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Sample records for non-endocrine autoimmune disorders

  1. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or viruses) or drugs may trigger changes that confuse the immune system. This may happen more often in people who have genes that make them more prone to autoimmune disorders. ...

  2. Celiac sprue: a unique autoimmune disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rashtak, Shadi; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Celiac sprue (CS) is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy with many autoimmune features. CS involves multiple organs through immune and nonimmune processes, and is frequently associated with other autoimmune disorders. This article reviews the co-occurrence of CS with autoimmune disorders of the cutaneous, nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. The types of autoimmune disorders associated with CS and the prevalence of CS in other autoimmune disorders are also discussed. A brief review of the literature on the potential mechanisms behind these associations and the therapeutic effects of a gluten-free diet for autoimmune comorbidities in CS is also provided. PMID:20477645

  3. Pleural involvement in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Bouros, Demosthenes; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases, a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders including multiorgan involvement, can affect the pleura with various frequencies, either as a single presenting feature or as part of multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus represent the most common immunological diseases that affect the pleural cavity; however, there is considerable variation regarding the reported prevalence, natural history and prognosis of pleural involvement in both conditions. The definition of pleural disease in the remaining systemic autoimmune disorders is unquestionably imprecise and assumptive, since it is risky to support premises based on single case reports or retrospective data from very small series. In this article, we will review the manifestations of pleural disease caused by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjogren's syndrome and Wegener's granulomatosis. PMID:18477860

  4. Autoimmune disorders: gastrointestinal manifestations and endoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Alison; Merikhi, Afkhamossadat; Frank, Barbara B

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract can be involved in many autoimmune disorders, and women are affected more than men in most of the disease processes discussed. As this article outlines, gastrointestinal manifestations can be either part of the clinical presentation or complications of treatment. Depending on the disease process and the severity of symptoms, gastrointestinal evaluation and treatment can have an important role in the management of these diseases. PMID:16546029

  5. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n?=?115) and with autoimmune diseases (n?=?40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases were divided by organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The clinical, laboratory and magnetic resonance imaging features between two groups were assessed. Results Motor deficit was less frequent in NMOSD patients with non-organ-specific autoimmune diseases (p?=?0.024). Cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell and protein, serum C-reactive protein and immunoglobulin G were lower in NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases, while several autoantibodies seropositivity and thyroid indexes were significantly higher in NMOSD patients with autoimmune diseases (p??0.05). NMOSD patients with autoimmune diseases had higher brain abnormalities than NMOSD without autoimmune diseases (p?autoimmune diseases were similar. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases have high frequency of brain abnormalities. PMID:25135481

  6. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  7. Current treatment strategies in autoimmune hemolytic disorders.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a heterogeneous disease usually classified according to the thermal range of the autoantibody in warm, cold and mixed forms. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for warm AIHA. For refractory/relapsed cases, the choice is between splenectomy (effective in ?70% cases but with a presumed cure rate of 20%) and rituximab (effective in ?70-80% of cases), which is becoming the preferred second-line treatment, and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins and danazol. For severe or refractory cases, last option treatments are plasma-exchange, high-dose cyclophosphamide and alemtuzumab. As regards cold agglutinin disease, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:26343892

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps (Nets) impact upon autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kotu?a, Iwona; Manda-Handzlik, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Friend or foe? This is often asked question when it comes to neutrophil extracellular traps studies. There is no simple answer to that. At the time of their discovery they were considered to be protectors of our well-being. Excellent pathogen fighting skills were described as purely beneficial. But it was not long before those guardians of immunity reveal their dark side. What seemed to be profitable could also take its toll. They are perfectly constructed, made from nucleic deoxyribonucleic acid ornamented with cytoplasmic and granular proteins, to fight invaders. But this unique build is prone to become considered by our body as a threat. Since there is a thin line which when crossed turns a savior into enemy, it was postulated that Nets can play a significant role in autoimmune disorders pathogenesis and disease exacerbation. Recent years have brought a new insight into autoimmune disorders trying to connect the old knowledge and suspicions with modern discoveries. PMID:26557037

  9. Audiovestibular disorders as autoimmune reaction in patients with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Barozzi, S; Ginocchio, D; Socci, M; Alpini, D; Cesarani, A

    2015-09-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of cancer derived from neuroectodermal melanocytes. Melanocytes are present in the skin and hair follicles, as well as in the eye (iris and choroids), the leptomeninges, the anal canal and the inner ear. In the inner ear melanocytes are found both in the intermediate layer of the stria vascularis of the cochlea and in the dark cells of the vestibular organs. They are believed to play an important role in the production of endolymphatic potentials and in the maintenance of normal volumes of the inner ear fluids. Recently, audiovestibular dysfunctions have been demonstrated in patients treated with immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma and have been related to an autoimmune attack on the normal melanocytes of the inner ear. Melanoma is an immunogenic tumor type frequently associated with spontaneous autoimmune manifestations which seem to be associated with better prognosis. The melanoma-associated antigens are also expressed in normal melanocytes in the skin, eye and ear. We hypothesize that inner ear melanocytes could be a target of an autoimmune process in patients affected by melanoma. The immune system could produce antibodies that cross-react with both the melanoma cells and the labyrinth melanocytes causing an altered homeostasis of endolymphatic liquids and provoking some labyrinthic disorders such as vertigo, hearing loss, aural fullness and tinnitus resembling or influencing Ménière's disease. In this perspective, audiovestibular disorders could be interpreted as an attempt by the individual immune system to develop anti-tumor response. In patients affected by melanoma an autoimmune genesis has already been advocated for ocular symptoms in melanoma-associated retinopathy, where the cross-reaction happens against retinal cells. A possible role of inner ear melanocytes should be considered as a potential cause of audiovestibular disorders. Further research is needed to demonstrate a connection between melanoma and labyrinth dysfunctions such as in melanoma-associated retinopathy. PMID:26115944

  10. Post-infectious autoimmune disorders: Sydenham's chorea, PANDAS and beyond.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kyle A; Swedo, Susan E

    2015-08-18

    Infections, and the resulting immune response to these infections, have recently received increased recognition as pathogenic mechanisms for neuropsychiatric disorders. Sydenham's chorea (SC), a widely recognized post-streptococcal autoimmune disorder, represents a model for this proposed pathogenesis. In SC, a dysregulated immune response to a streptococcal infection is hypothesized to result in inflammation of neuronal networks, particularly the basal ganglia nuclei. The resulting dysfunction in the basal ganglia nuclei are hypothesized to lead to a constellation of adventitious movements and psychiatric symptoms, which investigations have shown are amenable to immunomodulatory therapies. PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal infections) has been proposed as a variant of SC, and is hypothesized to share a pathogenic mechanism, despite a unique symptom profile of predominantly psychiatric symptoms. In this review, we present the clinical aspects of both disorders, the data for potential shared etiopathogenesis between them, and the evidence for the therapeutic use of immunomodulatory therapies for the symptoms of SC and PANDAS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. PMID:25301689

  11. Paedatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection in an Indian Adolescent--A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sachin; Vaish, Supriya; Chopra, Saurabh; Singh, Vindyaprakash; Sharma, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a unique constellation of signs and symptoms that exist in a subset of children with rapid onset or exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders due to an initial autoimmune reaction to a Group A Beta Hemolytic…

  12. SLE: Another Autoimmune Disorder Influenced by Microbes and Diet?

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qinghui; Zhang, Husen; Luo, Xin M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disease. Despite years of study, the etiology of SLE is still unclear. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the disease mechanisms. In the past decade, a growing body of evidence has indicated an important role of gut microbes in the development of autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. However, such knowledge on SLE is little, though we have already known that environmental factors can trigger the development of lupus. Several recent studies have suggested that alterations of the gut microbial composition may be correlated with SLE disease manifestations, while the exact roles of either symbiotic or pathogenic microbes in this disease remain to be explored. Elucidation of the roles of gut microbes?–?as well as the roles of diet that can modulate the composition of gut microbes?–?in SLE will shed light on how this autoimmune disorder develops, and provide opportunities for improved biomarkers of the disease and the potential to probe new therapies. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contributions of diet and gut microbes to SLE occurrence and pathogenesis. PMID:26648937

  13. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  14. Biologics in children's autoimmune disorders: efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Breda, Luciana; Del Torto, Marianna; De Sanctis, Sara; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases have led to the discovery of mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmunity and have made possible the invention of new target-specific drugs. Biologic drugs, designed to inhibit specific components of the immune system, such as cytokines, cytokine gene expression, and their complex interactions, have revolutionized the treatment options in pediatric rheumatology. Only three agents are currently available for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): etanercept, at the dose of 0.8 mg/kg once weekly, adalimumab at the dose of 24 mg/m(2) every 2 weeks, and abatacept at the dose of 10 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, 4, and then every 4 weeks. They are well tolerated and relatively safe in children: Side effects are generally mild and include injection site reactions and infections. Infliximab, rilonacept, and canakinumab are also approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of pediatric autoimmune disorders and are currently investigated in JIA. This review summarizes the current state of biologic drugs, their clinical application, and their efficacy and safety in the pediatric age. PMID:20556424

  15. Useful biomarkers for assessment of hepatitis C virus infection-associated autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Deng-Ho; Ho, Ling-Jun; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2014-01-01

    During the course of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, various extrahepatic manifestations of autoimmune disorders may occur, including arthralgia/arthritis, sicca complex, purpura, cutaneous ulcer, and thyroid dysfunction. In addition, the prevalence of circulating autoantibodies is high among patients with HCV infection. Commonly detected autoantibodies in HCV-infected patients include rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, anti-SSA/anti-SSB antibody, cryoglobulin, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, anti-smooth muscle antibody, anti-liver and anti-thyroid autoantibodies. These autoantibodies may be associated with underlying autoimmune disorders or liver inflammation in HCV infection. A possible reason for antibody production is overactivation and proliferation of B lymphocytes, via the interaction with the surface protein of HCV. Because immunotherapy can cause HCV flare-up or liver damage, overdiagnosis of HCV-related autoimmune symptoms as primary autoimmune disorders should be avoided. This review describes biomarkers that are useful in clinically evaluating autoimmune manifestations and disorders associated with HCV infection. PMID:24659887

  16. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Judith M; McCombe, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways. PMID:23055689

  17. The Bcl-2 family in autoimmune and degenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Mérino, Delphine; Bouillet, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 family are essential regulators of programmed cell death and thus play a major role in the development and function of many tissues. The balance between pro-survival and pro-apoptotic members of the family decides whether a cell will live or die. This mechanism allows organisms to get rid of cells that are no longer needed or have become dangerous. Deregulation of apoptosis is a major contributing factor in the development of many diseases. A deeper understanding of how the Bcl-2 family proteins orchestrate death in normal and pathologic conditions is thus relevant not only for disease etiology, but also to try to prevent these various disorders. Experiments with transgenic and gene-ablated mice have helped elucidate the function of the different members of the Bcl-2 family and their physiological roles. The present review highlights the role of Bcl-2 family members in autoimmune and degenerative disorders, with a particular focus on the mouse models that have been used to study their function. PMID:19172396

  18. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  19. The Increased Risk for Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raevuori, Anu; Haukka, Jari; Vaarala, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana M.; Gissler, Mika; Grainger, Marjut; Linna, Milla S.; Suokas, Jaana T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research suggests autoimmune processes to be involved in psychiatric disorders. We aimed to address the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases in a large Finnish patient cohort with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Methods Patients (N?=?2342) treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1995 and 2010 were compared with general population controls (N?=?9368) matched for age, sex, and place of residence. Data of 30 autoimmune diseases from the Hospital Discharge Register from 1969 to 2010 were analyzed using conditional and Poisson regression models. Results Of patients, 8.9% vs. 5.4% of control individuals had been diagnosed with one or more autoimmune disease (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5–2.0, P<0.001). The increase in endocrinological diseases (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8–3.2, P<0.001) was explained by type 1 diabetes, whereas Crohn's disease contributed most to the risk of gastroenterological diseases (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4–2.5, P<0.001). Higher prevalence of autoimmune diseases among patients with eating disorders was not exclusively due to endocrinological and gastroenterological diseases; when the two categories were excluded, the increase in prevalence was seen in the patients both before the onset of the eating disorder treatment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1–2.1, P?=?0.02) and at the end of the follow-up (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.8, P?=?0.01). Conclusions We observed an association between eating disorders and several autoimmune diseases with different genetic backgrounds. Our findings support the link between immune-mediated mechanisms and development of eating disorders. Future studies are needed to further explore the risk of autoimmune diseases and immunological mechanisms in individuals with eating disorders and their family members. PMID:25147950

  20. Clinical and Pathological Implications of Concurrent Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders and Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, L. L.; Ferreira, R. C.; Marcello, M. A.; Vassallo, J.; Ward, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Cooccurrences of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer (DTC) have been repeatedly reported. Both CLT and DTC, mainly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), share some epidemiological and molecular features. In fact, thyroid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction has been observed in association with PTC at variable frequency, although the precise relationship between the two diseases is still debated. It also remains a matter of debate whether the association with a CLT or even an autoimmune disorder could influence the prognosis of PTC. A better understanding about clinical implications of autoimmunity in concurrent thyroid cancer could raise new insights of thyroid cancer immunotherapy. In addition, elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in autoimmune disease and concurrent cancer allowed us to identify new therapeutic strategies against thyroid cancer. The objective of this article was to review recent literature on the association of these disorders and its potential significance. PMID:21403889

  1. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in a Patient With Multiple Autoimmune Disorders and Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Zorman, Yilmaz; Ates, Gursel; Arslan, Ahmet H.; Yildiz, Yahya; Karahan Zor, Aysegul; Cicek, Sertac

    2013-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomypathy is a very rare cardiovascular syndrome leading to myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of a detectable coronary artery lesion. It is accepted as reversible left ventricular asynergy occuring typically after an intrinsic adrenergic hyperstimulation. In this report we present Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a 75-year-old patient with multiple autoimmune disorders. PMID:25478511

  2. Recognizing Autoimmune-Mediated Encephalitis in the Differential Diagnosis of Limbic Disorders.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, A J; Nunes, R H; Maia, A C M; do Amaral, L L F

    2015-12-01

    Limbic encephalitis is far more common than previously thought. It is not always associated with cancer, and it is potentially treatable. Autoantibodies against various neuronal cell antigens may arise independently or in association with cancer and cause autoimmune damage to the limbic system. Neuroimaging plays a key role in the management of patients with suspected limbic encephalitis by supporting diagnosis and excluding differential possibilities. This article describes the main types of autoimmune limbic encephalitis and its mimic disorders, and emphasizes their major imaging features. PMID:26381566

  3. Absence of some common organ-specific and non-organ-specific autoimmunity in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Nicolas; Krohn, Kai; Ranki, Annamari

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, whose loss of function leads to the escape of self-reactive T cells from the thymus and autoimmunity. APECED patients typically develop tissue-specific autoantibodies and anti-cytokine antibodies. Consequently, various endocrine and non-endocrine autoimmune disorders appear. However, only a certain number of autoimmune diseases develop, while some common autoimmune conditions have not been reported or are seen only anecdotally. Objective We investigated the clinical manifestations and occurrence of antinuclear antibodies (AN-Abs) and antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens, citrullinated peptide, and transglutaminase in 24 patients and against bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 and desmogleins 1 (Dsg1) and Dsg3 in 30 patients of a Finnish cohort of APECED patients. Results Despite the loss of central tolerance, the autoantibodies investigated were not overrepresented among the APECED patients. None of the patients had a history of autoimmune connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, or autoimmune cutaneous bullous disorders. Altogether, 25% (6/24) had low-titer (1:80) AN-Abs. Two patients had anti-BP180 antibodies and two others had anti-Dsg3 antibodies without any cutaneous or mucosal symptoms. No anti-citrullinated peptide and anti-transglutaminase reactivity was found. Conclusions The mechanisms that drives tolerance to tissue autoantigens is not fully understood as even APECED patients, who are genetically prone to develop autoantibodies, are tolerant against some common autoantigens. The hypothesis that some of the anti-cytokine antibodies commonly found in APECED patients may be protective should be investigated in larger series. PMID:23781320

  4. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10?8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  5. The Immunobiology of Tourette's Disorder, Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus, and Related Disorders: A Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Kurlan, Roger; Leckman, James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related conditions including Tourette's disorder (TD) are chronic, relapsing disorders of unknown etiology associated with marked impairment and disability. Associated immune dysfunction has been reported and debated in the literature since the late 80s. The immunologic culprit receiving the most interest has been Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which began to receive attention as a potential cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms, following the investigation of the symptoms reported in Sydenham's chorea (SC) and rheumatic fever, such as motor tics, vocal tics, and both obsessive-compulsive and attention deficit/hyperactivity symptoms. Young children have been described as having a sudden onset of these neuropsychiatric symptoms temporally associated with GAS, but without supporting evidence of rheumatic fever. This presentation of OCD and tics has been termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS). Of note, SC, OCD, and TD often begin in early childhood and share common anatomic areas—the basal ganglia of the brain and the related cortical and thalamic sites—adding support to the possibility that these disorders might share a common immunologic and/or genetic vulnerability. Relevant manuscripts were identified through searches of the PsycINFO and MedLine databases using the following keywords: OCD, immune, PANDAS, Sydenham chorea, Tourette's disorder Group A Streptococcus. Articles were also identified through reference lists from research articles and other materials on childhood OCD, PANDAS, and TD between 1966 and December 2010. Considering the overlap of clinical and neuroanatomic findings among these disorders, this review explores evidence regarding the immunobiology as well as the relevant clinical and therapeutic aspects of TD, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:20807070

  6. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  7. Interleukin-1 as a Common Denominator from Autoinflammatory to Autoimmune Disorders: Premises, Perils, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cantarini, Luca; Vitale, Antonio; Iannone, Florenzo; Anelli, Maria Grazia; Andreozzi, Laura; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rigante, Donato

    2015-01-01

    A complex web of dynamic relationships between innate and adaptive immunity is now evident for many autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, the first deriving from abnormal activation of innate immune system without any conventional danger triggers and the latter from self-/non-self-discrimination loss of tolerance, and systemic inflammation. Due to clinical and pathophysiologic similarities giving a crucial role to the multifunctional cytokine interleukin-1, the concept of autoinflammation has been expanded to include nonhereditary collagen-like diseases, idiopathic inflammatory diseases, and metabolic diseases. As more patients are reported to have clinical features of autoinflammation and autoimmunity, the boundary between these two pathologic ends is becoming blurred. An overview of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders, PFAPA syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, uveitis, pericarditis, Behçet's disease, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung diseases, and Still's disease is presented to highlight the fundamental points that interleukin-1 displays in the cryptic interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:25784780

  8. Therapeutic and preventive interventions for postulated vasoactive neuropeptide autoimmune fatigue-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Staines, Donald R

    2005-01-01

    Major advances have been made in understanding the relatively novel group of vasoactive (vasodilatory) neuropeptides (VNs) in humans. VNs comprise a novel but expanding group of substances having immunoregulation, inflammation modulation, neurotransmitter, neurotrophic, hormonal and metabolic functions. These substances may control gene expression for mRNA for themselves and their receptors. They have complex relationships with gaseous and other neurotransmitters and xenobiotic substances. Theoretical arguments have implicated these substances in autoimmune phenomena resulting in fatigue-related conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), fibromyalgia (FM) and Gulf War syndrome (GWS) but remain unproven. As well as possibly spontaneous onset, the precipitating causes of VN autoimmune dysfunction are likely to be a combination of genetic predisposition, infection and xenobiotic substances. Therapeutic and preventive possibilities for postulated VN autoimmune conditions will be influenced by the complex patholophysiology underpinning them. Some speculative possibilities are VN substitution/replacement, preservation of biological effect, epigenetic DNA modifications, plasma exchange, anti-cholinesterases, e.g., pyridostigmine, corticosteroids and other drug treatments, thymectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin and anti-idiotype antibodies, and CpG/DNA vaccines. Prevention and treatment of possible VN autoimmune fatigue-related disorders may prove to be important areas for future research and development. PMID:16042995

  9. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): Experience at a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Caitlin E.; Blackwood, R. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with obsessive compulsive disorder and/or tics. Like Sydenham’s chorea, its presumed pathogenesis consists of autoantibodies cross-reacting with neurons in response to a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection (GASI). There are currently no diagnostic laboratory findings and management ranges from antibiotic prophylaxis to intravenous immunoglobulin to plasmapheresis. The diagnosis remains controversial, resulting in inconsistent referrals and significant patient anxiety. Methods A retrospective study was performed on all patients referred to the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Patients were analyzed by demographics, medical history, co-morbidities, symptoms, prior treatment, laboratory tests, management strategies, and treatment outcomes. Results From 2003 to 2013, there were 21 patients with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Only five met the diagnostic criteria. No patient at referral had an objective scale to monitor symptoms. Eight referrals had a major psychiatric disorder, and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria (p<0.01). Discussion The majority of the patients referred with a pre-diagnosis of PANDAS do not fulfill diagnostic criteria nor do they have objective criteria for symptom monitoring. Major psychiatric disorders do not seem to be associated with PANDAS, and better physician education may prevent misdiagnoses. Multidisciplinary management is recommended. PMID:26196024

  10. Exploring the role of interleukin-22 in neurological and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Xin, Ning; Namaka, Michael Peter; Dou, Changxin; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family that has recently gained attention in regard to its recognized pathogenic role in neurological and autoimmune disorders. The pathological involvement of IL-22 has been linked to Th17 cells that are involved in its production. Its biological activity results from its ability to bind to a heterodimeric receptor consisting of IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1) and IL-10R2. Emerging evidence has identified IL-22 involvement in neurological diseases and autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), encephalitis, inflammatory myopathies, myasthenia gravis (MG), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjogren's syndrome (SS), psoriasis and Crohn's disease (CD). However, the biological activity of IL-22 is variable resulting in protective or pathogenic effects in different disease states. As such, the development of therapeutic targeting strategies to modify the biological activity of IL-22 is being explored as a promising interventional approach to treat neurological and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26311525

  11. Lyme disease and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS): an overview

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hanna; Cameron, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a complex, multisystemic illness. As the most common vector- borne disease in the United States, LD is caused by bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, with potential coinfections from agents of anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and ehrlichiosis. Persistent symptoms and clinical signs reflect multiorgan involvement with episodes of active disease and periods of remission, not sparing the coveted central nervous system. The capability of microorganisms to cause and exacerbate various neuropsychiatric pathology is also seen in pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), a recently described disorder attributed to bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in which neurologic tics and obsessive-compulsive disorders are sequelae of the infection. In the current overview, LD and PANDAS are juxtaposed through a review of their respective infectious etiologies, clinical presentations, mechanisms of disease development, courses of illness, and treatment options. Future directions related to immunoneuropsychiatry are also discussed. PMID:22393303

  12. Familial Autoimmune Thyroid Disease as a Risk Factor for Regression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A CPEA Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Cynthia A.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Dawson, Geraldine; Bernier, Raphael; Dunn, Michelle; Hyman, Susan L.; McMahon, William M.; Goudie-Nice, Julie; Hepburn, Susan; Minshew, Nancy; Rogers, Sally; Sigman, Marian; Spence, M. Anne; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Volkmar, Fred R.; Lord, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    A multicenter study of 308 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) was conducted through the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism (CPEA), sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to compare the family history of autoimmune disorders in children with ASD with and without a history of regression. A…

  13. Autoimmune phenomena and hepatitis C virus in lymphoproliferative and connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Caligaris-Cappio, F; De Leo, A M; Bertero, M T

    1997-12-01

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently detected in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders and since the virus may infect lymphocytes, the question is raised whether malignant transformation and autoimmune manifestations in the presence of HCV are HCV-related or merely fortuitous. A close association has been firmly established between HCV infection and essential type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (ECM), an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cryoprecipitable immune-complexes (IC) that may evolve into classical non Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) retaining the ability to produce cryoprecipitable rheumatoid factor (RF). It is reasonable to consider HCV as one cofactor in lymphomagenesis, even if the precise pathogenetic relationship between HCV infection, the chronic presence of cryoprecipitable IC and the development of NHL have not been established yet. Several epidemiological studies have documented the ability of chronic HCV infection to favour the production of autoAb. It is not clear why only some patients with HCV infection develop autoAb, nor why the most frequent autoAb detected in HCV-infected subjects are cryoglobulins. Though a high prevalence of anti-HCV has been found in a variety of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases, it is likely that several of these associations are fortuitous with the notable exception of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. As HCV can provoke or exacerbate inflammatory signs and cause the production of RF, it is reasonable to suspect that HCV infection may be able to trigger the development of some connective tissue diseases or to exacerbate their clinical course. Nonetheless, it is clinically prudent to conclude that the pathogenetic relationships of Sjögren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and polyarthritis with HCV infection are more likely to be regarded as mediated via the intermediate development of ECM. PMID:9498704

  14. The expanding field of IgG4-mediated neurological autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, M G; Querol, L A; Niks, E H; Plomp, J J; van der Maarel, S M; Graus, F; Dalmau, J; Illa, I; Verschuuren, J J

    2015-08-01

    At least 13 different disease entities affecting the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and connective tissue of the skin or kidneys are associated with immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) immune reactivity. IgG4 has always been considered a benign, non-inflammatory subclass of IgG, in contrast to the well-known complement-activating pro-inflammatory IgG1 subclass. A comprehensive review of these IgG4 autoimmune disorders reveals striking similarities in epitope binding and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. Mechanical interference of extracellular ligand-receptor interactions by the associated IgG4 antibodies seems to be the common/converging disease mechanism in these disorders. PMID:26032110

  15. Maternal autoimmune diseases and the risk of autism spectrum disorders in offspring: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Wei; Zhong, Xue-Shan; Jiang, Li-Na; Zheng, Xue-Yan; Xiong, Yi-Quan; Ma, Shu-Juan; Qiu, Min; Huo, Shu-Ting; Ge, Jing; Chen, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Although inherited and immune disorder factors are known to be involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), controversy still exists as to whether maternal autoimmune disease is an independent risk of ASD in offspring. We aimed to quantitatively summarize the risk of ASD in offspring in relation to maternal autoimmune diseases. A literature search in Pubmed, Web of science, Embase, and China national knowledge internet was conducted to identify relevant studies. Pooled odd ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were computed by STATA version 12.0. Nine case-control studies and one cohort studies comprising 9775 cases and 952,211 controls were included in this study. A positive association between maternal autoimmune diseases and the risk of ASD in offspring was identified assuming a fixed effect model (pooled OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.23-1.46; I(2), 27.9%). There were statistically significant associations between maternal autoimmune diseases developed during pregnancy or maternal thyroid disease and the risk of ASD in offspring (pooled OR, 1.30, 1.29, respectively). Maternal autoimmune disease is likely to be an independent risk factor of ASD in offspring. PMID:26327239

  16. Pathological mourning: a key factor in the psychopathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. A special contribution.

    PubMed

    Paulley, J W

    1983-01-01

    Prolonged mourning has been recorded as a precipitant life event in RA and other autoimmune disorders, but other events such as retirement, redundancy and injury have also been identified. The author's submission is that pathological mourning is present in all patients with AI disease, and that other events such as those mentioned are only precipitant because they uncover mourning until then kept in check by occupation and use of work as a drug. When time for reflection and loneliness allows long suppressed ambivalent feelings, guilt and bitterness to surface, remorse over 'unfinished business' increasingly dominates the patient's thoughts. Children and young people rarely have the opportunity to mourn, thus early loss is often paramount and is awakened from the unconscious years later when further losses of key figures or surrogates, including pets, occur or are anticipated. Psychotherapy involves helping patients resolve their pathological mourning. PMID:6657873

  17. Dimethyl Fumarate Protects Pancreatic Islet Cells and Non-Endocrine Tissue in L-Arginine-Induced Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Lourdes; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Li, Shiri; Masuda, Yuichi; Takasu, Chie; Takasu, Mizuki; Vo, Kelly; Farzaneh, Seyed H.; Stamos, Michael J.; Ichii, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disorder resulting in the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which ultimately leads to impairment of the endocrine and exocrine functions. Dimethyl Fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by FDA for treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. DMF's unique anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make it an interesting drug to test on other inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of DMF on islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in a rodent model of L-Arginine-induced CP. Methods Male Wistar rats fed daily DMF (25 mg/kg) or vehicle by oral gavage were given 5 IP injections of L-Arginine (250 mg/100 g×2, 1 hr apart). Rats were assessed with weights and intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT, 2 g/kg). Islets were isolated and assessed for islet mass and viability with flow cytometry. Non-endocrine tissue was assessed for histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lipid peroxidation level (MDA). In vitro assessments included determination of heme oxygenase (HO-1) protein expression by Western blot. Results Weight gain was significantly reduced in untreated CP group at 6 weeks. IPGTT revealed significant impairment in untreated CP group and its restoration with DMF therapy (P <0.05). Untreated CP rats had pancreatic atrophy, severe acinar architectural damage, edema, and fatty infiltration as well as elevated MDA and MPO levels, which were significantly improved by DMF treatment. After islet isolation, the volume of non-endocrine tissue was significantly smaller in untreated CP group. Although islet counts were similar in the two groups, islet viability was significantly reduced in untreated CP group and improved with DMF treatment. In vitro incubation of human pancreatic tissue with DMF significantly increased HO-1 expression. Conclusion Administration of DMF attenuated L-Arginine-induced CP and islet function in rats. DMF treatment could be a possible strategy to improve clinical outcome in patients with CP. PMID:25198679

  18. Immunological profile of HTLV-1-infected patients associated with infectious or autoimmune dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana Grazziela Alves; Passos, Livia; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4(+)HLA-DR(+), CD8(+) T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-?/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  19. Immunological Profile of HTLV-1-Infected Patients Associated with Infectious or Autoimmune Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+ T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-?/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  20. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes].

    PubMed

    Maurer, A; Schwarting, A; Kahaly, G J

    2011-11-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGA) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a genetically caused dysfunction of the immune system leads to a destruction of endocrine glands with subsequent loss of function. In addition non-endocrine autoimmune diseases are also frequently present. Due to different patterns of inheritance and occurrence of disease a differentiation is made between juvenile PGA (also called APECED, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy) with a monogenetic alteration of the AIRE (autoimmune regulator) gene, different ethnic distribution and a typical triad of diseases and the adult form, mainly conditioned by mutations of the HLA (human leukocyte antigens) alleles on chromosome 6. The article will briefly deal with the very rare IPEX (immune dysfunction, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked) syndrome, where the FOXP3 gene on chromosome X is altered. Important for the diagnosis are the clinical appearance and functional tests of the endocrine glands and the testing for antibodies. Additionally for PGA I and IPEX genetic testing is advisable. Currently patient-adjusted hormone replacement therapy is very important and screening of family members is recommended. PMID:22033826

  1. Autoimmune encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming; Hacohen, Yael; Vincent, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are a relatively new and challenging field in autoimmune neurologic disease and of major clinical importance in children and adults. The antibodies bind to cell-surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The presence of seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders, alongside neuroimaging and electrophysiological features may indicate a specific antibody-mediated disorder. However, phenotypic variation may be observed in children with the same antibody. Regardless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement. PMID:26022169

  2. A Possible Mechanism behind Autoimmune Disorders Discovered By Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Analysis in Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Östensson, Malin; Montén, Caroline; Bacelis, Jonas; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Adamovic, Svetlana; Ek, Johan; Ascher, Henry; Pollak, Elisabet; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Agardh, Daniel; Wahlström, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Torinsson-Naluai, Åsa

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an intestinal inflammation triggered by gluten, a storage protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Similar to other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease is the result of an immune response to self-antigens leading to tissue destruction and production of autoantibodies. Common diseases like celiac disease have a complex pattern of inheritance with inputs from both environmental as well as additive and non-additive genetic factors. In the past few years, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding genetic risk variants behind many common diseases and traits. To complement and add to the previous findings, we performed a GWAS including 206 trios from 97 nuclear Swedish and Norwegian families affected with celiac disease. By stratifying for HLA-DQ, we identified a new genome-wide significant risk locus covering the DUSP10 gene. To further investigate the associations from the GWAS we performed pathway analyses and two-locus interaction analyses. These analyses showed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and identified a set of candidate mechanisms and genes of which some were selected for mRNA expression analysis using small intestinal biopsies from 98 patients. Several genes were expressed differently in the small intestinal mucosa from patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to intestinal mucosa from control patients. From top-scoring regions we identified susceptibility genes in several categories: 1) polarity and epithelial cell functionality; 2) intestinal smooth muscle; 3) growth and energy homeostasis, including proline and glutamine metabolism; and finally 4) innate and adaptive immune system. These genes and pathways, including specific functions of DUSP10, together reveal a new potential biological mechanism that could influence the genesis of celiac disease, and possibly also other chronic disorders with an inflammatory component. PMID:23936387

  3. Biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: systematic literature review and analysis of a monocentric cohort.

    PubMed

    Piga, Matteo; Chessa, Elisabetta; Ibba, Valentina; Mura, Valentina; Floris, Alberto; Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The use of biologic drugs has been linked with the paradoxical development of systemic and organ specific autoimmune processes. The aim of this study was to describe the features of biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders (AIRD) through a systematic review and a cohort study of 707 adult patients affected with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Ankylosing Spondylitis (SA) and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). The literature search identified 2687 articles of which 21 were considered relevant for the present study, accounting for 26 case reports. The cohort analysis retrieved 3 cases. According to clinical manifestations and kidney histology the identified AIRD cases were classified as: a) glomerulonephritis associated with systemic vasculitis (GNSV), b) glomerulonephritis in lupus-like syndrome (GNLS), c) isolated autoimmune renal disorders (IARD). Twenty-two out of 29 cases with AIRD were reported in patients affected by RA, 5 in AS and 2 in PsA. The biologic drug most frequently associated with development of AIRD was Etanercept (15 cases, 51.7%), followed by Adalimumab (9 cases, 31.0%) and Infliximab (3 cases, 10.3%) while Tocilizumab and Abatacept were reported in 1 case (3.4%) for each. Thirteen out of 29 (44.8%) cases were classified as affected by IARD, 12 (41.3%) as GNSV and 4 (13.9%) as GNLS. Worse prognosis was associated with GNSV and lack of biologic withdrawal. Although rare, AIRD may be life-threatening and may lead to renal failure and death. If AIRD occurs, biologic drugs must be stopped and patient should be treated according to clinical manifestations and kidney biopsy findings. PMID:24840285

  4. Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Iannello, Silvia; Cavaleri, Antonina; Milazzo, Paolina; Cantarella, Santi; Belfiore, Francesco

    2003-08-01

    The authors recently reported the occurrence of low fasting serum triglyceride (TG) and high free fatty acid (FFA) levels in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. TG estimation in diverse groups of patients with autoimmune disease or hyperactive immune response confirmed the occurrence of a similar decrease of TG. In some patients, serum FFA level was also evaluated. TG value in lean and obese patients was compared with that in lean (n = 108) and obese (n = 208) control subjects without autoimmune disease. In patients affected by autoimmune chronic thyroiditis with enhanced concentration of antithyroglobulin antibodies and without thyroidal failure (n = 24), lean and obese patients had reduced TG (-69/%, P < .01 and -52%, P < .0001, respectively). Both lean and obese patients affected by chronic active B or C hepatitis (n = 26), with autoantibodies and without signs of hepatic insufficiency or cirrhosis, presented reduced TG (-57%, P < .01 and -61%, P < .001, respectively). A marked TG decrease (-73%, P < .001) was observed in the lean patients affected by lupus-like syndrome (n = 7). The lean and obese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis (n = 11) showed TG decrease (-66%, P < .01 and -55%, P < .05, respectively). In patients affected by anamnestic allergy or atopic dermatitis/asthma (n = 66), both lean and obese, TGs were reduced (-67%, P < .0001 and -62%, P < .001, respectively). In isolated cases of diverse autoimmune diseases (scleroderma, APECED [autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis, and ectodermal dystrophy], urticaria or urticarial vasculitis, Reiter or Sjogren syndromes, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barré syndrome) (n = 14), decreased TG was also observed both in the lean and obese subjects (-59%, P < .01 and -57%, P < .01, respectively). Concerning FFA (n = 69), value in lean patients (n = 22) vs that in lean controls (n = 18) was increased (520 +/- 31 vs 299 +/- 30 mcEq/L, +74%, P < .001), whereas value in obese patients (n = 18) vs that in obese control subjects (n = 11) was decreased (542 +/- 34 vs 774 +/- 62, -30%, P < .01). This opposite behavior of FFA in lean and obese patients needs to be confirmed. Data in this study seem to indicate that low TG value may be a precocious marker of autoimmunity or immune system hyperreactivity. PMID:14600656

  5. Frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autistic spectrum disorders and association with family history of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Valicenti-McDermott, Maria; McVicar, Kathryn; Rapin, Isabelle; Wershil, Barry K; Cohen, Herbert; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2006-04-01

    This is a cross-sectional study that compares lifetime prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) and children with typical development and with other developmental disabilities (DDs) and examines the association of GI symptoms with a family history of autoimmune disease. A structured interview was performed in 50 children with ASD and 2 control groups matched for age, sex, and ethnicity-50 with typical development and 50 with other DDs. Seventy-four percent were boys with a mean age of 7.6 years (SD, +/-3.6). A history of GI symptoms was elicited in 70% of children with ASD compared with 28% of children with typical development (p <.001) and 42% of children with DD (p =.03). Abnormal stool pattern was more common in children with ASD (18%) than controls (typical development: 4%, p =.039; DD: 2%, p =.021). Food selectivity was also higher in children with ASD (60%) compared with those with typical development (22%, p =.001) and DD (36%, p =.023). Family history of autoimmune disease was reported in 38% of the ASD group and 34% of controls and was not associated with a differential rate of GI symptoms. In the multivariate analysis, autism (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 3.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.7-11.2) and food selectivity (adjusted OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.8-9.1) were associated with GI symptoms. Children with ASD have a higher rate of GI symptoms than children with either typical development or other DDs. In this study, there was no association between a family history of autoimmune disease and GI symptoms in children with ASD. PMID:16685179

  6. Selective interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and lymphoid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Priscilla N; Romero, Donna L; Yang, Yibin; Shaffer, Arthur L; Chaudhary, Divya; Robinson, Shaughnessy; Miao, Wenyan; Rui, Lixin; Westlin, William F; Kapeller, Rosana; Staudt, Louis M

    2015-12-14

    Pathological activation of the Toll-like receptor signaling adaptor protein MYD88 underlies many autoimmune and inflammatory disease states. In the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the oncogenic MYD88 L265P mutation occurs in 29% of cases, making it the most prevalent activating mutation in this malignancy. IRAK4 kinase accounts for almost all of the biological functions of MYD88, highlighting IRAK4 as a therapeutic target for diseases driven by aberrant MYD88 signaling. Using innovative structure-based drug design methodologies, we report the development of highly selective and bioavailable small molecule IRAK4 inhibitors, ND-2158 and ND-2110. These small molecules suppressed LPS-induced TNF production, alleviated collagen-induced arthritis, and blocked gout formation in mouse models. IRAK4 inhibition promoted killing of ABC DLBCL lines harboring MYD88 L265P, by down-modulating survival signals, including NF-?B and autocrine IL-6/IL-10 engagement of the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In ABC DLBCL xenograft models, IRAK4 inhibition suppressed tumor growth as a single agent, and in combination with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib or the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199. Our findings support pharmacological inhibition of IRAK4 as a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune disorders, in a genetically defined population of ABC DLBCL, and possibly other malignancies dependent on aberrant MYD88 signaling. PMID:26621451

  7. Overlapping genetic susceptibility variants between three autoimmune disorders: rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Genome wide association studies, replicated by numerous well powered validation studies, have revealed a large number of loci likely to play a role in susceptibility to many multifactorial diseases. It is now well established that some of these loci are shared between diseases with similar aetiology. For example, a number of autoimmune diseases have been associated with variants in the PTPN22, TNFAIP3 and CTLA4 genes. Here we have attempted to define overlapping genetic variants between rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes (T1D) and coeliac disease (CeD). Methods We selected eight SNPs previously identified as being associated with CeD and six T1D-associated SNPs for validation in a sample of 3,962 RA patients and 3,531 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Sequenom MassArray platform and comparison of genotype and allele frequencies between cases and controls was undertaken. A trend test P-value < 0.004 was regarded as significant. Results We found statistically significant evidence for association of the TAGAP locus with RA (P = 5.0 × 10-4). A marker at one other locus, C1QTNF6, previously associated with T1D, showed nominal association with RA in the current study but did not remain statistically significant at the corrected threshold. Conclusions In exploring the overlap between T1D, CeD and RA, there is strong evidence that variation within the TAGAP gene is associated with all three autoimmune diseases. Interestingly a number of loci appear to be specific to one of the three diseases currently studied suggesting that they may play a role in determining the particular autoimmune phenotype at presentation. PMID:20854658

  8. There might be a role for CD200 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Akman-Karaka?, Ay?e; Yalcin, Arzu Didem; Koç, Saliha; Gumuslu, Saadet; ?enol, Ye?im Yi?iter; Özkesici, Birgül; Genc, Gizem Esra; Ergun, Erkan; Ongut, Gozde; Yilmaz, Ertan; Uzun, Soner; Alpsoy, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Background Soluble CD200 (sCD200) is a novel immuno-effective molecule, which acts to regulate inflammatory and acquired immune responses. Recently, our study group showed that sCD200 was present in serum and blister fluid in a patient with bullous pemphigoid and a patient with toxic epidermal necrolysis. We therefore planned this study to evaluate the sCD200 levels of autoimmune and inflammatory skin disorder patients and to compare them with that of healthy controls. Maleral/Methods Our study included 30 consecutive patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 15 with pemphigus vulgaris, and 15 healthy controls. Clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed on the same day. Psoriasis patients were also assessed with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and pemphigus patients were assessed using the Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI). Levels of sCD200 in the serum samples were quantified using ELISA kits. Results The serum sCD200 level was observed to be statistically significantly higher in patients with psoriasis vulgaris (96.7±15.8) compared to patients with pemphigus vulgaris (76.2±14.6), (p<0.001) and healthy controls (26.8±7.0) (p<0.001). The serum sCD200 levels were observed to be statistically significantly higher in patients with pemphigus vulgaris compared with that in healthy controls (p<0.001). In addition, there was a statistically significant correlation between serum sCD200 levels and PDAI (r=0.987, p=0.001). Nevertheless, there was no statistically significant correlation between serum sCD200 levels and PASI (r=0.154, p=0.407). Conclusions sCD200 might play a role in immune response in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory skin disorders. However, it remains to be fully elucidated how sCD200 can orchestrate inflammatory response in psoriasis and pemphigus. PMID:24157657

  9. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a ?-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26142116

  10. Autoimmune encephalitis update

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated immune-mediated disorders of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group. These disorders include the classic paraneoplastic neurologic disorders and the more recently described autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors that occur with and without a cancer association. Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes that can be severe and prolonged. In contrast to the classic paraneoplastic disorders that are poorly responsive to tumor treatment and immunotherapy, autoimmune encephalitis often responds to these treatments, and patients can have full or marked recoveries. As early treatment speeds recovery, reduces disability, and decreases relapses that can occur in about 20% of cases, it is important that the immune pathogenesis of these disorders is recognized. PMID:24637228

  11. Evidence of association between FKBP1B and thyroid autoimmune disorders in a large Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Abdellatif; Mbarki, Fadhila; Rebai, Ahmed; Karray, Foued; Jouida, Jomaa; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2004-05-01

    FKBP1B belongs to immunophilins superfamily and functions as a cytosolic receptor protein of FK506. The role of FKBP1B in the immunosuppressive pathway of FK506 is well established. Previously, we reported a strong evidence of linkage between D2S171 microsatellite marker (located in vicinity of FKBP1B gene) and susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs). In this study, we report linkage disequilibrium between the dimorphism (C/T) in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of FKBP1B gene and susceptibility to AITDs. DNAs were extracted from a large Tunisian family affected with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and analysed by PCR-RFLP using DraIII restriction enzyme. Our results showed an excess of transmission of the allele C from heterozygous parents to affected offspring (transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) = 4.76; p = 0.012). This suggests a linkage disequilibrium of 3' UTR (C/T) SNP with AITDs. Moreover, The FBAT analysis gives a significant association with the C allele under the recessive model (chi2 = 5.50; p = 0.018). These results support the involvement of FKBP1B gene in the genetic susceptibility to the AITDs development in the studied family. PMID:15497458

  12. 99th Dahlem Conference on Infection, Inflammation and Chronic Inflammatory Disorders: Triggering of autoimmune diseases by infections

    PubMed Central

    Getts, M T; Miller, S D

    2010-01-01

    Human autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are linked genetically to distinct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and other immune modulators. However, genetic predisposition is only one risk factor for the development of these diseases, and low concordance rates in monozygotic twins as well as geographical distribution of disease risk suggest a critical role for environmental factors in the triggering of these autoimmune diseases. Among potential environmental factors, infections have been implicated in the onset and/or promotion of autoimmunity. This review will discuss human autoimmune diseases with a potential viral cause, and outline potential mechanisms by which pathogens can trigger autoimmune disease as discerned from various animal models of infection-induced autoimmune disease. PMID:20415846

  13. Familial characteristics of autoimmune and hematologic disorders in 8,406 multiple myeloma patients: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola; Linet, Martha S; McMaster, Mary L; Gridley, Gloria; Hemminki, Kari; Goldin, Lynn R

    2006-06-15

    A population-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate risk of developing multiple myeloma (MM) associated with personal history of autoimmune diseases and occurrence of autoimmune and selected hematologic disorders in first-degree relatives. Data were obtained for all (n = 8,406) MM cases diagnosed in Sweden (1958-1998), with linkable relatives, 16,543 matched controls and first-degree relatives of cases (n = 22,490) and controls (n = 44,436). Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to quantify the risk of MM in relation to personal/family history of 32 autoimmune disorders. Familial aggregation of malignancies was evaluated in a marginal survival model using relatives as the cohort. The risk for MM was significantly elevated among subjects with a personal history of pernicious anemia (OR = 3.27; 2.22-4.83) and individuals with a family history of systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 2.66; 1.12-6.32). Compared with controls, relative risk (RR) of MM was significantly increased (RR = 1.67; 1.02-2.73) in relatives of cases, particularly relatives of probands aged > or =65 at diagnosis (RR = 2.50; 1.19-5.27). Risks were nearly 4-fold elevated among female relatives (RR = 3.97; 1.54-10.2) and among relatives of female probands (RR = 3.74; 1.58-8.83). MM cases had more cases of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) among their relatives than controls, but the numbers were too small to be conclusive. There was generally no increase in risk of MM in probands whose relatives had hematologic malignancies other than MM. These findings do not support a strong association between personal/familial autoimmune diseases and MM. However, MM itself shows significant familial aggregation, implicating the etiologic importance of this type of hematological neoplasm and perhaps MGUS in germ line genes. PMID:16395700

  14. Bone Marrow or Blood Stem Cell Transplants in Children With Severe Forms of Autoimmune Disorders or Certain Types of ...

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sept. 25, 2013 Bone Marrow or Blood Stem Cell Transplants in Children With Severe Forms of Autoimmune ... HSCT may help your child. Understanding Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants What are hematopoietic stem cells? Hematopoietic stem ...

