Science.gov

Sample records for non-differential global positioning

  1. The Global Positioning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1999-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of navigation satellites called Navigation Satellite Timing And Ranging (NAVSTAR), maintained by the U.S. Department of Defense. Many outdoor enthusiasts recognize that a handheld GPS receiver can be an accurate tool for determining their location on the terrain. The GPS receiver helps determine locations on the Earth's surface by collecting signals from three or more satellites through a process called triangulation. Identifying a location on the Earth is more useful if you also know about the surrounding topographic conditions. Using a topographic map with the GPS receiver provides important information about features of the surrounding terrain and can help you plot an effective route from one location to another.

  2. Global Positioning Satellite Recorder

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-11-10

    The GPS Tracker is a device (automotive unit) that records position (latitude and longitude), date, and time autonomously with time. The data from the GPS Tracker can be used offline with a personal computer and map data base to plot the track of where a vehicle or other mobile battery powered object has been. The invention simplifies field operations for recording location autonomously by obviating the need to execute a set of detailed instructions priormore » to operation. The vehicle combines GPS technology and a cpu with custom software to accomplish the task.« less

  3. Navstar/Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ananda, M.

    1982-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) was developed to provide highly precise position, velocity, and time information to users anywhere in the area of the Earth and at any time. The GPS, when fully operational, will consist of 18 satellites in six orbital planes. Any GPS user, by receiving and processing the radio signals from the satellite network can instantaneously determine navigation information to an accuracy of about 15 m in position and 0.1 m/s in velocity. The GPS is compared with other systems such as Loran-C, Omega, TACAN and Transit.

  4. Airborne lidar global positioning investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) network of satellites shows high promise of revolutionizing methods for conducting surveying, navigation, and positioning. This is especially true in the case of airborne or satellite positioning. A single GPS receiver (suitably adapted for aircraft deployment) can yield positioning accuracies (world-wide) in the order of 30 to 50 m vertically, as well as horizontally. This accuracy is dramatically improved when a second GPS receiver is positioned at a known horizontal and vertical reference. Absolute horizontal and vertical positioning of 1 to 2 m are easily achieved over areas of separation of tens of km. If four common satellites remain in lock in both receivers, then differential phase pseudo-ranges on the GPS L-band carrier can be utilized to achieve accuracies of + or - 10 cm and perhaps as good as + or - 2 cm. The initial proof of concept investigation for airborne positioning using the phase difference between the airborne and stationary GPS receivers was conducted and is examined.

  5. The Mathematics of the Global Positioning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Gail D.; Jabon, David; Nord, John

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that illustrates the application of mathematics to modern navigation and utilizes the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS is a constellation of 24 satellites that enables receivers to compute their position anywhere on the earth with great accuracy. (DDR)

  6. Geodetic positioning using a global positioning system of satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Geodetic positioning using range, integrated Doppler, and interferometric observations from a constellation of twenty-four Global Positioning System satellites is analyzed. A summary of the proposals for geodetic positioning and baseline determination is given which includes a description of measurement techniques and comments on rank deficiency and error sources. An analysis of variance comparison of range, Doppler, and interferometric time delay to determine their relative geometric strength for baseline determination is included. An analytic examination to the effect of a priori constraints on positioning using simultaneous observations from two stations is presented. Dynamic point positioning and baseline determination using range and Doppler is examined in detail. Models for the error sources influencing dynamic positioning are developed. Included is a discussion of atomic clock stability, and range and Doppler observation error statistics based on random correlated atomic clock error are derived.

  7. Global Position and Position Taking: The Case of Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2007-01-01

    From 1990 to 2003, Australia's share of the global market in cross-border degrees grew from 1% to 9%. Full fee-paying foreign students now constitute one quarter of enrolments, and education is Australia's third largest services export. Positioned as an Anglo-American system on the edge of Asia, Australia has differentiated itself from the United…

  8. Shuttle Global Positioning (GPS) System design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P.; Huth, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations of certain aspects and problems of the shuttle global positioning system GPS, are presented. Included are: test philosophy and test outline; development of a phase slope specification for the shuttle GPS antenna; an investigation of the shuttle jamming vulnerability; and an expression for the GPS signal to noise density ratio for the thermal protection system.

  9. Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of oscillator noise on Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver performance, GPS navigation system self-test, GPS ground transmitter design to augment shuttle navigation, the effect of ionospheric delay modelling on GPS receiver design, and GPS receiver tracking of Shuttle transient maneuvers were investigated.

  10. Global Positioning System Instruction in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikle, Thomas A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of satellite-based global positioning system (GPS) technology and includes some illustrations of how GPS is introduced in field-based exercises in the educational setting. Highlights forestry and geography classes, but also discusses archeology, geology, and wildlife science. Benefits include affordability, flexibility,…

  11. Global positioning system missile test range applications

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, M.E.

    1986-06-01

    Using the Global Positioning System (GPS), a missile under test could transmit its own position, reducing radar tracking requirements while still providing three-dimensional position and velocity data with the required accuracy. This study investigated minimum package size requirements for GPS implementation on the SRAM II missile as part of the joint test assembly telemetry system. Reported GPS missile test range applications are reviewed. The two missile tracking system implementations considered are a complete GPS package onboard the missile and onboard frequency translator that retransmits the GPS satellite signals. Accuracy and operation of the two methods are compared. A functional description of the GPS is provided.

  12. Method and Apparatus for Determining Position Using Global Positioning Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, John L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A global positioning satellite receiver having an antenna for receiving a L1 signal from a satellite is presented. The L1 signal is processed by a preamplifier stage including a band pass filter and a low noise amplifier and output as a radio frequency (RF) signal. A mixer receives and de-spreads the RF signal in response to a pseudo-random noise code, i,e., Gold code, generated by an internal pseudo-random noise code generator. A microprocessor enters a code tracking loop, such that during the code tracking loop, it addresses the pseudorandom code generator to cause the pseudo-random code generator to sequentially output pseudo-random codes corresponding to satellite codes used to spread the L1 signal, until correlation occurs. When an output of the mixer is indicative of the occurrence of correlation between the RF signal and the generated pseudo-random codes, the microprocessor caters an operational state which slows the receiver code sequence to stay locked with the satellite cede sequence. The output of the mixer is provided to a detector which, in turn, controls certain routines of the microprocessor. The microprocessor will output pseudo range information according to an interrupt routine in response detection of correlation. The pseudo range information is to be telemetered to a ground station which determines the position of the global positioning satellite receiver.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining position using global positioning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, John (Inventor); Ward, William S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A global positioning satellite receiver having an antenna for receiving a L1 signal from a satellite. The L1 signal is processed by a preamplifier stage including a band pass filter and a low noise amplifier and output as a radio frequency (RF) signal. A mixer receives and de-spreads the RF signal in response to a pseudo-random noise code, i.e., Gold code, generated by an internal pseudo-random noise code generator. A microprocessor enters a code tracking loop, such that during the code tracking loop, it addresses the pseudo-random code generator to cause the pseudo-random code generator to sequentially output pseudo-random codes corresponding to satellite codes used to spread the L1 signal, until correlation occurs. When an output of the mixer is indicative of the occurrence of correlation between the RF signal and the generated pseudo-random codes, the microprocessor enters an operational state which slows the receiver code sequence to stay locked with the satellite code sequence. The output of the mixer is provided to a detector which, in turn, controls certain routines of the microprocessor. The microprocessor will output pseudo range information according to an interrupt routine in response detection of correlation. The pseudo range information is to be telemetered to a ground station which determines the position of the global positioning satellite receiver.

  14. High dynamic global positioning system receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver having a number of channels, receives an aggregate of pseudorange code time division modulated signals. The aggregate is converted to baseband and then to digital form for separate processing in the separate channels. A fast fourier transform processor computes the signal energy as a function of Doppler frequency for each correlation lag, and a range and frequency estimator computes estimates of pseudorange, and frequency. Raw estimates from all channels are used to estimate receiver position, velocity, clock offset and clock rate offset in a conventional navigation and control unit, and based on the unit that computes smoothed estimates for the next measurement interval.

  15. Global positioning system recorder and method

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, D.W.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Eakle, R.F. Jr.; Reeves, G.E.

    1998-12-22

    A global positioning system recorder (GPSR) is disclosed in which operational parameters and recorded positional data are stored on a transferable memory element. Through this transferrable memory element, the user of the GPSR need have no knowledge of GPSR devices other than that the memory element needs to be inserted into the memory element slot and the GPSR must be activated. The use of the data element also allows for minimal downtime of the GPSR and the ability to reprogram the GPSR and download data therefrom, without having to physically attach it to another computer. 4 figs.

  16. Non-differentiable variational principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky

    2005-07-01

    We develop a calculus of variations for functionals which are defined on a set of non-differentiable curves. We first extend the classical differential calculus in a quantum calculus, which allows us to define a complex operator, called the scale derivative, which is the non-differentiable analogue of the classical derivative. We then define the notion of extremals for our functionals and obtain a characterization in term of a generalized Euler-Lagrange equation. We finally prove that solutions of the Schrödinger equation can be obtained as extremals of a non-differentiable variational principle, leading to an extended Hamilton's principle of least action for quantum mechanics. We compare this approach with the scale relativity theory of Nottale, which assumes a fractal structure of space-time.Résumé (Principes variationnels non différentiable). Nous développons un calcul des variations pour des fonctionnelles définies sur un ensemble de courbes non différentiables. Pour cela, nous étendons le calcul différentiel classique, en calcul appelé calcul quantique, qui nous permet de définir un opérateur à valeur complexes, appelé dérivée d'échelle, qui est l'analogue non différentiable de la dérivée usuelle. On définit alors la notion d'extremale pour ces fonctionnelles pour lesquelles nous obtenons une caractérisation via une équation d'Euler-Lagrange généralisée. On prouve enfin que les solutions de l'équation de Schrödinger peuvent s'obtenir comme solution d'un problème variationnel non différentiable, étendant ainsi le principe de moindre action de Hamilton au cadre de la mécanique quantique. On discute enfin la connexion entre ce travail et la théorie de la relativité d'échelle développée par Nottale, et qui suppose une structure fractale de l'espace-temps.

  17. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  18. Precise Applications Of The Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    Report represents overview of Global Positioning System (GPS). Emphasizes those aspects of theory, history, and status of GPS pertaining to potential utility for highly precise scientific measurements. Current and anticipated applications include measurements of crustal motions in seismically active regions of Earth, measurements of rate of rotation of Earth and orientation of poles, tracking of non-GPS spacecraft in orbit around Earth, surveying, measurements of radio-signal-propagation delays, determinations of coordinates of ground stations, and transfer of precise time signals worldwide.

  19. Global positioning system supported pilot's display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Erdogan, Temel; Schwalb, Andrew P.; Curley, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The hardware, software, and operation of the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS) Flight Inspection System Pilot's Display is discussed. The Pilot's Display is used in conjunction with flight inspection tests that certify the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System used at Space Shuttle landing facilities throughout the world. The Pilot's Display was developed for the pilot of test aircraft to set up and fly a given test flight path determined by the flight inspection test engineers. This display also aids the aircraft pilot when hazy or cloud cover conditions exist that limit the pilot's visibility of the Shuttle runway during the flight inspection. The aircraft position is calculated using the Global Positioning System and displayed in the cockpit on a graphical display.

  20. Single-satellite global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, Alexander V.; Leonov, Vladislav A.; Mitkin, Alexander S.; Nasyrov, Alexander F.; Ponomarenko, Andreu D.; Pichkhadze, Konstantin M.; Sysoev, Valentin K.

    2015-12-01

    A new concept of a global positioning support system, based on only one satellite, was offered. Unlike all other GPS and GLONASS satellite systems that are in use, within the offered modification, all metrological support is provided by on-board measurements, which means, that it does not need any ground support of coordinate measurements or orbital characteristics of the satellite system. The cosmic-based angle-measuring instrument measures the arcs lengths between the measured ground-points, that are marked with light beacons, and navigation stars. Each measurement takes approximately 0.04 s, with the precision of 1 mm in recalculation to ground-relations. Long series of arc measurements between different objects on the ground and in the sky enable the solution of both determination of geodesic coordinates of the measured points and position of the spacecraft during the measuring process by using geodesic equation methods. In addition, it enables the qualification of the geopotential guaranties. The offered scheme will be used for the determination of the frame of selenocentric coordinates during the "Luna-Globe" and "Luna-Resource" missions for precise navigation of landing modules and maybe will be used for precise gridding of the Martian surface.

  1. Spaceborne Global Positioning System for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Lamar F. (Inventor); Niles, Frederick A. (Inventor); Wennersten, Miriam D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The spaceborne Global Positioning System receiver provides navigational solutions and is designed for use in low Earth orbit. The spaceborne GPS receiver can determine the orbital position of a spacecraft using any of the satellites wi thin the GPS constellation. It is a multiple processor system incorporating redundancy by using a microcontroller to handle the closure of tracking loops for acquired GPS satellites, while a separate microprocessor computes the spacecraft navigational solution and handles other tasks within the receiver. 'Me spaceborne GPS receiver can use either microcontroller or the microprocessor to close the satellite tracking loops. The use of microcontroller provides better tracking performance of acquired GPS satellites. The spaceborne GPS receiver utilizes up to seven separate GPS boards, with each board including its own set of correlators, down-converters and front-end components. The spaceborne GPS receiver also includes telemetry and time-marking circuitry. The spaceborne GPS receiver communicates with other spacecraft systems through a variety of interfaces and can be software-configured to support several different mission profiles.

  2. Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Frederick A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The satellite selection method as utilized by the spaceborne Global Positioning System receiver provides navigational solutions and is designed for use in low Earth orbit. The satellite selection method is a robust algorithm that can be used a GPS receiver to select appropriate GPS satellites for use in calculating point solutions or attitude solutions. The method is takes into account the difficulty of finding a particular GPS satellite phase code, especially when the search range in greatly increased due to Doppler shifts introduced into the carrier frequency. The method starts with an update of the antenna pointing and spacecraft vectors to determine the antenna backplane direction. Next, the GPS satellites that will potentially be in view of the antenna are ranked on a list, whereby the list is generated based on the estimated attitude and position of each GPS satellite. Satellites blocked by the Earth are not entered on this list. A second list is created, whereby the GPS satellites are ranked according to their desirability for use in attitude determination. GPS satellites are ranked according to their orthogonality to the antenna backplane, and according to geometric dilution of precision considerations. After the lists are created, the channels of the spaceborne GPS receiver are assigned to various GPS satellites for acquisition and lock. Preliminary Doppler frequencies for searching are assigned to the various channels.

  3. Global Positioning System Simulator Field Operational Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Quinn, David A.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) simulation is an important activity in the development or qualification of GPS signal receivers for space flight. Because a GPS simulator is a critical resource it is highly desirable to develop a set of field operational procedures to supplement the basic procedures provided by most simulator vendors. Validated field procedures allow better utilization of the GPS simulator in the development of new test scenarios and simulation operations. These procedures expedite simulation scenario development while resulting in scenarios that are more representative of the true design, as well as enabling construction of more complex simulations than previously possible, for example, spacecraft maneuvers. One difficulty in the development of a simulation scenario is specifying various modes of test vehicle motion and associated maneuvers requiring that a user specify some (but not all) of a few closely related simulation parameters. Currently this can only be done by trial and error. A stand-alone procedure that implements the simulator maneuver motion equations and solves for the motion profile transient times, jerk and acceleration would be of considerable value. Another procedure would permit the specification of some configuration parameters that would determine the simulated GPS signal composition. The resulting signal navigation message, for example, would force the receiver under test to use only the intended C-code component of the simulated GPS signal. A representative class of GPS simulation-related field operational procedures is described in this paper. These procedures were developed and used in support of GPS integration and testing for many successful spacecraft missions such as SAC-A, EO-1, AMSAT, VCL, SeaStar, sounding rockets, and by using the industry standard Spirent Global Simulation Systems Incorporated (GSSI) STR series simulators.

  4. Global Plate Velocities from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Philipsen, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the horizontal velocity components range from 1.2 to 5.0 mm/yr. With the exception of sites on the Pacific and Nazca plates, the GPS velocities agree with absolute plate model predictions within 95% confidence. For most of the sites in North America, Antarctica, and Eurasia, the agreement is better than 2 mm/yr. We find no persuasive evidence for significant vertical motions (less than 3 standard deviations), except at four sites. Three of these four were sites constrained to geodetic reference frame velocities. The GPS velocities were then used to estimate angular velocities for eight tectonic plates. Absolute angular velocities derived from the GPS data agree with the no net rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1A model within 95% confidence except for the Pacific plate. Our pole of rotation for the Pacific plate lies 11.5 deg west of the NNR NUVEL-1A pole, with an angular speed 10% faster. Our relative angular velocities agree with NUVEL-1A except for some involving the Pacific plate. While our Pacific-North America angular velocity differs significantly from NUVEL-1A, our model and NUVEL-1A predict very small differences in relative motion along the Pacific-North America plate boundary itself. Our Pacific-Australia and Pacific- Eurasia angular velocities are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, predicting more rapid convergence at these two plate boundaries. Along the East Pacific Pise, our Pacific-Nazca angular velocity agrees in both rate and azimuth with NUVFL-1A.

  5. Global positioning automatic vehicle location system

    SciTech Connect

    Papatheofanis, B.J.; Hasenack, M.L.; Teller, R.T.; Ramsey, G.F.

    1997-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a unique facility covering over 43 square miles. The Emergency Management and Response Office (EM&R) is required to respond, provide Incident Command (IC), and coordination for all Laboratory emergencies. This requires IC`s and support staff to respond to the actual scene of the incident. Since the IC is under numerous constraints and stress, the office wanted the capability of locating the EM&R vehicles on an electronic map. An automated vehicle location (AVL) system was required for the additional safety of the emergency response personal. The requirements for the AVL system include total automatic tracking and low cost. After careful consideration, it was determined that the most efficient and cost effective system would be based on packet radio technology as the transmission media. The location is determined by the Department of Defense Global Positioning System (GPS). The system that was designed and constructed required four components to be interfaced and communicate with each other. The first component was a GPS receiver which actually provides the location information, equipped with a digital interface to communicate location information remotely. The second component is a modem that interfaces the GPS digital interface information to a radio. The third component is the radio itself which allows for the actual information transfer from the remote GPS receiver and modem. The fourth component is the software package that provides moving maps and displays the vehicle location on that map. The equipment was all commercial off-the-shelf that only required proper integration and packaging for the AVL application. This paper describes the steps taken in the integration of the equipment into the AVL package.

  6. 78 FR 22554 - Nationwide Differential Global Positioning System (NDGPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Nationwide Differential Global Positioning System (NDGPS) AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS and Research and... future user needs and requirements of the Nationwide Differential Global Positioning System (NDGPS). The NDGPS was designed to broadcast signals to improve the accuracy and integrity of the Global...

  7. Connect Global Positioning System RF Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Garth W.; Young, Lawrence E.; Ciminera, Michael A.; Tien, Jeffrey Y.; Gorelik, Jacob; Okihiro, Brian Bachman; Koelewyn, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    The CoNNeCT Global Positioning System RF Module (GPSM) slice is part of the JPL CoNNeCT Software Defined Radio (SDR). CoNNeCT is the Communications, Navigation, and Net working reconfigurable Testbed project that is part of NASA's Space Communication and Nav igation (SCaN) Program. The CoNNeCT project is an experimental dem onstration that will lead to the advancement of SDRs and provide a path for new space communication and navigation systems for future NASA exploration missions. The JPL CoNNeCT SDR will be flying on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2012 in support of the SCaN CoNNeCT program. The GPSM is a radio-frequency sampler module (see Figure 1) that directly sub-harmonically samples the filtered GPS L-band signals at L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.6 MHz), and L5 (1176.45 MHz). The JPL SDR receives GPS signals through a Dorne & Margolin antenna mounted onto a choke ring. The GPS signal is filtered against interference, amplified, split, and fed into three channels: L1, L2, and L5. In each of the L-band channels, there is a chain of bandpass filters and amplifiers, and the signal is fed through each of these channels to where the GPSM performs a one-bit analog-to-digital conversion (see Figure 2). The GPSM uses a sub-harmonic, single-bit L1, L2, and L5 sampler that samples at a clock rate of 38.656 MHz. The new capability is the down-conversion and sampling of the L5 signal when previous hardware did not provide this capability. The first GPS IIF Satellite was launched in 2010, providing the new L5 signal. With the JPL SDR flying on the ISS, it will be possible to demonstrate navigation solutions with 10-meter 3-D accuracy at 10-second intervals using a field-program mable gate array (FPGA)-based feedback loop running at 50 Hz. The GPS data bits will be decoded and used in the SDR. The GPSM will also allow other waveforms that are installed in the SDR to demonstrate various GNSS tracking techniques.

  8. Measuring Global Position Using the Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Evan; Hughes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The determination of latitude and longitude on Earth has always been of interest to explorers and cartographers alike. Accurate positional information is often needed for rescue purposes in locations where satellite navigational systems are inoperable. The activity described in this paper demonstrates a simple procedure to determine latitude and…

  9. Measuring global position using the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Evan; Hughes, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    The determination of latitude and longitude on Earth has always been of interest to explorers and cartographers alike. Accurate positional information is often needed for rescue purposes in locations where satellite navigational systems are inoperable. The activity described in this paper demonstrates a simple procedure to determine latitude and longitude using a structure that casts a shadow and a clock. The latitude is calculated by the angle of the shadow cast by the midday Sun, and the longitude determined by knowing the local noon time in terms of the universal time. Using this technique, the latitude is usually within 1.5° of the true value, whilst the longitude within 0.25°. This exercise would be suitable as a high-school class experiment.

  10. The effect of different Global Navigation Satellite System methods on positioning accuracy in elite alpine skiing.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Limpach, Philippe; Geiger, Alain; Müller, Erich

    2014-01-01

    In sport science, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are frequently applied to capture athletes' position, velocity and acceleration. Application of GNSS includes a large range of different GNSS technologies and methods. To date no study has comprehensively compared the different GNSS methods applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of differential and non-differential solutions, different satellite systems and different GNSS signal frequencies on position accuracy. Twelve alpine ski racers were equipped with high-end GNSS devices while performing runs on a giant slalom course. The skiers' GNSS antenna positions were calculated in three satellite signal obstruction conditions using five different GNSS methods. The GNSS antenna positions were compared to a video-based photogrammetric reference system over one turn and against the most valid GNSS method over the entire run. Furthermore, the time for acquisitioning differential GNSS solutions was assessed for four differential methods. The only GNSS method that consistently yielded sub-decimetre position accuracy in typical alpine skiing conditions was a differential method using American (GPS) and Russian (GLONASS) satellite systems and the satellite signal frequencies L1 and L2. Under conditions of minimal satellite signal obstruction, valid results were also achieved when either the satellite system GLONASS or the frequency L2 was dropped from the best configuration. All other methods failed to fulfill the accuracy requirements needed to detect relevant differences in the kinematics of alpine skiers, even in conditions favorable for GNSS measurements. The methods with good positioning accuracy had also the shortest times to compute differential solutions. This paper highlights the importance to choose appropriate methods to meet the accuracy requirements for sport applications. PMID:25285461

  11. The Effect of Different Global Navigation Satellite System Methods on Positioning Accuracy in Elite Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Limpach, Philippe; Geiger, Alain; Müller, Erich

    2014-01-01

    In sport science, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are frequently applied to capture athletes' position, velocity and acceleration. Application of GNSS includes a large range of different GNSS technologies and methods. To date no study has comprehensively compared the different GNSS methods applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of differential and non-differential solutions, different satellite systems and different GNSS signal frequencies on position accuracy. Twelve alpine ski racers were equipped with high-end GNSS devices while performing runs on a giant slalom course. The skiers' GNSS antenna positions were calculated in three satellite signal obstruction conditions using five different GNSS methods. The GNSS antenna positions were compared to a video-based photogrammetric reference system over one turn and against the most valid GNSS method over the entire run. Furthermore, the time for acquisitioning differential GNSS solutions was assessed for four differential methods. The only GNSS method that consistently yielded sub-decimetre position accuracy in typical alpine skiing conditions was a differential method using American (GPS) and Russian (GLONASS) satellite systems and the satellite signal frequencies L1 and L2. Under conditions of minimal satellite signal obstruction, valid results were also achieved when either the satellite system GLONASS or the frequency L2 was dropped from the best configuration. All other methods failed to fulfill the accuracy requirements needed to detect relevant differences in the kinematics of alpine skiers, even in conditions favorable for GNSS measurements. The methods with good positioning accuracy had also the shortest times to compute differential solutions. This paper highlights the importance to choose appropriate methods to meet the accuracy requirements for sport applications. PMID:25285461

  12. The Ether Wind and the Global Positioning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Rainer

    2000-01-01

    Explains how students can perform a refutation of the ether theory using information from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Discusses the functioning of the GPS, qualitatively describes how position determination would be affected by an ether wind, and illustrates the pertinent ideas with a simple quantitative model. (WRM)

  13. Global Positioning Systems: Keeping Us on Track. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte G.

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System is a satellite-based system used to determine location, speed, and precise time in any weather, anywhere on earth. Developed by the U.S. Air Force as a defense system, it is now available for civilian and commercial uses. (JOW)

  14. Finding a Target with an Accessible Global Positioning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, Paul E.; MacKenzie, Nancy; Long, Richard G.; Denton-Smith, Pamela; Hicks, Thomas L.; Miley, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two target-location experiments. In the first experiment, 19 participants located a 25-foot chalk circle 93% of the time with a Global Positioning System (GPS) compared to 12% of the time without it. In a single-subject follow-up experiment, the participant came within 1 foot of the target on all GPS trials. Target-location…

  15. Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) clock program: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennant, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) program status are discussed and plans for ensuring the long term continuation of the program are presented. Performance of GPS clocks is presented in terms of on orbit data as portrayed by GPS master control station kalman filter processing. The GPS Clock reliability program is reviewed in depth and future plans fo the overall clock program are published.

