by microscopy or internal friction. The object of this paper is to report on the recently developed, combined AE and dilatometry technique and its application in a structural evolution in Mg-based MMCs subjected to thermal cycling.

  3. Magnetically attachable stencils and the non-destructive analysis of the contribution made by the underlying matrix to cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ashby, William J; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries

    2012-11-01

    Cell migration is controlled by the integration of numerous distinct components. Consequently, the analysis of cell migration is advancing towards comprehensive, multifaceted in vitro models. To accurately evaluate the contribution of an underlying substrate to cell motility in complex cellular environments we developed a migration assay using magnetically attachable stencils (MAts). When attached to a culture surface, MAts create a defined void in the cell monolayer without disrupting the cells or damaging the underlying substrate. Quantitative analysis of migration into this void reveals the substrate's contribution to migration. The magnetically-guided placement of a microfabricated stencil allows for full experimental control of the substrate on which migration is analyzed. MAts enable the evaluation of intact, defined matrix, and make it possible to analyze migration on unique surfaces such as micropatterned proteins, nano-textured surfaces, and pliable hydrogels. These studies also revealed that mechanical disruption, including the damage that occurs during scratch assays, diminishes migration and confounds the analysis of individual cell behavior. Analysis of migration on increasingly complex biomaterials reveals that the contribution of the underlying matrix depends not only on its molecular composition but also its organization and the context in which it is presented. PMID:22940214

  4. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah; Yahya, Redzuan; Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  5. Non-destructive geochemical analysis and element mapping using bench-top μ-XRF: applications and uses for geoscience problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Haschke, M.; Storey, M.; Tindle, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence(XRF) has long been used to provide valuable geochemical analysis of bulk rock samples in geological studies. However, it is a destructive technique, requiring samples to be homogenised by grinding to a fine powder and formed into a compacted pellet, or fused glass disk. The resulting sample has to be completely flat for reliable analysis. Until recently, non-destructive, high spatial resolution μ- XRF analysis, was possible only at specialised Synchotron radiation facilities, where high excitation beam energies are possible and specialised X-Ray focussing optical systems are available. Recently, a number of bench-top μ-XRF systems have become available, allowing easy, rapid and non-destructive geochemical analysis of various materials. We present a number of examples of how the new bench-top M4 Tornado μ-XRF system, developed by Bruker AXS, can be used to provide valuable geochemical information on geological samples. Both quantitative and qualitative (in the form of X-Ray area-maps) data can be quickly and easily acquired for a wide range of elements (as light as Na, using a vacuum), with minimal sample preparation, using an X-Ray spot size as low as 25 μm. Large (up to 30 cm) specimens can be analysed due to the large sample chamber. This allows non-destructive characterisation of (for example) archaeological obsidian artefacts, potentially allowing their source to be identified. It also allows rapid chemical characterisation of large heterogenous samples and may be of use applied to (for example) drill core samples, sedimentary or pyroclastic rocks containing a wide variety of clasts, lavas sourced from mixed and mingled magmas and mineralised samples. An obvious application is the ability to produce element maps or line-scans of minerals, allowing zoning of major and trace elements to be identified and thus informing on crystallisation histories. An application of particular interest to 40Ar/39Ar geochronologists is the ability to screen

  6. Non-destructive geochemical analysis and element mapping using bench-top μ-XRF: applications and uses for geoscience problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Haschke, Michael; Tagle, Roald; Storey, Michael

    2013-04-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) has long been used to provide valuable geochemical analysis of bulk rock samples in geological studies. However, it is a destructive technique, requiring samples to be homogenised by grinding to a fine powder and formed into a compacted pellet, or fused glass disk and the resulting sample has to be completely flat for reliable analysis. Until recently, non-destructive, high spatial resolution µ- XRF analysis was possible only at specialised Synchrotron radiation facilities, where high excitation beam energies are possible and specialised X-ray focussing optical systems are available. Recently, a number of bench-top µ-XRF systems have become available, allowing easy, rapid and non-destructive geochemical analysis of various materials. We present a number of examples of how the new bench-top M4 Tornado µ-XRF system, developed by Bruker Nano, can be used to provide valuable geochemical information on geological samples. Both quantitative and qualitative (in the form of X-Ray area-maps) data can be quickly and easily acquired for a wide range of elements (as light as Na, using a vacuum), with minimal sample preparation, using an X-Ray spot size as low as 25 µm. Large specimens up to 30 cm and 5 kg in weight can be analysed due to the large sample chamber, allowing non-destructive characterisation of rare or valuable materials. This technique is particularly useful in characterising heterogeneous samples, such as drill cores, sedimentary and pyroclastic rocks containing a variety of clasts, lavas sourced from mixed and mingled magmas, mineralised samples and fossils. An obvious application is the ability to produce element maps or line-scans of minerals, allowing zoning of major and trace elements to be identified and thus informing on crystallisation histories. An application of particular interest to 40Ar/39Ar geochronologists is the ability to screen and assess the purity of mineral separates, or to characterise polished slabs for

  7. 3D Non-destructive morphological analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell anode using full-field X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Cronin, J. Scott; Yuan, Qingxi; Yakal-Kremski, Kyle J.; Barnett, Scott A.; Wang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    An accurate 3D morphological analysis is critically needed to study the process-structure-property relationship in many application fields such as battery electrodes, fuel cells and porous materials for sensing and actuating. Here we present the application of a newly developed full field X-ray nano-scale transmission microscopy (TXM) imaging for a non-destructive, comprehensive 3D morphology analysis of a porous Ni-YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode. A unique combination of improved 3D resolution and large analyzed volume (˜3600 μm3) yields structural data with excellent statistical accuracy. 3D morphological parameters quantified include phase volume fractions, surface and interfacial area densities, phase size distribution, directional connectivity, tortuosity, and electrochemically active triple phase boundary density. A prediction of electrochemical anode polarization resistance based on this microstructural data yielded good agreement with a measured anode resistance via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Mclachlan model is used to estimate the anode electrical conductivity.

  8. Non-destructive analysis of the conformational changes in human lens lipid and protein structures of the immature cataracts associated with glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Liang, Run-Chu; Lee, Shui-Mei

    1998-09-01

    Previous study has supposed a possible mechanism of exacerbating cataract formation in cataractous human lens capsules induced by hypertension or glaucoma. To clarify the glaucoma-induced cataract formation of the eyes lens, changes in the human lens lipid and protein structures of immature cataractous patients with or without glaucoma were investigated. Two normal lenses, ten immature cataractous lenses without any complication and four immature cataractous lenses with glaucoma were used after surgical operation. Each de-capsulated human lens sample was sliced with a number 15 surgical blade. The intact nuclear lens regions were used for non-destructive analysis. The lens lipid and protein structures, as well as compositions of these lens samples, were determined using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy with second-derivative, de-convolution and curve-fitting methods. The results indicate that the IR spectrum of glaucomatous lenses appeared as a shoulder only at 2853 cm -1, thus the composition of the symmetric CH 2 stretching band at 2853 (2852) cm -1 decreased more significantly in glaucomatous lens to only one half of that in normal and immature cataractous lenses. The composition of the asymmetric CH 3 stretching band at 2965 cm -1 for normal lens decreases markedly from 32 to 20% for immature cataractous lenses with or without glaucoma. The compositional ratio of component at 2965 cm -1 to component at 2928 (2930) cm -1 for normal lenses was about 0.702, and that ratio for cataractous lenses without glaucoma was 0.382 but for glaucomatous lenses was 0.377. The maximum peak position of amide I band for IR spectra of the normal lens, immature cataractous lenses without complications or glaucomatous lenses appeared respectively at 1632, 1630 or 1622 cm -1, assigned to β sheet structure. A marked difference in peak intensity of amide I band for the normal lenses and immature cataractous human lenses with or without glaucoma was observed. The

  9. Non-destructive evaluation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves by simple and multiple regression analysis of RGB image components.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, M; Mele, G; Pulvento, C; Lavini, A; d'Andria, R; Jacobsen, S-E

    2014-06-01

    Leaf chlorophyll content provides valuable information about physiological status of plants; it is directly linked to photosynthetic potential and primary production. In vitro assessment by wet chemical extraction is the standard method for leaf chlorophyll determination. This measurement is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Over the years alternative methods, rapid and non-destructive, have been explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the applicability of a fast and non-invasive field method for estimation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves based on RGB components analysis of digital images acquired with a standard SLR camera. Digital images of leaves from different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth were acquired directly in the field. Mean values of each RGB component were evaluated via image analysis software and correlated to leaf chlorophyll provided by standard laboratory procedure. Single and multiple regression models using RGB color components as independent variables have been tested and validated. The performance of the proposed method was compared to that of the widely used non-destructive SPAD method. Sensitivity of the best regression models for different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth was also checked. Color data acquisition of the leaves in the field with a digital camera was quick, more effective, and lower cost than SPAD. The proposed RGB models provided better correlation (highest R (2)) and prediction (lowest RMSEP) of the true value of foliar chlorophyll content and had a lower amount of noise in the whole range of chlorophyll studied compared with SPAD and other leaf image processing based models when applied to quinoa and amaranth. PMID:24442792

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE BEAM MEASUREMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.

    2004-07-05

    In high energy accelerators, especially storage rings, non-destructive beam measurements are highly desirable to minimize the impact on the beam quality. In principle, the non-destructive tools can be either passive detectors like Schottky, or active devices which excite either longitudinal or transverse beam motions for the corresponding measurements. An example of such a device is an ac dipole, a magnet with oscillating field, which can be used to achieve large coherent betatron oscillations. It has been demonstrated in the Brookhaven AGS that by adiabatically exciting the beam, the beam emittance growth due to the filamentation in the phase space can be avoided. This paper overviews both techniques in general. In particular, this paper also presents the beam tune measurement with a Schottky detector, phase advance measurements as well as nonlinear resonance measurements with the ac dipoles in the Brookhaven RHIC.

  11. Rapid and non-destructive analysis of metallic dental restorations using X-ray fluorescence spectra and light-element sampling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhashi, K.; Uo, M.; Kitagawa, Y.; Watari, F.

    2012-12-01

    IntroductionRecently, allergic diseases caused by dental metals have been increasing. Therefore, rapid and accurate analytical methods for the metal restorations in the oral cavities of patients are required. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-destructive extraction method for dental alloys, along with a subsequent, rapid and accurate elemental analysis. Materials and methodSamples were obtained by polishing the surfaces of metal restorations using a dental rotating tool with disposable buffs and polishing pastes. As materials for the analysis, three dental alloys were used. To compare the sampling and analysis efficiencies, two buffs and seven pastes were used. After polishing the surface of a metal restoration, the buff was analyzed using X-ray scanning analytical microscopy (XSAM). ResultsThe efficiency of the analysis was judged based on the sampling rate achieved and the absence of disturbing elements in the background in fluorescence X-ray spectra. The best results were obtained for the combination of TexMet as a buff with diamond as a paste. This combination produced a good collection efficiency and a plain background in the fluorescence X-ray spectra, resulting in a high precision of the analysis.

  12. Analysis of polarimetric terahertz imaging for non-destructive detection of subsurface defects in wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert Warren

    During the manufacture of wind turbine blades, internal defects can form which negatively affect their structural integrity and can lead to premature failure. These defects are often not detected before the final installation of the blades onto wind turbines in the field. The purpose of this research was to investigate the advantages of using fully-polarimetric inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) terahertz imaging techniques for scanning the interior structure of the wind turbine blades in order to detect and identify any defects in the blade's internal structure before the blade leaves the manufacturer. Additionally, the research has investigated the use of the Euler parameter polarimetric transformation in improving defect detection, and increasing understanding of the scattering properties of such defects. Use of an image compositing algorithm and of the Euler parameters was found to enhance defect detection.

  13. Rhizoslides: paper-based growth system for non-destructive, high throughput phenotyping of root development by means of image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A quantitative characterization of root system architecture is currently being attempted for various reasons. Non-destructive, rapid analyses of root system architecture are difficult to perform due to the hidden nature of the root. Hence, improved methods to measure root architecture are necessary to support knowledge-based plant breeding and to analyse root growth responses to environmental changes. Here, we report on the development of a novel method to reveal growth and architecture of maize root systems. Results The method is based on the cultivation of different root types within several layers of two-dimensional, large (50 × 60 cm) plates (rhizoslides). A central plexiglass screen stabilizes the system and is covered on both sides with germination paper providing water and nutrients for the developing root, followed by a transparent cover foil to prevent the roots from falling dry and to stabilize the system. The embryonic roots grow hidden between a Plexiglas surface and paper, whereas crown roots grow visible between paper and the transparent cover. Long cultivation with good image quality up to 20 days (four fully developed leaves) was enhanced by suppressing fungi with a fungicide. Based on hyperspectral microscopy imaging, the quality of different germination papers was tested and three provided sufficient contrast to distinguish between roots and background (segmentation). Illumination, image acquisition and segmentation were optimised to facilitate efficient root image analysis. Several software packages were evaluated with regard to their precision and the time investment needed to measure root system architecture. The software 'Smart Root’ allowed precise evaluation of root development but needed substantial user interference. 'GiaRoots’ provided the best segmentation method for batch processing in combination with a good analysis of global root characteristics but overestimated root length due to thinning artefacts. 'Whin

  14. A NEW NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD FOR CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER FILTERS: THE CASE OF MANGANESE AIR POLLUTION IN VALLECAMONICA (ITALY)

    PubMed Central

    Borgese, Laura; Zacco, Annalisa; Pal, Sudipto; Bontempi, Elza; Lucchini, Roberto; Zimmerman, Neil; Depero, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a well-established technique for chemical analysis, but it is mainly employed for quality control in the electronics semiconductor industry. The capability to analyze liquid and uniformly thin solid samples makes this technique suitable for other applications, and especially in the very critical field of environmental analysis. Comparison with standard methods like Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) show that TXRF is a practical, accurate, and reliable technique in occupational settings. Due to the greater sensitivity necessary in trace heavy metal detection, TXRF is also suitable for environmental chemical analysis. In this paper we show that based on appropriate standards, TXRF can be considered for non-destructive routine quantitative analysis of environmental matrices such as air filters. This work has been developed in the frame of the EU-FP6 PHIME (Public Health Impact of long-term, low-level Mixed element Exposure in susceptible population strata) Integrated Project (www.phime.org). The aim of this work was to investigate Mn air pollution in the area of Vallecamonica (Italy). PMID:21315919

  15. Computer vision-based analysis of foods: a non-destructive colour measurement tool to monitor quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Gökmen, Vural

    2014-05-01

    Computer vision-based image analysis has been widely used in food industry to monitor food quality. It allows low-cost and non-contact measurements of colour to be performed. In this paper, two computer vision-based image analysis approaches are discussed to extract mean colour or featured colour information from the digital images of foods. These types of information may be of particular importance as colour indicates certain chemical changes or physical properties in foods. As exemplified here, the mean CIE a* value or browning ratio determined by means of computer vision-based image analysis algorithms can be correlated with acrylamide content of potato chips or cookies. Or, porosity index as an important physical property of breadcrumb can be calculated easily. In this respect, computer vision-based image analysis provides a useful tool for automatic inspection of food products in a manufacturing line, and it can be actively involved in the decision-making process where rapid quality/safety evaluation is needed. PMID:24288215

  16. Feasibility study in the application of optical signal analysis to non-destructive testing of complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B.; Brown, H.

    1974-01-01

    Advantages of the large time bandwidth product of optical processing are presented. Experiments were performed to study the feasibility of the use of optical spectral analysis for detection of flaws in structural elements excited by random noise. Photographic and electronic methods of comparison of complex spectra were developed. Limitations were explored, and suggestions for further work are offered.

  17. From the experimental simulation to integrated non-destructive analysis by means of optical and infrared techniques: results compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Lambiase, F.; Paoletti, D.; Di Ilio, A.; Maldague, X.

    2012-11-01

    In this work the possibility of modeling manufacturing ceramic products is analyzed through the application of transient thermography, holographic interferometry and digital speckle photography, in order to identify the subsurface defects characteristics. This integrated method could be used to understand the nature of heterogeneous materials (such as plastic, sponge simulating a void, wood, aluminum) potentially contained within ceramic materials, as well as to predict crack formation due to them. The paper presents the analysis of green ceramic tile containing defects of different types and sizes located at different depths. The finite element method is used for solving the problem of transient heat transfer occurring in experimental conditions. Unknown parameters of the numerical model (such as convective heat transfer coefficients and sample surface emissivity) were adjusted to obtain numerical simulation results as close as possible to those obtained experimentally. Similarities and differences between experimental and simulated data are analyzed and discussed. Possibilities for improving the results and further developments are proposed.

  18. Non/destructive testing (NDT) and vibration analysis of defects in components and structures using laser diode shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinchen, Wolfgang; Gan, Ymin; Kupfer, Gerhard; Mackel, Peter

    2004-09-01

    One of the most interesting and useful applications of shearographic interferometry is the detection, visualisation and measurement of the mechanical vibration of opaque objects. Until now the time-average shearography is a qualitative interferometric method for determining the oscillating loadings. The detected gradient of the deformation can be determined by changing the shearing distance. The fringes of the moving object are often faded and become clearer by filtering with FFT and against an uniform background intensity. The fringes formed in time-average shearography of sinusoidal motions have an irradiance described by the Bessel function Jo2. Quantitative interpretation of the shearogram requires a more precise analysis. Such a technique for extending or decreasing the sensitivity of vibration measurements and for determining the relative phase of vibration across the object surface is the stroboscopic illumination. Stroboscopic shearographic interferometry is a technique which compensates the deficiencies of time-average shearography at the expense of some increase in experimental complexity. However more complex is the recording of stroboscopic shearograms by using two pulses from a double-pulse laser.