  15. Inflammasomes and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Patrick J; McDermott, Michael F; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2011-02-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family members are cytosolic sensors of microbial components and danger signals. A subset of NLRs control inflammasome assembly that results in caspase-1 activation and, in turn, IL-1? and IL-18 production. Excessive inflammasome activation can cause autoinflammatory disorders, including the hereditary periodic fevers. Autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases form a disease spectrum of aberrant, immune-mediated inflammation against self, through innate and adaptive immunity. However, the role of inflammasomes in autoimmune disease is less clear than in autoinflammation, despite the numerous effects IL-1? and IL-18 can have on shaping adaptive immunity. We summarize the role of inflammasomes in autoimmune disorders, highlight the need for a better understanding of inflammasomes in these conditions and offer suggestions for future research directions. PMID:21163704

  16. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  17. Hepatitis C virus syndrome: A constellation of organ- and non-organ specific autoimmune disorders, B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Fallahi, Poupak; Piluso, Alessia; Antonelli, Alessandro; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by possible development of both liver and extrahepatic disorders. The tropism of HCV for the lymphoid tissue is responsible for several immune-mediated disorders; a poly-oligoclonal B-lymphocyte expansion, commonly observed in a high proportion of patients with HCV infection, are responsible for the production of different autoantibodies and immune-complexes, such as mixed cryoglobulins. These serological alterations may characterize a variety of autoimmune or neoplastic diseases. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis due to small-vessel deposition of circulating mixed cryoglobulins is the prototype of HCV-driven immune-mediated and lymphoproliferative disorders; interestingly, in some cases the disease may evolve to frank malignant lymphoma. In addition, HCV shows an oncogenic potential as suggested by several clinico-epidemiological and laboratory studies; in addition to hepatocellular carcinoma that represents the most frequent HCV-related malignancy, a causative role of HCV has been largely demonstrated in a significant percentage of patients with isolated B-cells non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The same virus may be also involved in the pathogenesis of papillary thyroid cancer, a rare neoplastic condition that may complicate HCV-related thyroid involvement. Patients with HCV infection are frequently asymptomatic or may develop only hepatic alteration, while a limited but clinically relevant number can develop one or more autoimmune and/or neoplastic disorders. Given the large variability of their prevalence among patients’ populations from different countries, it is possible to hypothesize a potential role of other co-factors, i.e., genetic and/or environmental, in the pathogenesis of HCV-related extra-hepatic diseases. PMID:25848462

  18. Pituitary gonadotropins and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Cristina; Brancia, Carla; D'Amato, Filomena; Noli, Barbara

    2014-03-25

    Autoimmune disease occurs when the body produces an inappropriate immune response against its own tissues producing antibodies, called autoantibodies, reacting to specific antigens. Studies regarding the presence of an autoimmune process specifically involving gonadotropins date from over than 20 years ago, when antibodies to gonadotropic-secreting cells were found by immunofluorescence in sera from a group of patients affected by cryptorchidism. Later on, antibodies detected by the same technique, and directed to the same cells were also found at high titer in sera from patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, Kallmann's syndrome, lymphocytic hypophysitis with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, as well as autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. Concerning the autoimmune target/s within the gonadotropic cells, rarely autoantibodies were found labeling gonadotropins while in a large number of cases, auto-antigens remained to be identified. Since pituitary gonadotropins are fundamental for the sexual maturity and reproductive mechanisms, patients with infertility were largely investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the presence of circulating antibodies likely interfering with gonadotropin activity. In infertile women, autoantibodies to gonadotropins were found related to ovarian autoimmunity, ovarian disorders that cause infertility and also associated with in vitro fertilization treatments. In infertile men, autoantibodies to gonadotropins may alter the testicular spermatogenesis and cause apoptosis of the spermatogenic cells. In conclusion, circulating antibodies were found labeling gonadotropic cells and/or gonadotropins, and in both cases they could create dysfunctions in gonadotropin related mechanism. The intriguing question of what can cause the production of such autoantibodies is not clear yet. PMID:24153235

  19. Complement and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come. PMID:23615835

  20. The Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) preserves fertility in male and female Balb/c mice.

    E-print Network

    Warren, Bryce

    2014-12-31

    The Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) contributes to central immune tolerance through the induction of self-antigen expression within the thymus. In humans, a defect in AIRE results in a multi-organ autoimmune disorder known as Autoimmune Polyglandular...

  1. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  2. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an autoimmune disease in which people cannot tolerate gluten because it damages the lining of their small ... or osteomalacia thinning of the hair and skin acne diabetes high blood pressure cataracts, a clouding in ...

  3. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  4. Immunologic derangement preceding clinical autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Dellavance, A; Coelho Andrade, L E

    2014-10-01

    Autoantibodies are valuable markers for the recognition of autoimmune diseases. Over the last 25 years, several investigators have consistently shown that autoantibodies precede the clinical onset of cognate diseases by years or decades. This phenomenon, regularly observed in the natural history of autoimmune diseases, indicates that autoimmunity develops through successive stages across a variable period of time until the characteristic manifestations of disease are clinically apparent. Recent evidence indicates that the pre-clinical stages of autoimmune diseases involve a series of immunologic derangements and that this process is dynamic and progressive. During the years preceding clinical disease onset, there is progressive intensification in the humoral autoimmune response, characterized by increases in autoantibody titer, avidity, number of immunoglobulin isotypes, and spread of epitopes and of autoantigens targeted. This scenario is reminiscent of cancer processes that develop slowly by means of progressive stages, and may be interrupted by early detection and therapeutic intervention. Therefore, it might be reasoned that early intervention may be more effective in reverting the less firmly established autoimmune abnormalities at the pre-clinical stage of autoimmunity. With the continuous progress in novel immunologic therapeutic strategies, one can envision the possibility that early intervention at pre-clinical stages may lead to prevention of overt disease development and even cure of the autoimmune disorder. PMID:25228734

  5. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  6. The IRF5-TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, Leah C; Zoller, Erin E; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A; Rupert, Andrew M; Lessard, Christopher J; Vaughn, Samuel E; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A; Nath, Swapan K; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G; Gøransson, Lasse G; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T; Lessard, James A; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L; Segal, Barbara M; Merrill, Joan T; James, Judith A; Guthridge, Joel M; Scofield, R Hal; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L; Jacob, Chaim O; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M; Tsao, Betty P; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D; Gorlova, Olga Y; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Harley, John B; Kaufman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-15

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5-TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5-TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10(-49); OR = 1.38-1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10(-27)-10(-32), OR = 1.7-1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5-TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5-TNPO3. PMID:25205108

  7. Autoimmune thyrotoxicosis: diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ponto, Katharina A; Kahaly, George J

    2012-09-01

    Autoimmune thyrotoxicosis or Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States (full text available online: http://education.amjmed.com/pp1/249). GD occurs more often in women (ratio 5:1) and has a population prevalence of 1-2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to GD is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, and the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies. GD is a systemic autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid-antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) expressing tissues, i.e. orbit, skin, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens. Stimulatory autoantibodies in GD activate the TSHR leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Diagnosis of GD is straightforward in a patient with a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow on neck ultrasound) thyroid gland, associated orbitopathy, biochemically confirmed thyrotoxicosis, positive TSHR autoantibodies, and often a family history of autoimmune disorders. PMID:22938935

  8. Comorbidity of Allergic and Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Previous clinical and genetic studies have suggested autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is associated with immunological abnormalities involving cytokines, immunoglobulins, inflammation, and cellular immunity, but epidemiological reports are still limited. Patients with ASDs were identified in the National Health Insurance Database from 1996 to…

  9. [Pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Sgarbi, José Augusto; Maciel, Rui M B

    2009-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder affecting 2% to 5% of the population in Western countries. Clinical presentation varies from hyperthyroidism in Graves' Disease to hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors appears to be of fundamental importance to initiate the process of thyroid autoimmunity. It has been postulated that 79% of the susceptibility to develop AITD is attributed to genetic factors, while environmental factors contribute to 21%. The identified AITD susceptibility genes include immune-modulating genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), CD40 molecule, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN22), and thyroid-specific genes, including TSH receptor (TSHR) and thyroglobulin (TG). The exact nature of the role environmental factors play in AITD is still not well known, but the involvement of several factors such as iodine diet content, stress, drugs and infections has been reported. However, there is no clear evidence of causality and the mechanisms by which environmental factors trigger thyroid autoimmunity in genetically predisposed individuals remain not fully understood. Knowledge of the precise mechanisms of interaction between environmental factors and genes in inducing thyroid autoimmunity could result in the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:19347180

  10. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II.

    PubMed

    Amr, Bashar S; Mamillapalli, Chaitanya

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders. PMID:26078736

  11. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Bashar S.; Mamillapalli, Chaitanya

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders. PMID:26078736

  12. Could ehrlichial infection cause some of the changes associated with leukemia, myelodysplastic diseases and autoimmune disorders, and offer antibiotic treatment options?

    PubMed

    Kallick, Charles A; Friedman, Daniel A; Nyindo, Mramba B A

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesize that a large group of medical conditions of unknown etiology including leukemia, multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic and autoimmune disorders, may be associated with or caused by an obscure group of intracellular obligate parasitic bacteria named Ehrlichia/Anaplasma (EA). Ensconced in the stem cells of the bone marrow, EA may disrupt the normal development and function of many of the cells of immunity, manifesting itself as different syndromes. Recent studies of the activity of EA suggest direct effects on the immune system consistent with the manifestations of leukemia. We reference here three leukemia patients with direct or indirect evidence of EA infection. Moreover, EA have been shown to be most sensitive to rifamycins. Two moribund leukemia patients with levels of platelets and white cells incompatible with life were treated with therapeutic doses of Rifampin. Though they did not survive, their condition improved dramatically for a time, suggesting Rifampin provided some therapeutic benefit. We assert that these results warrant more extensive study. PMID:26394545

  13. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This is called an autoimmune disease. (“Autoimmune” means immunity against the self.) The Immune System Autoimmune Diseases ... disease. Unfortunately, because these drugs also suppress normal immunity, they leave the body at risk for infection. ...

  14. Reduction of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cells in migraine: Is migraine an autoimmune disorder?

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Murugesan; Parthasarathy, Varadarajan

    2016-01-15

    Migraine is believed to be a chronic neurological disorder with the exact aetiology being unknown. But, there is a debate on the role of immune dysfunction in migraine pathophysiology. Hence, authors made a debut attempt to explore the link between lymphocyte subset populations and migraine. A significant increase in CD4(+) and decrease in CD8(+) population were observed in migraine patients compared to healthy volunteers. Interestingly, the immunoregulator CD4(+)CD25(+) levels were less in migraine patients compared to the healthy volunteers. The results of the present study indicate that failure of immunoregulation could be implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. PMID:26711570

  15. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64-15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59-27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  16. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  17. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zekeridou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and a related spectrum of inflammatory CNS disorders are unified by detection of a serum autoantibody specific for the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel, which is abundant in astrocytic foot processes. The classic clinical manifestations of NMO are optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. Newly recognized manifestations of AQP4 autoimmunity include lesions of circumventricular organs and skeletal muscle. NMO is commonly relapsing, is frequently accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, and sometimes occurs in a paraneoplastic context. The goals of treatment are to minimize neurologic disability in the acute attack and thereafter to prevent relapses and cumulative disability. The disease specificity of AQP4 immunoglobulin (Ig) G approaches 100% using optimized molecular-based detection assays. Clinical, immunohistopathologic, and in vitro evidence support this antibody being central to NMO pathogenesis. Current animal models yield limited histopathologic characteristics of NMO, with no clinical deficits to date. Recent descriptions of a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein autoantibody in a minority of patients with NMO spectrum phenotype who lack AQP4-IgG predict serologic delineation of additional distinctive disease entities. PMID:26185772

  18. Skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rashtak, Shadi; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases present with varied and broad-ranging cutaneous manifestations. Connective tissue disorders have a plethora of skin manifestations such as rheumatoid nodules in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic plaques in psoriatic arthritis, acne and pustulosis in SAPHO syndrome, livedo reticularis and ulceration in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and xerosis in Sjögren syndrome. Cutaneous manifestations of autoimmune vasculitides such as polyarteritis nodosa, Kawasaki disease, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, Behcet disease, Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome range from papules, subcutaneous nodules and livedo reticularis, to palpable purpura, hemorrhagic bulla and ulcerating lesions. Pathological skin manifestations in autoimmune endocrinopathies include pretibial myxedema/dermopathy in Graves' disease, diabetic dermopathy and necrobiosis lipoidica in type I autoimmune diabetes mellitus, candidiasis, ectodermal dysplasia, vitiligo and alopecia areata in APECED and uniform hyperpigmentation of the skin in Addison's disease. Autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (with erythema nodosum), gluten-sensitive enteropathy (with dermatitis herpetiformis), autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (with jaundice and pruritus), hematologic/oncologic disorders such as acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (with skin manifestations ranging from pruritic maculopapular eruptions and lichen planus-like lesions to generalized scleroderma), and paraneoplastic autoimmune dermatoses are discussed as well. PMID:18460895

  19. Worldwide population distribution of the common LCE3C-LCE3B deletion associated with psoriasis and other autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence of the importance of copy number variants (CNV) in genetic diversity among individuals and populations, as well as in some common genetic diseases. We previously characterized a common 32-kb insertion/deletion variant of the PSORS4 locus at chromosome 1q21 that harbours the LCE3C and LCE3B genes. This variant allele (LCE3C_LCE3B-del) is common in patients with psoriasis and other autoimmune disorders from certain ethnic groups. Results Using array-CGH (Agilent 244 K) in samples from the HapMap and Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP) collections, we identified 54 regions showing population differences in comparison to Africans. We provided here a comprehensive population-genetic analysis of one of these regions, which involves the 32-kb deletion of the PSORS4 locus. By a PCR-based genotyping assay we characterised the profiles of the LCE3C_LCE3B-del and the linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern between the variant allele and the tag SNP rs4112788. Our results show that most populations tend to have a higher frequency of the deleted allele than Sub-Saharan Africans. Furthermore, we found strong LD between rs4112788G and LCE3C_LCE3B-del in most non-African populations (r2 >0.8), in contrast to the low concordance between loci (r2 <0.3) in the African populations. Conclusions These results are another example of population variability in terms of biomedical interesting CNV. The frequency distribution of the LCE3C_LCE3B-del allele and the LD pattern across populations suggest that the differences between ethnic groups might not be due to natural selection, but the consequence of genetic drift caused by the strong bottleneck that occurred during “out of Africa” expansion. PMID:23594316

  20. Seronegative autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Cristiano; Conti, Fabrizio; Conigliaro, Paola; Mancini, Riccardo; Massaro, Laura; Valesini, Guido

    2009-09-01

    A close relationship exists between autoimmunity and autoantibodies; despite this, some patients are persistently negative for disease-specific autoantibodies. These conditions have been defined as seronegative autoimmune diseases. Although the prevalence of seronegative autoimmune diseases is low, they may represent a practical problem because they are often difficult cases. There are also situations in which autoantibodies are positive in healthy subjects. In particular, three different conditions can be described: latent autoimmunity, preclinical autoimmunity, and postclinical autoimmunity. Here, we analyze briefly the meaning of autoantibody negativity in the seronegative autoimmune diseases, focusing in particular on the specificities associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19758132

  1. Autoimmune Thyroiditis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rosalind S.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is the most common thyroid disorder in the pediatric age range. The disease results from an as yet poorly characterized defect or defects in immunoregulation and a cascade of events progressing from lymphocyte infiltration of the thyroid, to T-cell- and cytokine-mediated thyroid follicular cell injury, and apoptotic cell death. Approximately 70% of disease risk has been attributed to genetic background with environmental factors being important in triggering disease in susceptible individuals. The contribution of individual genes is small and probably polymorphisms in multiple genes play a role. Some immunosusceptibility genes affect immune recognition or response in general, while others are thyroid-specific. Environmental agents may act through an epigenetic mechanism. Antibodies (Abs) to a variety of thyroid-specific antigens are detectable in a majority of patients, but the role of Abs in mediating cell injury and death is unclear and only thyrotropin (TSH) receptor Abs significantly affect thyroid function by interfering with (or stimulating) the action of TSH. Nonetheless, thyroid peroxidase (TPO) Abs and thyroglobulin (Tg) Abs, present in a majority of patients, are valuable diagnostically as markers of underlying autoimmune thyroid destruction. TSH receptor blocking Abs are found in ˜18% of children and adolescents with severe hypothyroidism and, when persistent, may identify an adolescent likely to have a baby with TSH receptor blocking Ab-induced congenital hypothyroidism. AIT may coexist with other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Although the most common age at presentation is adolescence, the disease may occur rarely in children <1 year of life. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23154164

  2. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    There are two types of autoimmune pancreatitis. Type 1 is a part of a polyexocrinopathy syndrome associated with an elevation of serum igG4. Other organs might be involved: salivary glands, biliary ducts, retroperitoneum, kidneys, etc. Relapse risk is elevated and evolution to exocrine and endocrine insufficiencies is possible. Type 2 is not linked to 16gG4 and might be associated to inflammatory bowel diseases that may occur before, during or after pancreatitis. Relapse risk is lower than for type 1. Main clinical manifestations are jaundice (type 1) or acute pancreatitis (type 2). The diagnosis relies mainly on a fine analysis of ductal abnormalities on MRCP with thick slices. Pancreatic lesions might be diffuse, multifocal or pseudotumoral. In the latter case, there is a high risk of misdiagnosis leading to inappropriate pancreatic resection. In doubtful cases, a pancreatic biopsy is warranted. Indications for treatment rely on symptoms. Corticosteroids and rarely immunosuppressive therapy or rituximab are the basis of treatment. PMID:25668826

  3. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders. PMID:26696795

  4. Thyroid autoimmunity and environment.

    PubMed

    Tanda, M L; Piantanida, E; Lai, A; Lombardi, V; Dalle Mule, I; Liparulo, L; Pariani, N; Bartalena, L

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs) are the result of a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, the former account for about 70-80% of liability to develop AITDs. However, at least 20-30% is contributed by environmental factors, which include certainly smoking (at least for Graves' disease and orbitopathy), probably stress, iodine and selenium intake, several drugs, irradiation, pollutants, viral and bacterial infections, allergy, pregnancy, and post-partum. Evidence for the intervention of these factors is often limited, and the mechanisms whereby environmental factors may concur to the onset of AITDs are in many instances unclear. Nevertheless, gene-environment interaction seems a fundamental process for the occurrence of AITDs. PMID:19343619

  5. Thyroid autoimmunity as a window to autoimmunity: An explanation for sex differences in the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Stephen J; Mu, Ying

    2015-06-21

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), predominately Graves? disease and Hashimoto?s thyroiditis, comprise the most common autoimmune diseases in humans. Both have the production of anti-thyroid antibody as an important aspect and both are much more prevalent in females, being at least 10 times more common than in males. Using these two clues, a hypothesis for the initiation of thyroid autoimmunity is proposed that helps to make the case that the thyroid is one of the most sensitive sites for autoimmunity and helps account for the prevalence and the observed sex differences in AITDs and associated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). The primary mechanisms proposed involve the underlying state of inflammation as a result of the adipokines, especially leptin, TNF-?, and IL-6, and the receptors able to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP?s) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP?s) through Toll-like receptors (TLR) and others receptors present on thyrocytes. The adipokines are produced by adipose tissue, but have hormone-like and immune modulating properties. As the levels of leptin are significantly higher in females, an explanation for the sex difference in thyroid autoimmunity emerges. The ability of the thyrocytes to participate in innate immunity through the TLR provides an adjuvant-like signal and allows for the action of other agents, such as environmental factors, viruses, bacteria, and even stress to provide the initiation step to break tolerance to thyroid self-antigens. Seeing the thyroid as one of the most sensitive sites for autoimmunity, means that for many autoimmune disorders, if autoimmunity is present, it is likely to also be present in the thyroid - and that that condition in the thyroid was probably earlier. The evidence is seen in multiple autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25576242

  6. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders. PMID:26264940

  7. Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Per; Kono, Dwight H.

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing on a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity some similarities do exist and a working model is proposed. PMID:20078109

  8. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  9. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  11. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  12. Th17 response and inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Waite, Janelle C; Skokos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17) cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17) pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets. PMID:22229105

  13. Deleterious versus protective autoimmunity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Milos; Stojanovic, Ivana; Marjanovic, Goran; Zivkovic, Nikola; Cvetanovic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorder of central nervous system, in which myelin specific CD4(+) T cells have a central role in orchestrating pathological events involved in disease pathogenesis. There is compelling evidence that Th1, Th9 and Th17 cells, separately or in cooperation, could mediate deleterious autoimmune response in MS. However, the phenotype differences between Th cell subpopulations initially employed in MS pathogenesis are mainly reflected in the different patterns of inflammation introduction, which results in the development of characteristic pathological features (blood-brain barrier disruption, demyelination and neurodegeneration), clinically presented with MS symptoms. Although, autoimmunity was traditionally seen as deleterious, some studies indicated that autoimmunity mediated by Th2 cells and T regulatory cells could be protective by nature. The concept of protective autoimmunity in MS pathogenesis is still poorly understood, but could be of great importance in better understanding of MS immunology and therefore, creating better therapeutic strategies. PMID:25944389

  14. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens. PMID:26357634

  15. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  16. Soluble Fc epsilon RII/CD23 in patients with autoimmune diseases and Epstein-Barr virus-related disorders: analysis by ELISA for soluble Fc epsilon RII/CD23.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, T; Nanba, T; Kato, H; Hori, K; Inamoto, T; Kumagai, S; Yodoi, J

    1994-02-01

    The low-affinity Fc receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RII/CD23) and its soluble form (sCD23, IgE-binding factor) have multiple functions, and enhanced levels of these are associated with various immunological diseases. We established two sensitive ELISA systems using enzyme-conjugated mAb and biotinylated mAb. The detection limits of the ELISA systems were 0.03 and 1.0 ng/ml, which showed good correlation in the range 1.0-10 ng/ml. In the ELISA system using enzyme-conjugated mAb, the average sCD23 concentration in 303 normal healthy volunteers was 1.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml. In the ELISA system using biotinylated mAb, sCD23 levels in normal healthy volunteers showed almost the same values. In patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease, the sCD23 levels were significantly higher than those in normal individuals. Furthermore, in Epstein-Barr virus-related disorders after liver transplantation with immunosuppression, plasma levels of sCD23 rapidly increased to more than 12 ng/ml when clinical symptoms were evident. In addition, the sCD23 values remained high, although elevated GOT levels gradually decreased to standard values and EBV hepatitis improved. These data suggest that sCD23 levels are a sensitive marker of autoimmune diseases and EBV-related disorders in addition to allergic disorders. The ELISA system for sCD23 may be an additional diagnostic tool in estimating the clinical courses of these diseases. PMID:8069529

  17. Smell and autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; de Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Roberto; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-08-01

    The sense of smell is an ancient sensory modality vital for sampling and perceiving the chemical composition of surrounding environments. Olfaction involves a pathway of biochemical and electrophysiological processes, which allows the conversion of molecular information into sensations. Disturbances in the olfactory function have been investigated mainly in neurological/neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; impaired sense of smell has been associated with depressed mood. Only recently, smell capability was tested in other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Shoenfeld and colleagues opened this chapter showing that patients affected with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have disturbances in their olfactory functions and revealed its association with neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease. This evidence was confirmed in experimental models and replicated in other SLE populations. The connection between autoimmunity and the sense of smell was lately emphasized by studies on patients with Sjögren's syndrome and in patients with other autoimmune/immune-mediated diseases, such as polydermatomyositis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and hereditary angioedema. Genetic susceptibility and hormonal and environmental factors may play a role in these conditions. Olfactory receptor gene clusters are located in proximity to key locus of susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as the major histocompatibility complex, suggesting not only a physic linkage, but a functional association. Nonetheless, gender- and hormone-mediated effects are fundamental in the development of autoimmune diseases. The different connections between smell and autoimmunity, genes and hormones may suggest that this is another tessera of a mosaic which is waiting the answer of Oedipus. PMID:23233263

  18. Solving the puzzle of autoimmunity: critical questions

    PubMed Central

    Smilek, Dawn E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in delineating the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune disease, the puzzle that reveals the true picture of these diverse immunological disorders is yet to be solved. We know that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci as well as many different genetic susceptibility loci with relatively small effect sizes predispose to various autoimmune diseases and that environmental factors are involved in triggering disease. Models for mechanisms of disease become increasingly complex as relationships between components of both the adaptive and innate immune systems are untangled at the molecular level. In this article, we pose some of the important questions about autoimmunity where the answers will advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and improve the rational design of novel therapies. How is autoimmunity triggered, and what components of the immune response drive the clinical manifestations of disease? What determines whether a genetically predisposed individual will develop an autoimmune disease? Is restoring immune tolerance the secret to finding cures for autoimmune disease? Current research efforts seek answers to these big questions. PMID:25750735

  19. Using T-Cells for Transplantation and Autoimmune Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Transplant complications and autoimmune diseases are primarily caused by T-cell immune responses against normal host tissue or transplanted tissues. Current treatment for these disorders is often not effective, and is typically associated with significant side effects, including global immune suppression. Researchers at NCI's Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch have developed a cellular therapy to treat graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) that results from hematopoetic transplant and other autoimmune disorders.

  20. Autoimmune primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Silva, C A; Yamakami, L Y S; Aikawa, N E; Araujo, D B; Carvalho, J F; Bonfá, E

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as sustained amenorrhea, increased follicle-stimulating hormone and low estrogen levels, whereas diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is characterized as regular menses and alterations of ovarian reserve tests. POI of autoimmune origin may be associated with adrenal autoimmunity, non-adrenal autoimmunity or isolated. This autoimmune disease is characterized by serum ovarian, adrenocortical or steroidogenic cell autoantibodies. POI of adrenal autoimmune origin is the most frequent type observed in 60-80% of patients. Clinically, amenorrhea is the hallmark of POI, however before menstruation stops completely, irregular cycles occur. Infertility, hot flushes, vaginal atrophy, and dyspareunia are also common. Autoimmune oophoritis is characterized by mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate in the theca cells of growing follicles, with early stage follicles without lymphocytic infiltration. This infiltrate includes plasma, B and T-cells. A novel classification criterion for autoimmune POI/DOR is proposed subdividing in three distinct categories (possible, probable and confirmed) according to autoantibodies, autoimmune disease and ovarian histology. Unfortunately, up to date guidelines for the treatment of autoimmune oophoritis are not available. Strategies to POI treatment include hormone replacement and infertility therapy. Assisted conception with donated oocytes has been proven to achieve pregnancy by intra cytoplasmic sperm injection in POI women. PMID:24418305

  1. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the ?-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28? T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  2. Angiotensin receptors, autoimmunity, and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Zhou, Cissy Chenyi; Ramin, Susan M; Kellems, Rodney E

    2007-09-15

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorder that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite being a leading cause of maternal death and a major contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity, the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia are poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that women with preeclampsia have autoantibodies that activate the angiotensin receptor, AT1, and that autoantibody-mediated receptor activation contributes to pathophysiology associated with preeclampsia. The research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune disease. PMID:17785770

  3. The epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-02-15

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been suspected to be caused by inflammation or brain-reactive antibodies associated with the autoimmune diseases. However, the associations could also be caused by shared genetic factors or common etiologic components such as infections. Infections can induce the development of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies, possibly affecting the brain. Autoimmune diseases and brain-reactive antibodies should be considered by clinicians in the treatment of individuals with psychotic symptoms, and even if the association is not causal, treatment would probably still improve quality of life and survival. PMID:24199668

  4. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Summit. Read the press release ! Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two important events for Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month. The State of Autoimmune Disease: a National Summit ...

  5. MDSC in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, James G.; Gorham, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were first described nearly two decades ago. Until recently, however, descriptions of MDSC populations were found almost exclusively in animal models of cancer or in cancer patients. Over the last few years, an increasing number of reports have been published describing populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of autoimmune disease. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSC in cancer - where these cells likely inhibit tumor immunity - in the context of autoimmunity, MDSC have the potential to suppress the autoimmune response, thereby limiting tissue injury. A logical corollary of this hypothesis is that a failure of endogenous MDSC to appropriately control autoimmune T cell responses in vivo may actually contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. PMID:21310255

  6. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity. PMID:24900918

  7. Molecular Diagnosis in Autoimmune Skin Blistering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Otten, J.V.; Hashimoto, T.; Hertl, M.; Payne, A.S.; Sitaru, C.

    2014-01-01

    Blister formation in skin and mucous membranes results from a loss of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion and is a common outcome of pathological events in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune and genetic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, or injury by physical and chemical factors. Autoantibodies against structural components maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion induce tissue damage in autoimmune blistering diseases. Detection of these autoantibodies either tissue-bound or circulating in serum is essential to diagnose the autoimmune nature of disease. Various immunofluorescence methods as well as molecular immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, belong to the modern diagnostic algorithms for these disorders. There is still a considerable need to increase awareness of the rare autoimmune blistering diseases, which often show a severe, chronic-relapsing course, among physicians and the public. This review article describes the immunopathological features of autoimmune bullous diseases and the molecular immunoassays currently available for their diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:24160488

  8. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiyangzi; Shi, Na; Li, Mengtao; Chen, Fei; Niu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26432094

  9. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and rheumatoid arthritis, but their pathogenetic significance remains to be established. Nevertheless, the capacity of certain stress proteins to bind to multiple proteins in the nucleus and cytoplasm both physiologically and during stress or injury to cells, suggests that stress proteins may be important elements in the "immunogenic particle" concept of the origin of antinuclear and other autoantibodies. In short, this fascinating group of proteins, so mysterious only a few years ago, has impelled truly extraordinary new lines of investigation into the nature of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. PMID:2055095

  10. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  11. Evaluation of autoimmune thyroid disease in melasma.

    PubMed

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Maleki, Nasrollah; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Abedkouhi, Selma

    2015-06-01

    Melasma is one of the most frequently acquired hyperpigmentation disorders clinically characterized by symmetrical brown patches on sun-exposed areas. To date, few studies have been conducted about the relationship between thyroid autoimmun-ity and melasma. To evaluate the thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in nonpregnant women with melasma. A total of 70 women with melasma and 70 age-matched healthy women with no history of melasma were enrolled in the study. We studied the thyroid hormone profile in both groups. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Patients with melasma had 18.5% frequency of thyroid disorders, and 15.7% had positive anti-TPO, while subjects from the control group had a 4.3% frequency of thyroid abnormalities, and only 5.7% had positive anti-TPO. There was a significantly higher prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in women with melasma compared with control group (P = 0.008). This study suggests that there is a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and melasma. However, to make recommendations on screening for thyroid disease in patients with melasma, future research of good methodological quality is needed. PMID:25810215

  12. Autoimmunity in 2014.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Our PubMed search for peer-reviewed articles published in the 2014 solar year retrieved a significantly higher number of hits compared to 2013 with a net 28 % increase. Importantly, full articles related to autoimmunity constitute approximately 5 % of immunology articles. We confirm that our understanding of autoimmunity is becoming a translational paradigm with pathogenetic elements rapidly followed by new treatment options. Furthermore, numerous clinical and pathogenetic elements and features are shared among autoimmune diseases, and this is well illustrated in the recent literature. More specifically, the past year witnessed critical revisions of our understanding and management of antiphospholipid syndrome with new exciting data on the pathogenicity of the serum anti-beta2 glycoprotein autoantibody, a better understanding of the current and new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, and new position papers on important clinical questions such as vaccinations in patients with autoimmune disease, comorbidities, or new classification criteria. Furthermore, data confirming the important connections between innate immunity and autoimmunity via toll-like receptors or the critical role of T regulatory cells in tolerance breakdown and autoimmunity perpetuation were also reported. Lastly, genetic and epigenetic data were provided to confirm that the mosaic of autoimmunity warrants a susceptible individual background which may be geographically determined and contribute to the geoepidemiology of diseases. The 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world should be cumulatively regarded as part of an annus mirabilis in which, on a different level, the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston was attended by over 16,000 participants with over selected 3000 abstracts. PMID:26335699

  13. The epigenetics of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Francesca; Folci, Marco; Baccarelli, Andrea; Selmi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Concordance rates in monozygotic twins are lower than 50% while genome-wide association studies propose numerous significant associations representing only a minority of patients. These lines of evidence strongly support other complementary mechanisms involved in the regulation of genes expression ultimately causing overt autoimmunity. Alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation are the two major epigenetic mechanisms that may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoimmune diseases. In recent years, several studies both in clinical settings and experimental models proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. We herein discuss what we currently know and what we expect will come in the next future. Ultimately, epigenetic treatments already being used in oncology may soon prove beneficial also in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21278766

  14. Autoimmunity and the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A H; Addison, D J

    1983-01-01

    Structurally and therefore antigenically the retina is a complex tissue. Since it develops as an extension from the neural tube it shares with the brain several cell membranes and cytoplasm associated antigens including those present in neurofilaments of the various neurones and the glial filaments of the astrocytes. The advent of monoclonal antibodies has helped to dissect, in detail, the antigenic makeup of the retina. Nervous system antigens (NS-3, 4 and 7) are generously represented in the retina. At least in the chick eye there seems to be a concentration gradient of retinal antigens along a dorsoventral axis which is believed to provide means by which neurones of developing retinal signal and receive the positional information necessary for the formation of specific synapses. It now seems certain that organ-specific antigens are presented not only in the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium but also in the retinal ganglion cells and the astrocytes. Photoreceptor outer-segment contains soluble antigens which when injected in rats, rabbits, guinea-pigs or monkeys produce varying degrees of intraocular inflammation leading to uveitis, retinal detachment, photoreceptor degeneration and occasionally retinal vasculitis. Both cell-mediated and humoral immunity to photoreceptor antigen has been demonstrated in various types of uveitis (including toxoplasmosis and sarcoidosis), pars planitis, vitriitis, Behçets disease, sympathetic ophthalmitis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, birdshot retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal vasculitis. Retinal autoimmunity is also found in retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy, particularly after Argon laser photocoagulation. Antibodies to retinal antigens are also found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic immune disorders without ocular involvement. The precise pathogenetic role of retinal autoimmunity in eye disease is therefore uncertain. It may simply represent an epiphenomenon which develops afer retinal damage due to physical, micro-organismal or immunological insult. Alternatively it is possible that although autoimmunity does not initiate ocular inflammation it perpetuates and maintains the inflammatory state and produces further damage to ocular tissues. PMID:6611615

  15. Autoimmune diseases and venous thromboembolism: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, Bengt; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is major health problem and is sometimes complicated by lethal pulmonary embolism (PE). Disturbances of the coagulation and anticoagulation systems are important risk factors for VTE. Comparative studies suggest that coagulation and innate immunity have a shared evolutionary origin. It is therefore unsurprising that the immune and coagulation systems are linked, with many molecular components being important for both systems. Systemic inflammation modulates thrombotic responses by suppressing fibrinolysis, upregulating procoagulant, and downregulating anticoagulants, and autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and Behçet’s syndrome have been linked to an increased risk of VTE. Recent reports have further shown that a majority of autoimmune and immune-mediated disorders are linked to an increased risk of venous thrombosis, PE, or VTE. For instance, a Swedish nationwide study found that the risk of PE was increased in the first year after hospitalization for 33 different autoimmune disorders. Especially high risks were noted for several autoimmune diseases such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, ulcerative colitis, and SLE. Another study from England, also based on hospitalization data, found that immune-mediated disorders were associated with an increased risk of VTE compared with other medical causes of hospitalization. Multiple mechanisms may operate and disease-specific factors, such as cardiolipin antibodies, have been identified. However, inflammation by itself appears to change the hemostatic balance in a thrombogenic direction. Recent epidemiological studies, together with previous experimental and clinical studies, indicate that autoimmune disorders should not only be viewed as inflammatory disorders, but also hypercoagulable disorders. Research to identify thrombotic risk factors, elucidate the mechanisms involved, and investigate prophylactic regiments is needed. The present review describes the epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence for the connection between VTE and autoimmune and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:22937487

  16. Altered Th17 cells and Th17/regulatory T-cell ratios indicate the subsequent conversion from undifferentiated connective tissue disease to definitive systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Szodoray, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Barath, Sandor; Csipo, Istvan; Nagy, Gabor; El-Hage, Fadi; Osnes, Liv T; Szegedi, Gyula; Bodolay, Edit

    2013-12-01

    A shift in the balance between Th17-cells and regulatory T-cells (Treg) is an important feature of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), and may also contribute to their development. Hereby, we assessed the distribution of peripheral Th17 and Treg-cells in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD), the forerunner of SAIDs and followed these parameters during the development towards definitive SAIDs. Fifty-one UCTD patients were investigated and followed-up for 3 years. Flow cytometry was used to identify and follow three cell-populations: Th17-cells (CD4+IL-17+ T-cells), natural regulatory T-cells (CD4(+)CD25(bright)FoxP3(+); nTregs) and IL-10 producing Type-1 regulatory T-cells (CD4+IL-10+ T-cells; Tr1). Altogether 37.3% of these patients progressed into SAIDs. Th17-cells were increased in UCTD vs. controls, which further increased in those, whom developed SAIDs eventually. The Th17/nTreg ratio gradually increased from controls through UCTD patients, reaching the highest values in SAID-progressed patients. Regarding the Th17/Tr1 ratios, a similar tendency was observed moreover Th17/Tr1 could distinguish between UCTD patients with, or without subsequent SAID progression in a very early UCTD stage. Various immunoserological markers showed association with Th17 and Th17/nTreg at baseline, indicating the consecutive development of a distinct SAID. The derailed Th17/Treg balance may contribute to disease progression therefore could function as a prognostic marker. PMID:23974054

  17. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009–June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  18. Interferon-? and Systemic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K.M.; Cauvi, D.M.; Toomey, C.B; Morris, K.V.; Kono, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    The term interferon describes a family of proteins consisting of three major types (I, II, III) which differ in their primary protein sequences, cognate receptors, genetic loci, and cell types responsible for their production. The interferons, especially types I and II, overlap significantly in the genes they control resulting in a shared spectrum of diverse biological effects which includes regulation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. As such, the interferons are major effectors in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, especially systemic autoimmunity. The type I IFNs, because they are produced during the early stages of the innate immune response, are thought to play the foremost role in autoimmune responses. However, numerous studies have found that the single type II IFN, IFN-?, plays an essential role in the development and severity of systemic autoimmunity, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. This is supported by animal studies where IFN-? is uniformly required in both spontaneous and induced models of lupus. Although expression of IFN-? in cells of the innate immune system is almost immediate after activation, expression in adaptive immunity requires a complex orchestration of cellular interactions, signaling events and epigenetic modifications. The multifaceted nature of IFN-? in adaptive immunity identifies numerous possible therapeutic targets that, because of the essential contribution of IFN-? to systemic autoimmunity, have the potential for producing significant benefits. PMID:23998448

  19. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  20. Reconceiving autoimmunity: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2015-06-21

    Three interconnected positions are advocated: (1) although serving as a useful model, the immune self does not exist as such; (2) instead of a self/nonself demarcation, the immune system 'sees' itself, i.e., it does not ignore the 'self' or attack the 'other;' but exhibits a spectrum of responses, which when viewed from outside the system appear as discrimination of 'self' and 'nonself' based on certain criteria of reactivity. When immune reactions are conceived in terms of normal physiology and open exchange with the environment, where borders dividing host and foreign are elusive and changing, host defense is only part of the immune system's functions, which actually comprise two basic tasks: protection, i.e., to preserve host integrity, and maintenance of organismic identity. And thus (3) if the spectrum of immunity is enlarged, differentiating low reactive 'autoimmune' reactions from activated immune responses against the 'other' is only a matter of degree. Simply, all immunity is 'autoimmunity,' and the pathologic state of immunity directed at normal constituents of the organism is a particular case of dis-regulation, which appropriately is designated, autoimmune. Other uses of 'autoimmunity' and its congeners function as the semantic remnants of Burnet's original self/nonself theory and should be replaced. A new nomenclature is proposed, concinnity, which more accurately designates the physiology of the animal's ordinary housekeeping economy mediated by the immune system than 'autoimmunity' when used to describe such normal functions. PMID:24880023

  1. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  2. The role of autoimmunity in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahbod; Akbari Asbagh, Firouzeh

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous syndrome with several causative factors. Autoimmune mechanisms are involved in pathogenesis of 4-30 % of POF cases. The present review focuses on the role of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of POF. The evidences for an autoimmune etiology are: demonstration of ovarian autoantibodies, the presence of lymphocytic oophoritis, and association with other autoimmune disorders. Several ovarian antigenic targets have been identified in POF patients. The oocyte seems to be the most often targeted cell. Lymphocytic oophoritis is widely present in POF associated adrenal insufficiency. Addison?s disease is one of the most common autoimmune disorders associated with POF. Early detection of this potentially life threatening disease was recommended in several studies. The gold standard for detecting autoimmune POF is ovarian biopsy. This procedure is not recommended due to unknown clinical value, expense, and risks. Several immunoassays have been proposed as substitute diagnostic tools. Nevertheless, there is no clinically proven sensitive and specific serum test to confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune POF or to anticipate the patient’s chance of developing POF or associated diseases. Some authors suggested the possible effects of immuno-modulating therapy on the resumption of ovarian function and fertility in a selected group of autoimmune POF patients. However, in most instances, this treatment fails to reverse the course of the disease. Numerous studies illustrated that standard treatment outcome for infertility is less effective in the presence of ovarian autoimmunity. The antibody-induced damage could be a pathogenic factor. Nevertheless, the precise cause remains obscure. PMID:26568748

  3. [MAIT cells in autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant TCR? chain: V?7.2-J?33 in humans and V?19-J?33 in mice. They are restricted by a nonpolymorphic MHC-related molecule-1 (MR1), and cells are selected in the thymus. Interestingly, MAIT cells require B cells as well as commensal flora for their peripheral expansion. MAIT cells display antimicrobial capacity. Recently, vitamin metabolites were demonstrated as antigens created by intestinal flora for MAIT cells. MAIT cells play a protective role against autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of human multiple sclerosis (MS), wheras they play a pathogenic role in murine models of arthritis. In patients with autoimmune diseases, the frequency of MAIT cells in peripheral blood was significantly reduced. The frequency of MAIT cells reflected the disease activity in MS patients, suggesting the involvement of MAIT cells in the regulation of autoimmune diseases. PMID:24598064

  4. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or service advertised on this site. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease What is autoimmunity? How is it connected ... reaction. The immune system can attack just the ear, attack the ear and some other body part ...

  5. Primary autoimmune myelofibrosis in a 36-year old patient presenting with isolated extreme anemia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fabio P S; Konoplev, Sergej N; Lu, Huifang; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Primary autoimmune myelofibrosis is a very rare condition characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, bone marrow fibrosis with lymphoid aggregates, and by the finding of autoantibodies in peripheral blood, suggesting a systemic autoimmune process. Patients can be frequently misdiagnosed as having the more common disorder primary myelofibrosis, a myeloproliferative neoplasm. We report the case of a patient with primary autoimmune myelofibrosis with emphasis on the clinical and pathological features that lead to the diagnosis. PMID:19748119

  6. Experimental autoimmune hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) has been hindered by the inaccessibility of the inner ear to biopsy and the lack of workable animal models. A report in this issue of the JCI describes a mouse model of CD4+ T cell–mediated ASNHL induced by immunization with peptides from the inner ear–specific proteins cochlin and ?-tectorin. PMID:15085190

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  9. Naturally Occurring Anthraquinones: Chemistry and Therapeutic Potential in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Anthraquinones are a class of aromatic compounds with a 9,10-dioxoanthracene core. So far, 79 naturally occurring anthraquinones have been identified which include emodin, physcion, cascarin, catenarin, and rhein. A large body of literature has demonstrated that the naturally occurring anthraquinones possess a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as cathartic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, diuretic, vasorelaxing, and phytoestrogen activities, suggesting their possible clinical application in many diseases. Despite the advances that have been made in understanding the chemistry and biology of the anthraquinones in recent years, research into their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential in autoimmune disorders is still at an early stage. In this paper, we briefly introduce the etiology of autoimmune diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 10 million worldwide, and the role of chemotaxis in autoimmune diabetes. We then outline the chemical structure and biological properties of the naturally occurring anthraquinones and their derivatives with an emphasis on recent findings about their immune regulation. We discuss the structure and activity relationship, mode of action, and therapeutic potential of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes, including a new strategy for the use of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25866536

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Christian M.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic origin of autoimmune diseases can be traced to both genetic susceptibility and epigenetic modifications arising from exposure to the environment. Epigenetic modifications influence gene-expression and alter cellular functions without modifying the genomic sequence. CpG-DNA methylation, histone-tail modifications, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are the main epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases is essential for the introduction of effective, target-directed, and tolerated therapies. In this review, we summarize recent findings that signify the importance of epigenetic modifications in autoimmune disorders while focusing on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss future directions in basic research, autoimmune diagnostics, and applied therapy. PMID:21885342

  11. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    King, Karen E; Ness, Paul M

    2005-07-01

    The appropriate therapy of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is dependent on the correct diagnosis and classification of this family of hemolytic disorders. Although the majority of cases are warm AIHA, there are several distinct types of cold AIHA and a number of drug-induced etiologies of AIHA, which must be investigated to determine if stopping a drug will induce a remission. In warm AIHA, corticosteroids are standard, followed by consideration of splenectomy in recalcitrant cases. If steroids and splenectomy are insufficient, other forms of immunosuppressive therapy are typically initiated. In cold AIHA, keeping the patient warm in often sufficient, but therapy directed at an underlying lympholiferative disorder may be helpful. Brisk hemolysis, inadequate responses to therapy, and worsening anemia require transfusion therapy. Although the pretransfusion workup is made difficult by the presence of the autoantibody, transfusion services can usually provide blood safe for transfusion by excluding underlying alloantibodies. When transfusion is urgently required and compatible blood cannot be located, incompatible blood may be provided as a life-saving measure. Communication between the transfusion service and the hematologist is critical to assess the risks in these settings. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers may provide an important bridging therapy in the future. Requests for "least incompatible" blood do not enhance transfusion safety and often result in unnecessary delays. PMID:16041662

  12. Intracellular Nucleic Acid Sensors and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Dwight H.; Beutler, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A collection of molecular sensors has been defined by studies in the last decade that can recognize a diverse array of pathogens and initiate protective immune and inflammatory responses. However, if the molecular signatures recognized are shared by both foreign and self-molecules, as is the case of nucleic acids, then the responses initiated by these sensors may have deleterious consequences. Notably, this adverse occurrence may be of primary importance in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. In this case, microbe-induced damage or mishandled physiologic processes could lead to the generation of microparticles containing self-nucleic acids. These particles may inappropriately gain access to the cytosol or endolysosomes and, hence, engage resident RNA and DNA sensors. Evidence, as reviewed here, strongly indicates that these sensors are primary contributors to autoimmune disease pathogenesis, spearheading efforts toward development of novel therapeutics for these disorders. PMID:22029446

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Jagadesham, Vamshi P; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2008-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a multifactorial degenerative vascular disorder. One of the defining features of the pathophysiology of aneurysmal disease is inflammation. Recent developments in vascular and molecular cell biology have increased our knowledge on the role of the adaptive and innate immune systems in the initiation and propagation of the inflammatory response in aortic tissue. AAAs share many features of autoimmune disease, including genetic predisposition, organ specificity and chronic inflammation. Here, this evidence is used to propose that the chronic inflammation observed in AAAs is a consequence of a dysregulated autoimmune response against autologous components of the aortic wall that persists inappropriately. Identification of the molecular and cellular targets involved in AAA formation will allow the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of AAA. PMID:18980864

  14. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the amount of hormones produced by the thyroid. Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a thyroid disorder that occurs when the ... irregularities Depression Dry skin and hair Sluggishness Constipation Hypothyroidism is often caused by Hashimoto's disease, an autoimmune ...