  16. The Evolution of Global Positioning System (GPS) Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sameer; Moore, Kevin B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes technological advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is also known as the NAVSTAR GPS satellite constellation program developed in 1937, and changes in the nature of our world by GPS in the areas of agriculture, health, military, transportation, environment, wildlife biology, surveying and mapping, space applications, and…

  17. BDD: a dosimeter for the Global Positioning System

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, H.V.; Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.; Cope, L.K.; Higbie, P.R.

    1980-10-01

    This report describes the design and operation of the BDD, a four-channel spectrometer carried by some satellites of the Global Positioning System to collect data about magnetically trapped particle fluxes. The methods of data collection and analysis are also discussed.

  18. Testing of Candidate Batteries for Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. A.; Debold, F. C.; Bis, R. F.; Buchholz, S.; Davis, P.; Kowalchik, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Three lithium batteries proposed as candidates for use in the Global Positioning System are studied. The batteries are discharged at several rates and temperatures both before and after environmental testing. Batteries are heated inside a closed chamber until they vent. Samples of the vented gases are analyzed for components which might be toxic. The test results raise concerns about each of the proposed batteries.

  19. A unified approach to global and local beam position feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1994-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The global feedback system uses 40 BPMs and 40 correctors per plane. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix is used for closed orbit correction. The local feedback system uses two X-ray BPMS, two rf BPMS, and the four-magnet local bump to control the angle and displacement of the X-ray beam from a bending magnet or an insertion device. Both the global and local feedback systems are based on digital signal processing (DSP) running at 4-kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. In this paper, we will discuss resolution of the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error and decoupling of the global and local feedback systems to maximize correction efficiency. In this scheme, the global feedback system absorbs the local bump closure error and the local feedback systems compensate for the effect of global feedback on the local beamlines. The required data sharing between the global and local feedback systems is done through the fiber-optically networked reflective memory.

  20. High precision applications of the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of U.S. defense navigation satellites which can be used for military and civilian positioning applications. A wide variety of GPS scientific applications were identified and precise positioning capabilities with GPS were already demonstrated with data available from the present partial satellite constellation. Expected applications include: measurements of Earth crustal motion, particularly in seismically active regions; measurements of the Earth's rotation rate and pole orientation; high-precision Earth orbiter tracking; surveying; measurements of media propagation delays for calibration of deep space radiometric data in support of NASA planetary missions; determination of precise ground station coordinates; and precise time transfer worldwide.

  1. Sub-milliarcsecond determination of pole position using Global Positioning System data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan; King, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of pole-position variations from the analysis of 23 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data continuously collected with a globally distributed, 21-station network is discussed. The comparison of the estimated pole positions from these data with results from 11 very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiments conducted during this same interval yields weighted root-mean-square differences about the mean differences of 0.5 mas for both X- and Y-pole position estimates from an analysis using single-day arcs, and 1.0 and 0.8 mas from an analysis using three weekly multiday arcs. These results are of sufficient quality that GPS could provide an alternative technique to VLBI and satellite laser ranging for regular monitoring of high-time-resolution variations in the position of the earth's rotation axis.

  2. Impacts of GNSS position offsets on global frame stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Jake; Ray, Jim

    2014-05-01

    Positional offsets appear in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) time series for a variety of reasons. Antenna or radome changes are the most common cause for these discontinuities. Many others are from earthquakes, receiver changes, and different anthropogenic modifications at or near the stations. Some jumps appear for unknown or undocumented reasons. The accurate determination of station velocities, and therefore geophysical parameters and terrestrial reference frames, requires that positional offsets be correctly found and compensated. Williams (2003) found that undetected offsets introduce a random walk error component in individual station time series. The topic of detecting positional offsets has received considerable attention in recent years (e.g., Detection of Offsets in GPS Experiment; DOGEx), and most research groups using GNSS have adopted a combination of manual and automated methods for finding them. The removal of a positional offset is usually handled by estimating the average station position on both sides of the discontinuity, assuming a constant, continuous velocity. This is sufficient in the absence of time-correlated errors. However, GNSS time series contain systematic and power-law errors (white to random walk noise). In this paper, we aim to evaluate the impact to both individual station results and the overall stability of the global reference frame from adding increasing numbers of positional discontinuities. We use the International GNSS Service (IGS) weekly SINEX files, and iteratively insert positional offset parameters at the midpoint of each data segment. Each iteration includes a restacking of the modified SINEX files using the CATREF software from Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière (IGN) to estimate: regularized station positions, secular velocities, Earth orientation parameters, Helmert frame alignment parameters, and the empirical shifts across all positional discontinuities. A comparison of the

  3. International GPS (Global Positioning System) Service for Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F. (Editor); Liu, R. (Editor); Neilan, R. E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The International GPS (Global Positioning System) Service for Geodynamics (IGS) began formal operation on January 1, 1994. This first annual report is divided into sections, which mirror different aspects of the service. Section (1) contains general information, including the history of the IGS, its organization, and the global network of GPS tracking sites; (2) contains information on the Central Bureau Information System; (3) describes the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS); (4) details collecting and distributing IGS data in Data Center reports; (6) describes how the IGS Analysis Centers generate their products; (7) contains miscellaneous contributions from other organizations that share common interests with the IGS.

  4. Global positioning system recorder and method government rights

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, David W.; Hofstetter, Kenneth J.; Eakle, Jr., Robert F.; Reeves, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A global positioning system recorder (GPSR) is disclosed in which operational parameters and recorded positional data are stored on a transferable memory element. Through this transferrable memory element, the user of the GPSR need have no knowledge of GPSR devices other than that the memory element needs to be inserted into the memory element slot and the GPSR must be activated. The use of the data element also allows for minimal downtime of the GPSR and the ability to reprogram the GPSR and download data therefrom, without having to physically attach it to another computer.

  5. A comparison of four precise global positioning system geodetic receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, C. C.; Sims, M. L.; Young, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Four precise global positioning system (GPS) geodetic receivers were operated simultaneously in January and February 1984 over ten baselines ranging in distance from 13 to 1304 km. Several of the baselines had been previously measured using very long baseline interferometry and, therefore, provide very good standards to which the satellite results can be compared. Results of these experiments are presented along with a brief description of each receiver and the associated analysis techniques.

  6. An analysis of GDOP in global positioning system navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, B. T.

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy of user navigation fix based on the NAVSTAR global positioning system is described. The trace of this matrix serves as a convenient navigation performance index and the square root of the trace is called geometric dilution of precision (GDOP). Certain theoretical results concerning the general properties of the navigation performance are derived. An efficient algorithm for the computation of GDOP is given. Applications of the results are illustrated by numerical examples.

  7. NAVSTAR Global Positioning System. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the global system of navigation satellites developed to provide immediate and accurate worldwide three-dimensional positioning by air, land, and sea vehicles equipped with appropriate receiving equipment. Technological forecasting, reliability, performance tests, and evaluations are discussed. Developments and applications of the NAVSTAR system are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Helicopter precision approach capability using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The period between 1 July and 31 December, 1992, was spent developing a research plan as well as a navigation system document and flight test plan to investigate helicopter precision approach capability using the Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition, all hardware and software required for the research was acquired, developed, installed, and verified on both the test aircraft and the ground-based reference station.

  9. NAVSTAR Global Positioning System. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the global system of navigation satellites developed to provide immediate and accurate worldwide three-dimensional positioning by air, land, and sea vehicles equipped with appropriate receiving equipment. Technological forecasting, reliability, performance tests, and evaluations are discussed. Developments and applications of the NAVSTAR system are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Spacecraft applications of advanced global positioning system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, Gaylord; Dodds, James; Udalov, Sergei; Austin, Richard; Loomis, Peter; Duboraw, I. Newton, III

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential uses of Global Positioning System (GPS) in spacecraft applications in the following areas: attitude control and tracking; structural control; traffic control; and time base definition (synchronization). Each of these functions are addressed. Also addressed are the hardware related issues concerning the application of GPS technology and comparisons are provided with alternative instrumentation methods for specific functions required for an advanced low earth orbit spacecraft.

  11. High accuracy autonomous navigation using the global positioning system (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Son H.; Hart, Roger C.; Shoan, Wendy C.; Wood, Terri; Long, Anne C.; Oza, Dipak H.; Lee, Taesul

    1997-01-01

    The application of global positioning system (GPS) technology to the improvement of the accuracy and economy of spacecraft navigation, is reported. High-accuracy autonomous navigation algorithms are currently being qualified in conjunction with the GPS attitude determination flyer (GADFLY) experiment for the small satellite technology initiative Lewis spacecraft. Preflight performance assessments indicated that these algorithms are able to provide a real time total position accuracy of better than 10 m and a velocity accuracy of better than 0.01 m/s, with selective availability at typical levels. It is expected that the position accuracy will be increased to 2 m if corrections are provided by the GPS wide area augmentation system.

  12. Iterative least squares method for global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Bilgic, A.

    2011-08-01

    The efficient implementation of positioning algorithms is investigated for Global Positioning System (GPS). In order to do the positioning, the pseudoranges between the receiver and the satellites are required. The most commonly used algorithm for position computation from pseudoranges is non-linear Least Squares (LS) method. Linearization is done to convert the non-linear system of equations into an iterative procedure, which requires the solution of a linear system of equations in each iteration, i.e. linear LS method is applied iteratively. CORDIC-based approximate rotations are used while computing the QR decomposition for solving the LS problem in each iteration. By choosing accuracy of the approximation, e.g. with a chosen number of optimal CORDIC angles per rotation, the LS computation can be simplified. The accuracy of the positioning results is compared for various numbers of required iterations and various approximation accuracies using real GPS data. The results show that very coarse approximations are sufficient for reasonable positioning accuracy. Therefore, the presented method reduces the computational complexity significantly and is highly suited for hardware implementation.

  13. Impacts of GNSS position offsets on global frame stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Jake; Ray, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Positional offsets appear in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) time series for a variety of reasons. Antenna or radome changes are the most common cause for these discontinuities. Many others are from earthquakes, receiver changes, and different anthropogenic modifications at or near the stations. Some jumps appear for unknown or undocumented reasons. Accurate determination of station velocities, and therefore geophysical parameters and terrestrial reference frames, requires that positional offsets be correctly found and compensated. Williams (2003) found that undetected offsets introduce a random walk error component in individual station time series. The topic of detecting positional offsets has received considerable attention in recent years (e.g., Detection of Offsets in GPS Experiment; DOGEx), and most research groups using GNSS have adopted a mix of manual and automated methods for finding them. The removal of a positional offset from a time series is usually handled by estimating the average station position on both sides of the discontinuity. Except for large earthquake events, the velocity is usually assumed constant and continuous across the positional jump. This approach is sufficient in the absence of time-correlated errors. However, GNSS time series contain periodic and power-law (flicker) errors. In this paper, we evaluate the impact to individual station results and the overall stability of the global reference frame from adding increasing numbers of positional discontinuities. We use the International GNSS Service (IGS) weekly SINEX files, and iteratively insert positional offset parameters. Each iteration includes a restacking of the modified SINEX files using the CATREF software from Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière (IGN). Comparisons of successive stacked solutions are used to assess the impacts on the time series of x-pole and y-pole offsets, along with changes in regularized position and secular velocity

  14. Determination of Earth orientation using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.

    1989-01-01

    Modern spacecraft tracking and navigation require highly accurate Earth-orientation parameters. For near-real-time applications, errors in these quantities and their extrapolated values are a significant error source. A globally distributed network of high-precision receivers observing the full Global Positioning System (GPS) configuration of 18 or more satellites may be an efficient and economical method for the rapid determination of short-term variations in Earth orientation. A covariance analysis using the JPL Orbit Analysis and Simulation Software (OASIS) was performed to evaluate the errors associated with GPS measurements of Earth orientation. These GPS measurements appear to be highly competitive with those from other techniques and can potentially yield frequent and reliable centimeter-level Earth-orientation information while simultaneously allowing the oversubscribed Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas to be used more for direct project support.

  15. Measuring earth orientation with the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam P.

    1991-01-01

    A globally distributed network of high-precision receivers which obtain data from the full Global Positioning System (GPS) configuration of 18 or more satellites may soon become an efficient and economical method for the rapid determination of short-term variations in earth orientation. A covariance analysis has been performed to evaluate the errors associated with GPS monitoring of earth orientation. Earth orientation parameters were modeled either as constants over observing windows of various lengths, or as stochastic process-noise variables. The sensitivity of earth orientation estimates to systematic errors in selected model parameters was also examined. GPS measurements appear to be highly competitive with those from other techniques, and have the potential to generate nearly continuous centimeter-level earth orientation information to aid both spacecraft navigation and the study of high-frequency earth orientation-related processes.

  16. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  17. Wide area augmentation of the Global Positioning System

    SciTech Connect

    Enge, P.; Walter, T.; Pullen, S.; Kee, C.; Chao, Y.C.; Tsai, Y.J.

    1996-08-01

    The Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is being deployed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to augment the Global Positioning System (GPS). The WAAS will aid GPS with the following three services. First, it will broadcast spread-spectrum ranging signals from communication satellites. The airborne WAAS receiver will add these new ranging signals to the GPS constellation of measurements. By so doing, the augmented position fix will be less sensitive to the failure of individual system components, thus improving time availability and continuity of service. Second, the WAAS will use a nationwide ground network to monitor the health of all satellites over the airspace and flag situations which threaten flight safety. This data will be modulated on to the WAAS ranging signals and broadcast to the users, thereby guaranteeing the integrity of the airborne position fix. Third, the WAAS will use the ground network to develop corrections for the errors which currently limit the accuracy of unaugmented GPS. This data will also be included on the WAAS broadcast and will improve position accuracy from approximately 100 m to 8 m. When complete, the augmented system will provide an accurate position fix from satellites to an unlimited number of aircraft across the nation. It will be the primary navigation system for aircraft in oceanic routes, enroute over domestic airspace, in crowded metropolitan airspaces, and on airport approach.

  18. Autonomous satellite navigation with the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, A. J.; Wooden, W. H., II; Long, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide autonomous navigation capability to NASA satellites in the 1980 era. Some of the driving forces motivating autonomous navigation are presented. These include such factors as advances in attitude control systems, onboard science annotation, and onboard gridding of imaging data. Simulation results which demonstrate baseline orbit determination accuracies using GPS data on Seasat, Landsat-D, and the Solar Maximum Mission are presented. Emphasis is placed on identifying error sources such as GPS time, GPS ephemeris, user timing biases, and user orbit dynamics, and in a parametric sense on evaluating their contribution to the orbit determination accuracies.

  19. Multipath effects in a Global Positioning Satellite system receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1992-01-01

    This study, as a part of a large continuing investigation being conducted by the Communications Systems Branch of the Information and Electronic Systems Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center, was undertaken to explore the multipath response characteristics of a particular Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receiver which was available in the laboratory at the beginning and throughout the entirety of the study, and to develop a suitable regime of experimental procedure which can be applied to other state-of-the-art GPS receivers in the larger investigation.

  20. Accurate aircraft wind measurements using the global positioning system (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobosy, R.J.; Crawford, T.L., McMillen, R.T., Dumas, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    High accuracy measurements of the spatial distribution of wind speed are required in the study of turbulent exchange between the atmosphere and the earth. The use of a differential global positioning system (GPS) to determine the sensor velocity vector component of wind speed is discussed in this paper. The results of noise and rocking testing are summarized, and fluxes obtained from the GPS-based methods are compared to those measured from systems on towers and airplanes. The GPS-based methods provided usable measurements that compared well with tower and aircraft data at a significantly lower cost. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: Precision and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Davis, J.L.; Svarc, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million.

  2. Global positioning system pseudolite-based relative navigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Monda, Eric W.

    2004-03-01

    Though the Global Positioning System has revolutionized navigation in the modern age, it is limited in its capability for some applications because an unobstructed line of sight to a minimum of four satellites is required. One way of augmenting the system in small areas is by employing pseudolites to broadcast additional signals that can be used to improve the user's position solution. At the Navigation Systems Testing Laboratory (NSTL) at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, research has been underway on the use of pseudolites to perform precision relative navigation. Based on the findings of previous research done at the NSTL, the method used to process the pseudolite measurements is an extended Kalman filter of the double differenced carrier phase measurements. By employing simulations of the system, as well as processing previously collected data in a real time manner, sub-meter tracking of a moving receiver with carrier phase measurements in the extended Kalman filter appears to be possible.

  3. Professional rugby league positional match-play analysis through the use of global positioning system.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien J; Kelly, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the movement demands of all 9 individual playing positions in professional rugby league. The movement demands of 135 professional rugby league players were recorded during 28 National Rugby League games in 2011, using a nondifferential 5 Hz global positioning system. The mean total distances covered in a game for fullback, wing, center, five-eight, halfback, hooker, lock, back row, and prop players were 7,760, 7,457, 7,301, 8,402, 8,500, 6,988, 5,481, 6,936, and 4,597 m, respectively. The average occurrence of high-intensity runs per match was 42, 35, 34, 86, 120, 74, 52, 26, and 18 for fullback, wing, center, five-eight, halfback, hooker, lock, back row, and prop players, respectively. The average distance traveled greater than 18 km·h-1 for fullback were 17 ± 2 m, wing 18 ± 2 m, center 18 ± 3 m, five-eight 16 ± 3 m, and halfback 17 ± 4 m. The average distance and range traveled greater than 18 km·h for hooker were 14 ± 3 m, lock 16 ± 2 m, back row 18 ± 3 m, and prop 16 ± 2 m. The use of global positioning systems has demonstrated plausibility to eliminate the use of grouping of positions in rugby league and for coaches to make specific training protocols for each position. Given the differences in movement demands of all 9 positions in rugby league, some positions would lack specificity to their positional requirements if using collective grouping for planning of training regimens. PMID:23591946

  4. Building resilience of the Global Positioning System to space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Genene; Kunches, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    Almost every aspect of the global economy now depends on GPS. Worldwide, nations are working to create a robust Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), which will provide global positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) services for applications such as aviation, electric power distribution, financial exchange, maritime navigation, and emergency management. The U.S. government is examining the vulnerabilities of GPS, and it is well known that space weather events, such as geomagnetic storms, contribute to errors in single-frequency GPS and are a significant factor for differential GPS. The GPS industry has lately begun to recognize that total electron content (TEC) signal delays, ionospheric scintillation, and solar radio bursts can also interfere with daily operations and that these threats grow with the approach of the next solar maximum, expected to occur in 2013. The key challenges raised by these circumstances are, first, to better understand the vulnerability of GPS technologies and services to space weather and, second, to develop policies that will build resilience and mitigate risk.

  5. Global Positioning System Antenna Fixed Height Tripod Adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinardo, Steven J.; Smith, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    An improved Global Positioning em antenna adaptor allows fixed antenna height measurements by removably attaching an adaptor plate to a conventional surveyor's tripod. Antenna height is controlled by an antenna boom which is a fixed length rod. The antenna is attached to one end of the boom. The opposite end of the boom tapers to a point sized to fit into a depression at the center of survey markers. The boom passes through the hollow center of a universal ball joint which is mounted at the center of the adaptor plate so that the point of the rod can be fixed in the marker's central depression. The mountains of the ball joint allow the joint to be moved horizontally in any direction relative to the tripod. When the ball joint is moved horizontally, the angle between the boom and the vertical changes because the boom's position is fixed at its lower end. A spirit level attached to the rod allows an operator to determine when the boom is plumb. The position of the ball joint is adjusted horizontally until the boom is plumb. At that time the antenna is positioned exactly over the center of the monument and the elevation of the antenna is precisely set by the length of the boom.

  6. Impacts of GNSS position offsets on global frame stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Ray, J.

    2016-01-01

    While it has been known for some time that offsets in the time-series of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position estimates degrade station velocity determinations, the magnitude of the effect has not been clear. Using products of the International GNSS Service (IGS), we assess the impact empirically by injecting progressively larger numbers of artificial offsets and solving for a series of long-term secular GNSS frames. Our results show that the stability of the IGS global frame datum is fairly robust, with significant effects at the formal error level only for the Rx (and Y-pole) and Rz rotational orientations. On the other hand, station velocity estimates are more seriously affected, especially the vertical component. For the typical IGS station, the mean vertical rate uncertainty is already limited to 0.34 mm yr-1 for the current set of position discontinuities. If the number of breaks doubles, which might occur using newer detection schemes, then that uncertainty will worsen by ˜40 per cent to 0.48 mm yr-1. This error source is generally a more important component of realistic velocity uncertainties than any other, including accounting for temporal correlations in the GNSS data. The only way to improve future GNSS velocity estimates is to severely limit manmade displacements at the tracking stations.

  7. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  8. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  9. High precision global positioning system for mining applications

    SciTech Connect

    O`Grady, M.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses today`s satellite technology that has lead to the development of a system that will increase safety and production in surface mining. The Department of Defense is maintaining a satellite system made up of 24 NavStar satellites that allow the use of their frequencies to position equipment anywhere on Earth. The previous satellite system was called the Transit system or Sat-Nav. It consisted of low-orbit satellites (not many up there) that ground-based receivers needed three days of logged data to process sub-meter accuracy positions. With the NavStar network of satellites, centimeter accuracy can be achieved within just a few minutes. Changes to the way one used to survey in the mining industry are being replaced with the Global Positioning System. It has proven to be a system that is more accurate and after the typical learning curve that is required by any new system, will lead to higher productivity; hence, financial rewards are in the immediate future.

  10. Autonomous satellite navigation methods using the Global Positioning Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, M.; Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation considers the problem of autonomous satellite navigation using the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS). The major topics covered include the design, implementation, and validation of onboard navigation filter algorithms by means of computer simulations. The primary errors that the navigation filter design must minimize are computational effects and modeling inaccuracies due to limited capability of the onboard computer. The minimization of the effect of these errors is attained by applying the sequential extended Kalman filter using a factored covariance implementation with Q-matrix or dynamical model compensations. Peformance evaluation of the navigation filter design is carried out using both the CDC Cyber 170/750 computer and the PDP-11/60 computer. The results are obtained assuming the Phase I GPS constellation, consisting of six satellites, and a Landsat-D type spacecraft as the model for the user satellite orbit.

  11. Modeling Selective Availability of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braasch, Michael

    1990-01-01

    As the development of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) continues, there will increasingly be the need for a software centered signal model. This model must accurately generate the observed pseudorange which would typically be encountered. The observed pseudorange varies from the true geometric (slant) range due to range measurement errors. Errors in range measurement stem from a variety of hardware and environment factors. These errors are classified as either deterministic or random and, where appropriate, their models are summarized. Of particular interest is the model for Selective Availability which is derived from actual GPS data. The procedure for the determination of this model, known as the System Identification Theory, is briefly outlined. The synthesis of these error sources into the final signal model is given along with simulation results.

  12. Launch vehicle tracking enhancement through Global Positioning System Metric Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. C.; Li, Hanchu; Gray, T.; Doran, A.