  19. Non-Destructive Testing Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bio-Imaging Research's technology that originated in an aerospace program has come full circle with a new aerospace adaptation called the Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System, or ACTIS. The medical version of CT scans the human body for tumors or other abnormalities, the ACTIS system finds imperfections in aerospace structures and components, such as castings, assemblies, rocket motors and nozzles. ACTIS is described by its developer as the most versatile CT scanner available for non-destructive testing applications. ACTIS is a variable geometry system. ACTIS source and detectors can be moved closer together or farther apart to optimize the geometry for different sizes of test objects. The combination of variable geometry, three sources, and focusing detectors makes ACTIS cost effective for a broad range of applications. System can scan anything from very small turbine blades to large rocket assemblies.

  20. Non-destructive identification of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Wang, Bo; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive identification of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is essential to various applications in the optical information processing. Here, we propose and demonstrate experimentally an efficient method to identify non-destructively the OAM by using a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our schemes are applicable not only to the case with integer charges, but also to optical vortices with noninteger charges. Our Letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the non-destructive identification of twisted light with integer or noninteger topological charges, which has potential applications in the OAM-based data transmission for optical communications. PMID:27192290

  1. Combined use of the non-destructive XRF and low energy micro-XRF techniques for the analysis of silvered nummi belonging to the Treasure of Misurata (Libya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Garraffo, Salvatore; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Roman coinage underwent a severe debasement of silver during the time and the production of plated coins became a common practice for giving the impression of a high finesses of the alloy. In 294 AD, Diocletian introduced the nummus, manufactured with the same standard in all the mints by using an internal Cu-Sn-Pb-Ag core and presenting a thin silvered patina (about 2 micron) on its surface. The silver plating of the nummi have been investigated in the past and different methods have been suggested for its manufacturing (e.g. segregation during casting, chemical treatments, mercury-silvering). However, previous analyses were focused on few samples and, consequently, this technological issue remained unresolved. In the present work, the BSC-XRF (Beam Stability Controlled -XRF) and a LE-micro-XRF portable spectrometers developed at the LANDIS laboratory of IBAM-CNR and LNS-INFN in Catania (Italy), have been applied for the in-situ analysis of the silvered nummi belonging to the Misurata Treasure (Museum of Leptis Magna, El-Khomes, Libya). The treasure is composed of 108 thousand coins manufactured in 19 Imperial mints operating in the period 294-333 AD. In order to establish if, and at what extent, the mercury-silvering was used to produce the thin Ag-patina of the nummi, the non-destructive investigation was extended to 1050 well preserved coins. Measurements allowed to explore the presence of Hg and the Hg-Ag correlation at the coin surface. The portable BSC-XRF and the LE-micro XXRF techniques are suited to approach this study. A new version of the BSC-XRF spectrometer, consisting of a compact high-intensity x-ray tube (50 kV; 4 mA) coupled to a 80 mm2 SDD detector (138 eV @ 5.9 keV), was developed for the fast determination of mercury traces in a large number of coins (measurement time is 150 seconds; MDL for Hg is 100 ppm). The investigation allowed to identify the Imperial mints and the periods where the mercury-silvering were probably used. However the BSC

  2. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials via Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging for the non-destructive evaluation of the degree of cure, aging, and other properties of resin-based composite materials. This method can be used in air, and is portable for field use. This method operates in reflectance, absorbance, and luminescence modes. The ultraviolet source is used to illuminate a composite surface of interest. In reflectance mode, the reflected response is acquired via the imaging system or via the spectrometer. The spectra are analyzed for organic compounds (conjugated organics) and inorganic compounds (semiconducting band-edge states; luminescing defect states such as silicates, used as adhesives for composite aerospace applications; and metal oxides commonly used as thermal coating paints on a wide range of spacecraft). The spectra are compared with a database for variation in conjugation, substitution, or length of molecule (in the case of organics) or band edge position (in the case of inorganics). This approach is useful in the understanding of material quality. It lacks the precision in defining the exact chemical structure that is found in other materials analysis techniques, but it is advantageous over methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and chromatography in that it can be used in the field to assess significant changes in chemical structure that may be linked to concerns associated with weaknesses or variations in structural integrity, without disassembly of or destruction to the structure of interest.

  3. Quantitative non-destructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The work undertaken during this period included two primary efforts. The first is a continuation of theoretical development from the previous year of models and data analyses for NDE using the Optical Thermal Infra-Red Measurement System (OPTITHIRMS) system, which involves heat injection with a laser and observation of the resulting thermal pattern with an infrared imaging system. The second is an investigation into the use of the thermoelastic effect as an effective tool for NDE. As in the past, the effort is aimed towards NDE techniques applicable to composite materials in structural applications. The theoretical development described produced several models of temperature patterns over several geometries and material types. Agreement between model data and temperature observations was obtained. A model study with one of these models investigated some fundamental difficulties with the proposed method (the primitive equation method) for obtaining diffusivity values in plates of thickness and supplied guidelines for avoiding these difficulties. A wide range of computing speeds was found among the various models, with a one-dimensional model based on Laplace's integral solution being both very fast and very accurate.

  4. Swelling of U-7Mo/Al-Si dispersion fuel plates under irradiation - Non-destructive analysis of the AFIP-1 fuel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachs, D. M.; Robinson, A. B.; Rice, F. J.; Kraft, N. C.; Taylor, S. C.; Lillo, M.; Woolstenhulme, N.; Roth, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive fuel-matrix interactions leading to plate pillowing have proven to be a significant impediment to the development of a suitable high density low-enriched uranium molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based dispersion fuel for high power applications in research reactors. The addition of silicon to the aluminum matrix was previously demonstrated to reduce interaction layer growth in mini-plate experiments. The AFIP-1 project involved the irradiation, in-canal examination, and post-irradiation examination of two fuel plates. The irradiation of two distinct full size, flat fuel plates (one using an Al-2wt%Si matrix and the other an Al-4043 (∼4.8 wt% Si) matrix) was performed in the INL ATR reactor in 2008-2009. The irradiation conditions were: ∼250 W/cm2 peak Beginning Of Life (BOL) power, with a ∼3.5e21 f/cm3 peak burnup. The plates were successfully irradiated and did not show any pillowing at the end of the irradiation. This paper reports the results and interpretation of the in-canal and post-irradiation non-destructive examinations that were performed on these fuel plates. It further compares additional PIE results obtained on fuel plates irradiated in contemporary campaigns in order to allow a complete comparison with all results obtained under similar conditions. Except for a brief indication of accelerated swelling early in the irradiation of the Al-2Si plate, the fuel swelling is shown to evolve linearly with the fission density through the maximum burnup.

  5. Method for non-destructive testing

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-08-30

    Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

  6. Mathematical models applied in inductive non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wac-Wlodarczyk, A.; Goleman, R.; Czerwinski, D.; Gizewski, T.

    Non-destructive testing are the wide group of investigative methods of non-homogenous material. Methods of computer tomography, ultrasonic, magnetic and inductive methods still developed are widely applied in industry. In apparatus used for non-destructive tests, the analysis of signals is made on the basis of complex system answers. The answer is linearized due to the model of research system. In this paper, the authors will discuss the applications of the mathematical models applied in investigations of inductive magnetic materials. The statistical models and other gathered in similarity classes will be taken into consideration. Investigation of mathematical models allows to choose the correct method, which in consequence leads to precise representation of the inner structure of examined object. Inductive research of conductive media, especially those with ferromagnetic properties, are run with high frequency magnetic field (eddy-currents method), which considerably decrease penetration depth.

  7. Hybrid holographic non-destructive test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic hybrid holographic non-destructive testing (HNDT) method and system capable of detecting flaws or debonds contained within certain materials are described. This system incorporates the techniques of optical holography, acoustical/optical holography and holographic correlation in determining the structural integrity of a test object. An automatic processing system including a detector and automatic data processor is used in conjunction with the three holographic techniques for correlating and interpreting the information supplied by the non-destructive systems. The automatic system also includes a sensor which directly translates an optical data format produced by the holographic techniques into electrical signals and then transmits this information to a digital computer for indicating the structural properties of the test object. The computer interprets the data gathered and determines whether further testing is necessary as well as the format of this new testing procedure.

  8. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, G.; Orion, I.; Prior, S.; Rogers, H.; Runion, B.; Torbert, A.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil

  9. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. SIMS; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    The first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet and power supplies as currently designed are described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND magnet will provide a 100 T pulsed field of 5 ms duration (above 90% of full field) in a 15 mm diameter bore once per hour. Magnet operation will be non-destructive. The magnet will consist of a controlled power outer coil set which produces a 47 T platform field in a 225 mm diameter bore. Located within the outer coil set will be a 220 mm outer diameter capacitor powered insert coil. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator will provide ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters will energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. The insert will then be energized to produce the balance of the 100 T peak field using a 2.3 MJ, 18 kV (charged to 15 kV), 14.4 mF capacitor bank controlled with solid-state switches. The magnet will be the first of its kind and the first non-destructive, reusable 100 T pulsed magnet. The operation of the magnet will be described along with special features of its design and construction.

  10. Complementary Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Wilson, John; Morozov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) for defect detection and failure prediction in structures and specimens is widespread in energy industries, aimed at ageing power plants and pipelines, material degradation, fatigue and radiation damage, etc. At present there are no suitable electromagnetic NDE methods for the measurement and characterization of material degradation, in irradiated samples in particular, which is very important and timely for the nuclear power industry in the UK. This paper reports recent developments in the field of electromagnetic (EM) NDE at Newcastle University, including pulsed eddy current (PEC), pulsed magnetic flux leakage (PMFL), magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and magneto-acoustic emission (MAE). As different EM methods have different strengths, an integrative EM framework is introduced. Case studies through the second round robin tests organized by the Universal Network for Magnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation (UNMNDE), representing eighteen leading research groups worldwide in the area of electromagnetic NDE, are reported. Twelve samples with different ageing times and rolling reduction ratios were tested using different magnetic methods among the UNMNDE members. Based on the studies, the complementary characteristics of electromagnetic techniques for NDE are discussed.

  11. Advances in the use of tomographic inspection techniques for non-destructive analysis of geometric conductor position and correlation with magnetic cross-section modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, D.; Snitchler, G.; Rabaey, G.F.; Bolger, J.; Crane, R. Morgan, I.L.; Vinson, M.

    1993-05-01

    Industrial Computerized Tomography has been applied to magnet components in various stages of the manufacturing process. These Computerized Tomographic images can be analyzed to infer detailed dimensional information about magnet component positions (conductor, wedges, collars, etc.) throughout the magnet manufacturing process (cable winding, collaring, yoked/skinned). An analysis technique will be presented and measurement accuracies will be discussed.

  12. Further development of ultrasonic techniques for non-destructive evaluation based on Fourier analysis of signals from irregular and inhomogeneous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate the use of Fourier analysis techniques model systems had to be designed to test some of the general properties of the interaction of sound with an inhomogeneity. The first models investigated were suspensions of solid spheres in water. These systems allowed comparison between theoretical computation of the frequency dependence of the attenuation coefficient and measurement of the attenuation coefficient over a range of frequencies. Ultrasonic scattering processes in both suspensions of hard spheres in water, and suspensions of hard spheres in polyester resin were investigated. The second model system was constructed to test the applicability of partial wave analysis to the description of an inhomogeneity in a solid, and to test the range of material properties over which the measurement systems were valid.

  13. Non-destructive characterization using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, P. C.; Schultz, F. J.; Vourvopoulos, G.

    1995-05-01

    Explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband materials contain various chemical elements in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from innocuous substances. Furthermore, the major chemical elements in coal can provide information about various parameters of importance to the coal industry. In both examples, the non-destructive identification of chemical elements can be performed using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons that, through nuclear reactions, excite the nuclei of the various elements. This technique is being currently developed for the dismantling of nuclear weapons classified as trainers, and for the on-line coal bulk analysis.

  14. Non-destructive analysis of the conformational differences among feedstock sources and their corresponding co-products from bioethanol production with molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, I. H.; Jonker, A.; Zhang, X.; Yu, P.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the possibility of using molecular spectroscopy with multivariate technique as a fast method to detect the source effects among original feedstock sources of wheat and their corresponding co-products, wheat DDGS, from bioethanol production. Different sources of the bioethanol feedstock and their corresponding bioethanol co-products, three samples per source, were collected from the same newly-built bioethanol plant with current bioethanol processing technology. Multivariate molecular spectral analyses were carried out using agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis (AHCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The molecular spectral data of different feedstock sources and their corresponding co-products were compared at four different regions of ca. 1800-1725 cm-1 (carbonyl Cdbnd O ester, mainly related to lipid structure conformation), ca. 1725-1482 cm-1 (amide I and amide II region mainly related to protein structure conformation), ca. 1482-1180 cm-1 (mainly associated with structural carbohydrate) and ca. 1180-800 cm-1 (mainly related to carbohydrates) in complex plant-based system. The results showed that the molecular spectroscopy with multivariate technique could reveal the structural differences among the bioethanol feedstock sources and among their corresponding co-products. The AHCA and PCA analyses were able to distinguish the molecular structure differences associated with chemical functional groups among the different sources of the feedstock and their corresponding co-products. The molecular spectral differences indicated the differences in functional, biomolecular and biopolymer groups which were confirmed by wet chemical analysis. These biomolecular and biopolymer structural differences were associated with chemical and nutrient profiles and nutrient utilization and availability. Molecular spectral analyses had the potential to identify molecular structure difference among bioethanol feedstock sources

  15. Non-destructive analysis of the conformational differences among feedstock sources and their corresponding co-products from bioethanol production with molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gamage, I H; Jonker, A; Zhang, X; Yu, P

    2014-01-24

    The objective of this study was to determine the possibility of using molecular spectroscopy with multivariate technique as a fast method to detect the source effects among original feedstock sources of wheat and their corresponding co-products, wheat DDGS, from bioethanol production. Different sources of the bioethanol feedstock and their corresponding bioethanol co-products, three samples per source, were collected from the same newly-built bioethanol plant with current bioethanol processing technology. Multivariate molecular spectral analyses were carried out using agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis (AHCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The molecular spectral data of different feedstock sources and their corresponding co-products were compared at four different regions of ca. 1800-1725 cm(-1) (carbonyl CO ester, mainly related to lipid structure conformation), ca. 1725-1482 cm(-1) (amide I and amide II region mainly related to protein structure conformation), ca. 1482-1180 cm(-1) (mainly associated with structural carbohydrate) and ca. 1180-800 cm(-1) (mainly related to carbohydrates) in complex plant-based system. The results showed that the molecular spectroscopy with multivariate technique could reveal the structural differences among the bioethanol feedstock sources and among their corresponding co-products. The AHCA and PCA analyses were able to distinguish the molecular structure differences associated with chemical functional groups among the different sources of the feedstock and their corresponding co-products. The molecular spectral differences indicated the differences in functional, biomolecular and biopolymer groups which were confirmed by wet chemical analysis. These biomolecular and biopolymer structural differences were associated with chemical and nutrient profiles and nutrient utilization and availability. Molecular spectral analyses had the potential to identify molecular structure difference among bioethanol feedstock

  16. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors, such as Si-PIN, Si-drift, Cd1-xZnxTe and HgI 2, coupled to miniaturized low-power X-ray tubes, are well suited in portable systems for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), analysis of archaeological samples. The Si-PIN detector is characterized by a thickness of about 300 μm, an area of about 2×3 mm 2, an energy resolution of about 200-250 eV at 5.9 keV and an entrance window of 25-75 μm. The Si-drift detector has approximately the same area and thickness, but an energy resolution of 155 eV at 5.9 keV. The efficiency of these detectors is around 100% from 4 to 10 keV, and then decreases versus energy, reaching ˜9% at 30 keV. Coupled to a miniaturized 10 kV, 0.1 mA, Ca-anode or to a miniaturized 30 kV, 0.1 mA, W-anode X-ray tubes, portable systems can be constructed, which are able to analyse K-lines of elements up to about silver, and L-lines of heavy elements. The Cd 1- xZn xTe detector has an area of 4 mm 2 and a thickness of 3 mm. It has an energy resolution of about 300 eV at 5.9 keV, and an efficiency of 100% over the whole range of X-rays. Finally the HgI 2 detector has an efficiency of about 100% in the whole range of X-rays, and an energy resolution of about 200 eV at 5.9 keV. Coupled to a small 50-60 kV, 1 mA, W-anode X-ray tube, portable systems can be constructed, for the analysis of practically all elements. These systems were applied to analysis in the field of archaeometry and in all applications for which portable systems are needed or at least useful (for example X-ray transmission measurements, X-ray microtomography and so on). Results of in-field use of these detectors and a comparison among these room temperature detectors in relation to concrete applications are presented. More specifically, concerning EDXRF analysis, ancient gold samples were analysed in Rome, in Mexico City and in Milan, ancient bronzes in Sassari, in Bologna, in Chieti and in Naples, and sulfur (due to pollution

  17. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-10-04

    Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

  18. NON-DESTRUCTIVE FLAW DETECTION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stateman, M.J.; Holloway, H.R.

    1957-12-17

    An apparatus is described for the non-destructive detection of flaws in electrical conducting articles. The particular feature of the detection apparatus is that a flaw in the front or back of the test article will not be masked by signals caused by the passage of the end and front of the article through the detection apparatus. The present invention alleviates the above problem by mounting detection coils on directly opposite sides of the test passageway so that the axes of the pickup coils are perpendicular to the axis of an energizing coil through which the article is passed. A flaw in the article will cause a change in the voltage induced in one pickup coil, but passage of the end or front of the article will not produce unequal signals. The signals are compared in appropriate electrical circuitry to actuate a recorder only when unequal signals are present, indicating the presence of a flaw.