  15. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... substances that are usually not harmful Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your ...

  16. Citrullination and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Valesini, Guido; Gerardi, Maria C; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Pacucci, Viviana A; Pendolino, Monica; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the body's own immune system attack to the self-tissues, a condition enabled, in predisposed subjects, by the reduction of self-tolerance. A central role has been recently recognized to post-translational modifications, since they can promote generation of neo-(auto)antigens and in turn an autoimmune response. During the last years great attention has been paid to citrullination, because of its role in inducing anti-citrullinated proteins/peptide antibodies (ACPA), a class of autoantibodies with diagnostic, predictive and prognostic value for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Nonetheless, citrullination has been reported to be a process present in a wide range of inflammatory tissues. Indeed, citrullinated proteins have been detected also in other inflammatory arthritides and in inflammatory conditions other than arthritides (polymyositis, inflammatory bowel disease and chronic tonsillitis). Moreover, environmental exposure to cigarette smoke and nanomaterials of air pollution may be able to induce citrullination in lung cells prior to any detectable onset of inflammatory responses, suggesting that protein citrullination could be considered as a sign of early cellular damage. Accordingly, citrullination seems to be implicated in all those para-physiological processes, such as cells death pathways, in which intracellular calcium concentration raises to higher levels than in physiologic conditions: hence, peptidylarginine deiminases enzymes are activated during apoptosis, autophagy and NETosis, processes which are well-known to be implicated in autoimmunity. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that rather than being a disease-dependent process, citrullination is an inflammatory-dependent condition that plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25636595

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1

    MedlinePLUS

    ... many have all three. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is a fungal infection that affects the skin and mucous membranes, such ... Addison's Disease MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Autoimmune Disorders MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Cutaneous Candidiasis MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hypoparathyroidism You might also find ...

  18. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  19. A Case of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome (APS) Type II with Hypothyroidism, Hypoadrenalism, and Celiac Disease - A Rare Combination

    PubMed Central

    Pahadia, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Tak, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular syndrome (APS) are rare condition characterised by presence of immune dysfunction of two or more endocrine glands and other non-endocrine organs. APS is divided into 2 major subtypes based on age of presentation, pattern of disease combinations and mode of inheritance. APS 1(juvenile) usually manifest in early adolescence or in infancy. It is characterised by multiple endocrinal deficiency with mucocutaneous candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy. Of the endocrine diseases, hypoparathyroidism form an important component followed by Addison’s disease, type 1A diabetes, hypogonadism and thyroid disease. On the other hand APS II usually manifest in 3rd or 4th decade of life with female preponderance. Endocrine diseases commonly include autoimmune thyroid disease (graves or autoimmune thyroiditis), type 1A diabetes, and Addison’s disease. Hypoparathyroidism is of rare occurrence and there is no mucocutaneous candidiasis. We report here a case of APS type II in a 29-year-old male who initially presented with hypothyroidism, which was soon followed by Addison’s disease. The involvement of thyroid gland preceding the involvement of adrenal is of rare occurrence. The patient also had celiac disease which makes the combination further uncommon. PMID:26023582

  20. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P.; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  1. Role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Kristen R; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent an important class of immunoregulatory cells that can be activated to suppress T cell functions. These MDSCs can inhibit T cell functions through cell surface interactions and the release of soluble mediators. MDSCs accumulate in the inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs of patients with autoimmune diseases. Much of our knowledge of MDSC function has come from studies involving cancer models, however many recent studies have helped to characterize MDSC involvement in autoimmune diseases. MDSCs are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells with a number of different functions for the suppression of T cell responses. However, we have yet to fully understand their contributions to the development and regulation of autoimmune diseases. A number of studies have described beneficial functions of MDSCs during autoimmune diseases, and thus there appears to be a potential role for MDSCs in the treatment of these diseases. Nevertheless, many questions remain as to the activation, differentiation, and inhibitory functions of MDSCs. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of MDSC subsets and suppressive functions in tissue-specific autoimmune disorders. We also describe the potential of MDSC-based cell therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and note some of hurdles facing the implementation of this therapy. PMID:25621222

  2. The spectrum of autoimmune encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Sawhney, Anshudha; Greenberg, Benjamin; Lowden, Andrea; Warnack, Worthy; Khemani, Pravin; Stuve, Olaf; Vernino, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Despite being a potentially reversible neurological condition, no clear guidelines for diagnosis or management of autoimmune encephalitis exist. In this study we analyzed clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging characteristics, and outcome of autoimmune encephalitis from three teaching hospitals. Non-paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against membrane antigens was the most common syndrome, especially in the pediatric population. Clinical outcome was better for patients with shorter latency from symptom onset to diagnosis and initiation of immunomodulation. Patients with underlying malignancy were less likely to respond well to immunomodulatory therapy. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis is fairly broad, but prompt recognition and treatment often leads to excellent outcome. PMID:26439968

  3. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective. PMID:26359647

  4. Angiotensin Receptors, Autoimmunity, and Preeclampsia1

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhou, Cissy Chenyi; Ramin, Susan M.; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorder that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite being a leading cause of maternal death and a major contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity, the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia are poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that women with preeclampsia have autoantibodies that activate the angiotensin receptor, AT1, and that autoantibody-mediated receptor activation contributes to pathophysiology associated with preeclampsia. The research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune disease. PMID:17785770

  5. Referral Centres for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Fondazione

    E-print Network

    Chawla, Nitesh V.

    S-18 1 Referral Centres for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore correspondence to: Dr Lorenzo Beretta, Referral Centres for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS sclerosis (SSc) is a complex autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement that results in significant

  6. The Autoimmune Basis of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mahlios, Josh; De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K.; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagonic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (orexin)-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Evidence, such as a strong association with HLA DQB1*06:02, strongly suggests an autoimmune basis targeting hypocretin neurons. Genome-wide association studies have strengthened the association between narcolepsy and immune system gene polymorphisms, including the identification of polymorphisms in the T cell receptor alpha locus, TNFSF4 (also called OX40L), Cathepsin H (CTSH) the purinergic receptor P2RY11, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Recently, attention has been raised regarding a spike in cases of childhood narcolepsy in 2010 following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) in China and vaccination with Pandemrix, an adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine that was used in Europe. How the immune system may be involved in disease initiation and/or progression remains a challenge to researchers. Potential immunological pathways that could lead to the specific elimination of hypocretin producing neurons include molecular mimicry or bystander activation, and are likely a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as upper airway infections. PMID:23725858

  7. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  8. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  9. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  10. A look at autoimmunity and inflammation in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Rachel R.

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune and inflammatory uveitis are a group of potentially blinding intraocular inflammatory diseases that arise without a known infectious trigger and are often associated with immunological responses to unique retinal proteins. In the United States, about 10% of the cases of severe visual handicap are attributed to this group of disorders. As I discuss here, experimental models of ocular autoimmunity targeting retinal proteins have brought about a better understanding of the basic immunological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of uveitis and are serving as templates for the development of novel therapies. PMID:20811163

  11. Neuroimmunology: An Expanding Frontier in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Anti-neuronal autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) comprises a recently characterized group of immune-mediated disorders that result in limbic, multifocal, or diffuse encephalitis due to direct interaction of autoantibodies with neuronal surface or synaptic proteins. The pathological effects of the autoantibodies vary according to the target antigen but when they are removed, neuronal dysfunction is commonly reversed. Ongoing research on AIE constantly increases the number of novel autoantibodies and expands the spectrum of neurological syndromes that are important in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric illness, dementia, or viral encephalitis. This review summarizes recent advances in AIE, focusing on pathogenetic mechanisms and novel associations with other CNS disorders such as neurodegeneration, relapsing symptoms post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis, and demyelinating diseases. In addition, an algorithmic approach to detect and characterize neuronal cell surface autoantibodies is proposed. PMID:25972873

  12. Rare association of insulin autoimmune syndrome with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Nishant; Rahaman, S H; Kandasamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a rare cause of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia, which is known to occur in association with the use of sulfhydryl-containing drugs and autoimmune disorders. We describe a patient with hitherto an unreported association of IAS with ankylosing spondylitis. We have also performed and described a simplified method of polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation of an insulin bound antibody in the serum. Learning points IAS should be considered in differential diagnosis of endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia. Ankylosing spondylitis can be associated with IAS apart from several other autoimmune diseases. Very high serum insulin levels (100–10?000??U/ml) are frequently seen in IAS. When faced with very high serum insulin before suspecting insulinoma, it is advisable that PEG precipitation of serum be done to identify antibody bound insulin. A clinical suspicion of IAS can avoid expensive imaging and unnecessary surgery in affected patients. PMID:26527431

  13. Immune-endocrine interactions in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Klecha, Alicia Juana; Barreiro Arcos, María Laura; Frick, Luciana; Genaro, Ana María; Cremaschi, Graciela

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorders affecting approximately 5% of the overall population. An aberrant interaction between abnormal thyrocytes, abnormal antigen-presenting cells and abnormal T cells forms the basis for the atypical autoimmune reaction targeting thyroid antigens. It was proposed that nongenetic (environmental and hormonal) factors play a crucial etiological role in AITD development, through altering immune-endocrine interactions. The most outstanding fact is that in genetically predisposed individuals, the disruption of these neuroendocrine-immune interactions by environmental factors results in thyroid autoimmune dysfunction. These interactions are able to incline the balance between Th1-Th2 immune response toward one side, resulting in a Th1-cell-mediated autoimmune reaction with thyrocyte destruction and hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis but to a hyperreactive Th2-mediated humoral response against TSH receptor with stimulatory antibodies leading to Graves' disease hyperthyroidism. In this review the main mechanisms involved are summarized. In this sense, the participation of stress-mediated activation of the sympathoadrenal system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hormonal changes occurring during pregnancy and postpartum acting on antigen-presenting cells and influencing, in this way, the balance of the immune status are shown to participate in AITD etiology. The possibility that altered levels of thyroid hormones during the course of the AITD may alter immune function is also discussed. PMID:18667802

  14. CT and MRI Findings of Autoimmune Polymorph Bifocal Pancreatitis Mimicking Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bläker, Hendrik; Bahra, Marcus; Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis. It is supposed to be a pancreatic manifestation of an immune-complex modulated systemic disorder. In contrast, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. Within the rare type of focal autoimmune pancreatitis, only few presentations with multifocal pancreatic lesions have been described. Herein we report a case of a 58-year-old patient with autoimmune pancreatitis presenting with bifocal manifestations of the pancreatic head and tail, mimicking pancreatic adenocarcinoma clinically, on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Typical imaging findings of autoimmune pancreatitis are compared with typical findings in pancreatic carcinoma. The diagnostic dilemma of differentiating between both entities is discussed. A review of the present literature regarding multifocal presence of autoimmune pancreatitis is performed. PMID:26425636

  15. Sialic acids and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vinay S; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    An important underlying mechanism that contributes to autoimmunity is the loss of inhibitory signaling in the immune system. Sialic acid-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins or Siglecs are a family of cell surface proteins largely expressed in hematopoietic cells. The majority of Siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in immune cells that bind to sialic acid-containing ligands and recruit SH2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases to their cytoplasmic tails. They deliver inhibitory signals that can contribute to the constraining of immune cells, and thus protect the host from autoimmunity. The inhibitory functions of CD22/Siglec-2 and Siglec-G and their contributions to tolerance and autoimmunity, primarily in the B lymphocyte context, are considered in some detail in this review. The relevance to autoimmunity and unregulated inflammation of modified sialic acids, enzymes that modify sialic acid, and other sialic acid-binding proteins are also reviewed. PMID:26683151

  16. Dyslipidaemia in Rheumatological Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Tracey E; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Kitas, George D

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmunity forms the basis of many rheumatological diseases, and may contribute not only to the classical clinical manifestations but also to the complications. Many of the autoimmune rheumatological diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with an excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Much of this excess cardiovascular risk can be attributed to atherosclerotic disease. Atherosclerosis is a complex pathological process, with dyslipidaemia and inflammation fundamental to all stages of plaque evolution. The heightened inflammatory state seen in conjunction with many rheumatological diseases may accelerate plaque formation, both through direct effects on the arterial wall and indirectly through inflammation-mediated alterations in the lipid profile. Alongside these factors, antibodies produced as part of the autoimmune nature of these conditions may lead to alterations in the lipid profile and promote atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the association between several of the rheumatological autoimmune diseases and dyslipidaemia, and the potential cardiovascular impact this may confer. PMID:21660202

  17. Distal renal tubular acidosis with multiorgan autoimmunity: a case report.

    PubMed

    van den Wildenberg, Maria J; Hoorn, Ewout J; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Wagner, Carsten A; Woittiez, Arend-Jan; de Vries, Peter A M; Laverman, Gozewijn D

    2015-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman with a history of pernicious anemia presented with progressive muscle weakness and dysarthria. Hypokalemic paralysis (serum potassium, 1.4 mEq/L) due to distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) was diagnosed. After excluding several possible causes, dRTA was considered autoimmune. However, the patient did not meet criteria for any of the autoimmune disorders classically associated with dRTA. She had very high antibody titers against parietal cells, intrinsic factor, and thyroid peroxidase (despite normal thyroid function). The patient consented to a kidney biopsy, and acid-base transporters, anion exchanger type 1 (AE1), and pendrin were undetectable by immunofluorescence. Indirect immunofluorescence detected diminished abundance of AE1- and pendrin-expressing intercalated cells in the kidney, as well as staining by the patient's serum of normal human intercalated cells and parietal cells expressing the adenosine triphosphatase hydrogen/potassium pump (H(+)/K(+)-ATPase) in normal human gastric mucosa. The dRTA likely is caused by circulating autoantibodies against intercalated cells, with possible cross-reactivity against structures containing gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. This case demonstrates that in patients with dRTA without a classic autoimmune disorder, autoimmunity may still be the underlying cause. The mechanisms involved in autoantibody development and how dRTA can be caused by highly specific autoantibodies against intercalated cells have yet to be determined. PMID:25533600

  18. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted. PMID:26543815

  19. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  20. Autoimmune diseases and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Flachenecker, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the rehabilitation of autoimmune diseases. After general remarks on rehabilitation, the effects of acute and chronic exercises on inflammatory markers are summarized. Most of the available literature deals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS), and therefore, rehabilitation of these diseases is described in more detail. Exercise is the main component in the rehabilitation of patients with RA and aims at increasing physical capacity, muscle strength, aerobic endurance, cardiovascular fitness and functional abilities, and helps to prevent secondary deconditioning due to reduced activity levels. Since MS causes a wide range of symptoms, the rehabilitation of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach and encompasses physiotherapy, exercise therapy, hippotherapy, cognitive rehabilitation, psychological therapy, strategies to improve fatigue and coping programs. The ultimate goal of rehabilitation is to enable patients with chronic conditions to reach and maintain their optimal physical, sensory, intellectual, psychological and social functional levels, and to attain independence and self-determination as far as possible. PMID:21619946

  1. Progesterone and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Grant C.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human immune systems is most apparent in the female predominance of certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Epidemiologic, observational and experimental evidence strongly suggest sex steroids are important modulators of genetic risk in human AD. In this regard, the roles of progesterone (Pg), an immunomodulatory female sex steroid, are poorly understood. Several lines of investigation indicate Pg and synthetic progestins impact risk of AD and immune-mediated injury in different ways depending on their concentrations and their engagement of various Pg receptors expressed in immune organs, immune cells or tissues targeted by immune attack. At low physiologic levels, Pg may enhance interferon-alpha (IFN-?) pathways important in SLE pathogenesis. Commonly used synthetic progestins may have the opposite effect. At pregnancy levels, Pg may suppress disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) via inhibition of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 pathways and induction of anti-inflammatory molecules. Importantly, Pg’s immunomodulatory effects differ from those of estrogens and androgens. An additional layer of complexity arises from apparent interdependence of sex hormone signaling pathways. Identifying mechanisms by which Pg and other sex steroids modulate risk of AD and immune-mediated injury will require clarification of their cellular and molecular targets in vivo. These future studies should be informed by recent genetic discoveries in human AD, particularly those revealing their sex-specific genetic associations. PMID:22193289

  2. Thyroid-associated orbitopathy is linked to gastrointestinal autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ponto, K A; Schuppan, D; Zwiener, I; Binder, H; Mirshahi, A; Diana, T; Pitz, S; Pfeiffer, N; Kahaly, G J

    2014-01-01

    Common autoimmune disorders tend to co-exist in the same subjects and cluster in families. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune co-morbidity in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) with and without thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO). This was a cross-sectional study conducted at an academic tertiary referral centre. Of 1310 patients with AITD [n?=?777 or 59% with Graves' disease (GD) and n?=?533, 41% with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT)] followed at a specialized joint thyroid–eye out-patient clinic, 176 (13·4%) had an adult type of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, 129 (9·8%) type 1 diabetes, 111 (8·5%) coeliac disease, 60 (4·6%) type A autoimmune gastritis, 57 (4·4%) vitiligo and 25 (1·9%) Addison's disease. Coeliac disease and autoimmune gastritis were associated positively with GD [odds ratio (OR)?=?2·18; P?=?0·002 and OR?=?6·52; P?autoimmune primary hypogonadism, alopecia areata, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren's syndrome were ‘protective’ for GD and thus linked to HT, OR?=?0·49 (P?autoimmune gastritis (3·4 and 4·03, both P?autoimmune condition and rates are increased compared to GD patients without TAO. PMID:24903731

  3. Clinical Presentation and Outcomes of Autoimmune Hepatitis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Kumar, Sonal

    2015-10-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have abnormal liver tests, which can be indicative of underlying hepatic disease. Primary sclerosing cholangitis has a clear association with ulcerative colitis, but other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) have also been associated with IBD. AIH may also occur in the setting of an overlap syndrome or in the setting of medications, particularly tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. Importantly, some studies have shown that IBD patients with AIH fail treatment more frequently than IBD patients without AIH. This review will focus on the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management of autoimmune hepatitis in inflammatory bowel disease patients. PMID:25999245

  4. The role of environmental estrogens and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, Cecilia; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the recent years. It has been proposed that this epidemiological evidence could be in part attributable to environmental estrogens, compounds that display estrogen-like activity and are ubiquitously present in the environment. Environmental estrogens can be found in a wide variety of foods: phytoestrogens occur in plants such as clover and soy, while mycoestrogens are food contaminants produced by fungi. Meat, eggs and dairy products from animals given exogenous hormones contain relatively high concentration of estrogens. Among xenoestrogens, industrial estrogens are synthetic chemicals produced for specific purposes (pesticides, plastics, surfactants and detergents) while metalloestrogens are found in heavy metals. Estrogens can be also administered through medications (contraceptive pill, hormone replacement therapy, genistein, cimetidine, creams). There is a considerable burden of evidence in vitro and in animal models that these compounds may exert immunotoxic effects. However, to date there is no convincing data that exposure to environmental estrogens can be regarded as a risk for human health. In particular, there is no consensus whether prolonged exposure to relatively low concentrations of different estrogenic chemicals can affect the human immune system and induce clinically evident diseases in real-life scenario. Moreover, the effects on human health of the synergistic interactions between natural, medical, dietary and environmental estrogens have not been fully elucidated yet. Here we provide an extensive review of the in vivo and in vitro effects of environmental estrogens on the immune system, focusing on the evidences of association between exposure and autoimmune disorders. PMID:22172713

  5. Leptin in autoimmunity: many questions, some answers.

    PubMed

    Matarese, G; Leiter, E H; La Cava, A

    2007-08-01

    It has recently become apparent that several molecules involved in the control of metabolism also play an important function in the regulation of immune responses. Among those molecules, the adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin has been shown to significantly influence innate and adaptive immune responses both in normal and in pathological conditions. For example, levels of leptin are typically low in infection and high in autoimmunity, both systemically and at the site of inflammation. Moreover, in addition to its long-known effects on the promotion of T helper 1 immune responses and cell-mediated immunity, leptin has more recently been found capable to constrain proliferation of regulatory T cells. As such, leptin represents not only a link between metabolism and immune responses in general but also a pivotal modulator of the magnitude of selected mechanisms of peripheral immunity in relation to body fat mass. We review here the most recent advances on the role of leptin in the control of immune tolerance and critically discuss how strategies aimed at neutralizing the leptin axis could represent innovative tools for the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:17610413

  6. Systemic Autoimmune, Rheumatic Diseases and Coinciding Psoriasis: Data from a Large Single-Centre Registry and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bazsó, Anna; Szodoray, Péter; Szappanos, Ágnes; Korda, Judit; Pálfi, Patrícia; Kiss, Emese; Poór, Gyula

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a systemic immune-inflammatory disease characterized by chronic or recurrent skin symptoms, psoriatic arthritis, enthesopathy, and uveitis. Psoriasis has recently been published to appear with various autoimmune disorders, but the coexistence has been systematically reviewed by only few studies until now. In the present study, charts and electronic database of 4344 patients with various systemic autoimmune disorders, under regular medical control at our department, were reviewed retrospectively searching for association with psoriasis. Hereby, we demonstrate 25 psoriatic patients coinciding with various systemic autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of psoriasis and autoimmune diseases resulted in the worsening of the clinical outcome of the autoimmune diseases as indicated by higher frequency and dosages of glucocorticoid use, need for biologicals, and other comorbidities. These results suggest common environmental and genetic background as well as therapeutic possibilities in the future. PMID:26339139

  7. Th17 Cells in Immunity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Simone Kennedy; Lam, Brandon; Lau, Kenneth; Larkin, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Th17 and IL-17 play important roles in the clearance of extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. However, strong evidence also implicates the Th17 lineage in several autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and asthma. The Th17 subset has also been connected with type I diabetes, although whether it plays a role in the pathogenicity of or protection from the disease remains a controversial issue. In this review we have provided a comprehensive overview of Th17 pathogenicity and function, including novel evidence for a protective role of Th17 cells in conjunction with the microbiota gut flora in T1D onset and progression. PMID:24454481

  8. Localized Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhe; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease with clinical presentations that greatly mimic pancreatic cancer (PC). It is critical for clinicians to distinguish AIP from PC because their treatments and prognoses are entirely different. Typical images show characteristic features such as diffuse pancreatic swelling and strictures of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). However, AIP may present as a localized pancreatic mass, in which case it is very difficult to differentiate from PC. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old man with computed tomography (CT) imaging studies confirming an area of low-density neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas with dilation in the common biliary duct (CBD) and MPD. Increased uptake in the uncinate mass was observed by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which strongly suggested PC. Further laboratory analyses showed a marked elevation of serum IgG4. Because there was not enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis of malignancy, a histopathological biopsy became the criterion standard. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle biopsy failed. As an alternative, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was conducted for the biopsy, and pathological analysis confirmed IgG4-related sclerotic chronic pancreatitis with moderate lymphoplasmacellular infiltration. We suggest that an accurate preoperative diagnosis for localized AIP with MPD and CBD obstructions mimicking PC is of great importance. Radiological imaging findings, particularly observations of diffused enlargement of the pancreas and delayed enhancement during the venous and portal phases, are essential for diagnosing AIP. Careful consideration should be given if serum IgG4 was taken as a special indicator for a differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. A history of IgG4-related diseases involving the biliary, lacrimal, salivary, retroperitoneal, renal, or pulmonary systems should also be highlighted. Thus, the pathology of extrapancreatic organs can be utilized as diagnostic evidence when the pathology for a pancreatic mass is not available, as in the case presented here. Furthermore, cautious use of hormone therapy is indicated for patients who cannot be ruled out as having PC. The results of future studies on localized AIP are eagerly awaited. PMID:26496272

  9. Autoimmune disease and hair loss.

    PubMed

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Franks, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    Once systemic disease is in remission, it is prudent to recognize the importance of alopecia in the patient's overall sense of well-being and quality-of-life clinical outcome. Scarring alopecia (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus) can be the presenting manifestation of lupus in more than half of affected individuals. Diffuse nonscarring alopecia in lupus is usually responsive to treatment of the systemic disease. Severe, often intractable burning pruritus of the scalp is a frequent complaint in dermatomyositis. Lichen planopilaris may mimic other autoimmune forms of scarring alopecia. Alopecia can also be caused by medications used to treat systemic autoimmune disease and fibromyalgia. PMID:23159178

  10. Therapeutic Potential of Hyporesponsive CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schafer, Carolina; Ubilla-Olguín, Gabriela; Catalán, Diego; Schinnerling, Katina; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells is crucial on immunity or tolerance induction. In an immature or semi-mature state, DCs induce tolerance through T-cell deletion, generation of regulatory T cells, and/or induction of T-cell anergy. Anergy is defined as an unresponsive state that retains T cells in an “off” mode under conditions in which immune activation is undesirable. This mechanism is crucial for the control of T-cell responses against self-antigens, thereby preventing autoimmunity. Tolerogenic DCs (tDCs), generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy donors or patients with autoimmune pathologies, were shown to modulate immune responses by inducing T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Animal models of autoimmune diseases confirmed the impact of T-cell anergy on disease development and progression in vivo. Thus, the induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by tDCs has become a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. Here, we review recent findings in the area and discuss the potential of anergy induction for clinical purposes. PMID:26441992

  11. Role of Sortilin in Models of Autoimmune Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Eva; Weber, Juliane; Paterka, Magdalena; Ploen, Robert; Breiderhoff, Tilman; van Horssen, Jack; Willnow, Thomas E; Siffrin, Volker; Zipp, Frauke

    2015-12-15

    The proneurotrophin receptor sortilin is a protein with dual functions, being involved in intracellular protein transport, as well as cellular signal transduction. The relevance of the receptor for various neuronal disorders, such as dementia, seizures, and brain injury, is well established. In contrast, little is known about the role of sortilin in immune cells and inflammatory diseases. The aim of our study was to elucidate the distribution of sortilin in different immune cell types in mice and humans and to analyze its function in autoimmune CNS inflammation. Sortilin was expressed most profoundly in murine and human macrophages and dendritic cells and to a much lesser extent in B and T cells. In dendritic cells, sortilin had an impact on Ag processing. Accordingly, sortilin was highly expressed by infiltrated perivascular myeloid cells, mainly in vessel cuffs, in the CNS of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, the most common inflammatory autoimmune disease of the CNS. Yet, sortilin gene-targeted mice (Sort1(-/-)) and chimeras deficient in sortilin in the immune system were as susceptible as wild-type littermates to T cell-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Considering our results and recent data from other investigators, we conclude that the proneurotrophin receptor sortilin plays a role in innate, rather than in adaptive, immune processes and, thus, not in autoimmune neuroinflammation. PMID:26566674

  12. T cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J M; Lalor, S J; Sweeney, C M; Tubridy, N; Mills, K H G

    2010-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), which involves autoimmune responses to myelin antigens. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS, have provided convincing evidence that T cells specific for self-antigens mediate pathology in these diseases. Until recently, T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were thought to be the main effector T cells responsible for the autoimmune inflammation. However more recent studies have highlighted an important pathogenic role for CD4(+) T cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-17, termed Th17, but also IL-17-secreting ?? T cells in EAE as well as other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions. This has prompted intensive study of the induction, function and regulation of IL-17-producing T cells in MS and EAE. In this paper, we review the contribution of Th1, Th17, ??, CD8(+) and regulatory T cells as well as the possible development of new therapeutic approaches for MS based on manipulating these T cell subtypes. PMID:20682002

  13. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune congenital heart block.

    PubMed

    Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Izmirly, Peter M; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Buyon, Jill P; Khamashta, Munther A

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) is an immune-mediated acquired disease that is associated with the placental transference of maternal antibodies specific for Ro and La autoantigens. The disease develops in a fetal heart without anatomical abnormalities that could otherwise explain the block, and which is usually diagnosed in utero, but also at birth or within the neonatal period. Autoantibody-mediated damage of fetal conduction tissues causes inflammation and fibrosis and leads to blockage of signal conduction at the atrioventricular (AV) node. Irreversible complete AV block is the principal cardiac manifestation of CHB, although some babies might develop other severe cardiac complications, such as endocardial fibroelastosis or valvular insufficiency, even in the absence of cardiac block. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, classification and management of women whose pregnancies are affected by autoimmune CHB, with a particular focus on the autoantibodies associated with autoimmune CHB and how we should test for these antibodies and diagnose this disease. Without confirmed effective preventive or therapeutic strategies and further research on the aetiopathogenic mechanisms, autoimmune CHB will remain a severe life-threatening disorder. PMID:25800217

  14. Invited Review Autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Invited Review Autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease J.S. Leon, D.M. Engman* Northwestern University the genesis of autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease: (i) What mechanism(s) are potentially responsible for Parasitology Inc. Keywords: Myocarditis; Chagas heart disease Myosin; Autoimmunity 1. Introduction After

  15. Autoimmunity as a Candidate for the Etiopathogenesis of Meniere's Disease: Detection of Autoimmune Reactions and Diagnostic Biomarker Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun Jin; Gi, Mia; Kim, Bo Gyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an inner ear disorder that can manifest as fluctuating vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. However, the pathologic mechanism of Meniere's disease is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated autoimmunity as a potential cause of Meniere's disease. In addition we tried to find useful biomarker candidates for diagnosis. We investigated the protein composition of human inner ear fluid using liquid column mass spectrometry, the autoimmune reaction between circulating autoantibodies in patient serum and multiple antigens using the Protoarray system, the immune reaction between patient serum and mouse inner ear tissues using western blot analysis. Nine proteins, including immunoglobulin and its variants and interferon regulatory factor 7, were found only in the inner ear fluid of patients with Meniere's disease. Enhanced immune reactions with 18 candidate antigens were detected in patients with Meniere's disease in Protoarray analysis; levels of 8 of these antigens were more than 10-fold higher in patients than in controls. Antigen-antibody reactions between mouse inner ear proteins with molecular weights of 23–48 kDa and 63–75 kDa and patient sera were detected in 8 patients. These findings suggest that autoimmunity could be one of the pathologic mechanisms behind Meniere's disease. Multiple autoantibodies and antigens may be involved in the autoimmune reaction. Specific antigens that caused immune reactions with patient's serum in Protoarray analysis can be candidates for the diagnostic biomarkers of Meniere's disease. PMID:25330336

  16. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L.

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  17. Fc?RIIB and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Espéli, Marion; Smith, Kenneth G C; Clatworthy, Menna R

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by adaptive immune responses against self-antigens, including humoral responses resulting in the production of autoantibodies. Autoantibodies generate inflammation by activating complement and engaging Fc? receptors (Fc?Rs). The inhibitory receptor Fc?RIIB plays a central role in regulating the generation of autoantibodies and their effector functions, which include activation of innate immune cells and the cellular arm of the adaptive immune system, via effects on antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Polymorphisms in Fc?RIIB have been associated with susceptibility to autoimmunity but protection against infections in humans and mice. In the last few years, new mechanisms by which Fc?RIIB controls the adaptive immune response have been described. Notably, Fc?RIIB has been shown to regulate germinal center B cells and dendritic cell migration, with potential impact on the development of autoimmune diseases. Recent work has also highlighted the implication of Fc?RIIB on the regulation of the innate immune system, via inhibition of Toll-like receptor- and complement receptor-mediated activation. This review will provide an update on the role of Fc?RIIB in adaptive immune responses in autoimmunity, and then focus on their emerging function in innate immunity. PMID:26683154

  18. New insights into immune mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Giuffrida, Paolo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Recent progresses in the immune mechanisms implicated in chronic inflammatory disorders have led to a more in-depth knowledge of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including autoimmune atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune enteropathy and ulcerative colitis. While the pathogenic role of specific circulating autoantibodies, i.e., respectively anti-parietal cell, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-enterocyte and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic, is still controversial, some common T-cell mediated mechanisms for inflammation - increase in T helper cell type 1/type 17 pro-inflammatory cytokines- or losing self-tolerance-abnormal regulatory T cell function - are recognized as crucial mediators of the tissue damage causing atrophy of the stomach mucosa in autoimmune atrophic gastritis, villous flattening of the small bowel in celiac disease and autoimmune enteropathy, and mucosal ulceration of the colon in ulcerative colitis. This review deals with novel advances in the immunological bases of the aforementioned autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders, and it also highlights immune mechanisms of progression from chronic inflammation to cancer and implications for new therapeutic targets. PMID:26275585

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-? in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR-) ? expression has been shown in thyroid tissue from patients with thyroiditis or Graves' disease and furthermore in the orbital tissue of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), such as in extraocular muscle cells. An increasing body of evidence shows the importance of the (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3) and cognate chemokines (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, in the T helper 1 immune response and in inflammatory diseases such as thyroid autoimmune disorders. PPAR-? agonists show a strong inhibitory effect on the expression and release of CXCR3 chemokines, in vitro, in various kinds of cells, such as thyrocytes, and in orbital fibroblasts, preadipocytes, and myoblasts from patients with GO. Recently, it has been demonstrated that rosiglitazone is involved in a higher risk of heart failure, stroke, and all-cause mortality in old patients. On the contrary, pioglitazone has not shown these effects until now; this favors pioglitazone for a possible use in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. However, further studies are ongoing to explore the use of new PPAR-? agonists in the treatment of thyroid autoimmune disorders. PMID:25722716

  20. Redundancy between Cysteine Cathepsins in Murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Allan, Euan Ramsay Orr; Yates, Robin Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine cathepsins B, S, and L are functionally linked to antigen processing, and hence to autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Stemming from several studies that demonstrate that mice can be protected from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through the pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine cathepsins, it has been suggested that targeting these enzymes in multiple sclerosis may be of therapeutic benefit. Utilizing mice deficient in cysteine cathepsins both individually and in combination, we found that the myelin-associated antigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was efficiently processed and presented by macrophages to CD4+ T cells in the individual absence of cathepsin B, S or L. Similarly, mice deficient in cathepsin B or S were susceptible to MOG-induced EAE and displayed clinical progression and immune infiltration into the CNS, similar to their wild-type counterparts. Owing to a previously described CD4+ T cell deficiency in mice deficient in cathepsin L, such mice were protected from EAE. When multiple cysteine cathepsins were simultaneously inhibited via genetic deletion of both cathepsins B and S, or by a cathepsin inhibitor (LHVS), MHC-II surface expression, MOG antigen presentation and EAE were attenuated or prevented. This study demonstrates the functional redundancy between cathepsin B, S and L in EAE, and suggests that the inhibition of multiple cysteine cathepsins may be needed to modulate autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26075905

  1. Redundancy between Cysteine Cathepsins in Murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Euan Ramsay Orr; Yates, Robin Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine cathepsins B, S, and L are functionally linked to antigen processing, and hence to autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Stemming from several studies that demonstrate that mice can be protected from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through the pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine cathepsins, it has been suggested that targeting these enzymes in multiple sclerosis may be of therapeutic benefit. Utilizing mice deficient in cysteine cathepsins both individually and in combination, we found that the myelin-associated antigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was efficiently processed and presented by macrophages to CD4+ T cells in the individual absence of cathepsin B, S or L. Similarly, mice deficient in cathepsin B or S were susceptible to MOG-induced EAE and displayed clinical progression and immune infiltration into the CNS, similar to their wild-type counterparts. Owing to a previously described CD4+ T cell deficiency in mice deficient in cathepsin L, such mice were protected from EAE. When multiple cysteine cathepsins were simultaneously inhibited via genetic deletion of both cathepsins B and S, or by a cathepsin inhibitor (LHVS), MHC-II surface expression, MOG antigen presentation and EAE were attenuated or prevented. This study demonstrates the functional redundancy between cathepsin B, S and L in EAE, and suggests that the inhibition of multiple cysteine cathepsins may be needed to modulate autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26075905

  2. Anticytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen-4 Induced Autoimmune Hypophysitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Korytkowski, Mary T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We describe a case of autoimmune hypophysitis induced by the anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) agent, ipilimumab. Methods. Case presentation and review of the literature. Results. Autoimmune hypophysitis, a previously described rare disorder, is being recognized more frequently as a side effect of novel immunomodulatory agents used in the treatment of malignancies such as melanoma. CTLA-4 agents are associated with immune-related adverse effects (irAE) which occur as a result of activation (or lack of inactivation) of the immune response. This impacts not only malignant cells but also different host organ-systems. Autoimmune hypophysitis is one of several endocrinopathies associated with these agents. Conclusion. It is important that endocrinologists become familiar with the endocrinopathies, such as autoimmune hypophysitis, associated with new immunomodulator agents which are being used with increasing frequency to treat a variety of malignancies. PMID:25694832

  3. In Vivo Visualization of (Auto)Immune Processes in the Central Nervous System of Rodents.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Litke, Tanja; Flügel, Alexander; Odoardi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The CNS is effectively shielded from the periphery by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which limits the entry of cells and solutes. However, in autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, immune cells can overcome this barrier and induce the formation of CNS inflammatory lesions. Recently, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has made it possible to visualize autoimmune processes in the living CNS in real time. However, along with a high microscopy standard, this technique requires an advanced surgical procedure to access the region of interest. Here, we describe in detail the necessary methodological steps to visualize (auto)immune processes in living rodent tissue. We focus on the procedures to image the leptomeningeal vessels of the thoracic spinal cord during transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in LEW rats (AT EAE) and in active EAE in C57BL/6 mice (aEAE). PMID:25549830

  4. Association of Extrahepatic Manifestations with Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Guan Wee; Heneghan, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    For many patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), the presence of extrahepatic features is well recognised both at the time of presentation and during long-term follow-up. Concomitant 'autoimmune disorders' have been described in 20-50% of patients with AIH, both in adults and children. Indeed, the presence of these associated phenomena has been incorporated into both the original and revised International AIH group scoring systems as an aid to codifying the diagnosis. In acute index presentations, non-specific joint pains sometimes flitting in nature have been reported in 10-60% of patients, and while joint swelling is uncommon, rheumatoid arthritis and mixed connective tissue disease have been reported in 2-4% of patients with AIH. For a majority of patients, these joint symptoms resolve within days of the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy. Rarer features at index presentation include a maculopapular skin rash and unexplained fever, which are features that tend to resolve quickly with treatment. Interestingly, joint pain and stiffness are also well recognised in the context of steroid withdrawal and cessation in AIH. The occasional co-presentation of AIH with coeliac disease is clinically important (1-6%), since for some patients, there is a risk of immunosuppression malabsorption, thus delaying effective treatment. Similarly, the co-existence of selective IgA deficiency (IgAD) can occur in patients with coeliac disease or in isolation. Selective IgAD as a co-existing extraheaptic feature seems to be more common in paediatric patients with AIH. For these patients, they are at an increased risk of respiratory and sinus infections. Although, typically associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) has been described in 2-8% of patients with AIH. Interestingly, for patients with autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, a distinct pattern of IBD has been recently described. Other conditions have been reported at a lower frequency, including Sjogren's syndrome 1-7%, systemic lupus erythematosus 1-3% and glomerulonephritis 1%. Rarer still and at a frequency of <1% include fibrosing alveolitis, haemolytic anaemia, uveitis, mononeuritis multiplex, polymyositis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, the reported associations between AIH and thyroiditis 8-23%, diabetes 1-10% and psoriasis 3% are commonly seen and notable in clinical practice. PMID:26641498

  5. Epigenetics in autoimmune diseases: Pathogenesis and prospects for therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zimu; Zhang, Rongxin

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in genome function without underlying modifications in their nucleotide sequence. Disorders of epigenetic processes, which involve DNA methylation, histone modification, non-coding RNA and nucleosome remodeling, may influence chromosomal stability and gene expression, resulting in complicated syndromes. In the past few years, it has been disclosed that identified epigenetic alterations give rise to several typical human autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). These emerging epigenetic studies provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of specific epigenetic dysregulation may inspire more discoveries of other uncharacterized mechanisms. Further elucidation of the biological functions and clinical significance of these epigenetic alterations may be exploited for diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic benefits. PMID:26026695

  6. Autoimmunity at the ocular surface: pathogenesis and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Stern, ME; Schaumburg, CS; Dana, R; Calonge, M; Niederkorn, JY; Pflufelder, SC

    2013-01-01

    A healthy ocular surface environment is essential to preserve visual function, and as such the eye has evolved a complex network of mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. Fundamental to the health of the ocular surface is the immune system, designed to respond rapidly to environmental and microbial insults, whereas maintaining tolerance to self-antigens and commensal microbes. To this end, activation of the innate and adaptive immune response is tightly regulated to limit bystander tissue damage. However, aberrant activation of the immune system can result in autoimmunity to self-antigens localized to the ocular surface and associated tissues. Environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, and genetic factors provide the triggers underlying the immunological events that shape the outcome of the diverse spectrum of autoimmune-based ocular surface disorders. PMID:20485329

  7. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Terry, Rachael L; Ifergan, Igal; Miller, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), has provided significant insight into the mechanisms that initiate and drive autoimmunity. Several central nervous system proteins and peptides have been used to induce disease, in a number of different mouse strains, to model the diverse clinical presentations of MS. In this chapter, we detail the materials and methods used to induce active and adoptive EAE. We focus on disease induction in the SJL/J, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mouse strains, using peptides derived from proteolipid protein, myelin basic protein, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. We also include a protocol for the isolation of leukocytes from the spinal cord and brain for flow cytometric analysis. PMID:25005074

  8. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of testosterone replacement, on disease course remains underexplored. In women, the course of all three diseases with onset after the age of menopause differs from that with onset before menopause. Early age at menopause is associated with increased disease risk, and after menopause, disease course changes in SLE and RA. Less is known about MS. This article summarizes what is known about the relationship between reproductive aging and autoimmune diseases in men and women, and highlights areas for further investigation. PMID:23522436

  9. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S. Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810

  10. Autoimmunity: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.S.; Rose, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains five parts and a section of poster papers. Each part contains several papers. Some of the papers are: Molecular Genetics and T Cells in Autoimmunity; Gene Conversion: A Mechanism to Explain HLA-D Region and Disease Association; Genetics of the Complement System; Speculation on the Role of Somatic Mutation in the Generation of Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Monoclonal Anti-DNA Antibodies: The Targets and Origins of SLE.

  11. Celiac disease as an autoimmune condition

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Genel; Lupan, Iulia; Tilinca, Mariana; Deleanu, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have become a major medical problem of recent years. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease model. The aim of our study was to follow the changes in the clinical autoimmunity picture of the celiac disease from recent years. The study of autoimmunity in celiac disease has focused on associated diseases with the aforementioned disease: type 1 diabetes mellitus, thyroid autoimmunity disease, Graves’ disease, Hashimoto's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, spondyloarthritis, hyperprolactinemia, Turner syndrome, Addison's disease, sensory neuronopathies. Immune reactivity to tissue transglutaminase targeted autoantibodies and other autoantigens, including transglutaminase 3, actin, ganglioside, collagen, calreticulin or zonulin which have been reported in the celiac disease. New research directions given by celiac disease autoimmunity, interleukin 1, interleukin 2, protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22, CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, infection with Necator americanus and definitive identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, seem to provide a solution in celiac disease treatment. PMID:26155154

  12. CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY AND INTERFERON GAMMA IN AUTOIMMUNE VITILIGO OF SMYTH LINE CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitiligo is a common acquired hypopigmentary disorder characterized by a loss of epidermal pigment cells (melanocytes). The Smyth line (SL) chicken is the only animal model for autoimmune vitiligo that recapitulates the entire spectrum of clinical and biological manifestations of the human disease....