    United Launch Alliance (ULA) initiated operational flights of both the Atlas V and Delta IV launch vehicle families in 2002. The Atlas V and Delta IV launch vehicles were developed jointly with the US Air Force (USAF) as part of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program. Both Launch Vehicle (LV) families have provided 100% mission success since their respective inaugural launches and demonstrated launch capability from both Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) on the Western Test Range and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on the Eastern Test Range. However, the current EELV fleet communications, tracking, & control architecture & technology, which date back to the origins of the space launch business, require support by a large and high cost ground footprint. The USAF has embarked on an initiative known as Future Flight Safety System (FFSS) that will significantly reduce Test Range Operations and Maintenance (O& M) cost by closing facilities and decommissioning ground assets. In support of the FFSS, a Global Positioning System Metric Tracking (GPS MT) System based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite constellation has been developed for EELV which will allow both Ranges to divest some of their radar assets. The Air Force, ULA and Space Vector have flown the first 2 Atlas Certification vehicles demonstrating the successful operation of the GPS MT System. The first Atlas V certification flight was completed in February 2012 from CCAFS, the second Atlas V certification flight from VAFB was completed in September 2012 and the third certification flight on a Delta IV was completed October 2012 from CCAFS. The GPS MT System will provide precise LV position, velocity and timing information that can replace ground radar tracking resource functionality. The GPS MT system will provide an independent position/velocity S-Band telemetry downlink to support the current man-in-the-loop ground-based commanded destruct of an anomalous flight- The system

  13. Helicopter approach capability using the differential Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.

    1993-01-01

    The results of flight tests to determine the feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the differential mode (DGPS) to provide high accuracy, precision navigation and guidance for helicopter approaches to landing are presented. The airborne DGPS receiver and associated equipment is installed in a NASA UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. The ground-based DGPS reference receiver is located at a surveyed test site and is equipped with a real-time VHF data link to transmit correction information to the airborne DGPS receiver. The corrected airborne DGPS information, together with the preset approach geometry, is used to calculate guidance commands which are sent to the aircraft's approach guidance instruments. The use of DGPS derived guidance for helicopter approaches to landing is evaluated by comparing the DGPS data with the laser tracker truth data. Both standard (3 degrees) and steep (6 degrees and 9 degrees) glidescope straight-in approaches were flown. DGPS positioning accuracy based on a time history analysis of the entire approach was 0.2 m (mean) +/- 1.8 m (2 sigma) laterally and -2.0 m (mean) +/- 3.5 m (2 sigma) vertically for 3 degree glidescope approaches, -0.1 m (mean) +/- 1.5 m (2 sigma) laterally and -1.1 m (mean) +/- 3.5 m (2 sigma) vertically for 6 degree glidescope approaches, and 0.2 m (mean) +/- 1.3 m (2 sigma) laterally and -1.0 m (mean) +/- 2.8 (2 sigma) vertically for 9 degree glidescope approaches. DGPS positioning accuracy at the 200 ft decision height on a standard 3 degree glidescope approach was 0.3 m (mean) +/- 1.5 m (2 sigma) laterally and -2.3 m (mean) +/- 1.6 m (2 sigma) vertically. These errors indicate that the helicopter position based on DGPS guidance satisfies the International Civil Aviation Organization Category 1 lateral and vertical accuracy requirements.

  14. Volcano monitoring using the Global Positioning System: Filtering strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, K.M.; Cervelli, Peter; Lisowski, M.; Miklius, Asta; Segall, P.; Owen, S.

    2001-01-01

    Permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) networks are routinely used for producing improved orbits and monitoring secular tectonic deformation. For these applications, data are transferred to an analysis center each day and routinely processed in 24-hour segments. To use GPS for monitoring volcanic events, which may last only a few hours, real-time or near real-time data processing and subdaily position estimates are valuable. Strategies have been researched for obtaining station coordinates every 15 min using a Kalman filter; these strategies have been tested on data collected by a GPS network on Kilauea Volcano. Data from this network are tracked continuously, recorded every 30 s, and telemetered hourly to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. A white noise model is heavily impacted by data outages and poor satellite geometry, but a properly constrained random walk model fits the data well. Using a borehole tiltmeter at Kilauea's summit as ground-truth, solutions using different random walk constraints were compared. This study indicates that signals on the order of 5 mm/h are resolvable using a random walk standard deviation of 0.45 cm/???h. Values lower than this suppress small signals, and values greater than this have significantly higher noise at periods of 1-6 hours. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Workshop Builds Strategies to Address Global Positioning System Vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Genene

    2011-01-01

    When we examine the impacts of space weather on society, do we really understand the risks? Can past experiences reliably predict what will happen in the future? As the complexity of technology increases, there is the potential for it to become more fragile, allowing for a single point of failure to bring down the entire system. Take the Global Positioning System (GPS) as an example. GPS positioning, navigation, and timing have become an integral part of daily life, supporting transportation and communications systems vital to the aviation, merchant marine, cargo, cellular phone, surveying, and oil exploration industries. Everyday activities such as banking, mobile phone operations, and even the control of power grids are facilitated by the accurate timing provided by GPS. Understanding the risks of space weather to GPS and the many economic sectors reliant upon it, as well as how to build resilience, was the focus of a policy workshop organized by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and held on 13-14 October 2010 in Washington, D. C. The workshop brought together a select group of policy makers, space weather scientists, and GPS experts and users.

  16. Modeling the global positioning system signal propagation through the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassiri, S.; Hajj, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Based on realistic modeling of the electron density of the ionosphere and using a dipole moment approximation for the Earth's magnetic field, one is able to estimate the effect of the ionosphere on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal for a ground user. The lowest order effect, which is on the order of 0.1-100 m of group delay, is subtracted out by forming a linear combination of the dual frequencies of the GPS signal. One is left with second- and third-order effects that are estimated typically to be approximately 0-2 cm and approximately 0-2 mm at zenith, respectively, depending on the geographical location, the time of day, the time of year, the solar cycle, and the relative geometry of the magnetic field and the line of sight. Given the total electron content along a line of sight, the authors derive an approximation to the second-order term which is accurate to approximately 90 percent within the magnetic dipole moment model; this approximation can be used to reduce the second-order term to the millimeter level, thus potentially improving precise positioning in space and on the ground. The induced group delay, or phase advance, due to second- and third-order effects is examined for two ground receivers located at equatorial and mid-latitude regions tracking several GPS satellites.

  17. Helicopter Approach Capability Using the Differential Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.

    1994-01-01

    The results of flight tests to determine the feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the Differential mode (DGPS) to provide high accuracy, precision navigation and guidance for helicopter approaches to landing are presented. The airborne DGPS receiver and associated equipment is installed in a NASA UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. The ground-based DGPS reference receiver is located at a surveyed test site and is equipped with a real-time VHF data link to transmit correction information to the airborne DGPS receiver. The corrected airborne DGPS information, together with the preset approach geometry, is used to calculate guidance commands which are sent to the aircraft's approach guidance instruments. The use of DGPS derived guidance for helicopter approaches to landing is evaluated by comparing the DGPS data with the laser tracker truth data. The errors indicate that the helicopter position based on DGPS guidance satisfies the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Category 1 (CAT 1) lateral and vertical navigational accuracy requirements.

  18. 76 FR 33022 - Eighty-Sixth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... 159 meeting: Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS). DATES: The meeting... for a Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS) meeting. The agenda will...

  19. 75 FR 2581 - Eighty-First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... 159 meeting: Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS). DATES: The meeting... hereby given for a Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS) meeting. The agenda...

  20. 76 FR 67019 - Eighty-Seventh: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eighty-Seventh: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS... RTCA Special Committee 159 meeting: Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System...

  1. 76 FR 50808 - Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... cancel TSO-C129a, Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System (GPS... Global Positioning System Equipment Using Aircraft-Based Augmentation; an updated minimum performance... system (TSO-C145c, Airborne Navigation Sensors Using the Global Positioning System Augmented by...

  2. 77 FR 12106 - 88th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 88th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System (GPS... RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the 88th meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System...

  3. 78 FR 13396 - 90th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 90th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Notice of RTCA Special Committee 159, RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS). DATES: The meeting will be held March 12-15,...

  4. 78 FR 57672 - 91st Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 91st Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Notice of RTCA Special Committee 159, RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) DATES: The meeting will be held October 7-11,...

  5. 76 FR 27744 - Eighty-Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... 159 meeting: Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS). DATES: The meeting...), notice is hereby given for a Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS) meeting. The...

  6. 77 FR 56254 - 89th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 89th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Notice of RTCA Special Committee 159, RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS). DATES: The meeting will be held October 5,...

  7. Global positioning system watches for estimating energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Hongu, Nobuko; Orr, Barron J; Roe, Denise J; Reed, Rebecca G; Going, Scott B

    2013-11-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) watches have been introduced commercially, converting frequent measurements of time, location, speed (pace), and elevation into energy expenditure (EE) estimates. The purpose of this study was to compare EE estimates of 4 different GPS watches (Forerunner, Suunto, Polar, Adeo), at various walking speeds, with EE estimate from a triaxial accelerometer (RT3), which was used as a reference measure in this study. Sixteen healthy young adults completed the study. Participants wore 4 different GPS watches and an RT3 accelerometer and walked at 6-minute intervals on an outdoor track at 3 speeds (3, 5, and 7 km/hr). The statistical significance of differences in EE between the 3 watches was assessed using linear contrasts of the coefficients from the overall model. Reliability across trials for a given device was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients as estimated in the mixed model. The GPS watches demonstrated lower reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient) across trials when compared with the RT3, particularly at the higher speed, 7 km/hr. Three GPS watches (Forerunner, Polar, and Suunto) significantly and consistently underestimated EE compared with the reference EE given by the RT3 accelerometer (average mean difference: Garmin, -50.5%; Polar, -41.7%; and Suunto, -41.7%; all p < 0.001). Results suggested that caution should be exercised when using commercial GPS watches to estimate EE in athletes during field-based testing and training. PMID:23439338

  8. Spacecraft applications of advanced global positioning system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This is the final report on the Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) simulations study of Spacecraft Application of Advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) Technology. This work was conducted for the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) under contract NAS9-17781. GPS, in addition to its baselined capability as a highly accurate spacecraft navigation system, can provide traffic control, attitude control, structural control, and uniform time base. In Phase 1 of this program, another contractor investigated the potential of GPS in these four areas and compared GPS to other techniques. This contract was for the Phase 2 effort, to study the performance of GPS for these spacecraft applications through computer simulations. TI had previously developed simulation programs for GPS differential navigation and attitude measurement. These programs were adapted for these specific spacecraft applications. In addition, TI has extensive expertise in the design and production of advanced GPS receivers, including space-qualified GPS receivers. We have drawn on this background to augment the simulation results in the system level overview, which is Section 2 of this report.

  9. Predictive Attitude Estimation Using Global Positioning System Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Markley, F. Landis; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Ketchum, Eleanor

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm is developed for attitude estimation using Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. The new algorithm is based on a predictive filtering scheme designed for spacecraft without rate measuring devices. The major advantage of this new algorithm over traditional Kalman filter approaches is that the model error is not assumed to represented by an unbiased Gaussian noise process with known covariance, but instead is determined during the estimation process. This is achieved by simultaneously solving system optimality conditions and an output error constraint. This approach is well suited for GPS attitude estimation since some error sources that contribute to attitude inaccuracy, such as signal multipath, are known to be non-Gaussian processes. Also, the predictive filter scheme can use either GPS signals or vector observations or a combination of both for attitude estimation, so that performance characteristics can be maintained during periods of GPS attitude sensor outage. The performance of the new algorithm is tested using flight data from the REX-2 spacecraft. Results are shown using the predictive filter to estimate the attitude from both GPS signals and magnetometer measurements, and comparing that solution to a magnetometer-only based solution. Results using the new estimation algorithm indicate that GPS-based solutions are verified to within 2 degrees using the magnetometer cross-check for the REX-2 spacecraft. GPS attitude accuracy of better than 1 degree is expected per axis, but cannot be reliably proven due to inaccuracies in the magnetic field model.

  10. Tightly Coupled Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System (TCMIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Jackson, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many NASA applications planned for execution later this decade are seeking high performance, miniaturized, low power Inertial Management Units (IMU). Much research has gone into Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) over the past decade as a solution to these needs. While MEMS devices have proven to provide high accuracy acceleration measurements, they have not yet proven to have the accuracy required by many NASA missions in rotational measurements. Therefore, a new solution has been formulated integrating the best of all IMU technologies to address these mid-term needs in the form of a Tightly Coupled Micro Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) (TCMIG). The TCMIG consists of an INS and a GPS tightly coupled by a Kalman filter executing on an embedded Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) processor. The INS consists of a highly integrated Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyroscope (IFOG) and a MEMS accelerometer. The IFOG utilizes a tightly wound fiber coil to reduce volume and the high level of integration and advanced optical components to reduce power. The MEMS accelerometer utilizes a newly developed deep etch process to increase the proof mass and yield a highly accurate accelerometer. The GPS receiver consists of a low power miniaturized version of the Blackjack receiver. Such an IMU configuration is ideal to meet the mid-term needs of the NASA Science Enterprises and the new launch vehicles being developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI).

  11. Atomic clock augmentation for receivers using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Paul Andrew

    For receivers using the Global Positioning System (GPS), it is standard procedure to treat the receiver clock bias from GPS time as an unknown. This requires four range measurements to the satellites in order to solve for three dimensional position and clock offset. If the receiver clock could be synchronized with GPS time, the extra range measurement would not be necessary. To achieve this synchronization, a stable frequency reference must be incorporated into the GPS user set. This concept is known as clock aiding or clock augmentation of GPS receivers. Clock augmentation increases the availability of the navigation function because only three GPS satellites are required. Also, it is shown that clock augmentation improves vertical accuracy by reducing the vertical dilution of precision (VDOP), which is a unitless multiplier that translates range measurement error into vertical position error. This improvement in vertical accuracy is particularly beneficial for applications involving final approach and landing of aircraft using GPS, because GPS typically provides better horizontal accuracy than vertical accuracy. The benefits of atomic clock augmentation are limited by factors that cause a loss of synchronization either between the receiver and GPS time, or between ground station and airborne receivers processing GPS data in differential mode (DGPS). Among the error sources that cause a clock offset are antenna rotation, hardware drifts due to temperature variations, and relativistic effects for GPS receivers on moving platforms. Antenna rotation and temperature effects are addressed and supported by experimental data. It is shown that two particular relativity terms thought to be missing from GPS receiver algorithms are not evident in data collected during a flight test experiment. Upon addressing the error sources, the dissertation concludes with analysis of DGPS data collected during a flight test at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Tech Center in

  12. Global Organization of a Positive-strand RNA Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baodong; Grigull, Jörg; Ore, Moriam O.; Morin, Sylvie; White, K. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of plus-strand RNA viruses contain many regulatory sequences and structures that direct different viral processes. The traditional view of these RNA elements are as local structures present in non-coding regions. However, this view is changing due to the discovery of regulatory elements in coding regions and functional long-range intra-genomic base pairing interactions. The ∼4.8 kb long RNA genome of the tombusvirus tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) contains these types of structural features, including six different functional long-distance interactions. We hypothesized that to achieve these multiple interactions this viral genome must utilize a large-scale organizational strategy and, accordingly, we sought to assess the global conformation of the entire TBSV genome. Atomic force micrographs of the genome indicated a mostly condensed structure composed of interconnected protrusions extending from a central hub. This configuration was consistent with the genomic secondary structure model generated using high-throughput selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (i.e. SHAPE), which predicted different sized RNA domains originating from a central region. Known RNA elements were identified in both domain and inter-domain regions, and novel structural features were predicted and functionally confirmed. Interestingly, only two of the six long-range interactions known to form were present in the structural model. However, for those interactions that did not form, complementary partner sequences were positioned relatively close to each other in the structure, suggesting that the secondary structure level of viral genome structure could provide a basic scaffold for the formation of different long-range interactions. The higher-order structural model for the TBSV RNA genome provides a snapshot of the complex framework that allows multiple functional components to operate in concert within a confined context. PMID:23717202

  13. Global positioning system interference and satellite anomalous event monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Lukas M.

    Global Positioning System satellite Signal Quality Monitoring (SQM) is required to ensure the integrity of the received signal for aviation safety-critical systems. Failure mitigation is not addressed since failure detection ensures system integrity. The GPS Anomalous Event Monitor (GAEM) is introduced, consisting of a GPS receiver serving as an anomaly sensor, and the Software Defined Radio, allowing for a thorough analysis of signal malfunction modes through advanced signal processing techniques. Algorithms to monitor the GPS signal by the anomaly sensor are developed and in case of possible signal inconsistencies the signal is analyzed by the Software Defined Radio. For the purpose of quality monitoring it is essential to understand the impact of the radio frequency front-end on the received signal, and implicitly onto the signal parameter estimation process; otherwise a signal inconsistency may be flagged which is induced by the monitoring system. Thus, radio frequency front-end induced errors are examined and the statistics for signal parameter estimators are derived. As the statistics of an anomalous signal are unknown, a non-parametric, non-homoscedastic (uncommon variance of sample space) statistical test is developed. Berry-Esseen bounds are introduced to quantify convergence and to establish confidence levels. The algorithm is applied to the detection of signal anomalies, with emphasis on interference detection. The algorithms to detect GPS signal anomalies are verified with experimental data. The performance of the interference detection algorithms is demonstrated through data collection in a shielded measurement chamber. Actual GPS signals in combination with interference sources such as narrowband, wideband and pulsed interference were broadcast in the chamber. Subsequently, case studies from continuous GPS monitoring are included and observed anomalies are discussed. The performance demonstration of the GPS anomalous event monitor is concluded with a

  14. Precise mean sea level measurements using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelecy, Thomas M.; Born, George H.; Parke, Michael E.; Rocken, Christian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a sea level measurement test conducted off La Jolla, California, in November of 1991. The purpose of this test was to determine accurate sea level measurements using a Global Positioning System (GPS) equipped buoy. These measurements were intended to be used as the sea level component for calibration of the ERS 1 satellite altimeter. Measurements were collected on November 25 and 28 when the ERS 1 satellite overflew the calibration area. Two different types of buoys were used. A waverider design was used on November 25 and a spar design on November 28. This provided the opportunity to examine how dynamic effects of the measurement platform might affect the sea level accuracy. The two buoys were deployed at locations approximately 1.2 km apart and about 15 km west of a reference GPS receiver located on the rooftop of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. GPS solutions were computed for 45 minutes on each day and used to produce two sea level time series. An estimate of the mean sea level at both locations was computed by subtracting tide gage data collected at the Scripps Pier from the GPS-determined sea level measurements and then filtering out the high-frequency components due to waves and buoy dynamics. In both cases the GPS estimate differed from Rapp's mean altimetric surface by 0.06 m. Thus, the gradient in the GPS measurements matched the gradient in Rapp's surface. These results suggest that accurate sea level can be determined using GPS on widely differing platforms as long as care is taken to determine the height of the GPS antenna phase center above water level. Application areas include measurement of absolute sea level, of temporal variations in sea level, and of sea level gradients (dominantly the geoid). Specific applications would include ocean altimeter calibration, monitoring of sea level in remote regions, and regional experiments requiring spatial and

  15. Design studies for a technology assessment receiver for global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational conditions of a radio receiver - microprocessor for the global positioning system are studied. Navigation fundamentals and orbit characterization are reviewed. The global positioning system is described with emphasis upon signal structure and satellite positioning. Ranging and receiver processing techniques are discussed.

  16. Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-02-01

    In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

  17. Estimation of Subdaily Polar Motion with the Global Positioning System During the Spoch '92 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibanez-Meier, R.; Freedman, A. P.; Herring, T. A.; Gross, R. S.; Lichten, S. M.; Lindqwister, U. J.

    1994-01-01

    Data collected over six days from a worldwide Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking network during the Epoch '92 campaign are used to estimate variations of the Earth's pole position every 30 minutes.

  18. 76 FR 35858 - Global Positioning System Directorate (GPSD); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Global Positioning System Directorate (GPSD); Notice of Meeting ACTION: Notice of... Global Positioning Systems Directorate (GPSD) will be hosting a Public Interface Control Working...

  19. 76 FR 31943 - Global Positioning System Directorate (Gpsd); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Department of the Air Force Global Positioning System Directorate (Gpsd); Notice of Meeting ACTION: Notice of..., IS-GPS-705A, IS-GPS-800A). SUMMARY: This notice informs the public that the Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate will be hosting a Public Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) meeting for...

  20. 75 FR 14658 - Invitation for Public Comment on Mitigation Options for Global Positioning System Satellite...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may... Global Positioning System Satellite Vehicle Number 49 AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology... Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite IIR-20M (satellite vehicle number 49--SVN 49) from unhealthy...

  1. 75 FR 28318 - Eighty-Second Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... System (GPS) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 159 meeting: Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS). DATES: The...

  2. Criterion validity and accuracy of global positioning satellite and data logging devices for wheelchair tennis court movement

    PubMed Central

    Sindall, Paul; Lenton, John P.; Whytock, Katie; Tolfrey, Keith; Oyster, Michelle L.; Cooper, Rory A.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the criterion validity and accuracy of a 1 Hz non-differential global positioning system (GPS) and data logger device (DL) for the measurement of wheelchair tennis court movement variables. Methods Initial validation of the DL device was performed. GPS and DL were fitted to the wheelchair and used to record distance (m) and speed (m/second) during (a) tennis field (b) linear track, and (c) match-play test scenarios. Fifteen participants were monitored at the Wheelchair British Tennis Open. Results Data logging validation showed underestimations for distance in right (DLR) and left (DLL) logging devices at speeds >2.5 m/second. In tennis-field tests, GPS underestimated distance in five drills. DLL was lower than both (a) criterion and (b) DLR in drills moving forward. Reversing drill direction showed that DLR was lower than (a) criterion and (b) DLL. GPS values for distance and average speed for match play were significantly lower than equivalent values obtained by DL (distance: 2816 (844) vs. 3952 (1109) m, P = 0.0001; average speed: 0.7 (0.2) vs. 1.0 (0.2) m/second, P = 0.0001). Higher peak speeds were observed in DL (3.4 (0.4) vs. 3.1 (0.5) m/second, P = 0.004) during tennis match play. Conclusions Sampling frequencies of 1 Hz are too low to accurately measure distance and speed during wheelchair tennis. GPS units with a higher sampling rate should be advocated in further studies. Modifications to existing DL devices may be required to increase measurement precision. Further research into the validity of movement devices during match play will further inform the demands and movement patterns associated with wheelchair tennis. PMID:23820154

  3. Global remodeling of nucleosome positions in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic chromatin architecture is affected by intrinsic histone-DNA sequence preferences, steric exclusion between nucleosome particles, formation of higher-order structures, and in vivo activity of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Results To disentangle sequence-dependent nucleosome positioning from the other factors, we have created two high-throughput maps of nucleosomes assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. A comparison of in vitro nucleosome positions with those observed in a mixed-stage, mixed-tissue population of C. elegans cells reveals that in vivo sequence preferences are modified on the genomic scale. Indeed, G/C dinucleotides are predicted to be most favorable for nucleosome formation in vitro but not in vivo. Nucleosome sequence read coverage in vivo is distinctly lower in chromosome arms than in central regions; the observed changes in apparent nucleosome sequence specificity, likely due to genome-wide chromatin remodeler activity, contribute to the formation of these megabase-scale chromatin domains. We also observe that the majority of well-positioned in vivo nucleosomes do not occupy thermodynamically favorable sequences observed in vitro. Finally, we find that exons are intrinsically more amenable to nucleosome formation compared to introns. Nucleosome occupancy of introns and exons consistently increases with G/C content in vitro but not in vivo, in agreement with our observation that G/C dinucleotide enrichment does not strongly promote in vivo nucleosome formation. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of both sequence specificity and active nucleosome repositioning in creating large-scale chromatin domains, and the antagonistic roles of intrinsic sequence preferences and chromatin remodelers in C. elegans. Sequence read data has been deposited into Sequence Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra; accession number SRA050182). Additional data, software and computational

  4. Office of Spaceflight Standard Spaceborne Global Positioning System (GPS) user equipment project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Penny E.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides the following: (1) position and velocity determination to support vehicle GN&C, precise orbit determination, and payload pointing; (2) time reference to support onboard timing systems and data time tagging; (3) relative position and velocity determination to support cooperative vehicle tracking; and (4) attitude determination to support vehicle attitude control and payload pointing.

  5. Positional Accuracy of Airborne Integrated Global Positioning and Inertial Navigation Systems for Mapping in Glen Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.; Hothem, Larry D.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution airborne and satellite image sensor systems integrated with onboard data collection based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation systems (INS) may offer a quick and cost-effective way to gather accurate topographic map information without ground control or aerial triangulation. The Applanix Corporation?s Position and Orientation Solutions for Direct Georeferencing of aerial photography was used in this project to examine the positional accuracy of integrated GPS/INS for terrain mapping in Glen Canyon, Arizona. The research application in this study yielded important information on the usefulness and limits of airborne integrated GPS/INS data-capture systems for mapping.

  6. GPS aiding of ocean current determination. [Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The navigational accuracy of an oceangoing vessel using conventional GPS p-code data is examined. The GPS signal is transmitted over two carrier frequencies in the L-band at 1575.42 and 1227.6 MHz. Achievable navigational uncertainties of differenced positional estimates are presented as a function of the parameters of the problem, with particular attention given to the effect of sea-state, user equivalent range error, uncompensated antenna motion, varying delay intervals, and reduced data rate examined in the unaided mode. The unmodeled errors resulting from satellite ephemeris uncertainties are shown to be negligible for the GPS-NDS (Navigation Development) satellites. Requirements are met in relatively calm seas, but accuracy degradation by a factor of at least 2 must be anticipated in heavier sea states. The aided mode of operation is examined, and it is shown that requirements can be met by using an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to aid the GPS receiver operation. Since the use of an IMU would mean higher costs, direct Doppler from the GPS satellites is presented as a viable alternative.

  7. GIS TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 3: GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are a location determination technology that offers significance opportunities for obtaining highly accurate locational data at low costs. n order for the technology to perform up to its capabilities in Agency applications, Environmental Protectio...