  19. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, B. L.; Vanderstelt, J.; O'Meara, J.; McNeill, F. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  20. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R. L.

    2012-02-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14C dating.

  1. Cryogenic Storage Tank Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of cryogenic storage tanks. Four large cryogenic tanks, constructed in 1965 with perlite insulation in the annular regions, are of concern. The construction of the tanks, two Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and two Liquid Hydrogen (LH2), are described. The loss rate for the LOX tank at Pad A is slightly higher than that for the one at Pad B. The concerns for the LH2 tank at Pad B are that there is a significantly higher boil-off rate than that at Pad A, that there is mold growth, indicative of increased heat flow, that there is a long down-time needed for repairs, and that 3 of 5 full thermal cycles have been used on the Pad B LH2 tank. The advantages and disadvantages of thermal imaging are given. A detailed description of what is visible of the structures in the infra-red is given and views of the thermal images are included. Missing Perlite is given as the probable cause of the cold spot on the Pad B LH2 tank. There is no indications of problematic cold regions on the Pad A LH2 tank, as shown by the thermal images given in the presentation. There is definite indication of a cold region on the Pad A LOX tank. There is however concerns with thermal imaging, as thermal images can be significantly effected by environmental conditions, image differences on similar days but with different wind speeds. Other effects that must be considered include ambient temperature, humidity levels/dew, and cloud reflections

  2. Non destructive testing of soft body armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhise, Karan

    Pristine bullet proof vests are extremely effective at halting pre-determined projectile threats and have saved over 3000 lives. However, the effectiveness of these vests to halt a bullet is seen to decrease over time.Owing to the importance of bullet proof vests over a period of time, tests to determine their effectiveness have been carried out on every batch of vests at the time of inception and at certain time intervals by shooting a bullet through them. A few vests from every batch are picked up and shot at to check for bullet penetration during this process while these results are extrapolated onto the other vests from the batch.One of the main issues with this method is the fact that testing a few jackets among a large set of jackets does not guarantee the safety of every jacket in the entire batch.Further the jackets that are shot-at have the possibility of undergoing substantial damage during the process thus compromising its safety rendering them unsafe for future use.As the vest penetration phenomenon is extremely complex too, there arose a need for a better testing procedure that could not only help ensure more safety, but also save time and money.The new testing procedure proposed a non-destructive evaluation of the jackets that would solve the issues previous faced in testing the vests. This would lead to the building of a portable set up which could be carried to any location to test jackets in a matter of minutes thus saving time and money.

  3. Prediction of Service Life of Cordierite-Mullite Refractory Materials by Non-Destructive Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Kamseu, Elie; Cannio, M.; Romagnoli, M.; Veronesi, P.; Leonelli, C.; Volkov-Husoviae, T. D.; Dlouhy, I.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2008-02-15

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity testing was used to perform non-destructive quality control of refractory plates used as substrates in fast firing of porcelain whitewares. The measurement of the ultrasonic velocity was used to asses the presence of internal voids or cracks originated from the manufacturing procedure. Image analysis was used to predict thermal stability of the refractory materials. Two cordierite-mullite compositions were investigated that are characterized by different microstructure morphologies and crack propagation behaviour. A brief discussion about the correlation between microstructure, crack propagation behaviour and thermal shock resistance is presented. Moreover, empirical models were developed to predict the service life of refractory plates from measured values of ultrasonic velocities in plates in the as-received state.

  4. Prediction of Service Life of Cordierite-Mullite Refractory Materials by Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Kamseu, Elie; Volkov-Husoviæ, T. D.; Cannio, M.; Romagnoli, M.; Veronesi, P.; Dlouhy, I.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Leonelli, C.

    2008-02-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity testing was used to perform non-destructive quality control of refractory plates used as substrates in fast firing of porcelain whitewares. The measurement of the ultrasonic velocity was used to asses the presence of internal voids or cracks originated from the manufacturing procedure. Image analysis was used to predict thermal stability of the refractory materials. Two cordierite-mullite compositions were investigated that are characterized by different microstructure morphologies and crack propagation behaviour. A brief discussion about the correlation between microstructure, crack propagation behaviour and thermal shock resistance is presented. Moreover, empirical models were developed to predict the service life of refractory plates from measured values of ultrasonic velocities in plates in the as-received state.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation method employing dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members novelly employs a loosely mounted dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducer (DEUT) to receive and convert ultrasonic energy into an electrical signal which can be analyzed to determine the .beta. of the test material. The dielectric material is ferroelectric with a high dielectric constant .di-elect cons.. A computer-controlled measurement system coupled to the DEUT contains an excitation signal generator section and a measurement and analysis section. As a result, the DEUT measures the absolute particle displacement amplitudes in test material, leading to derivation of the nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) without the costly, low field reliability methods of the prior art.

  6. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-04-19

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  7. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  8. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-09-01

    In order to compare a few non-destructive classification techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  9. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR GEOTHERMAL PIPING.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2001-03-23

    Non-destructive testing is a key component of optimized plant inspection and maintenance programs. Risk based inspection, condition based maintenance and reliability centered maintenance systems all require detection, location and sizing of defects or flaws by non-destructive methods. Internal damage of geothermal piping by corrosion and erosion-corrosion is an ongoing problem requiring inspection and subsequent maintenance decisions to ensure safe and reliable performance. Conventional manual ultrasonic testing to determine remaining wall thickness has major limitations, particularly when damage is of a random and localized nature. Therefore, it is necessary to explore alternative non-destructive methods that offer potential benefits in terms of accurate quantification of size, shape and location of damage, probability of detection, ability to use on-line over long ranges, and economics. A review of non-destructive methods and their applicability to geothermal piping was performed. Based on this, ongoing research will concentrate on long range guided wave and dynamic methods.

  10. Non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics: A short discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbst, Uwe; Heckel, Thomas; Carboni, Michele

    2016-02-01

    A short discussion is provided on the relationship between non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics. The basic tasks behind this are to guarantee the safety of a component at a potential hazard loading event, to specify inspection intervals or, alternatively, of demands on non-destructive testing for a fixed inspection regime, to plan accompanying actions for cases of temporary continued operation of structures in which cracks have been detected, and, finally, fatigue strength considerations which take into account initial defects.

  11. Non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of quarantined Mars Returned Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionovici, Alexandre; Viso, Michel; Beck, Pierre; Lemelle, Laurence; Westphal, Andrew; Vincze, Laszlo; Schoonjans, Tom; Fihman, Francois; Chazalnoel, Pascale; Ferroir, Tristan; Solé, Vicente Armando; Tucoulou, R.

    Introduction: In preparation for the upcoming International Mars Sample Return mission (MSR), returning samples containing potential biohazards, we have implemented a hyperspec-tral method of in-situ analysis of grains performed in BSL4 quarantine conditions, by combining several non-destructive imaging diagnostics. This allows sample transportation on optimized experimental setups, while monitoring the sample quarantine conditions. Our hyperspectral methodology was tested during analyses of meteorites [1-2] and cometary and interstellar grains from the recent NASA Stardust mission [3-6]. Synchrotron Radiation protocols: X-ray analysis methods are widely accepted as the least destructive probes of fragile, unique samples. Diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and ab-sorption micro/nano-spectroscopies were performed on chondritic test samples using focused monochromatic beams at the ESRF synchrotron in Grenoble, France. 2D maps of grain com-position down to ppm concentrations and polycrystalline structure have simultaneously been acquired, followed by X-ray absorption performed on elements of Z 26. Ideally, absorption micro-tomography can later be performed in full-beam mode to record the 3D morphology of the grain followed by fluorescence-tomography in focus-beam mode which complements this picture with a 3D elemental image of the grain. Lab-based protocols: Raman and IR-based spectroscopies have been performed in reflection mode for mineralogical imaging of the grains in the laboratory using commercial microscopes. The spatial resolution varied in the 1-10 m range. Laser limited penetration of opaque samples permits only 2D imaging of the few nanometer-thick outer layers of the grains. Mineralogical maps are now routinely acquired using Raman spectroscopy at sub-micron scales through the 3 container walls of the Martian sample holder, followed by IR few-micrometer spot measurements recording C-based and potential aqueous alteration distributions. Sample Holder: A

  12. Development of non-destructive inspection method for the performance of thermal barrier coating.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, M; Takahashi, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper shows that our proprietary non-destructive inspection method can be used to effectively measure the thermal barrier performance of the thermal barrier coating used to coat gas turbine hot parts by the results of numerical analysis and laboratory experiments. PMID:11460665

  13. A non-destructive synchrotron X-ray study of the metallurgy and manufacturing processes of Eastern and Western astrolabes in the Adler Planetarium collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Brian Dale

    The astrolabe collection of the Adler Planetarium and History of Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL, was examined using non-destructive synchrotron based high-energy X-ray techniques including diffraction, fluorescence, and radiography to determine the metallurgy, microstructure, and metal forming processes used in astrolabe construction. All high-energy X-ray measurements were performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) synchrotron of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Astrolabes from the collection were selected to represent all major astrolabe production centers possible and time periods. It was found that all European astrolabes were manufactured of traditional cementation brass by hand worked metal forming processes consistent with technology in the literature. Of the Islamic astrolabes examined, all seven from Lahore in current-day Pakistan exhibited advanced brass alloys not typical of alloys discussed in the literature. It was found that these alloys were selected for their specific hot working properties, allowing the Lahore metalworkers to more efficiently make brass sheet from which to make astrolabe components. In addition, the alloy required a fundamental change in the brass foundry process, indicating advanced Zn metal production techniques. It was found that analysis by high energy X-rays from the APS was essential to produce data on the chemistry and microstructure from the interior of the astrolabe components in a non-destructive manner. Many astrolabe components had undergone surface dezincification due to heavy annealing during manufacturing, causing the Zn composition measured by the surface sensitive fluorescence technique to be lower than the true bulk alloy Zn composition. This would have been impossible to quantify non-destructively without the high-energy diffraction capability of the APS. The results of this study have proven the effectiveness of the synchrotron as a viable non-destructive analysis technique for examining cultural

  14. Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Applications of THz Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimdars, David

    2005-03-01

    The technology and applications of time domain terahertz (THz) imaging to non-destructive evaluation (NDE) will be discussed. THz imaging has shown great promise in 2 and 3 dimensional non-contact inspection of non-conductive materials such as plastics, foam, composites, ceramics, paper, wood and glass. THz imaging employs safe low power non-ionizing electromagnetic pulses, with lateral resolution < 200 um, and depth resolution < 50 um. THz pulses can be analyzed spectroscopically to reveal chemical content. Recently, highly integrated turn-key THz imaging systems have been introduced commercially. We will demonstrate the detection of voids and disbonds intentionally incorporated within the sprayed on foam insulation of a space shuttle external tank mock-up segments. An industrially hardened THz scanning system which has been deployed to scan the space shuttle tank with small remote transceiver will be described. Additional terahertz security imaging applications for the detection of weapons and explosives will also be discussed, as well as the application of terahertz sensors for high speed industrial process monitoring and quality control.

  15. Non-destructive provenance differentiation of prehistoric pigments by external PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, L.; Salomon, H.; Lahlil, S.; Lebon, M.; Odin, G. P.; Coquinot, Y.; Pichon, L.

    2012-02-01

    The elemental analysis of minerals/rocks has been often used for the determination of their geological origin. When these natural rocks were exploited by prehistoric civilizations as objects, weapons, or pigments, the composition of the minerals can provide information on the mobility, the exchanges and the interaction between groups of population. In this paper, we will present results obtained from archaeological samples of prehistoric pigments, mainly iron and manganese oxides. PIXE analysis has been applied to samples of the prehistoric cave "La grotte du Renne" in Arcy-sur-Cure, France (Chatelperronian, 38,000-34,000 BP). Because most of the archaeological objects are decorated or display some use marks, it is not possible to take samples. Consequently, we have used a non-destructive technique thanks to the external beam of AGLAE (C2RMF, Paris). In order to improve the limits of detection (LOD less than 10 ppm from Cu to Sb), a metal absorber has been placed on the X-ray detector to preferentially filter the Fe-K or Mn-K lines. Based on the quantitative analysis of major and trace elements, we have obtained groups of compositions corresponding to different geological sources. We demonstrate in this study that it is possible to extend PIXE analysis to the characterization of prehistoric pigments such as iron and manganese oxides for differentiating potential sources of pigments in archaeological contexts.

  16. Research on non-destructive testing method of silkworm cocoons based on image processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yong; Kong, Qing-hua; Wei, Li-fu

    2008-03-01

    The major studied in this dissertation is the non-destructive testing method of silkworm cocoon's quality, based on the digital image processing and photoelectricity technology. Through the images collection and the data analysis, procession and calculation of the tested silkworm cocoons with the non-destructive testing technology, internet applications automatically reckon all items of the classification indexes. Finally we can conclude the classification result and the purchase price of the silkworm cocoons. According to the domestic classification standard of the silkworm cocoons, the author investigates various testing methods of silkworm cocoons which are used or have been explored at present, and devices a non-destructive testing scheme of the silkworm cocoons based on the digital image processing and photoelectricity technology. They are dissertated about the project design of the experiment. The precisions of all the implements are demonstrated. I establish Manifold mathematic models, compare them with each other and analyze the precision with technology of databank to get the best mathematic model to figure out the weight of the dried silkworm cocoon shells. The classification methods of all the complementary items are designed well and truly. The testing method has less error and reaches an advanced level of the present domestic non-destructive testing technology of the silkworm cocoons.

  17. Data fusion for automated non-destructive inspection

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, N.; Tippetts, T.; Cawley, P.

    2014-01-01

    In industrial non-destructive evaluation (NDE), it is increasingly common for data acquisition to be automated, driving a recent substantial increase in the availability of data. The collected data need to be analysed, typically necessitating the painstaking manual labour of a skilled operator. Moreover, in automated NDE a region of an inspected component is typically interrogated several times, be it within a single data channel due to multiple probe passes, across several channels acquired simultaneously or over the course of repeated inspections. The systematic combination of these diverse readings is recognized to offer an opportunity to improve the reliability of the inspection, but is not achievable in a manual analysis. This paper describes a data-fusion-based software framework providing a partial automation capability, allowing component regions to be declared defect-free to a very high probability while readily identifying defect indications, thereby optimizing the use of the operator's time. The system is designed to applicable to a wide range of automated NDE scenarios, but the processing is exemplified using the industrial ultrasonic immersion inspection of aerospace turbine discs. Results obtained for industrial datasets demonstrate an orders-of-magnitude reduction in false-call rates, for a given probability of detection, achievable using the developed software system. PMID:25002828

  18. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Wind Turbine Blades Using an Infrared Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.; Rumsey, M.

    1998-12-17

    The use of a digital infrared as a non-destructive evaluation thermography camera (NDE) tool was ex- plored in two separate wind turbine blade fatigue tests. The fwst test was a fatigue test of part of a 13.1 meter wood-epoxy-composite blade. The second test was on a 4.25 meter pultruded fiber glass blade section driven at several mechanical resonant frequencies. The digital infrared camera can produce images of either the static temperature distribution on the surface of the specimen, or the dynamic temperature distribution that is in phase with a specific frequency on a vibrating specimen. The dynamic temperature distribution (due to thermoplastic effects) gives a measure of the sum of the principal stresses at each point on the surface. In the wood- epoxy-composite blade fatigue test, the point of ultimate failure was detected long before failure occurred. The mode shapes obtained with the digital infrared camera, from the resonant blade tests, were in very good agree- ment with the finite-element calculations. In addition, the static temperature images of the resonating blade showed two areas that contained cracks. Close-up dy- namic inf%red images of these areas showed the crack structure that agreed with subsequent dye-penetrant analysis.

  19. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefel, Denis E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  20. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  1. Non-destructive methods for food texture assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food texture is important to the successful marketing and profitability of food products. Non-destructive sensing would allow food producers and processors to inspect, sort, grade, or track individual product items, so that they can deliver consistent, superior food products to the marketplace. Over...

  2. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, T; Zavaljevski, N; Bakhtiari, S; Miron, A; Kupperman, D

    2004-12-24

    Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System (ANTARES) sofeware alogrithms were developed for use on X-probe(tm) data. Data used for algorithm development and preliminary perfomance determination was obtained for USNRC mock-up at Argone and data from EPRI.