  13. Thyroid Autoimmunity in the Context of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Implications for Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Toulis, Konstantinos; Tsekmekidou, Xanthippi; Potolidis, Evangelos; Didangelos, Triantafyllos; Gotzamani-Psarrakou, Anna; Zebekakis, Pantelis; Daniilidis, Michael; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and autoimmune disorders. The association of vitamin D with T2DM and thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) has not been investigated. Thus, we aimed to explore the putative association between T2DM and thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) focusing on the role of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D). Study population included 264 T2DM patients and 234 controls. To explore the potential association between 25(OH)D and thyroid autoimmunity while controlling for potential confounders—namely, age, gender, body mass index, and presence of T2DM—multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken. Patients with T2DM were younger (P < 0.001) and had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels (P < 0.001) and higher anti-TPO titers (P = 0.005). Multivariable logistic regression analyses suggested that T2DM and 25(OH)D levels were significantly associated with the presence of thyroid autoimmunity. In an elderly population of diabetic patients and controls with a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, a patient with T2DM was found to be 2.5 times more likely to have thyroid autoimmunity compared to a nondiabetic individual and the higher the serum 25(OH)D levels were, the higher this chance was. PMID:26078759

  14. Genetic association, seasonal infections and autoimmune basis of narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abinav Kumar; Mahlios, Josh; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a growing number of potential autoimmune disorders affecting neurons in the central nervous system have been identified, including narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible sleep attacks, cataplexy (sudden bilateral loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations, and abnormalities of Rapid Eye Movement sleep. Narcolepsy is generally a sporadic disorder and is caused by the loss of hypocretin (orexin)-producing neurons in the hypothalamus region of the brain. Studies have established that more than 90% of patients have a genetic association with HLA DQB1*06:02. Genome-wide association analysis shows a strong association between narcolepsy and polymorphisms in the TCR? locus and weaker associations within TNFSF4 (also called OX40L), Cathepsin H and the P2RY11-DNMT1 (purinergic receptor subtype P2Y11 to DNMT1, a DNA methytransferase) loci, suggesting an autoimmune basis. Mutations in DNMT1 have also been reported to cause narcolepsy in association with a complex neurological syndrome, suggesting the importance of DNA methylation in the pathology. More recently, narcolepsy was identified in association with seasonal streptococcus, H1N1 infections and following AS03-adjuvanted pH1N1 influenza vaccination in Northern Europe. Potential immunological pathways responsible for the loss of hypocretin producing neurons in these cases may be molecular mimicry or bystander activation. Specific autoantibodies or T cells cross-reactive with hypocretin neurons have not yet been identified, however, thus narcolepsy does not meet Witebsky’s criteria for an autoimmune disease. As the brain is not an easily accessible organ, mechanisms of disease initiation and progression remain a challenge to researchers. PMID:23497937

  15. Defective removal of ribonucleotides from DNA promotes systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Kind, Barbara; Reijns, Martin A.M.; Berndt, Nicole; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Wolf, Christine; Tüngler, Victoria; Chara, Osvaldo; Lee, Young Ae; Hübner, Norbert; Bicknell, Louise; Blum, Sophia; Krug, Claudia; Schmidt, Franziska; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Koss, Sarah; Astell, Katy R.; Ramantani, Georgia; Bauerfeind, Anja; Morris, David L.; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Bubeck, Doryen; Leitch, Andrea; Ralston, Stuart H.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Gahr, Manfred; Witte, Torsten; Vyse, Timothy J.; Melchers, Inga; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nöthen, Markus M.; Aringer, Martin; Kuhn, Annegret; Lüthke, Kirsten; Unger, Leonore; Bley, Annette; Lorenzi, Alice; Isaacs, John D.; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Conrad, Karsten; Dahl, Andreas; Roers, Axel; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is continuously challenged by the DNA damage that arises during normal cell metabolism. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the genome surveillance enzyme ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), a pediatric disorder that shares features with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we determined that heterozygous parents of AGS patients exhibit an intermediate autoimmune phenotype and demonstrated a genetic association between rare RNASEH2 sequence variants and SLE. Evaluation of patient cells revealed that SLE- and AGS-associated mutations impair RNase H2 function and result in accumulation of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA. The ensuing chronic low level of DNA damage triggered a DNA damage response characterized by constitutive p53 phosphorylation and senescence. Patient fibroblasts exhibited constitutive upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and an enhanced type I IFN response to the immunostimulatory nucleic acid polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and UV light irradiation, linking RNase H2 deficiency to potentiation of innate immune signaling. Moreover, UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation was markedly enhanced in ribonucleotide-containing DNA, providing a mechanism for photosensitivity in RNase H2–associated SLE. Collectively, our findings implicate RNase H2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest a role of DNA damage–associated pathways in the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:25500883

  16. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system refers to parts of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems in a myriad of ways and through a heterogeneous number of mechanisms leading to many different clinical manifestations. As a result, neurological complications of these disorders can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common complication of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement is peripheral neuropathy, with symptoms of numbness, sensory paresthesias, weakness, or gait imbalance. The neuropathy may be multifocal and asymmetric or, less frequently, distal and symmetric. PMID:25705295

  17. Anatabine ameliorates experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Patrizio; De Remigis, Alessandra; Ferlito, Marcella; Landek-Salgado, Melissa A; Iwama, Shintaro; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Ladenson, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco smoking favorably influences the course of Hashimoto thyroiditis, possibly through the antiinflammatory proprieties of nicotine. In this study we tested anatabine, another tobacco alkaloid, in a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced by different doses of thyroglobulin, to produce a disease of low, moderate, or high severity, in 88 CBA/J female mice: 43 drank anatabine supplemented water and 45 regular water. Mice were bled after immunization and killed to assess thyroid histopathology, thyroglobulin antibodies, T(4), and thyroid RNA expression of 84 inflammatory genes. We also stimulated in vitro a macrophage cell line with interferon-? or lipopolysaccharide plus or minus anatabine to quantitate inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. Anatabine reduced the incidence and severity of thyroiditis in the moderate disease category: only 13 of 21 mice (62%) developed thyroid infiltrates when drinking anatabine as compared with 22 of 23 (96%) controls (relative risk 0.59, P = 0.0174). The median thyroiditis severity was 0.5 and 2.0 in anatabine and controls, respectively (P = 0.0007 by Wilcoxon rank sum test). Anatabine also reduced the antibody response to thyroglobulin on d 14 (P = 0.029) and d 21 (P = 0.045) after immunization and improved the recovery of thyroid function on d 21 (P = 0.049). In the thyroid transcriptome, anatabine restored expression of IL-18 and IL-1 receptor type 2 to preimmunization levels. Finally, anatabine suppressed in a dose-dependent manner macrophage production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Anatabine ameliorates disease in a model of autoimmune thyroiditis, making the delineation of its mechanisms of action and potential clinical utility worthwhile. PMID:22807490

  18. Autoimmune Dysregulation and Purine Metabolism in Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties. PMID:22969765

  19. The Immunogenetics of Autoimmune Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Palak J; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-02-01

    The immune-mediated hepatobiliary diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis are relatively rare, albeit and account for a significant amount of liver transplant activity and liver-related mortality globally. Precise disease mechanisms are yet to be described although a contributory role of genetic predisposition is firmly established. In addition to links with the major histocompatibility complex, a number of associations outside this region harbor additional loci which underscore the fundamental role of breaks in immune tolerance and mucosal immunogenicity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune biliary disease. We provide an overview of these key discoveries before discussing putative avenues of therapeutic exploitation based on existing findings. PMID:26593288

  20. Immunomodulatory vaccines against autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sela, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vaccines are for healthy people, to prevent them from becoming ill. Such prophylactic vaccines have been a great success. Therapeutic vaccines become more and more important, especially as life expectancy increases. Efforts to develop vaccines against such diseases as cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis, Alzheimer disease, and mad cow disease have not yet reached the stage where they can be successfully used on a daily basis. However, significant progress has been made in the realm of autoimmune diseases, resulting (at least in one case) in an immunomodulatory vaccine against multiple sclerosis that was developed in the author's laboratory, and that is in daily use by about 100,000 patients. The drug or therapeutic vaccine against the exacerbating-remitting type of multiple sclerosis is a copolymer of four amino acid residues, denoted Copaxone, which are related to myelin basic protein. This paper discusses Copaxone as well as a candidate immunomodulatory vaccine against myasthenia gravis, a peptide derived from the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Copolymer 1 (Cop 1, glatiramer acetate, Copaxone) is a synthetic amino acid random copolymer that is immunologically cross-reactive with myelin basic protein and suppresses experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in several animal species. Cop 1 slows the progression of disability and reduces the relapse rate in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Cop 1 is a potent inducer of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory cells in mice and humans; and Th2 cells are found in both the brains and spinal cords of Cop 1-treated mice and humans. MG and experimental autoimmune MG are T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Two peptides, representing sequences of the human AChR-alpha-subunit, p195-212 and p259-271, are immunodominant T-cell epitopes in MG patients and two strains of mice. Altered peptide ligand, composed of the randomly arranged two single amino acid analogs inhibits in vitro and in vivo MG-associated autoimmune responses. The active suppression is mediated by the CD4+ CD25+ immunoregulatory cells and is associated with the downregulation of Th1-type cytokines and upregulation of the secretion of IL-10 and the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor beta. PMID:16608409

  1. Helicobacter pylori and skin autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Delgado, Jorge-Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune skin diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to skin self-antigen(s). The prolonged interaction between the bacterium and host immune mechanisms makes Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) a plausible infectious agent for triggering autoimmunity. Epidemiological and experimental data now point to a strong relation of H. pylori infection on the development of many extragastric diseases, including several allergic and autoimmune diseases. H. pylori antigens activate cross-reactive T cells and induce autoantibodies production. Microbial heat shock proteins (HSP) play an important role of in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases because of the high level of sequence homology with human HSP. Eradication of H. pylori infection has been shown to be effective in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria, psoriasis, alopecia areata and Schoenlein-Henoch purpura. There is conflicting and controversial data regarding the association of H. pylori infection with Behçet’s disease, scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. No data are available evaluating the association of H. pylori infection with other skin autoimmune diseases, such as vitiligo, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. The epidemiological and experimental evidence for a possible role of H. pylori infection in skin autoimmune diseases are the subject of this review. PMID:24587626

  2. Autoimmune disease and vaccination: impact on infectious disease prevention and a look at future applications.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, John E; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines hold promise both for the prevention of infections and as potential immunologic therapy for patients with autoimmune disease (AD). These patients are at high risk for both common and opportunistic infections, but this risk can be significantly reduced and even obviated with the use of recommended available vaccines. Unfortunately, patients with ADs are not routinely offered or provided indicated vaccinations and have higher rates of complications from vaccine-preventable illnesses than patients without ADs. In addition, vaccine therapy is currently under study for the treatment of autoimmune disorders, with early studies demonstrating immunomodulatory effects that may counter undesired immune activation and alleviate disease activity. PMID:26408802

  3. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  4. The autoimmune concept of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Grundtman, Cecilia; Wick, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes the recent data on the ‘Autoimmune Concept of Atherosclerosis’, according to which the first stage of this disease is due to an autoimmune reaction against arterial endothelial cells expressing heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and adhesion molecules when stressed by classical atherosclerosis risk factors. Special emphasis is put on oxidized low-density lipoproteins as early endothelial stressors. Recent findings Plasma cholesterol and LDL levels considered ‘normal’ by the medical community are possibly too high from an evolutionary viewpoint. The proinflammatory milieu at sites of early atherosclerotic lesions could be conducive to oxidation of LDL in situ. LDL oxidation can also take place at nonvascular sites or in the circulation under general proinflammatory conditions explaining its proatherosclerotic role in ‘normocholesterolemic’ individuals. Summary We hypothesize that the plasma cholesterol and LDL levels currently considered normal are evolutionarily too high. Cholesterol and/or oxidized low-density lipoprotein, even as a mild HSP60-inducing endothelial stressor, function as a ubiquitous risk factor. If this hypothesis is true, most members of developed societies might be at risk to develop atherosclerotic plaques at anti-HSP60-immunity-triggered intimal inflammatory foci, irrespective of the primary risk-factor(s). PMID:21881502

  5. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  6. Autoimmune mechanisms in pernicious anaemia & thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Osborne, David; Sobczy?ska-Malefora, Agata

    2015-09-01

    Pernicious anaemia (PA) and some types of thyroid disease result from autoimmune processes. The autoimmune mechanisms in these conditions have not been fully elucidated. This review discusses the autoimmune mechanisms involved in PA and how these affect diagnosis and disease progression. In addition to gastric antibodies, antibodies to the vitamin B12 binding protein transcobalamin which can result in high serum B12 levels are also addressed with regard to how they affect clinical practice. The role of autoimmune susceptibility is investigated by comparing PA to one of its most common comorbidities, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Thyroid disease (although not exclusively AITD) and B12 deficiency are both also implicated in the pathology of hyperhomocysteinemia, an elevated homocysteine in plasma. Since hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular occlusive disease, this review also addresses how thyroid disease in particular leads to changes in homocysteine levels. PMID:25936607

  7. Cell-surface MHC density profiling reveals instability of autoimmunity-associated HLA

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Hiroko; Ohashi, Jun; Lernmark, Åke; Kitamura, Toshio; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms within HLA gene loci are strongly associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disorders; however, it is not clear how genetic variations in these loci confer a disease risk. Here, we devised a cell-surface MHC expression assay to detect allelic differences in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ proteins. We found extreme variation in cell-surface MHC density among HLA-DQ alleles, indicating a dynamic allelic hierarchy in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ proteins. Using the case-control data for type 1 diabetes (T1D) for the Swedish and Japanese populations, we determined that T1D risk–associated HLA-DQ haplotypes, which also increase risk for autoimmune endocrinopathies and other autoimmune disorders, encode unstable proteins, whereas the T1D–protective haplotypes encode the most stable HLA-DQ proteins. Among the amino acid variants of HLA-DQ, alterations in 47?, the residue that is located on the outside of the peptide-binding groove and acts as a key stability regulator, showed strong association with T1D. Evolutionary analysis suggested that 47? variants have been the target of positive diversifying selection. Our study demonstrates a steep allelic hierarchy in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ that is associated with T1D risk and protection, suggesting that HLA instability mediates the development of autoimmune disorders. PMID:25485681

  8. Ear-nose-throat manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Papadimitraki, E D; Kyrmizakis, D E; Kritikos, I; Boumpas, D T

    2004-01-01

    Ear-nose-throat (ENT) manifestations of connective tissue disorders represent a diagnostic challenge for clinicians as they often constitute the initial sign of an otherwise asymptomatic autoimmune disease. Moreover, in patients with known autoimmune rheumatic diseases, ENT manifestations can be overlooked. Hearing disturbances may be seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Wegener's granulomatosis, relapsing polychondritis, polyarteritis nodosa, Cogan's syndrome, Sjögren's syndrome, and less frequently in Churg-Strauss syndrome and Adamantiades-Behçet's disease. Nose and paranasal sinuses are variably affected during the course of Wegener's granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, relapsing polychondritis and sarcoidosis. Recurrent mucosal ulcerations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus and Adamantiades-Behçet's disease. Xerostomia is a common feature of primary and secondary Sjögren's syndrome; salivary gland enlargement may be also seen in these patients, as well as in patients with sarcoidosis. The cricoarytenoid joint can be involved during the course of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and gout; osteoarthritic changes have also been described. Motility disorders of the upper and/or the lower portions of the esophagus have been reported in patients with dermatomyositis/polymyositis, systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Trigeminal nerve dysfunction may occur in patients with Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease. Peripheral facial nerve palsy has been described to complicate the course of Sjögren's syndrome and sarcoidosis. PMID:15301251

  9. The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ for autoimmune and allergic diseases: an update

    PubMed Central

    Okada, H; Kuhn, C; Feillet, H; Bach, J-F

    2010-01-01

    According to the ‘hygiene hypothesis’, the decreasing incidence of infections in western countries and more recently in developing countries is at the origin of the increasing incidence of both autoimmune and allergic diseases. The hygiene hypothesis is based upon epidemiological data, particularly migration studies, showing that subjects migrating from a low-incidence to a high-incidence country acquire the immune disorders with a high incidence at the first generation. However, these data and others showing a correlation between high disease incidence and high socio-economic level do not prove a causal link between infections and immune disorders. Proof of principle of the hygiene hypothesis is brought by animal models and to a lesser degree by intervention trials in humans. Underlying mechanisms are multiple and complex. They include decreased consumption of homeostatic factors and immunoregulation, involving various regulatory T cell subsets and Toll-like receptor stimulation. These mechanisms could originate, to some extent, from changes in microbiota caused by changes in lifestyle, particularly in inflammatory bowel diseases. Taken together, these data open new therapeutic perspectives in the prevention of autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:20415844

  10. PI3K inhibitors in inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Anne-Katrien; Sriskantharajah, Srividya; Hessel, Edith M; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The healthy immune system protects against infection and malignant transformation without causing significant damage to host tissues. Immune dysregulation results in diverse pathologies including autoimmune disease, chronic inflammatory disorders, allergies as well as immune deficiencies and cancer. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling has been shown to be a key pathway in the regulation of the immune response and continues to be the focus of intense research. In recent years we have gained detailed understanding of PI3K signalling, and saw the development of potent and highly selective small molecule inhibitors, of which several are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of immune-related disorders and cancer. The role of PI3K signalling in the immune response has been the subject of detailed reviews; here we focus on relevant recent progress in pre-clinical and clinical development of PI3K inhibitors. PMID:26093105

  11. Beneficial effect of testosterone in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.A.; Young, P.R.; Penhale, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Early thymectomy and sublethal irradiation of normal rats consistently induces a sex-dependent chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Females are much more susceptible to this autoimmune disorder than are males. The possible therapeutic effects of testosterone (Te) on established autoimmune thyroiditis has been investigated in this model. The pathologic condition of the gland before treatment was monitored by a thyroid grafting and extirpation techniques. Te administration by either parenteral injection or implantation caused significant regression of established thyroiditis. Repeated doses of Te ester in oil were found to be more effective than powdered free-Te given by implantation, and frequently produced complete resolution of chronic lesions involving the entire gland. In these thyroids, there was reappearance of normal thyroid architecture and complete absence of mononuclear cellular infiltration. However, no inhibitory effect on serum autoantibody production to thyroglobulin was noted with any form of Te treatment. These observations strengthen the concept that cellular rather than humoral mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of thyroiditis.

  12. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  13. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Dijkman, Karin; Dunham, Jordon; 't Hart, Bert A; Kap, Yolanda S

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset, a small-bodied Neotropical primate, is a well-known and validated animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). This model can be used for exploratory research, i.e., investigating the pathogenic mechanisms involved in MS, and applied research, testing the efficacy of new potential drugs.In this chapter, we will describe a method to induce EAE in the marmoset. In addition, we will explain the most common immunological techniques involved in the marmoset EAE research, namely isolation of mononuclear cells (MNC) from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue, assaying T cell proliferation by thymidine incorporation, MNC phenotyping by flow cytometry, antibody measurement by ELISA, generation of B cell lines and antigen-specific T cell lines, and assaying cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25208751

  14. Heat shock protein 90: a pathophysiological factor and novel treatment target in autoimmune bullous skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Tukaj, Stefan; Zillikens, Detlef; Kasperkiewicz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a cell stress-inducible molecule that regulates activity of many client proteins responsible for cellular growth, differentiation and apoptosis, has been proposed as an important therapeutic target in patients with malignancies. More recently, its active participation in (auto)immune processes has been recognized as evidenced by amelioration of inflammatory disease pathways through pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 in rodent models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Based on own current research results, this viewpoint essay provides important insights that Hsp90 is also involved as a notable pathophysiological factor in autoimmune blistering dermatoses including epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid and possibly dermatitis herpetiformis. The observed in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of anti-Hsp90 treatment in experimental models of autoimmune bullous diseases and its underlying multimodal anti-inflammatory mechanisms of interference with key contributors to autoimmune-mediated blister formation supports the introduction of selective non-toxic Hsp90 inhibitors into the clinical setting for the treatment of patients with these disorders. PMID:25980533

  15. Biological effects of IL-21 on different immune cells and its role in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, Tohid; Majidi, Jafar; Kazemi, Tohid; Dehghanzadeh, Rashedeh; Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Babaloo, Zohreh

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) is a member of the common ?-chain cytokines with broad pleiotropic actions that affects different immune and nonimmune cells. IL-21 can affect differentiation, proliferation and function of T and B cells; it can also induce the maturation and enhance the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells and Natural killer (NK) cells. IL-21 exerts major effects on B-cell activation and differentiation or apoptosis during humoral immune responses and induces differentiation of naïve B cells and memory B cells into plasma cells. IL-21 also affects different subtypes of T cells including T helper-17 (TH17), T follicular helper (TFH) and regulatory T (Treg) cells and thereby promotes the development of autoimmune disorders and inflammatory diseases. Observations have shown that the blockade of IL-21 has therapeutic effects on various autoimmune diseases in animal models. A better understanding of the regulation of cell differentiation and stabilization by IL-21 in the context of each specific autoimmune disease or tissue-specific pathological microenvironments will be helpful in developing novel treatments to control autoimmune diseases. Herein, we review the biological effects of IL-21 on different immune cells and uncover the emerging role of this interesting cytokine in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26466984

  16. Proliferating brain cells are a target of neurotoxic CSF in systemic autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakic, Boris; Kirkham, David L.; Ballok, David A.; Mwanjewe, James; Fearon, Ian M.; Macri, Joseph; Yu, Guanhua; Sidor, Michelle M.; Denburg, Judah A.; Szechtman, Henry; Lau, Jonathan; Ball, Alexander K.; Doering, Laurie C.

    2006-01-01

    Brain atrophy, neurologic and psychiatric (NP) manifestations are common complications in the systemic autoimmune disease, lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we show that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from autoimmune MRL-lpr mice and a deceased NP-SLE patient reduce the viability of brain cells which proliferate in vitro. This detrimental effect was accompanied by periventricular neurodegeneration in the brains of autoimmune mice and profound in vivo neurotoxicity when their CSF was administered to the CNS of a rat. Multiple ionic responses with microfluorometry and protein peaks on electropherograms suggest more than one mechanism of cellular demise. Similar to the CSF from diseased MRL-lpr mice, the CSF from a deceased SLE patient with a history of psychosis, memory impairment, and seizures, reduced viability of the C17.2 neural stem cell line. Proposed mechanisms of cytotoxicity involve binding of intrathecally synthesized IgG autoantibodies to target(s) common to different mammalian species and neuronal populations. More importantly, these results indicate that the viability of proliferative neural cells can be compromised in systemic autoimmune disease. Antibody-mediated lesions of germinal layers may impair the regenerative capacity of the brain in NP-SLE and possibly, brain development and function in some forms of CNS disorders in which autoimmune phenomena have been documented. PMID:16198428

  17. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage. PMID:23984314

  18. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim, namely, evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease. In fact, the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue. In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with “diopathic”pancreatitis, we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis. Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low, we believe that in the future, by increasing our knowledge on the subject, we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:18286678

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Autoimmune Addison disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... characteristic feature of autoimmune Addison disease is abnormally dark areas of skin (hyperpigmentation), especially in regions that ... lining of the mouth can also be unusually dark. Because of an imbalance of hormones involved in ...

  20. Nanoparticle-mediated codelivery of myelin antigen and a tolerogenic small molecule suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Ada; Nadeau, Meghan; Burns, Evan J; Weiner, Howard L; Quintana, Francisco J

    2012-07-10

    The immune response is normally controlled by regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, Treg deficits are found in autoimmune diseases, and therefore the induction of functional Tregs is considered a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune disorders. The activation of the ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor by 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) or other ligands induces dendritic cells (DCs) that promote FoxP3(+) Treg differentiation. Here we report the use of nanoparticles (NPs) to coadminister ITE and a T-cell epitope from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)(35)(-55) to promote the generation of Tregs by DCs. NP-treated DCs displayed a tolerogenic phenotype and promoted the differentiation of Tregs in vitro. Moreover, NPs carrying ITE and MOG(35-55) expanded the FoxP3(+) Treg compartment and suppressed the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an experimental model of multiple sclerosis. Thus, NPs are potential new tools to induce functional Tregs in autoimmune disorders. PMID:22745170

  1. Lessons from type 1 diabetes for understanding natural history and prevention of autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Kimber; Michels, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder resulting from immune mediated destruction of insulin producing beta cells within the pancreatic islets. The natural history of T1D is well defined with distinct stages in disease development. Genetics and environmental factors contribute to disease susceptibility, followed by autoimmune targeting of proteins within beta cells. Preclinical T1D is marked by the presence of islet autoantibodies and normal blood glucose levels. Prediction of T1D is now possible as having two or more islet autoantibodies confers a 100% risk of diabetes development; however the time to disease onset varies amongst individuals. Once enough insulin producing beta cells are destroyed, hyperglycemia results, and treatment with insulin is necessary. With the ability to assess risk and predict disease development, large clinical trials to prevent diabetes onset have been completed and are currently underway. This review focuses on the natural history, prediction, and prevention trials in T1D. We will review the lessons learned from these attempts at preventing a chronic autoimmune disease and apply the paradigm from T1D prevention to other autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25437293

  2. The Influence and Role of Microbial Factors in Autoimmune Kidney Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the pathophysiology of autoimmune disorders is desired to allow tailored interventions. Despite increased scientific interest a direct pathogenic factor in autoimmune renal disease has been described only in a minority like membranous nephropathy or ANCA-associated vasculitis. Nonetheless the initial step leading to the formation of these antibodies is still obscure. In this review we will focus on the possible role of microbial factors in this context. Staphylococcus aureus may be a direct pathogenetic factor in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Chronic bacterial colonization or chronic infections of the upper respiratory tract have been proposed as trigger of IgA vasculitis and IgA nephropathy. Interventions to remove major lymphoid organs, such as tonsillectomy, have shown conflicting results but may be an option in IgA vasculitis. Interestingly no clear clinical benefit despite similar local colonization with bacterial strains has been detected in patients with IgA nephropathy. In systemic lupus erythematosus injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced progressive lupus nephritis in mouse models. The aim of this review is to discuss and summarize the knowledge of microbial antigens in autoimmune renal disease. Novel methods may provide insight into the involvement of microbial antigens in the onset, progression, and prognosis of autoimmune kidney disorders. PMID:26078982

  3. Human Regulatory T cells and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Cristina Maria; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Hafler, David A.

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) appear to be critical in regulating immune responses to self-antigens. Treg deficiency is associated with several human autoimmune diseases. Although substantial progress has been made in the study of murine and human Tregs, their fundamental mechanism of action remains unknown. In this review, we discuss phenotype of human natural Tregs, the functional mechanism of these cells, and the role of these Tregs in autoimmune disease. PMID:18395861

  4. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  5. Gender disparities in ocular inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Sen, Hatice Nida; Davis, Janet; Ucar, Didar; Fox, Austin; Chan, Chi Chao; Goldstein, Debra A

    2015-02-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders disproportionately affect women, and the majority of affected women are of childbearing age. The role of sex or reproductive hormones has been proposed in many other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and findings from non-ocular autoimmune diseases suggest a complex interaction between sex hormones, genetic factors and the immune system. However, despite the age and sex bias, factors that influence this disparity are complicated and unclear. This review aims to evaluate the gender disparities in prevalence, incidence and severity of the most common infectious and non-infectious ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:24987987

  6. Gender Disparities in Ocular Inflammatory Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Hatice Nida; Davis, Janet; Ucar, Didar; Fox, Austin; Chan, Chi Chao; Goldstein, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders disproportionately affect women, and the majority of affected women are of childbearing age. The role of sex or reproductive hormones has been proposed in many other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and findings from non-ocular autoimmune diseases suggest a complex interaction between sex hormones, genetic factors and the immune system. However, despite the age and sex bias, factors that influence this disparity are complicated and unclear. This review aims to evaluate the gender disparities in prevalence, incidence and severity of the most common infectious and non-infectious ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:24987987

  7. Adverse reactions to food constituents: allergy, intolerance, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kitts, D; Yuan, Y; Joneja, J; Scott, F; Szilagyi, A; Amiot, J; Zarkadas, M

    1997-04-01

    Food allergies and intolerance represent important health concerns to consumers who are predisposed to these illnesses. Unlike many current food safety issues, food sensitivities are complicated by both complex and multiple individual adverse reactions, which can vary from emotional to pathophysiological ailments. In some instances, the underlying mechanisms that result in the development of food allergies or intolerance have marked differences but produce common symptoms. The present-day diagnosis of these disorders can be impeded by intrinsic limitations in generating accurate information from patient history and biochemical, physicochemical, and immunochemical tests. Oral challenge tests represent effective methods for confirming and testing food allergens and food intolerance; however, these procedures are often restricted to clinical trials. It is important to be able to distinguish among food allergy, intolerance, and autoimmune disease in the management of these disorders. The role of food in the development of autoimmune disease may be exemplified by celiac disease, a food-induced enteropathy, requiring exposure to prolamins in wheat, rye, and barley. Various wheat and soy protein sources, including the soy protein isolates used to make infant formulas, have been related to juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), a common chronic disease of childhood. Employing food process technologies to eliminate food constituents with potential for intolerance in some individuals is a potentially viable approach for reducing risk to food-related disorders. Finally, the development of food labelling regulations that require the identification of potential food allergens or agents for intolerance in the ingredient declaration on prepackaged food is a positive step toward the prevention of severe adverse reactions in hypersensitive individuals. PMID:9196849

  8. NK Cell Autoreactivity and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells in organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands up-regulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alternating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular-matrix components, and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity. PMID:24550913

  9. Targeting interleukin-6 in inflammatory autoimmune diseases and cancers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Huang, Jiaqi; Zhong, Haihong; Shen, Nan; Faggioni, Raffaella; Fung, Michael; Yao, Yihong

    2014-02-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with significant functions in the regulation of the immune system. As a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6 plays a pivotal role in host defense against pathogens and acute stress. However, increased or deregulated expression of IL-6 significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases. Numerous preclinical and clinical studies have revealed the pathological roles of the IL-6 pathway in inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Based on the rich body of studies on biological activities of IL-6 and its pathological roles, therapeutic strategies targeting the IL-6 pathway are in development for cancers, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Several anti-IL-6/IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibodies developed for targeted therapy have demonstrated promising results in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Tocilizumab, an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, is effective in the treatment of various autoimmune and inflammatory conditions notably rheumatoid arthritis. It is the only IL-6 pathway targeting agent approved by the regulatory agencies for clinical use. Siltuximab, an anti-IL-6 antibody, has been shown to have potential benefits treating various human cancers either as a single agent or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. Several other anti-IL-6-based therapies are also under clinical development for various diseases. IL-6 antagonism has been shown to be a potential therapy for these disorders refractory to conventional drugs. New strategies, such as combination of IL-6 blockade with inhibition of other signaling pathways, may further improve IL-6-targeted immunotherapy of human diseases. PMID:24076269

  10. Thyroid disorders in women.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid disorders include autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer. AITD mainly consist of autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves disease. The common characteristic of thyroid disorders is female preponderance in their prevalence. The female-to-male rate ratio is reported at 4~6:1 for AITD and about 3~4:1 for thyroid nodule. For PTC, it is greatest during reproductive age and drops from five and more in patients aged 20-24, to 3.4 in patients aged 35-44 to one in patients over 80. The effects of female gonadal hormones and X chromosome inactivation on thyroid gland and immune system greatly contribute to the female predilection of AITD. The former mainly include prolactin and estrogen. The direct actions of estrogen on the thyroid tissue contribute to the development of thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer in women. PMID:25668600

  11. Is preeclampsia an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E

    2009-10-01

    Preeclampsia is a life-threatening hypertensive disease of pregnancy. The condition is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT(1). Research conducted during the past decade has shown that these autoantibodies activate AT(1) receptors on a variety of cell types and provoke biological responses that are relevant to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The introduction of these autoantibodies into pregnant mice results in hypertension, proteinuria and a variety of other features of preeclampsia including small fetuses and placentas. These findings demonstrate the pathophysiological role of these autoantibodies in preeclampsia. The biological properties of these autoantibodies can be blocked by a 7-amino acid peptide that corresponds to a specific sequence associated with the second extracellular loop of the AT(1) receptor. The fact that autoantibodies from different individuals are directed to a common epitope provides obvious diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune condition characterized by the presence of disease-causing angiotensin receptor activating autoantibodies. PMID:19501024

  12. IS PREECLAMPSIA AN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a life-threatening hypertensive disease of pregnancy. The condition is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT1. Research conducted during the past decade has shown that these autoantibodies activate AT1 receptors on a variety of cell types and provoke biological responses that are relevant to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The introduction of these autoantibodies into pregnant mice results in hypertension, proteinuria and a variety of other features of preeclampsia including small fetuses and placentas. These findings demonstrate the pathophysiological role of these autoantibodies in preeclampsia. The biological properties of these autoantibodies can be blocked by a 7-amino acid peptide that corresponds to a specific sequence associated with the second extracellular loop of the AT1 receptor. The fact that autoantibodies from different individuals are directed to a common epitope provides obvious diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune condition characterized by the presence of disease-causing angiotensin receptor activating autoantibodies PMID:19501024

  13. New Autoantibody Detection Technologies Yield Novel Insights into Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to highlight recent progress in autoantibody detection technologies and describe how these methods are providing novel information and insights into autoimmune disorders. Recent findings In recent years, alternative methods such as comprehensive phage display, fluid-phase immunoassays, and antigen microarrays have been developed for autoantigen discovery and profiling autoantibody responses. Compared to classic approaches such as Western blot and ELISA, these methods show improved diagnostic performance, the ability to measure antibody responses to multiple targets, and/or allow for more quantitative analyses. Specific notable findings include uncovering previously unrecognized autoantigens, the improved classification of patient clinical phenotypes, and the discovery of pathogenic autoantibodies promoting disease. Summary Advances in immunoassay technologies offer many opportunities for understanding the relationship between autoantibody detection and the myriad complex, clinical phenotypes characteristic of most autoimmune diseases. Further simplification and standardization of these technologies may allow routine integration into clinical practice with improved diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25203116

  14. Combined short-term immunotherapy for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Pestronk, A.; Drachman, D.B.; Teoh, R.; Adams, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    A therapeutic strategy was designed to eliminate the humoral immune response to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Rats with EAMG were treated with a protocol consisting of three components: (1) A single high dose of cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was used to produce a rapid and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels by preferential destruction of antibody-producing B-lymphocytes. ''Memory'' lymphocytes were not eliminated by cyclophosphamide. (2) Irradiation (600 rads) was used to eliminate the ''memory'' cells. It eliminated the anamnestic response to a challenge with the antigen AChR. (3) Bone marrow transplantation was used to repopulate the hematopoietic system after the otherwise lethal dose of cyclophosphamide. We used bone marrow from syngeneic rats with active EAMG to simulate an autologous transplant. Rats with EAMG treated with this combined protocol showed a prompt and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels and had no anamnestic response to a challenge with AChR. Thus, an affected animal's own marrow could be stored and used later for repopulation after cyclophosphamide-irradiation treatment. This treatment eliminates the animal's ongoing immune responses and reconstitutes the immune system in its original state. The success of this approach suggests that, if their safety could be established, similar ''curative'' strategies might be developed for the treatment of patients with severe antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, such as myasthenia gravis.

  15. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and ?-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. PMID:26387449

  16. Expert Panel Workshop Consensus Statement on the Role of the Environment in the Development of Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Christine G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Pollard, Kenneth Michael; Selmi, Carlo; Germolec, Dori; Joyce, Kelly; Rose, Noel R.; Humble, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases include 80 or more complex disorders characterized by self-reactive, pathologic immune responses in which genetic susceptibility is largely insufficient to determine disease onset. In September 2010, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) organized an expert panel workshop to evaluate the role of environmental factors in autoimmune diseases, and the state of the science regarding relevant mechanisms, animal models, and human studies. The objective of the workshop was to analyze the existing data to identify conclusions that could be drawn regarding environmental exposures and autoimmunity and to identify critical knowledge gaps and areas of uncertainty for future study. This consensus document summarizes key findings from published workshop monographs on areas in which “confident” and “likely” assessments were made, with recommendations for further research. Transcribed notes and slides were reviewed to synthesize an overview on exposure assessment and questions addressed by interdisciplinary panels. Critical advances in the field of autoimmune disease research have been made in the past decade. Collaborative translational and interdisciplinary research is needed to elucidate the role of environmental factors in autoimmune diseases. A focus on exposure assessment methodology is needed to improve the effectiveness of human studies, and more experimental studies are needed to focus on causal mechanisms underlying observed associations of environmental factors with autoimmune disease in humans. PMID:25196523

  17. Neuropathological Techniques to Investigate CNS Pathology in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Karin; Merkler, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathological techniques such as conventional and immunohistochemical staining of paraffin-embedded tissue sections are instrumental for identification and characterization of aberrations of organ architecture during human inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) as in their animal models. Here we describe step-by-step protocols for tissue processing, sectioning, and conventional and immunohistochemical stainings to display as well as quantify CNS inflammation, demyelination, and neuronal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). PMID:25146304

  18. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II - a case report.

    PubMed

    Azad, A K; Islam, M S; Quayum, S L

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome also known as autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) type II is characterized by the presence of Addison's disease, in association with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type I diabetes mellitus. Here a 14 year old girl is reported with Addison's disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism and primary hypogonadism. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) type II occurs most often in middle aged female and is quite rare in children but one should think to autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II in patient at any age especially in patients with Addison's disease. PMID:25725692

  19. Complement and autoimmune glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Quigg, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    The renal glomerulus is the specialized structure in the kidney responsible for generating over 150 liters of plasma ultrafiltrate per day in humans. Certain characteristics of this structure favor involvement in autoimmune diseases. Formation of immune complexes in the glomerulus, either deposited from the circulation or generated in situ, can activate the complement system. Active products of this system include the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, C3b, which covalently associates with immune complexes, and the C5b-9 membrane attack complex. If complement is activated in a site accessible to blood constituents, such as in the subendothelial and mesangial regions, generated C3a, C5a and C3b can interact with their respective receptors on inflammatory cells to lead to an exudative lesion. In addition, intrinsic glomerular cells bearing relevant receptors may also be activated and can proliferate to contribute to the inflammation. In a privileged site such as the subepithelial region, complement activation products are not accessible to blood cells, and as such, the resultant pathology is noninflammatory. In this setting, effects of C5b-9 predominate, which include activation and injury of cells through still incompletely characterized pathways. Various means to alter the complement pathway are now available, including antibody inhibitors and recombinant proteins based upon naturally occurring complement regulators. The use of these agents, as well as mice in which individual components of the complement system have been deleted, has given a great deal of insight into how the complement system is involved in glomerular disease. The ability to manipulate the complement pathway is now a reality in a clinical setting, yet conclusive human studies are difficult to achieve. PMID:14719380

  20. Impaired Autonomic Responses to Emotional Stimuli in Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Olga; Schriewer, Elisabeth; Golombeck, Kristin S.; Kürten, Julia; Lohmann, Hubertus; Schwindt, Wolfram; Wiendl, Heinz; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Melzer, Nico; Straube, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) is an autoimmune-mediated disorder that affects structures of the limbic system, in particular, the amygdala. The amygdala constitutes a brain area substantial for processing of emotional, especially fear-related signals. The amygdala is also involved in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including skin conductance responses (SCRs) to emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigates behavioral and autonomic responses to discrete emotion evoking and neutral film clips in a patient suffering from LE associated with contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2) antibodies as compared to a healthy control group. Results show a lack of SCRs in the patient while watching the film clips, with significant differences compared to healthy controls in the case of fear-inducing videos. There was no comparable impairment in behavioral data (emotion report, valence, and arousal ratings). The results point to a defective modulation of sympathetic responses during emotional stimulation in patients with LE, probably due to impaired functioning of the amygdala. PMID:26648907

  1. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  2. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  3. Eosinophilia in Dermatologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    de Graauw, Elisabeth; Beltraminelli, Helmut; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Simon, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophil infiltration can be observed in skin disorders, such as allergic/immunologic, autoimmune, infectious, and neoplastic diseases. Clinical presentations are variable and include eczematous, papular, urticarial, bullous, nodular, and fibrotic lesions; pruritus is a common symptom in all. In this review, we present representative eosinophilic skin diseases according to their clinical pattern, together with histologic findings and diagnostic procedures. We also discuss the potential roles of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of dermatologic disorder. Current pathogenesis-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are outlined. PMID:26209899

  4. Autoimmune Myocarditis, Valvulitis, and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer M.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Huber, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-induced autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a model of inflammatory heart disease initiated by CD4+ T cells (Smith and Allen 1991; Li, Heuser et al. 2004). It is a paradigm of the immune-mediated cardiac damage believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of postinfectious human cardiomyopathies (Rose, Herskowitz et al. 1993). Myocarditis is induced in susceptible mice by immunization with purified cardiac myosin (Neu, Rose et al. 1987) or specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Donermeyer, Beisel et al. 1995; Pummerer, Luze et al. 1996) (see Basic Protocol 1), or by adoptive transfer of myosin-reactive T cells (Smith and Allen 1991) (see Alternate Protocol). Myocarditis has been induced in Lewis rats by immunization with purified rat or porcine cardiac myosin (Kodama, Matsumoto et al. 1990; Li, Heuser et al. 2004) (see Basic Protocol 2) or S2-16 peptide (Li, Heuser et al. 2004), or by adoptive transfer of T cells stimulated by specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Wegmann, Zhao et al. 1994). Myocarditis begins 12 to 14 days after the first immunization, and is maximal after 21 days. Other animal models commonly used to study myocarditis development include the pathogen-induced models in which disease is initiated by viral infection. The first murine model of acute viral myocarditis causes sudden death via viral damage to cardiomyocytes (Huber, Gauntt et al. 1998; Horwitz, La Cava et al. 2000; Fong 2003; Fuse, Chan et al. 2005; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) whereas the second model is based on inoculation with heart-passaged coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) that includes damaged heart proteins (Fairweather, Frisancho-Kiss et al. 2004; Fairweather D 2004; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) In addition to the protocols used to induce EAM in mice and rats, support protocols are included for preparing purified cardiac myosin using mouse or rat heart tissue (see Support Protocol 1), preparing purified cardiac myosin for injection (see Support Protocol 2), and collecting and assessing hearts by histopathological means (see Support Protocol 3). PMID:23564686

  5. Management of autoimmune associated alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    McKillop, Jaqueline

    Alopecia areata or hair loss occurs in one in 1000 people. If medical reasons for the hair loss are ruled out, opinion and hypothesis point towards autoimmunity and stress as possible causes. Dealing with the gradual or sudden loss of head hair, eyebrows, eyelashes, nasal, ear and body hair poses unique challenges for those it affects. Autoimmune-associated alopecia areata has no age boundaries and affects children, men and women equally. The dramatic change in appearance can result in psychological trauma, loss in confidence, bullying, low self-esteem and relationship difficulties. PMID:20527485

  6. Murine autoimmune hearing loss mediated by CD4+ T cells specific for inner ear peptides

    PubMed Central

    Solares, C. Arturo; Edling, Andrea E.; Johnson, Justin M.; Baek, Moo-Jin; Hirose, Keiko; Hughes, Gordon B.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) is characterized typically by bilateral, rapidly progressive hearing loss that responds therapeutically to corticosteroid treatment. Despite its name, data implicating autoimmunity in the etiopathogenesis of ASNHL have been limited, and targeted self-antigens have not been identified. In the current study we show that the inner ear–specific proteins cochlin and ?-tectorin are capable of targeting experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) in mice. Five weeks after immunization of SWXJ mice with either Coch 131–150 or ?-tectorin 71–90, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) showed significant hearing loss at all frequencies tested. Flow cytometry analysis showed that each peptide selectively activated CD4+ T cells with a proinflammatory Th1-like phenotype. T cell mediation of EAHL was determined by showing significantly increased ABR thresholds 6 weeks after adoptive transfer of peptide-activated CD4+ T cells into naive SWXJ recipients. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that leukocytic infiltration of inner ear tissues coincided with onset of hearing loss. Our study provides a contemporary mouse model for clarifying our understanding of ASNHL and facilitating the development of novel effective treatments for this clinical entity. Moreover, our data provide experimental confirmation that ASNHL may be a T cell–mediated organ-specific autoimmune disorder of the inner ear. PMID:15085200

  7. Murine autoimmune hearing loss mediated by CD4+ T cells specific for inner ear peptides.

    PubMed

    Solares, C Arturo; Edling, Andrea E; Johnson, Justin M; Baek, Moo-Jin; Hirose, Keiko; Hughes, Gordon B; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2004-04-01

    Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) is characterized typically by bilateral, rapidly progressive hearing loss that responds therapeutically to corticosteroid treatment. Despite its name, data implicating autoimmunity in the etiopathogenesis of ASNHL have been limited, and targeted self-antigens have not been identified. In the current study we show that the inner ear-specific proteins cochlin and beta-tectorin are capable of targeting experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) in mice. Five weeks after immunization of SWXJ mice with either Coch 131-150 or beta-tectorin 71-90, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) showed significant hearing loss at all frequencies tested. Flow cytometry analysis showed that each peptide selectively activated CD4(+) T cells with a proinflammatory Th1-like phenotype. T cell mediation of EAHL was determined by showing significantly increased ABR thresholds 6 weeks after adoptive transfer of peptide-activated CD4(+) T cells into naive SWXJ recipients. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that leukocytic infiltration of inner ear tissues coincided with onset of hearing loss. Our study provides a contemporary mouse model for clarifying our understanding of ASNHL and facilitating the development of novel effective treatments for this clinical entity. Moreover, our data provide experimental confirmation that ASNHL may be a T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disorder of the inner ear. PMID:15085200

  8. Increased incidence of autoimmune markers in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is an umbrella term encompassing upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe pulmonary fibrosis with pathogenesis elusive. The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence of autoimmune markers in patients with CPFE. Methods In this multicenter study we retrospectively evaluated records from patients with CPFE (n=40) and IPF (n=60) without emphysema. Baseline demographic characteristics, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), spirometry, histopathological, treatment, serum immunologic and survival data were investigated. B cell presence was estimated with CD20 immunostaining in representative lung biopsy samples from CPFE patients and control subjects. Results A statistically significant increased number of CPFE patients with elevated serum ANA with or without positive p-ANCA titers compared to patients with IPF without emphysema was observed. Patients with CPFE and positive autoimmune markers exhibited improved survival compared to patients with a negative autoimmune profile. A massive infiltration of clusters of CD20+ B cells forming lymphoid follicles within the fibrotic lung in CPFE patients with positive serum immunologic profile compared to patients with negative profile, was noted and positively correlated with improved survival. Conclusions A significant proportion of patients with CPFE may present with underlying auto-immune disorders that may reside insidiously and be associated with favorable prognosis. Early identification of these patients using a panel of auto-antibodies may lead to more targeted and effective therapeutic applications. PMID:23697753

  9. Spinster 2, a sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter, plays a critical role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Donoviel, Michael S; Hait, Nitai C; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Maceyka, Michael; Takabe, Kazuaki; Milstien, Sheldon; Oravecz, Tamas; Spiegel, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic bioactive sphingolipid metabolite that regulates numerous processes important for immune responses. S1P is made within cells and must be transported out of cells to exert its effects through activation of 5 specific cell surface GPCRs in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Spinster 2 (Spns2) transports S1P out of cells, and its deletion in mice reduces circulating levels of S1P, alters immune cell trafficking, and induces lymphopenia. Here we examined the effects of Spns2 deletion on adaptive immune responses and in autoimmune disease models. Airway inflammation and hypersensitivity as well as delayed-type contact hypersensitivity were attenuated in Spns2(-/-) mice. Similarly, Spns2 deletion reduced dextran sodium sulfate- and oxazolone-induced colitis. Intriguingly, Spns2(-/-) mice were protected from the development of experimental autoimmune encephalopathy, a model of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. Deletion of Spns2 also strongly alleviated disease development in collagen-induced arthritis. These results point to a broad role for Spns2-mediated S1P transport in the initiation and development of adaptive immune related disorders.-Donoviel, M. S., Hait, N. C., Ramachandran, S., Maceyka, M., Takabe, K., Milstien, S., Oravecz, T., Spiegel, S. Spinster 2, a sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter, plays a critical role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26324848

  10. Leon and Engman The Contribution of Autoimmunity to Chagas Heart

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    proposed hypothesis is that Chagas disease is an autoimmune disease (reviewed in Eisen and Kahn, 1991 that Chagas disease is an autoimmune disease, tissue inflammation or cellular damage must be shownLeon and Engman The Contribution of Autoimmunity to Chagas Heart Disease J. S. Leon and D. M

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Prevalence and evolutionary origins of autoimmune

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Scott

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Prevalence and evolutionary origins of autoimmune susceptibility alleles in the SLAM/CD2 gene cluster, implicated in autoimmune lupus susceptibility in mice, was investigated and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).10­12 Although genetic predisposition to these autoimmune diseases

  12. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-?B-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  13. Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies

    E-print Network

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    pathogenic cell types in autoimmune diseases by using a gene-expression data set of 223 murine-sorted immune and high-quality cell-type-specific gene expression is available. Introduction Autoimmune diseasesARTICLE Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies Specific Pathogenic

  14. Autoimmunity to protective molecules: is it the perpetuum mobile (vicious cycle) of autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Martine Szyper; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2006-09-01

    Apoptotic defects and impaired clearance of cellular debris are considered key events in the development of autoimmunity, as they can contribute to autoantigen overload and might be involved in the initiation of an autoimmune response. The C1q protein and mannose-binding lectin are activators of the complement system. The pentraxins are a group of highly conserved proteins including the short pentraxins, C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P, and the long pentraxin family member, pentraxin 3, all of which are involved in innate immunity and in acute-phase responses. In addition to their role in innate immunity and inflammation, each of these proteins participates in the removal of damaged and apoptotic cells. In this article, we discuss the clinical significance of different levels of these proteins, their role in the induction of or protection against autoimmunity, and the presence of specific autoantibodies against them in various autoimmune diseases. PMID:16951703

  15. Fifteen-minute consultation: autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Clews, Sarah; Jeyasing, Sharmila; Lim, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AE) is increasingly diagnosed in children, and can result in severe long-term disability. We use a clinical case to illustrate the core clinical features, initial investigations and management of this potentially treatable condition, and describe the common presenting neurological syndromes alongside highlighting differences between each autoantibody subtype. PMID:25990215

  16. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2010-01-01

    Treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis are complicated by the diversity of its clinical presentations, uncertainties about its natural history, evolving opinions regarding treatment end points, varied nature of refractory disease, and plethora of alternative immunosuppressive agents. The goals of this article are to review the difficult treatment decisions and to provide the bases for making sound therapeutic judgments. The English literature on the treatment problems in autoimmune hepatitis were identified by Medline search up to October 2009 and 32 years of personal experience. Autoimmune hepatitis may have an acute severe presentation, mild inflammatory activity, lack autoantibodies, exhibit atypical histological changes (centrilobular zone 3 necrosis or bile duct injury), or have variant features reminiscent of another disease (overlap syndrome). Corticosteroid therapy must be instituted early, applied despite the absence of symptoms, or modified in an individualized fashion. Pursuit of normal liver tests and tissue is the ideal treatment end point, but this objective must be tempered against the risk of side effects. Relapse after treatment withdrawal requires long-term maintenance therapy, preferably with azathioprine. Treatment failure or an incomplete response warrants salvage therapy that can include conventional medications in modified dose or empirical therapies with calcineurin inhibitors or mycophenolate mofetil. Liver transplantation supersedes empirical drug therapy in decompensated patients. Elderly and pregnant patients warrant treatment modifications. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis can be simplified by recognizing its diverse manifestations and individualizing treatment, pursuing realistic goals, applying appropriate salvage regimens, and identifying problematic patients early. PMID:20180231

  17. [Laboratory diagnosis of polysystemic autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Sipka, Sándor

    2005-02-27

    After a short description of the mechanism of the development of polysystemic autoimmune diseases, this paper presents the in vitro laboratory methods suitable for the characterization of the humoral and cellular elements of immune system, furthermore, summarizes the characteristic autoantibodies and other laboratory alterations in these diseases. PMID:15830607

  18. Metabolic Regulation in Progression to Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sysi-Aho, Marko; Ermolov, Andrey; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti V.; Tripathi, Abhishek; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Maukonen, Johanna; Mattila, Ismo; Ruohonen, Suvi T.; Vähätalo, Laura; Yetukuri, Laxman; Härkönen, Taina; Lindfors, Erno; Nikkilä, Janne; Ilonen, Jorma; Simell, Olli; Saarela, Maria; Knip, Mikael; Kaski, Samuel; Savontaus, Eriika; Oreši?, Matej

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence from serum metabolomics indicates that specific metabolic disturbances precede ?-cell autoimmunity in humans and can be used to identify those children who subsequently progress to type 1 diabetes. The mechanisms behind these disturbances are unknown. Here we show the specificity of the pre-autoimmune metabolic changes, as indicated by their conservation in a murine model of type 1 diabetes. We performed a study in non-obese prediabetic (NOD) mice which recapitulated the design of the human study and derived the metabolic states from longitudinal lipidomics data. We show that female NOD mice who later progress to autoimmune diabetes exhibit the same lipidomic pattern as prediabetic children. These metabolic changes are accompanied by enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, normoglycemia, upregulation of insulinotropic amino acids in islets, elevated plasma leptin and adiponectin, and diminished gut microbial diversity of the Clostridium leptum group. Together, the findings indicate that autoimmune diabetes is preceded by a state of increased metabolic demands on the islets resulting in elevated insulin secretion and suggest alternative metabolic related pathways as therapeutic targets to prevent diabetes. PMID:22046124

  19. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  20. IL-35 and Autoimmunity: a Comprehensive Perspective.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinjung; Leung, Patrick S C; Bowlus, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is the most recently identified member of the IL-12 family of cytokines and offers the potential to be a target for new therapies for autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Similar to other members of the IL-12 family including IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27, IL-35 is composed of a heterodimer of ? and ? chains, which in the case of IL-35 are the p35 and Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) proteins. However, unlike its proinflammatory relatives, IL-35 has immunosuppressive effects that are mediated through regulatory T and B cells. Although there are limited data available regarding the role of IL-35 in human autoimmunity, several murine models of autoimmunity suggest that IL-35 may have potent effects in regulating immunoreactivity via IL-10-dependent mechanisms. We suggest that similar effects are operational in human disease and IL-35-directed therapies hold significant promise. In particular, we emphasize that IL-35 has immunosuppressive ability that are mediated via regulatory T and B cells that are IL-10 dependent. Further, although deletion of IL-35 does not result in spontaneous breach of tolerance, recombinant IL-35 can improve autoimmune responses in several experimental models. PMID:25619872

  1. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  2. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen set with synthetic peptide sequences should reveal the shared bacterial/human epitopes involved.