  8. Using The Global Positioning System For Earth Orbiter and Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Haines, Bruce J.; Young, Lawrence E.; Dunn, Charles; Srinivasan, Jeff; Sweeney, Dennis; Nandi, Sumita; Spitzmesser, Don

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) can play a major role in supporting orbit and trajectory determination for spacecraft in a wide range of applications, including low-Earth, high-earth, and even deep space (interplanetary) tracking.

  9. Daily estimates of the earth's pole position with the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Freedman, Adam P.; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    Daily estimates of the earth's pole position have been obtained with measurements from a worldwide network of GPS receivers, obtained during the three week GIG '91 experiment in January-February 1991. For this short-term study, the GPS based polar motion series agrees with the other space based geodetic techniques (Very Long Baseline Interferometry and Satellite Laser Ranging) to about 0.4 mas rms, after the removal of mean biases of order 1-3 mas. The small error in day-to-day variability is not sensitive to the fiducial strategy used, nor are fiducial sites even necessary for monitoring high frequency pole position variability. The small biases indicate that the applied reference frames of the three geodetic techniques are nearly aligned, that the GPS fiducial errors are small, and that systematic errors in GPS are also small (of order 5 ppb). A well determined reference frame is necessary for monitoring the long-term stability of polar motion and for separating it from other long-term signals such as tectonic motion and internal systematic errors.

  10. Contributions of Positive Psychology to Peace: Toward Global Well-Being and Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohrs, J. Christopher; Christie, Daniel J.; White, Mathew P.; Das, Chaitali

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the relationship between positive psychology and peace psychology. We discuss how positive emotions, engagement, meaning, personal well-being, and resilience may impact peace at different levels, ranging from the personal and interpersonal to community, national, and global peace. First, we argue that an…

  11. The Global Positioning System and Its Integration into College Geography Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikle, Thomas A.; Lambert, Dean P.

    1996-01-01

    Introduces global positioning system (GPS) technology to nonspecialist geographers and recommends a framework for implementing GPS instructional modules in college geography courses. GPS was developed as a worldwide satellite-based system by the U.S. Department of Defense to simplify and improve military and civilian navigation and positioning.…

  12. The Global Positioning System--Direction for the Future [and] GPS Technology and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Paul R.; Ginsburg, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Edmondson introduces a satellite-based radio navigation, positioning, and timing system that can be integrated into a variety of curriculum areas. Ginsburg describes how the global positioning system brings far-reaching benefits for crop growers and the environment. (Author)

  13. Lyapunov Exponents of Minimizing Measures for Globally Positive Diffeomorphisms in All Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, M.-C.

    2016-05-01

    The globally positive diffeomorphisms of the 2 n-dimensional annulus are important because they represent what happens close to a completely elliptic periodic point of a symplectic diffeomorphism where the torsion is positive definite. For these globally positive diffeomorphisms, an Aubry-Mather theory was developed by Garibaldi and Thieullen that provides the existence of some minimizing measures. Using the two Green bundles {G_-} and {G_+} that can be defined along the support of these minimizing measures, we will prove that there is a deep link between: the angle between {G_-} and {G_+} along the support of the considered measure {μ};

  14. TOPEX orbit determination and gravity recovery using Global Positioning System data from repeat orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong; Yunck, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    A covariance analysis is presented for satellite tracking and gravity recovery with a differential Global Positioning System-based technique to be demonstrated on TOPEX in the early 1990s. The technique employs data from an ensemble of repeat ground tracks to recover a unique satellite epoch state for each track and a set of invariant positional parameters common to all tracks. The positional parameters represent the effect of mismodeled gravitational field on the satellite orbit. At an altitude of 1336 km, where gravity modeling is the dominant systematic error, averaging of random error over many arcs and adjustment of the gravity model reduce the final satellite position error. The positional parameters can then be used to produce a refined global gravity model. The analysis indicates that errors ranging from 5 to 8 cm in TOPEX altitude and 0.05 to 0.2 mGal for the gravity field can be achieved, depending on the number of repeat arcs used.

  15. Contributions of positive psychology to peace: toward global well-being and resilience.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, J Christopher; Christie, Daniel J; White, Mathew P; Das, Chaitali

    2013-10-01

    In this article, we analyze the relationship between positive psychology and peace psychology. We discuss how positive emotions, engagement, meaning, personal well-being, and resilience may impact peace at different levels, ranging from the personal and interpersonal to community, national, and global peace. First, we argue that an individual's positive experiences, personal well-being, and personal resilience, as defined in current positive psychology, may in fact contribute to personal and interpersonal peace but can also entail detrimental consequences for other individuals, communities, and nations. Second, we describe how peace psychology contains traces of positive psychology, especially with its focus on the pursuit of social justice. Third, reviewing and extending the concept of community resilience, we outline directions for further conceptual and empirical work in positive psychology inspired by peace psychology. Such work would do well to transcend positive psychology's current bias toward individualism and nationalism and to conceptualize well-being and resilience at the level of the "global community." This extended "positive peace psychology" perspective would have important implications for our understanding of how to overcome oppression and work toward global peace. PMID:24128320

  16. Concepts for AutomatedPrecise Low Earth Orbiter Navigation With the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used for satellite positioning and navigation and for numerous geolocation activities. Real-time, onboard positioning accuracies for low Earth orbiters (LEOs) currently vary from 50 to 100 m for stand-alone conventional GPS tracking to somewhat better than 10 m with sophisticated onboard data filtering. Wide-area differential techniques, such as those supported by the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) under development by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, offer real-time, kinematic positioning accuracies ranging from a few meters to better than a meter over well-defined local regions. This article describes a concept for extending the wide-area differential GPS techniques to achieve global, real-time positioning of LEOs at submeter accuracies. GPS design and operation policy issues that currently limit real-time, onboard precision positioning are discussed. The article then examines a number of proposed system design enhancements under consideration by the U.S. Department of Defense for the next-generation GPS, termed GPS III. These potential enhancements, if implemented, would enable global real-time, stand-alone position accuracies of a few decimeters for kinematic users and better than 10 cm for LEOs. Such capabilities could dramatically impact NASA missions by greatly lowering ground operations costs, as well as navigation and orbit determination costs in general.

  17. The Global Positioning System and Education in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikle, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Students should have an understanding of basic Global Positioning System (GPS) principles as well as an awareness of how the technology will impact society in the future. Provides a brief overview of the evolution, principles, and applications of GPS together with suggested activities. (Contains 25 references.) (Author/WRM)

  18. Global positioning system for general aviation: Joint FAA-NASA Seminar. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Programs to examine and develop means to utilize the global positioning system (GPS) for civil aviation functions are described. User requirements in this regard are discussed, the development of technologies in the areas of antennas, receivers, and signal processors for the GPS are examined, and modifications to the GPS to fit operational and design criteria are evaluated.

  19. Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Local versus Global Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Maybery, Murray T.; Bayliss, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Crespi and Badcock (2008) proposed that autism and psychosis represent two extremes on a cognitive spectrum with normality at its center. Their specific claim that autistic and positive schizophrenia traits contrastingly affect preference for local versus global processing was investigated by examining Embedded Figures Test performance in two…

  20. Miltipath measurements for land mobile satellite service using global positioning system signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed multipath system for the land mobile satellite radio channel using the Global Positioning System (GPS) is presented. The measurement technique and equipment used to make multipath measurements on communications links are briefly described. The system configuration and performance specifications of the proposed measurement system are discussed.

  1. Using the Global Positioning System for Earth Orbiter and Deep Space Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) can play a major role in supporting orbit and trajectory determination for spacecraft in a wide range of applications, including low-Earth, high-Earth, and even deep space (interplanetary) tracking. This paper summarizes recent results demonstrating these unique and far-ranging applications of GPS.

  2. Marine benefits from NASA's global differential system: sub-meter positioning, anywhere, anytime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Precise real-time, onboard knowledge of a platform s state (position and velocity) is a critical compponent in many marine applications. This article describes a recent technology development that provides a breakthrough in this capability for platforms carrying a dual-frequency GPS receiver - seamless global coverage and roughly an order of magnitude improvement in accuracy compared to state-of-the-art.

  3. AUTOMATED GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM CHARTING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ATTRIBUTES: A LIMNOLOGIC CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient, automated system for the collection of spatially variant environmental data has been designed and tested in a limnologic setting. he technique links differentially corrected global positions system data directly with that of a digital environmental sensor using a sy...

  4. Portable device to assess dynamic accuracy of global positioning systems (GPS) receivers used in agricultural aircraft

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device was designed to test the dynamic accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used in aerial vehicles. The system works by directing a sun-reflected light beam from the ground to the aircraft using mirrors. A photodetector is placed pointing downward from the aircraft and circuitry...

  5. Effects of non-differential exposure misclassification on false conclusions in hypothesis-generating studies.

    PubMed

    Burstyn, Igor; Yang, Yunwen; Schnatter, A Robert

    2014-01-01

    Despite the theoretical success of obviating the need for hypothesis-generating studies, they live on in epidemiological practice. Cole asserted that "… there is boundless number of hypotheses that could be generated, nearly all of them wrong" and urged us to focus on evaluating "credibility of hypothesis". Adopting a Bayesian approach, we put this elegant logic into quantitative terms at the study planning stage for studies where the prior belief in the null hypothesis is high (i.e., "hypothesis-generating" studies). We consider not only type I and II errors (as is customary) but also the probabilities of false positive and negative results, taking into account typical imperfections in the data. We concentrate on a common source of imperfection in the data: non-differential misclassification of binary exposure classifier. In context of an unmatched case-control study, we demonstrate-both theoretically and via simulations-that although non-differential exposure misclassification is expected to attenuate real effect estimates, leading to the loss of ability to detect true effects, there is also a concurrent increase in false positives. Unfortunately, most investigators interpret their findings from such work as being biased towards the null rather than considering that they are no less likely to be false signals. The likelihood of false positives dwarfed the false negative rate under a wide range of studied settings. We suggest that instead of investing energy into understanding credibility of dubious hypotheses, applied disciplines such as epidemiology, should instead focus attention on understanding consequences of pursuing specific hypotheses, while accounting for the probability that the observed "statistically significant" association may be qualitatively spurious. PMID:25337942

  6. Observations of geographically correlated orbit errors for TOPEX/Poseidon using the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, E. J.; Haines, B. J.; Mccoll, K. C.; Nerem, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared Global Positioning System (GPS)-based dynamic and reduced-dynamic TOPEX/Poseidon orbits over three 10-day repeat cycles of the ground-track. The results suggest that the prelaunch joint gravity model (JGM-1) introduces geographically correlated errors (GCEs) which have a strong meridional dependence. The global distribution and magnitude of these GCEs are consistent with a prelaunch covariance analysis, with estimated and predicted global rms error statistics of 2.3 and 2.4 cm rms, respectively. Repeating the analysis with the post-launch joint gravity model (JGM-2) suggests that a portion of the meridional dependence observed in JGM-1 still remains, with global rms error of 1.2 cm.

  7. Position estimation and local mapping using omnidirectional images and global appearance descriptors.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Yerai; Payá, Luis; Ballesta, Mónica; Reinoso, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    This work presents some methods to create local maps and to estimate the position of a mobile robot, using the global appearance of omnidirectional images. We use a robot that carries an omnidirectional vision system on it. Every omnidirectional image acquired by the robot is described only with one global appearance descriptor, based on the Radon transform. In the work presented in this paper, two different possibilities have been considered. In the first one, we assume the existence of a map previously built composed of omnidirectional images that have been captured from previously-known positions. The purpose in this case consists of estimating the nearest position of the map to the current position of the robot, making use of the visual information acquired by the robot from its current (unknown) position. In the second one, we assume that we have a model of the environment composed of omnidirectional images, but with no information about the location of where the images were acquired. The purpose in this case consists of building a local map and estimating the position of the robot within this map. Both methods are tested with different databases (including virtual and real images) taking into consideration the changes of the position of different objects in the environment, different lighting conditions and occlusions. The results show the effectiveness and the robustness of both methods. PMID:26501289

  8. Position Estimation and Local Mapping Using Omnidirectional Images and Global Appearance Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer, Yerai; Payá, Luis; Ballesta, Mónica; Reinoso, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    This work presents some methods to create local maps and to estimate the position of a mobile robot, using the global appearance of omnidirectional images. We use a robot that carries an omnidirectional vision system on it. Every omnidirectional image acquired by the robot is described only with one global appearance descriptor, based on the Radon transform. In the work presented in this paper, two different possibilities have been considered. In the first one, we assume the existence of a map previously built composed of omnidirectional images that have been captured from previously-known positions. The purpose in this case consists of estimating the nearest position of the map to the current position of the robot, making use of the visual information acquired by the robot from its current (unknown) position. In the second one, we assume that we have a model of the environment composed of omnidirectional images, but with no information about the location of where the images were acquired. The purpose in this case consists of building a local map and estimating the position of the robot within this map. Both methods are tested with different databases (including virtual and real images) taking into consideration the changes of the position of different objects in the environment, different lighting conditions and occlusions. The results show the effectiveness and the robustness of both methods. PMID:26501289

  9. Study on global control network precision positioning method in visual shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chang-yu; Zhu, Ji-gui

    2013-08-01

    Large-size visual shape measurement based on ICP (iterative closest point) mosaicing algorithm generally has a larger cumulative error; however, this problem can be well solved by precision positioning global control network. Therefore, this method is widely used in large-size visual shape measurement. Since the positioning accuracy of the global control network is the key influencing factor of the final measurement accuracy, the method of precision positioning global control network is researched, which is dependent on the principle of portable close-range photogrammetry. The precision positioning theory and mathematical model of global control network are investigated in this paper. Bundle adjustment optimization algorithm is the core of this measurement system, the solution method of this algorithm is introduced in detail, which can improve the model solution accuracy. As is known, the initial value of the algorithm has a direct influence on the convergence of the result, so obtaining the initial value is a key part of the measurement system, including control points matching technology, stations orientation technology and the technology of obtaining the initial value of the three-dimensional coordinates of global control points. New technological breakthroughs were made based on the existing researches to get a more precious and stable initial value. Firstly, a nonlinear adjustment model based control points matching method is proposed, which significantly improves the correct matching rate when the control points distribute intensively. Secondly, a new station orientation method without using an external orientation device is studied, which greatly improves the shooting freedom and expands the range of the spatial distribution of the measurement stations. Finally, a camera calibration method independent with the imaging model is explored, which converts image coordinate information into image angle information. Thus, the initial value calculation accuracy of

  10. Measuring precise sea level from a buoy using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocken, Christian; Kelecy, Thomas M.; Born, George H.; Young, Larry E.; Purcell, George H., Jr.; Wolf, Susan Kornreich

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) for accurate sea surface positioning was examined. An experiment was conducted on the Scripps pier at La Jolla, California from December 13-15, 1989. A GPS-equipped buoy was deployed about 100 m off the pier. Two fixed reference GPS receivers, located on the pier and about 80 km away on Monument Peak, were used to estimate the relative position of the floater. Kinematic GPS processing software, developed at the National Geodetic Survey, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's GPS Infrared Processing System software were used to determine the floater position relative to land-fixing receivers. Calculations were made of sea level and ocean wave spectra from GPS measurements. It is found that the GPS sea level for the short 100 m baseline agrees with the PPT sea level at the 1 cm level and has an rms variation of 5 mm over a period of 4 hours.

  11. A Short Tutorial on Inertial Navigation System and Global Positioning System Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalling, Kyle M.; Eure, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe a simple method of integrating Inertial Navigation System (INS) information with Global Positioning System (GPS) information for an improved estimate of vehicle attitude and position. A simple two dimensional (2D) case is considered. The attitude estimates are derived from sensor data and used in the estimation of vehicle position and velocity through dead reckoning within the INS. The INS estimates are updated with GPS estimates using a Kalman filter. This tutorial is intended for the novice user with a focus on bringing the reader from raw sensor measurements to an integrated position and attitude estimate. An application is given using a remotely controlled ground vehicle operating in assumed 2D environment. The theory is developed first followed by an illustrative example.

  12. Physical Demands of Top-Class Soccer Friendly Matches in Relation to a Playing Position Using Global Positioning System Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mallo, Javier; Mena, Esteban; Nevado, Fabio; Paredes, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the physical demands imposed on professional soccer players during 11-a-side friendly matches in relation to their playing position, using global positioning system (GPS) technology. One hundred and eleven match performances of a Spanish “La Liga” team during the 2010–11 and 2011–12 pre-seasons were selected for analysis. The activities of the players were monitored using GPS technology with a sampling frequency of 1 Hz. Total distance covered, distance in different speed categories, accelerations, and heart rate responses were analyzed in relation to five different playing positions: central defenders (n=23), full-backs (n=20), central midfielders (n=22), wide midfielders (n=26), and forwards (n=20). Distance covered during a match averaged 10.8 km, with wide and central midfielders covering the greatest total distance. Specifically, wide midfielders covered the greatest distances by very high-intensity running (>19.8 km·h-1) and central midfielders by jogging and running (7.2–19.7 km·h-1). On the other hand, central defenders covered the least total distance and at high intensity, although carried out more (p<0.05–0.01) accelerations than forwards, wide midfielders, and fullbacks. The work rate profile of the players obtained with the GPS was very similar to that obtained with semi-automatic image technologies. However, when comparing results from this study with data available in the literature, important differences were detected in the amount of distance covered by sprinting, which suggests that caution should be taken when comparing data obtained with the GPS with other motion analysis systems, especially regarding high-intensity activities. PMID:26557202

  13. Physical Demands of Top-Class Soccer Friendly Matches in Relation to a Playing Position Using Global Positioning System Technology.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Javier; Mena, Esteban; Nevado, Fabio; Paredes, Víctor

    2015-09-29

    The aim of this study was to examine the physical demands imposed on professional soccer players during 11-a-side friendly matches in relation to their playing position, using global positioning system (GPS) technology. One hundred and eleven match performances of a Spanish "La Liga" team during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 pre-seasons were selected for analysis. The activities of the players were monitored using GPS technology with a sampling frequency of 1 Hz. Total distance covered, distance in different speed categories, accelerations, and heart rate responses were analyzed in relation to five different playing positions: central defenders (n=23), full-backs (n=20), central midfielders (n=22), wide midfielders (n=26), and forwards (n=20). Distance covered during a match averaged 10.8 km, with wide and central midfielders covering the greatest total distance. Specifically, wide midfielders covered the greatest distances by very high-intensity running (>19.8 km·h-1) and central midfielders by jogging and running (7.2-19.7 km·h-1). On the other hand, central defenders covered the least total distance and at high intensity, although carried out more (p<0.05-0.01) accelerations than forwards, wide midfielders, and fullbacks. The work rate profile of the players obtained with the GPS was very similar to that obtained with semi-automatic image technologies. However, when comparing results from this study with data available in the literature, important differences were detected in the amount of distance covered by sprinting, which suggests that caution should be taken when comparing data obtained with the GPS with other motion analysis systems, especially regarding high-intensity activities. PMID:26557202

  14. An introduction to the global positioning system and some geological applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.

    1991-01-01

    The fundamental principles of the global positioning system (GPS) are reviewed, with consideration given to geological and geophysical applications and related accuracy requirements. Recent improvements are emphasized which relate to areas such as equipment cost, limitations in the GPS satellite constellation, data analysis, uncertainties in satellite orbits and propagation delays, and problems in resolving carrier phase cycle ambiguities. Earthquake processes and near-fault crustal deformation monitoring have been facilitated by advances in GPS data acquisition and analysis. Horizontal positioning capability has been improved by new satellite constellation, better models, and global tracking networks. New classes of tectonic problems may now be studied through GPS, such as kinematic descriptions of crustal deformation and the measurement of relative plate motion at convergent boundaries. Continued improvements in the GPS are foreseen.

  15. Determination of vertical deflections using the global positioning system and geodetic leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, T.; Carlson, A.E. Jr.; Evans, A.G.

    1989-07-01

    The capabilities of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for accurately determining geodetic quantities are well established. Nevertheless, no comparison between deflections of the vertical as determined through GPS with leveling and values conventionally computer by astrogeodetic methods has yet been published. This investigation demonstrates that the accurate deflections of the vertical components ({eta}, {xi}) can be obtained independently of classical astronomic observations by combining geodetic leveling with satellite GOS positioning. The approach uses a radial configuration of baselines to determine the best (in a least square sense) values of ({eta}, {xi}) at the central station.

  16. Orbiter global positioning system design and Ku-band problems investigation, exhibit B, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chie, C. M.; Braun, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    The LinCom effort in supporting the JSC study of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) on the space shuttle and in Ku-band problem investigation is documented. LinCom was tasked to evaluate system implementation, performance, and integration aspects of the shuttle GPS and to provide independent technical assessment of reports submitted to JSC regarding integration studies, system studies and navigation analyses.

  17. NAVSTAR global positioning system applicability to the National Oceanic Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matchett, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the potential for applying NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) user equipment to the spacecraft of the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS). Two widely different navigation goals for NOSS spacecraft are examined: one being moderate accuracy, real-time navigation utilizing the simplest of GPS receivers, and the other being precision vertical displacement measurement over limited arcs utilizing specialized GPS equipment, possibly with ground data processing.

  18. Evolution of the Global Aurora During Positive IMP Bz and Varying IMP By Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Sharber, J. R.; Heelis. R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Carven, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The DE 1 imaging instrumentation provides a full view of the entire auroral oval every 12 min for several hours during each orbit. We examined five examples of global evolution of the aurora that occurred during the northern hemisphere winter of 1981-1982 when the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field was positive and the y component was changing sign. Evolution of an expanded auroral emission region into a theta aurora appears to require a change in the sign of By during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Theta aurora are formed both from expanded duskside emission regions (By changes from positive to negative) and dawnside emission regions (By changes from negative to positive), however the dawnside-originating and duskside-originating evolutions are not mirror images. The persistence of a theta aurora after its formation suggests that there may be no clear relationship between the theta aurora pattern and the instantaneous configuration of the IMF.

  19. Quantification of Competitive Game Demands of NCAA Division I College Football Players Using Global Positioning Systems.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Aaron D; Coad, Sam C; Goulet, Grant C; McLellan, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the competitive physiological movement demands of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college football players using portable global positioning system (GPS) technology during games and to examine positional groups within offensive and defensive teams, to determine if a player's physiological requirements during games are influenced by playing position. Thirty-three NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision football players were monitored using GPS receivers with integrated accelerometers (GPSports) during 12 regular season games throughout the 2014 season. Individual data sets (n = 295) from players were divided into offensive and defensive teams and subsequent position groups. Movement profile characteristics, including total, low-intensity, moderate-intensity, high-intensity, and sprint running distances (m), sprint counts, and acceleration and deceleration efforts, were assessed during games. A one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni statistical analysis were used to determine differences in movement profiles between each position group within offensive and defensive teams. For both offensive and defensive teams, significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences exist between positional groups for game physical performance requirements. The results of the present study identified that wide receivers and defensive backs completed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater total distance, high-intensity running, sprint distance, and high-intensity acceleration and deceleration efforts than their respective offensive and defensive positional groups. Data from the present study provide novel quantification of position-specific physical demands of college football games and support the use of position-specific training in the preparation of NCAA Division I college football players for competition. PMID:26382134

  20. Evaluating the Effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Clock Error via GPS Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh; Shafii, Shalini; Amin, Zainal Fitry M.; Jusoh, Asmariah; Zainun Ali, Siti

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock error using GPS simulation. Two conditions of tests are used; Case 1: All the GPS satellites have clock errors within the normal range of 0 to 7 ns, corresponding to pseudorange error range of 0 to 2.1 m; Case 2: One GPS satellite suffers from critical failure, resulting in clock error in the pseudorange of up to 1 km. It is found that increase of GPS satellite clock error causes increase of average positional error due to increase of pseudorange error in the GPS satellite signals, which results in increasing error in the coordinates computed by the GPS receiver. Varying average positional error patterns are observed for the each of the readings. This is due to the GPS satellite constellation being dynamic, causing varying GPS satellite geometry over location and time, resulting in GPS accuracy being location / time dependent. For Case 1, in general, the highest average positional error values are observed for readings with the highest PDOP values, while the lowest average positional error values are observed for readings with the lowest PDOP values. For Case 2, no correlation is observed between the average positional error values and PDOP, indicating that the error generated is random.

  1. Observing Tropospheric Water Vapor by Radio Occultation using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Hajj, G. A.; Hardy, K. R.; Romans, L. J.; Schofield, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Given the importance of water vapor to weather, climate and hydrology, global humidity observations from satellites are critical. At low latitudes, radio occultation observations of Earth's atmosphere using the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites allow water vapor profiles to be retrieved with accuracies of 10 to 20% below 6 to 7 km altitude and approx. 5% or better within the boundary layer. GPS observations provide a unique combination of accuracy, vertical resolution (less than or equal to 1 km) and insensitivity to cloud and aerosol particles that is well suited to observations of the lower troposphere. These characteristics combined with the inherent stability of radio occultation observations make it an excellent candidate for the measurement of long term trends.