  3. Research Based on Optical Non-Destructive Testing of Pigment Identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Hao, Shengcai; Zhou, Wenhua; Qi, Xiaokun; Shi, Jilong

    2016-04-01

    Optical Non-Destructive Testing (ONDT) can be applied as penetrating elemental and structure analysis technology in the Pigments identification field. Three-dimensional video microscopy, Raman microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy are employed to measure the materials based on a Qing Dynasty meticulous painting. The results revealed that the dark yellow area within the decorative patterns was presented due to the interaction of Emerald green and hematite, and the bright yellow edge area was delineated by Cu-Zn-Pb composition. The interesting thing is that an artificial synthetic ultramarine blue was checked in the painting. According to the first synthesized time of ultramarine blue and Paris green, the time limit of the painting completion can be identified. The principle of Pigment subtractive colorant and nitikaset method were employed to interpreting the results. Optical testing combined with the area of cultural relic identification can be a potential method to build an expert identification system successfully. This work also help lay the optical method groundwork for further cultural relic identification, sterilization, and preservation. PMID:27451669

  4. Application of Non-destructive Methods of Stress-strain State at Hazardous Production Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shram, V.; Kravtsova, Ye; Selsky, A.; Bezborodov, Yu; Lysyannikova, N.; Lysyannikov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the sources of accidents in distillation columns, on the basis of which the most dangerous defects are detected. The analysis of the currently existing methods of non-destructive testing of the stress-strain state is performed. It is proposed to apply strain and acoustic emission techniques to continuously monitor dangerous objects, which helps prevent the possibility of accidents, as well as reduce the work.

  5. Quality parameters of mango and potential of non-destructive techniques for their measurement - a review.

    PubMed

    Jha, S N; Narsaiah, K; Sharma, A D; Singh, M; Bansal, S; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    The king of fruits "Mango" (Mangifera indica L.) is very nutritious and rich in carotenes. India produces about 50% of the total world's mango. Many researchers have reported the maturity indices and quality parameters for determination of harvesting time and eating quality. The methods currently used for determination of quality of mango are mostly based on the biochemical analysis, which leads to destruction of the fruits. Numerous works are being carried out to explore some non-destructive methods such as Near Infrared (NIR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), X-ray and Computed Tomography (CT), electronic nose, machine vision and ultrasound for quality determination of fruits. This paper deals with some recent work reported on quality parameters, harvesting and post-harvest treatments in relation to quality of mango fruits and reviews on some of the potential non-destructive techniques that can be explored for quality determination of mango cultivars. PMID:23572595

  6. Non-destructive examination system of vitreous body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuma; Gong, Jin; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Masato, Makino; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Nishitsuka, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Eyeball plays a quite important role in acquiring the vision. Vitreous body occupies the largest part of the eyeball and consists of biological, elastic, transparent, gel materials. In the present medical examination, the non-destructive examination method of the vitreous body has not been well established. Here, we focus on an application of dynamic light scattering to this topic. We tried to apply our lab-made apparatus, scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS), which was specially designed for observing the nanometer-scale network structure in gel materials. In order to examine the vitreous body using SMILS method, a commercial apparatus, nano Partica (Horiba Co. Ltd.) was also customized. We analyzed vitreous body using both the SMILS and the customized nano Partica. We successfully examined the vitreous bodies of healthy pigs in non-destructive way.

  7. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  8. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  9. Non-destructive techniques based on eddy current testing.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  10. Multispectral UV imaging for fast and non-destructive quality control of chemical and physical tablet attributes.

    PubMed

    Klukkert, Marten; Wu, Jian X; Rantanen, Jukka; Carstensen, Jens M; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2016-07-30

    Monitoring of tablet quality attributes in direct vicinity of the production process requires analytical techniques that allow fast, non-destructive, and accurate tablet characterization. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of multispectral UV imaging as a reliable, rapid technique for estimation of the tablet API content and tablet hardness, as well as determination of tablet intactness and the tablet surface density profile. One of the aims was to establish an image analysis approach based on multivariate image analysis and pattern recognition to evaluate the potential of UV imaging for automatized quality control of tablets with respect to their intactness and surface density profile. Various tablets of different composition and different quality regarding their API content, radial tensile strength, intactness, and surface density profile were prepared using an eccentric as well as a rotary tablet press at compression pressures from 20MPa up to 410MPa. It was found, that UV imaging can provide both, relevant information on chemical and physical tablet attributes. The tablet API content and radial tensile strength could be estimated by UV imaging combined with partial least squares analysis. Furthermore, an image analysis routine was developed and successfully applied to the UV images that provided qualitative information on physical tablet surface properties such as intactness and surface density profiles, as well as quantitative information on variations in the surface density. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that UV imaging combined with image analysis is an effective and non-destructive method to determine chemical and physical quality attributes of tablets and is a promising approach for (near) real-time monitoring of the tablet compaction process and formulation optimization purposes. PMID:26657202

  11. Direct, non-destructive, and rapid evaluation of developmental cotton fibers by ATR FT-IR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical, compositional, and structural differences within the fibers at different growth stages have been investigated considerably through a number of methodologies. Due to its direct, non-destructive, and rapid attribute, this study reports the utilization of attenuated total reflection Fourier t...

  12. Non-Destructive Testing for Control of Radioactive Waste Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumeri, S.; Carrel, F.

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and control of radioactive waste packages are important issues in the management of a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, Andra performs quality control inspection on radwaste package before disposal to ensure the compliance of the radwast characteristics with Andra waste disposal specifications and to check the consistency between Andra measurements results and producer declared properties. Objectives of this quality control are: assessment and improvement of producer radwaste packages quality mastery, guarantee of the radwaste disposal safety, maintain of the public confidence. To control radiological characteristics of radwaste package, non-destructive passive methods (gamma spectrometry and neutrons counting) are commonly used. These passive methods may not be sufficient, for instance to control the mass of fissile material contained inside radwaste package. This is particularly true for large concrete hull of heterogeneous radwaste containing several actinides mixed with fission products like 137Cs. Non-destructive active methods, like measurement of photofission delayed neutrons, allow to quantify the global mass of actinides and is a promising method to quantify mass of fissile material. Andra has performed different non-destructive measurements on concrete intermediate-level short lived nuclear waste (ILW-SL) package to control its nuclear material content. These tests have allowed Andra to have a first evaluation of the performance of photofission delayed neutron measurement and to identify development needed to have a reliable method, especially for fissile material mass control in intermediate-level long lived waste package.

  13. Investigations and Non-destructive Testing in New Building Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenov, V.; Ovchinnikov, A.; Osipov, S.; Shtein, A.; Ustinov, A.; Danilson, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical rebar couplers are preferable in the advanced building construction and structural design of antiseismic elements. The paper presents destructive inspection techniques used to investigate stress fields (tensile and compressive) and deformation curves for mechanical rebar splicing. The properties of mechanical rebar splicing are investigated by the non-destructive testing digital radiography. The behavior of real connections (column-to- column, beam-to-column) is studied under static and dynamic loads. Investigation results allow the elaboration of recommendations on their application in the universal prefabricated antiseismic structural system developed at Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Tomsk, Russia.

  14. Potential techniques for non-destructive evaluation of cable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Kenneth T.; Clough, Roger L.; Mattson, Bengt; Stenberg, Bengt; Oestman, Erik

    This paper describes the connection between mechanical degradation of common cable materials, in radiation and elevated temperature environments, and density increases caused by the oxidation which leads to this degradation. Two techniques based on density changes are suggested as potential non-destructive evaluation (NDE) procedures which may be applicable to monitoring the mechanical condition of cable materials in power plant environments. The first technique is direct measurement of density changes, via a density gradient column, using small shavings removed from the surface of cable jackets at selected locations. The second technique is computed X-ray tomography, utilizing a portable scanning device.

  15. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  16. Non-destructive electrical characterization of controlled Waspaloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Kelekanjeri, V. Siva Kumar

    In this research, controlled Waspaloy microstructures are produced with the objective of studying microstructural evolution in this alloy via non-destructive electrical measurements. Waspaloy is a precipitation-hardenable gamma-gamma' nickel-base superalloy that is used in turbine blade applications demanding superior strength retention capabilities at elevated temperatures. Overall, three different sets of microstructures were produced that varied systematically as a function of the matrix (gamma) grain size and gamma' precipitate size distribution or just the latter. Initial solutionizing treatments conducted at 1045°C, 1090°C and 1145°C resulted in average y grain size of 13, 52 and 89 mum respectively. A vacancy stabilization treatment at 1045°C followed the solutionizing treatments in Set I experiments, after which the specimens were aged at 800°C for durations ranging from 0.1 hrs to 100 hrs. In Sets 11 and III, the matrix grain size was kept unchanged by an initial solution-treatment at 1145°C. The stabilization treatment at 1045°C was only conducted in Set II after the solution-treatment. Aging experiments were then conducted at 700°C (or 725°C in Set III), 800°C and 875°C to study the growth kinetics of gamma' precipitate distribution. The specimens with controlled microstructures were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultra small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) and dc four-point probe resistivity. The applicability of two and four-probe ac impedance techniques was also investigated. Characterization of heat-treated specimens. Solution-treated SEM microstructures showed the presence of polygonal etch-pit shapes, which was proposed to be due to the condensation of excess quenched-in vacancies along crystallographically soft-directions in the gamma phase. The etch-pits evolved upon subsequent aging into progressively irregular shapes, concurrent with gamma' growth inside

  17. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:23351273

  18. Local defect resonance for sensitive non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebahr, W.; Solodov, I.; Rahammer, M.; Gulnizkij, N.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic wave-defect interaction is a background of ultrasound activated techniques for imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials and industrial components. The interaction, primarily, results in acoustic response of a defect which provides attenuation and scattering of ultrasound used as an indicator of defects in conventional ultrasonic NDT. The derivative ultrasonic-induced effects include e.g. nonlinear, thermal, acousto-optic, etc. responses also applied for NDT and defect imaging. These secondary effects are normally relatively inefficient so that the corresponding NDT techniques require an elevated acoustic power and stand out from conventional ultrasonic NDT counterparts for their specific instrumentation particularly adapted to high-power ultrasonic. In this paper, a consistent way to enhance ultrasonic, optical and thermal defect responses and thus to reduce an ultrasonic power required is suggested by using selective ultrasonic activation of defects based on the concept of local defect resonance (LDR). A strong increase in vibration amplitude at LDR enables to reliably detect and visualize the defect as soon as the driving ultrasonic frequency is matched to the LDR frequency. This also provides a high frequency selectivity of the LDR-based imaging, i.e. an opportunity of detecting a certain defect among a multitude of other defects in material. Some examples are shown how to use LDR in non-destructive testing techniques, like vibrometry, ultrasonic thermography and shearography in order to enhance the sensitivity of defect visualization.

  19. Method and Apparatus for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil J. (Inventor); Washabaugh, Andrew P. (Inventor); Lyons, Robert (Inventor); Thomas, Zachary (Inventor); Jablonski, David A. (Inventor); Martin, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for characterizing composite materials for manufacturing quality assurance (QA), periodic inspection during the useful life, or for forensic analysis/material testing. System are provided that relate eddy-current sensor responses to the fiber layup of a composite structure, the presence of impact damage on a composite structure with or without a metal liner, volumetric stress within the composite, fiber tow density, and other NDE inspection requirements. Also provided are systems that determine electromagnetic material properties and material dimensions of composite materials from capacitive sensor inspection measurements. These properties are related to the presence of buried defects in non-conductive composite materials, moisture ingress, aging of the material due to service or environmental/thermal exposure, or changes in manufacturing quality.

  20. Research Performed within the Non-Destructive Evaluation Team at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Erin A.

    2004-01-01

    Non-destructive testing is essential in many fields of manufacturing and research in order to perform reliable examination of potentially damaged materials and parts without destroying the inherent structure of the materials. Thus, the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Team at NASA Glenn Research Center partakes in various projects to improve materials testing equipment as well as analyze materials, material defects, and material deficiencies. Due to the array of projects within the NDE Team at this time, five research aims were supplemental to some current projects. A literature survey of "DE and testing methodologies as related to rocks was performed. Also, Mars Expedition Rover technology was assessed to understand the requirements for instrumentation in harsh space environments (e.g. temperature). Potential instrumentation and technologies were also considered and documented. The literature survey provided background and potential sources for a proposal to acquire funding for ultrasonic instrumentation on board a future Mars expedition. The laboratory uses a Santec Systems AcousticScope AS200 acoustography system. Labview code was written within the current program in order to improve the current performance of the acoustography system. A sample of Reinforced Carbon/Carbon (RCC) material from the leading edge of the space shuttle underwent various non-destructive tests (guided wave scanning, thermography, computed tomography, real time x-ray, etc.) in order to characterize its structure and examine possible defects. Guided wave scan data of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panel was reanalyzed utilizing image correlations and signal processing variables. Additional guided wave scans and thermography were also performed on the CMC panel. These reevaluated data and images will be used in future presentations and publications. An additional axis for the guided wave scanner was designed, constructed, and implemented. This additional axis allowed incremental spacing

  1. Non Destructive Thermal Analysis and In Situ Investigation of Creep Mechanism of Graphite and Ceramic Composites using Phase-sensitive THz Imaging & Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasonic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, XI-Cheng; Hurley, David; Redo-Scanchez, Albert

    2012-11-26

    In this project, we conducted a comprehensive study on nuclear graphite properties with terahertz (THz) imaging. Graphite samples from Idaho National Laboratory were carefully imaged by continuous wave (CW) THz. The CW THz imaging of graphite shows that the samples from different billet with different fabricating conditions have different pore size and structure. Based on this result, we then used a phase sensitive THz system to study the graphite properties. In this exploration, various graphite were studied. By imaging nuclear graphite samples in reflection mode at nine different incident polarization angles using THz time-domain spectroscopy, we find that different domain distributions and levels of porosity will introduce polarization dependence in THz reflectivity. Sample with higher density is less porous and has a smaller average domain distribution. As a consequence, it is less polarization-dependent and the polarization-dependent frequency is higher. The results also show that samples oxidized at higher temperatures tend to be more polarization dependent. The graphite from the external billet is more polarization dependent compared to that from the center billet. In addition, we performed laser-based ultrasonic measurements on these graphite samples. The denser, unoxidized samples allow surface acoustic waves to propagate more rapidly than in the samples that had already undergone oxidation. Therefore, for the oxidized samples, the denser samples show less polarization-dependence, higher polarization-dependent frequency, and allow the surface acoustic waves propagate faster.

  2. A semi-automatic non-destructive method to quantify grapevine downy mildew sporulation.

    PubMed

    Peressotti, Elisa; Duchêne, Eric; Merdinoglu, Didier; Mestre, Pere

    2011-02-01

    The availability of fast, reliable and non-destructive methods for the analysis of pathogen development contributes to a better understanding of plant-pathogen interactions. This is particularly true for the genetic analysis of quantitative resistance to plant pathogens, where the availability of a method allowing a precise quantification of pathogen development allows the reliable detection of different genomic regions involved in the resistance. Grapevine downy mildew, caused by the biotrophic Oomycete Plasmopara viticola, is one of the most important diseases affecting viticulture. Here we report the development of a simple image analysis-based semi-automatic method for the quantification of grapevine downy mildew sporulation, requiring just a compact digital camera and the open source software ImageJ. We confirm the suitability of the method for the analysis of the interaction between grapevine and downy mildew by performing QTL analysis of resistance to downy mildew as well as analysis of the kinetics of downy mildew infection. The non-destructive nature of the method will enable comparison between the phenotypic and molecular data obtained from the very same sample, resulting in a more accurate description of the interaction, while its simplicity makes it easily adaptable to other plant-pathogen interactions, in particular those involving downy mildews. PMID:21167874

  3. A non-destructive metrology solution for detailed measurements of imprint templates and media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey; Hu, Linlin; Eriksson, Torbjörn; Thulin, Kristian; Heidari, Babak

    2009-10-01

    This study investigates a non-destructive optical metrology technique, that furnishes measurement solutions for hard drive discrete track recording (DTR) and bit patterned media (BPM) templates and imprints. From the measurement and analysis of polarized reflectance and transmittance, feature height and profile of DTR and BPM templates and imprints, as well as residual layer thickness of imprints, are accurately determined, and uniformity maps of these parameters are produced in a fraction of a minute. Simulations of theoretical polarized reflectance and transmittance, relating to next generation structures, demonstrate that the optical metrology solution has capability for future products.

  4. Non-destructive terahertz imaging of illicit drugs using spectral fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo; Ogawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yuuki; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2003-10-01

    The absence of non-destructive inspection techniques for illicit drugs hidden in mail envelopes has resulted in such drugs being smuggled across international borders freely. We have developed a novel basic technology for terahertz imaging, which allows detection and identification of drugs concealed in envelopes, by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the targets are obtained from terahertz multispectral transillumination images, using absorption spectra measured with a tunable terahertz-wave source. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  5. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, C.; Franklin, P.; Franklin, P.; Plowman, A.; Sayers, G.; Bol, J.; Shepard, D.; Fields, D.

    2009-07-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  6. A new facility for non-destructive assay using a 252Cf source.