  3. Autoimmune central diabetes insipidus in a patient with ureaplasma urealyticum infection and review on new triggers of immune response.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Spanò, Francesca; Ferone, Diego; Albertelli, Manuela; Schenone, Angelo; Contatore, Miriam; Guastalla, Andrea; De Bellis, Annamaria; Garibotto, Giacomo; Puppo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease in which large volumes of dilute urine (polyuria) are excreted due to vasopressin (AVP) deficiency [central diabetes insipidus (CDI)] or to AVP resistance (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). In the majority of patients, the occurrence of CDI is related to the destruction or degeneration of neurons of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. The most common and well recognized causes include local inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, vascular disorders, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), sarcoidosis, tumors such as germinoma/craniopharyngioma or metastases, traumatic brain injuries, intracranial surgery, and midline cerebral and cranial malformations. Here we have the opportunity to describe an unusual case of female patient who developed autoimmune CDI following ureaplasma urealyticum infection and to review the literature on this uncommon feature. Moreover, we also discussed the potential mechanisms by which ureaplasma urealyticum might favor the development of autoimmune CDI. PMID:26331225

  4. Early-Onset Autoimmune Disease as a Manifestation of Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Coutinho, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune disorders (AID) have been increasingly observed in association with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Here, we discuss the interface between PID and AID, focusing on autoimmune manifestations early in life, which can be diagnostic clues for underlying PIDs. Inflammatory bowel disease in infants and children has been associated with IL-10 and IL-10R deficiencies, chronic granulomatous disease, immunedysregulation-polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-X-linked syndrome (IPEX), autoinflammatory disorders, and others. Some PIDs have been identified as underlying defects in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus: C1q-, IgA-, IgM deficiencies, alterations of the IFN-? pathway (in Aicardi–Goutières syndrome due to TREX1 mutation). IPEX (due to FOXP3 mutation leading to Treg cell deficiency), usually appearing in the first months of life, was recently observed in miscarried fetuses with hydrops who presented with CD3+ infiltrating lymphocytes in the pancreas. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis due to perforin deficiency was also identified as a cause of fetal hydrops. In conclusion, PID should be suspected in any infant with signs of autoimmunity after excluding transferred maternal effects, or in children with multiple and/or severe AID. PMID:25999944

  5. Prenatal immunotoxicant exposure and postnatal autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D

    1999-01-01

    Reports in humans and rodents indicate that immune development may be altered following perinatal exposure to immunotoxic compounds, including chemotherapeutics, corticosteroids, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Effects from such exposure may be more dramatic or persistent than following exposure during adult life. For example, prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlordane or to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[(italic)a(/italic)]pyrene produces what appears to be lifelong immunosuppression in mice. Whether prenatal immunotoxicant exposure may predispose the organism to postnatal autoimmune disease remains largely unknown. In this regard, the therapeutic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) crosses the placenta poorly. However, lethally irradiated rodents exposed to CsA postsyngeneic bone marrow transplant (i.e., during re-establishment of the immune system) develop T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, suggesting this drug may produce a fundamental disruption in development of self-tolerance by T cells. The environmental contaminant 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxin (TCDD) crosses the placenta and produces fetal thymic effects (italic)in vivo(/italic) similar to effects of CsA in fetal thymic organ culture, including inhibited thymocyte maturation and reduced expression of thymic major histocompatability complex class II molecules. These observations led to the suggestion that gestational exposure to TCDD may interfere with normal development of self-tolerance. Possibly supporting this hypothesis, when mice predisposed to development of autoimmune disease were treated with TCDD during gestation, postnatal autoimmunity was exacerbated. Similar results have been reported for mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol during development. These reports suggest that prenatal exposure to certain immunotoxicants may play a role in postnatal expression of autoimmunity. PMID:10502532

  6. Breaking peripheral immune tolerance to CNS antigens in neurodegenerative diseases: boosting autoimmunity to fight-off chronic neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Baruch, Kuti

    2014-11-01

    Immune cell infiltration to the brain's territory was considered for decades to reflect a pathological process in which immune cells attack the central nervous system (CNS); such a process is observed in the inflammatory autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). As neuroinflammatory processes within the CNS parenchyma are also common to other CNS pathologies, regardless of their etiology, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), these pathologies have often been compared to MS, a disease that benefits from immunosuppressive therapy. Yet, over the last decade, it became clear that autoimmunity has a bright side, and that it plays a pivotal role in CNS repair following damage. Specifically, autoimmune T cells were found to facilitate CNS healing processes, such as in the case of sterile mechanical injuries to the brain or the spinal cord, mental stress, or biochemical insults. Even more intriguingly, autoimmune T cells were found to be involved in supporting fundamental processes of brain functional integrity, such as in the maintenance of life-long brain plasticity, including spatial learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Importantly, autoimmune T cells are part of a cellular network which, to operate efficiently and safely, requires tight regulation by other immune cell populations, such as regulatory T cells, which are indispensable for maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. Here, we suggest that dysregulation of the balance between peripheral immune suppression, on one hand, and protective autoimmunity, on the other, is an underlying mechanism in the emergence and progression of the neuroinflammatory response associated with chronic neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging. Mitigating chronic neuroinflammation under these conditions necessitates activation, rather than suppression, of the peripheral immune response directed against self. Accordingly, we propose that fighting off acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions requires breaking peripheral immune tolerance to CNS self-antigens, in order to boost protective autoimmunity. Nevertheless, the optimal approach to fine tune such immune response must be individually explored for each condition. PMID:25199710

  7. Ubiquitin-independent proteosomal degradation of myelin basic protein contributes to development of neurodegenerative autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kononikhin, Alexey; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Surina, Yelena; Smirnov, Ivan; Lomakin, Yakov; Bacheva, Anna; Stepanov, Alexey; Karpova, Yaroslava; Lyupina, Yulia; Kharybin, Oleg; Melamed, Dobroslav; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Sharova, Natalia; Nikolaev, Eugene; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that the ubiquitin–proteasome system is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer as well as autoimmune and several neurodegenerative diseases, and is thus a target for novel therapeutics. One disease that is related to aberrant protein degradation is multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder involving the processing and presentation of myelin autoantigens that leads to the destruction of axons. Here, we show that brain-derived proteasomes from SJL mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an ubiquitin-independent manner generate significantly increased amounts of myelin basic protein peptides that induces cytotoxic lymphocytes to target mature oligodendrocytes ex vivo. Ten times enhanced release of immunogenic peptides by cerebral proteasomes from EAE-SJL mice is caused by a dramatic shift in the balance between constitutive and ?1ihigh immunoproteasomes in the CNS of SJL mice with EAE. We found that during EAE, ?1i is increased in resident CNS cells, whereas ?5i is imported by infiltrating lymphocytes through the blood–brain barrier. Peptidyl epoxyketone specifically inhibits brain-derived ?1ihigh immunoproteasomes in vitro (kobs/[I] = 240 M?1s?1), and at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, it ameliorates ongoing EAE in vivo. Therefore, our findings provide novel insights into myelin metabolism in pathophysiologic conditions and reveal that the ?1i subunit of the immunoproteasome is a potential target to treat autoimmune neurologic diseases.—Belogurov Jr., A., Kuzina, E., Kudriaeva, A., Kononikhin, A., Kovalchuk, S., Surina, Y., Smirnov, I., Lomakin, Y., Bacheva, A., Stepanov, A., Karpova, Y., Lyupina, Y., Kharybin, O., Melamed, D., Ponomarenko, N., Sharova, N., Nikolaev, E., Gabibov, A. Ubiquitin-independent proteosomal degradation of myelin basic protein contributes to development of neurodegenerative autoimmunity. PMID:25634956

  8. ?? T Cell-Dependent Regulatory T Cells Prevent the Development of Autoimmune Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yafei; Yang, Zhifang; Huang, Chunjian; McGowan, Jessica; Casper, Tamara; Sun, Deming; Born, Willi K; O'Brien, Rebecca L

    2015-12-15

    To prevent potentially damaging inflammatory responses, the eye actively promotes local immune tolerance via a variety of mechanisms. Owing to trauma, infection, or other ongoing autoimmunity, these mechanisms sometimes fail, and an autoimmune disorder may develop in the eye. In mice of the C57BL/10 (B10) background, autoimmune keratitis often develops spontaneously, particularly in the females. Its incidence is greatly elevated in the absence of ?? T cells, such that ?80% of female B10.TCR?(-/-) mice develop keratitis by 18 wk of age. In this article, we show that CD8(+) ?? T cells are the drivers of this disease, because adoptive transfer of CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells to keratitis-resistant B10.TCR?/?(-/-) hosts induced a high incidence of keratitis. This finding was unexpected because in other autoimmune diseases, more often CD4(+) ?? T cells, or both CD4(+) and CD8(+) ?? T cells, mediate the disease. Compared with wild-type B10 mice, B10.TCR?(-/-) mice also show increased percentages of peripheral memory phenotype CD8(+) ?? T cells, along with an elevated frequency of CD8(+) ?? T cells biased to produce inflammatory cytokines. In addition, B10.TCR?-/- mice have fewer peripheral CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) ?? regulatory T cells (Tregs), which express lower levels of receptors needed for Treg development and function. Together, these observations suggest that in B10 background mice, ?? T cells are required to generate adequate numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs, and that in B10.TCR?(-/-) mice a Treg deficiency allows dysregulated effector or memory CD8(+) ?? T cells to infiltrate the cornea and provoke an autoimmune attack. PMID:26566677

  9. Gene/environment interactions in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity: new insights on the role of Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Gianchecchi, Elena; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune disorders are increasing worldwide. Although their pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is involved in their onset. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent a family of pattern recognition receptors involved in the recognition and in the defense of the host from invading microorganisms. They sense a wide range of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) deriving from metabolic pathways selective of bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan microorganisms. TLR activation plays a critical role in the activation of the downstream signaling pathway by interacting and recruiting several adaptor molecules. Although TLRs are involved in the protection of the host, several studies suggest that, in certain conditions, they play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We review the most recent advances showing a correlation between some single nucleotide polymorphisms or copy number variations in TLR genes or in adaptor molecules involved in TLR signaling and the onset of several autoimmune conditions, such as Type I diabetes, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. In light of the foregoing we finally propose that molecules involved in TLR pathway may represent the targets for novel therapeutic treatments in order to stop autoimmune processes. PMID:26184547

  10. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: clinical utility in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R

    2015-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production is amplified in several autoimmune disorders. In the 1990s, it became a validated therapeutic target used for the treatment of conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Biologic drugs targeting TNF include engineered monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. Currently, there are 5 Food and Drug Administration-approved TNF inhibitors (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab, and golimumab), representing close to $20 billion in sales. Clinical trials remain open to test their efficacy and safety compared with one another, as well as to measure clinical outcomes in different conditions and patient populations. The industry is also eager to develop biotherapeutics that are similar but cheaper than the currently existing biologics or are safer with higher efficacy; these are the so-called "biosimilars." Clinical utility of TNF inhibitors and indications of mono- or combined therapy with immunomodulators are reviewed here. Pharmacokinetics of the TNF inhibitors is affected by routes of administration, clearance mechanisms of immunoglobulins, and immunogenicity. Finally, strategies for management of treatment efficacy and increasing evidence for monitoring of serum concentration of TNF inhibitors are discussed, assessing for the presence of the antidrug antibodies and the different analytical methods available for laboratory testing. As clinical applications of the TNF inhibitors expand, and other classes join the revolution in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders, therapeutic drug monitoring of biologics will become increasingly important, with the potential to dramatically improve patient care and management. PMID:25305470

  11. Ncf1 polymorphism reveals oxidative regulation of autoimmune chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, Rikard; Sareila, Outi; Olsson, Lina M; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Wing, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    The current review on the function of neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 (NCF1) and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) is based on a genetic search for the major genes controlling autoimmune inflammatory disorders. Surprisingly, the disease-promoting allele determined a lower ROS response and was therefore in complete contrast to the prevailing dogma. Once cloned, it opened the possibility to dissect this complex field from a new angle and with the possibilities to study the role of ROS in vivo. We found that NCF1 and NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex-derived ROS is an important regulator of several chronic inflammatory disorders by using models for rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and psoriasis arthritis, gout, and lupus. ROS could therefore affect many different types of diseases and the common denominator seems to be that ROS regulate macrophages, which prevents inflammation from going chronic. The role of ROS is currently changing from being seen as toxic agents that will promote inflammation toward a more complex view with ROS as crucial regulators of immune and inflammatory pathways. PMID:26683156

  12. Obesity as a Risk and Severity Factor in Rheumatic Diseases (Autoimmune Chronic Inflammatory Diseases)

    PubMed Central

    Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue (AT) as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low-grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the AT on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25426122

  13. STK4 (MST1) deficiency in two siblings with autoimmune cytopenias: A novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Halacli, Sevil Oskay; Ayvaz, Deniz Cagdas; Sun-Tan, Cagman; Erman, Baran; Uz, Elif; Yilmaz, Didem Yucel; Ozgul, Koksal; Tezcan, ?lhan; Sanal, Ozden

    2015-12-01

    Combined immunodeficiencies (CIDs) are heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abrogated/impaired T cell development and/or functions that resulted from diverse genetic defects. In addition to the susceptibility to infections with various microorganisms, the patients may have lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity, inflammation, allergy and malignancy. Recently, three groups have independently reported patients having mutations in STK4 gene that cause a novel autosomal recessive (AR) CID. We describe here two siblings with a novel STK4 mutation identified during the evaluation of a group of patients with features highly overlapping with those of DOCK-8 deficiency, a form of AR hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome. The patients' clinical features include autoimmune cytopenias, viral skin (molluscum contagiosum and perioral herpetic infection) and bacterial infections, mild onychomycosis, mild atopic and seborrheic dermatitis, lymphopenia (particularly CD4 lymphopenia), and intermittent mild neutropenia. Determination of the underlying defect and reporting the patients are required for the description of the phenotypic spectrum of each immunodeficiency. PMID:26117625

  14. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Maat, Peter; de Beukelaar, Janet W.; Jansen, Casper; Schuur, Maaike; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Coevorden, Marleen H.; de Graaff, Esther; Titulaer, Maarten; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases performed 384 autopsies on patients with suspected CJD over a 14-year period (1998–2011). Clinical information was collected from treating physicians. Antineuronal antibodies were tested in CSF obtained postmortem by immunohistochemistry on fresh frozen rat brain sections, by Luminex assay for the presence of well-characterized onconeural antibodies, and by cell-based assays for antibodies against NMDAR, GABABR1/2, GABAAR GLUR1/2, LGI1, Caspr2, and DPPX. Results: In 203 patients, a diagnosis of definite CJD was made, while in 181 a variety of other conditions were diagnosed, mainly neurodegenerative. In 22 of these 181, the neuropathologist diagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. One patient was excluded because of lack of clinical information. Inflammatory infiltrates were predominantly perivascular and consisted mainly of T cells. The predominant locations were basal ganglia and thalamus (90%) and temporal lobes and hippocampus (81%). In 6 patients (29%), antineuronal antibodies were detected in postmortem CSF, directed against Hu, NMDAR, GABABR1/2, Caspr2, and an unidentified synaptic antigen in 2. The most frequent symptoms were dementia (90%), gait disturbance (86%), cerebellar signs (67%), and neuropsychiatric symptoms (67%). Immunopathologic and clinical findings did not differ between autoantibody-negative patients and patients with antineuronal antibodies. Conclusions: It is important to consider immune-mediated disorders in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:26601117

  15. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease. PMID:26057532

  16. Control of autoimmune CNS inflammation by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rothhammer, Veit; Quintana, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a neurologic disease caused by immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system, resulting in gray and white matter inflammation, progressive demyelination, and neuronal loss. Astrocytes, the most abundant cell population in the central nervous system (CNS), have been considered inert scaffold or housekeeping cells for many years. However, recently, it has become clear that this cell population actively modulates the immune response in the CNS at multiple levels. While being exposed to a plethora of cytokines during ongoing autoimmune inflammation, astrocytes modulate local CNS inflammation by secreting cytokines and chemokines, among other factors. This review article gives an overview of the most recent understanding about cytokine networks operational in astrocytes during autoimmune neuroinflammation and highlights potential targets for immunomodulatory therapies for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26223505

  17. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and autoimmune thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Aheta Sham, Mohammed; Nidsale Sudarshan, Ranjitha; Gangadharappa, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare demyelinating disease of the CNS that predominantly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis (MS). The association of NMO with autoimmune thyroiditis has been reported very rarely. Early differentiation between NMO and MS is very important because they have different natural courses and treatment regimens. We report a case regarding a 53-year-old woman who was admitted initially with hiccups and paraesthesias, but was not evaluated during first two episodes and presented with severe progression of NMO. Patient was found to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of thyroid which progressed to hypothyroidism. NMO was diagnosed with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (three or more spinal segments). Patient poorly responded to treatment due to the lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:26568836

  18. Autoimmunity vs. cancer: predator vs. alien?

    PubMed

    Berens, Christian; Lauber, Kirsten; Herrmann, Martin

    2013-08-01

    "The enemy of my enemy is my friend." According to this motto, the human protagonists in Paul W. S. Anderson's science-fiction movie "Alien vs. Predator" (2004) solidarize with a predator in order to fight the aliens. Can this ancient and simple logic be transferred to the field of oncology and cancer immunotherapy? Can we utilize mechanisms known from the context of autoimmunity to fight cancer? Here, we summarize immune cell-mediated detection of danger and damage, central and peripheral tolerance, immunoregulation and immune privilege--processes known to be deregulated in the context of autoimmunity. We discuss them with special regard towards their misusage by tumors and pathogens and how they might be instrumentalized in the context of anti-cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23706137

  19. Epigenetic dynamics in immunity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Wang, Zijun; Yung, Susan; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-10-01

    A tightly synchronized and spatial-temporal interaction among regulatory proteins within genomic DNA and chromatin is essential for cellular commitment and differentiation. During development and activation of the immune system, a complex regulatory network that involves induction of lineage instructive transcription factors, installation or removal of histone modifications and changes in DNA methylation patterns locally orchestrate the three-dimensional chromatin structure and determine immune cell fate and immune responses. In autoimmune diseases, disease associated epigenetic marks and dynamic changes control the dysregulated immune system, thus determining the disease development and clinical phenotype. In this review, we introduce the dynamic epigenetic regulation of DNA and histones, summarize the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the development and differentiation of some important immune cell subsets and provide new insights for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and Type 1 diabetes. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Epigenetics dynamics in development and disease. PMID:26026281

  20. [Cytotoxic T lymphocytes in cancer and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Prado-García, Heriberto; Avila-Moreno, Federico; López-González, José Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are cells of the immune system that recognize and kill cells that have been infected with intracellular pathogens, allogenic cells or tumor cells. It has been reported that CTLs participate in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. After stimulation with the antigen, CTLs undergo an activation process highly regulated, which leads to the cell to acquire an effector or memory function. In this review, we indicate the cellular markers associated with the different stages of CTL-differentiation (naive, memory and effector); we indicate the distinct models of CTLs differentiation; also, the mechanisms of CTLs cytotoxicity are mentioned. Furthermore, we describe the participation of CTLs in cancer and autoimmunity; the implications of CTLs in the progression of these diseases are discussed. PMID:15776868

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  2. Neurology of rheumatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Carbunar, Olimpia; Ruland, Sean

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatologic diseases encompass autoimmune and inflammatory disorders of the joints and soft tissues that often involve multiple organ systems, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common features include constitutional symptoms, arthralgia and arthritis, myalgia, and sicca symptoms. Neurological manifestations may present in patients with preexisting rheumatologic diagnoses, occur concurrently with systemic signs and symptoms, or precede systemic manifestations by months to years. Rheumatic disorders presenting as neurological syndromes may pose diagnostic challenges. Advances in immunosuppressive treatment of rheumatologic disease have expanded the treatment armamentarium. However, serious neurotoxic effects have been reported with both old and newer agents. Familiarity with neurological manifestations of rheumatologic diseases, diagnosis, and potential nervous system consequences of treatment is important for rapid diagnosis and appropriate intervention. This article briefly reviews the diverse neurological manifestations and key clinical features of rheumatic disorders and the potential neurological complications of agents commonly used for treatment. PMID:24871965

  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA. PMID:24772757

  4. Autoimmune hepatitis with anti centromere antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Moushumi; Pradhan, Debkant; Parida, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old type 2 diabetes mellitus patient presenting with abdominal pain and black stool for 15 days. A proper workup of laboratory investigations helped us diagnose autoimmune hepatitis with anticentromere antibodies. The authors would like to highlight that screening AIH patients for anticentromere antibody is not mandatory but can be considered, especially in the presence of disease-related symptomatology for quicker, more accurate diagnosis and optimum management. PMID:25379307

  5. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-Ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. PMID:26439957

  6. Arthritogenic T cells in autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, including arthritis, often result from an imbalance between regulatory T (Treg) cells and IL-17-producing (Th17) cells. Dozens of studies in mice and humans have shed light on the pathological significance of T cells in RA. Since Th17 cells play an important role in the exacerbation of inflammation and bone destruction in joints, it has been an important issue how arthritic Th17 cells arise. Th17 cells are generated in the local inflammatory milieu via cytokines produced by macrophages or synovial fibroblasts, while it is reported that Th17 cells are generated in the gut in the presence of specific commensal bacteria. A recent report showed a pathogenic Th17 cell subset with a distinct pattern of gene expression and a potent osteoclastogenic ability are converted from Foxp3(+) T cells in arthritic joints. Since Foxp3(+) Treg cells contain T cells which recognize self-antigens, the fate of plastic Foxp3(+) T cells can be a critical determinant of autoimmunity or self-tolerance. Further analysis on the molecular basis and antigen-specificity of arthritogenic Th17 cell subsets will be helpful to establish novel therapeutic approaches and clarify how self-tolerance breaks down in autoimmune arthritis. PMID:25450406

  7. The Dopaminergic System in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Rodrigo; Contreras, Francisco; Zouali, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional interactions between the immune and the nervous systems are of considerable interest both for deciphering their functioning and for designing novel therapeutic strategies. The past decade has brought a burst of insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroimmune communications mediated by dopamine. Studies of dendritic cells (DCs) revealed that they express the whole machinery to synthesize and store dopamine, which may act in an autocrine manner to stimulate dopamine receptors (DARs). Depending on specific DARs stimulated on DCs and T cells, dopamine may differentially favor CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 or Th17 inflammatory cells. Regulatory T cells can also release high amounts of dopamine that acts in an autocrine DAR-mediated manner to inhibit their suppressive activity. These dopaminergic regulations could represent a driving force during autoimmunity. Indeed, dopamine levels are altered in the brain of mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and lupus, and in inflamed tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The distorted expression of DARs in peripheral lymphocytes of lupus and MS patients also supports the importance of dopaminergic regulations in autoimmunity. Moreover, dopamine analogs had beneficial therapeutic effects in animal models, and in patients with lupus or RA. We propose models that may underlie key roles of dopamine and its receptors in autoimmune diseases. PMID:24711809

  8. Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss: an immunologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Solares, C Arturo; Hughes, Gordon B; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) typically produces a bilateral rapidly progressive loss of hearing that may occur suddenly. The diagnosis is made by excluding ototoxicity, systemic disease, and other factors that mimic ASNHL and by showing a therapeutic response to corticosteroid treatment. Although autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of ASNHL, several central issues remain unresolved, including the relative prominence of B cell or T cell autoimmunity in the initiation and progression of ASNHL, the identity of the putative inner ear self-antigen(s) that target ASNHL, and the development and application of immunosuppressive therapies for preventing the progressive hearing loss which may be profound and require cochlear implantation. In this review, we will examine the seminal human and animal studies that have led to our current views regarding the autoimmune etiopathogenesis of ASNHL. In addition, we will address the need for developing an inner ear-specific mouse model for ASNHL that may define the stages leading to the development of ASNHL and may also provide new diagnostic markers and help develop novel and effective treatments for preventing progressive hearing loss in ASNHL. PMID:12742646

  9. Chagas’ Disease and the Autoimmunity Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kierszenbaum, Felipe

    1999-01-01

    The notion that the pathology of Chagas’ disease has an autoimmune component was initially based on the finding of circulating antibodies binding heart tissue antigens in patients and mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Later, T lymphocytes reactive with heart or nerve tissue antigens were found in chagasic mice and patients, extending the concept to include cell-mediated immunity. However, there is disagreement about whether the observed immunologic autoreactivities are triggered by T. cruzi epitopes and then affect host tissue antigens by virtue of molecular mimicry or are elicited by host antigens exposed to lymphocytes after tissue damage caused by the parasite. There is also disagreement about the relevance of immunologic autoreactivities to the pathogenesis of Chagas’ disease because of the lack of reproducibility of some key reports supporting the autoimmunity hypothesis, conflicting data from independent laboratories, conclusions invalidated by advances in our understanding of the immunologic mechanisms underlying cell lysis, and, last but not least, a lack of direct, incontrovertible evidence that cross-reacting antibodies or autoreactive cells mediate the typical pathologic changes associated with human Chagas’ disease. The data and views backing and questioning the autoimmunity hypothesis for Chagas’ disease are summarized in this review. PMID:10194457

  10. [Cardiac involvement in systemic autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Dropi?ski, Jerzy; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Rubi?, Pawe?

    2003-04-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases form a diverse group which includes: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), scleroderma, dermato-polymyositis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Sjögren syndrome. Although multisystem involvement is the hallmark of these diseases, the heart seems to be less affected than other organ systems. The aim of the study was to study possible cardiac abnormalities in patients with documented systemic autoimmune diseases and to assess whether there was any relation between antiphospholipid, anti-dsDNA antibodies and myocardial dysfunction findings. 76 patients (53 with SLE, 9 with MCTD, 8 with scleroderma, 6 with Wegener's granulomatosis) were subjected to our study, 69% of these patients manifested cardiac involvement, based on two-dimentional echocardiografic examination (36%--post-inflammatory valvular thickening, 20%--pericardial effusions, 15%--valvular regurgitation, 7%--left atrial enlargement, 5%--left ventricular hypertrophy, 4%--left ventricular dysfunction). None of the patients showed characteristic, acute Libman-Sacks endocarditis, which probably can be explained by chronic corticosteroid-treatment. Clinical evidence of cardiac abnormalities has been observed, in as many as 58% of cases with positive echocardiographic findings. The frequency and extend of cardiac pathology positively correlated with the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. No such relationship was observed in patients with the presence of very high titers of antinuclear antibodies (anti-dsDNA). In conclusion, our results indicate that echocardiography is a useful method for assessment and monitoring cardiac involvement in the systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:12931489

  11. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO)

    PubMed Central

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic’s syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:26633965

  12. Delineating the autoimmune mechanisms in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Syed A; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F

    2012-12-01

    The immunologic processes involved in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), particularly Graves' disease (GD), are similar to other autoimmune diseases with the emphasis on the antibodies as the most unique aspect. These characteristics include a lymphocytic infiltrate at the target organs, the presence of antigen-reactive T and B cells and antibodies, and the establishment of animal models of GD by antibody transfer or immunization with antigen. Similar to other autoimmune diseases, risk factors for GD include the presence of multiple susceptibility genes, including certain HLA alleles, and the TSHR gene itself. In addition, a variety of known risk factors and precipitators have been characterized including the influence of sex and sex hormones, pregnancy, stress, infection, iodine and other potential environmental factors. The pathogenesis of GD is likely the result of a breakdown in the tolerance mechanisms, both at central and peripheral levels. Different subsets of T and B cells together with their regulatory populations play important roles in the propagation and maintenance of the disease process. Understanding different mechanistic in the complex system biology interplay will help to identify unique factors contributing to the AITD pathogenesis. PMID:22434518

  13. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    PubMed

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:26633965

  14. Open questions in autoimmunity: discussions from the 2013 Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Meeting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The recent CORA (Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity) meeting held in 2013 represented a unique opportunity for rheumatologists to address several topics. Among these, four topics include: (i) the role of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as shown by studies in monozygotic twins; (ii) the cardiovascular and atherosclerotic risk in patients with RA treated with biologics; (iii) the use of new biomarkers for the diagnosis and follow-up of RA and other autoimmune diseases, as represented by the new automatic machines for anti-nuclear antibodies detection, or ultrasound imaging to follow RA progression; and (iv) the latest guidelines on how to use and manage biologic therapies in RA and other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. In summary, we will herein present these topics of discussion and underline the conclusions obtained by rheumatologists during the 2013 CORA Meeting. PMID:24642104

  15. Autoantibodies and overlap syndromes in autoimmune rheumatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Jury, E; D'Cruz, D; Morrow, W

    2001-01-01

    Many patients diagnosed with autoimmune rheumatic disease cannot be categorised easily into one of the established clinical entities such as systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, or systemic sclerosis. The term "overlap syndrome" has been increasingly used to identify such patients and is useful in terms of clarifying prognosis and facilitating disease management. This article reviews overlap syndrome in autoimmune rheumatic disease, with particular emphasis on the associated serological markers. Key Words: autoantibodies • overlap syndromes • autoimmune rheumatic disease PMID:11328831

  16. Is preclinical autoimmunity benign?: The case of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Majka, Darcy S; Chang, Rowland W

    2014-11-01

    Although there are many examples of autoantibodies in disease-free individuals, they can be a preclinical phenomenon heralding future autoimmune rheumatic disease. They may be a marker for autoreactive B-cell activation and other inflammatory autoimmune processes. The increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in autoimmune rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, and the increased risk of CVD in patients with rheumatic disease with autoantibodies, suggest that CVD may have autoimmune features. Autoantibodies might be risk markers for subclinical and clinical CVD development not only in patients with rheumatic diseases but in the general population as well. PMID:25437283

  17. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M; Petroff, Brian K; Petroff, Margaret G

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in association with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune adrenal disease, and takes a toll on both society and individual health. Studies in mice have revealed at least two mechanisms that protect the ovary from autoimmune attack. These mechanisms include control of autoreactive T cells by thymus-derived regulatory T cells, as well as a role for the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells during development of T cells. Although the latter mechanism is incompletely defined, it is well established that failure of either results in autoimmune-mediated targeting and depletion of ovarian follicles. In this review, we will address the clinical features and consequences of autoimmune-mediated ovarian infertility in women, as well as the possible mechanisms of disease as revealed by animal models. PMID:25327908

  18. Imaging of autoimmune encephalitis - Relevance for clinical practice and hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Heine, J; Prüss, H; Bartsch, T; Ploner, C J; Paul, F; Finke, C

    2015-11-19

    The field of autoimmune encephalitides associated with antibodies targeting cell-surface antigens is rapidly expanding and new antibodies are discovered frequently. Typical clinical presentations include cognitive deficits, psychiatric symptoms, movement disorders and seizures and the majority of patients respond well to immunotherapy. Pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical features are increasingly recognized and indicate hippocampal dysfunction in most of these syndromes. Here, we review the neuroimaging characteristics of autoimmune encephalitides, including N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) encephalitis as well as more recently discovered and less frequent forms such as dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein 6 (DPPX) or glycine receptor encephalitis. We summarize findings of routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations as well as (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging and relate these observations to clinical features and disease outcome. We furthermore review results of advanced imaging analyses such as diffusion tensor imaging, volumetric analyses and resting-state functional MRI. Finally, we discuss contributions of these neuroimaging observations to the understanding of the pathophysiology of autoimmune encephalitides. PMID:26012492

  19. The Role of IL-17 and Th17 Lymphocytes in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Pozarowski, Piotr; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    The end of twentieth century has introduced some changes into T helper (Th) cells division. The identification of the new subpopulation of T helper cells producing IL-17 modified model of Th1-Th2 paradigm and it was named Th17. High abilities to stimulate acute and chronic inflammation made these cells ideal candidate for crucial player in development of autoimmune disorders. Numerous publications based on animal and human models confirmed their pivotal role in pathogenesis of human systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. These findings made Th17 cells and pathways regulating their development and function a good target for therapy. Therapies based on inhibition of Th17-dependent pathways are associated with clinical benefits, but on the other hand are frequently inducing adverse effects. In this review, we attempt to summarize researches focused on the importance of Th17 cells in development of human autoimmune diseases as well as effectiveness of targeting IL-17 and its pathways in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26062902

  20. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  1. Autoimmune thyroid disease in a cohort of Malaysian SLE patients: frequency, clinical and immunological associations.

    PubMed

    Ong, S G; Choy, C H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) has been associated with other systemic autoimmune diseases. To date, there is limited data on thyroid disorders and autoimmune thyroid disease in Malaysia. The frequency of ATD among 189 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was 6.3%, with 2.6% in the hyperthyroid group and 3.7% in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroidism developed at a much younger mean age (24.3 years), suggesting that SLE might be a predisposing factor for the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. There was a higher rate of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO) positivity compared with anti-thyroglobulin antibody (Tg) in the hyperthyroid subgroup. This study also demonstrated a greater proportion of ATD patients who demonstrated high titres (?1:6400) of TPO compared with high titres of Tg. Although there was an association between ATD and the presence of anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB antibodies, the absence of sicca symptoms and negative Schirmer's tests suggest a lack of association with secondary Sjogren's syndrome. A novel association between ATD and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was detected in our cohort. Hence we propose that patients affected by APS be routinely screened for ATD. PMID:26113361

  2. Mast Cells in the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Costanza, Massimo; Colombo, Mario P.; Pedotti, Rosetta

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are best known as key immune players in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent allergic reactions. In recent years, several lines of evidence have suggested that MCs might play an important role in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. Since their first description in MS plaques in the late 1800s, much effort has been put into elucidating the contribution of MCs to the development of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity. Mouse models of MC-deficiency have provided a valuable experimental tool for dissecting MC involvement in MS and EAE. However, to date there is still major controversy concerning the function of MCs in these diseases. Indeed, although MCs have been classically proposed as having a detrimental and pro-inflammatory role, recent literature has questioned and resized the contribution of MCs to the pathology of MS and EAE. In this review, we will present the main evidence obtained in MS and EAE on this topic, and discuss the critical and controversial aspects of such evidence. PMID:23203114

  3. Iodine Excess as an Environmental Risk Factor for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuqian; Kawashima, Akira; Ishido, Yuko; Yoshihara, Aya; Oda, Kenzaburo; Hiroi, Naoki; Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The global effort to prevent iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, such as universal salt iodization, has achieved impressive progress during the last few decades. However, iodine excess, due to extensive environmental iodine exposure in addition to poor monitoring, is currently a more frequent occurrence than iodine deficiency. Iodine excess is a precipitating environmental factor in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease. Excessive amounts of iodide have been linked to the development of autoimmune thyroiditis in humans and animals, while intrathyroidal depletion of iodine prevents disease in animal strains susceptible to severe thyroiditis. Although the mechanisms by which iodide induces thyroiditis are still unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed: (1) excess iodine induces the production of cytokines and chemokines that can recruit immunocompetent cells to the thyroid; (2) processing excess iodine in thyroid epithelial cells may result in elevated levels of oxidative stress, leading to harmful lipid oxidation and thyroid tissue injuries; and (3) iodine incorporation in the protein chain of thyroglobulin may augment the antigenicity of this molecule. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding excess iodide as an environmental toxicant and relate it to the development of autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:25050783

  4. Immunomodulatory effects and mechanisms of plant alkaloid tetrandrine in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2002-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases characterized by activation of immune effector cells and damage of target organs are currently treated with a combination of several disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) that preserve different immunomodulatory mechanisms. Such a combination treatment strategy not only provides synergistic effects but also reduces side effects from individual drug. Tetrandrine (Tet), purified from a creeper Stephania tetrandra S Moore, is a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid and has been used to treat patients with silicosis, autoimmune disorders, and hypertension in Mainland China for decades. The accumulated studies both in vitro and in vivo reveal that Tet preserves a wide variety of immunosuppressive effects. Importantly, the Tet-mediated immunosuppressive mechanisms are evidently different from some known DMARDs. The synergistic effects have also been demonstrated between Tet and other DMARDs like FK506 and cyclosporin. These results highlight Tet a very potential candidate to be considered as one of DMARDs in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes evidence-based in vivo and in vitro studies on this potential Chinese immunosuppressive herb. PMID:12466046

  5. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiblanco, John; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben Dario; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs) have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology). This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s) with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity. PMID:26697508

  6. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases: from bread baking to autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Maurizio; Perricone, Roberto; Blank, Miri; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is best known as the baker's and brewer's yeast, but its residual traces are also frequent excipients in some vaccines. Although anti-S. cerevisiae autoantibodies (ASCAs) are considered specific for Crohn's disease, a growing number of studies have detected high levels of ASCAs in patients affected with autoimmune diseases as compared with healthy controls, including antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Commensal microorganisms such as Saccharomyces are required for nutrition, proper development of Peyer's aggregated lymphoid tissue, and tissue healing. However, even the commensal nonclassically pathogenic microbiota can trigger autoimmunity when fine regulation of immune tolerance does not work properly. For our purposes, the protein database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) was consulted, comparing Saccharomyces mannan to several molecules with a pathogenetic role in autoimmune diseases. Thanks to the NCBI bioinformation technology tool, several overlaps in molecular structures (50-100 %) were identified when yeast mannan, and the most common autoantigens were compared. The autoantigen U2 snRNP B? was found to conserve a superfamily protein domain that shares 83 % of the S. cerevisiae mannan sequence. Furthermore, ASCAs may be present years before the diagnosis of some associated autoimmune diseases as they were retrospectively found in the preserved blood samples of soldiers who became affected by Crohn's disease years later. Our results strongly suggest that ASCAs' role in clinical practice should be better addressed in order to evaluate their predictive or prognostic relevance. PMID:23292495

  7. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a V?3S1/V?13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the V?3S1/V?13S1 TCR. Consistent with the V?3S1/V?13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  8. [Atopy and autoimmunity -- a case report].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, M; Tapadinhas, F; Neves, Am; Costa Trindade, J

    2007-01-01

    Atopy, immunodeficiency and autoimmunity are manifestations of immune system dysfunction. Classically atopy and autoimmunity are referred as distinct immunological reactions. Recent studies suggest the existence of common pathogenic mechanisms. We report the case of a teenager with familial history of asthma and miasthenia gravis in her mother (HLA- B8+) and personal history of recurrent upper respiratory infections from two to four years old, and pneumonia since five years old (3 or 4 episodes/ year, in three consecutive years), with associated dyspnoea and hypoxemia, requiring frequently hospital admission. Investigation was initially negative for atopy markers, and excluded other hypothesis as tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, -1 antitrypsin deficiency, congenital heart disease, bronchopulmonary malformations or foreign body aspiration. Latter, further exams finally confirmed atopy with a raised IgE, positive RAST and cutaneous sensitivity tests (for house dust mites and pollen) and revealed circulating immune complexes and IgG 2, 3 e 4 deficit. Most frequent autoantibodies and precipitins study were negative, and histocompatibility antigens study revealed HLA- B8 (as her mother). Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and respiratory function tests were normal. Antihistamines, topical corticoids and bronchodilators were done with an excellent clinical response. At 16 years- old she is admitted again with the diagnosis of erythema nodosum and the clinical suspicion of Sweet's syndrome, having a good evolution. The relation between atopy and autoimmunity is enfatized by the authors. This simultaneous occurrence does not correspond merely to a statistical association, but may represent a global immune system impairment, with the involvement of different types of hypersensibility. PMID:17962891

  9. IL-33 attenuates the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Mark; Allan, Debbie; Xu, Heping; Pei, Cheng; Chen, Mei; Niedbala, Wanda; Fukada, Sandra Y; Besnard, Anne-Galle; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Tong, Xiaoguang; Forrester, John V; Liew, Foo Yew; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is associated with several important immune-mediated disorders. However, its role in uveitis, an important eye inflammatory disease, is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of IL-33 in the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). IL-33 and IL-33 receptor (ST2) were expressed in murine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture, and IL-33 increased the expression of Il33 and Mcp1 mRNA in RPE cells. In situ, IL-33 was highly expressed in the inner nuclear cells of the retina of naïve mice, and its expression was elevated in EAU mice. ST2-deficient mice developed exacerbated EAU compared with WT mice, and administration of IL-33 to WT mice significantly reduced EAU severity. The attenuated EAU in IL-33-treated mice was accompanied by decreased frequency of IFN-?+ and IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and reduced IFN-? and IL-17 production but with increased frequency of IL-5+ and IL-4+ CD4 T cells and IL-5 production in the draining lymph node and spleen. Macrophages from the IL-33-treated mice show a significantly higher polarization toward an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype. Our results therefore demonstrate that the endogenous IL-33/ST2 pathway plays an important role in EAU, and suggest that IL-33 represents a potential option for treatment of uveitis. PMID:25116404

  10. IL-33 attenuates the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Mark; Allan, Debbie; Xu, Heping; Pei, Cheng; Chen, Mei; Niedbala, Wanda; Fukada, Sandra Y; Besnard, Anne-Galle; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Tong, Xiaoguang; Forrester, John V; Liew, Foo Yew; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is associated with several important immune-mediated disorders. However, its role in uveitis, an important eye inflammatory disease, is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of IL-33 in the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). IL-33 and IL-33 receptor (ST2) were expressed in murine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture, and IL-33 increased the expression of Il33 and Mcp1 mRNA in RPE cells. In situ, IL-33 was highly expressed in the inner nuclear cells of the retina of naïve mice, and its expression was elevated in EAU mice. ST2-deficient mice developed exacerbated EAU compared with WT mice, and administration of IL-33 to WT mice significantly reduced EAU severity. The attenuated EAU in IL-33-treated mice was accompanied by decreased frequency of IFN-?+ and IL-17(+) CD4+ T cells and reduced IFN-? and IL-17 production but with increased frequency of IL-5(+) and IL-4(+) CD4 T cells and IL-5 production in the draining lymph node and spleen. Macrophages from the IL-33-treated mice show a significantly higher polarization toward an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype. Our results therefore demonstrate that the endogenous IL-33/ST2 pathway plays an important role in EAU, and suggest that IL-33 represents a potential option for treatment of uveitis. PMID:25116404

  11. Neuroantibody Biomarkers: Links and Challenges in Environmental Neurodegeneration and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    El-Fawal, Hassan A. N.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of neurodegenerative (ND) and autoimmune diseases (AID) remain idiopathic. The contribution of environmental chemicals to the development of these disorders has become of great interest in recent years. A convergence of mechanism between of ND and AID development has also emerged. In the case of ND, including neurotoxicity, the focus of this review, work over the last two decade in the realm of biomarker development, indicates that the immune response provides a venue whereby humoral immunity, in the form of autoantibodies to nervous system specific proteins, or neuroantibodies (NAb), may provide, once validated, a sensitive high throughput surrogate biomarker of effect with the potential of predicting outcome in absence of overt neurotoxicity/neurodegeneration. In addition, NAb may prove to be a contributor to the progression of the nervous system pathology, as well as biomarker of stage and therapeutic efficacy. There is a compelling need for biomarkers of effect in light of the introduction of new chemicals, such as nanoengineered material, where potential neurotoxicity remains to be defined. Furthermore, the convergence of mechanisms associated with ND and AID draws attention to the neglected arena of angiogenesis in defining the link between environment, ND, and AID. PMID:25045531

  12. Exome Analysis of Patients with Concurrent Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreoletti, Gaia; Ashton, James J.; Coelho, Tracy; Willis, Claire; Haggarty, Rachel; Gibson, Jane; Holloway, John; Batra, Akshay; Afzal, Nadeem A.; Beattie, Robert Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (PIBD) is a chronic condition seen in genetically predisposed individuals. Genome-wide association studies have implicated >160 genomic loci in IBD with many genes coding for proteins in key immune pathways. This study looks at autoimmune disease burden in patients diagnosed with PIBD and interrogates exome data of a subset of patients. Methods: Patients were recruited from the Southampton Genetics of PIBD cohort. Clinical diagnosis of autoimmune disease in these individuals was ascertained from medical records. For a subset of patients with PIBD and concurrent asthma, exome data was interrogated to ascertain the burden of pathogenic variants within genes implicated in asthma. Association testing was conducted between cases and population controls using the SKAT-O test. Results: Forty-nine (28.3%) PIBD children (18.49% CD, 8.6% UC, and 21.15% IBDU patients) had a concurrent clinical diagnosis of at least one other autoimmune disorder; asthma was the most prevalent, affecting 16.2% of the PIBD cohort. Rare and common variant association testing revealed 6 significant genes (P < 0.05) before Bonferroni adjustment. Three of these genes were previously implicated in both asthma and IBD (ZPBP2 IL1R1, and IL18R1) and 3 in asthma only (PYHIN1, IL2RB, and GSTP1). Conclusions: One-third of our cohort had a concurrent autoimmune condition. We observed higher incidence of asthma compared with the overall pediatric prevalence. Despite a small sample size, SKAT-O evaluated a significant burden of rare and common mutations in 6 genes. Variant burden suggests that a systemic immune dysregulation rather than organ-specific could underpin immune dysfunction for a subset of patients. PMID:25895113

  13. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; Serra, Carla; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzabè; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic adenocarcinoma and AIP were detected simultaneously. We must carefully monitor AIP patients for the simultaneous presence of pancreatic cancer, even when a diagnosis of AIP is confirmed. PMID:21769291

  14. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. PMID:26554931

  15. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs.