  2. Global attractivity of positive periodic solution to periodic Lotka-Volterra competition systems with pure delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianhua; Cao, Daomin; Zou, Xingfu

    We consider a periodic Lotka-Volterra competition system without instantaneous negative feedbacks (i.e., pure-delay systems) x(t)=x(t)[r(t)-∑j=1na(t)x(t-τ(t))], i=1,2,…,n. We establish some 3/2-type criteria for global attractivity of a positive periodic solution of the system, which generalize the well-known Wright's 3/2 criteria for the autonomous delay logistic equation, and thereby, address the open problem proposed by both Kuang [Y. Kuang, Global stability in delayed nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra type systems without saturated equilibria, Differential Integral Equations 9 (1996) 557-567] and Teng [Z. Teng, Nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra systems with delays, J. Differential Equations 179 (2002) 538-561].

  3. A demonstration of centimeter-level monitoring of polar motion with the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, U. J.; Freedman, A. P.; Blewitt, G.

    1992-01-01

    Daily estimates of the Earth's pole position were obtained with the Global Positioning System (GPS) by using measurements obtained during the GPS IERS (International Earth Rotation Service) and Geodynamics (GIG'91) experiment from 22 Jan. to 13 Feb. 1991. Data from a globally distributed network consisting of 21 Rogue GPS receivers were chosen for the analysis. A comparison of the GPS polar motion series with nine 24-hour very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) estimates yielded agreement in the day-to-day pole position of about 1.5 cm for both X and Y polar motion. A similar comparison of GPS and satellite laser ranging (SLR) data showed agreement to about 1.0 cm. These preliminary results indicate that polar motion can be determined by GPS independent of, and at a level comparable to, that which is obtained from either VLBI or SLR. Furthermore, GPS can provide these data with a daily frequency that neither alternative technique can readily achieve. Thus, GPS promises to be a powerful tool for determining high-frequency platform parameter variation, essential for the ultraprecise spacecraft-tracking requirements of the coming years.

  4. Geometrically constrained kinematic global navigation satellite systems positioning: Implementation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Jamal; Mohammadloo, Tannaz H.; Amiri-Simkooei, Ali Reza

    2015-09-01

    GNSS kinematic techniques are capable of providing precise coordinates in extremely short observation time-span. These methods usually determine the coordinates of an unknown station with respect to a reference one. To enhance the precision, accuracy, reliability and integrity of the estimated unknown parameters, GNSS kinematic equations are to be augmented by possible constraints. Such constraints could be derived from the geometric relation of the receiver positions in motion. This contribution presents the formulation of the constrained kinematic global navigation satellite systems positioning. Constraints effectively restrict the definition domain of the unknown parameters from the three-dimensional space to a subspace defined by the equation of motion. To test the concept of the constrained kinematic positioning method, the equation of a circle is employed as a constraint. A device capable of moving on a circle was made and the observations from 11 positions on the circle were analyzed. Relative positioning was conducted by considering the center of the circle as the reference station. The equation of the receiver's motion was rewritten in the ECEF coordinates system. A special attention is drawn onto how a constraint is applied to kinematic positioning. Implementing the constraint in the positioning process provides much more precise results compared to the unconstrained case. This has been verified based on the results obtained from the covariance matrix of the estimated parameters and the empirical results using kinematic positioning samples as well. The theoretical standard deviations of the horizontal components are reduced by a factor ranging from 1.24 to 2.64. The improvement on the empirical standard deviation of the horizontal components ranges from 1.08 to 2.2.

  5. Use of the global positioning system in the field recovery of scattered human remains.

    PubMed

    Listi, Ginesse A; Manhein, Mary H; Leitner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the Global Positioning System (GPS) as a tool for field mapping of scattered human remains or other materials in forensic investigations. Two aspects of the GPS are considered: (1) the level of accuracy that can be obtained using a mid-priced GPS unit, and (2) the effectiveness of using the GPS to map scattered materials. The positional accuracy of the GPS receiver was tested using a National Geodetic Survey (NGS) point located in Baton Rouge, LA. The utility of the GPS for mapping was investigated by setting up a mock field recovery and mapping the remains using both the GPS and traditional archeological methods. The results indicate that the positional error for a single location using GPS was less than one-half meter. However, when multiple positions were considered, the data produced on different days were not consistent. Further, the GPS receiver used in this study could not distinguish items in close association. Factors such as tree cover density, the proximity of the materials to structures or trees, and satellite positioning contributed to the erratic data. These results indicate that traditional techniques and photographs are still indispensable for mapping scattered remains or artifacts. PMID:17209903

  6. Measuring precise sea level from a buoy using the global positioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rocken, C.; Kelecy, T.M.; Born, G.H. ); Young, L.E.; Purcell, G.H. Jr.; Wolf, S.K. )

    1990-11-01

    High-accuracy sea surface positioning is required for sea floor geodesy, satellite altimeter verification, and the study of sea level. An experiment to study the feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) for accurate sea surface positioning was conducted. A GPS-equipped buoy (floater) was deployed off the Scripps pier at La Jolla, California during December 13-15, 1989. Two reference GPS receivers were placed on land, one within {approximately}100 m of the floater, and the other about 80 km inland at the laser ranging site on Monument Peak. The position of the floater was determined relative to the land-fixed receivers using: (a) kinematic GPS processing software developed at the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), and (b) the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's GIPSY (GPS Inferred Positioning SYstem) software. Sea level and ocean wave spectra were calculated from GPPS measurements. These results were compared to measurements made with a NOAA tide gauge and a Paros{trademark} pressure transducer (PPT). GPS sea level for the short 100-m baseline agrees with the PPT sea level at the 1-cm level and has an rms variation of 5 mm over a period of 4 hours. Agreement between results with the two independent GPS analyses is on the order of a few millimeters. Processing of the longer Monument Peak - floater baseline is in progress and will require orbit adjustments and tropospheric modeling to obtain results comparable to the short baseline.

  7. A study of autonomous satellite navigation methods using the global positioning satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    Special orbit determination algorithms were developed to accommodate the size and speed limitations of on-board computer systems of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System. The algorithms use square root sequential filtering methods. A new method for the time update of the square root covariance matrix was also developed. In addition, the time update method was compared with another square root convariance propagation method to determine relative performance characteristics. Comparisions were based on the results of computer simulations of the LANDSAT-D satellite processing pseudo range and pseudo range-rate measurements from the phase one GPS. A summary of the comparison results is presented.

  8. Tracking of white-tailed deer migration by Global Positioning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.; Frame, P.F.

    2004-01-01

    Based on global positioning system (GPS) radiocollars in northeastern Minnesota, deer migrated 23-45 km in spring during 31-356 h, deviating a maximum 1.6-4.0 km perpendicular from a straight line of travel between their seasonal ranges. They migrated a minimum of 2.1-18.6 km/day over 11-56 h during 2-14 periods of travel. Minimum travel during 1-h intervals averaged 1.5 km/h. Deer paused 1-12 times, averaging 24 h/pause. Deer migrated similar distances in autumn with comparable rates and patterns of travel.

  9. Problems with studying wolf predation on small prey in summer via global positioning system collars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palacios, Vicente; Mech, L. David

    2010-01-01

    We attempted to study predation on various-sized prey by a male and female wolf (Canis lupus) with global positioning system (GPS) collars programmed to acquire locations every 10 min in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota. During May to August 2007, we investigated 147 clusters of locations (31% of the total) and found evidence of predation on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn and yearling, a beaver (Castor canadensis), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), and fisher (Martes pennanti) and scavenging on a road-killed deer and other carrion. However, we missed finding many prey items and discuss the problems associated with trying to conduct such a study.

  10. Global Positioning System Time Transfer Receiver (GPS/TTR) prototype design and initial test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, J.; Frank, A.; Falvey, S.; Lister, M.; Buisson, J.; Wardrip, C.; Warren, H.

    1982-01-01

    Time transfer equipment and techniques used with the Navigation Technology Satellites were modified and extended for use with the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. A prototype receiver was built and field tested. The receiver uses the GPS L1 link at 1575 MHz with C/A code only to resolve a measured range to the satellite. A theoretical range is computed from the satellite ephemeris transmitted in the data message and the user's coordinates. Results of user offset from GPS time are obtained by differencing the measured and theoretical ranges and applying calibration corrections. Results of the first field test evaluation of the receiver are presented.

  11. Autonomous satellite orbit determination during the development phases of the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    An onboard navigation system was developed to aid the design and evaluation of algorithms used in autonomous satellite navigation with Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The performance of the algorithms designed for a GPS Receiver/Processor Assembly (R/PA) intended for LANDSAT-D was investigated during the development phases of the GPS (four to six satellites in the constellation). This evaluation emphasized the effects on the orbit determination accuracy of the expected user clock errors, GPS satellite visibility, force model approximations, and state and covariance propagation approximations. Results are presented giving the sensitivity of orbit determination accuracy to these constraints.

  12. A New Centimeter-Level Real-Time Global Navigation and Positioning Capability with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz

    2001-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed a new, precise, global, GPS-based capability for real-time terrestrial and space platform navigation. It has been demonstrated on Earth's surface and is 10 times more accurate than other real-time GPS-based systems. The new system poses certain advantages for Earth science remote sensing, including: the onboard generation of science data products in real-time, sensor control and reduction of data transmission bandwidth, improved environmental forecasting, autonomous and intelligent platform control, operations cost savings, and technology transfer and commercial partnership opportunities. The system's measurement capabilities and applications, demonstrated orbit accuracies, and precision LEO and spacecraft positioning and timing are highlighted.

  13. A Self-Tuning Kalman Filter for Autonomous Navigation Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Son H.

    1999-01-01

    Most navigation systems currently operated by NASA are ground-based, and require extensive support to produce accurate results. Recently developed systems that use Kalman filter and GPS (Global Positioning Systems) data for orbit determination greatly reduce dependency on ground support, and have potential to provide significant economies for NASA spacecraft navigation. These systems, however, still rely on manual tuning from analysts. A sophisticated neuro-fuzzy component fully integrated with the flight navigation system can perform the self-tuning capability for the Kalman filter and help the navigation system recover from estimation errors in real time.

  14. Precise determination of earth's center of mass using measurements from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Lichten, Stephen M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.; Malla, Rajendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) data from a worldwide geodetic experiment were collected during a 3-week period early in 1991. Geocentric station coordinates were estimated using the GPS data, thus defining a dynamically determined reference frame origin which should coincide with the earth center of mass, or geocenter. The 3-week GPS average geocenter estimates agree to 7-13 cm with geocenter estimates determined from satellite laser ranging, a well-established technique. The RMS of daily GPS geocenter estimates were 4 cm for x and y, and 30 cm for z.

  15. A new model for yaw attitude of Global Positioning System satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.

    1995-01-01

    Proper modeling of the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite yaw attitude is important in high-precision applications. A new model for the GPS satellite yaw attitude is introduced that constitutes a significant improvement over the previously available model in terms of efficiency, flexibility, and portability. The model is described in detail, and implementation issues, including the proper estimation strategy, are addressed. The performance of the new model is analyzed, and an error budget is presented. This is the first self-contained description of the GPS yaw attitude model.

  16. Improved treatment of global positioning system force parameters in precise orbit determination applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Y.; Lichten, S. M.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Heflin, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected from a worldwide 1992 experiment were processed at JPL to determine precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A filtering technique was tested to improve modeling of solar-radiation pressure force parameters for GPS satellites. The new approach improves orbit quality for eclipsing satellites by a factor of two, with typical results in the 25- to 50-cm range. The resultant GPS-based estimates for geocentric coordinates of the tracking sites, which include the three DSN sites, are accurate to 2 to 8 cm, roughly equivalent to 3 to 10 nrad of angular measure.

  17. Vector Observation-Aided/Attitude-Rate Estimation Using Global Positioning System Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oshman, Yaakov; Markley, F. Landis

    1997-01-01

    A sequential filtering algorithm is presented for attitude and attitude-rate estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) differential carrier phase measurements. A third-order, minimal-parameter method for solving the attitude matrix kinematic equation is used to parameterize the filter's state, which renders the resulting estimator computationally efficient. Borrowing from tracking theory concepts, the angular acceleration is modeled as an exponentially autocorrelated stochastic process, thus avoiding the use of the uncertain spacecraft dynamic model. The new formulation facilitates the use of aiding vector observations in a unified filtering algorithm, which can enhance the method's robustness and accuracy. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  18. A Novel Method for Optimum Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiancai; Xue, Guixiang; Kang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method for selecting a navigation satellite subset for a global positioning system (GPS) based on a genetic algorithm is presented. This approach is based on minimizing the factors in the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) with an elite conservation strategy, adaptive selection, adaptive mutation, and a hybrid genetic algorithm that can select a subset of the satellites represented by specific numbers in the interval (4 ∼ n) while maintaining position accuracy. A comprehensive simulation demonstrates that the MGA-based satellite selection method effectively selects the correct number of optimal satellite subsets using receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) or fault detection and exclusion (FDE). This method is more adaptable and flexible for GPS receivers, particularly for those used in handset equipment and mobile phones. PMID:26943638

  19. Landsat-4 on-board ephemeris determination utilizing the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korenstein, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a worldwide system of navigation data satellites currently being deployed by the United States for land, sea, air and space-borne users. Currently several development satellites have been launched for system evaluation. Eventually the system will include 18 operational satellites. The GPS system utilizes precision clocks to allow users to measure the one-way propagation delay of navigational signals from the satellites, so that users can infer their position by decoding the navigation signal and observing the delay from several satellites. Landsat-4 is the first spacecraft to carry a GPS navigation system into orbit. This paper describes the Landsat-4 GPS experiment, Landsat-4 requirements for ephemeris data and the in-flight performance of the system.

  20. Autonomous Navigation of the SSTI/Lewis Spacecraft Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R. C.; Long, A. C.; Lee, T.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) is pursuing the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) technology to improve the accuracy and economy of spacecraft navigation. High-accuracy autonomous navigation algorithms are being flight qualified in conjunction with GSFC's GPS Attitude Determination Flyer (GADFLY) experiment on the Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) Lewis spacecraft, which is scheduled for launch in 1997. Preflight performance assessments indicate that these algorithms can provide a real-time total position accuracy of better than 10 meters (1 sigma) and velocity accuracy of better than 0.01 meter per second (1 sigma), with selective availability at typical levels. This accuracy is projected to improve to the 2-meter level if corrections to be provided by the GPS Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) are included.

  1. A Novel Method for Optimum Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiancai; Xue, Guixiang; Kang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method for selecting a navigation satellite subset for a global positioning system (GPS) based on a genetic algorithm is presented. This approach is based on minimizing the factors in the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) with an elite conservation strategy, adaptive selection, adaptive mutation, and a hybrid genetic algorithm that can select a subset of the satellites represented by specific numbers in the interval (4 ∼ n) while maintaining position accuracy. A comprehensive simulation demonstrates that the MGA-based satellite selection method effectively selects the correct number of optimal satellite subsets using receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) or fault detection and exclusion (FDE). This method is more adaptable and flexible for GPS receivers, particularly for those used in handset equipment and mobile phones. PMID:26943638

  2. Global Application of TaiWan Ionospheric Model to Single-Frequency GPS Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalalad, E.; Tsai, L. C.; Wu, J.

    2012-04-01

    Ionospheric delay is one the major sources of error in GPS positioning and navigation. This error in both pseudorange and phase ranges vary depending on the location of observation, local time, season, solar cycle and geomagnetic activity. For single-frequency receivers, this delay is usually removed using ionospheric models. Two of them are the Klobuchar, or broadcast, model and the global ionosphere map (GIM) provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS). In this paper, a three dimensional ionospheric electron (ne) density model derived from FormoSat3/COSMIC GPS Radio Occultation measurements, called the TaiWan Ionosphere Model, is used. It was used to calculate the slant total electron content (STEC) between receiver and GPS satellites to correct the pseudorange single-frequency observations. The corrected pseudorange for every epoch was used to determine a more accurate position of the receiver. Observations were made in July 2, 2011(Kp index = 0-2) in five randomly selected sites across the globe, four of which are IGS stations (station ID: cnmr, coso, irkj and morp) while the other is a low-cost single-frequency receiver located in Chungli City, Taiwan (ID: isls). It was illustrated that TEC maps generated using TWIM exhibited a detailed structure of the ionosphere, whereas Klobuchar and GIM only provided the basic diurnal and geographic features of the ionosphere. Also, it was shown that for single-frequency static point positioning TWIM provides more accurate and more precise positioning than the Klobuchar and GIM models for all stations. The average %error of the corrections made by Klobuchar, GIM and TWIM in DRMS are 3.88%, 0.78% and 17.45%, respectively. While the average %error in VRMS for Klobuchar, GIM and TWIM are 53.55%, 62.09%, 66.02%, respectively. This shows the capability of TWIM to provide a good global 3-dimensional ionospheric model.

  3. The positive Indian Ocean Dipole-like response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yiyong; Lu, Jian; Liu, Fukai; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-04-01

    Climate models project a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD)-like SST response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming. By employing the Community Earth System Model and applying an overriding technique to its ocean component (version 2 of the Parallel Ocean Program), this study investigates the similarities and differences of the formation mechanisms for the changes in the tropical Indian Ocean during the pIOD versus global warming. Results show that their formation processes and related seasonality are quite similar; in particular, wind-thermocline-SST feedback is the leading mechanism in producing the anomalous cooling over the eastern tropics in both cases. Some differences are also found, including the fact that the cooling effect of the vertical advection over the eastern tropical Indian Ocean is dominated by the anomalous vertical velocity during the pIOD but by the anomalous upper-ocean stratification under global warming. These findings are further examined through an analysis of the mixed layer heat budget.

  4. Office of Space Flight standard spaceborne Global Positioning System user equipment project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Penny E.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides users autonomous, real-time navigation capability. A vehicle equipped with GPS user equipment can receive and process signals transmitted by a constellation of GPS satellites and derive from the resulting measurements the vehicle's position and velocity. Specified accuracies range from 16 to 76 meters and 0.1 to 1.0 meters/second for position and velocity, respectively. In a rendezvous and docking scenario, the use of a technique called relative GPS can provide range and range rate accuracies on the order of 1 meter and 0.01 meters/second, respectively. Relative GPS requires both vehicles to be equipped with GPS user equipment and a data communication link for transmission of GPS data and GPS satellite selection coordination information. Through coordinated satellite selection, GPS measurement errors common to both users are cancelled and improved relative position and velocity accuracies are achieved. The background, the design approach, the expected performance and capabilities, the development plan, and the project status are described. In addition, a description of relative GPS, the possible GPS hardware and software configurations, and its application to automated rendezvous and capture are presented.

  5. Detecting Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae (L.) Nevski) Using High Frequency, Sequential, Globally Positioned Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndzeidze, Stephen Koghan

    Invasive plant species are expanding and transforming vegetative communities across Oregon and throughout the United States. Over the past three decades remote sensing, geographic information system (GIS), and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies have been integrated to detect and map the distribution of noxious rangeland plants. This study developed low-cost protocols to detect and map Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae (L.) Nevski) weed infestations using GPS loggers to track aircraft/camera position, altitude, and bearing, as well as Aerial Image Positioning Tool software to geographically rectify and project each aerial image. We then mapped the extent of medusahead in target areas and evaluated patterns of infestation. Flying in a single engine fixed-wing aircraft, images were collected every five seconds, with a total of 10,362 images obtained. All of the aerial images were processed and, on average, 23.9 % of the area was classified as medusahead infested, with 76.1 % without infestation. Each image covered 215 ha (531 acres), with 60% overlap, at a cost of $ 0.54/km2. Our study also employed mobile mapping technology to map medusahead on the ground by digitizing infestations using a laptop computer equipped with a GPS antenna and GIS software. Mobile mapping was also done from aircraft, but yielded coarser infestation maps, as the observation distance was greater. These maps covered the full study area. Aerial reconnaissance and mobile survey is cost effective, because thousands of digital images were collected, automatically positioned, and stored.

  6. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  7. Mapping stream habitats with a global positioning system: Accuracy, precision, and comparison with traditional methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauwalter, D.C.; Fisher, W.L.; Belt, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    We tested the precision and accuracy of the Trimble GeoXT??? global positioning system (GPS) handheld receiver on point and area features and compared estimates of stream habitat dimensions (e.g., lengths and areas of riffles and pools) that were made in three different Oklahoma streams using the GPS receiver and a tape measure. The precision of differentially corrected GPS (DGPS) points was not affected by the number of GPS position fixes (i.e., geographic location estimates) averaged per DGPS point. Horizontal error of points ranged from 0.03 to 2.77 m and did not differ with the number of position fixes per point. The error of area measurements ranged from 0.1% to 110.1% but decreased as the area increased. Again, error was independent of the number of position fixes averaged per polygon corner. The estimates of habitat lengths, widths, and areas did not differ when measured using two methods of data collection (GPS and a tape measure), nor did the differences among methods change at three stream sites with contrasting morphologies. Measuring features with a GPS receiver was up to 3.3 times faster on average than using a tape measure, although signal interference from high streambanks or overhanging vegetation occasionally limited satellite signal availability and prolonged measurements with a GPS receiver. There were also no differences in precision of habitat dimensions when mapped using a continuous versus a position fix average GPS data collection method. Despite there being some disadvantages to using the GPS in stream habitat studies, measuring stream habitats with a GPS resulted in spatially referenced data that allowed the assessment of relative habitat position and changes in habitats over time, and was often faster than using a tape measure. For most spatial scales of interest, the precision and accuracy of DGPS data are adequate and have logistical advantages when compared to traditional methods of measurement. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media

  8. Ambiguity resolution in precise point positioning with hourly data for global single receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Pan; Guo, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution (IAR) can improve precise point positioning (PPP) performance significantly. IAR for PPP became a highlight topic in global positioning system (GPS) community in recent years. More and more researchers focus on this issue. Progress has been made in the latest years. In this paper, we aim at investigating and demonstrating the performance of a global zero-differenced (ZD) PPP IAR service for GPS users by providing routine ZD uncalibrated fractional offsets (UFOs) for wide-lane and narrow-lane. Data sets from all IGS stations collected on DOY 1, 100, 200 and 300 of 2010 are used to validate and demonstrate this global service. Static experiment results show that an accuracy better than 1 cm in horizontal and 1-2 cm in vertical could be achieved in ambiguity-fixed PPP solution with only hourly data. Compared with PPP float solution, an average improvement reaches 58.2% in east, 28.3% in north and 23.8% in vertical for all tested stations. Results of kinematic experiments show that the RMS of kinematic PPP solutions can be improved from 21.6, 16.6 and 37.7 mm to 12.2, 13.3 and 34.3 mm for the fixed solutions in the east, north and vertical components, respectively. Both static and kinematic experiments show that wide-lane and narrow-lane UFO products of all satellites can be generated and provided in a routine way accompanying satellite orbit and clock products for the PPP user anywhere around the world, to obtain accurate and reliable ambiguity-fixed PPP solutions.

  9. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  10. INTERIM GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM DATA COLLECTION STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency Geospatial Quality Council developed this document to harmonize the process of collecting, editing, and exporting spatial data of known quality using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Each organizational entity may adopt this d...

  11. The Role of Trust and Interaction in Global Positioning System Related Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chris W.; Shea, Christine; Holloway, C. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) uses a network of satellites to calculate the position of a receiver over time. This technology has revolutionized a wide range of safety-critical industries and leisure applications. These systems provide diverse benefits; supplementing the users existing navigation skills and reducing the uncertainty that often characterizes many route planning tasks. GPS applications can also help to reduce workload by automating tasks that would otherwise require finite cognitive and perceptual resources. However, the operation of these systems has been identified as a contributory factor in a range of recent accidents. Users often come to rely on GPS applications and, therefore, fail to notice when they develop faults or when errors occur in the other systems that use the data from these systems. Further accidents can stem from the over confidence that arises when users assume automated warnings will be issued when they stray from an intended route. Unless greater attention is paid to the role of trust and interaction in GPS applications then there is a danger that we will see an increasing number of these failures as positioning technologies become integral in the functioning of increasing numbers of applications.

  12. TOPEX/POSEIDON operational orbit determination results using global positioning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, J.; Jee, J.; Wolff, P.; Lagattuta, F.; Drain, T.; Sierra, V.

    1994-01-01

    Results of operational orbit determination, performed as part of the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) Global Positioning System (GPS) demonstration experiment, are presented in this article. Elements of this experiment include the GPS satellite constellation, the GPS demonstration receiver on board T/P, six ground GPS receivers, the GPS Data Handling Facility, and the GPS Data Processing Facility (GDPF). Carrier phase and P-code pseudorange measurements from up to 24 GPS satellites to the seven GPS receivers are processed simultaneously with the GDPF software MIRAGE to produce orbit solutions of T/P and the GPS satellites. Daily solutions yield subdecimeter radial accuracies compared to other GPS, LASER, and DORIS precision orbit solutions.