    PubMed

    Stevanato, L; Caldogno, M; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Hao, Xin; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Pino, F; Sajo-Bohus, L; Viesti, G

    2013-03-01

    A new laboratory facility for non-destructive analysis (NDA) using a time-tagged (252)Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 20 × 25 cm(2), the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously total and energy dependent transmission of neutrons and gamma rays. The equipment technical characteristics and performances of the NDA system are presented, exploring also limits due to the sample thickness. Some recent applications in the field of cultural heritage are presented. PMID:23276691

  7. Non-destructive Raman analyses - polyacetylenes in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Bernhard; Schulz, Hartwig; Baranska, Malgorzata; Andreev, George N.; Lehner, Caroline; Sawatzki, Juergen

    2005-05-01

    Ferdinand Bohlmann has described the isolation, the identification and the structure elucidation of acetylene compounds in many plants, and confirmed it by its synthesis. We have recorded the Raman spectra of most of these plants non-destructively by FT-Raman spectroscopy using radiation at 1064 nm. We could not observe any interfering fluorescence. We found acetylene compounds in some plants, even distinct compounds with different concentration in various parts of it. The distribution of the different compounds over the plant can be observed and their changes during the ontogenesis can be followed by a FT-Raman mapping technique. Of special help is a library of Raman and IR spectra and the structure of the compounds, synthesized by Bohlmann. Thus, the Raman technique allows analyses in a very short time replacing the usual time-consuming separation procedures and avoiding artefacts during clean-up procedures.

  8. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  9. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilbrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-01-01

    Classification of meteorites is most effectively carried out by petrographic and mineralogic studies of thin sections, but a rapid and accurate classification technique for the many samples collected in dense collection areas (hot and cold deserts) is of great interest. Oil immersion techniques have been used to classify a large proportion of the US Antarctic meteorite collections since the mid-1980s [1]. This approach has allowed rapid characterization of thousands of samples over time, but nonetheless utilizes a piece of the sample that has been ground to grains or a powder. In order to compare a few non-destructive techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  10. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  11. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  12. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds. PMID:24007051

  13. EVALUATION OF TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR INTERMEDIATE NON DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Susan; Hoggard, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.”

  14. Induction thermography for non-destructive evaluation of adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, L.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive bonding is widely used in automotive industry in the recent times. One of the major problems with adhesive bonds is the lack of a suitable non-destructive evaluation technique for assessing bonding. In this paper, an experimental study was carried out to apply induction thermography technique to evaluate adhesively bonded steel plates. Samples were fabricated with artificial defects such as air gap, foreign material, and improper adhesive filling. Induction thermography technique was found to detect defects and foreign inclusions. The sample specimen was also inspected using standard techniques such as Ultrasonic testing and Radiography testing. Defect detecting capabilities of the three techniques are compared. Induction thermography heating was FE modelled in 3D using COMSOL 3.5a. The simulated Induction thermography model was compared and validated with experimental results.

  15. Non-destructive sampling of rock-dwelling microbial communities using sterile adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Oliver, Anna E; Viles, Heather A; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Building stone provides a habitat for an array of microorganisms, many of which have been demonstrated to have a deleterious effect on the appearance and/or structural integrity of stone masonry. It is essential to understand the composition and structure of stone-dwelling (lithobiontic) microbial communities if successful stone conservation strategies are to be applied, particularly in the face of global environmental change. Ideally, the techniques used to sample such assemblages should be non-destructive due to the sensitive conservation status of many stone buildings. This paper quantitatively assesses the performance of sterile adhesive tape as a non-destructive sampling technique and compares the results of tape sampling with an alternative, destructive, sampling method. We used DNA fingerprinting (TRFLP) to characterise the algal, fungal and bacterial communities living on a stone slab. Our results demonstrate that tape sampling may be used to collect viable quantities of microbial DNA from environmental samples. This technique is ideally suited to the sampling of microbial biofilms, particularly when these communities are dominated by green algae. It provides a good approximation of total community diversity (i.e. the aggregate diversity of epilithic and endolithic communities). Tape sampling is straightforward, rapid and cost effective. When combined with molecular analytical techniques, this sampling method has the potential to make a major contribution to efforts to understand the structure of lithobiontic microbial communities and our ability to predict the response of such communities to future environmental change. PMID:23022426

  16. The use of non destructive biomarkers in the study of marine mammals.

    PubMed

    M Cristina Fossi And Letizia Marsili

    1997-01-01

    Marine mammals have been subject to heavy anthropogenic pressure by direct killing and chemical pollution all over the world. Most studies of contamination and biomarker responses in marine mammals have been conducted using animals killed by hunting out of a total of 12 cetacean species studied, 45 of the specimens were obtained by sacrificing the animal; out of a total of eight pinniped species studied, 40 of the specimens were obtained by killing. The development of a series of non destructive techniques to evaluate biomarker responses and residue levels is recommended for the hazard assessment and conservation of endangered species of marine mammals. Here we review the current status of the non destructive biomarker approach in marine mammals, describing the biological materials available for non destructive tests in stranded brain, liver, blood, skin, subcutaneous blubber, muscle and fur and free ranging animals blood, skin biopsy, fur and faeces and the respective biomarker techniques mixed function oxidase activity and DNA damage in skin biopsy samples; porphyrins in faeces and fur; esterases, porphyrins, clinical biochemical parameter, vitamin A and micronuclei in blood samples. Residue analysis can be carried out in the various biological materials. We also report the results of applying this methodological approach to cetaceans minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata, fin whale-- Balaenoptera physalus, beluga whale-- Delphinapterus leucas, short finned pilot whale-- Globicephala macrorhynchus, harbour porpoise -- Phocoena phocoena, Rissos dolphin-- Risso s Grampus griseus, Dall s porpoise-- Phocoenoides dalli dalli, melon headed whale-- Peponocephala electra, bottlenose dolphin -- Tursiops truncatus, striped dolphin-- Stenella coeruleoalba, spinner dolphin-- Stenella longirostris, killer whale-- Orcinus orca and pinnipeds northern fur seal- Callorhinus ursinus, hooded seal-- Cystophora cristata, grey seal-- Halichoerus grypus, harbour seal-- Phoca vitulina

  17. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, M. L.; Muralha, V. S. F.; Mirão, J.; Veiga, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara- a- Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified.

  18. A Non-Destructive Investigation of Plutonium Reference Items Used for Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, D.; Wormald, M.; Wilkins, C.G.; Croft, S.

    2008-07-01

    The calibration of Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) equipment relies on the availability of certified items of known content and construction. Increasing use is being made of calculational tools to create calibration data and so representative standards are no longer always needed. However, even with this approach it is invaluable to benchmark the tools against the measured response under well known conditions and to apply the Measured: Calculated ratio as a scaling factor. Reference sources for Pu are typically doubly encapsulated for safety reasons and contain Pu of well known chemical form, elemental composition, relative isotopic composition and mass. Destructive analysis techniques are used to characterize the materials and so these attributes are usually known with far greater accuracy than that achievable by the NDA methods to which they are being applied. Construction details are also usually provided in order to permit attenuation and related factors to be estimated. This work concerns the empirical investigation of a set of encapsulated PuO{sub 2} powder standards. The characterization and fabrication of the items is adequately documented with the exception of fill height. The fill height governs the powder density and in turn both the self attenuation of photons and the self multiplication of neutrons, consequently this is an important omission. Initially the location and dimensions of the internal plunger cup was used as a basis to estimate the packing density, but later records of plunger positions made at the time of filling were found and significant revisions followed. As a consequence of discrepancies observed in measurements designed to evaluate a new lump correction algorithm we were led to investigate the powder density and distribution directly by gamma-ray scanning. In some cases this resulted in revised density estimates. Equally importantly it was discovered that for the smallest mass items, the powder was not held fixed in the form of a uniform

  19. Non-destructive measurement of soil liquefaction density change by crosshole radar tomography, Treasure Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Ashford, Scott; Rollins, Kyle

    2000-01-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) experiment at the Treasure Island Test Site [TILT] was performed to non-destructively image the soil column for changes in density prior to, and following, a liquefaction event. The intervening liquefaction was achieved by controlled blasting. A geotechnical borehole radar technique was used to acquire high-resolution 2-D radar velocity data. This method of non-destructive site characterization uses radar trans-illumination surveys through the soil column and tomographic data manipulation techniques to construct radar velocity tomograms, from which averaged void ratios can be derived at 0.25 - 0.5m pixel footprints. Tomograms of void ratio were constructed through the relation between soil porosity and dielectric constant. Both pre- and post-blast tomograms were collected and indicate that liquefaction related densification occurred at the site. Volumetric strains estimated from the tomograms correlate well with the observed settlement at the site. The 2-D imagery of void ratio can serve as high-resolution data layers for numerical site response analysis.

  20. Non-destructive Magnetic Evaluation of Laser Weld Quality in Hot Rolled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, J. N.; Chakradhar, I.; Rao, K. R. C.; Rao, V. V. L.; Kaza, Marutiram

    2015-06-01

    Weld quality evaluation was conducted on laser welded thin sectsions (2 mm) of hot-rolled (HR) low-carbon steel coils during cold rolling process. The analysis revealed that the poor welds consisting of the weld defects like incomplete fusion, cluster of porosity, and large difference in hardness between the weld zone and base metal were responsible for the weld failures. Experiments were conducted by varying the welding parameters; laser power and welding speed to optimize the parameters for minimizing the weld defects. The optimized weld process parameters have helped elimination of weld defects and the results are verified with microscopy and microhardness measurements. As destructive evaluation techniques are time consuming and not always permitted in industrial applications, attempts have been made in the present investigation for the utilization of suitable non-destructive techniques for the evaluation of weld quality. Non-destructive magnetic techniques of magnetic hysteresis loop and magnetic Barkhausen emissions were used in the present investigation to establish possible correlations of magnetic properties across the weld seam with the mechanical property (microhardness) for evaluation of weld quality. It is inferred that the magnetic properties of coercivity and inverse of root mean square voltage can be effectively utilized to determine weld quality in HR steel coils.

  1. Non-destructive detection of pesticide residues in cucumber using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Bahareh; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Jamshidi, Jamshid; Minaei, Saeid; Sharifi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy was assessed for non-destructive detection of diazinon residues in intact cucumbers. Vis/NIR spectra of diazinon solution and cucumber samples without and with different concentrations of diazinon residue were analysed at the range of 450-1000 nm. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models were developed based on different spectral pre-processing techniques to classify cucumbers with contents of diazinon below and above the MRL as safe and unsafe samples, respectively. The best model was obtained using a first-derivative method with the lowest standard error of cross-validation (SECV = 0.366). Moreover, total percentages of correctly classified samples in calibration and prediction sets were 97.5% and 92.31%, respectively. It was concluded that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be an appropriate, fast and non-destructive technology for safety control of intact cucumbers by the absence/presence of diazinon residues. PMID:25789964

  2. Non-destructive forensic latent fingerprint acquisition with chromatic white light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leich, Marcus; Kiltz, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2011-02-01

    Non-destructive latent fingerprint acquisition is an emerging field of research, which, unlike traditional methods, makes latent fingerprints available for additional verification or further analysis like tests for substance abuse or age estimation. In this paper a series of tests is performed to investigate the overall suitability of a high resolution off-the-shelf chromatic white light sensor for the contact-less and non-destructive latent fingerprint acquisition. Our paper focuses on scanning previously determined regions with exemplary acquisition parameter settings. 3D height field and reflection data of five different latent fingerprints on six different types of surfaces (HDD platter, brushed metal, painted car body (metallic and non-metallic finish), blued metal, veneered plywood) are experimentally studied. Pre-processing is performed by removing low-frequency gradients. The quality of the results is assessed subjectively; no automated feature extraction is performed. Additionally, the degradation of the fingerprint during the acquisition period is observed. While the quality of the acquired data is highly dependent on surface structure, the sensor is capable of detecting the fingerprint on all sample surfaces. On blued metal the residual material is detected; however, the ridge line structure dissolves within minutes after fingerprint placement.

  3. Non-destructive testing of the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y.; Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Hahl, S.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H. P.; Schwarz, R.; Spahr, A.; Zanini, L.; Kuster, D.; Gavillet, D.; Wagner, W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is one important part of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the MEGAPIE target. It includes visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement of the beam window of the T91 LBE container and gamma mapping of the beam window of the AlMg3 safety-container. The visual inspection showed no visible failure in the proton beam window area of the T91 LBE container. The ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in the wall thickness of the T91 beam window, which implies no severe corrosion effect induced by flowing LBE during the four-month irradiation period. The gamma mapping provided the distribution of 22Na, a spallation product, in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The result was used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. A maximum proton fluence of 1.9 × 1025 p/m2 was deduced. The corresponding displacement damage degree in the T91 beam window was 7.1 dpa.

  4. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOEpatents

    Fong, James T.

    1996-01-01

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  5. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  6. Non-destructive monitoring of curing process in precast concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, S.; Ranz, J.; Fernández, R.; Albert, V.; Fuente, J. V.; Hernández, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, the use of precast concrete elements has gained importance because it offers many advantages over site-cast concrete. A disadvantage of site-cast concrete is that its properties vary according to the manufacturing method, the environment and even the operator who carried out the mixing, pouring and implementation of the concrete. Precast concrete elements are manufactured in a controlled environment (typically referred to as a precast plant) and this reduces the shrinkage and creep. One of the key properties of precast concrete is the capability to gain compressive strength rapidly under the appropriate conditions. The compressive strength determines if the precast can be stripped from the form or manipulated. This parameter is measured using destructive testing over cylindrical or cubic samples. The quality control of precast is derived from the fracture suffered by these elements, resulting in a "pass or fail" evaluation. In most cases, the solution to this problem is to allow the material to cure for a few hours until it acquires sufficient strength to handle the precast element. The focus of this paper is the description of the research project "CUREND". This project aims to design a non-destructive methodology to monitor the curing process in precast concrete. The monitoring will be performed using wireless sensor networks.

  7. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET

    SciTech Connect

    J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

  8. Non-destructive evaluation of anchorage zones by ultrasonics techniques.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, M; Gaillet, L

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of two Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods for damage assessment in bridges' anchorages. The Acousto-Ultrasonic (AU) technique is compared to classical Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in terms of defect detection and structural health classification. The AU technique is firstly used on single seven-wire strands damaged by artificial defects. The effect of growing defects on the waves traveling through the strands is evaluated. Thereafter, three specimens of anchorages with unknown defects are inspected by the AU and UT techniques. Damage assessment results from both techniques are then compared. The structural health conditions of the specimens can be then classified by a damage severity criterion. Finally, a damaged anchorage socket with mastered defects is controlled by the same techniques. The UT allows the detection and localization of damaged wires. The AU technique is used to bring out the effect of defects on acoustic features by comparing a healthy and damaged anchorage sockets. It is concluded that the UT method is suitable for local and crack-like defects, whereas the AU technique enables the assessment of the global structural health of the anchorage zones. PMID:25824342

  9. Complex Archaeological Prospection Using Combination of Non-destructive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Pavelka, K.; Nový, P.; Šedina, J.

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the use of a combination of non-destructive techniques for the complex documentation of a fabulous historical site called Devil's Furrow, an unusual linear formation lying in the landscape of central Bohemia. In spite of many efforts towards interpretation of the formation, its original form and purpose have not yet been explained in a satisfactory manner. The study focuses on the northern part of the furrow which appears to be a dissimilar element within the scope of the whole Devil's Furrow. This article presents detailed description of relics of the formation based on historical map searches and modern investigation methods including airborne laser scanning, aerial photogrammetry (based on airplane and RPAS) and ground-penetrating radar. Airborne laser scanning data and aerial orthoimages acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre were used. Other measurements were conducted by our laboratory. Data acquired by various methods provide sufficient information to determine the probable original shape of the formation and proves explicitly the anthropological origin of the northern part of the formation (around village Lipany).

  10. Template synthesis of test tube nanoparticles using non-destructive replication

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan; Yao, Jingyuan; Rodgers, David; Hinds, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Nano test tubes are a promising delivery vehicle for a range of therapeutics including small molecule drugs and biologics. However, current template synthesis methods of producing nano test tubes are prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Here, non-destructive template replication was used to increase nano test tube yield from porous alumina by more than a hundredfold. We demonstrate how to produce nano test tubes of several sizes and compositions including hybrid tubes with different inner and outer surfaces for targeted surface chemistry. Nano test tubes were readily suspended and stored in aqueous solutions without the need for chemical treatment. These nano test tubes should find application as delivery vehicles for therapeutics, particularly for processive “bionanoreactors” loaded with enzymes. PMID:23376956

  11. Template synthesis of test tube nanoparticles using non-destructive replication.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jonathan; Yao, Jingyuan; Rodgers, David; Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Nano test tubes are a promising delivery vehicle for a range of therapeutics, including small molecule drugs and biologics. However, current template synthesis methods of producing nano test tubes are prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Here, non-destructive template replication was used to increase nano test tube yield from porous alumina by more than a hundredfold. We demonstrate how to produce nano test tubes of several sizes and compositions, including hybrid tubes with different inner and outer surfaces for targeted surface chemistry. Nano test tubes were readily suspended and stored in aqueous solutions without the need for chemical treatment. These nano test tubes should find application as delivery vehicles for therapeutics, particularly for processive 'bionanoreactors' loaded with enzymes. PMID:23376956

  12. Geophysical Methods for Non-Destructive Testing in Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederleithinger, E.