  16. Eosinophilic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  17. Mental Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  18. PRKDC mutations associated with immunodeficiency, granuloma, and autoimmune regulator–dependent autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Verronese, Estelle; Rice, Gillian I.; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bertrand, Yves; Picard, Capucine; Chansel, Marie; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Butte, Manish J.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Csomos, Krisztian; Chen, David J.; Chen, Karin; Delgado, Ana; Rigal, Chantal; Bardin, Christine; Schuetz, Catharina; Moshous, Despina; Reumaux, Héloïse; Plenat, François; Phan, Alice; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Balme, Brigitte; Viel, Sébastien; Bienvenu, Jacques; Cochat, Pierre; van der Burg, Mirjam; Caux, Christophe; Kemp, E. Helen; Rouvet, Isabelle; Malcus, Christophe; Méritet, Jean-Francois; Lim, Annick; Crow, Yanick J.; Fabien, Nicole; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Walzer, Thierry; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background PRKDC encodes for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a kinase that forms part of a complex (DNA-dependent protein kinase [DNA-PK]) crucial for DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. In mice DNA-PK also interacts with the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE) to promote central T-cell tolerance. Objective We sought to understand the causes of an inflammatory disease with granuloma and autoimmunity associated with decreasing T- and B-cell counts over time that had been diagnosed in 2 unrelated patients. Methods Genetic, molecular, and functional analyses were performed to characterize an inflammatory disease evocative of a combined immunodeficiency. Results We identified PRKDC mutations in both patients. These patients exhibited a defect in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Whole-blood mRNA analysis revealed a strong interferon signature. On activation, memory T cells displayed a skewed cytokine response typical of TH2 and TH1 but not TH17. Moreover, mutated DNA-PKcs did not promote AIRE-dependent transcription of peripheral tissue antigens in vitro. The latter defect correlated in vivo with production of anti–calcium-sensing receptor autoantibodies, which are typically found in AIRE-deficient patients. In addition, 9 months after bone marrow transplantation, patient 1 had Hashimoto thyroiditis, suggesting that organ-specific autoimmunity might be linked to nonhematopoietic cells, such as AIRE-expressing thymic epithelial cells. Conclusion Deficiency of DNA-PKcs, a key AIRE partner, can present as an inflammatory disease with organ-specific autoimmunity, suggesting a role for DNA-PKcs in regulating autoimmune responses and maintaining AIRE-dependent tolerance in human subjects. PMID:25842288

  19. Utility and safety of rituximab in pediatric autoimmune and inflammatory CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Brilot, Fabienne; Duffy, Lisa V.; Twilt, Marinka; Waldman, Amy T.; Narula, Sona; Muscal, Eyal; Deiva, Kumaran; Andersen, Erik; Eyre, Michael R.; Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul A.; Kneen, Rachel; Alper, Gulay; Anlar, Banu; Wassmer, Evangeline; Heineman, Kirsten; Hemingway, Cheryl; Riney, Catherine J.; Kornberg, Andrew; Tardieu, Marc; Stocco, Amber; Banwell, Brenda; Gorman, Mark P.; Benseler, Susanne M.; Lim, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility and safety of rituximab in pediatric autoimmune and inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Methods: Multicenter retrospective study. Results: A total of 144 children and adolescents (median age 8 years, range 0.7–17; 103 female) with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis (n = 39), opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (n = 32), neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (n = 20), neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 18), and other neuroinflammatory disorders (n = 35) were studied. Rituximab was given after a median duration of disease of 0.5 years (range 0.05–9.5 years). Infusion adverse events were recorded in 18/144 (12.5%), including grade 4 (anaphylaxis) in 3. Eleven patients (7.6%) had an infectious adverse event (AE), including 2 with grade 5 (death) and 2 with grade 4 (disabling) infectious AE (median follow-up of 1.65 years [range 0.1–8.5]). No patients developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. A definite, probable, or possible benefit was reported in 125 of 144 (87%) patients. A total of 17.4% of patients had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–2 at rituximab initiation, compared to 73.9% at outcome. The change in mRS 0–2 was greater in patients given rituximab early in their disease course compared to those treated later. Conclusion: While limited by the retrospective nature of this analysis, our data support an off-label use of rituximab, although the significant risk of infectious complications suggests rituximab should be restricted to disorders with significant morbidity and mortality. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that in pediatric autoimmune and inflammatory CNS disorders, rituximab improves neurologic outcomes with a 7.6% risk of adverse infections. PMID:24920861

  20. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, György; Huszthy, Peter C.; Fossum, Even; Konttinen, Yrjö; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies. PMID:26300591

  1. Gender differences in autoimmunity associated with exposure to environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmunity is thought to result from a combination of genetics, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Gender is also a significant risk factor with many diseases exhibiting a female bias. Although the role of environmental triggers, especially medications, in eliciting autoimmunity is well established less is known about the interplay between gender, the environment and autoimmunity. This review examines the contribution of gender in autoimmunity induced by selected chemical, physical and biological agents in humans and animal models. Epidemiological studies reveal that environmental factors can be associated with a gender bias in human autoimmunity. However many studies show that the increased risk of autoimmunity is often influenced by occupational exposure or other gender biased activities. Animal studies, although often prejudiced by the exclusive use of female animals, reveal that gender bias can be strain specific suggesting an interaction between sex chromosome complement and background genes. This observation has important implications because it argues that within a gender biased disease there may be individuals in which gender does not contribute to autoimmunity. Exposure to environmental factors, which encompasses everything around us, adds an additional layer of complexity. Understanding how the environment influences the relationship between sex chromosome complement and innate and adaptive immune responses will be essential in determining the role of gender in environmentally-induced autoimmunity. PMID:22137891

  2. Effects of Latent Toxoplasmosis on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Pregnancy

    E-print Network

    Flegr, Jaroslav

    Effects of Latent Toxoplasmosis on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Pregnancy Sa´rka Kan kova´1, and its most common form, latent toxoplasmosis, influences the course of pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) belong to the well-defined risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim

  3. MODELING CYCLIC WAVES OF CIRCULATING T CELLS IN AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES

    E-print Network

    Mahaffy, Joseph M.

    MODELING CYCLIC WAVES OF CIRCULATING T CELLS IN AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES JOSEPH M. MAHAFFY AND LEAH EDELSTEIN-KESHET Abstract. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which immune cells, notably T diabetes result once a large enough fraction of these beta cells have been destroyed. Recent investigation

  4. IDO2 is a critical mediator of autoantibody production and inflammatory pathogenesis in a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis1

    PubMed Central

    DuHadaway, James B.; Grabler, Samantha; Metz, Richard; Prendergast, George C.; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune disorders are associated with altered activity of the immunomodulatory enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). However, the precise contributions of IDO function to autoimmunity remain unclear. Here, we examine the effect of two different IDO enzymes, IDO1 and IDO2, on the development of autoimmune arthritis in the KRN preclinical model of RA. We find that IDO2, not IDO1, is critical for arthritis development, providing the first direct evidence of separate in vivo functions for IDO1 and IDO2. Mice null for Ido2 display decreased joint inflammation relative to wild-type mice due to a reduction in pathogenic autoantibodies and antibody secreting cells. Notably, IDO2 appears to specifically mediate autoreactive, but not normal B cell responses, as total serum Ig levels are not altered and IDO2 ko mice are able to mount productive antibody responses to model antigens in vitro and in vivo. Reciprocal adoptive transfer studies confirm that autoantibody production and arthritis are modulated by IDO2 expression in a cell type extrinsic to the T cell. Taken together, our results provide the first insights into IDO2 function by defining its pathogenic contributions to autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:24489090

  5. The potential role of retroviruses in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    In the last 20 years research in Immunology underwent fundamental changes. Most importantly, the identification of the key role of innate immune pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize evolutionarily conserved molecular patterns on infectious pathogens. This results in priming of innate immune cells, which in turn activate and direct the adaptive immune response. Progress in innate immune recognition instigated the current working hypothesis, that recognition of endogenous ligands by PRRs results in innate immune cell activation (autoinflammation) or activation of adaptive cells, with self-reactive antigen receptors (autoimmunity). In particular, nucleic acid-sensing innate immune receptors seem to be prime candidates for a mechanistic understanding of autoreactive activation of the immune system. However, it remains uncertain what the actual source of nucleic acid ligands is and what other signals are needed to drive activation of autoreactive innate immune cells and break self-tolerance of the adaptive immune system. Here, I will review our present understanding about whether the infection with exogenous retroviruses or the reactivation of endogenous retroviruses might play an etiological role in certain autoimmune conditions of humans and murine experimental models. PMID:26683147

  6. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis: An Autoimmune Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Altintoprak, Fatih; Karakece, Engin; Kivilcim, Taner; Dikicier, Enis; Cakmak, Guner; Celebi, Fehmi; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakk?

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the autoimmune basis of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) by determining the anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) levels of patients diagnosed with IGM. Material and Methods. Twenty-six IGM patients were evaluated. Serum samples were analyzed for autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using a substrate kit that induced fluorescein-conjugated goat antibodies to human immunoglobulin G (IgG). IIF patterns were read at serum dilutions of 1?:?40 and 1?:?100 for ANA positivity. Using the immunoblot technique, the sera of patients were assayed at dilutions of 1?:?40 and 1?:?100 for human autoantibodies of the IgG class to 15 lines of highly purified ENAs. Results. In the IIF studies for ANA, positivity was identified for four different patterns in the 1?:?40 diluted preparations, for three different patients in the 1?:?100 diluted preparations and only one pattern was identified at the 1?:?320 dilution. In the ENA studies, positivity was identified for four different pattern in the 1?:?40 dilution, and only one pattern was identified at the 1?:?100 dilution. Conclusion. This study was not able to support the eventual existence of an autoimmune basis for IGM. PMID:24082849

  7. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. PMID:20353574

  8. Effect of autoimmune diseases on cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lily; Lippe, Sarah; Silverman, Earl

    2013-01-01

    The location of both autoimmune processes and other causes of brain inflammation is important in determining the impact of inflammation on brain function. This chapter focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases leading to inflammatory brain disease resulting in cognitive defects with a special focus on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Collectively called neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE), NPSLE occurs in 20-95% of pediatric patients with SLE (pSLE). The incidence of cognitive dysfunction is difficult to ascertain in pediatric patients as few studies have been performed. Using formal neurocognitive testing of unselected pediatric SLE patients, the rate of cognitive abnormalities was approximately 50% and impairment was associated with longer disease duration in one study. A second small study showed global depression on performance and academic scores while a larger study using a neuropsychiatric inventory showed a 55% rate of dysfunction. These diverging findings may result from the lack of a standardized cognitive assessment battery. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) group of pediatric rheumatologists proposed a 2 hour 40 minutes battery for assessment of cognitive testing of SLE patients from age 9 to 18 years. Further assessments using this battery should provide a better neurocognitive profile of pSLE. PMID:23622338

  9. Conversion of autoimmune hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are the two autoimmune spectrum of thyroid disease. Cases of conversion from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism have been reported but conversion from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism is very rare. Although such cases have been reported rarely in the past we are now seeing such conversions from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism more frequently in clinical practice. Case presentation We are reporting three cases of middle aged Asian females who presented with classical symptoms of hypothyroidism and the investigations showed elevated thyroid stimulating hormone with positive thyroid antibodies. Diagnosis of autoimmune hypothyroidism was made and thyroxine replacement therapy was initiated. Patients became asymptomatic with normalization of thyroid stimulating hormone level. After few years they developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism with suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone level. Over replacement of thyroxine was considered and the dose of thyroxine was decreased, but they remain symptomatic. After gradual decrease in the dose of thyroxine it was stopped finally. Even after few months of stopping thyroxine, the symptoms of hyperthyroidism did not improve and the biochemical and imaging modalities confirmed that the patients have developed hyperthyroidism. Anti-thyroid treatment was then started and the patients became symptom free. Conclusion High index of suspicion should be there for possible conversion of hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism if a patient with primary hypothyroidism develops persistent symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Otherwise it can be missed easily considering it as an over replacement with thyroid hormone. PMID:25086829

  10. Psoriasis is not an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Fry, Lionel; Baker, Barbara S; Powles, Anne V; Engstrand, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The concept that psoriasis is an autoimmune disease needs to be questioned. The autoimmune label has been based on molecular mimicry between streptococcal and keratin proteins and the existence of homologous peptides between these proteins. However, it is only peripheral blood CD8, and not CD4, T lymphocytes that respond to the homologous peptides. This ignores the fact that it is CD4 T cells which are necessary to initiate psoriasis. Recent studies on skin bacterial microbiota have found a variety of bacteria in both normal skin and psoriatic lesions. In biopsy specimens, the most common phylum was Firmicutes and the most common genus streptococcus in both psoriasis and normal skin. The innate immune system is activated in psoriasis, and recent genetic findings have shown the majority of susceptibility loci are associated with innate immunity. There is a known clinical relationship between both Crohn's disease (CD) and periodontitis, and psoriasis, and patients with psoriasis share mutations in some innate immunity genes with individuals with CD. It is now accepted that CD is due to a breakdown of immune tolerance (dysbiosis) to bacteria in the intestine. These findings suggest that psoriasis is initiated by an abnormal response to bacteria in the skin due to genetic factors. PMID:25348334

  11. Autoimmune Hepatitis in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Kagihara, Jaclyn E; Tsai, Naoky C S; Roytman, Marina M

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a poorly understood disease. There has been a paucity of reports on the epidemiology and clinical course of AIH in multiethnic populations. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and serologic features of AIH in the multiethnic population of Hawai‘i. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study of a cohort of patients seen between 2010–2013 in a tertiary referral center in Hawai‘i. All 32 patients were diagnosed according to International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG) criteria. The mean (SD) age of diagnosis was 49.4 (17.5) years, 75% of patients were female, 72% were Asian, 19% were Caucasian, 6% were Pacific Islander, and 3% were African American. When compared to Caucasians, Asians had lower transaminase levels and international normalized ratio (INR), and were more likely to have anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) seropositivity at presentation. Asians were also older at diagnosis and more likely to achieve complete or partial remission. Patients diagnosed before the age of 40 had higher levels of total bilirubin at presentation compared to those diagnosed after the age of 40. No significant differences were observed between genders. Asian patients with type I AIH present later in life with more favorable laboratory values, and have a superior treatment response compared to Caucasians. Diagnosis before the age of 40 is associated with less favorable laboratory values at diagnosis. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings and determine the reason for the ethnic differences. PMID:26279964

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  13. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Nabiha; Renner, Eberhard L

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatment modality for end stage liver disease caused by many etiologies including autoimmune processes. That said, the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreased over the years due to the availability of effective medical treatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superior transplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. While AIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limited clinical significance in most, but not all cases. Recurrent PSC, however, often progresses over years to a stage requiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence and the predisposing factors of disease recurrence remain debated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseases is required to develop preventive measures. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatment of recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC) following LT. PMID:26689244

  14. Emerging role of long noncoding RNAs in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Cui; Pan, Hai-Feng; Leng, Rui-Xue; Wang, De-Guang; Li, Xiang-Pei; Li, Xiao-Mei; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), with size larger than 200 nucleotides, is a new class of noncoding RNA. Emerging evidence has revealed that lncRNAs play a key role in the regulation of immunological functions and autoimmunity. Herein, we review the recent findings of lncRNA regulation in immune functions and in the development of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. In addition, we focus on the involvement of lncRNA regulation in innate and adaptive immune responses, immune cell development, and differential expression of lncRNAs in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), multiple sclerosis (MS), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), psoriasis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:25989481

  15. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor-ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor-ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  16. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  17. Autoimmunity: from black water fever to regulatory function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity is a field that has only been around for a little over a century. Initially, it was thought that autoimmunity could not happen, that the body would never turn on itself (i.e. "horror autotoxicus"). It was only around the First World War that autoimmunity was recognized as the pathogenesis of various diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of Compound E led to successful treatment of patients with autoimmune diseases, but it was not till later that the adverse effects of this class of drugs were elucidated. The "modern" age of autoimmunity began around 1945 with the description of blackwater fever, and most of the subsequent research on hemolytic anemia and the role of an autoantibody in its pathogenesis led to a description of the anti-globulin reaction. The lupus erythematous (LE) cell was recognized in the mid-1940s by Hargreaves. His research carried on into the 1960s. Rheumatoid factor was also first described in the 1940s as yet another serum factor with activity against globulin-coated sheep red blood cells. The concept of autoimmunity really gained a foothold in the 1950s, when autoimmune thyroid disease and idiopathic thrombocytopenia were first described. Much has happened since then, and our understanding of autoimmunity has evolved now to include mechanisms of apoptosis, signaling pathway derangements, and the discovery of subsets of T cells with regulatory activity. The modern day study of autoimmunity is a fascinating area of research, and full understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is far from being completely elucidated. PMID:24491820

  18. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA): clues and pitfalls in the pediatric background.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Prada, Elisabetta; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Tarantino, Giusyda; Codecà, Claudio; Rigante, Donato

    2014-12-01

    The development and increasing diffusion of new vaccinations and global immunization protocols have aroused burning debates about safety of adjuvants and their immunogenicity-enhancing effect in vaccines. Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin have grouped under the term "autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants" (ASIA) a complex of variable signs and symptoms that may occur after a previous exposure to different adjuvants and also external environmental triggers, even eliciting specific overt immune-mediated disorders. This entity subsumes five medical conditions: post-vaccination phenomena, gulf war syndrome, macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome, siliconosis, and sick building syndrome, but the relevance and magnitude of the syndrome in the pediatric age is fundamentally limited to post-vaccination autoimmune or inflammatory disorders. The occurrence of vaccine-triggered phenomena represents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and a research conundrum for many investigators. In this paper, we will analyze the general features of ASIA and focus on specific post-vaccination events in relation with the pediatric background. In the presence of a favorable genetic background, many autoimmune/inflammatory responses can be triggered by adjuvants and external factors, showing how the man himself might breach immune tolerance and drive many pathogenetic aspects of human diseases. Nonetheless, the elective application of ASIA diagnostic criteria to the pediatric population requires further assessment and evaluations. Additional studies are needed to help clarify connections between innate or adaptive immunity and pathological and/or protective autoantibodies mostly in the pediatric age, as children and adolescents are mainly involved in the immunization agendas related to vaccine-preventable diseases. PMID:25395340

  19. Cytokine-producing B cells: a translational view on their roles in human and mouse autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lino, Andreia C; Dörner, Thomas; Bar-Or, Amit; Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-01-01

    B-cell depletion therapy has beneficial effects in autoimmune diseases. This is only partly explained by an elimination of autoantibodies. How does B-cell depletion improve disease? Here, we review preclinical studies showing that B cells can propagate autoimmune disorders through cytokine production. We also highlight clinical observations indicating the relevance of these B-cell functions in human autoimmunity. Abnormalities in B-cell cytokine production have been observed in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In the first two diseases, B-cell depletion erases these abnormalities, and improves disease progression, suggesting a causative role for defective B-cell cytokine expression in disease pathogenesis. However, in the last two disorders, the pathogenic role of B cells and the effect of B-cell depletion on cytokine-producing B cells remain to be clarified. A better characterization of cytokine-expressing human B-cell subsets, and their modulation by B cell-targeted therapies might help understanding both the successes and failures of current B cell-targeted approaches. This may even lead to the development of novel strategies to deplete or amplify selectively pathogenic or protective subsets, respectively, which might be more effective than global depletion of the B-cell compartment. PMID:26683150

  20. Autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis: a newly described entity that is not exclusive of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses have long been known to be associated with autoinmune systemic diseases. Recently, a small number of cases of a disorder distinct from Sweet syndrome or bullous lupus erythematosus (LE) have been described as specifically related to systemic LE under diverse terms, including nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis, nonbullous neutrophilic LE, and Sweet-like neutrophilic dermatosis. We describe 7 patients that developed urticarial lesions in the context of a known or concurrently diagnosed autoimmune connective tissue disease. Of a total of 7 patients, 6 were afflicted by systemic LE and 1 by rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren syndrome. Histological findings in all patients included an interstitial and perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate with leukocytoclasia, vacuolar alteration along the dermal-edidermal junction, and no vasculitis. Most patients had active systemic disease at the time of the cutaneous eruption. Skin lesions resolved rapidly after the administration of immunomodulating agents. In conclusion, we provide additional evidence of the existence of a recently defined nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis in the context of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and propose the term autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis as an appropriate designation. Furthermore, we believe that this entity should prompt physicians to screen the presence of an active systemic disorder in afflicted patients. PMID:23518639

  1. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known ?-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-?ICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-?ICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  2. The Potential Roles of Bisphenol A (BPA) Pathogenesis in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a monomer found in commonly used consumer plastic goods. Although much attention in recent years has been placed on BPA's impact as an endocrine disruptor, it also appears to activate many immune pathways involved in both autoimmune disease development and autoimmune reactivity provocation. The current scientific literature is void of research papers linking BPA directly to human or animal onset of autoimmunity. This paper explores the impact of BPA on immune reactivity and the potential roles these mechanisms may have on the development or provocation of autoimmune diseases. Potential mechanisms by which BPA may be a contributing risk factor to autoimmune disease development and progression include its impact on hyperprolactinemia, estrogenic immune signaling, cytochrome P450 enzyme disruption, immune signal transduction pathway alteration, cytokine polarization, aryl hydrocarbon activation of Th-17 receptors, molecular mimicry, macrophage activation, lipopolysaccharide activation, and immunoglobulin pathophysiology. In this paper a review of these known autoimmune triggering mechanisms will be correlated with BPA exposure, thereby suggesting that BPA has a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:24804084

  3. Keratan sulfate exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Rino; Miyamoto, Katsuichi; Tanaka, Noriko; Moriguchi, Kota; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2015-12-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are the components of extracellular matrices in the central nervous system (CNS). Keratan sulfate (KS) is a glycosaminoglycan that is included in the KSPG that acts as an inhibitory factor in nerve regeneration after CNS injury. To investigate the role of KS in immune diseases, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice that were deficient in the N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-O-sulfotransferase 1 (GlcNAc6ST1) gene (KS-KO). KS-KO mice developed less severe EAE and showed repressed recall response in the induction phase. Furthermore, GlcNAc6ST1 might have roles in the passage of the pathogenic lymphocytes through the blood-brain barrier via adhesion molecules. Thus, modulation of KS may become a treatment for neuroimmunological diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26340909

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking Klatskin tumour on radiology.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Sohail, Abdul Malik Amir Humza; Haider, Zishan

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is categorised into two distinct types, AIP type 1 and 2. Although there can be multisystem involvement, rarely, the cholangitis associated with AIP can present radiologically in a manner similar to that of Klatskin tumour. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who was almost misdiagnosed with a Klatskin tumour because of the similarity in radiological features of the two aforementioned clinical entities. The patient presented with a history of jaundice, pruritus and abdominal pain, and work up showed deranged liver function tests, elevated cancer antigen 19-9 levels and positive antinuclear antibodies. CT scan of the abdomen showed findings suggestive of Klatskin tumour but due to diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding low-attenuation halo found on a closer review, a diagnosis of AIP was performed. The patient was started on standard corticosteroid therapy and responded well, with complete resolution of the radiological findings. PMID:25858920

  5. [Autoimmune diseases associated with transverse myelitis. Review].

    PubMed

    Tristano, Antonio G

    2009-06-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) is an inflammatory process involving restricted areas of the spinal cord. The usually dramatic presentation with rapidly progressive symptoms involving motor, sensory and autonomic functions makes acute TM a medical emergency. Acute TM has been cited as a rare and unusual complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS), but early diagnosis and aggressive treatment might improve the prognosis. This review of the literature (MEDLINE), showed that, within autoimmune diseases, acute transverse myelitis is mainly associated with SLE and SS. Previous studies seem to indicate that the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies might play a role in the etiology of TM. Although no uniform therapeutic protocol exists, and the prognosis is usually poor, early aggressive treatment (usually with EV pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide) might improve the prognosis. PMID:19662820

  6. Nitric oxide, chronic inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nagy, György; Clark, Joanna M; Buzás, Edit I; Gorman, Claire L; Cope, Andrew P

    2007-07-31

    Whilst many physiological functions of nitric oxide (NO) have been revealed so far, recent evidence proposes an essential role for NO in T lymphocyte activation and signal transduction. NO acts as a second messenger, activating soluble guanyl cyclase and participating in signal transduction pathways involving cyclic GMP. NO modulates mitochondrial events that are involved in apoptosis and regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Several studies undertaken on patients with RA and SLE have documented increased endogenous NO synthesis, although the effects of NO may be distinct. Here, we discuss recent evidence that NO contributes to T cell dysfunction in both SLE and RA by altering multiple signaling pathways in T cells. Although NO may play a physiological role in lymphocyte cell signaling, its overproduction may perturb T cell activation, differentiation and effector responses, each of which may contribute in different ways to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:17568690

  7. Actively Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Weissert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rat and especially a number of inbred rat strains are very well suited for modeling multiple sclerosis (MS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the model of MS, can be induced by active or passive immunization. Active immunization can be performed with different myelin proteins or peptides thereof. Passive immunization is performed by transfer of myelin-specific T cells. Most known is EAE induced with myelin basic protein (MBP) in LEW (RT1(l)) rats that results in monophasic disease and EAE induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in DA (RT1(av1)) rats that leads to relapsing remitting or chronic disease. Depending on the selected inbred rat strain, the immunogen and adjuvant used, different disease courses and pathologies can be induced that mimic different aspects of MS. PMID:25630921

  8. RNA degradation in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Rachel E.; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control determines the fate of cellular RNA molecules. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) provides quality control of mRNA, targeting faulty cellular transcripts for degradation by multiple nucleases including the RNA exosome. Recent findings have revealed a role for NMD in targeting viral RNA molecules, thereby restricting virus infection. Interestingly, NMD is also linked to immune responses at another level: mutations affecting the NMD or RNA exosome machineries cause chronic activation of defence programmes, resulting in autoimmune phenotypes. Here we place these observations in the context of other links between innate antiviral immunity and type I interferon mediated disease and examine two models: one in which expression or function of pathogen sensors is perturbed and one wherein host-derived RNA molecules with a propensity to activate such sensors accumulate. PMID:25709093

  9. Levamisole-associated neutropenia and autoimmune granulocytotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Drew, S I; Carter, B M; Nathanson, D S; Terasaki, P I

    1980-01-01

    To investigate possible immune mechanisms responsible for levamisole-associated neutropenia we tested patients with bladder cancer on levamisole therapy. Autoimmune and complement-dependent granulocytotoxic antibodies were detected in 3 patients with levamisole-induced neutropenia. The granulocytopenia appeared to be causally related to the presence of autoantibodies in that pretreatment serum or serum obtained after the restoration of neutrophil counts showed diminished or no granulocytotoxic reactivity. In addition, granulocytotoxins were found in 6 out of 20 (30%) patients receiving levamisole compared to only 2 out of 28 (7.1%) patients on no levamisole or placebo (P less than 0.06). Hence, screening for granulocytotoxins may forewarn of neutropenia in patients receiving levamisole for a variety of clinical diseases. PMID:7377861

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  11. IDO2 in Immunomodulation and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, George C.; Metz, Richard; Muller, Alexander J.; Merlo, Lauren M. F.; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2014-01-01

    IDO2 is a relative of IDO1 implicated in tryptophan catabolism and immune modulation but its specific contributions to normal physiology and pathophysiology are not known. Evolutionary genetic studies suggest that IDO2 has a unique function ancestral to IDO1. In mice, IDO2 gene deletion does not appreciably affect embryonic development or hematopoiesis, but it leads to defects in allergic or autoimmune responses and in the ability of IDO1 to influence the generation of?T regulatory cells. Gene expression studies indicate that IDO2 is a basally and more narrowly expressed gene than IDO1 and that IDO2 is uniquely regulated by AhR, which serves as a physiological receptor for the tryptophan catabolite kynurenine. In the established KRN transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, where IDO1 gene deletion has no effect, IDO2 deletion selectively blunts responses to autoantigen but has no effect on responses to neoantigen challenge. In human populations, natural variations in IDO2 gene sequence that attenuate enzymatic activity have been reported to influence brain cancer control and adaptive immune responses to the IDO2 protein itself, consistent with the concept that IDO2 is involved in shaping immune tolerance in human beings. Biochemical and pharmacological studies provide further evidence of differences in IDO2 enzymology and function relative to IDO1. We suggest that IDO2 may act in a distinct manner from IDO1 as a set-point for tolerance to “altered-self” antigens along the self-non-self continuum where immune challenges from cancer and autoimmunity may arise. PMID:25477879

  12. Auto-reactions, autoimmunity and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Terracciano, Chiara; Crisanti, Anna; Guarino, Maria Domenica; Bernardini, Sergio; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from the literature suggests that autoimmune processes may drive features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Such hypothesis is supported by the evidence that class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with susceptibility to develop PsA and auto-reactive cells, such as CD8 T cells, T helper (h) 17 and plasma cells, have been demonstrated in PsA. However, no autoantigens have ever been demonstrated in PsA. The presence of a new autoantibody system, anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies, has been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. These autoantibodies have been associated with a worse disease progression independent of anti-citrulline antibodies (ACPA). In PsA, anti-CarP antibodies have not been evaluated yet. We aimed at analyzing, for the first time, the anti-CarP antibodies in sera of patients with active PsA who were negative for ACPA in order to explore both their presence and their relationship with disease activity. A total of 70 individuals, 30 patients with diagnosis of PsA (according to CASPAR criteria) and 40 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. We found significantly increased levels of anti-CarP antibodies in PsA patients compared with HC (P<0.0001). Our findings indicate that anti-CarP antibodies are detectable with high specificity and sensibility in PsA patients suggesting an autoimmune background of PsA. Anti-CarP antibodies can be useful in improving the diagnosis of PsA and are correlated with disease activity. PMID:26254734

  13. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... making life feel overwhelming or out of control. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) . For a person with OCD, anxiety takes ... Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder A to Z: Panic Disorder Social Phobia Special ...

  14. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Anxiety Disorders About Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Disorders in Older Adults If you have an ... to treatment for the anxiety disorder. Types of Anxiety Disorders There are several basic types of anxiety ...

  15. Eating Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > Body Image > Eating disorders Body Image Eating disorders About eating disorders Over-exercising More information on eating disorders About eating disorders "Mirror, Mirror on the wall...who's the thinnest ...

  16. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School How Can I Stop Cutting? Scoliosis Bipolar Disorder KidsHealth > Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Bipolar Disorder Print ... Treat It? Living With Bipolar Disorder What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions ...

  17. TNFR2 Deficiency Acts in Concert with Gut Microbiota To Precipitate Spontaneous Sex-Biased Central Nervous System Demyelinating Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick G; Bonn, Michael B; Franklin, Craig L; Ericsson, Aaron C; McKarns, Susan C

    2015-11-15

    TNF-? antagonists provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune disorders such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. However, TNF antagonism unexplainably exacerbates CNS autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. We demonstrate that TNFR2 deficiency results in female-biased spontaneous autoimmune CNS demyelination in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific 2D2 TCR transgenic mice. Disease in TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice was associated with CNS infiltration of T and B cells as well as increased production of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific IL-17, IFN-?, and IgG2b. Attenuated disease in TNF(-/-) 2D2 mice relative to TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice identified distinctive roles for TNFR1 and TNFR2. Oral antibiotic treatment eliminated spontaneous autoimmunity in TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice to suggest role for gut microbiota. Illumina sequencing of fecal 16S rRNA identified a distinct microbiota profile in male TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 that was associated with disease protection. Akkermansia muciniphila, Sutterella sp., Oscillospira sp., Bacteroides acidifaciens, and Anaeroplasma sp. were selectively more abundant in male TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice. In contrast, Bacteroides sp., Bacteroides uniformis, and Parabacteroides sp. were more abundant in affected female TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice, suggesting a role in disease causation. Overall, TNFR2 blockade appears to disrupt commensal bacteria-host immune symbiosis to reveal autoimmune demyelination in genetically susceptible mice. Under this paradigm, microbes likely contribute to an individual's response to anti-TNF therapy. This model provides a foundation for host immune-microbiota-directed measures for the prevention and treatment of CNS-demyelinating autoimmune disorders. PMID:26475926

  18. Phenidone, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases, ameliorates rat paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by suppressing its target enzymes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changjong; Ahn, Meejung; Wie, Myung-Bok; Kim, Hyung-Min; Koh, Chang-Sung; Hong, Seong-Chul; Kim, Moon-Doo; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Yoh; Shin, Taekyun

    2005-02-28

    This study examined whether phenidone, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX), affects the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the rat, and the expression of both COX-1/-2 and 5-LOX in EAE spinal cords. Oral phenidone (200 mg/kg) significantly suppressed the incidence and clinical severity of EAE paralysis. Western blot analysis showed that phenidone significantly inhibited the increases in COX-1/-2 and 5-LOX in the spinal cords of rats with EAE. This finding was paralleled by immunohistochemical observations. Overall, these findings suggest that COX-1/-2 and 5-LOX are important inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of EAE, and that the inhibition of both COX and LOX ameliorates the autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system. PMID:15722060

  19. Genetics of autoimmune diseases: insights from population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Paula S; Shedlock, Andrew M; Langefeld, Carl D

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are a family of complex heterogeneous disorders with similar underlying mechanisms characterized by immune responses against self. Collectively, ADs are common, exhibit gender and ethnic disparities, and increasing incidence. As natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation, and immune function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, it is thought that the prevalence of AD risk alleles seen in different population is partially the result of differing selective pressures (for example, due to pathogens). With the advent of high-throughput technologies, new analytical methodologies and large-scale projects, evidence for the role of natural selection in contributing to the heritable component of ADs keeps growing. This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different ADs and concomitant evidence for selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions. Examples of specific adaptive variants with phenotypic effects are included as an evidence of natural selection increasing AD susceptibility. Many of the complexities of gene effects in different ADs can be explained by population genetics phenomena. Integrating AD susceptibility studies with population genetics to investigate how natural selection has contributed to genetic variation that influences disease risk will help to identify functional variants and elucidate biological mechanisms. As such, the study of population genetics in human population holds untapped potential for elucidating the genetic causes of human disease and more rapidly focusing to personalized medicine. PMID:26223182

  20. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: boundary issues.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Naomi A; Saxena, Sanjaya; Zohar, Joseph; Craig, Kevin J

    2007-05-01

    The boundaries between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and other neuropsychiatric disorders remain unresolved and may well differ from one disorder to another. Endophenotypes are heritable, quantitative traits hypothesized to more closely represent genetic risk for complex polygenic mental disorders than overt symptoms and behaviors. They may have a role in identifying how closely these disorders are associated with another and with other mental disorders with which they share major comorbidity. This review maps the nosological relationships of OCD to other neuropsychiatric disorders, using OCD as the prototype disorder and endophenotype markers, such as cognitive, imaging, and molecular data as well as results from demographic, comorbidity, family, and treatment studies. Despite high comorbidity rates, emerging evidence suggests substantial endophenotypic differences between OCD and anxiety disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and addictions, though comparative data is lacking and the picture is far from clear. On the other hand, strong relationships between OCD, Tourette syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder, hypochondriasis, grooming disorders, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus are likely. Studies designed to delineate the cause, consequences, and common factors are a challenging but essential goal for future research in this area. PMID:17514081

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is ALPS? ALPS is a rare disorder; its prevalence is unknown. More than 200 affected individuals have ... lymphoma ; mutation ; neurological ; neutropenia ; ovarian ; panniculitis ; platelets ; population ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; somatic mutation ; splenomegaly ; syndrome ; thrombocytopenia ; uveitis ; ...

  2. IL-2 as a therapeutic target for the restoration of Foxp3+ regulatory T cell function in organ-specific autoimmunity: implications in pathophysiology and translation to human disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral immune tolerance requires a finely controlled balance between tolerance to self-antigens and protective immunity against enteric and invading pathogens. Self-reactive T cells sometimes escape thymic clonal deletion, and can subsequently provoke autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) unless they are controlled by a network of tolerance mechanisms in the periphery, including CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg) cells. CD4+ Treg cells are characterized by the constitutive expression of the IL-2R? chain (CD25) and preferentially express the forkhead winged helix transcriptional regulator Foxp3. These cells have been shown to possess immunosuppressive properties towards various immune cell subsets and their defects are thought to contribute to many autoimmune disorders. Strong evidence shows that IL-2 is one of the important stimulatory signals for the development, function and fitness of Treg cells. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model, a prototypic model of spontaneous autoimmunity, mimics many features of human T1 D. Using this model, the contribution of the IL-2-IL-2R pathway to the development of T1 D and other autoimmune disorders has been extensively studied. In the past years, strong genetic and molecular evidence has indicated an essential role for the IL-2/IL-2R pathway in autoimmune disorders. Thus, the major role of IL-2 is to maintain immune tolerance by promoting Treg cell development, functional fitness and stability. Here we first summarize the genetic and experimental evidence demonstrating a role for IL-2 in autoimmunity, mainly through the study of the NOD mouse model, and analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of its action on Treg cells. We then move on to describe how this data can be translated to applications for human autoimmune diseases by using IL-2 as a therapeutic agent to restore Treg cell fitness, numbers and functions. PMID:21059266

  3. PTPN22: the archetypal non-HLA autoimmunity gene

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    PTPN22 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase that is expressed by haematopoietic cells and functions as a key regulator of immune homeostasis by inhibiting T-cell receptor signalling and by selectively promoting type I interferon responses after activation of myeloid-cell pattern-recognition receptors. A single nucleotide polymorphism of PTPN22, 1858C>T (rs2476601), disrupts an interaction motif in the protein, and is the most important non-HLA genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis and the second most important for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PTPN22 exemplifies a shared autoimmunity gene, affecting the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis and other autoimmune diseases. In this Review, we explore the role of PTPN22 in autoimmune connective tissue disease, with particular emphasis on candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies and clinical variability of disease. We also propose a number of PTPN22-dependent functional models of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25003765

  4. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    E-print Network

    Cotsapas, Chris

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, ...

  5. The multi-factorial pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Wick, G; Krömer, G; Neu, N; Fässler, R; Ziemiecki, A; Müller, R G; Ginzel, M; Béládi, I; Kühr, T; Hála, K

    1987-12-01

    Development of organ-specific autoimmune diseases depends on both an abnormal immune regulation and a genetically determined primary susceptibility of the target organ to the autoimmune attack. In addition to the essential genetically determined prerequisites there are also facultative, modulating factors that influence the outcome of an autoimmune disease. This concept is exemplified in the Obese strain (OS) chicken model which develops a spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis closely resembling human Hashimoto disease. Three modulating factors are specifically addressed, viz. (a) the lower threshold of OS thyroid epithelial cells for the gamma-interferon-induced MHC class II antigen expression as compared to normal controls, (b) the decreased glucocorticoid tonus of the OS and (c) the presence of a new endogenous virus (ev 22) locus in the OS that has so far not been found in any normal strain and which seems to influence the glucocorticoid-mediated immunoregulatory process. PMID:3127334

  6. Genetic Risk and the Development of Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom H; Chung, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) have collectively been recognized as autoimmune liver diseases. They have all been subjected to genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and several dozens susceptibility loci have been determined. The predominant feature of the genetic findings is that of a strong association with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and numerous weak associations scattered throughout the remainder of the genome. The non-HLA associations show some degree of overlap, not only between PBC, PSC and AIH, but also with other autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases. Mathematical modelling shows that the main fraction of autoimmune disease risk (including that of autoimmune liver diseases) is not explained by GWAS, proposing a major role of environmental factors. The HLA associations and autoantibodies observed in these conditions may hold clues as to the nature of such factors, which are exceedingly difficult to map by means of epidemiological study designs. The present review article explores the potential relationship between genetic risk as determined by GWAS and environmental risk in autoimmune liver diseases, and proposes a model for relevant thinking on the susceptibility genes in PBC, PSC and AIH. PMID:26641277

  7. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Parks, C G; Conrad, K; Cooper, G S

    1999-10-01

    Occupational exposure to silica dust has been examined as a possible risk factor with respect to several systemic autoimmune diseases, including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some of the small vessel vasculitidies with renal involvement (e.g., Wegener granulomatosis). Crystalline silica, or quartz, is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. High-level exposure to respirable silica dust can cause chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the lung and other organs. Studies of specific occupational groups with high-level silica exposure (e.g., miners) have shown increased rates of autoimmune diseases compared to the expected rates in the general population. However, some clinic- and population-based studies have not demonstrated an association between silica exposure and risk of autoimmune diseases. This lack of effect may be due to the limited statistical power of these studies to examine this association or because the lower- or moderate-level exposures that may be more common in the general population were not considered. Experimental studies demonstrate that silica can act as an adjuvant to nonspecifically enhance the immune response. This is one mechanism by which silica might be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. Given that several different autoimmune diseases may be associated with silica dust exposure, silica dust may act to promote or accelerate disease development, requiring some other factor to break immune tolerance or initiate autoimmunity. The specific manifestation of this effect may depend on underlying differences in genetic susceptibility or other environmental exposures. PMID:10970168

  8. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, C G; Conrad, K; Cooper, G S

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to silica dust has been examined as a possible risk factor with respect to several systemic autoimmune diseases, including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some of the small vessel vasculitidies with renal involvement (e.g., Wegener granulomatosis). Crystalline silica, or quartz, is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. High-level exposure to respirable silica dust can cause chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the lung and other organs. Studies of specific occupational groups with high-level silica exposure (e.g., miners) have shown increased rates of autoimmune diseases compared to the expected rates in the general population. However, some clinic- and population-based studies have not demonstrated an association between silica exposure and risk of autoimmune diseases. This lack of effect may be due to the limited statistical power of these studies to examine this association or because the lower- or moderate-level exposures that may be more common in the general population were not considered. Experimental studies demonstrate that silica can act as an adjuvant to nonspecifically enhance the immune response. This is one mechanism by which silica might be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. Given that several different autoimmune diseases may be associated with silica dust exposure, silica dust may act to promote or accelerate disease development, requiring some other factor to break immune tolerance or initiate autoimmunity. The specific manifestation of this effect may depend on underlying differences in genetic susceptibility or other environmental exposures. PMID:10970168

  9. Drug-induced autoimmune liver disease: A diagnostic dilemma of an increasingly reported disease

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Agustin; Zapata, Eva; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J

    2014-01-01

    The aetiology of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is uncertain but the disease can be triggered in susceptible patients by external factors such as viruses or drugs. AIH usually develops in individuals with a genetic background mainly consisting of some risk alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (HLA). Many drugs have been linked to AIH phenotypes, which sometimes persist after drug discontinuation, suggesting that they awaken latent autoimmunity. At least three clinical scenarios have been proposed that refers to drug- induced autoimmune liver disease (DIAILD): AIH with drug-induced liver injury (DILI); drug induced-AIH (DI-AIH); and immune mediated DILI (IM-DILI). In addition, there are instances showing mixed features of DI-AIH and IM-DILI, as well as DILI cases with positive autoantibodies. Histologically distinguishing DILI from AIH remains a challenge. Even more challenging is the differentiation of AIH from DI-AIH mainly relying in histological features; however, a detailed standardised histologic evaluation of large cohorts of AIH and DI-AIH patients would probably render more subtle features that could be of help in the differential diagnosis between both entities. Growing information on the relationship of drugs and AIH is being available, being drugs like statins and biologic agents more frequently involved in cases of DIAILD. In addition, there is some evidence on the fact that patients diagnosed with DIAILD may have had a previous episode of hepatotoxicity. Further collaborative studies in DIAILD will strengthen the knowledge and understanding of this intriguing and complex disorder which might represent different phenotypes across the spectrum of disease PMID:24799984

  10. A cholera toxoid-insulin conjugate as an oral vaccine against spontaneous autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bergerot, I; Ploix, C; Petersen, J; Moulin, V; Rask, C; Fabien, N; Lindblad, M; Mayer, A; Czerkinsky, C; Holmgren, J; Thivolet, C

    1997-04-29

    Mucosally induced immunological tolerance is an attractive strategy for preventing or treating illnesses resulting from untoward inflammatory immune reactions against self- or non-self-antigens. Oral administration of relevant autoantigens and allergens has been reported to delay or suppress onset of clinical disease in a number of experimental autoimmune and allergic disorders. However, the approach often requires repeated feeding of large amounts of tolerogens over long periods and is only partly effective in animals already systemically sensitized to the ingested antigen such as in animals already harboring autoreactive T cells, and thus presumably also in humans with an autoimmune disease. We have recently shown that oral administration of microgram amounts of antigen coupled to cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), can effectively suppress systemic T cell reactivity in naive as well as in immune animals. We now report that feeding small amounts (2-20 microg) of human insulin conjugated to CTB can effectively suppress beta cell destruction and clinical diabetes in adult nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The protective effect could be transferred by T cells from CTB-insulin-treated animals and was associated with reduced lesions of insulitis. Furthermore, adoptive co-transfer experiments involving injection of Thy-1,2 recipients with diabetogenic T cells from syngeneic mice and T cells from congenic Thy-1,1 mice fed with CTB-insulin demonstrated a selective recruitment of Thy-1,1 donor cells in the peripancreatic lymph nodes concomitant with reduced islet cell infiltration. These results suggest that protection against autoimmune diabetes can be achieved by feeding minute amounts of a pancreas islet cell autoantigen linked to CTB and appears to involve the selective migration and retention of protective T cells into lymphoid tissues draining the site of organ injury. PMID:9114038

  11. Vitamin D deficiency is related to thyroid antibodies in autoimmune thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tarcin, Ozlem; Parildar, Hulya; Cigerli, Ozlem; Eroglu, Hacer; Demirag, Nilgun Guvener

    2014-01-01

    Introduction It has been known that vitamin D has some immunomodulatory effects and in autoimmune thyroid diseases, vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent. In this study, our aim was to investigate the relationship between thyroid autoantibodies and vitamin D. Material and methods Group 1 and 2 consisted of 254 and 27 newly diagnosed Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves’ disease (GD) cases, respectively; age-matched 124 healthy subjects were enrolled as controls (group 3). All subjects (n = 405) were evaluated for 25OHD and thyroid autoantibody [anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-tg)] levels. Results Group 2 and group 1 patients had lower 25OHD levels than group 3 subjects 14.9 ±8.6 ng/ml, 19.4 ±10.1 ng/ml and 22.5 ±15.4 ng/ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Serum 25OHD levels inversely correlated with anti-tg (r = –0.136, p = 0.025), anti-TPO (r = –0.176, p = 0.003) and parathormone (PTH) (r = –0.240, p < 0.001). Group 2 patients had higher anti-tg and anti-TPO levels than group 1 and 3 (p < 0.001). Conclusions In this study, we found that patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) present with lower vitamin D levels and GD patients have higher prevalence. Since we found an inverse correlation between vitamin D levels and thyroid antibody levels, we may suggest that vitamin D deficiency is one of the potential factors in pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disorders. PMID:26155169