  13. Global positioning system surveying to monitor land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikehara, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    A subsidence research program began in 1985 to document the extent and magnitude of land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, an area of about 15 600 km2m, using Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying. In addition to periodic conventional spirit levelling, an examination was made of the changes in GPS-derived ellipsoidal height differences (summary differences) between pairs of adjacent bench marks in central Sacramento Valley from 1986 to 1989. The average rates of land subsidence in the southern Sacramento Valley for the past several decades were determined by comparing GPS-derived orthometric heights with historic published elevations. A maximum average rate of 0.053 m year-1 (0.90 m in 17 years) of subsidence has been measured. -Author

  14. Problems with studying wolf predation on small prey in summer via global positioning system collars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palacios, V.; Mech, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    We attempted to study predation on various-sized prey by a male and female wolf (Canis lupus) with global positioning system (GPS) collars programmed to acquire locations every 10 min in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota. During May to August 2007, we investigated 147 clusters of locations (31% of the total) and found evidence of predation on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn and yearling, a beaver (Castor canadensis), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), and fisher (Martes pennanti) and scavenging on a road-killed deer and other carrion. However, we missed finding many prey items and discuss the problems associated with trying to conduct such a study. ?? 2010 US Government.

  15. Building a global consensus approach to chordoma: a position paper from the medical and patient community.

    PubMed

    Stacchiotti, Silvia; Sommer, Josh

    2015-02-01

    Chordomas are very rare bone malignant tumours that have had a shortage of effective treatments for a long time. New treatments are now available for both the local and the metastatic phase of the disease, but the degree of uncertainty in selecting the most appropriate treatment remains high and their adoption remains inconsistent across the world, resulting in suboptimum outcomes for many patients. In December, 2013, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) convened a consensus meeting to update its clinical practice guidelines on sarcomas. ESMO also hosted a parallel consensus meeting on chordoma that included more than 40 chordoma experts from several disciplines and from both sides of the Atlantic, with the contribution and sponsorship of the Chordoma Foundation, a global patient advocacy group. The consensus reached at that meeting is shown in this position paper. PMID:25638683

  16. Fault tolerant integrated inertial navigation/global positioning systems for next generation spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Hugh; Hilts, David A.

    The authors address the requirements, benefits, and mitigation of risks to adapt a commercial Hexad fault-tolerant inertial navigation/global positioning system (FT IN/GPS) for use in next-generation spacecraft. Next-generation requirements are examined to determine whether a high production base system can meet autonomous, reliable, and low-cost requirements for future spacecraft. The major benefits are the combining and replacement of functions, the reduction of unscheduled maintenance and operations costs, and a higher probability of mission success. The design, development, and production risks are mitigated by the long-term commercial production schedule for the Boeing 777 air data inertial reference unit (ADIRU) which begins in the mid-1990s. The conclusion is that a strapdown ring laser gyro (RLG) Hexad FT IN/GPS is the preferred integrated navigation and control system for next-generation vehicles.

  17. Monitoring mobility in older adults using global positioning system (GPS) watches and accelerometers: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; Porter, Michelle M

    2009-10-01

    This exploratory study examined the feasibility of using Garmin global positioning system (GPS) watches and ActiGraph accelerometers to monitor walking and other aspects of community mobility in older adults. After accuracy at slow walking speeds was initially determined, 20 older adults (74.4 +/- 4.2 yr) wore the devices for 1 day. Steps, distances, and speeds (on foot and in vehicle) were determined. GPS data acquisition varied from 43 min to over 12 hr, with 55% of participants having more than 8 hr between initial and final data-collection points. When GPS data were acquired without interruptions, detailed mobility information was obtained regarding the timing, distances covered, and speeds reached during trips away from home. Although GPS and accelerometry technology offer promise for monitoring community mobility patterns, new GPS solutions are required that allow for data collection over an extended period of time between indoor and outdoor environments. PMID:19940324

  18. Integrating remote sensing, geographic information systems and global positioning system techniques with hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Jay Krishna; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Ekanthalu, Vicky Shettigondahalli

    2016-03-01

    Integration of remote sensing (RS), geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS) are emerging research areas in the field of groundwater hydrology, resource management, environmental monitoring and during emergency response. Recent advancements in the fields of RS, GIS, GPS and higher level of computation will help in providing and handling a range of data simultaneously in a time- and cost-efficient manner. This review paper deals with hydrological modeling, uses of remote sensing and GIS in hydrological modeling, models of integrations and their need and in last the conclusion. After dealing with these issues conceptually and technically, we can develop better methods and novel approaches to handle large data sets and in a better way to communicate information related with rapidly decreasing societal resources, i.e. groundwater.

  19. Demonstration of precise estimation of polar motion parameters with the global positioning system: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    Data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) were used to determine precise polar motion estimates. Conservatively calculated formal errors of the GPS least squares solution are approx. 10 cm. The GPS estimates agree with independently determined polar motion values from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at the 5 cm level. The data were obtained from a partial constellation of GPS satellites and from a sparse worldwide distribution of ground stations. The accuracy of the GPS estimates should continue to improve as more satellites and ground receivers become operational, and eventually a near real time GPS capability should be available. Because the GPS data are obtained and processed independently from the large radio antennas at the Deep Space Network (DSN), GPS estimation could provide very precise measurements of Earth orientation for calibration of deep space tracking data and could significantly relieve the ever growing burden on the DSN radio telescopes to provide Earth platform calibrations.

  20. Space Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) testing at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlowski, J. F.; Quinn, M.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the significance of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the Space Shuttle. On the basis of a study regarding the use of the GPS on the Space Shuttle, it was decided that such a system would greatly benefit Space Shuttle navigation. Studies with GPS user equipment were, therefore, conducted to obtain data and information which would provide a base for the formulation and the further refinement of NASA requirements with respect to the type of set the Shuttle would need. Attention is given to orbit determination, satellite numbers, background information concerning the GPS, the currently available GPS sets, the conducted studies, Shuttle sonic boom recording sites, tests performed with the aid of the Kuiper airborne observatory, and questions regarding the test applicability to Shuttle GPS.

  1. Constraints on Pacific plate kinematics and dynamics with global positioning system measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Golombek, M. P.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    A measurement program designed to investigate kinematic and dynamic aspects of plate tectonics in the Pacific region by means of satellite observations is proposed. Accuracy studies are summarized showing that for short baselines (less than 100 km), the measuring accuracy of global positioning system (GPS) receivers can be in the centimeter range. For longer baselines, uncertainty in the orbital ephemerides of the GPS satellites could be a major source of error. Simultaneous observations at widely (about 300 km) separated fiducial stations over the Pacific region, should permit an accuracy in the centimeter range for baselines of up to several thousand kilometers. The optimum performance level is based on the assumption of that fiducial baselines are known a priori to the centimeter range. An example fiducial network for a GPS study of the South Pacific region is described.

  2. Relative motions of the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates estimated by the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements spanning approximately 3 years have been used to determine velocities for 7 sites on the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates. The site velocities agree with both plate model predictions and other space geodetic techniques. We find no evidence for internal deformation of the interior of the Australian plate. Wellington, New Zealand, located in the Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, moves 20 +/- 5 mm/yr west-southwest relative to the Australian plate. Its velocity lies midway between the predicted velocities of the two plates. Relative Euler vectors for the Australia-Antarctica and Pacific-Antarctica plates agree within one standard deviation with the NUVEL-1A predictions.

  3. Some tests of wet tropospheric calibration for the CASA Uno Global Positioning System experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Wolf, S. Kornreich

    1990-01-01

    Wet tropospheric path delay can be a major error source for Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic experiments. Strategies for minimizing this error are investigted using data from CASA Uno, the first major GPS experiment in Central and South America, where wet path delays may be both high and variable. Wet path delay calibration using water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and residual delay estimation is compared with strategies where the entire wet path delay is estimated stochastically without prior calibration, using data from a 270-km test baseline in Costa Rica. Both approaches yield centimeter-level baseline repeatability and similar tropospheric estimates, suggesting that WVR calibration is not critical for obtaining high precision results with GPS in the CASA region.

  4. Global positioning system reoccupation of early triangulation sites - Tectonic deformation of the Southern Coast Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Zheng-Kang; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We study tectonic deformation in the Southern Coast Range, California. We use triangulation and astronomic azimuth data collected since 1875, trilateration since 1970, and global positioning system data collected from 1986 to 1987. Two modeling techniques have been used. An elastic block-fault model is applied to study the tectonic motion of the San Andreas Fault and the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault. Station velocities are modeled to study regional deformations. Results show that the regional deformation is predominantly controlled by deep strike-slip motion along the San Andreas Fault, at a rate of 33 +/- 2 mm/yr. Deep slip along the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault is about 0-4 mm/yr, assuming a locked suit to a depth of 20 km. Convergence normal to the San Andreas Fault in the Southern Coast Ranges is not greater than 0.02 microrad/yr.

  5. Efficient and Optimal Attitude Determination Using Recursive Global Positioning System Signal Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Markley, F. Landis

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, a new and efficient algorithm is developed for attitude determination from Global Positioning System signals. The new algorithm is derived from a generalized nonlinear predictive filter for nonlinear systems. This uses a one time-step ahead approach to propagate a simple kinematics model for attitude determination. The advantages of the new algorithm over previously developed methods include: it provides optimal attitudes even for coplanar baseline configurations; it guarantees convergence even for poor initial conditions; it is a non-iterative algorithm; and it is computationally efficient. These advantages clearly make the new algorithm well suited to on-board applications. The performance of the new algorithm is tested on a dynamic hardware simulator. Results indicate that the new algorithm accurately estimates the attitude of a moving vehicle, and provides robust attitude estimates even when other methods, such as a linearized least-squares approach, fail due to poor initial starting conditions.

  6. Modular Software for Spacecraft Navigation Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, S. H.; Hartman, K. R.; Weidow, D. A.; Berry, D. L.; Oza, D. H.; Long, A. C.; Joyce, E.; Steger, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics and Mission Operations Divisions have jointly investigated the feasibility of engineering modular Global Positioning SYSTEM (GPS) navigation software to support both real time flight and ground postprocessing configurations. The goals of this effort are to define standard GPS data interfaces and to engineer standard, reusable navigation software components that can be used to build a broad range of GPS navigation support applications. The paper discusses the GPS modular software (GMOD) system and operations concepts, major requirements, candidate software architecture, feasibility assessment and recommended software interface standards. In additon, ongoing efforts to broaden the scope of the initial study and to develop modular software to support autonomous navigation using GPS are addressed,

  7. Sub-daily resolution of earth rotation variations with Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Marcus, Steven L.; Dickey, Jean O.

    1992-01-01

    Data from a worldwide Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking experiment have been used to determine variations in earth rotation (UT1-UTC) over a time period of three weeks. Kalman filtering and smoothing enabled changes in UT1-UTC over intervals of 2 to 24 hrs to be detected with the GPS data. Internal consistency checks and comparisons with other solutions from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and satellite laser ranging (SLR) indicate that the GPS UT1-UTC estimates are accurate to about 2 cm. Comparison of GPS-estimated variations in UT1-UTC with 2-hr time resolution over 4 days with predicted variations computed from diurnal and semidiurnal oceanic tidal contributions strongly suggests that the observed periodic sub-daily variations of about 0.1 msec are largely of tidal origin.

  8. Three Years of Global Positioning System Experience on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station global positioning systems (GPS) receiver was activated in April 2002. Since that time, numerous software anomalies surfaced that had to be worked around. Some of the software problems required waivers, such as the time function, while others required extensive operator intervention, such as numerous power cycles. Eventually, enough anomalies surfaced that the three pieces of code included in the GPS unit have been re-written and the GPS units were upgraded. The technical aspects of the problems are discussed, as well as the underlying causes that led to the delivery of a product that has had numerous problems. The technical aspects of the problems included physical phenomena that were not well understood, such as the affect that the ionosphere would have on the GPS measurements. The underlying causes were traced to inappropriate use of legacy software, changing requirements, inadequate software processes, unrealistic schedules, incorrect contract type, and unclear ownership responsibilities.

  9. Three Years of Global Positioning System Experience on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station global positioning system (GPS) receiver was activated in April 2002. Since that time, numerous software anomalies surfaced that had to be worked around. Some of the software problems required waivers, such as the time function, while others required extensive operator intervention, such as numerous power cycles. Eventually enough anomalies surfaced that the three pieces of code included in the GPS unit have been re-written and the GPS units upgraded. The technical aspects of the problems are discussed, as well as the underlying causes that led to the delivery of a product that has had so many problems. The technical aspects of the problems included physical phenomena that were not well understood, such as the affect that the ionosphere would have on the GPS measurements. The underlying causes were traced to inappropriate use of legacy software, changing requirements, inadequate software processes, unrealistic schedules, incorrect contract type, and unclear ownership responsibilities..

  10. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  11. Global systems for mobile position tracking using Kalman and Lainiotis filters.

    PubMed

    Assimakis, Nicholas; Adam, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We present two time invariant models for Global Systems for Mobile (GSM) position tracking, which describe the movement in x-axis and y-axis simultaneously or separately. We present the time invariant filters as well as the steady state filters: the classical Kalman filter and Lainiotis Filter and the Join Kalman Lainiotis Filter, which consists of the parallel usage of the two classical filters. Various implementations are proposed and compared with respect to their behavior and to their computational burden: all time invariant and steady state filters have the same behavior using both proposed models but have different computational burden. Finally, we propose a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) implementation of the Steady State Kalman, and Lainiotis filters, which does not require previous estimations but requires a well-defined set of previous measurements. PMID:24883349

  12. Investigation on global positioning system signal scattering and propagation over the rough sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Guo, Li-Xin; Wu, Zhen-Sen

    2010-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of polarization properties, scattering properties and propagation properties of global positioning system (GPS) scattering signal over the rough sea surface. To investigate the polarization and the scattering properties, the scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of modified Kirchhoff approximation using the tapered incident wave is derived in detail. In modeling the propagation properties of the GPS scattering signal in the evaporation duct, the initial field of parabolic equation traditionally computed by the antenna pattern using fast Fourier transform (FFT) is replaced by the GPS scattering field. And the propagation properties of the GPS scattering signal in the evaporation duct with different evaporation duct heights and elevation angles of GPS are discussed by the improved discrete mixed Fourier transform taking into account the sea surface roughness.

  13. Intercontinental time and frequency transfer using a global positioning system timing receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has a requirement to maintain knowledge of the frequency offset between DSN stations within 3 x 10 to the -13th power and time offset within 10 microseconds. It is further anticipated that in the 1987-1990 era the requirement for knowledge of time offset between DSN stations will be less than 10 nanoseconds. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is using the Global Positioning System (GPS) Space Vehicles, as a development project, to transfer time and frequency over intercontinental distances between stations of the DSN and between the DSN and other agencies. JPL has installed GPS timing receivers at its tracking station near Barstow, California and at its tracking station near Madrid, Spain. The details of the experiment and the data are reported. There is a discussion of the ultimate capabilities of these techniques for meeting the functional requirements of the DSN.

  14. Intercontinental time and frequency transfer using a global positioning system timing receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    The DSN has a requirement to maintain knowledge of the frequency offset between DSN stations with 3 x 10 to the minus 13th power and time offset within 10 microseconds. It is further anticipated that in the 1987-1990 era the requirement for knowledge of time offset between DSN stations will be less than 10 nanoseconds. JPL is using the Global Positioning System (GPS) Space Vehicles, as a development project, to transfer time and frequency over intercontinental distances between stations of the DSN and between the DSN and other agencies. JPL has installed GPS timing receivers at its tracking station near Barstow, California, and at its tracking station near Madrid, Spain. The details of the experiment and the data are reported. There is a discussion of the ultimate capabilities of these techniques for meeting the functional requirements of the DSN.

  15. Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation Estimated with Geodetic Data from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    We use geodetic data taken over four years with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate: (1) motion between six major plates and (2) motion relative to these plates of ten sites in plate boundary zones. The degree of consistency between geodetic velocities and rigid plates requires the (one-dimensional) standard errors in horizontal velocities to be approx. 2 mm/yr. Each of the 15 angular velocities describing motion between plate pairs that we estimate with GPS differs insignificantly from the corresponding angular velocity in global plate motion model NUVEL-1A, which averages motion over the past 3 m.y. The motion of the Pacific plate relative to both the Eurasian and North American plates is observed to be faster than predicted by NUVEL-1A, supporting the inference from Very Long B ase- line Interferometry (VLBI) that motion of the Pacific plate has speed up over the past few m.y. The Eurasia-North America pole of rotation is estimated to be north of NUVEL-1A, consistent with the independent hypothesis that the pole has recently migrated northward across northeast Asia to near the Lena River delta. Victoria, which lies above the main thrust at the Cascadia subduction zone, moves relative to the interior of the overriding plate at 30% of the velocity of the subducting plate, reinforcing the conclusion that the thrust there is locked beneath the continental shelf and slope.

  16. Use of global positioning system measurements to determine geocentric coordinates and variations in Earth orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Geocentric tracking station coordinates and short-period Earth-orientation variations can be measured with Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements. Unless calibrated, geocentric coordinate errors and changes in Earth orientation can lead to significant deep-space tracking errors. Ground-based GPS estimates of daily and subdaily changes in Earth orientation presently show centimeter-level precision. Comparison between GPS-estimated Earth-rotation variations, which are the differences between Universal Time 1 and Universal Coordinated Time (UT1-UTC), and those calculated from ocean tide models suggests that observed subdaily variations in Earth rotation are dominated by oceanic tidal effects. Preliminary GPS estimates for the geocenter location (from a 3-week experiment) agree with independent satellite laser-ranging estimates to better than 10 cm. Covariance analysis predicts that temporal resolution of GPS estimates for Earth orientation and geocenter improves significantly when data collected from low Earth-orbiting satellites as well as from ground sites are combined. The low Earth GPS tracking data enhance the accuracy and resolution for measuring high-frequency global geodynamical signals over time scales of less than 1 day.

  17. Helicopter approach capability using the differential global positioning system. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.

    1993-01-01

    The results of flight tests to determine the feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the differential mode (DGPS) to provide high accuracy, precision navigation, and guidance for helicopter approaches to landing are presented. The airborne DGPS receiver and associated equipment is installed in a NASA UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. The ground-based DGPS reference receiver is located at a surveyed test site and is equipped with a real-time VHF data link to transmit correction information to the airborne DGPS receiver. The corrected airborne DGPS information, together with the preset approach geometry, is used to calculate guidance commands which are sent to the aircraft's approach guidance instruments. The use of DGPS derived guidance for helicopter approaches to landing is evaluated by comparing the DGPS data with the laser tracker truth data. Both standard (3 deg) and steep (6 deg and 9 deg) glideslope straight-in approaches were flown. DGPS positioning accuracy based on a time history analysis of the entire approach was 0.2 m (mean) +/- 1.8 m (2 sigma) laterally and -2.0 m (mean) +/- 3.5 m (2 sigma) vertically for 3 deg glideslope approaches, -0.1 m (mean) +/- 1.5 m (2 sigma) laterally and -1.1 m (mean) +/- 3.5 m (2 sigma) vertically for 6 deg glideslope approaches and 0.2 m (mean) +/- 1.3 m (2 sigma) laterally and -1.0 m (mean) +/- 2.8 m (2 sigma) vertically for 9 deg glideslope approaches. DGPS positioning accuracy at the 200 ft decision height (DH) on a standard 3 deg slideslope approach was 0.3 m (mean) +/- 1.5 m (2 sigma) laterally and -2.3 m (mean) +/- 1.6 m (2 sigma) vertically. These errors indicate that the helicopter position based on DGPS guidance satisfies the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Category 1 (CAT 1) lateral and vertical navigational accuracy requirements.

  18. Global Positioning System Use in the Community to Evaluate Improvements in Walking After Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gernigon, Marie; Le Faucheur, Alexis; Fradin, Dominique; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Landron, Cédric; Mahe, Guillaume; Abraham, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Revascularization aims at improving walking ability in patients with arterial claudication. The highest measured distance between 2 stops (highest-MDCW), the average walking speed (average-WSCW), and the average stop duration (average-DSCW) can be measured by global positioning system, but their evolution after revascularization is unknown. We included 251 peripheral artery diseased patients with self-reported limiting claudication. The patients performed a 1-hour stroll, recorded by a global positioning system receiver. Patients (n = 172) with confirmed limitation (highest-MDCW <2000m) at inclusion were reevaluated after 6 months. Patients revascularized during the follow-up period were compared with reference patients (ie, with unchanged lifestyle medical or surgical status). Other patients (lost to follow-up or treatment change) were excluded (n = 89). We studied 44 revascularized and 39 reference patients. Changes in highest-MDCW (+442 vs. +13 m) and average-WSCW (+0.3 vs. −0.2 km h−1) were greater in revascularized than in reference patients (both P < 0.01). In contrast, no significant difference in average-DSCW changes was found between the groups. Among the revascularized patients, 13 (29.5%) had a change in average-WSCW, but not in highest-MDCW, greater than the mean + 1 standard deviation of the change observed for reference patients. Revascularization may improve highest-MDCW and/or average-WSCW. This first report of changes in community walking ability in revascularized patients suggests that, beyond measuring walking distances, average-WSCW measurement is essential to monitor these changes. Applicability to other surgical populations remains to be evaluated. Registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01141361 PMID:25950694

  19. Monitoring crustal motion in Papua New Guinea using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, A.

    Papua New Guinea is a region of intense and frequent earthquake activity. Four earthquakes of magnitude 8.0 or greater have occurred here in the last century. There are about 100 major volcanoes of which 14 are classified as active and 24 are classified as dormant. Bouguer gravity anomalies range from about -180 mGal to 200 mGal and the minimum free-air gravity anomalies reach about -300 mGal. The region occupies a unique position on the global satellite geoid — at the crest of a bulge which is higher than other parts of this geoid. Papua New Guinea is also a region of large predicted plate tectonic motions. The region includes two, and possibly as many as four, minor plates sandwiched between the major Indo-Australian and Pacific plates. It is proposed to use Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to monitor crustal motion in Papua New Guinea. Because of the location of various islands on both sides of the plate boundaries, and within the broad inter-arc area, it is possible to use GPS to establish baselines that straddle many of the major tectonic elements, and so by repeated observations of these baselines, to directly observe the kinematics of plate convergence, intra-arc strain and back-arc spreading. Because the rates of plate convergence and back-arc spreading in this region are among the highest found in the world, and baseline length is generally under 500 km, it should be possible to attain an unusually high ratio of tectonic signal-to-measurement noise.

  20. Geodetic point positioning with GPS (Global Positioning System) carrier beat phase data from the CASA (Central and South America) Uno experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Malys, S.; Jensen, P.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier beat phase data collected by the TI4100 GPS receiver has been successfully utilized by the US Defense Mapping Agency in an algorithm which is designed to estimate individual absolute geodetic point positions from data collected over a few hours. The algorithm uses differenced data from one station and two to four GPS satellites at a series of epochs separated by 30 second intervals. The precise GPS ephemerides and satellite clock states, held fixed in the estimation process, are those estimated by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC). Broadcast ephemerides and clock states are also utilized for comparative purposes. An outline of the data corrections applied, the mathematical model and the estimation algorithm are presented. Point positioning results and statistics are presented for a globally-distributed set of stations which contributed to the CASA Uno experiment. Statistical assessment of 114 GPS point positions at 11 CASA Uno stations indicates that the overall standard deviation of a point position component, estimated from a few hours of data, is 73 centimeters. Solution of the long line geodetic inverse problem using repeated point positions such as these can potentially offer a new tool for those studying geodynamics on a global scale.

  1. Precise Real-Time Low-Earth-Orbiter Navigation With the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertiger, W.; Haines, B.; Kuang, D.; Lough, M.; Lichten, S.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Vigue-Rodi, Y.; Wu, S.