    2013-12-01

    Many non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for civil engineering (e. g. ultrasonics, radar) are similar to geophysical techniques. They just differ in scale, material under investigation and vocabulary used. In spite of the fact that the same principles of physics and mathematics apply to both fields, exchange has been limited in the past. But since a few years more and more geophysical knowledge is used in civil engineering. One of the focal points in research is to improve ultrasonic testing of concrete to be able to image the inside even of large, complex structures and to detect any deterioration as early as possible. One of the main issues is the heterogeneity of concrete, including aggregates, reinforcement, cracks and many other features. Our current research focuses on three points. One is the application of state of the art geophysical migration techniques as Reverse Time Migration (RTM) to image vertical faces or the backside of voids and ducts in thick concrete structures, which isn't possible with conventional techniques used in NDT. Second, we have started to use seismic interferometric techniques to interpolate ultrasonic traces, which can't be measured directly for technical reasons. Third, we are using coda wave interferometry to detect concrete degradation due to load, fatigue, temperature or other influences as early as possible. Practical examples of the application of these techniques are given and potential future research directions will be discussed. It will be shown, how a subset of these techniques can be used for innovative monitoring systems for civil infrastructure. Imaging the interior of a concrete body by ultrasonics and reverse time migration(simulated data).

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-01

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm-1 to 68 cm-1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  14. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-25

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm{sup -1} to 68 cm{sup -1} to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100 Degree-Sign C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  15. Non-destructive fraud detection in rosehip oil by MIR spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Santana, Felipe Bachion de; Gontijo, Lucas Caixeta; Mitsutake, Hery; Mazivila, Sarmento Júnior; Souza, Leticia Maria de; Borges Neto, Waldomiro

    2016-10-15

    Rosehip oil (Rosa eglanteria L.) is an important oil in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. However, due to its high added value, it is liable to adulteration with other cheaper or lower quality oils. With this perspective, this work provides a new simple, fast and accurate methodology using mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) as a means to discriminate authentic rosehip oil from adulterated rosehip oil containing soybean, corn and sunflower oils in different proportions. The model showed excellent sensitivity and specificity with 100% correct classification. Therefore, the developed methodology is a viable alternative for use in the laboratory and industry for standard quality analysis of rosehip oil since it is fast, accurate and non-destructive. PMID:27173556

  16. Recent advances in the use of non-destructive near infrared spectroscopy on intact olive fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this review is to illustrate the state of the art in the use of non-destructive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for quality evaluation of intact fruit in the olive industry. First, the most recent studies regarding the application of non-destructive NIR spectroscopy methods to asse...

  17. A quasi non-destructive approach for amber geological provenance assessment based on head space solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, I D; Aresta, A; Truică, G I; Radu, G L; Palmisano, F; Sabbatini, L

    2014-02-01

    Head space (HS) solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyze the volatile fraction of ambers of different geological origin. In particular, Romanian (romanite) and Baltic (succinite) amber samples were studied. Both types of amber have nearly similar bulk chemical compositions and could probably reflect only some differences of paleobiological and/or diagenetic origin. The present study shows that amber head space fingerprint, obtained by SPME/GC-MS, can provide a simple and quasi non-destructive method capable of romanite/succinite differentiation. Among the numerous compounds present in the head space, a number of few informative variables could be selected that were able to differentiate the ambers as demonstrated by Principal Component and Cluster Analysis. PMID:24401437

  18. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TBC SPALLATION DETECTION BY A MICRO-INDENTATION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Tannenbaum; B.S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-06-18

    In this research, a load-based depth-sensing micro-indentation method for spallation detection and damage assessment of thermal barrier coating (TBC) materials is presented. A non-destructive multiple loading/partial unloading testing methodology was developed where in stiffness responses of TBC coupons subjected to various thermal cyclic loading conditions were analyzed to predict the spallation site and assess TBC degradation state. The measured stiffness responses at various thermal loading cycles were used to generate time-series color maps for correlation with accumulation of TBC residual stress states. The regions with higher stiffness responses can be linked to a rise in out-of-plane residual stress located near or at the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface, which is ultimately responsible for initiating TBC spallation failure. A TBC thermal exposure testing plan was carried out where time-series cross-sectional microstructural analyses of damage accumulation and spallation failure associated with the evolution of bond coat/TGO/top coat composite (e.g. thickness, ratcheting, localized oxidations, etc.) of air plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs were evaluated and correlated to the measured stiffness responses at various thermal cycles. The results show that the load-based micro-indentation test methodology is capable of identifying the spallation site(s) before actual occurrence. This micro-indentation technique can be viewed as a viable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for determining as-manufactured and process-exposed TBCs. This technique also shows promise for the development of a portable instrument for on-line, in-situ spallation detection/prediction of industrial-size TBC turbine components.

  19. Non-destructive inspection using HTS SQUID on aluminum liner covered by CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Y.; Yotsugi, K.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    2007-10-01

    An eddy-current-based SQUID non-destructive inspection (NDI) system to detect deep-lying cracks in multi-layer composite-Al vessels was developed taking advantage of the uncontested sensitivity of HTS-SQUID in low-frequency range. An HTS-SQUID gradiometer was mounted in a pulse tube cryocooler. A pair of differential coils with C-shaped ferrite cores was employed to induce an enhanced eddy current in an Al vessel wrapped in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cover. Ellipsoidal dome-shaped Al liners containing through cracks, which were made by pressure cycle tests, in the CFRP covers with total thickness of 6 mm (CFPR 3 mm, and Al 3 mm) were inspected by the system. While inducing eddy currents in the vessels with excitation fields at 100 Hz or 7 kHz, the vessels were rotated under the HTS-SQUID. Above the cracks, anomalous signals due to the cracks were clearly detected at both frequencies. These results suggested the SQUID-NDI technique would be a possible candidate for inspection of high-pressure multi-layer composite-Al vessels.

  20. Non-destructive evaluation of TBC by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianqi

    suggested. An alternative electrolyte (trifluoroacetic acid) was investigated using EIS in order to be used as compatible or friendly solution to TBC. A similar characteristic EIS result was found using the alternative electrolyte compared with the commonly used electrolyte [Fe(CN)6]-3/[Fe(CN) 6]-4 in this work. It has indicated that a friendly electrolyte be viable for EIS technique to be used for non-destructive evaluation of TBC. Visualization of a flexible probe for EIS field detection has also been designed. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. Non-destructive infrared analyses: a method for provenance analyses of sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowitz, Jörg; Ehling, Angela

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy) is commonly applied in the laboratory for mineral analyses in addition to XRD. Because such technical efforts are time and cost consuming, we present an infrared-based mobile method for non-destructive mineral and provenance analyses of sandstones. IR spectroscopy is based on activating chemical bonds. By irradiating a mineral mixture, special bonds are activated to vibrate depending on the bond energy (resonance vibration). Accordingly, the energy of the IR spectrum will be reduced thereby generating an absorption spectrum. The positions of the absorption maxima within the spectral region indicate the type of the bonds and in many cases identify minerals containing these bonds. The non-destructive reflection spectroscopy operates in the near infrared region (NIR) and can detect all common clay minerals as well as sulfates, hydroxides and carbonates. The spectra produced have been interpreted by computer using digital mineral libraries that have been especially collected for sandstones. The comparison of all results with XRD, RFA and interpretations of thin sections demonstrates impressively the accuracy and reliability of this method. Not only are different minerals detectable, but also differently ordered kaolinites and varieties of illites can be identified by the shape and size of the absorption bands. Especially clay minerals and their varieties in combination with their relative contents form the characteristic spectra of sandstones. Other components such as limonite, hematite and amorphous silica also influence the spectra. Sandstones, similar in colour and texture, often can be identified by their characteristic reflectance spectra. Reference libraries with more than 60 spectra of important German sandstones have been created to enable entirely computerized interpretations and identifications of these dimension stones. The analysis of infrared spectroscopy results is demonstrated with examples of different sandstones

  2. Non-destructive testing of an original XVI century painting on wood by ESPI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, G.; Paturzo, M.; Fatigati, G.; Grilli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI), a non-contact and non-destructive optical techniques, was employed for assessing the conservation state of a XVI Century painting on wood (72x88x1,9 cm). By a long term analysis, the whole structure alterations, induced by the room temperature and relative humidity variations, were evaluated. Measurement of the whole painting structural bends was achieved. Local flaws and hidden detachments of pictorial layers from the support, which cannot be recognized by traditional art-restorer methods, were also revealed. This work was prevalently aimed at achieving a simple approach, in the laboratory practice, to get an intuitively user-friendly method for art conservators, not accustomed to high-tech or math based methods. The results demonstrate that ESPI can largely improve the traditional art conservation survey techniques.

  3. High-resolution thermal imaging methodology for non-destructive evaluation of historic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Michael; Vanoni, David; Petrovic, Vid; Kuester, Falko

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a methodology for automated, portable thermography, for the acquisition of high-resolution thermal image mosaics supporting the non-destructive evaluation of historic structures. The presented approach increases the spatial resolution of thermal surveys to a level of detail needed for building scale analysis. The integration of a robotic camera platform enables automated alignment of multiple images into a high-resolution thermal image mosaic giving a holistic view of the structure while maintaining a level of detail equaling or exceeding that of traditional spot surveys using existing cameras. Providing a digital workflow for automated data and metadata recording increases the consistency and accuracy of surveys regardless of the location or operator. An imaging workflow and instrumentation are shown for a case-study on buildings in Florence, Italy demonstrating the effectiveness of this methodology for structural diagnostics.

  4. Non-destructive in situ mapping of macroholes, cracks and inhomogeneities of stalagmites in cave environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegymegi, Erika; Gyöngy, Miklós; Bodolai, Tamás; Divós, Ferenc; Barta, Edit; Gribovszki, Katalin; Bokelmann, Götz; Hegymegi, Csaba; Lednická, Markéta; Kovács, Károly

    2016-04-01

    Intact and vulnerable, candle-stick type stalagmites can be used as prehistoric-earthquake indicators during seismic-hazard analysis of a given region, because they are old enough to survive several earthquakes. The continued intactness of the stalagmites indicates a lack of earthquakes that had the strength to destroy them. To make sure that the stalagmites are intact, we have to image their internal structure in order to estimate the steadiness more accurate and potential failure in the last few thousand years, during their evolution. These stalagmites play an important indicator role and carry fundamental information; however, legally they are strictly protected natural objects in Europe. Therefore it is impossible to examine them in the laboratory by conventional equipment such as computer tomography (CT) or X-ray, because this would require taking samples. With the presented non-destructive methods (ultrasound and acoustic tomography) we tried to detect macroholes, cracks and velocity anomalies inside the stalagmites on the mm scale in situ, in the cave. The acoustic tomography applied in the current work is an existing method in forest research. Forest researchers use it to non-destructively detect the size and location of decayed or hollow parts in the trunk and this technique is able to detect the velocity changing of wave propagation and anomalies in the stalagmites as well. The other method that we use is ultrasound imaging, which uses (and is able to calculate) the velocity of sound propagation. Here, the frequency used is much higher (typically 250 kHz to 5 MHz), which increases resolution but at the same time decreases penetration depth compared to acoustic tomography. In this latter work, through transmission and TOFD (time-of-flight-diffraction) ultrasound methods are using thickness-mode ultrasound transducers (Panametrics, Olympus). Such equipment is well-adapted to the cave environment and this is the first time that it has been used for these

  5. Damage Detection in a Composite Plate Using Modal Analysis and Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, M. R.; Mahjoob, M. J.; Aghakasiri, A.

    2011-12-01

    The use of composite materials has vastly increased in recent years. Great interest is therefore developed in the damage detection of composites using non-destructive test methods. Several approaches have been applied to obtain information about the existence, location and growth of the faults. The main goal in this paper is to use the vibration response of a composite plate to detect and localize delamination defect based on the frequency response and modal analysis. The features extracted are used as the input data in an artificial intelligence scheme to identify the severity of the damages. Experiments are then conducted to validate the developed model.

  6. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, Stefan Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Truong, Vo-Van

    2014-03-21

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  7. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, Stefan; Truong, Vo-Van; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2014-03-01

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  8. Robotic path planning for non-destructive testing of complex shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, Carmelo; Pierce, Stephen Gareth; Wright, Ben; Nicholson, Pascual Ian; Cooper, Ian

    2015-03-01

    The requirement to increase inspection speeds for non-destructive testing (NDT) of composite aerospace parts is common to many manufacturers. The prevalence of complex curved surfaces in the industry provides significant motivation for the use of 6 axis robots for deployment of NDT probes in these inspections. A new system for robot deployed ultrasonic inspection of composite aerospace components is presented. The key novelty of the approach is through the accommodation of flexible robotic trajectory planning, coordinated with the NDT data acquisition. Using a flexible approach in MATLAB, the authors have developed a high level custom toolbox that utilizes external control of an industrial 6 axis manipulator to achieve complex path planning and provide synchronization of the employed ultrasonic phase array inspection system. The developed software maintains a high level approach to the robot programming, in order to ease the programming complexity for an NDT inspection operator. Crucially the approach provides a pathway for a conditional programming approach and the capability for multiple robot control (a significant limitation in many current off-line programming applications). Ultrasonic and experimental data has been collected for the validation of the inspection technique. The path trajectory generation for a large, curved carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) aerofoil component has been proven and is presented. The path error relative to a raster-scan tool-path, suitable for ultrasonic phased array inspection, has been measured to be within + 2mm over the 1.6 m2 area of the component surface.

  9. Crime scene investigations using portable, non-destructive space exploration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, Jacob I.; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Selavka, Carl; Dale, Mark; Gahn, Norman; Floyd, Samuel; Marie, James; Hobson, Maritza; Zeosky, Jerry; Martin, Ken; McClannahan, Timothy; Solomon, Pamela; Gottschang, Elyse

    2002-01-01

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals solve crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ programs with state and local forensic laboratories. A working group of NASA scientists and law enforcement professionals has been established to develop and implement a feasibility demonstration program. Specifically, the group has focused its efforts on identifying gunpowder and primer residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. Non-destructive elemental composition identification methods are carried out using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. These systems are similar to those being developed for planetary exploration programs. A breadboard model of a portable XRF system has been constructed for these tests using room temperature silicon and cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Preliminary tests have been completed with gunshot residue (GSR), blood-spatter and semen samples. Many of the element composition lines have been identified. Studies to determine the minimum detectable limits needed for the analyses of GSR, blood and semen in the crime scene environment have been initiated and preliminary results obtained. Furthermore, a database made up of the inorganic composition of GSR is being developed. Using data obtained from the open literature of the elemental composition of barium (Ba) and antimony (Sb) in handswipes of GSR, we believe that there may be a unique GSR signature based on the Sb to Ba ratio.

  10. Crime scene investigations using portable, non-destructive space exploration technology.

    PubMed

    Trombka, Jacob I; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Selavka, Carl; Dale, Mark; Gahn, Norman; Floyd, Samuel; Marie, James; Hobson, Maritza; Zeosky, Jerry; Martin, Ken; McClannahan, Timothy; Solomon, Pamela; Gottschang, Elyse

    2002-09-10

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals solve crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ programs with state and local forensic laboratories. A working group of NASA scientists and law enforcement professionals has been established to develop and implement a feasibility demonstration program. Specifically, the group has focused its efforts on identifying gunpowder and primer residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. Non-destructive elemental composition identification methods are carried out using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. These systems are similar to those being developed for planetary exploration programs. A breadboard model of a portable XRF system has been constructed for these tests using room temperature silicon and cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Preliminary tests have been completed with gunshot residue (GSR), blood-spatter and semen samples. Many of the element composition lines have been identified. Studies to determine the minimum detectable limits needed for the analyses of GSR, blood and semen in the crime scene environment have been initiated and preliminary results obtained. Furthermore, a database made up of the inorganic composition of GSR is being developed. Using data obtained from the open literature of the elemental composition of barium (Ba) and antimony (Sb) in handswipes of GSR, we believe that there may be a unique GSR signature based on the Sb to Ba ratio. PMID:12230992

  11. Recent advances in rapid and non-destructive assessment of meat quality using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Ngadi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Meat is an important food item in human diet. Its production and consumption has greatly increased in the last decades with the development of economies and improvement of peoples' living standards. However, most of the traditional methods for evaluation of meat quality are time-consuming, laborious, inconsistent and destructive to samples, which make them not appropriate for a fast-paced production and processing environment. Development of innovative and non-destructive optical sensing techniques to facilitate simple, fast, and accurate evaluation of quality are attracting increasing attention in the food industry. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the promising techniques. It integrates the combined merits of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in evaluation of the important quality attributes of meat including color, marbling, tenderness, pH, water holding capacity, and also chemical composition attributes such as moisture content, protein content and fat content in pork, beef and lamb. In addition, the future potential applications and trends of hyperspectral imaging are also discussed in this paper.