  12. Lack of Evidence for a Role of Islet Autoimmunity in the Aetiology of Canine Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Landegren, Nils; Grimelius, Lars; von Euler, Henrik; Sundberg, Katarina; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lobell, Anna; Hedhammar, Åke; Andersson, Göran; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lernmark, Åke; Kämpe, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical presentation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine diabetes are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported. Methods Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 40 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immune precipitation. Sections of pancreata from five diabetic dogs and two control dogs were examined histopathologically including immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreas polypeptide. Results None of the canine sera analysed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay. Histopathology showed marked degenerative changes in endocrine islets, including vacuolisation and variable loss of immune-staining for insulin. No sign of inflammation was noted. Conclusions/Interpretations Contrary to previous observations, based on results from tests for humoral autoreactivity towards islet proteins using four different assays, and histopathological examinations, we do not find any support for an islet autoimmune aetiology in canine diabetes mellitus. PMID:25153886

  13. [Insulin autoimmune syndrome: Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Alejandra; Paredes, Ana; Espinosa, Consuelo; Caamaño, Egardo; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Pinto, Rodrigo; Iñiguez, Germán; Martínez, Darío; Soto, Néstor

    2015-07-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is characterized by spontaneous hypoglycemia with extremely high insulin levels and the presence of circulating autoantibodies against insulin, in patients who have never been exposed to exogenous insulin. We report two patients with the syndrome. A 36 years old male presenting with hypoglycemia in the emergency room had an oral glucose tolerance test showed basal and 120 min glucose levels of 88 and 185 mg/dl. The basal and 120 min insulin levels were 2,759 and 5,942 ?UI/ml. The presence of an insulin secreting tumor was discarded. Anti-insulin antibodies were positive. He was successfully treated with a diet restricted in carbohydrates and frequent meals in small quantities. A 65 years old female presenting with hypoglycemia in the emergency room had the fasting insulin levels of 1,910 µUI/ml. No insulin secreting tumor was detected by images and anti-insulin antibodies were positive. The polyethylene glycol precipitation test showed a basal and after exposition insulin level 1,483 and 114 µUI/ml, respectively. She responded partially to diet and acarbose and required the use of prednisone with a good clinical response. PMID:26361032

  14. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Maggiore, Giuseppe; Nastasio, Silvia; Sciveres, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis (JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific and organ-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoantibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature. PMID:25067998

  15. Role of Histopathology in Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Tiniakos, Dina G; Brain, John G; Bury, Yvonne A

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is based on a combination of biochemical, immunological and histological features and exclusion of other causes of liver disease. Typical histological features include a chronic hepatitis pattern of injury with portal inflammation and interface activity, predominance of plasma cells in the portal infiltrate, emperipolesis, and hepatocellular rosette formation. Centrilobular injury with prominent hepatocellular necrosis and mononuclear inflammation is now recognised in the histological spectrum of AIH and may represent an early stage of the disease. Liver histology plays a major role in clinical diagnostic scoring systems and is important to confirm or support the clinical diagnosis of AIH. This review focuses on the role of histopathology in AIH and highlights the contribution of histological interpretation to the diagnosis of AIH, differential diagnosis from other entities, recognition of concurrent liver disease, and identification of the so-called overlap or variant syndromes, and addresses the importance of liver biopsy in the management and prognosis of patients with AIH. PMID:26642062

  16. Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Anatabine

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Mullan, Myles; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Mathura, Venkat; Bachmeier, Corbin; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Anatabine, a naturally occurring alkaloid, is becoming a commonly used human food supplement, taken for its claimed anti-inflammatory properties although this has not yet been reported in human clinical trials. We have previously shown that anatabine does display certain anti-inflammatory properties and readily crosses the blood-brain barrier suggesting it could represent an important compound for mitigating neuro-inflammatory conditions. The present study was designed to determine whether anatabine had beneficial effects on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice and to precisely determine its underlying mechanism of action in this mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We found that orally administered anatabine markedly suppressed neurological deficits associated with EAE. Analyses of cytokine production in the periphery of the animals revealed that anatabine significantly reduced Th1 and Th17 cytokines known to contribute to the development of EAE. Anatabine appears to significantly suppress STAT3 and p65 NF?B phosphorylation in the spleen and the brain of EAE mice. These two transcription factors regulate a large array of inflammatory genes including cytokines suggesting a mechanism by which anatabine antagonizes pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Additionally, we found that anatabine alleviated the infiltration of macrophages/microglia and astrogliosis and significantly prevented demyelination in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Altogether our data suggest that anatabine may be effective in the treatment of MS and should be piloted in clinical trials. PMID:23383175

  17. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by anatabine.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Mullan, Myles; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Mathura, Venkat; Bachmeier, Corbin; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Anatabine, a naturally occurring alkaloid, is becoming a commonly used human food supplement, taken for its claimed anti-inflammatory properties although this has not yet been reported in human clinical trials. We have previously shown that anatabine does display certain anti-inflammatory properties and readily crosses the blood-brain barrier suggesting it could represent an important compound for mitigating neuro-inflammatory conditions. The present study was designed to determine whether anatabine had beneficial effects on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice and to precisely determine its underlying mechanism of action in this mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We found that orally administered anatabine markedly suppressed neurological deficits associated with EAE. Analyses of cytokine production in the periphery of the animals revealed that anatabine significantly reduced Th1 and Th17 cytokines known to contribute to the development of EAE. Anatabine appears to significantly suppress STAT3 and p65 NF?B phosphorylation in the spleen and the brain of EAE mice. These two transcription factors regulate a large array of inflammatory genes including cytokines suggesting a mechanism by which anatabine antagonizes pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Additionally, we found that anatabine alleviated the infiltration of macrophages/microglia and astrogliosis and significantly prevented demyelination in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Altogether our data suggest that anatabine may be effective in the treatment of MS and should be piloted in clinical trials. PMID:23383175

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  19. Altered Expression of Autoimmune Regulator in Infant Down Syndrome Thymus, a Possible Contributor to an Autoimmune Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Vanja; Lindgren, Susanne; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Sandström, Kerstin; Kämpe, Olle; Annerén, Göran; Gustafsson, Jan; Sunnegårdh, Jan; van der Post, Sjoerd; Telemo, Esbjörn; Berglund, Martin; Ekwall, Olov

    2014-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with immunological dysfunctions such as increased frequency of infections and autoimmune diseases. Patients with DS share clinical features, such as autoimmune manifestations and specific autoantibodies, with patients affected by autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, located on chromosome 21, which regulates the expression of tissue-restricted Ags (TRAs) in thymic epithelial cells. We investigated the expression of AIRE and TRAs in DS and control thymic tissue using quantitative PCR. AIRE mRNA levels were elevated in thymic tissue from DS patients, and trends toward increased expression of the AIRE-controlled genes INSULIN and CHRNA1 were found. Immunohistochemical stainings showed altered cell composition and architecture of the thymic medulla in DS individuals with increased frequencies of AIRE-positive medullary epithelial cells and CD11c-positive dendritic cells as well as enlarged Hassall’s corpuscles. In addition, we evaluated the proteomic profile of thymic exosomes in DS individuals and controls. DS exosomes carried a broader protein pool and also a larger pool of unique TRAs compared with control exosomes. In conclusion, the increased AIRE gene dose in DS could contribute to an autoimmune phenotype through multiple AIRE-mediated effects on homeostasis and function of thymic epithelial cells that affect thymic selection processes. PMID:25038256

  20. Altered expression of autoimmune regulator in infant down syndrome thymus, a possible contributor to an autoimmune phenotype.

    PubMed

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Lindgren, Susanne; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Sandström, Kerstin; Kämpe, Olle; Annerén, Göran; Gustafsson, Jan; Sunnegårdh, Jan; van der Post, Sjoerd; Telemo, Esbjörn; Berglund, Martin; Ekwall, Olov

    2014-09-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with immunological dysfunctions such as increased frequency of infections and autoimmune diseases. Patients with DS share clinical features, such as autoimmune manifestations and specific autoantibodies, with patients affected by autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, located on chromosome 21, which regulates the expression of tissue-restricted Ags (TRAs) in thymic epithelial cells. We investigated the expression of AIRE and TRAs in DS and control thymic tissue using quantitative PCR. AIRE mRNA levels were elevated in thymic tissue from DS patients, and trends toward increased expression of the AIRE-controlled genes INSULIN and CHRNA1 were found. Immunohistochemical stainings showed altered cell composition and architecture of the thymic medulla in DS individuals with increased frequencies of AIRE-positive medullary epithelial cells and CD11c-positive dendritic cells as well as enlarged Hassall's corpuscles. In addition, we evaluated the proteomic profile of thymic exosomes in DS individuals and controls. DS exosomes carried a broader protein pool and also a larger pool of unique TRAs compared with control exosomes. In conclusion, the increased AIRE gene dose in DS could contribute to an autoimmune phenotype through multiple AIRE-mediated effects on homeostasis and function of thymic epithelial cells that affect thymic selection processes. PMID:25038256

  1. Myasthenia gravis and related disorders: Pathology and molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ha, James C; Richman, David P

    2015-04-01

    Disorders affecting the presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic portions of the neuromuscular junction arise from various mechanisms in children and adults, including acquired autoimmune or toxic processes as well as genetic mutations. Disorders include autoimmune myasthenia gravis associated with acetylcholine receptor, muscle specific kinase or Lrp4 antibodies, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, nerve terminal hyperexcitability syndromes, Guillain Barré syndrome, botulism, organophosphate poisoning and a number of congenital myasthenic syndromes. This review focuses on the various molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms of these disorders, characterization of which has been crucial to the development of treatment strategies specific for each pathogenic mechanism. In the future, further understanding of the underlying processes may lead to more effective and targeted therapies of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25486268

  2. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... us to find out more about bipolar disorder. Bipolar Disorder (Easy to Read) Order a free hardcopy En ... this brochure to find out more. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  3. Does Vitamin D Affect Risk of Developing Autoimmune Disease?: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kriegel, Martin A.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the epidemiologic evidence that vitamin D may be related to human autoimmune disease risk. Methods PubMed limited to English from inception through April 2010 was searched using keywords: “vitamin D”, “autoimmune” and autoimmune disease names. We summarized in vitro, animal, and genetic association studies of vitamin D in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. We sorted studies by design and disease and performed a systematic review of: a) cross-sectional data concerning vitamin D level and autoimmune disease; b) interventional data on vitamin D supplementation in autoimmune diseases and c) prospective data linking vitamin D level or intake to autoimmune disease risk. Results Vitamin D has effects on innate and acquired immune systems and vitamin D receptor polymorphisms have been associated with various autoimmune diseases. In experimental animal models, vitamin D supplementation can prevent or forestall autoimmune disease. We identified 76 studies in which vitamin D levels were studied in autoimmune disease patients, particularly with active disease, and compared to controls. Nineteen observational or interventional studies assessed the effect of vitamin D supplementation as therapy for various autoimmune diseases (excluding psoriasis and vitiligo) with a range of study approaches and results. The few prospective human studies performed conflict as to whether vitamin D level or intake is associated with autoimmune disease risk. No interventional trials have investigated whether vitamin D affects human autoimmune disease risk. Conclusions Cross-sectional data point to a potential role of vitamin D in autoimmune disease prevention, but prospective interventional evidence in humans is still lacking. PMID:21047669

  4. Sex hormones, immune responses, and autoimmune diseases. Mechanisms of sex hormone action.

    PubMed Central

    Ansar Ahmed, S.; Penhale, W. J.; Talal, N.

    1985-01-01

    Immune reactivity is greater in females than in males. In both experimental animals and in man there is a greater preponderance of autoimmune diseases in females, compared with males. Studies in many experimental models have established that the underlying basis for this sex-related susceptibility is the marked effects of sex hormones. Sex hormones influence the onset and severity of immune-mediated pathologic conditions by modulating lymphocytes at all stages of life, prenatal, prepubertal, and postpubertal. However, despite extensive studies, the mechanisms of sex hormone action are not precisely understood. Earlier evidence suggested that the sex hormones acted via the thymus gland. In recent years it has become apparent that sex hormones can also influence the immune system by acting on several nonclassic target sites such as the immune system itself (nonthymic lymphoid organs), the central nervous system, the macrophage-macrocyte system, and the skeletal system. Immunoregulatory T cells appear to be most sensitive to sex hormone action among lymphoid cells. Several mechanisms of action of sex hormones are discussed in this review. The possibility of using sex hormone modulation of immune responses for the treatment of autoimmune disorders is a promising area for future investigation. Images Figure 1 PMID:3907369

  5. Virus-induced preferential antibody gene-usage and its importance in humoral autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Francesca; Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    It is known that even the adaptive components of the immune system are based on genetic traits common to all individuals, and that diversity is shaped by the lifelong contacts with different non-self antigens, including those found on infectious pathogens. Besides the individual differences, some of these common traits may be more prone to react against a given antigen, and this may be exploited by the infectious pathogens. Indeed, viral infections can deregulate immune response by subverting antibody (Ab) gene usage, leading to the overexpression of specific Ab subfamilies. This overexpression often results in a protective antiviral response but, in some cases, also correlates with a higher likelihood of developing humoral autoimmune disorders. These aspects of virus-induced autoimmunity have never been thoroughly reviewed, and this is the main purpose of this review. An accurate examination of virus specific Ab subfamilies elicited during infections may help further characterize the complex interplay between viruses and the humoral immune response, and be useful in the design of future monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based anti-infective prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25857210

  6. Autoimmune Hepatitis: Clinical Review with Insights into the Purinergic Mechanism of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kapila, Nikhil; Higa, Jennifer T.; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an important disorder that predominantly results in inflammatory liver disease in genetically predisposed women. The clinicopathological picture is characterized by symptoms associated with both systemic inflammation and hepatic dysfunction, and with increased serum aminotransferases, elevated IgG, autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. AIH usually results in liver injury as a consequence of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. However, rarely, patients may present with fulminant liver failure. Early diagnosis is important in all instances because the disease can be highly responsive to immunosuppressive therapeutic options. Left untreated, the disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Here we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on AIH and summarize the treatment options for this serious condition in adults. We also discuss the pathogenesis of the disease as a possible consequence of autoimmunity and the breakdown of hepatic tolerance. We focus on regulatory T cell impairments as a consequence of changes in CD39 ectonucleotidase expression and altered purinergic signaling. Further understanding of hepatic tolerance may aid in the development of specific and well-tolerated therapies for AIH. PMID:26356124

  7. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  8. Post-infectious group A streptococcal autoimmune syndromes and the heart.

    PubMed

    Martin, William John; Steer, Andrew C; Smeesters, Pierre Robert; Keeble, Joanne; Inouye, Michael; Carapetis, Jonathan; Wicks, Ian P

    2015-08-01

    There is a pressing need to reduce the high global disease burden of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and its harbinger, acute rheumatic fever (ARF). ARF is a classical example of an autoimmune syndrome and is of particular immunological interest because it follows a known antecedent infection with group A streptococcus (GAS). However, the poorly understood immunopathology of these post-infectious diseases means that, compared to much progress in other immune-mediated diseases, we still lack useful biomarkers, new therapies or an effective vaccine in ARF and RHD. Here, we summarise recent literature on the complex interaction between GAS and the human host that culminates in ARF and the subsequent development of RHD. We contrast ARF with other post-infectious streptococcal immune syndromes - post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) and the still controversial paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), in order to highlight the potential significance of variations in the host immune response to GAS. We discuss a model for the pathogenesis of ARF and RHD in terms of current immunological concepts and the potential for application of in depth "omics" technologies to these ancient scourges. PMID:25891492

  9. N-Acetylcysteine attenuates tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in autoimmune inner ear disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Shresh; Stern, Corey; Vambutas, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is a poorly understood disease marked by bilateral, rapidly progressive hearing loss triggered by unknown stimuli, which is corticosteroid responsive in 60 % of patients. Although the mechanism of the disease is not precisely understood, a complex interaction of cytokines is believed to contribute toward the inflammatory disease process and hearing loss. Previously, we showed the role of TNF-? in steroid-sensitive and IL-1? in steroid-resistant immune-mediated hearing loss. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), a broad spectrum antioxidant, has been effective in other autoimmune disorders. Other studies have shown NAC to have a protective adjunct role in human idiopathic sudden hearing loss, where the addition of NAC resulted in better hearing recovery than with steroids alone, although the mechanism of this protection was not elucidated. In the present study, we observed PBMCs from AIED patients exhibited higher baseline TNF-? and MPO levels compared with normal healthy controls. NAC effectively abrogates LPS-mediated TNF-? release from PBMC of both AIED patients and controls. We demonstrated that in AIED patients, the TNF-? downstream signaling pathway appears aberrantly regulated, influencing both MPO and IL-8 expression. Given that NAC effectively abrogated LPS-mediated TNF-? release and exerted minimal effects on the downstream targets of this pathway, we feel NAC may be a rational adjunct therapy for this enigmatic disease, worthy of clinical exploration. PMID:26392121

  10. Use of Rituximab for Refractory Cytopenias Associated with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti; Price, Susan; Perkins, Katie; Aldridge, Patricia; Tretler, Jean; Davis, Joie; Dale, Janet K.; Gill, Fred; Hartman, Kip R.; Stork, Linda C.; Gnarra, David J.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Newburger, Peter E.; Puck, Jennifer; Fleisher, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background ALPS is a disorder of apoptosis resulting in accumulation of autoreactive lymphocytes, leading to marked lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and multilineage cytopenias due to splenic sequestration and/or autoimmune destruction often presenting in childhood. We summarize our experience of rituximab use during the last 8 years in twelve patients, 9 children and 3 adults, out of 259 individuals with ALPS, belonging to 166 families currently enrolled in studies at the National Institutes of Health. Methods Refractory immune thrombocytopenia (platelet count <20,000) in 9 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in 3 patients led to treatment with rituximab. Among them, 7 patients had undergone prior surgical splenectomy; 3 had significant splenomegaly; and 2 had no palpable spleen. Results In 7 out of 9 patients with ALPS and thrombocytopenia, rituximab therapy led to median response duration of 21months (range 14–36 months). In contrast, none of the 3 children treated with rituximab for AIHA responded. Noted toxicities included profound and prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia in 3 patients requiring replacement IVIG, total absence of antibody response to polysaccharide vaccines lasting up to 4 years after rituximab infusions in 1 patient and prolonged neutropenia in 1 patient. Conclusion Toxicities including hypogammaglobulinemia and neutropenia constitute an additional infection risk burden, especially in asplenic individuals, and may warrant avoidance of rituximab until other immunosuppressive medication options are exhausted. Long term follow up of ALPS patients with cytopenias after any treatment is necessary to determine relative risks and benefits. PMID:19214977

  11. Preventive and therapeutic effects of adenanthin on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting NF-?B signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian-Qian; Liu, Chuan-Xu; Wu, Ying-Li; Wu, Shao-Fang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Hu, Xiao-Juan; Pu, Jian-Xin; Lu, Ying; Zhou, Hu-Chen; Wang, Hong-Lin; Nie, Hong; Sun, Han-Dong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-09-01

    Adenanthin, a diterpenoid isolated from the leaves of Isodon adenanthus, has been reported to possess antileukemic activity through targeting peroxiredoxin I/II. However, its other potential activities remain to be explored. Using myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis, we report in this study that adenanthin exerts efficaciously preventive and therapeutic effects on EAE accompanied by significant restriction of infiltration of inflammatory cells and demyelination in CNS. Adenanthin-presented immunomodulatory effects on EAE are correlated with suppressed proliferation of MOG35-55-reactive T cells, decreased Th1 and Th17 cells, increased regulatory T cell populations, decreased production of serum proinflammatory cytokines, and reduced stimulatory capacity of APCs, which might be mediated by its inhibitory action on NF-?B signaling pathway. Our results propose that, as a novel NF-?B inhibitor, adenanthin has potent immunomodulatory activity for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and possibly other autoimmune disorders. PMID:23964105

  12. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-? therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen-specific, not blanket, therapeutic approach. PMID:24091783

  13. Autoimmune predisposition in Down syndrome may result from a partial central tolerance failure due to insufficient intrathymic expression of AIRE and peripheral antigens.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Barcons, Mireia; Casteràs, Anna; Armengol, Maria del Pilar; Porta, Eduard; Correa, Paula A; Marín, Ana; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Colobran, Roger

    2014-10-15

    Down syndrome (DS), or trisomy of chromosome 21, is the most common genetic disorder associated with autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune regulator protein (AIRE), a transcription factor located on chromosome 21, plays a crucial role in autoimmunity by regulating promiscuous gene expression (pGE). To investigate if autoimmunity in DS is promoted by the reduction of pGE owing to dysregulation of AIRE, we assessed the expression of AIRE and of several peripheral tissue-restricted Ag genes by quantitative PCR in thymus samples from 19 DS subjects and 21 euploid controls. Strikingly, despite the 21 trisomy, AIRE expression was significantly reduced by 2-fold in DS thymuses compared with controls, which was also confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. Allele-specific quantification of intrathymic AIRE showed that despite its lower expression, the three copies are expressed. More importantly, decreased expression of AIRE was accompanied by a reduction of pGE because expression of tissue-restricted Ags, CHRNA1, GAD1, PLP1, KLK3, SAG, TG, and TSHR, was reduced. Of interest, thyroid dysfunction (10 cases of hypothyroidism and 1 of Graves disease) developed in 11 of 19 (57.9%) of the DS individuals and in none of the 21 controls. The thymuses of these DS individuals contained significantly lower levels of AIRE and thyroglobulin, to which tolerance is typically lost in autoimmune thyroiditis leading to hypothyroidism. Our findings provide strong evidence for the fundamental role of AIRE and pGE, namely, central tolerance, in the predisposition to autoimmunity of DS individuals. PMID:25217160

  14. Autoimmune encephalopathy and drug refractory seizures with the presence of two autoantibodies specific for the neuronal cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ajlan, Fahad S.; Althobiti, Ahmad; Baz, Salah; Al-Attas, Alawi

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing number of autoantibodies are being described in epilepsy and other seizure-related disorders. A pathogenic role of autoantibodies in epilepsy has been suggested based on observations of the efficacy of immunotherapy. Objective This study aimed to report a new case of autoimmune-mediated encephalopathy and seizures caused by autoantibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) and voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) (P/Q-type) and the response to immunotherapy. Design This study follows a case report design. Setting This study was conducted in a tertiary care center. Patients Our patient was an eighteen-year-old female with new-onset encephalopathy and refractory seizures. Intervention Our patient was treated for five days with intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Results After treatment with IVMP and IVIG, our patient showed significant clinical improvement and did not exhibit any seizures during the one-month follow-up period. Conclusions Here, we report a rare case of an autoimmune encephalopathy and seizures associated with the presence of two surface neuronal autoantibodies. This report highlights the importance of early diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsy, as early immunomodulating treatments improve the outcome. PMID:25667907

  15. Female adolescent hair disorders.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Elena Balestreire; English, Joseph C

    2009-08-01

    Hair abnormalities can have tremendous psychosocial impacts on adolescents and young adults, and may cause a great amount of anxiety regarding physical appearance, associated illnesses, and potential clinical course. The pathophysiology of such disorders may vary,with potential congenital, infectious, autoimmune, nutritional, or environmental causes. Hair abnormalities may present as changes in hair appearance or quality, becoming weathered or fractured.An abnormal increase in hair is present in hypertrichosis and hirsutism, whereas a thinning or shedding of hair is evident in patients with telogen effluviumand alopecia areata. Diagnosis is focused on a detailed clinical history and physical exam, in addition to laboratory testing, a variety of clinical diagnostic tests, and scalp biopsy, which may be necessary to confirm some diagnoses. Many hair disorders have no cure, but clinicians can have a positive impact on their patients by identifying the abnormality and educating the patient regarding disease course. However, some conditions such as infectious hair disorders or scarring alopecia should be identified promptly to initiate treatment and ensure clinical improvement or optimal outcome. PMID:19658203

  16. Human adjuvant-related syndrome or autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. Where have we come from? Where are we going? A proposal for new diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Alijotas-Reig, J

    2015-09-01

    In 1964, Miyoshi reported a series of patients with diverse symptoms after receiving treatment with silicone or paraffin fillers. Miyoshi named this condition 'human adjuvant disease'. Since then, the literature has been flooded with case reports and case series of granulomatous and systemic autoimmune disorders related to vaccines, infection or other adjuvants such as silicone and other biomaterials. A new term -autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants--has recently been coined for a process that includes several clinical features previously described by Miyoshi plus other clinical and laboratory parameters related to exposure to diverse external stimuli. Disorders such as siliconosis, Gulf War syndrome, macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome, sick building syndrome and post-vaccination syndrome have been included in autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. Disorders such as Spanish toxic oil syndrome and Ardystil syndrome could also be included. Furthermore, biomaterials other than silicone should also be considered as triggering factors for these adjuvant-related syndromes. New diagnostic criteria in this field have been proposed. Nevertheless, many of these criteria are too subjective, leading to some patients being diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome or other 'central sensitization syndromes'. Diagnostic criteria based only on objective clinical and laboratory data to be further discussed and validated are proposed herein. PMID:25813870

  17. Autoimmune and gastrointestinal dysfunctions: does a subset of children with autism reveal a broader connection?

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2011-08-01

    A large number of autoimmune disorders have a gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction component that may interplay with genetic, hormonal, environmental and/or stress factors. This narrarive review investigates possible links between autism, immune system abnormalities and GI symptoms in a subgroup of children with autism. A literature search on Medline (1950 to September 2010) was conducted to identify relevant articles by using the keywords 'autism and gastrointestinal' (71 publications) and 'autism and immune' (237 publications), cross-referencing and general searching to evaluate the available literature on the immunological and GI aspects of autism. Sufficient evidence exists to support that a subgroup of children with autism may suffer from concomitant immune-related GI symptoms. PMID:21780894

  18. Aluminum in the central nervous system (CNS): toxicity in humans and animals, vaccine adjuvants, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Tomljenovic, L

    2013-07-01

    We have examined the neurotoxicity of aluminum in humans and animals under various conditions, following different routes of administration, and provide an overview of the various associated disease states. The literature demonstrates clearly negative impacts of aluminum on the nervous system across the age span. In adults, aluminum exposure can lead to apparently age-related neurological deficits resembling Alzheimer's and has been linked to this disease and to the Guamanian variant, ALS-PDC. Similar outcomes have been found in animal models. In addition, injection of aluminum adjuvants in an attempt to model Gulf War syndrome and associated neurological deficits leads to an ALS phenotype in young male mice. In young children, a highly significant correlation exists between the number of pediatric aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines administered and the rate of autism spectrum disorders. Many of the features of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity may arise, in part, from autoimmune reactions, as part of the ASIA syndrome. PMID:23609067

  19. The antioxidant idebenone fails to prevent or attenuate chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Sebastian M; Bros, Helena; Grobosch, Thomas; Janssen, Antonia; Chanvillard, Coralie; Paul, Friedemann; Dörr, Jan; Millward, Jason M; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2013-09-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction appear to contribute to neurodegenerative processes during multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus, antioxidants may represent a therapeutic option for MS. The antioxidant idebenone was proven to be beneficial in Friedreich's ataxia and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, two disorders caused by mitochondrial alterations. Here we showed that idebenone protected neuronal HT22 cells from glutamate-induced death in vitro. However, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, idebenone failed to affect disease incidence or onset when applied preventively, or to reduce disease severity when applied therapeutically. Histopathological examination of CNS from idebenone treated mice showed no improvement in inflammation, demyelination, or axonal damage. Thus, we hypothesize that idebenone treatment will likely not benefit patients with MS. PMID:23871488

  20. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune hepatitis in children: A challenge for pediatric hepatologists

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Priscila Menezes; Ferreira, Alexandre Rodrigues; Miranda, Débora Marques; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disorder that is rare in children and adolescents. AIH has a broad clinical spectrum and a quick response to treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive medication. The available diagnosis criteria have limitations and should be evaluated in pediatric populations. Recently, some studies reported that the 2008 simplified diagnostic criteria for AIH could be used in children with high sensibility and specificity. In addition, the authors reported that globulin and immunoglobulin G levels can be used interchangeably for diagnostic purposes. They also demonstrated that the 2008 simplified criteria fail in identifying patients with fulminant hepatic failure. Here, we discuss the limitations of the use of these criteria in pediatric patients and the requirement of more studies to improve the diagnosis of AIH in children. PMID:22969217

  1. Autoimmunity: Rationalizing possible pathways from initiation to disease.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Melvin

    2015-06-21

    Any physiological system that has as its output an activity that is biodestructive and ridding must have a way of distinguishing the host (self) from that which is other (nonself). The setting in which autoimmunity can be analyzed depends, in part and unavoidably, on the way in which the normal self (S)-nonself (NS) discrimination is accomplished. Any discussion of autoimmunity should include one's view of this latter. To this end, a pathway for the normal S-NS discrimination will be proposed. Then, a mechanism for the determination of effector class will be considered as autoimmune disease is consequent to it. Experiments challenging both the proposed model of normal behavior, as well as that of the extrapolation to autoimmunity, will be cited along with a discussion of some of the elements which, if rendered defective, would result in autoimmunity. The goal is to see how far this particular abstraction based largely on the logic of evolutionary biology can meaningfully guide understanding of the disease. PMID:24882789

  2. B cells as effectors and regulators of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Eliana; Grey, Shane T

    2012-08-01

    A classic understanding of the interplay between B and T cell components of the immune system that drive autoimmunity, where B cells provide an effector function, is represented by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune condition characterised by the production of auto-antibodies. In SLE, CD4+T cells provide cognate help to self-reactive B cells, which in turn produce pathogenic auto-antibodies (1). Thus, B cells act as effectors by producing auto-antibody aided by T cell help such that B and T cell interactions are unidirectional. However, this paradigm of B and T cell interactions is challenged by new clinical data demonstrating that B cell depletion is effective for T cell mediated autoimmune diseases including type I diabetes mellitus (T1D) (2), rheumatoid arthritis (3), and multiple sclerosis (4). These clinical data indicate a model whereby B cells can influence the developing autoimmune T cell response, and therefore act as effectors, in ways that extend beyond the production of autoantibody (5). In this review by largely focusing on type I diabetes we will develop a hypothesis that bi-directional B and T interactions control the course of autoimmunity. PMID:22432804

  3. A Potential Link between Environmental Triggers and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have registered an alarming rise worldwide in recent years. Accumulated evidence indicates that the immune system's ability to distinguish self from nonself is negatively impacted by genetic factors and environmental triggers. Genetics is certainly a factor, but since it normally takes a very long time for the human genetic pattern to change enough to register on a worldwide scale, increasingly the attention of studies has been focused on the environmental factors of a rapidly changing and evolving civilization. New technology, new industries, new inventions, new chemicals and drugs, and new foods and diets are constantly and rapidly being introduced in this fast-paced ever-changing world. Toxicants, infections, epitope spreading, dysfunctions of immune homeostasis, and dietary components can all have an impact on the body's delicate immune recognition system. Although the precise etiology and pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases are still unknown, it would appear from the collated studies that there are common mechanisms in the immunopathogenesis of multiple autoimmune reactivities. Of particular interest is the citrullination of host proteins and their conversion to autoantigens by the aforementioned environmental triggers. The identification of these specific triggers of autoimmune reactivity is essential then for the development of new therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:24688790

  4. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zandong . E-mail: zandong_yang@merck.com; Chen Meng; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Garmey, James C.; Kimble, Sarah D.; Nadler, Jerry L. . E-mail: jln2n@virginia.edu

    2006-06-09

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic {beta}-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that {beta}-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of {beta}-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for {beta}-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance {beta}-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved {beta}-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing {beta}-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans.

  5. IL-27-induced modulation of autoimmunity and its therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Meka, Rakeshchandra R; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H; Dudics, Steven; Acharya, Bodhraj; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a new member of the IL-12 family. It is produced by activated antigen-presenting cells and plays an important role in the regulation of CD4+ T cell differentiation and immune response. IL-27 activates multiple signaling cascades, including the JAK-STAT and p38 MAPK pathways. Several studies have revealed that IL-27 promotes the differentiation of Th1 and Tr1, but inhibits Th2, Th17, and Treg cells. However, a few studies have shown an opposite effect on certain T cell subsets, such as Treg. IL-27 displays both pro- and anti- inflammatory activities in different autoimmune diseases. Here, we have discussed the role of IL-27 in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, colitis, lupus, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes, and uveitis. Most of this information is derived from experimental models of these autoimmune diseases. The mechanistic basis of the dual role of IL-27 in inflammation and autoimmunity is still not fully defined. In general, the pro-/anti-inflammatory activity of IL-27 is influenced by the underlying immune effector pathways, the phase of the disease, the presence or absence of counter-regulatory cytokines/T cell subsets, and the tissue/cell type under study. Despite a spectrum of outcomes in various autoimmune diseases, mostly anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of IL-27 have been observed in this category of diseases. Accordingly, IL-27 represents a novel, promising target/agent for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26253381

  6. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zandong; Chen, Meng; Carter, Jeffrey D; Nunemaker, Craig S; Garmey, James C; Kimble, Sarah D; Nadler, Jerry L

    2006-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic beta-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that beta-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of beta-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for beta-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance beta-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved beta-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing beta-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans. PMID:16643856

  7. How do autoimmune diseases cluster in families? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A primary characteristic of complex genetic diseases is that affected individuals tend to cluster in families (that is, familial aggregation). Aggregation of the same autoimmune condition, also referred to as familial autoimmune disease, has been extensively evaluated. However, aggregation of diverse autoimmune diseases, also known as familial autoimmunity, has been overlooked. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed aimed at gathering evidence about this topic. Methods Familial autoimmunity was investigated in five major autoimmune diseases, namely, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. Articles were searched in Pubmed and Embase databases. Results Out of a total of 61 articles, 44 were selected for final analysis. Familial autoimmunity was found in all the autoimmune diseases investigated. Aggregation of autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, was the most encountered. Conclusions Familial autoimmunity is a frequently seen condition. Further study of familial autoimmunity will help to decipher the common mechanisms of autoimmunity. PMID:23497011

  8. Regulation of T cell lineage commitment by SMAR1 during inflammatory & autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Majumdar, Subeer; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: CD4+ T cells are involved in abnormal inflammatory responses causing adverse effects to the body. Th17 cells play a major role in immune disorders and the exact mechanism by which CD4+ T cells regulate its effector Th1 and Th17 phenotype at chromatin level is not clearly understood. This study was aimed to understand the role of matrix associated region (MAR) binding protein SMAR1 (scaffold/matrix attachment region binding protein 1) in T cell differentiation during inflammatory and autoimmune condition using SMAR1 transgenic mice as model. Methods: Wild type (C57BL/6J) and SMAR1 transgenic mice were used for isolation of T cells and further identification of different T cell lineages, along with histological analysis. Further, we studied autoimmune and inflammatory diseases using chemically induced and T cell transfer model of colitis and rheumatoid arthritis to better understand the role of SMAR1 in immune responses. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice were resistant to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) induced colitis with decreased expression of Th1 and Th17 specific cytokines. Overexpression of SMAR1 repressed Th17 response by negatively regulating ROR?t and IL-17 expression. Downregulation of SMAR1 upregulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) and IL-17 expression that caused generation of more proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells leading to inflammation and disease. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results show an important role of SMAR1 in regulating CD4+ T cell differentiation during inflammatory disorders via regulation of both Th1 and Th17 signaling pathways. This study reveals a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining the proinflammatory immune responses by repressing Th1 and Th17 cell function and it gives the novel insight into immune regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26609032

  9. Sustained clinical response to rituximab in a case of life-threatening overlap subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaohan; Foshee, J B; Sontheimer, Richard D

    2011-04-01

    The conventional treatment for the autoimmune bullous skin diseases is broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimen typically combining systemic corticosteroids with adjuvant immunosuppressive therapeutic agents. Orphan diseases in the pemphigus, pemphigoid, and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita groups of clinical disorders are often clinically severe, requiring long-term treatment with such drugs or drug combinations. Rituximab, a chimeric recombinant monoclonal antibody targeting CD20(+) B cells, has recently been suggested to be effective in the treatment of pemphigus with relatively few adverse effects. The clinical value of rituximab in other immune-mediated blistering diseases has been less thoroughly examined. We report a case of a woman who presented initially with the Brunsting-Perry phenotype of cicatricial pemphigoid who subsequently developed severe generalized subepidermal blisters healing with scarring and milia formation thought to be clinically compatible with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, although type VII collagen autoantibodies were never identified. Treatment with a number of conventional systemic agents was unsuccessful and complicated by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced cutaneous ulcers and near-fatal gram-negative sepsis. This woman has enjoyed an 18-month complete clinical remission after a single inductive 4-week cycle of intravenous rituximab. This outcome supports the idea that systemic memory B-cell depletion with drugs such as rituximab should be considered for therapeutically refractory subepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases in addition to intraepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases. A potential role for the immunologic phenomenon of epitope spreading in the generation of overlapping features of autoimmune blistering diseases, and its contribution to therapeutic refractoriness ("hardening"), is discussed. PMID:20494477

  10. [Gluten-related disorders and demyelinating diseases].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lahoz, Carlos; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-04-15

    Gluten-related disorders are a spectrum of systemic immune mediated conditions that occur at any age in genetically susceptible individuals upon ingesting gluten. Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are the most important conditions of the spectrum. They may be associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Treatment with a gluten-free diet can provide considerable benefits to the patients having both a gluten-related disorder and one of these 2 demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:22998972

  11. Autoimmune enteropathy and colitis in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Carroccio, Antonio; Volta, Umberto; Di Prima, Lidia; Petrolini, Nunzio; Florena, Ada Maria; Averna, Maurizio R; Montalto, Giuseppe; Notarbartolo, Alberto

    2003-08-01

    The presence of circulating autoantibodies to gut enterocytes has been very rarely described in adults and is considered a possible cause of refractory sprue. Our aims was to describe the case of an adult patient with serum anti-enterocyte autoantibodies associated with a clinical picture characterized by involvement of both the small intestine and colon. A female, age 50, had suffered from diarrhea with mucus and blood, abdominal pain, thinness, anemia, and leukopenia since the age of 20. She also suffered from HCV infection and had mild chronic hepatitis. Family history was positive for autoimmunity. Symptoms were reported to worsen after eating gluten-containing foods, but anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies were negative. Intestinal histology showed mild, patch villous atrophy with a high intraepithelial lymphocyte count, but a normal number of intraepithelial lymphocytes carrying the gamma/delta+ receptor. HLA was: A11, A31 (19), B52 (5), DR 15 (2), DR 14 (6), DR 51, DR 52, DQ1. Colonoscopy did not show ulcerations or erosions and colon histology showed a moderate inflammatory infiltrate without minor crypt distortion or granuloma. RAST tests were positive for lactalbumin, lactoglobulin, casein, egg, and gliadin. After commencement of an oligoantigenic diet, stool frequency initially decreased, but the presence of mucus in the stools persisted, with episodes of bloody diarrhea. After one year of diet, nutritional parameters were low and anemia associated with a low leukocyte count persisted. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and histology of the small intestine and colon were virtually unchanged. Consequently, natural autoantibodies and enterocyte autoantibodies were assayed. The patient was positive for IgG class enterocyte autoantibodies at a titer of 1:34. No other organ-specific or non-organ-specific autoantibodies were positive. Prednisolone treatment was started and the symptoms improved. After one year of this treatment plus elimination diet she was reevaluated. Bowel movement frequency was normal, body weight increased, and the asthenia had completely regressed. IgG anti-enterocyte autoantibodies were absent. Histology of the distal duodenum showed a normal villus/crypt ratio and IEL infiltration was reduced. Colon histology showed a reduction in inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria. In conclusion, we report a case of generalized gut disorder in an adult patient, affecting both the small intestine and the colon and characterized by the presence of circulating anti-enterocyte autoantibodies. Systematic testing for enterocyte autoantibodies should be performed not only in patients with refractory sprue, but also in subjects with upper and lower intestinal symptoms who have not been definitively diagnosed. PMID:12924654

  12. Statistical colocalization of genetic risk variants for related autoimmune diseases in the context of common controls.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Mary D; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Determining whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent data sets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared-control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases--type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis--identified 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which were associated with 2 or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions, there was evidence that the causal variants differed. We identified new disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other 3 disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes (T2D) candidate genes (COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1), suggesting a shared cellular etiology. PMID:26053495

  13. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  14. The multiple faces of autoimmune-mediated bone loss.

    PubMed

    Schett, Georg; David, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Inflammation perturbs normal bone homeostasis and is known to induce bone loss, as it promotes both local cartilage degradation and local and systemic bone destruction by osteoclasts, as well as inhibits bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, not surprisingly, inflammatory autoimmune diseases often lead to local and/or general bone loss. However, the mechanisms that target the bone in autoimmune disease are complex and diverse, as they range from a direct attack on the bone and cartilage by the immune cells to indirect consequences of disturbances of the systemic control of bone remodeling. This Review discusses current understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmune-mediated bone loss in view of new insight from two new fields of research: osteoimmunology, which analyzes the direct effect of immune cells on bone, and the integrative metabolism approach, which established the existence of neuroendocrine loops that regulate bone remodeling. PMID:21045788

  15. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laužikien?, D.; Ramašauskait?, D.; L?ža, T.; Lenkutien?, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied. PMID:26719601

  16. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  17. HLA-G Molecules in Autoimmune Diseases and Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Fainardi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule, a non-classical HLA-Ib molecule, is less polymorphic when compared to classical HLA class I molecules. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was first detected on cytotrophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface but its expression is prevalent during viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. HLA-G gene is characterized by polymorphisms at the 3? un-translated region and 5? upstream regulatory region that regulate its expression and are associated with autoimmune diseases and viral infection susceptibility, creating an unbalanced and pathologic environment. This review focuses on the role of HLA-G genetic polymorphisms, mRNA, and protein expression in autoimmune conditions and viral infections. PMID:25477881

  18. Current Status of Therapy in Autoimmune Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harthi, Nadya; Heathcote, E. Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for autoimmune liver diseases are increasingly established. Although proportionately uncommon, specialist centers have with time refined the best approaches for each disease, based on an improved understanding of the spectrum of presentation. The major treatment aims are to prevent end-stage liver disease and its associated complications. As a result of drugs such as ursodeoxycholic acid, predniso(lo)ne and azathioprine, both primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis are now less commonly indications for liver transplantation. Unfortunately, the same inroads in treatment efficacy have as yet not been made for primary sclerosing cholangitis, although the recognition that a subset of patients may have a treatable secondary sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4 related) is helping a proportion. With better biological understanding, more specific interventions are expected that will benefit all those with autoimmune liver diseases. PMID:21180531

  19. Maternal Immune-Mediated Conditions, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Hertz-Picciotto, I.

    2014-01-01

    The maternal immune system may play a role in offspring neurodevelopment. We examined whether maternal autoimmune disease, asthma, and allergy were associated with child autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delay without autism (DD) using 560 ASD cases, 391 typically developing controls, and 168 DD cases from the CHildhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study. Results from conditional logistic regression demonstrated few significant associations overall. Maternal autoimmune disease was significantly associated with a modest increase in odds of developmental disorders (combined ASD + DD; OR = 1.46, 95 % CI 1.01, 2.09) but not of ASD alone. Associations with certain allergens and onset periods were also suggested. These findings suggest maternal autoimmune disease may modestly influence childhood developmental disorders (ASD + DD). PMID:24337796

  20. Pathological Findings in Human Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Megan S.; Straus, Stephen E.; Dale, Janet K.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Strober, Warren; Sneller, Michael C.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.; Lin, Albert Y.; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    1998-01-01

    The defects in lymphocyte apoptosis that underlie the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) are usually attributable to inherited mutations of the CD95 (Fas) gene. In this report, we present the histopathological and immunophenotypic features seen in the lymph nodes (n = 16), peripheral blood (n = 10), bone marrow (n = 2), spleen (n = 3), and liver (n = 2) from 10 patients with ALPS. Lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Interfollicular areas were expanded and populated by T cell receptor-?? CD3+ CD4?CD8? (double-negative, DN) T cells that were negative for CD45RO. CD45RA+ T cells were increased in all cases studied. The paracortical infiltrate was a result of both reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation, as measured by in situ detection of DNA fragmentation and staining with MIB-1, respectively. The paracortical proliferation may be extensive enough to suggest a diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. Many of the paracortical lymphocytes expressed markers associated with cytotoxicity, such as perforin, TIA-1, and CD57. CD25 was negative. In addition, most lymph nodes exhibited florid follicular hyperplasia, often with focal progressive transformation of germinal centers; in some cases, follicular involution was seen. A polyclonal plasmacytosis also was present. The spleens were markedly enlarged, more than 10 times normal size. There was expansion of both white pulp and red pulp, with increased DN T cells. DN T cells also were observed in liver biopsies exhibiting portal triaditis. In the peripheral blood, the T cells showed increased expression of HLA-DR and CD57 but not CD25. CD45RA+ T cells were increased in the four cases studied. Polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis with expansion of CD5+ B cells was a characteristic finding. Taken together, the histopathological and immunophenotypic findings, particularly in lymph nodes and peripheral blood, are sufficiently distinctive to suggest a diagnosis of ALPS. Of note, two affected family members of one proband developed lymphoma (T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin’s disease, respectively). PMID:9811346

  1. Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health

    SciTech Connect

    Silbergeld, Ellen K. . E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A.; Nyland, Jennifer F.