    1999-01-01

    Technology currently is available to support real-time onboard knowledge of the position of a low Earth orbiter at the 5- to 15-m level using the civilian broadcast Global Positioning System (GPS) signal with sophisticated models and filtering techniques onboard the spacecraft. Without these techniques, the standard positioning service yields 50 to 100 m with the current level of selective availability (SA). Proposed augmentations and/or enhancements to the GPS system will make rms accuracies of from 10 centimeters to a few decimeters available to the real-time onboard user. Presently, near-real-time processing of GPS tracking data can routinely provide low-Earth-orbit determination accuracy at the level of 5 cm. Such processing systems can, in fact, be fully automated; recent results from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where ongoing daily processing of low Earth GPS tracking data has been undertaken for several years, are presented in this article, showing orbit determination accuracies at the sub-10-cm level. At the present time, such solutions can be produced with about a 10-h delay after real time, but recent improvements in JPL's processing system soon will enable turnaround at the 1-h level or better for such precise orbit determination. We anticipate that orbit determination at the 1-cm-accuracy level will be demonstrated, with some refinements to the current system, in the not too distant future. Continuing enhancements in the automation of data retrieval and precise orbit processing will result in continuing decreases in latency for ground-based generation of precise orbit products for Earth orbiters. Such ephemerides can be propagated slightly ahead to provide real-time knowledge. However, there are advantages to an onboard, real-time orbit-determination capability. These include unique mission requirements (military, strategic, and scientific), as well as the potential to dramatically lower navigation operations costs through the enabling of a

  2. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M; Fuller, Mark R; Kie, John G; Bates, Kirk K

    2010-07-27

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  3. The Validity and Reliability of Global Positioning Systems in Team Sport: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Scott, Macfarlane T U; Scott, Tannath J; Kelly, Vincent G

    2016-05-01

    The use of global positioning systems (GPS) has increased dramatically over the last decade. Using signals from orbiting satellites, the GPS receiver calculates the exact position of the device and the speed at which the device is moving. Within team sports GPS devices are used to quantify the external load experienced by an athlete, allowing coaches to better manage trainings loads and potentially identify athletes who are overreaching or overtraining. This review aims to collate all studies that have tested either (or both) the validity or reliability of GPS devices in a team sport setting, with a particular focus on (a) measurements of distance, speed, velocities, and accelerations across all sampling rates and (b) accelerometers, player/body load and impacts in accelerometer-integrated GPS devices. A comprehensive search of the online libraries identified 22 articles that fit search criteria. The literature suggests that all GPS units, regardless of sampling rate, are capable of tracking athlete's distance during team sport movements with adequate intraunit reliability. One Hertz and 5Hz GPS units have limitations in their reporting of distance during high-intensity running, velocity measures, and short linear running (particularly those involving changes of direction), although these limitations seem to be overcome during measures recorded during team sport movements. Ten Hertz GPS devices seem the most valid and reliable to date across linear and team sport simulated running, overcoming many limitations of earlier models, whereas the increase to 15Hz GPS devices have had no additional benefit. PMID:26439776

  4. Simulation and analysis of differential global positioning system for civil helicopter operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denaro, R. P.; Cabak, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    A Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) computer simulation was developed, to provide a versatile tool for assessing DGPS referenced civil helicopter navigation. The civil helicopter community will probably be an early user of the GPS capability because of the unique mission requirements which include offshore exploration and low altitude transport into remote areas not currently served by ground based Navaids. The Monte Carlo simulation provided a sufficiently high fidelity dynamic motion and propagation environment to enable accurate comparisons of alternative differential GPS implementations and navigation filter tradeoffs. The analyst has provided the capability to adjust most aspects of the system, the helicopter flight profile, the receiver Kalman filter, and the signal propagation environment to assess differential GPS performance and parameter sensitivities. Preliminary analysis was conducted to evaluate alternative implementations of the differential navigation algorithm in both the position and measurement domain. Results are presented to show that significant performance gains are achieved when compared with conventional GPS but that differences due to DGPS implementation techniques were small. System performance was relatively insensitive to the update rates of the error correction information.

  5. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  6. Detecting and characterizing genomic signatures of positive selection in global populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuanyao; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Pillai, Esakimuthu Nisha; Elzein, Abier M; Small, Kerrin S; Clark, Taane G; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Natural selection is a significant force that shapes the architecture of the human genome and introduces diversity across global populations. The question of whether advantageous mutations have arisen in the human genome as a result of single or multiple mutation events remains unanswered except for the fact that there exist a handful of genes such as those that confer lactase persistence, affect skin pigmentation, or cause sickle cell anemia. We have developed a long-range-haplotype method for identifying genomic signatures of positive selection to complement existing methods, such as the integrated haplotype score (iHS) or cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity (XP-EHH), for locating signals across the entire allele frequency spectrum. Our method also locates the founder haplotypes that carry the advantageous variants and infers their corresponding population frequencies. This presents an opportunity to systematically interrogate the whole human genome whether a selection signal shared across different populations is the consequence of a single mutation process followed subsequently by gene flow between populations or of convergent evolution due to the occurrence of multiple independent mutation events either at the same variant or within the same gene. The application of our method to data from 14 populations across the world revealed that positive-selection events tend to cluster in populations of the same ancestry. Comparing the founder haplotypes for events that are present across different populations revealed that convergent evolution is a rare occurrence and that the majority of shared signals stem from the same evolutionary event. PMID:23731540

  7. Halo orbit dynamics and properties for a lunar global positioning system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Circi, Christian; Romagnoli, Daniele; Fumenti, Federico

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the use of north and south families of halo orbits, around the L1 and L2 collinear libration points of the Earth-Moon system, to realize a lunar global positioning system (LGPS) is proposed. The computation of the reference trajectories and the required station-keeping manoeuvres with the associated ΔV are described, as well as different configurations for the satellites' constellation. The combination of the north and south families of halo orbits results in an X-shaped configuration allowing optimal performances. A visibility study, from different locations on the lunar surface, has been performed together with a performance analysis in terms of availability of the LGPS signal and quality of the position solution, resulting in a candidate architecture able to guarantee the availability of the LGPS service at the scientifically interesting lunar poles. In addition, the proposed constellations are also interesting from a connection point of view, assuring continuous communication capabilities between the Earth and every location on the surface of the Moon, as well as between any of the points on the ground.

  8. High-resolution measurements of surface topography with airborne laser altimetry and the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Bufton, Jack L.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Krabill, William B.; Clem, Thomas D.; Frederick, Earl B.; Ward, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, an airborne lidar system that measures laser pulse time-of-flight and the distortion of the pulse waveform upon reflection from earth surface terrain features was developed and is now operational. This instrument is combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and a two-axis gyroscope for accurate recovery of aircraft position and pointing attitude. The laser altimeter system is mounted on a high-altitude aircraft platform and operated in a repetitively-pulsed mode for measurements of surface elevation profiles at nadir. The laser transmitter makes use of recently developed short-pulse diode-pumped solid-state laser technology in Q-switched Nd:YAG operating at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. A reflector telescope and silicon avalanche photodiode are the basis of the optical receiver. A high-speed time-interval unit and a separate high-bandwidth waveform digitizer under microcomputer control are used to process the backscattered pulses for measurements of terrain. Other aspects of the lidar system are briefly discussed.

  9. Time determination for spacecraft users of the Navstar Global Positioning System /GPS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenchik, T. J.; Fang, B. T.

    1977-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation is performed by time measurements. A description is presented of a two body model of spacecraft motion. Orbit determination is the process of inferring the position, velocity, and clock offset of the user from measurements made of the user motion in the Newtonian coordinate system. To illustrate the effect of clock errors and the accuracy with which the user spacecraft time and orbit may be determined, a low-earth-orbit spacecraft (Seasat) as tracked by six Phase I GPS space vehicles is considered. The obtained results indicate that in the absence of unmodeled dynamic parameter errors clock biases may be determined to the nanosecond level. There is, however, a high correlation between the clock bias and the uncertainty in the gravitational parameter GM, i.e., the product of the universal gravitational constant and the total mass of the earth. It is, therefore, not possible to determine clock bias to better than 25 nanosecond accuracy in the presence of a gravitational error of one part per million.

  10. Hybrid extended particle filter (HEPF) for integrated inertial navigation and global positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Syed, Zainab; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2009-05-01

    Navigation includes the integration of methodologies and systems for estimating time-varying position, velocity and attitude of moving objects. Navigation incorporating the integrated inertial navigation system (INS) and global positioning system (GPS) generally requires extensive evaluations of nonlinear equations involving double integration. Currently, integrated navigation systems are commonly implemented using the extended Kalman filter (EKF). The EKF assumes a linearized process, measurement models and Gaussian noise distributions. These assumptions are unrealistic for highly nonlinear systems like land vehicle navigation and may cause filter divergence. A particle filter (PF) is developed to enhance integrated INS/GPS system performance as it can easily deal with nonlinearity and non-Gaussian noises. In this paper, a hybrid extended particle filter (HEPF) is developed as an alternative to the well-known EKF to achieve better navigation data accuracy for low-cost microelectromechanical system sensors. The results show that the HEPF performs better than the EKF during GPS outages, especially when simulated outages are located in periods with high vehicle dynamics.

  11. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  12. Detecting and Characterizing Genomic Signatures of Positive Selection in Global Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuanyao; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Pillai, Esakimuthu Nisha; Elzein, Abier M.; Small, Kerrin S.; Clark, Taane G.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Natural selection is a significant force that shapes the architecture of the human genome and introduces diversity across global populations. The question of whether advantageous mutations have arisen in the human genome as a result of single or multiple mutation events remains unanswered except for the fact that there exist a handful of genes such as those that confer lactase persistence, affect skin pigmentation, or cause sickle cell anemia. We have developed a long-range-haplotype method for identifying genomic signatures of positive selection to complement existing methods, such as the integrated haplotype score (iHS) or cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity (XP-EHH), for locating signals across the entire allele frequency spectrum. Our method also locates the founder haplotypes that carry the advantageous variants and infers their corresponding population frequencies. This presents an opportunity to systematically interrogate the whole human genome whether a selection signal shared across different populations is the consequence of a single mutation process followed subsequently by gene flow between populations or of convergent evolution due to the occurrence of multiple independent mutation events either at the same variant or within the same gene. The application of our method to data from 14 populations across the world revealed that positive-selection events tend to cluster in populations of the same ancestry. Comparing the founder haplotypes for events that are present across different populations revealed that convergent evolution is a rare occurrence and that the majority of shared signals stem from the same evolutionary event. PMID:23731540

  13. An evaluation of the physiological demands of elite rugby union using Global Positioning System tracking software.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Brian; Proctor, Wayne; Baker, Julien S; Davies, Bruce

    2009-07-01

    The current case study attempted to document the contemporary demands of elite rugby union. Players (n = 2) were tracked continuously during a competitive team selection game using Global Positioning System (GPS) software. Data revealed that players covered on average 6,953 m during play (83 minutes). Of this distance, 37% (2,800 m) was spent standing and walking, 27% (1,900 m) jogging, 10% (700 m) cruising, 14% (990 m) striding, 5% (320 m) high-intensity running, and 6% (420 m) sprinting. Greater running distances were observed for both players (6.7% back; 10% forward) in the second half of the game. Positional data revealed that the back performed a greater number of sprints (>20 km x h(-1)) than the forward (34 vs. 19) during the game. Conversely, the forward entered the lower speed zone (6-12 km x h(-1)) on a greater number of occasions than the back (315 vs. 229) but spent less time standing and walking (66.5 vs. 77.8%). Players were found to perform 87 moderate-intensity runs (>14 km x h(-1)) covering an average distance of 19.7 m (SD = 14.6). Average distances of 15.3 m (back) and 17.3 m (forward) were recorded for each sprint burst (>20 km x h(-1)), respectively. Players exercised at approximately 80 to 85% VO2max during the course of the game with a mean heart rate of 172 b x min(-1) ( approximately 88% HRmax). This corresponded to an estimated energy expenditure of 6.9 and 8.2 MJ, back and forward, respectively. The current study provides insight into the intense and physical nature of elite rugby using "on the field" assessment of physical exertion. Future use of this technology may help practitioners in design and implementation of individual position-specific training programs with appropriate management of player exercise load. PMID:19528840

  14. Real-time, autonomous precise satellite orbit determination using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, David Ben

    2000-10-01

    The desire for autonomously generated, rapidly available, and highly accurate satellite ephemeris is growing with the proliferation of constellations of satellites and the cost and overhead of ground tracking resources. Autonomous Orbit Determination (OD) may be done on the ground in a post-processing mode or in real-time on board a satellite and may be accomplished days, hours or immediately after observations are processed. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now widely used as an alternative to ground tracking resources to supply observation data for satellite positioning and navigation. GPS is accurate, inexpensive, provides continuous coverage, and is an excellent choice for autonomous systems. In an effort to estimate precise satellite ephemeris in real-time on board a satellite, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) created the GPS Enhanced OD Experiment (GEODE) flight navigation software. This dissertation offers alternative methods and improvements to GEODE to increase on board autonomy and real-time total position accuracy and precision without increasing computational burden. First, GEODE is modified to include a Gravity Acceleration Approximation Function (GAAF) to replace the traditional spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field. Next, an ionospheric correction method called Differenced Range Versus Integrated Doppler (DRVID) is applied to correct for ionospheric errors in the GPS measurements used in GEODE. Then, Dynamic Model Compensation (DMC) is added to estimate unmodeled and/or mismodeled forces in the dynamic model and to provide an alternative process noise variance-covariance formulation. Finally, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is implemented in the form of Genetic Model Compensation (GMC) to optimize DMC forcing noise parameters. Application of GAAF, DRVID and DMC improved GEODE's position estimates by 28.3% when applied to GPS/MET data collected in the presence of Selective Availability (SA), 17.5% when SA is removed from the GPS

  15. Maintenance of the Geodetic Reference Frame in the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oria, A.; Brodsky, B. L.; Labrecque, J.; Miller, J. J.; Moreau, M.; Pearlman, M.; Nelson, R.

    2007-12-01

    In the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the satellite coordinates and the underlying World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 84) reference frame are derived from observables such as pseudorandom noise (PRN) signals, and carrier phase, which are referenced to on-board atomic clocks. Systematic errors exist in both the estimated satellite coordinates and the reference frame. The reference frame utilizes external inputs in the form of International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) coordinates and constrains the results to be compatible with the ITRF coordinates for a set of global reference stations. The ITRF is, in turn, obtained from the combined analysis of GPS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data. The current realization of the reference frame could be described as circular in that an independent method of external verification is currently not available. To ensure the continued successful operation of the GPS it is necessary to have the capability of analyzing systematic errors by an independent means from current radiometric observables and data from foreign sources. In practice, accuracy of the standards used for measurement should be better than the expected, required operational measurement accuracy by a factor of ten to ensure that the desired requirement is met. Currently, the accuracy of both the ITRF and the WGS 84 is estimated to be on the order of 1 to 2 parts per billion, leading to expected drifts of 0.6 to 1.2 cm per year. The experience of the last three decades has indicated an approximate improvement by a factor of ten per decade. Therefore, while current accuracy of the ITRF and WGS 84 reference frames marginally meets civilian and military requirements, it is very likely that, within the lifetime of GPS III, the accuracy of the reference frames will be unable to meet the anticipated requirements. This report examines

  16. Detecting grizzly bear use of ungulate carcasses using global positioning system telemetry and activity data.

    PubMed

    Ebinger, Michael R; Haroldson, Mark A; van Manen, Frank T; Costello, Cecily M; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Thompson, Daniel J; Gunther, Kerry A; Fortin, Jennifer K; Teisberg, Justin E; Pils, Shannon R; White, P J; Cain, Steven L; Cross, Paul C

    2016-07-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) wildlife collars have revolutionized wildlife research. Studies of predation by free-ranging carnivores have particularly benefited from the application of location clustering algorithms to determine when and where predation events occur. These studies have changed our understanding of large carnivore behavior, but the gains have concentrated on obligate carnivores. Facultative carnivores, such as grizzly/brown bears (Ursus arctos), exhibit a variety of behaviors that can lead to the formation of GPS clusters. We combined clustering techniques with field site investigations of grizzly bear GPS locations (n = 732 site investigations; 2004-2011) to produce 174 GPS clusters where documented behavior was partitioned into five classes (large-biomass carcass, small-biomass carcass, old carcass, non-carcass activity, and resting). We used multinomial logistic regression to predict the probability of clusters belonging to each class. Two cross-validation methods-leaving out individual clusters, or leaving out individual bears-showed that correct prediction of bear visitation to large-biomass carcasses was 78-88 %, whereas the false-positive rate was 18-24 %. As a case study, we applied our predictive model to a GPS data set of 266 bear-years in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (2002-2011) and examined trends in carcass visitation during fall hyperphagia (September-October). We identified 1997 spatial GPS clusters, of which 347 were predicted to be large-biomass carcasses. We used the clustered data to develop a carcass visitation index, which varied annually, but more than doubled during the study period. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness and utility of identifying GPS clusters associated with carcass visitation by a facultative carnivore. PMID:26971522

  17. Detecting grizzly bear use of ungulate carcasses using global positioning system telemetry and activity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebinger, Michael R.; Haroldson, Mark A.; van Manen, Frank T.; Costello, Cecily M; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Thompson, Daniel J.; Gunther, Kerry A.; Fortin, Jennifer K.; Teisberg, Justin E.; Pils, Shannon R; White, P J; Cain, Steven L; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) wildlife collars have revolutionized wildlife research. Studies of predation by free-ranging carnivores have particularly benefited from the application of location clustering algorithms to determine when and where predation events occur. These studies have changed our understanding of large carnivore behavior, but the gains have concentrated on obligate carnivores. Facultative carnivores, such as grizzly/brown bears (Ursus arctos), exhibit a variety of behaviors that can lead to the formation of GPS clusters. We combined clustering techniques with field site investigations of grizzly bear GPS locations (n = 732 site investigations; 2004–2011) to produce 174 GPS clusters where documented behavior was partitioned into five classes (large-biomass carcass, small-biomass carcass, old carcass, non-carcass activity, and resting). We used multinomial logistic regression to predict the probability of clusters belonging to each class. Two cross-validation methods—leaving out individual clusters, or leaving out individual bears—showed that correct prediction of bear visitation to large-biomass carcasses was 78–88%, whereas the false-positive rate was 18–24%. As a case study, we applied our predictive model to a GPS data set of 266 bear-years in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (2002–2011) and examined trends in carcass visitation during fall hyperphagia (September–October). We identified 1997 spatial GPS clusters, of which 347 were predicted to be large-biomass carcasses. We used the clustered data to develop a carcass visitation index, which varied annually, but more than doubled during the study period. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness and utility of identifying GPS clusters associated with carcass visitation by a facultative carnivore.

  18. Current and planned use of the Navstar Global Positioning System by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theiss, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    NASA was quick to realize the potential that the Global Positioning System (GPS) had to offer for its many diverse vehicles, experiments and platforms. Soon after the first Block 1 GPS satellites were launched, NASA began to use the tremendous capabilities that they had to offer. Even with a partial GPS constellation in place, important results have been obtained about the shape, orientation and rotation of the earth and calibration of the ionosphere and troposphere. These calibrations enhance geophysical science and facilitate the navigation of interplanetary spacecraft. Some very important results have been obtained in the continuing NASA program for aircraft terminal area operations. Currently, a large amount of activity is being concentrated on real time kinematic carrier phase tracking which has the potential to revolutionize aircraft navigation. This year marks the launch of the first GPS receiver equipped earth-orbiting NASA spacecraft: the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX/Poseidon). This paper describes a cross section of GPS-based research at NASA.

  19. Tracking the movement of Hawaiian volcanoes; Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    At some well-studied volcanoes, surface movements of at least several centimeters take place out to distances of about 10 km from the summit of the volcano. Widespread deformation of this type is relatively easy to monitor, because the necessary survey stations can be placed at favorable sites some distance from the summit of the volcano. Examples of deformation of this type include Kilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawaii, Krafla in Iceland, Long Valley in California, Camp Flegrei in Italy, and Sakurajima in Japan. In contrast, surface movement at some other volcanoes, usually volcanoes with steep slopes, is restricted to places within about 1 km of their summits. Examples of this class of volcanoes include Mount St. Helens in Washington, Etna in Italy, and Tangkuban Parahu in Indonesia. Local movement on remote, rugged volcanoes of this type is difficult to observe using conventional methods of measuring ground movement, which generally require a clear line-of-sight between points of interest. However, a revolutionary new technique, called the Global Positional System (GPS), provides a very efficient, alternative method of making such measurements. GPS, which uses satellites and ground-based receivers to accurately record slight crustal movements, is rapidly becoming the method of choice to measure deformation at volcanoes. 

  20. Testing global positioning system telemetry to study wolf predation on deer fawns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demma, D.J.; Barber-Meyer, S. M.; Mech, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a pilot study to test the usefulness of Global Positioning System (GPS) collars for investigating wolf (Canis lupus) predation on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns. Using GPS collars with short location-attempt intervals on 5 wolves and 5 deer during summers 2002-2004 in northeastern Minnesota, USA, demonstrated how this approach could provide new insights into wolf hunting behavior of fawns. For example, a wolf traveled ???1.5-3.0 km and spent 20-22 hours in the immediate vicinity of known fawn kill sites and ???0.7 km and 8.3 hours at scavenging sites. Wolf travel paths indicated that wolves intentionally traveled into deer summer ranges, traveled ???0.7-4.2 km in such ranges, and spent <1-22 hours per visit. Each pair of 3 GPS-collared wolf pack members were located together for ???6% of potential locations. From GPS collar data, we estimated that each deer summer range in a pack territory containing 5 wolves ???1 year old and hunting individually would be visited by a wolf on average every 3-5 days. This approach holds great potential for investigating summer hunting behavior of wolves in areas where direct observation is impractical or impossible.

  1. Design and integration of a solar AMTEC power system with an advanced global positioning satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.; Hunt, M.E.; Determan, W.R.; HoSang, P.A.; Schuller, M.

    1996-12-31

    A 1,200-W solar AMTEC (alkali metal thermal-to-electric conversion) power system concept was developed and integrated with an advanced global positioning system (GPS) satellite. The critical integration issues for the SAMTEC with the GPS subsystems included (1) packaging within the Delta 2 launch vehicle envelope, (2) deployment and start-up operations for the SAMTEC, (3) SAMTEC operation during all mission phases, (4) satellite field of view restrictions with satellite operations, and (5) effect of the SAMTEC requirements on other satellite subsystems. The SAMTEC power system was compared with a conventional planar solar array/battery power system to assess the differences in system weight, size, and operations. Features of the design include the use of an advanced multitube, vapor anode AMTEC cell design with 24% conversion efficiency, and a direct solar insolation receiver design with integral LiF salt canisters for energy storage to generate power during the maximum solar eclipse cycle. The modular generator design consists of an array of multitube AMTEC cells arranged into a parallel/series electrical network with built-in cell redundancy. The preliminary assessment indicates that the solar generator design is scalable over a 500 to 2,500-W range. No battery power is required during the operational phase of the GPS mission. SAMTEC specific power levels greater than 5 We/kg and 160 We/m{sup 2} are anticipated for a mission duration of 10 to 12 yr in orbits with high natural radiation backgrounds.

  2. The use of global positioning systems in promoting safer walking for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Brian; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-07-01

    There are about 5 million people in Europe who have dementia, approximately half of whom need daily care. A common reason why dementia sufferers are admitted to long-term care is because of "wandering", i.e. leaving home without informing a carer, thereby potentially putting themselves at risk. Common methods of managing wandering include locking doors or alerting carers when a door is opened. A new method of managing wandering is by using electronic location devices. These depend on the satellite-based global positioning system (GPS). People can wear a location device in the form of a watch or pendant, or carry it like a mobile phone. This offers affected individuals the possibility of safe walking, with the reassurance that they can be found quickly if lost. However, it is not known how effective this method is and its use raises questions about safety and individual civil liberties. GPS location is a potentially useful method of managing wandering in dementia and there is considerable pressure on caregivers from commercial organisations to adopt the technique. Research is therefore required to determine which people are best suited for such devices, how effective they are in practice and what effect they have on important outcomes. PMID:24163239

  3. Using global positioning systems to study health-related mobility and participation.

    PubMed

    Brusilovskiy, Eugene; Klein, Louis A; Salzer, Mark S

    2016-07-01

    Community participation, as indicated by mobility and engagement in socially meaningful activities, is a central component of health based on the International Classification of Health, Functioning, and Disease (WHO, 2001). Global positioning systems (GPS) technology is emerging as a tool for tracking mobility and participation in health and disability-related research. This paper fills a gap in the literature and provides a thorough description of a method that can be used to generate a number of different variables related to the constructs of mobility and participation from GPS data. Here, these variables are generated with the help of ST-DBSCAN, a spatiotemporal data mining algorithm. The variables include the number of unique destinations, activity space area, distance traveled, time in transit, and time at destinations. Data obtained from five individuals with psychiatric disabilities who carried GPS-enabled cell phones for two weeks are presented. Within- and across- individual variability on these constructs was observed. Given the feasibility of gathering data with GPS, larger scale studies of mobility and participation employing this method are warranted. PMID:27289268

  4. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances induced by atmospheric gravity waves using the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassiri, Sassan; Hajj, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Natural and man-made events like earthquakes and nuclear explosions launch atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) into the atmosphere. Since the particle density decreases exponentially with height, the gravity waves increase exponentially in amplitude as they propagate toward the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. As atmospheric gravity waves approach the ionospheric heights, the neutral particles carried by gravity waves collide with electrons and ions, setting these particles in motion. This motion of charged particles manifests itself by wave-like fluctuations and disturbances that are known as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID). The perturbation in the total electron content due to TID's is derived analytically from first principles. Using the tilted dipole magnetic field approximation and a Chapman layer distribution for the electron density, the variations of the total electron content versus the line-of-sight direction are numerically analyzed. The temporal variation associated with the total electron content measurements due to AGW's can be used as a means of detecting characteristics of the gravity waves. As an example, detection of tsunami generated earthquakes from their associated atmospheric gravity waves using the Global Positioning System is simulated.

  5. Mobile very long baseline interferometry and Global Positioning System measurement of vertical crustal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroger, Peter M.; Davidson, John M.; Gardner, Elaine C.