  12. Feasibility for non-destructive discrimination of natural and beryllium-diffused sapphires using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyeol; Lee, Sanguk; Park, Jimin; Chung, Hoeil

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy based non-destructive discrimination between natural and beryllium-diffused (Be-diffused) sapphires has been attempted. The initial examination of Raman image acquired on a sapphire revealed that microscopic structural and compositional heterogeneity was apparent in the sample, so acquisition of spectra able to represent a whole body of sapphire rather than a localized area was necessary for a reliable discrimination. For this purpose, a wide area illumination (WAI) scheme (illumination area: 28.3mm(2)) providing a large sampling volume was employed to collect representative Raman spectra of sapphires. Upon the diffusion of Be into a sapphire, the band shift originated from varied lattice structure by substitution of Be at cation sites was observed and utilized as a valuable spectral signature for the discrimination. In the domain of principal component (PC) scores, the groups of natural and Be-diffused sapphires were identifiable with minor overlapping and the cross-validated discrimination error was 7.3% when k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) was used as a classifier. PMID:26717849

  13. Long-term and high frequency non-destructive monitoring of water stable isotope profiles in an evaporating soil column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Y.; Merz, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Hermes, N.; Weuthen, A.; Pohlmeier, A.; Vereecken, H.; Brüggemann, N.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotope compositions of soil water (δ2H and δ18O) carry important information about the prevailing soil hydrological conditions and for constraining ecosystem water budgets. However, they are highly dynamic, especially during and after precipitation events. The classical method of determining soil water δ2H and δ18O at different depths, i.e., soil sampling and cryogenic extraction of the soil water, followed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometer analysis is destructive and laborious with limited temporal resolution. In this study, we present a new non-destructive method based on gas-permeable tubing and isotope-specific infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. We conducted a laboratory experiment with an acrylic glass column filled with medium sand equipped with gas-permeable tubing at eight different soil depths. The soil column was initially saturated from the bottom, exposed to evaporation for a period of 290 days, and finally rewatered. Soil water vapor δ2H and δ18O were measured daily, sequentially for each depth. Soil liquid water δ2H and δ18O were inferred from the isotopic values of the vapor assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between liquid and vapor phases in the soil. The experimental setup allowed following the evolution of typical exponential-shaped soil water δ2H and δ18O profiles with unprecedentedly high temporal resolution. As the soil dried out, we could also show for the first time the increasing influence of the isotopically depleted ambient water vapor on the isotopically enriched liquid water close to the soil surface (i.e., atmospheric invasion). Rewatering at the end of the experiment led to instantaneous resetting of the stable isotope profiles, which could be closely followed with the new method.

  14. Image pixel guided tours: a software platform for non-destructive x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Emery, R.

    2009-02-01

    Multivariate analysis seeks to describe the relationship between an arbitrary number of variables. To explore highdimensional data sets, projections are often used for data visualisation to aid discovering structure or patterns that lead to the formation of statistical hypothesis. The basic concept necessitates a systematic search for lower-dimensional representations of the data that might show interesting structure(s). Motivated by the recent research on the Image Grand Tour (IGT), which can be adapted to view guided projections by using objective indexes that are capable of revealing latent structures of the data, this paper presents a signal processing perspective on constructing such indexes under the unifying exploratory frameworks of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and Projection Pursuit (PP). Our investigation begins with an overview of dimension reduction techniques by means of orthogonal transforms, including the classical procedure of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and extends to an application of the more powerful techniques of ICA in the context of our recent work on non-destructive testing technology by element specific x-ray imaging.

  15. Numerical study of light propagation in agricultural products for non-destructive assessment of food quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kiyohito; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Tatekura, Yuki; Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Masao

    2015-12-01

    An accurate determination of optical properties of agricultural products is crucial for non-destructive assessment of food quality. For the determination, light intensity is measured at the surface of the product; then, inverse analysis is employed based on a light propagation model such as the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The inverse analysis requires high computational loads because the light intensity is numerically calculated using the model every time the optical properties are changed. For the calculation, we propose an efficient technique by combining a numerical solution with an analytical solution of the RTE, and investigate the validity of the technique in a two-dimensional homogeneous circular medium which is regarded as a light propagation model with optical properties of kiwifruit. The proposed technique can provide accurate results of the light intensity in change of the optical properties, and the accuracy is less dependent on the boundary conditions and source-detector angles. In addition, the technique can reduce computation time compared with that for numerical calculation of the RTE. These results indicate usefulness of the proposed technique for the inverse analysis.

  16. Litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose and non-linear dynamics stochastic resonance model

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) was proposed. EN responses to litchi samples were continuously detected for 6 d Principal component analysis (PCA) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) methods were utilized to analyze EN detection data. PCA method could not totally discriminate litchi samples, while SR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen spectrum successfully discriminated all litchi samples. Litchi freshness predictive model developed using SNR eigen values shows high predictive accuracy with regression coefficients R2 = 0 .99396. PMID:25920547

  17. Accuracy of Non-Destructive Testing of PBRs to Estimate Fragilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, J. N.; Brune, R.; Biasi, G. P.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Purvance, M.

    2011-12-01

    Prior studies of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) have involved various methods of documenting rock shapes and fragilities. These have included non-destructive testing (NDT) methods such as photomodeling, and potentially destructive testing (PDT) such as forced tilt tests. PDT methods usually have the potential of damaging or disturbing the rock or its pedestal so that the PBR usefulness for future generations is compromised. To date we have force-tilt tested approximately 28 PBRs, and of these we believe 7 have been compromised. We suggest here that given other inherent uncertainties in the current methodologies, NDT methods are now sufficiently advanced as to be adequate for the current state of the art use for comparison with Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) and seismic hazard maps (SHMs). Here we compare tilt-test static toppling estimates to three non-destructive methods: (1) 3-D photographic modeling (2) profile analysis assuming the rock is 2-D, and (3) expert judgments from photographs. 3-D modeling uses the commercial Photomodeler program and photographs in the field taken from numerous directions around the rock. The output polyhedral shape is analyzed in Matlab determine the center of mass and in Autocad to estimate the static overturning angle alpha. For the 2-D method we chose the photograph in profile looking perpendicular to the estimated direction of toppling. The rock is outlined as a 2-D object in Matlab. Rock dimensions, rocking points, and a vertical reference are supplied by the photo analyst to estimate the center of gravity and static force overturning angles. For the expert opinion method we used additional photographs taken from different directions to improve the estimates of the center of mass and the rocking points. We used 7 rocks for comparisons. The error in estimating tan alpha from 3-D modeling is about 0.05. For 2-D estimates an average error is about 0.1 (?). For expert opinion estimates the error is about 0.06. For

  18. Non-destructive testing for the structures and civil infrastructures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, L.; Rizzo, E.

    2012-04-01

    infrared thermography and sonic testing. Finally, we investigated a radiant floor by GPR (900 MHz to 2000 MHz antennas) and long-wave infrared camera. Non-destructive diagnostic techniques allow to investigate a building structure in reinforced concrete or masonry without altering the characteristics of the element investigated. For this reason, geo-electrical and electromagnetic surveys of masonry are a suitable non-destructive tool for the diagnosis of a deteriorated concrete structure. Moreover, the integration of different NDT techniques (conventional and no-conventional) is a very powerful to maximize the capabilities and to compensate for the limitations of each method.

  19. Fast solver for large scale eddy current non-destructive evaluation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Naiguang

    Eddy current testing plays a very important role in non-destructive evaluations of conducting test samples. Based on Faraday's law, an alternating magnetic field source generates induced currents, called eddy currents, in an electrically conducting test specimen. The eddy currents generate induced magnetic fields that oppose the direction of the inducing magnetic field in accordance with Lenz's law. In the presence of discontinuities in material property or defects in the test specimen, the induced eddy current paths are perturbed and the associated magnetic fields can be detected by coils or magnetic field sensors, such as Hall elements or magneto-resistance sensors. Due to the complexity of the test specimen and the inspection environments, the availability of theoretical simulation models is extremely valuable for studying the basic field/flaw interactions in order to obtain a fuller understanding of non-destructive testing phenomena. Theoretical models of the forward problem are also useful for training and validation of automated defect detection systems. Theoretical models generate defect signatures that are expensive to replicate experimentally. In general, modelling methods can be classified into two categories: analytical and numerical. Although analytical approaches offer closed form solution, it is generally not possible to obtain largely due to the complex sample and defect geometries, especially in three-dimensional space. Numerical modelling has become popular with advances in computer technology and computational methods. However, due to the huge time consumption in the case of large scale problems, accelerations/fast solvers are needed to enhance numerical models. This dissertation describes a numerical simulation model for eddy current problems using finite element analysis. Validation of the accuracy of this model is demonstrated via comparison with experimental measurements of steam generator tube wall defects. These simulations generating two

  20. Non-destructive analyses on a meteorite fragment that fell in the Madrid city centre in 1896.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Tormo, Laura; Rubio Ordoñez, Alvaro; Garcia-Moreno, Olga

    2013-09-30

    The historical Madrid meteorite chondrite fell in 1896 showing thin melt veins with a 65% of brecciated forsterite fragments surrounded by a fine grained matrix formed by troilite, chromite and Fe-Ni blebs. It exhibits a delicate iron infill, neo-formation of troilite in pockets and shock veins and neo-formation of Na-feldspar formed at high temperature and fast quenching. The semi-quantitative mineral determinations were performed with IMAGEJ freeware and chemical mappings resulting in the following approximated compositions: olivine (~55%); augite (~10%); enstatite (~10%); plagioclase (~10%); chromite (~2%); troilite (~4%), kamacite-taenite α-γ-(Fe, Ni) (~7%) and merrillite (~7%). The specimen was also studied by computer tomography, micro-Raman spectroscopy and spectral cathodoluminescence. X-ray diffraction patterns were also recorded in non-destructive way on a polished surface because of the small size of the specimen. This combination of non-destructive techniques provides an improved knowledge on the Madrid-1896 meteorite compared to the previous study performed on the same specimen carried out twenty years ago by electron probe microanalysis and optical microscopy in destructive way. Limits of these techniques are the specimen's size in the analytical chambers and the threshold resolution of the microscopes analyzing shock veins micro-crystals. PMID:23953455

  1. Neutron radiography as a non-destructive method for diagnosing neutron converters for advanced thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraro, A.; Albani, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Croci, G.; Angella, G.; Birch, J.; Cazzaniga, C.; Caniello, R.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Schimdt, S.; Robinson, L.; Rebai, M.; Salvato, G.; Tresoldi, D.; Vasi, C.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the well-known problem of 3He shortage, a series of different thermal neutron detectors alternative to helium tubes are being developed, with the goal to find valid candidates for detection systems for the future spallation neutron sources such as the European Spallation Source (ESS). A possible 3He-free detector candidate is a charged particle detector equipped with a three dimensional neutron converter cathode (3D-C). The 3D-C currently under development is composed by a series of alumina (Al2O3) lamellas coated by 1 μ m of 10B enriched boron carbide (B4C). In order to obtain a good characterization in terms of detector efficiency and uniformity it is crucial to know the thickness, the uniformity and the atomic composition of the B4C neutron converter coating. In this work a non-destructive technique for the characterization of the lamellas that will compose the 3D-C was performed using neutron radiography. The results of these measurements show that the lamellas that will be used have coating uniformity suitable for detector applications. This technique (compared with SEM, EDX, ERDA, XPS) has the advantage of being global (i.e. non point-like) and non-destructive, thus it is suitable as a check method for mass production of the 3D-C elements.

  2. Nitrogen Concentration Estimation in Tomato Leaves by VIS-NIR Non-Destructive Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ulissi, Valentina; Antonucci, Francesca; Benincasa, Paolo; Farneselli, Michela; Tosti, Giacomo; Guiducci, Marcello; Tei, Francesco; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Pari, Luigi; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen concentration in plants is normally determined by expensive and time consuming chemical analyses. As an alternative, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO3 concentration determination in petiole sap were proposed, but these assays are not always satisfactory. Spectral reflectance values of tomato leaves obtained by visible-near infrared spectrophotometry are reported to be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plant nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility and the accuracy of the estimation of tomato leaf nitrogen concentration performed through a rapid, portable and non-destructive system, in comparison with chemical standard analyses, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO3 concentration in petiole sap. Mean reflectance leaf values were compared to each reference chemical value by partial least squares chemometric multivariate methods. The correlation between predicted values from spectral reflectance analysis and the observed chemical values showed in the independent test highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.94). The utilization of the proposed system, increasing efficiency, allows better knowledge of nutritional status of tomato plants, with more detailed and sharp information and on wider areas. More detailed information both in space and time is an essential tool to increase and stabilize crop quality levels and to optimize the nutrient use efficiency. PMID:22163962

  3. Nitrogen concentration estimation in tomato leaves by VIS-NIR non-destructive spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulissi, Valentina; Antonucci, Francesca; Benincasa, Paolo; Farneselli, Michela; Tosti, Giacomo; Guiducci, Marcello; Tei, Francesco; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Pari, Luigi; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen concentration in plants is normally determined by expensive and time consuming chemical analyses. As an alternative, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO(3) concentration determination in petiole sap were proposed, but these assays are not always satisfactory. Spectral reflectance values of tomato leaves obtained by visible-near infrared spectrophotometry are reported to be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plant nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility and the accuracy of the estimation of tomato leaf nitrogen concentration performed through a rapid, portable and non-destructive system, in comparison with chemical standard analyses, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO(3) concentration in petiole sap. Mean reflectance leaf values were compared to each reference chemical value by partial least squares chemometric multivariate methods. The correlation between predicted values from spectral reflectance analysis and the observed chemical values showed in the independent test highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.94). The utilization of the proposed system, increasing efficiency, allows better knowledge of nutritional status of tomato plants, with more detailed and sharp information and on wider areas. More detailed information both in space and time is an essential tool to increase and stabilize crop quality levels and to optimize the nutrient use efficiency. PMID:22163962

  4. How clean is clean: Non-destructive/direct methods of flux, residue detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, C. S.; Ray, U.; Stallard, B. R.; Watkins, R. D.; Koch, M. W.; Moya, M. M.

    The feasibility of three different non-destructive and direct methods of evaluating PCB (printed circuit boards) cleanliness was demonstrated. The detection limits associated with each method were established. In addition, the pros and cons of these methods as routine quality control inspection tools were discussed. OSEE (Optically Stimulated Electron Emission) was demonstrated to be a sensitive technique for detection of low levels of flux residues on insulating substances. However, future work including development of rugged OSEE instrumentation will determine whether the PCB industry can accept this technique in a production environment. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) microscopy is a well established technique with well known characteristics. The inability of FTIR to discriminate an organic contaminant from an organic substrate limits its usefulness as a PCB line inspection tool, but it will still remain a technique for the QC/QA laboratory. One advantage of FTIR over the other two techniques described here is its ability to identify the chemical nature of the residue, which is important in Failure Mode Analysis. Optical imaging using sophisticated pattern recognition algorithms was found to be limited to high concentrations of residue. Further work on improved sensor techniques is necessary.

  5. Wavelet-based subsurface defect characterization in pulsed phase thermography for non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauner, G.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2009-02-01

    Active infrared thermography is a method for non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials and components. In pulsed thermography (PT), a brief and high intensity flash is used to heat the sample. The decay of the sample surface temperature is detected and recorded by an infrared camera. Any subsurface anomaly (e.g. inclusion, delamination, etc.) gives rise to a local temperature increase (thermal contrast) on the sample surface. Conventionally, in Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) the analysis of PT time series is done by means of Discrete Fourier Transform producing phase images which can suppress unwanted physical effects (due to surface emissivity variations or non-uniform heating). The drawback of the Fourier-based approach is the loss of temporal information, making quantitative inversion procedures tricky (e.g. defect depth measurements). In this paper the complex Morlet-Wavelet transform is used to preserve the time information of the signal and thus provides information about the depth of a subsurface defect. Additionally, we propose to use the according phase contrast value to derive supplementary information about the thermal reflection properties at the defect interface. This provides additional information (e.g. about the thermal mismatch factor between the specimen and the defect) making interpretation of PPT results easier and perhaps unequivocal.

  6. Non-destructive evaluation of spiral-welded pipes using flexural guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Tang, Zhifeng; Lü, Fuzai; Pan, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    Millions of miles of pipes are being used in both civil and industrial fields. Spiral-welded pipes, which are widely applied in fields such as drainage, architecture as well as oil and gas storage and transportation, are difficult to inspect due to their complex geometry. Guided waves have shown a great potential in Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) for such cases. Flexural guided waves that propagate at a helix angle relative to the axial direction of pipe, are the most appropriate modes for inspecting spiral-welded pipes. The classical Normal Mode Expansion method (NME) is adopted to disseminate the forced response and perturbation analysis of a steel pipe with respect to a time delay circular loading. A time delay circular array transducer (TDCAT) is proposed for the purpose of exciting pure flexural mode in pipes. Pure flexural mode can be excited when the time delay parameter is specifically designed. The theoretical prediction is verified by finite element numerical evaluation and spiral-welded pipe inspection experiment.

  7. Non-destructive testing of critical infrastructure with giant magneto resistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunze, A.; Bailey, J.; Sidorov, G.; Bondurant, P.; Mactutis, T.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is the leading failure mechanism for metallic structures. One of the standard non-destructive techniques to assess the status and predict remaining lifetime and possible failure is based on the excitation with a varying magnetic field and measuring the change of the magnetic field due to eddy currents in the device under test. Since the magnetic field is decaying quickly a large lift-off between the excitation source, magnetic sensors and the test object will reduce the signals considerably. In order to obtain a deep penetration into the test object excitation at low frequency is desirable. In this study an investigation of a high power excitation system in combination with giant magneto resistance (GMR) based sensors was done. GMR sensors have a good sensitivity and are suitable for low frequency eddy current testing due to their low 1/f noise. Finite element analysis was used to evaluate the excitation setup, sensor alignment and positions and study the influence of different parameters of the excitation and sensor setup as well as the device under test. Based on these results a laboratory setup was build and used to study the influence of main measurement parameters.