    1986-01-01

    Mobile Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) and Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic measurements have many error sources in common. Calibration of the effects of water vapor on signal transmission through the atmosphere, however, remains the primary limitation to the accuracy of vertical crustal motion measurements made by either technique. The two primary methods of water vapor calibration currently in use for mobile VLBI baseline measurements were evaluated: radiometric measurements of the sky brightness near the 22 GHz emission line of free water molecules and surface meteorological measurements used as input to an atmospheric model. Based upon a limited set of 9 baselines, it is shown that calibrating VLBI data with water vapor radiometer measurements provides a significantly better fit to the theoretical decay model than calibrating the same data with surface meteorological measurements. The effect of estimating a systematic error in the surface meteorological calibration is shown to improve the consistency of the vertical baseline components obtained by the two calibration methods. A detailed error model for the vertical baseline components obtained indicates current mobile VLBI technology should allow accuracies of order 3 cm with WVR calibration and 10 cm when surface meteorological calibration is used.

  6. A turn-key Concept for active cancellation of Global Positioning System L3 Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Lou; Lewis, B. M.; Edgar, C. E.; Perillat, P.; Quintero, L.; Stanimirovic, S.; Gallagher, J. S., III

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept, developed at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC) at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, for suppression of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals in the 305 m dish radio receiver path prior to backend processing. The subsystem does not require an auxiliary antenna and is intended for easy integration with radio telescope systems with a goal of being a turnkey addition to virtually any facility. We have focused on detection and cancellation of the GPS L3 signal at 1381.05 MHz which, during periodic test modes and particularly during system-wide tests, interfere with observations of objects in a range of redshifts that includes the Coma supercluster, for example. The signal can dynamically change modulation modes and our scheme has demonstrated, through simulations using actual sampled telescope data, the ability to acquire and track these signals as well as detect the mode changes in order to apply cancellation or blanking, as appropriate. The subsystem can also be adapted to GPS L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2C (1227.6 MHz), and others. A follow-up is underway to develop a prototype to deploy and evaluate at NAIC.

  7. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances induced by atmospheric gravity waves using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiri, Sassan; Hajj, George A.

    Natural and man-made events like earthquakes and nuclear explosions launch atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) into the atmosphere. Since the particle density decreases exponentially with height, the gravity waves increase exponentially in amplitude as they propagate toward the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. As atmospheric gravity waves approach the ionospheric heights, the neutral particles carried by gravity waves collide with electrons and ions, setting these particles in motion. This motion of charged particles manifests itself by wave-like fluctuations and disturbances that are known as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID). The perturbation in the total electron content due to TID's is derived analytically from first principles. Using the tilted dipole magnetic field approximation and a Chapman layer distribution for the electron density, the variations of the total electron content versus the line-of-sight direction are numerically analyzed. The temporal variation associated with the total electron content measurements due to AGW's can be used as a means of detecting characteristics of the gravity waves. As an example, detection of tsunami generated earthquakes from their associated atmospheric gravity waves using the Global Positioning System is simulated.

  8. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-06-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  9. Global Positioning System Navigation Above 76,000 km for NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke B.; Bamford, William A.; Price, Samuel R.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Long, Anne C.; Farahmand, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched in March of 2015, consists of a controlled formation of four spin-stabilized spacecraft in similar highly elliptic orbits reaching apogee at radial distances of 12 and 25 Earth radii (RE) in the first and second phases of the mission. Navigation for MMS is achieved independently on-board each spacecraft by processing Global Positioning System (GPS) observables using NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Navigator GPS receiver and the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System (GEONS) extended Kalman filter software. To our knowledge, MMS constitutes, by far, the highest-altitude operational use of GPS to date and represents a high point of over a decade of high-altitude GPS navigation research and development at GSFC. In this paper we will briefly describe past and ongoing high-altitude GPS research efforts at NASA GSFC and elsewhere, provide details on the design of the MMS GPS navigation system, and present on-orbit performance data from the first phase. We extrapolate these results to predict performance in the second phase orbit, and conclude with a discussion of the implications of the MMS results for future high-altitude GPS navigation, which we believe to be broad and far-reaching.

  10. Maintenance of Time and Frequency in the DSN Using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, P. A.; Kirk, A.; Borutzki, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep Space Network must maintain time and frequency within specified limits in order to accurately track the spacecraft engaged in deep space exploration. The DSN has three tracking complexes, located approximately equidistantly around the Earth. Various methods are used to coordinate the clocks among the three complexes. These methods include Loran-C, TV Line 10, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS is becoming increasingly important because of the accuracy, precision, and rapid availability of the data; GPS receivers have been installed at each of the DSN complexes and are used to obtain daily time offsets between the master clock at each site and UTC(USNO/NBS). Calculations are made to obtain frequency offsets and Allan variances. These data are analyzed and used to monitor the performance of the hydrogen masers that provide the reference frequencies for the DSN frequency and timing system (DFT). A brief history of the GPS timing receivers in the DSN, a description of the data and information flow, data on the performance of the DSN master clocks and GPS measurement system, and a description of hydrogen maser frequency steering using these data are presented.

  11. Flight Test Results from Real-Time Relative Global Positioning System Flight Experiment on STS-69

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young W.; Brazzel, Jack P., Jr.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Hinkel, Heather D.; Newman, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A real-time global positioning system (GPS) Kalman filter has been developed to support automated rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). The filter is integrated with existing Shuttle rendezvous software running on a 486 laptop computer under Windows. In this work, we present real-time and postflight results achieved with the filter on STS-69. The experiment used GPS data from an Osborne/Jet propulsion Laboratory TurboRouge receiver carried on the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) free flyer and a Rockwell Collins 3M receiver carried on the Orbiter. Real time filter results, processed onboard the Shuttle and replayed in near-time on the ground, are based on single vehicle mode operation and on 5 to 20 minute snapshots of telemetry provided by WSF for dual-vehicle mode operation. The Orbiter and WSF state vectors calculated using our filter compare favorably with precise reference orbits determined by the University of Texas Center for Space Research. The lessons learned from this experiment will be used in conjunction with future experiments to mitigate the technology risk posed by automated rendezvous and docking to the ISS.

  12. A Novel Sensor for Attitude Determination Using Global Positioning System Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Quinn, David A.; Markley, F. Landis; McCullough, Jon D.

    1998-01-01

    An entirely new sensor approach for attitude determination using Global Positioning System (GPS) signals is developed. The concept involves the use of multiple GPS antenna elements arrayed on a single sensor head to provide maximum GPS space vehicle availability. A number of sensor element configurations are discussed. In addition to the navigation function, the array is used to find which GPS space vehicles are within the field-of-view of each antenna element. Attitude determination is performed by considering the sightline vectors of the found GPS space vehicles together with the fixed boresight vectors of the individual antenna elements. This approach has clear advantages over the standard differential carrier-phase approach. First, errors induced by multipath effects can be significantly reduced or eliminated altogether. Also, integer ambiguity resolution is not required, nor do line biases need to be determined through costly and cumbersome self-surveys. Furthermore, the new sensor does not require individual antennas to be physically separated to form interferometric baselines to determine attitude. Finally, development potential of the new sensor is limited only by antenna and receiver technology development unlike the physical limitations of the current interferometric attitude determination scheme. Simulation results indicate that accuracies of about 1 degree (3 omega) are possible.

  13. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  14. Gravity field error analysis - Applications of Global Positioning System receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low-orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3-10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85, respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  15. High accuracy integrated global positioning system/inertial navigation system LDRD: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, T.E.; Meindl, M.A.; Fellerhoff, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report contains the results of a Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate the integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation system (INS) technologies toward the goal of optimizing the navigational accuracy of the combined GPSANS system. The approach undertaken is to integrate the data from an INS, which has long term drifts, but excellent short term accuracy, with GPS carrier phase signal information, which is accurate to the sub-centimeter level, but requires continuous tracking of the GPS signals. The goal is to maintain a sub-meter accurate navigation solution while the vehicle is in motion by using the GPS measurements to estimate the INS navigation errors and then using the refined INS data to aid the GPS carrier phase cycle slip detection and correction and bridge dropouts in the GPS data. The work was expanded to look at GPS-based attitude determination, using multiple GPS receivers and antennas on a single platform, as a possible navigation aid. Efforts included not only the development of data processing algorithms and software, but also the collection and analysis of GPS and INS flight data aboard a Twin Otter aircraft. Finally, the application of improved navigation system accuracy to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) target location is examined.

  16. Error Analysis System for Spacecraft Navigation Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, S. H.; Hart, R. C.; Hartman, K. R.; Tomcsik, T. L.; Searl, J. E.; Bernstein, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing improved space-navigation filtering algorithms to use the Global Positioning System (GPS) for autonomous real-time onboard orbit determination. In connection with a GPS technology demonstration on the Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI)/Lewis spacecraft, FDD analysts and programmers have teamed with the GSFC Guidance, Navigation, and Control Branch to develop the GPS Enhanced Orbit Determination Experiment (GEODE) system. The GEODE system consists of a Kalman filter operating as a navigation tool for estimating the position, velocity, and additional states required to accurately navigate the orbiting Lewis spacecraft by using astrodynamic modeling and GPS measurements from the receiver. A parallel effort at the FDD is the development of a GPS Error Analysis System (GEAS) that will be used to analyze and improve navigation filtering algorithms during development phases and during in-flight calibration. For GEAS, the Kalman filter theory is extended to estimate the errors in position, velocity, and other error states of interest. The estimation of errors in physical variables at regular intervals will allow the time, cause, and effect of navigation system weaknesses to be identified. In addition, by modeling a sufficient set of navigation system errors, a system failure that causes an observed error anomaly can be traced and accounted for. The GEAS software is formulated using Object Oriented Design (OOD) techniques implemented in the C++ programming language on a Sun SPARC workstation. The Phase 1 of this effort is the development of a basic system to be used to evaluate navigation algorithms implemented in the GEODE system. This paper presents the GEAS mathematical methodology, systems and operations concepts, and software design and implementation. Results from the use of the basic system to evaluate

  17. Northwest Basin and Range tectonic deformation observed with the Global Positioning System, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, W.C.; Thatcher, W.

    2005-01-01

    We use geodetic velocities obtained with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to quantify tectonic deformation of the northwest Basin and Range province of the western United States. The results are based on GPS data collected in 1999 and 2003 across five new quasi-linear networks in northern Nevada, northeast California, and southeast Oregon. The velocities show ???3 mm/yr westward movement of northern Nevada with respect to stable North America. West of longitude 119??W the velocities increase and turn northwest, parallel to Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate motion, and similar to velocities previously obtained to the south. The observations are explained by a kinematic model with three domains that rotate around Euler poles in eastern Oregon and western Idaho. Northeast California experiences internal dextral shear deformation (11.2 ?? 3.6 nstrain/yr) subparallel to Pacific/North America motion. Relative motions of the domains imply 2-5 mm/yr approximately east-west extension in northwest Nevada and 1-4 mm/yr approximately north-south contraction near the California/Oregon border. The northward decreasing approximately east-west extension in northwest Nevada is consistent with the northern termination of Basin and Range deformation, faulting and characteristic topography. No significant extension is detected in the Oregon Basin and Range. The Oregon Cascade arc moves north at ???3.5 mm/yr and is possibly influenced by the approximately eastward motion of the Juan de Fuca plate. These results disagree with secular northwest trenchward motion of the Oregon forearc inferred from paleomagnetic rotations. South of latitude 43??, however, trenchward motion exists and is consistent with block rotations, approximately east-west Basin and Range extension, and northwest Sierra Nevada translation. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Defining space use and movements of Canada lynx with global positioning system telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdett, C.L.; Moen, R.A.; Niemi, G.J.; Mech, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    Space use and movements of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) are difficult to study with very-high-frequency radiocollars. We deployed global positioning system (GPS) collars on 11 lynx in Minnesota to study their seasonal space-use patterns. We estimated home ranges with minimum-convex-polygon and fixed-kernel methods and estimated core areas with area/probability curves. Fixed-kernel home ranges of males (range = 29-522 km2) were significantly larger than those of females (range = 5-95 km2) annually and during the denning season. Some male lynx increased movements during March, the month most influenced by breeding activity. Lynx core areas were predicted by the 60% fixed-kernel isopleth in most seasons. The mean core-area size of males (range = 6-190 km2) was significantly larger than that of females (range = 1-19 km2) annually and during denning. Most female lynx were reproductive animals with reduced movements, whereas males often ranged widely between Minnesota and Ontario. Sensitivity analyses examining the effect of location frequency on home-range size suggest that the home-range sizes of breeding females are less sensitive to sample size than those of males. Longer periods between locations decreased home-range and core-area overlap relative to the home range estimated from daily locations. GPS collars improve our understanding of space use and movements by lynx by increasing the spatial extent and temporal frequency of monitoring and allowing home ranges to be estimated over short periods that are relevant to life-history characteristics. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  19. On Use of Global Positioning Technology for Solution of Wake Vortex Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Olson, Lawerence E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Improved precision of the flight paths used by aircraft to approach and depart airports is becoming available when the Global Positioning System (GPS) is implemented at airports. An overview will be given of published information on how GPS precision guidance at airports can be used to avoid encounters with the lift-generated vortices shed by preceding aircraft during landing. It is pointed out that GPS provides two needed services to bring about improved avoidance capability. Firstly, GPS pseudolites are being built and installed at airports so that, when coupled with autopilot systems currently available on subsonic transport aircraft, the aircraft can make precision approaches for zero visibility landings. The same equipment can also be used for precision approaches for wake-vortex avoidance. Secondly, regular monitoring of atmospheric motions along the approach corridor can be obtained by use of GPS equipment on board aircraft that are in the flight corridors. That is, wind velocity is determined by use of GPS equipment to measure the ground speed of the aircraft and then combined with onboard instrumentation to measure the airspeed of the aircraft. The difference between the two measurements yields the wind velocity. When the measured wind velocities are transmitted to an airport ground station they are used to monitor whether air motions adverse for safety in the flight corridor are present. If any parts of the corridor are unsafe, the spacing of the aircraft, or the location of the flight corridor being used, is modified. It is estimated that the spacings between any combination of aircraft can then be safely reduced to a uniform 3 n. mi. Information to be presented is contained in an article published in the AIAA Journal of Aircraft, May-June 1996.

  20. Evaluating home range techniques: use of Global Positioning System (GPS) collar data from chacma baboons.

    PubMed

    Pebsworth, Paula A; Morgan, Hanna R; Huffman, Michael A

    2012-10-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) collars have revolutionized the field of spatial ecology, but to date, few primate studies have used them. We fitted a free-ranging, semi-habituated, juvenile male chacma baboon (Papio hamadryas ursinus) with an automatic self-releasing GPS collar and tracked his movements for 359 days. The collar captured 4254 fixes out of 5719 programmed opportunities, a 74.4 % acquisition rate, suggesting that the collar effectively tracked this baboon in a variety of habitat types. Of the data points captured, 73.7 % were three-dimensional fixes, and of these fixes, 66.9 % were highly accurate, having a dilution of precision of less than four. We calculated home range using three protocols with three estimation methods: minimum convex polygon, fixed kernel-density estimation (KDE), and fixed r local convex hull. Using all data points and the 95 % contour, these methods created home range estimations ranging from 10.8 to 23.1 km(2) for this baboon troop. Our results indicate that the KDE output using all data locations most accurately represented our data set, as it created a continuous home range boundary that excluded unused areas and outlying, potentially exploratory data points while including all seven sleeping sites and a movement corridor. However, home range estimations generated from KDE varied from 15.4 to 18.8 km(2) depending on the smoothing parameter used. Our results demonstrated that the ad hoc smoothing parameter selection technique was a better method for our data set than either the least squares cross-validation or biased cross-validation techniques. Our results demonstrate the need for primatologists to develop a standardized reporting method which documents the tool, screening protocol, and smoothing parameter used in the creation of home range estimations in order to make comparisons that are meaningful. PMID:22476515

  1. Evaluation of Two Computational Techniques of Calculating Multipath Using Global Positioning System Carrier Phase Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan F.; Hood, Laura; Panneton, Robert J.; Saunders, Penny E.; Adkins, Antha; Hwu, Shian U.; Lu, Ba P.

    1996-01-01

    Two computational techniques are used to calculate differential phase errors on Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier war phase measurements due to certain multipath-producing objects. The two computational techniques are a rigorous computati electromagnetics technique called Geometric Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and the other is a simple ray tracing method. The GTD technique has been used successfully to predict microwave propagation characteristics by taking into account the dominant multipath components due to reflections and diffractions from scattering structures. The ray tracing technique only solves for reflected signals. The results from the two techniques are compared to GPS differential carrier phase ns taken on the ground using a GPS receiver in the presence of typical International Space Station (ISS) interference structures. The calculations produced using the GTD code compared to the measured results better than the ray tracing technique. The agreement was good, demonstrating that the phase errors due to multipath can be modeled and characterized using the GTD technique and characterized to a lesser fidelity using the DECAT technique. However, some discrepancies were observed. Most of the discrepancies occurred at lower devations and were either due to phase center deviations of the antenna, the background multipath environment, or the receiver itself. Selected measured and predicted differential carrier phase error results are presented and compared. Results indicate that reflections and diffractions caused by the multipath producers, located near the GPS antennas, can produce phase shifts of greater than 10 mm, and as high as 95 mm. It should be noted tl the field test configuration was meant to simulate typical ISS structures, but the two environments are not identical. The GZ and DECAT techniques have been used to calculate phase errors due to multipath o the ISS configuration to quantify the expected attitude determination errors.

  2. Development of a wearable global positioning system for place and health research

    PubMed Central

    Rainham, Daniel; Krewski, Daniel; McDowell, Ian; Sawada, Mike; Liekens, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Background An increasing number of studies suggest that characteristics of context, or the attributes of the places within which we live, work and socialize, are associated with variations in health-related behaviours and outcomes. The challenge for health research is to ensure that these places are accurately represented spatially, and to identify those aspects of context that are related to variations in health and amenable to modification. This study focuses on the design of a wearable global positioning system (GPS) data logger for the purpose of objectively measuring the temporal and spatial features of human activities. Person-specific GPS data provides a useful source of information to operationalize the concept of place. Results We designed and tested a lightweight, wearable GPS receiver, capable of logging location information for up to 70 hours continuously before recharging. The device is accurate to within 7 m in typical urban environments and performs well across a range of static and dynamic conditions. Discussion Rather than rely on static areal units as proxies for places, wearable GPS devices can be used to derive a more complete picture of the different places that influence an individual's wellbeing. The measures are objective and are less subject to biases associated with recall of location or misclassification of contextual attributes. This is important for two reasons. First, it brings a dynamic perspective to place and health research. The influence of place on health is dynamic in that certain places are more or less relevant to wellbeing as determined by the length of time in any location and by the frequency of activity in the location. Second, GPS data can be used to assess whether the characteristics of places at specific times are useful to explaining variations in health and wellbeing. PMID:19032783

  3. Localization of Physical Activity in Primary School Children Using Accelerometry and Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Rahel; Tomatis, Laura; Murer, Kurt; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ecological approaches have highlighted the importance of the built environment as a factor affecting physical activity. However, knowledge on children’s activity patterns is still incomplete. Particularly, data on the spatial context of physical activity is limited, which limits the potential to design location-based interventions effectively. Using global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometry, this study aimed to identify locations where children engage in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Methods Participants included 119 children (11–14 years, 57% girls) from public schools in Winterthur, Switzerland. During a regular school week between February and April 2013, children wore an accelerometer and GPS sensor for seven consecutive days. Time-matched accelerometer and GPS data was mapped with a geographic information system and each data point was assigned to one of seven defined activity settings. Both the absolute amount of MVPA and proportion of time in MVPA were calculated for every setting. Multilevel analyses accounting for the hierarchical structure of the data were conducted to investigate any gender differences. Results Children achieved most MVPA on streets (34.5%) and on school grounds (33.4%). The proportion children spent in MVPA was highest in recreational facilities (19.4%), at other schools (19.2%) and on streets (18.6%). Boys accumulated significantly more MVPA overall and on other school grounds (p < 0.05) and showed a significantly higher proportion of time in MVPA at own school and outside of Winterthur (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results indicate the importance of streets and school grounds as activity-promoting environments. The high use of streets may be an indicator for active transportation, which appears to contribute to an active lifestyle in both genders. In contrast, the school setting is more likely to encourage physical activity in boys. Recreational facilities seem to be conducive for MVPA among both

  4. Nonparametric Bayesian Filtering for Location Estimation, Position Tracking, and Global Localization of Mobile Terminals in Outdoor Wireless Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf-Allah, Mohamed

    2007-12-01

    The mobile terminal positioning problem is categorized into three different types according to the availability of (1) initial accurate location information and (2) motion measurement data. Location estimation refers to the mobile positioning problem when both the initial location and motion measurement data are not available. If both are available, the positioning problem is referred to as position tracking. When only motion measurements are available, the problem is known as global localization. These positioning problems were solved within the Bayesian filtering framework. Filter derivation and implementation algorithms are provided with emphasis on the mapping approach. The radio maps of the experimental area have been created by a 3D deterministic radio propagation tool with a grid resolution of 5 m. Real-world experimentation was conducted in a GSM network deployed in a semiurban environment in order to investigate the performance of the different positioning algorithms.

  5. An Inquiry-Based Approach to Teaching the Spherical Earth Model to Preservice Teachers Using the Global Positioning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Youngjin; Schwenz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an inquiry-based lesson to deepen preservice teachers' understanding of the spherical Earth model using the Global Positioning System. The lesson was designed with four learning goals: (1) to increase preservice teachers' conceptual knowledge of the spherical Earth model; (2) to develop preservice teachers'…

  6. A Group-learning Approach to Academic and Transferable Skills through an Exercise in the Global Positioning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Giles H.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a project based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) that offers students a chance to design and implement a mini-research program to prepare them for an undergraduate research project. Discusses the context of the GPS exercise, teaching and learning outcomes, and advantages and evaluation of the exercise. (CMK)

  7. The orbit determination of the global positioning system satellites for geodetic applications: developments and results at the Geographical Survey Institute.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.

    1989-03-01

    The subject which this paper deals with is a 1-ppm level determination of the orbits of the Global Positioning System satellites for geodetic applications. A detailed model of the observables is developed. A new method of processing the phase and the range observables simultaneously to determine the GPS orbits is presented. Results are included and discussed.

  8. Getting from Here to There and Knowing Where: Teaching Global Positioning Systems to Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Craig L.

    2011-01-01

    Global Positioning Systems' (GPS) technology is available for individuals with visual impairments to use in wayfinding and address Lowenfeld's "three limitations of blindness." The considerations and methodologies for teaching GPS usage have developed over time as GPS information and devices have been integrated into orientation and mobility…

  9. Multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver and its advantages in high-precision positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Danan; Chen, Wen; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Yu, Chao; Zheng, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuanfei

    2016-02-01

    The multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver is a high precision, low cost, and widely used emerging receiver. Using this type of receiver, the satellite and receiver clock errors can be eliminated simultaneously by forming between antenna single-differences, which is equivalent to the conventional double-difference model. However, current multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver products have not fully realized their potential to achieve better accuracy, efficiency, and broader applications. This paper introduces the conceptual design and derivable products of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers involving the aspects of attitude determination, multipath effect mitigation, phase center variation correction, and ground-based carrier phase windup calibration. Through case studies, the advantages of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers in high-precision positioning applications are demonstrated.

  10. Crustal motion in the Antarctic interior from a decade of Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Michael J.

    A decade of Global Positioning System (GPS) data have been collected at bedrock sites in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Measured motions of the crust have been examined to determine if ongoing tectonic deformation occurs within the study area, across the structural boundary between East and West Antarctica. Crustal motions are used to test for activity over the offshore Terror Rift, where young faulting is documented, and to assess locally whether the active Erebus volcano deforms the crust. Bedrock motions caused by large scale ice-mass changes that have occurred in the area since the Last Glacial Maximum are also a major focus of the study. The horizontal GPS motions record Antarctic plate motion of ˜15 mm/yr to the southeast. No deformation is observed over the Transantarctic Mountains Front Zone. Very small amounts of deformation are observed along the Terror Rift, however the recorded direction of motions may be the result of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), rather than active tectonics. Recorded motions observed to the south of Ross Island suggest that the Terror Rift continues beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. No volcanic loading signal is observed. Vertical crustal motions exhibit a down-to-the-east tilt over the study area. A suite of earth models, including more than three hundred different mantle viscosity profiles, three different lithospheric thicknesses and three different ice histories, were used to model uplift due to Glacial Isostatic Adjustment driven by ice mass change. None replicate the observed tilt. Two Relative Sea Level curves for the region also could not be replicated by GIA models examined. Comparison of GPS vertical velocities and our GIA models produce well-constrained earth models for the study area, but suggest that current ice history models for the region must be revised to replicate measured crustal motions. We compare the output of our GPS-constrained models with published crustal uplift rates used in modern ice mass balance