  8. Routes for GMR-Sensor Design in Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Pelkner, Matthias; Neubauer, Andreas; Reimund, Verena; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Schütze, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    GMR sensors are widely used in many industrial segments such as information technology, automotive, automation and production, and safety applications. Each area requires an adaption of the sensor arrangement in terms of size adaption and alignment with respect to the field source involved. This paper deals with an analysis of geometric sensor parameters and the arrangement of GMR sensors providing a design roadmap for non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. For this purpose we use an analytical model simulating the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) distribution of surface breaking defects and investigate the flux leakage signal as a function of various sensor parameters. Our calculations show both the influence of sensor length and height and that when detecting the magnetic flux leakage of μm sized defects a gradiometer base line of 250 μm leads to a signal strength loss of less than 10% in comparison with a magnetometer response. To validate the simulation results we finally performed measurements with a GMR magnetometer sensor on a test plate with artificial μm-range cracks. The differences between simulation and measurement are below 6%. We report on the routes for a GMR gradiometer design as a basis for the fabrication of NDT-adapted sensor arrays. The results are also helpful for the use of GMR in other application when it comes to measure positions, lengths, angles or electrical currents.

  9. How clean is clean: Non-destructive/direct methods of flux, residue detection

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, C.S.; Ray, U.; Stallard, B.R.; Watkins, R.D.; Koch, M.W.; Moya, M.M.

    1994-06-01

    The feasibility of three different non-destructive and direct methods of evaluating PCB (printed circuit boards) cleanliness was demonstrated. The detection limits associated with each method were established. In addition, the pros and cons of these methods as routine quality control inspection tools were discussed. OSEE (Optically Stimulated Electron Emission) was demonstrated to be a sensitive technique for detection of low levels of flux residues on insulating substances. However, future work including development of rugged OSEE instrumentation will determine whether the PCB industry can accept this technique in a production environment. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) microscopy is a well established technique with well known characteristics. The inability of FTIR to discriminate an organic contaminant from an organic substrate limits its usefulness as a PCB line inspection tool, but it will still remain a technique for the QC/QA laboratory. One advantage of FTIR over the other two techniques described here is its ability to identify the chemical nature of the residue, which is important in Failure Mode Analysis. Optical imaging using sophisticated pattern recognition algorithms was found to be limited to high concentrations of residue. Further work on improved sensor techniques is necessary.

  10. Combined non-destructive XRF and SR-XAS study of archaeological artefacts.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2011-03-01

    We report on a non-destructive study of Sicilian ceramic fragments of cultural heritage interest, classified as "proto-majolica" pottery and dating back to the twelfth to thirteen centuries AD. The analytical approach used is based on the employment of two totally non-invasive spectroscopic techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), using a portable energy-dispersive XRF analyser, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, using synchrotron radiation as a probe (SR-XAS). XRF measurements allowed us to collect elemental and spatially resolved information on major and minor constituents of the decorated coating of archaeological pottery fragments, so providing preliminary results on the main components characterizing the surface. In particular, we assigned to Fe and Mn the role of key elements of the colouring agent. With the aim of obtaining more detailed information, we performed SR-XAS measurements at the Fe and Mn K-edges at the Italian BM08 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). The experimental data were analysed by applying principal component analysis and least-squares fitting to the near-edge part of the spectra (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) to determine the samples' speciation. From the overall results, umber, a class of brownish pigments characterized by a mixture of hydrated iron and manganese oxides, has been ascribed as a pigmenting agent. PMID:21311873

  11. Non-destructive monitoring of fiber orientation using AC-IS: An industrial-scale application

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyurt, Nilufer . E-mail: ozyurtnil@itu.edu.tr; Mason, Thomas O.; Shah, Surendra P.

    2006-09-15

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken to investigate the ability of AC-impedance spectroscopy (AC-IS) to non-destructively monitor the fiber dispersion of conductive fiber-reinforced cement-based materials. Previous work showed that AC-IS effectively monitors various fiber dispersion issues in lab-scale steel fiber-reinforced specimens. In this part of the study, AC-IS was used to study fiber orientation in an industrial-scale pre-cast concrete beam. A conventional method-image analysis (IA)-was used to verify the results of AC-IS measurements. The results of AC-IS and IA were found to match very well in experimental uncertainty. Splitting tensile tests and bending tests were conducted on the parts of the beam to study the effects of fiber orientation on the mechanical performance. The results of the mechanical tests also confirmed the results of AC-IS with splitting tensile strengths increasing as the alignment of fibers increased.

  12. Autofluorescence microscopy: a non-destructive tool to monitor mitochondrial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Macko, Peter; Palosaari, Taina; Whelan, Maurice P

    2011-10-30

    Visualization of NADH by fluorescence microscopy makes it possible to distinguish mitochondria inside living cells, allowing structure analysis of these organelles in a non-invasive way. Mitochondrial morphology is determined by the occurrence of mitochondrial fission and fusion. During normal cell function mitochondria appear as elongated tubular structures. However, cellular malfunction induces mitochondria to fragment into punctiform, vesicular structures. This change in morphology is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and early apoptosis. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that autofluorescence imaging of mitochondria in living eukaryotic cells provides structural and morphological information that can be used to assess mitochondrial health. We firstly established the illumination conditions that do not affect mitochondrial structure and calculated the maximum safe light dose to which the cells can be exposed. Subsequently, sequential recording of mitochondrial fluorescence was performed and changes in mitochondrial morphology were monitored in a continuous non-destructive way. This approach was then used to assess mitochondrial toxicity induced by potential toxicants exposed to mammalian cells. Both mouse and human cells were used to evaluate mitochondrial toxicity of different compounds with different toxicities. This technique constitutes a novel and promising approach to explore chemical induced toxicity because of its reliability to monitor mitochondrial morphology changes and corresponding toxicity in a non-invasive way. PMID:21864658

  13. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, T.; Zavaljevski, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Miron, A.; Jupperman, D.

    2004-12-31

    Utilities perform eddy current tests on nuclear power plant steam generator (SG) tubes to detect degradation. This report summarizes the status of ongoing research to develop signal processing algorithms that automate analysis of eddy current test data. The research focuses on analyzing array probe data for detecting, classifying, and characterizing degradation in SG tubes.

  14. Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lianshan

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT), sometimes also known as non-destructive inspection (NDI) or non-destructive examination (NDE), has been applied to solve a wide range of science and industry problems including construction, aerospace, nuclear engineering, manufacturing, space exploration, art objects, forensic studies, biological and medical fields, etc. Without any permanent changing or alteration of testing objects, NDT methods provide great advantages such as increased testing reliability, efficiency, and safety, as well as reduced time and cost. Since the second half of the 20th century, NDT technology has seen significant growth. Depending on the physical properties being measured, NDT techniques can be classified into several branches. This article will provide a brief overview of commonly used NDT methods and their up-to-date progresses including optical examination, radiography, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. For extended reviews on many presently used NDT methods, please refer to articles by Mullins [1, 2].

  15. A study of active thermography approaches for the non-destructive testing and evaluation of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Marioli-Riga, Zaira P.; Bendada, Abdelhakim; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2008-03-01

    The prerequisite for more competent and cost effective aircraft has led to the evolution of innovative testing and evaluation procedures. Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT & E) techniques for assessing the integrity of an aircraft structure are essential to both reduce manufacturing costs and out of service time of aircraft due to maintenance. Nowadays, active - transient thermal NDT & E (i.e. thermography) is commonly used for assessing aircraft composites. This research work evaluates the potential of pulsed thermography (PT) and/or pulsed phase thermography (PPT) for assessing defects (i.e. impact damage and inclusions for delaminations) on GLARE and GLARE type composites. Finally, in the case of the detection of inserts - delaminations C-Scan ultrasonic testing was also used with the intention of providing supplementary results.

  16. Non-destructive ultrasonic measurements of case depth. [in steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flambard, C.; Lambert, A.

    1978-01-01

    Two ultrasonic methods for nondestructive measurements of the depth of a case-hardened layer in steel are described. One method involves analysis of ultrasonic waves diffused back from the bulk of the workpiece. The other method involves finding the speed of propagation of ultrasonic waves launched on the surface of the work. Procedures followed in the two methods for measuring case depth are described.

  17. Non-destructive evaluation techniques for chemical weapons destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, J.K.; Caffrey, A.J.

    1996-09-01

    fThe safe and verifiable disposition, either by incineration or chemical neutralization of chemical warfare (CW) agents requires correct {ital a priori} identification of each munition or container to be processed. A variety of NDE techniques have been used or tested for the examination and characterization of munitions. In the U.S., three widely used techniques are X-ray radiography, acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS), and prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PINS). The technical bases, instrumental implementations, and applications of the U.S. versions of these methods are briefly discussed. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Non destructive characterization using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, P. C.; Schultz, F. J.; Vourvopoulos, G.

    It has been shown that explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband materials contain various chemical elements in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from other innocuous substances. In coal, the major chemical elements in it can provide information about various parameters of importance to the coal industry. In both examples, the nondestructive identification of chemical elements can be performed by utilizing incident pulsed fast-thermal neutrons that, through nuclear reactions, excite the nuclei of the various elements. This technique is being currently developed for dismantling of nuclear weapons classified as trainer's, and for on-line coal bulk analysis.

  19. Optical surface contouring for non-destructive inspection of turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modarress, Dariush; Schaack, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Detection of stress cracks and other surface defects during maintenance and in-service inspection of propulsion system components, including turbine blades and combustion compartments, is presently performed visually. There is a need for a non-contact, miniaturized, and fully fieldable instrument that may be used as an automated inspection tool for inspection of aircraft engines. During this SBIR Phase 1 program, the feasibility of a ruggedized optical probe for automatic and nondestructive inspection of complex shaped objects will be established. Through a careful analysis of the measurement requirements, geometrical and optical constraints, and consideration of issues such as manufacturability, compactness, simplicity, and cost, one or more conceptual optical designs will be developed. The proposed concept will be further developed and a prototype will be fabricated during Phase 2.

  20. Design of a Borescope for Extravehicular Non-Destructive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachnak, Rafic

    2003-01-01

    Anomalies such as corrosion, structural damage, misalignment, cracking, stress fiactures, pitting, or wear can be detected and monitored by the aid of a borescope. A borescope requires a source of light for proper operation. Today s current lighting technology market consists of incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps and other types of electric arc and electric discharge vapor lamp. Recent advances in LED technology have made LEDs viable for a number of applications, including vehicle stoplights, traffic lights, machine-vision-inspection, illumination, and street signs. LEDs promise significant reduction in power consumption compared to other sources of light. This project focused on comparing images taken by the Olympus IPLEX, using two different light sources. One of the sources is the 50-W internal metal halide lamp and the other is a 1 W LED placed at the tip of the insertion tube. Images acquired using these two light sources were quantitatively compared using their histogram, intensity profile along a line segment, and edge detection. Also, images were qualitatively compared using image registration and transformation [l]. The gray-level histogram, edge detection, image profile and image registration do not offer conclusive results. The LED light source, however, produces good images for visual inspection by an operator. Analysis using pattern recognition using Eigenfaces and Gaussian Pyramid in face recognition may be more useful.

  1. Pallasite formation after a non-destructive impact. An experimental- and image analyses-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solferino, Giulio; Golabek, Gregor J.; Nimmo, Francis; Schmidt, Max W.

    2015-04-01

    The formation conditions of pallasite meteorites in the interior of terrestrial planetesimals have been matter of debate over the last 40 years. Among other characteristics, the simple mineralogical composition (i.e., olivine, FeNi, FeS +/- pyroxene) and the dualism between fragmental and rounded olivine-bearing pallasites must be successfully reproduced by a potential formation scenario. This study incorporates a series of annealing experiments with olivine plus Fe-S, and digital image analyses of slabs from Brenham, Brahin, Seymchan, and Springwater pallasites. Additionally a 1D finite-difference numerical model was employed to show that a non-destructive collision followed by mixing of the impactor's core with the target body silicate mantle could lead to the formation of both fragmental and rounded pallasite types. Specifically, an impact occurring right after the accomplishment of the target body differentiation and up to several millions of years afterwards allows for (i) average grain sizes consistent with the observed rounded olivine-bearing pallasites, (ii) a remnant magnetization of Fe-Ni olivine inclusions as measured in natural pallasites and (iii) for the metallographic cooling rates derived from Fe-Ni in pallasites. An important result of this investigation is the definition of the grain growth rate of olivine in molten Fe-S as follows: dn - d0n = k0 exp(-Ea/RT) t, where, d0 is the starting grain size, d the grain size at time t, n = 2.42(46) the growth exponent, k0 = 9.43•E06 μm n s-1 a characteristic constant, Ea = 289 kJ/mol the activation energy for a specific growth process, R the gas constant, and T the absolute temperature. The computed olivine coarsening rate is markedly faster than in olivine-FeNi and olivine-Ni systems.

  2. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  3. Iron speciation in ancient Attic pottery pigments: a non-destructive SR-XAS investigation.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports a detailed investigation on the speciation of iron in the pigments of decorated pottery fragments of cultural heritage relevance. The fragments come from the Gioiosa Guardia archaeological site in the area of the `Strait of Messina' (Sicily, Southern Italy), and date back to VI-V century BC. The purpose of this study is to characterize the main pigmenting agents responsible for the dark-red coloration of the specimens using non-destructive analytical techniques such as synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS), a well established technique for cultural heritage and environmental subjects. Absorption spectra were collected at the Fe K-edge on the Italian beamline for absorption and diffraction (BM8-GILDA) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France). In order to determine the speciation of Fe in the samples, principal component analysis and least-squares fitting procedures were applied to the near-edge part of the absorption spectra (XANES). Details on the local structure around the Fe sites were obtained by analyzing the extended part of the spectra (EXAFS). Furthermore, an accurate determination of the average Fe oxidation state was carried out through analysis of the pre-edge peaks of the absorption spectra. Samples resulted composed of an admixture of Fe(2)O(3) (hematite or maghemite) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), occurring in different relative abundance in the dark- and light-colored areas of the specimens. The results obtained are complementary to information previously obtained by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis, Fourier transform infrared absorbance and time-of-flight neutron diffraction. PMID:22898958

  4. Parameter estimation and multivariable model building for the non-destructive, on-line determination of eggshell strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ketelaere, B.; Vanhoutte, H.; De Baerdemaeker, J.

    2003-09-01

    In the non-destructive quality assessment of agro-products using vibration analysis, the resonant frequency and the damping of the vibration are the main interest. Those parameters are usually calculated starting from the frequency spectrum, obtained after a fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of the time signal. However, this method faces several drawbacks when applied to short-time signals, as in the case of impact testing of highly damped specimen. An alternative to the FFT method is used for the high-resolution estimation of both resonant frequency and damping. Furthermore, the mass-spring model that is used in the literature for non-destructive quality assessment of various agro-products is extended with the incorporation of the damping and a shape characteristic. As a practical example, eggshell stiffness was estimated using vibration measurements. A data set consisting of 229 eggs was measured. It is shown that both the damping and the shape characteristics are of major importance to explain eggshell strength. This paper makes clear that a univariable model, as is mostly used in the literature, is not always satisfactory to describe the vibration behaviour of biological products.

  5. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor. PMID:27608029

  6. Time Domain Terahertz Non-Destructive Evaluation of Aeroturbine Blade Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffrey; Fichter, G.; Chernovsky, A.; Whitaker, John F.; Das, D.; Pollock, Tresa M.; Zimdars, David

    2009-03-01

    Time domain terahertz (TD-THz) non destructive evaluation (NDE) imaging is used to two-dimensionally map the thickness of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) on aircraft engine turbine blades. Indications of thermal degradation can be seen. The method is non-contact, rapid, and requires no special preparation of the blade.

  7. The non-destructive identification of early Chinese porcelain by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H. S.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Zhang, B.; Yang, F. J.

    2004-06-01

    PIXE is used for the non-destructive differentiation of early precious Chinese blue and white porcelain made in Yuan (AD 1206-1368), Ming (AD 1368-1644) Dynasty in Jingdezhen from imitations. Also, ancient celadon made in Song Dynasty (AD 960-1279) is identified by measuring the trace elements contained in the glazes.

  8. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated. PMID:25589230

  9. Non-destructive freeze damage detection in oranges using machine vision and ultraviolet fluorescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A non-contact, non-destructive, and rapid method of detecting freeze damaged oranges based on ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of the peel oil constituents visible on the peel surface was investigated. The visual appearance is different from oleocellosis in that freeze damaged oranges exhibit a fine pa...

  10. Non-destructive method for inward leakage detection of a plate evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Ales

    2007-05-01

    A new non-destructive method was developed for the detection of refrigerant leakage at an evaporator's inflow. Nitrogen and oxygen gas were successively blown through the evaporator. A gas analyser was applied at the outflow of the evaporator and the oxygen concentration measured. It was possible to detect any leakage by investigating the oxygen concentration-time history diagram.