    2005-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

  2. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  3. Surgical treatment of granulomatous mastitis associated with autoimmune response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Yu, Min; Guo, Xiaodong; Lin, Zhezhu; Chen, Suxian

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a rare breast disease with unknown etiology. Clinical management strategies for GM include surgery, antibiotics, and steroid treatments. As patients with GM often respond to steroids, GM is thought to be an autoimmune disease. Here we describe a case of trauma-induced GM that presented as autoimmune disease but was successfully treated by surgery without steroids. The patient showed no sign of recurrence for 11 months. This case provides useful information on both the underlying mechanisms and clinical management of GM. PMID:25709663

  4. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1A diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Type 1A diabetes (DM1A) is an autoimmune disease that comprises 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Its frequency is gradually increasing in countries like Mexico. Patients with DM1A commonly have hypothyroidism, Addison disease, celiac disease and less common diseases such as polyglandular syndrome. These diseases are related to susceptibility genes such as HLA, CTLA-4 and PTPN22, which induce central and peripheral immunologic tolerance. This review article emphasizes the importance of searching other autoimmune diseases in patients with DM1A, to improve their prognosis and quality of life. PMID:26436934

  5. Hepatocyte growth factor: A regulator of inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Molnarfi, Nicolas; Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Lalive, Patrice H

    2015-04-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has been extensively studied over several decades, but was only recently recognized as a key player in mediating protection of many types of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. HGF was reported to prevent and attenuate disease progression by influencing multiple pathophysiological processes involved in inflammatory and immune response, including cell migration, maturation, cytokine production, antigen presentation, and T cell effector function. In this review, we discuss the actions and mechanisms of HGF in inflammation and immunity and the therapeutic potential of this factor for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25476732

  6. Activating germline mutations in STAT3 cause early-onset multi-organ autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Richard; Allen, Hana Lango; De Franco, Elisa; McDonald, Timothy J.; Rajala, Hanna; Ramelius, Anita; Barton, John; Heiskanen, Kaarina; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Kajosaari, Merja; Murphy, Nuala P.; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Seppänen, Mikko; Lernmark, Åke; Mustjoki, Satu; Otonkoski, Timo; Kere, Juha; Morgan, Noel G.; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic causes of autoimmunity give key insights to the complex regulation of the immune system. We report a new monogenic cause of autoimmunity resulting from de novo germline activating STAT3 mutations in 5 individuals with a spectrum of early-onset autoimmune disease including type 1 diabetes. These findings emphasise the critical role of STAT3 in autoimmune disease and contrast with the germline inactivating STAT3 mutations that result in Hyper IgE syndrome. PMID:25038750

  7. Myosin Autoimmunity Is Not Essential for Cardiac Inflammation in Acute Chagas' Disease1

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Myosin Autoimmunity Is Not Essential for Cardiac Inflammation in Acute Chagas' Disease1 Juan S. It has been difficult to determine the contribution of autoimmunity to tissue inflammation, because other severe autoimmune myocarditis. In this case, myosin-specific DTH and Ab production were significantly

  8. Antibodies to Conformational Epitopes of Soluble Liver Antigen Define a Severe Form of Autoimmune

    E-print Network

    and clinical relevance of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (tRNP(Ser)Sec/SLA) in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH implication of this autoantibody in autoimmune liver disease. By using eukaryotically expressed tRNP(Ser)Sec/SLA as target in a radioligand assay (RLA), 81 patients with autoimmune liver disease (AILD) (33 type 1 AIH, 31

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PANDAS-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Findings From A Preliminary Waitlist Controlled Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Mann, Giselle; Adkins, Jennifer; Merlo, Lisa J.; Duke, Danny; Munson, Melissa; Swaine, Zoe; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide preliminary estimates of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS) subtype. Method: Seven children with OCD of the PANDAS subtype (range 9-13 years) were treated…

  10. Evidence of a correlation between mannose binding lectin and celiac disease: a model for other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Boniotto, Michele; Braida, Laura; Baldas, Valentina; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro; Vatta, Serena; Radillo, Oriano; Tedesco, Francesco; Percopo, Selvaggia; Montico, Marcella; Amoroso, Antonio; Crovella, Sergio

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease is a multifactorial disorder caused, in genetically susceptible patients, by the ingestion of dietary gluten. Very little is known about the genetic factors, but there is a strong association of two HLA haplotypes (DQ2 or alpha1*05, beta1*02 and DQ8 or alpha1*0301, beta1*0302) with the disease. We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in the first exon of the MBL2 gene, which encodes for mannose binding lectin (MBL) and celiac disease. Moreover we studied the MBL role by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL. Results were confirmed by clinical findings. We enrolled 149 Italian celiac patients; 116 were characterized by the presence of DQ2 or DQ8. The HLA haplotype was established by allelic specific PCR while the MBL2 genotype was resolved by melting temperature assay. Immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays were performed on serial sections of biopsy specimens from celiac patients and healthy controls. MBL2 allele and genotype frequencies varied significantly between celiac patients and healthy controls. The frequencies of the 0 allele were 28% in DQ2 or DQ8 celiac patients, 36% in HLA atypical celiac patients, and 22% in healthy controls. Interestingly, the MBL2 0/0 genotype was present in 7 of 33 HLA atypical celiac patients (21%) and in 13 of 116 HLA typical celiac patients (13%) but in only 7 of 147 healthy controls (5%). Furthermore, we found that MBL2 genotype is strongly associated with the occurrence of secondary autoimmune diseases. Immunohistochemistry and TUNEL findings support a role of MBL2 in the clearance of apoptotic cells. In conclusion, MBL2 variants, responsible for lower MBL levels, are associated with celiac disease and higher risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Here we propose a role for MBL in the disease which could be easily applied to other autoimmune disorders. PMID:15645196

  11. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  12. Mood Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional ... ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also called ...

  13. Cerebellar Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... balance. Problems with the cerebellum include Cancer Genetic disorders Ataxias - failure of muscle control in the arms and legs that result in movement disorders Degeneration - disorders caused by brain cells decreasing in ...

  14. Cyclothymic disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... It is a mild form of bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness), in which a person has mood swings over ... causes of cyclothymic disorder are unknown. Major depression, bipolar disorder, and cyclothymia often occur together in families. This ...

  15. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Bonito, Anthony J.; Weinstein, Erica G.; Herbin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease. PMID:25603179

  16. Properties of irradiated PVC plasticized with non-endocrine disruptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzler, Beatriz W.; Machado, Luci D. B.; Lugão, Ademar B.; Villavicencio, Anna.-Lucia C. H.

    2000-03-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) is under heavy attack from environmentalist groups due to the use of plasticizers and its recycling difficulties. Chloro-organics and phtalates are considered now as ubiquitous global contaminants due to their potential as weak endocrine disruptor and huge consumption. In order to make PVC acceptable for the irradiation processing industry in the long term, non-toxic plasticizers should be used. PVC was added with dioctyl phtalate (DOP) and epoxy soybean oil (ESO) and irradiated up to 50 kGy. Mechanical properties, optical properties and viscosity were measured and compared. The elongation and mechanical strength were under the usual range and they didn't show any significant change in the studied range of irradiation dose. All the samples showed a weak yellowing effect after irradiation and the molecular weight measured by viscosimetry showed only negligible changes. In conclusion, DOP and ESO were shown to be effective in stabilizing the radiolytic abstraction of HCl from PVC. Both plasticizers imparted good color stability and overall properties to the products.

  17. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  18. Antisocial Personality Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  19. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  20. Any Personality Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  2. Autoimmune statin-induced myopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jonathan B.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim I.

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a history of statin use presented with a 4-month history of progressive weakness of both shoulders and thighs. Laboratory and electromyography testing confirmed the presence of generalized proximal myopathy and ruled out connective tissue disease, malignancy, or active viral infection. Muscle biopsy was consistent with necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. PMID:26333863

  3. Diagnostic Criteria for Autoimmune Hepatitis: Scores and More.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Ansgar W

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis is a clinical diagnosis that combines the patient's history, clinical examination, laboratory and serological markers and the results of a liver biopsy. As the clinical spectrum of autoimmune hepatitis is very wide, making the diagnosis can sometimes be difficult, especially in non-expert hands. Diagnostic scores can help in making the diagnosis, and the simplified diagnostic score of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group has a sensitivity and specificity of around 90% in the different populations that have been studied. Therefore, it can be very helpful in everyday use, but nonetheless for some patients the score is not good enough. Limitations are patients with very acute presentations as well as atypical cases. In such cases, a trial of monotherapy with steroids and quick tapering of the steroids is recommended. If the disease responds well to treatment, but recurs after tapering the steroids, the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis is confirmed. In addition to its clinical use, diagnostic scores can also be helpful in defining the unified criteria in order to make scientific studies comparable. PMID:26641924

  4. AUTOIMMUNITY AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF PROTACTIN-INDUCED PROSTATITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AUTOIMMUNITY AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF PROLACTIN-INDUCED PROSTATITIS. RW Luebke, CB Copeland, and LR Bishop. US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Stoker et al. reported inflammation of the lateral prostate (LP) lobes in 120 day old Wistar rats after manipulation of prolac...

  5. Hospital For Special Surgery/Immune System REgulation In Musculoskeletal Disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Meffre; Lionel Ivashkiv

    2007-08-20

    Inflammation on musculoskeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the result of dysregulation of the immune system. When the immune system, which maintains the integrity of the organism in an environment rich in infectious microbes, becomes misdirected toward components of one’s own tissue, autoimmune disease can result with autoantibodies contributing to the inflammation and tissue damage. RA is a chronic autoimmune disease marked by severe inflammation that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in the joints, which is estimated to affect 1 percent of the US adult population. Furthermore, autoimmune diseases, which affect women at a higher rate, are the fourth largest cause of disability among women in the US and among the top ten causes of death. The long range goal of this study is to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate the generation of autoantibodies by B cells in normal individuals and in patients with autoimmune diseases and provide insights into potential therapeutic interventions.

  6. The PD-1 Pathway in Tolerance and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Loise M.; Sage, Peter T.; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the PD-1: PD-ligand (PD-L) pathway are both critical to terminating immune responses. Elimination of either can result in the breakdown of tolerance and the development of autoimmunity. The PD-1: PD-L pathway can thwart self-reactive T cells and protect against autoimmunity in many ways. In this review, we highlight how PD-1 and its ligands defend against potentially pathogenic self-reactive effector T cells by simultaneously harnessing two mechanisms of peripheral tolerance: (i) the promotion of Treg development and function and (ii) the direct inhibition of potentially pathogenic self-reactive T cells that have escaped into the periphery. Treg cells induced by the PD-1 pathway may also assist in maintaining immune homeostasis, keeping the threshold for T-cell activation high enough to safeguard against autoimmunity. PD-L1 expression on non-hematopoietic cells as well as hematopoietic cells endows PD-L1 with the capacity to promote Treg development and enhance Treg function in lymphoid organs and tissues that are targets of autoimmune attack. At sites where transforming growth factor-? is present (e.g. sites of immune privilege or inflammation), PD-L1 may promote the de novo generation of Tregs. When considering the consequences of uncontrolled immunity, it would be therapeutically advantageous to manipulate Treg development and sustain Treg function. Thus, this review also discusses how the PD-1 pathway regulates a number of autoimmune diseases and the therapeutic potential of PD-1: PD-L modulation. PMID:20636820

  7. Restoring the balance: immunotherapeutic combinations for autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Smilek, Dawn E.; Ehlers, Mario R.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity occurs when T cells, B cells or both are inappropriately activated, resulting in damage to one or more organ systems. Normally, high-affinity self-reactive T and B cells are eliminated in the thymus and bone marrow through a process known as central immune tolerance. However, low-affinity self-reactive T and B cells escape central tolerance and enter the blood and tissues, where they are kept in check by complex and non-redundant peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Dysfunction or imbalance of the immune system can lead to autoimmunity, and thus elucidation of normal tolerance mechanisms has led to identification of therapeutic targets for treating autoimmune disease. In the past 15 years, a number of disease-modifying monoclonal antibodies and genetically engineered biologic agents targeting the immune system have been approved, notably for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Although these agents represent a major advance, effective therapy for other autoimmune conditions, such as type 1 diabetes, remain elusive and will likely require intervention aimed at multiple components of the immune system. To this end, approaches that manipulate cells ex vivo and harness their complex behaviors are being tested in preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, approved biologic agents are being examined in combination with one another and with cell-based therapies. Substantial development and regulatory hurdles must be overcome in order to successfully combine immunotherapeutic biologic agents. Nevertheless, such combinations might ultimately be necessary to control autoimmune disease manifestations and restore the tolerant state. PMID:24795433

  8. IL-17-dependent Autoimmunity to Collagen Type V in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dart, Melanie L.; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Huang, Guorui; Roenneburg, Drew A.; Keller, Melissa R.; Torrealba, Jose R.; Rhoads, Aaron; Kim, Byoungjae; Bobadilla, Joseph L.; Haynes, Lynn D.; Wilkes, David S.; Burlingham, William J.; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Considerable evidence shows atherosclerosis to be a chronic inflammatory disease in which immunity to self-antigens contributes to disease progression. We recently identified the collagen V [col(V)] ?1(V) chain as a key autoantigen driving the Th17-dependent cellular immunity underlying another chronic inflammatory disease, obliterative bronchiolitis. Since specific induction of ?1(V) chains has previously been reported in human atheromas, we postulated involvement of col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerosis. Objective To determine whether col(V) autoimmunity may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Here we demonstrate Th17-dependent anti-col(V) immunity to be characteristic of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and in apolipoprotein E null (ApoE?/?) atherosclerotic mice. Responses were ?1(V)-specific in CAD with variable Th1 pathway involvement. In early atherosclerosis in ApoE?/? mice, anti-col(V) immunity was tempered by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. In support of a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, col(V)-sensitization of ApoE?/? mice on a regular chow diet overcame IL-10-mediated inhibition of col(V) autoimmunity, leading to increased atherosclerotic burden in these mice and local accumulation of IL-17 producing cells, particularly in the col(V)-rich adventitia subjacent to the atheromas. Conclusions These findings establish col(V) as an autoantigen in human CAD and show col(V) autoimmunity to be a consistent feature in atherosclerosis in humans and mice. Furthermore, data are consistent with a causative role for col(V) in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:20814021

  9. Circulating anti-brain autoantibodies in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Petruzzelli, Maria Giuseppina; Mianulli, Rossana; Campa, Maria Gloria; Pastore, Adriana; Tampoia, Marilina

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, an inflammatory autoimmune process, autoantibodies mediated, has been porposed as having a role in the development of different psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to assay organ-specific and non organ-specific circulating autoantibodies in schizophrenia, mood disorders and healthy controls; among organ-specific autoantibodies we focused on different fluorescence patterns of anti-brain autoantibodies against rat and monkey's sections of hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum. Serum samples from 50 acutelly ill patients (30 schizophrenia and 20 mood disorders) and from 20 healthy controls were collected. Autoantibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescence immunoassay. We found a significant difference for circulating autoantibodies to hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum and for anti-nuclear autoantibodies in both schizophrenia and mood disorders when compared to the control group. Referring to the two groups of patients only, circulating antibodies anti-hypothalamus were found significant higher in mood disorders rather than in schizophrenia, with specific regard to nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of the neurons. These data suggest an aspecific diffuse brain involvement of anti-brain autoantibodies in acute phases of schizophrenia and mood disorders. The greater involvement of the hypothalamus in mood disorders highlights the close relationship between autoimmunity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and affective disorders. PMID:26548982

  10. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in treating inflammatory neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous immunoglobulin administration has long been used in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. Immunoglobulins may be administered by intramuscular, intravenous or subcutaneous routes. Methods: This is a report on the long-term clinical follow up of six patients with inflammatory neuromuscular disorders, that is, three chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), one inclusion body myositis (IBM) and one myasthenia gravis (MG), treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins for a mean of 3.25 years. Results: One MMN and two CIDP patients received a weekly dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins equivalent to intravenous immunoglobulin. One CIDP patient received a 50% dose reduction, the IBM patient received a 30% reduction and the MG patient a 20% reduction. The lower dose chosen in the majority of patients was based not only on clinical effects, but also on studies of primary immunodeficiency syndromes. One patient with CIDP showed clinical fluctuation, which was successfully treated with an adaptation of the dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins, while the remaining patients with neuromuscular disorders had a stable clinical course for 2 years. No serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulins can be an attractive alternative therapy in autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26136842

  11. Spotlight on Eating Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disorders (2 items) Generalized Anxiety Disorder (2 items) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) (3 items) Panic Disorder (1 item) Post- ... Disorders (2 items) Generalized Anxiety Disorder (2 items) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) (3 items) Panic Disorder (1 item) Post- ...

  12. Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disorders (1 item) Generalized Anxiety Disorder (2 items) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) (3 items) Panic Disorder (1 item) Post- ... Disorders (1 item) Generalized Anxiety Disorder (2 items) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) (3 items) Panic Disorder (1 item) Post- ...

  13. Predictive value of antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune diseases classified by clinical criteria: Analytical study in a specialized health institute, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Soto, María Elena; Hernández-Becerril, Nidia; Perez-Chiney, Ada Claudia; Hernández-Rizo, Alfredo; Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Juárez-Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Melendez, Gabriela; Bojalil, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Determination of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is usually the initial test for the diagnosis of systemic rheumatic diseases (SRD). Assigning predictive values to positive and negative results of the test is vital because lack of knowledge about ANAs and their usefulness in classification criteria of SRD leads to inappropriate use. Methods: Retrospective study, ANA tests requested by different specialties, correlation to patients' final diagnosis. Results: The prevalence of autoimmune disease was relatively low in our population yielding a low PPV and a high NPV for the ANA test. 40% of the patients had no clinical criteria applied prior to test. Coexistence of two or more autoimmune disorders affects prevalence and predictive values. Conclusion: Application of the test after careful evaluation for clinical criteria remarkably improves the positive likelihood ratio for the diagnosis.

  14. Controlled delivery of a metabolic modulator promotes regulatory T cells and restrains autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Joshua M; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Adapa, Arjun R; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Jewell, Christopher M

    2015-07-28

    Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system abnormally recognizes and attacks self-molecules. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a powerful role in initiating adaptive immune response, and are therefore a recent target for autoimmune therapies. N-Phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC), a small molecule glutamate receptor enhancer, alters how DCs metabolize glutamate, skewing cytokine secretion to bias T cell function. These effects provide protection in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) by polarizing T cells away from inflammatory TH17 cells and toward regulatory T cells (TREG) when mice receive daily systemic injections of PHCCC. However, frequent, continued treatment is required to generate and maintain therapeutic benefits. Thus, the use of PHCCC is limited by poor solubility, the need for frequent dosing, and cell toxicity. We hypothesized that controlled release of PHCCC from degradable nanoparticles (NPs) might address these challenges by altering DC function to maintain efficacy with reduced treatment frequency and toxicity. This idea could serve as a new strategy for harnessing biomaterials to polarize immune function through controlled delivery of metabolic modulators. PHCCC was readily encapsulated in nanoparticles, with controlled release of 89% of drug into media over three days. Culture of primary DCs or DC and T cell co-cultures with PHCCC NPs reduced DC activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while shifting T cells away from TH17 and toward TREG phenotypes. Importantly, PHCCC delivered to cells in NPs was 36-fold less toxic compared with soluble PHCCC. Treatment of mice with PHCCC NPs every three days delayed disease onset and decreased disease severity compared with mice treated with soluble drug at the same dose and frequency. These results highlight the potential to promote tolerance through controlled delivery of metabolic modulators that alter DC signaling to polarize T cells, and suggest future gains that could be realized by engineering materials that provide longer term release. PMID:26002150

  15. Postulated Vasoactive Neuropeptide Autoimmunity in Fatigue-Related Conditions: A Brief Review and Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    Disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and gulf war syndrome (GWS) are characterised by prolonged fatigue and a range of debilitating symptoms of pain, intellectual and emotional impairment, chemical sensitivities and immunological dysfunction. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) surprisingly may have certain features in common with these conditions. Post-infection sequelae may be possible contributing factors although ongoing infection is unproven. Immunological aberration may prove to be associated with certain vasoactive neuropeptides (VN) in the context of molecular mimicry, inappropriate immunological memory and autoimmunity. Adenylate cyclase-activating VNs including pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) act as hormones, neurotransmitters, neuroregulators, immune modulators and neurotrophic substances. They and their receptors are potentially immunogenic. VNs are widely distributed in the body particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems and have been identified in the gut, adrenal gland, blood cells, reproductive system, lung, heart and other tissues. They have a vital role in maintaining cardio-respiratory function, thermoregulation, memory, concentration and executive functions such as emotional responses including social cues and appropriate behaviour. They are co-transmitters for a number of neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and gaseous transmitters, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system against toxic assault as well as being important in the maintenance of homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of certain fatigue-related syndromes based on loss of immunological tolerance to these VNs or their receptors following infection, other events or de novo resulting in significant pathophysiology possibly mediated via CpG fragments and heat shock (stress) proteins. These conditions extend the public health context of autoimmunity and VN dysregulation and have implications for military medicine where radiological, biological and chemical agents may have a role in pathogenesis. Possible treatment and prevention options are considered. PMID:16603442

  16. Lower Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Level is Associated With 3 Types of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Wu, Di; Li, Chenyang; Fan, Chenling; Chao, Nannan; Liu, Jing; Li, Yushu; Wang, Renee; Miao, Wei; Guan, Haixia; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common autoimmune disorders. A few studies have analyzed the association between serum vitamin D levels and AITD, and available data remain inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum vitamin D levels and 3 types of AITD, that is Graves’ disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), and postpartum thyroiditis (PPT). Two independent case-control studies were designed. The first is a cross-sectional case-control study in which we examined the levels of 25(OH)D in patients with newly diagnosed GD or HT and in controls; the second is a nested case-control study in which we compared 25(OH)D levels in 610 women who developed PPT during the follow-up after delivery and those who did not. Compared with the controls, GD patients and HT patients had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels. PPT cases also had a lower serum 25(OH)D concentration than controls. Serum 25(OH)D levels were associated with neither antithyroid peroxidase antibody nor antithyroglobulin antibody in GD and HT. There was no significant relationship between thyroid-stimulating hormone and 25(OH)D levels. Every 5?nmol/L increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations was associated with a 1.55-, 1.62-, and 1.51-fold reduction in GD, HT, and PPT risk, respectively. We observed a lower serum vitamin D levels in AITD patients compared with controls. The lower the vitamin D level is, not vitamin D deficiency per se, the higher the risk for developing AITD will be. However, vitamin D does not have strong association with the titers of thyroid antibodies or the levels of thyroid hormones. PMID:26426654

  17. Autoimmune Metaplastic Atrophic Gastritis: Recognizing Precursor Lesions for Appropriate Patient Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Meredith E; Voltaggio, Lysandra; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Robertson, Scott A; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG) is a significant risk factor for pernicious anemia and gastric neoplasia. Still, the histologic features of AMAG are frequently overlooked, especially in the early stages of the disease. The purpose of our study, therefore, was to catalogue the progression of histologic changes that precede the development of AMAG in affected individuals. Over a 2-year period (2012 to 2014), the diagnosis of AMAG was rendered on material from 113 patients seen at Johns Hopkins Hospital (?1.8% of "in house" gastric biopsies). Prior gastric body biopsies had been performed on 54 (48%) patients in the cohort, and the majority of these specimens had also shown AMAG. Eighteen of the previous biopsies, however, carried a diagnosis other than AMAG: 13 inactive chronic gastritis, 2 acute Helicobacter pylori gastritis, and 1 each of eosinophilic gastritis, iron pill gastritis, and proton-pump inhibitor-like effect. Upon review of these 18 biopsies, the most common histologic findings were heavy full-thickness or deep lamina propria chronic inflammation (12), inflammatory destruction of oxyntic glands (12), metaplasia (intestinal, pyloric, or pancreatic acinar) (10), prominent lamina propria eosinophils (8), and parietal cell pseudohypertrophy (4). At least 2 of these features were present in the majority (13, 72%) of the biopsies. In addition, 7 (58%) of these patients were also found to have another autoimmune or inflammatory disorder before the diagnosis of AMAG. Although subtle, histologic features of developing AMAG are identifiable in routine gastric body biopsies. When metaplasia, full-thickness chronic inflammation, and/or oxyntic destruction are seen, a note suggesting laboratory testing and/or close clinical follow-up in this subset of patients may be warranted. PMID:26291507

  18. [Narcolepsy with cataplexy: an autoimmune disease?].

    PubMed

    Jacob, Louis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 (also named narcolepsy-cataplexy or hypocretin deficiency syndrome) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, plus frequently hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and nocturnal sleep disturbances. Narcolepsy type 1 is an immune system-associated disease linked with the destruction of 70.000-90.000 hypocretin neurons notably involved in wakefulness. Among narcoleptic patients, 98% are positive for HLA-DQB1*06:02, a HLA class II allele, against 20-25% in general population. Individuals carrying HLA-DQB1*06:02 have an extraordinary risk to develop narcolepsy (odd ratio: 251). Other genes involved in CD4+ T cells and immune system activation as T-cell receptor ? are also associated with narcolepsy. The development of the disease is linked with environmental factors such as influenza and streptococcal infections. Narcolepsy type 1 incidence also increased in Europe following the use of Pandemrix, a 2009 H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Interestingly, such increase was not observed with Arepanrix, another vaccine developed by GSK very similar to Pandemrix. PMID:25537044

  19. Eating Disorders About eating disorders

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Eating Disorders About eating disorders There are many influences on an individual's self image, and in some cases, their lives. Anorexia nervosa is a disorder that affects 1% of young women-starvation. Bulimia nervosa is a disorder that affects 2-4% of young women. It is associated with recurrent episodes

  20. Immunological GABAergic interactions and therapeutic applications in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Gérald J; Glinka, Yelena; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. However, it is also produced in other sites; notably by pancreatic ? cells and immune cells. The function of GABA in the immune system is at an early stage of study, but it exerts inhibitory effects that are relevant to autoimmune diseases. The study of GABAergic interactions in the immune system has centered on three main aspects: 1) the expression of GABA and the relevant GABAergic molecular machinery; 2) the in vitro response of immune cells; and 3) therapeutic applications in autoimmune diseases. T cells and macrophages can produce GABA, and express all the components necessary for a GABAergic response. There are two types of GABA receptors, but lymphocytes appear to express only type A (GABAAR); a ligand-gated chloride channel. Other immune cells may also express the type B receptor (GABABR); a G-protein coupled receptor. Activation of GABA receptors on T cells and macrophages inhibits responses such as production of inflammatory cytokines. In T cells, GABA blocks the activation-induced calcium signal, and it also inhibits NF-?B activation. In preclinical models, therapeutic application of GABA, or GABAergic (agonistic) drugs, protects against type 1 diabetes (T1D), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and contact dermatitis. In addition, GABA exerts anti-apoptotic and proliferative effects on islet ? cells, which may be applicable to islet transplantation. Autoimmunity against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65; synthesizes GABA) occurs in T1D. Antigen therapy of T1D with GAD65 or proinsulin in mice has protective effects, which are markedly enhanced by combined GABA therapy. Clinically, autoantibodies against GAD65 and/or GABA receptors play a pathogenic role in several neurological conditions, including stiff person syndrome (SPS), some forms of encephalitis, and autoimmune epilepsy. GABAergic drugs are widely used in medicine, and include benzodiazepines, barbiturates, anticonvulsants, and anesthetic drugs such as propofol. Native GABA can be administered orally to humans as a drug, and has few adverse effects. However, the immune effects of GABAergic drugs in patients are not well documented. GABAergic immunobiology is a recent area of research, which shows potential for the development of new therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:26226414

  1. Anti-AMPA-Receptor Encephalitis Presenting as a Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder in a Young Woman with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune encephalitis is a disorder characterised by the subacute onset of seizures, short-term memory loss, and psychiatric and behavioural symptoms. Initially, it was recognised as a paraneoplastic disorder, but recently a subgroup of patients without systemic cancer was identified. Case Description. We describe a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome presenting with a treatment-resistant rapid cycling bipolar disorder with cognitive impairment. She was diagnosed with anti-AMPA-receptor encephalitis. She showed marked improvement after starting memantine and valproic acid. Conclusion. This case description emphasises the importance of timely recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalitis in patients with psychiatric manifestations and a possible predisposition to autoimmune conditions, in order to rule out malignancy and to quickly initiate treatment. PMID:26495149

  2. Molecular mimicry and horror autotoxicus: do chlamydial infections elicit autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Swanborg, Robert H; Boros, Dov L; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-01-01

    All species of the order Chlamydiales are obligate intracellular eubacterial pathogens of their various hosts. Two chlamydial species, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, are primarily human pathogens, and each is known to cause important diseases. Some strains of C. trachomatis are sexually transmitted and frequently cause severe reproductive problems, primarily in women. Other strains of the organism serve as the aetiological agents for blinding trachoma, still the leading cause of preventable blindness in underdeveloped nations. C. pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen known to cause community-acquired pneumonia. Importantly, both organisms engender an immunopathogenic response in the human host, and both have been associated with widely diverse, relatively common and currently idiopathic chronic diseases, most of which include an important autoimmune component. In this article, we explore the available experimental data regarding the possible elicitation of autoimmunity in various contexts by chlamydial infection, and we suggest several avenues for research to explore this potentially important issue further. PMID:17134529

  3. EBV-Associated Cancer and Autoimmunity: Searching for Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Giovanni; Fasano, Candida; Lucchese, Guglielmo; Calabrò, Michele; Kanduc, Darja

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects B-, T-, and NK cells and has been associated not only with a wide range of lymphoid malignancies but also with autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and, in particular, multiple sclerosis. Hence, effective immunotherapeutic approaches to eradicate EBV infection might overthrow cancer and autoimmunity incidence. However, currently no effective anti-EBV immunotherapy is available. Here we use the concept that protein immunogenicity is allocated in rare peptide sequences and search the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) sequence for peptides unique to the viral protein and absent in the human host. We report on a set of unique EBV EBNA1 peptides that might be used in designing peptide-based therapies able to specifically hitting the virus or neutralizing pathogenic autoantibodies. PMID:26344947

  4. Autoimmunity in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Huynh, Kyle; Grubbs, Joseph; Davis, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye is a chronic corneal disease that impacts the quality of life of many older adults. keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), a form of aqueous-deficient dry eye, is frequently associated with Sjögren’s syndrome and mechanisms of autoimmunity. For KCS and other forms of dry eye, current treatments are limited, with many medications providing only symptomatic relief rather than targeting the pathophysiology of disease. Here, we review proposed mechanisms in the pathogenesis of autoimmune-based KCS: genetic susceptibility and disruptions in antigen recognition, immune response, and immune regulation. By understanding the mechanisms of immune dysfunction through basic science and translational research, potential drug targets can be identified. Finally, we discuss current dry eye therapies as well as promising new treatment options and drug therapy targets. PMID:24395332

  5. Exploring autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tiffany W; Gracon, Adam S A; Murphy, Michael P; Wilkes, David S

    2015-09-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a disease process that carries significant morbidity and mortality in the absence of early identification and treatment. While current management includes surveillance and surgical treatment of low- and high-risk aneurysms, respectively, our narrow understanding of the pathophysiology of AAAs limits our ability to more effectively manage and perhaps even prevent the occurrence of this highly morbid disease. Over the past couple of decades, there has been considerable interest in exploring the role of autoimmunity as an etiological component of AAA. This review covers the current literature pertaining to this immunological process, focusing on research that highlights the local and systemic immune components found in both human patients and murine models. A better understanding of the autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AAAs can pave the way to novel and improved treatment strategies in this patient population. PMID:26116712

  6. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: an update and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shaili; Wu, Eveline; Rao, V. Koneti

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by immune dysregulation due to a defect in lymphocyte apoptosis. The clinical manifestations may be noted in multiple family members and include lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, increased risk of lymphoma and autoimmune disease, which typically involve hematopoietic cell lines manifesting as multilineage cytopenias. Since the disease was first characterized in the early 1990s, there have been many advances in the diagnosis and management of this syndrome. The inherited genetic defect of many ALPS patients has involved (FAS) pathway signaling proteins, but there remain those patients who carry undefined genetic defects. Despite ALPS having historically been considered a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized, and more so in genetically undefined patients and those with somatic FAS mutations. Thus, future research may identify novel pathways and/or regulatory proteins important in lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. PMID:25086580

  7. Fundamental role of C1q in autoimmunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Diamond, Betty; Santiago-Schwarz, Frances

    2015-12-01

    C1q, historically viewed as the initiating component of the classical complement pathway, also exhibits a variety of complement-independent activities in both innate and acquired immunity. Recent studies focusing on C1q's suppressive role in the immune system have provided new insight into how abnormal C1q expression and bioactivity may contribute to autoimmunity. In particular, molecular networks involving C1q interactions with cell surface receptors and other ligands are emerging as mechanisms involved in C1q's modulation of immunity. Here, we discuss the role of C1q in controlling immune cell function, including recently elucidated mechanisms of action, and suggest how these processes are critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis under steady-state conditions and in preventing autoimmunity. PMID:26410546

  8. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  9. RIG-I-like receptors and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroki; Fujita, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) plays an essential role in antiviral innate immune responses and also in adaptive immune responses. Defects in the production of IFN markedly increase susceptibility to viral invasion and attenuate the acquired immunity. Recently an increased expression of type I IFN, also termed IFN signature, has been reported in patients with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). The evidence clearly shows that the initiation and termination of IFN production should be tightly controlled. RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) are viral RNA sensors and are essential for type I IFN induction. We herein summarize recent reports on RLR mutations in patients and MDA5 mutant mice, and discuss possible mechanisms by which aberrant activation of RLRs can cause autoimmunity. PMID:26530735

  10. Peptide Microarrays for Medical Applications in Autoimmunity, Infection, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grötzinger, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of the antigen-specific humoral immune response reflects the interaction of the immune system with pathogens and autoantigens. Peptide microarray analysis opens up new perspectives for the use of antibodies as diagnostic biomarkers and provides unique access to a more differentiated serological diagnosis. This review focusses on latest applications of peptide microarrays for the serologic medical diagnosis of autoimmunity, infectious diseases, and cancer. PMID:26490478

  11. Variant of TYR and Autoimmunity Susceptibility Loci in Generalized Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A.; Fain, Pamela R.; Gowan, Katherine; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Holland, Paulene J.; Mailloux, Christina M.; Sufit, Alexandra J.D.; Hutton, Saunie M.; Amadi-Myers, Anita; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanny; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Spritz, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin and hair, and is associated with an elevated risk of other autoimmune diseases. METHODS To identify generalized vitiligo susceptibility loci, we conducted a genomewide association study. We genotyped 579,146 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1514 patients with generalized vitiligo who were of European-derived white (CEU) ancestry and compared the genotypes with publicly available control genotypes from 2813 CEU persons. We then tested 50 SNPs in two replication sets, one comprising 677 independent CEU patients and 1106 CEU controls and the other comprising 183 CEU simplex trios with generalized vitiligo and 332 CEU multiplex families. RESULTS We detected significant associations between generalized vitiligo and SNPs at several loci previously associated with other autoimmune diseases. These included genes encoding major-histocompatibility-complex class I molecules (P = 9.05×10?23) and class II molecules (P = 4.50×10?34), PTPN22 (P = 1.31×10?7), LPP (P = 1.01×10?11), IL2RA (P = 2.78×10?9), UBASH3A (P = 1.26×10?9), and C1QTNF6 (P = 2.21×10?16). We also detected associations between generalized vitiligo and SNPs in two additional immune-related loci, RERE (P = 7.07×10?15) and GZMB (P = 3.44×10?8), and in a locus containing TYR (P = 1.60×10?18), encoding tyrosinase. CONCLUSIONS We observed associations between generalized vitiligo and markers implicating multiple genes, some associated with other autoimmune diseases and one (TYR) that may mediate target-cell specificity and indicate a mutually exclusive relationship between susceptibility to vitiligo and susceptibility to melanoma. PMID:20410501

  12. Serum IgG Subclasses in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoze; Li, Ping; Wu, Di; Xu, Dong; Hou, Yong; Wang, Qian; Li, Mengtao; Li, Yongzhe; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Shi, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To characterize serum IgG subclass levels in several autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We aimed to analyze serum IgG subclass distribution and to test whether serum IgG4 levels are elevated in these diseases. Serum IgG subclass levels from 102 pSS, 102 SSc, 100 SLE, and 59 PBC patients, as well as 40 healthy controls (HCs), were measured using the immunonephelometric assay. The distribution of IgG subclasses among these autoimmune diseases was analyzed. In this cross-sectional study, serum IgG1 (IgG1/IgG) and/or IgG3 (IgG3/IgG) were significantly increased, compared with those in HCs. Only 6.34% of patients had levels of serum IgG4 >135?mg/dL. There were no significant differences in the frequency of elevated serum IgG4 levels between patients and HC. In pSS, serum IgG1 levels were much higher than those in other disease groups, whereas serum IgG2 and IgG3 levels were most prominently increased in PBC. A strikingly different serum IgG subclass distribution was detected in patients with autoimmune diseases compared with HCs. Serum IgG subclass levels also showed distinct characteristics among different autoimmune diseases. Serum IgG4 levels in these patients were lower or not much higher than those in HCs, which differed from IgG4-related diseases. PMID:25590841

  13. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; Lu, X T; Zhao, W H; Hua, Y

    2015-12-18

    We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a history of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an expanded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27.18% of lymphocytes, 35.16% of CD3+ T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We identified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c.309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child's parents. The patient was treated with glucocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment. PMID:26679669

  14. A model for the role of gut bacteria in the development of autoimmunity for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Triplett, Eric W

    2015-07-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role for the gut microbiome in type 1 diabetes. Treating diabetes-prone rodents with probiotics or antibiotics prevents the development of the disorder. Diabetes-prone rodents also have a distinctly different gut microbiome compared with healthy rodents. Recent studies in children with a high genetic risk for type 1 diabetes demonstrate significant differences in the gut microbiome between children who develop autoimmunity for the disease and those who remain healthy. However, the differences in microbiome composition between autoimmune and healthy children are not consistent across all studies because of the strong environmental influences on microbiome composition, particularly diet and geography. Controlling confounding factors of microbiome composition uncovers bacterial associations with disease. For example, in a human cohort from a single Finnish city where geography is confined, a strong association between one dominant bacterial species, Bacteroides dorei, and type 1 diabetes was discovered (Davis-Richardson et al. Front Microbiol 2014;5:678). Beyond this, recent DNA methylation analyses suggest that a thorough epigenetic analysis of the gut microbiome may be warranted. These studies suggest a testable model whereby a diet high in fat and gluten and low in resistant starch may be the primary driver of gut dysbiosis. This dysbiosis may cause a lack of butyrate production by gut bacteria, which, in turn, leads to the development of a permeable gut followed by autoimmunity. The bacterial community responsible for these changes in butyrate production may vary around the world, but bacteria of the genus Bacteroides are thought to play a key role. PMID:25957231

  15. Gene Expression Profiles from Disease Discordant Twins Suggest Shared Antiviral Pathways and Viral Exposures among Multiple Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Lai, Zhennan; Fannin, Rick; Weller, Melodie L.; Rider, Lisa G.; Chiorini, John A.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    Viral agents are of interest as possible autoimmune triggers due to prior reported associations and widely studied molecular mechanisms of antiviral immune responses in autoimmunity. Here we examined new viral candidates for the initiation and/or promotion of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), as well as possible related signaling pathways shared in the pathogenesis of those disorders. RNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 33 twins discordant for SAID and 33 matched, unrelated healthy controls was analyzed using a custom viral-human gene microarray. Paired comparisons were made among three study groups—probands with SAID, their unaffected twins, and matched, unrelated healthy controls—using statistical and molecular pathway analyses. Probands and unaffected twins differed significantly in the expression of 537 human genes, and 107 of those were associated with viral infections. These 537 differentially expressed human genes participate in overlapping networks of several canonical, biologic pathways relating to antiviral responses and inflammation. Moreover, certain viral genes were expressed at higher levels in probands compared to either unaffected twins or unrelated, healthy controls. Interestingly, viral gene expression levels in unaffected twins appeared intermediate between those of probands and the matched, unrelated healthy controls. Of the viruses with overexpressed viral genes, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) was the only human viral pathogen identified using four distinct oligonucleotide probes corresponding to three HSV-2 genes associated with different stages of viral infection. Although the effects from immunosuppressive therapy on viral gene expression remain unclear, this exploratory study suggests a new approach to evaluate shared viral agents and antiviral immune responses that may be involved in the development of SAID. PMID:26556803

  16. Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Immunological data show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifests autoimmune features. We wanted to test the association epidemiologically by assessing subsequent diagnosis of T2D following diagnosis of autoimmune disease (AId) and subsequent AId after T2D in the same individuals. Patients were identified from three Swedish health databases. A total of 32 different AId were included. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for T2D diagnosis in patients with previously diagnosed AId and compared to those without a previous AId. Among a total of 757,368 AId patients, 15,103 were diagnosed with T2D, giving an overall SIR for T2D of 1.66. T2D risks were increased after 27 AIds; the highest SIRs were noted for chorea minor (8.00), lupoid hepatitis (5.75), and Addison disease (2.63). T2D was increased after 27 of 32 AIds but we were unable to control for factors such as obesity and smoking. However, the clearly increased risks for T2D in most types of AId patients, and in reverse order increased risks for AId after T2D, do not support an overall confounding by life-style factors. Mechanistic links shared by T2D, AId and life-style factors such as obesity, perhaps through chronic inflammation, may drive autoimmune activation of T2D and many AIds. PMID:26350756

  17. Mizoribine treatment for antihistamine-resistant chronic autoimmune urticaria.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Ishii, Norito; Ishii, Kaori; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hide, Michihiro; Hamada, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune urticaria is routinely diagnosed using an autologous serum skin test. Mizoribine is a newly developed immunosuppressive agent that has low toxicity. The pharmacological effects of mizoribine are similar to those of another purine biosynthesis inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil. A 57-year-old woman presented with recurrent wheals and was insufficiently managed with administration of antihistamines, antileukotrienes, oral corticosteroids, and cyclosporine. She was positive in the autologous serum skin test. Oral mizoribine therapy was started as a combination therapy with prednisolone. The patient achieved a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete resolution of the urticaria a few days after adding mizoribine to her treatment. The prednisolone was tapered after the start of mizoribine treatment. Her symptoms did not flare up, and no side effects were observed. In vitro basophil histamine release assays suggested that she might have anti-IgE autoantibody-type histamine release activity. We believe that mizoribine has a therapeutic role in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria and may be useful for treatment of cases not responsive to classical therapy. We suggest that mizoribine might help to reduce anti-IgE autoantibody acting on the surface of basophils in chronic autoimmune urticaria. PMID:22950565

  18. Medullary thymic epithelial cell depletion leads to autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bonito, Anthony J.; Aloman, Costica; Fiel, M. Isabel; Danzl, Nichole M.; Cha, Sungwon; Weinstein, Erica G.; Jeong, Seihwan; Choi, Yongwon; Walsh, Matthew C.; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina

    2013-01-01

    TRAF6, an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, plays a critical role in T cell tolerance by regulating medullary thymic epithelial cell (mTEC) development. mTECs regulate T cell tolerance by ectopically expressing self-antigens and eliminating autoreactive T cells in the thymus. Here we show that mice with mTEC depletion due to conditional deletion of Traf6 expression in murine thymic epithelial cells (Traf6?TEC mice) showed a surprisingly narrow spectrum of autoimmunity affecting the liver. The liver inflammation in Traf6?TEC mice exhibited all the histological and immunological characteristics of human autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The role of T cells in AIH establishment was supported by intrahepatic T cell population changes and AIH development after transfer of liver T cells into immunodeficient mice. Despite a 50% reduction in natural Treg thymic output, peripheral tolerance in Traf6?TEC mice was normal, whereas compensatory T regulatory mechanisms were evident in the liver of these animals. These data indicate that mTECs exert a cell-autonomous role in central T cell tolerance and organ-specific autoimmunity, but play a redundant role in peripheral tolerance. These findings also demonstrate that Traf6?TEC mice are a relevant model with which to study the pathophysiology of AIH, as well as autoantigen-specific T cell responses and regulatory mechanisms underlying this disease. PMID:23867620

  19. GITR+ regulatory T cells in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Maria Grazia; Ronchetti, Simona; Ricci, Erika; Alunno, Alessia; Gerli, Roberto; Nocentini, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases decrease life expectancy and quality of life for millions of women and men. Although treatments can slow disease progression and improve quality of life, all currently available drugs have adverse effects and none of them are curative; therefore, requiring patients to take immunosuppressive drugs for the remainder of their lives. A curative therapy that is safe and effective is urgently needed. We believe that therapies promoting the in vivo expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) or injection of in vitro expanded autologous/heterologous Tregs (cellular therapy) can alter the natural history of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data from murine and human studies suggesting that 1) glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) plays a crucial role in thymic Treg (tTreg) differentiation and expansion; 2) GITR plays a crucial role in peripheral Treg (pTreg) expansion; 3) in patients with Sjögren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus, CD4(+)GITR(+) pTregs are expanded in patients with milder forms of the disease; and 4) GITR is superior to other cell surface markers to differentiate Tregs from other CD4(+) T cells. In this context, we consider two potential new approaches for treating autoimmune diseases consisting of the in vivo expansion of GITR(+) Tregs by GITR-triggering drugs and in vitro expansion of autologous or heterologous GITR(+) Tregs to be infused in patients. Advantages of such an approach, technical problems, and safety issues are discussed. PMID:25449679

  20. Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Immunological data show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifests autoimmune features. We wanted to test the association epidemiologically by assessing subsequent diagnosis of T2D following diagnosis of autoimmune disease (AId) and subsequent AId after T2D in the same individuals. Patients were identified from three Swedish health databases. A total of 32 different AId were included. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for T2D diagnosis in patients with previously diagnosed AId and compared to those without a previous AId. Among a total of 757,368 AId patients, 15,103 were diagnosed with T2D, giving an overall SIR for T2D of 1.66. T2D risks were increased after 27 AIds; the highest SIRs were noted for chorea minor (8.00), lupoid hepatitis (5.75), and Addison disease (2.63). T2D was increased after 27 of 32 AIds but we were unable to control for factors such as obesity and smoking. However, the clearly increased risks for T2D in most types of AId patients, and in reverse order increased risks for AId after T2D, do not support an overall confounding by life-style factors. Mechanistic links shared by T2D, AId and life-style factors such as obesity, perhaps through chronic inflammation, may drive autoimmune activation of T2D and many AIds. PMID:26350756

  1. Autoimmunity-mediated antitumor immunity: tumor as an immunoprivileged self.

    PubMed

    Miska, Jason; Bas, Esperanza; Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2012-10-01

    The association of autoimmunity with antitumor immunity challenges a paradigm of selective surveillance against tumors. Aided with well-characterized models of robust autoimmunity, we show that self-antigen-specific effector T (Teff) cell clones could eradicate tumor cells. However, a tumor microenvironment reinforced by Treg cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) presented a barrier to the autoimmune effectors, more so in tumors than in healthy tissues. This barrier required optimal CTLA4 expression in Teff cells. In a spontaneous model of breast cancer, subtle reductions in CTLA4 expression impeded tumor onset and progression, providing the first direct evidence that CTLA4 inhibits spontaneous tumor development. In an adoptive therapy model of lymphoma, self-antigen-specific Teff cells were potentiated by even a modest reduction of CTLA4. A subtle reduction of CTLA4 did not curtail Treg-cell suppression. Thus, Teff cells had an exquisite sensitivity to physiological levels of CTLA4 variations. However, both Treg and Teff cells were impacted by anti-CTLA4 antibody blockade. Therefore, whether CTLA4 impacts through Treg cells or Teff cells depends on its expression level. Overall, the results suggest that the tumor microenvironment represents an "immunoprivileged self" that could be overcome practically and at least partially by RNAi silencing of CTLA4 in Teff cells. PMID:22777737

  2. Gold causes genetically determined autoimmune and immunostimulatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Havarinasab, S; Johansson, U; Pollard, K M; Hultman, P

    2007-01-01

    Natrium aurothiomaleate (GSTM) is a useful disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, but causes a variety of immune-mediated adverse effects in many patients. A murine model was used to study further the interaction of GSTM with the immune system, including induction of systemic autoimmunity. Mice were given weekly intramuscular injections of GSTM and controls equimolar amounts of sodium thiomaleate. The effects of gold on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry. Humoral autoimmunity was measured by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, and deposition of immunoglobulin and C3 used to assess immunopathology. Gold, in the form of GSTM, stimulated the murine immune system causing strain-dependent lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, including a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted autoantibody response against the nucleolar protein fibrillarin. GSTM did not cause glomerular or vessel wall IgG deposits. However, it did elicit a strong B cell-stimulating effect, including both T helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-dependent isotypes. All these effects on the immune system were dependent on the MHC genotype, emphasizing the clinical observations of a strong genetic linkage for the major adverse immune reactions seen with GSTM treatment. PMID:17680821

  3. [Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome, connective tissue diseases and autoimmune pathology].

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G; Vinceneux, P; Bourgeois, P; Kahn, M F

    1977-01-01

    Each of the following conditions has a 4 to 6 percent frequency of association with the Gugerot-Sjögren syndrome: systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, autoimmune liver disease (simple biliary cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis), and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Association with a nodular periarteritis and a polymyositis is very much more unusual and should be discussed on account of the existence of myositis and the vascularity peculiar to the Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome. Very many true or supposedly autoimmune diseases have been reported in association with the Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome: mixed connectivity, atrophying polychondritis, Reynolds' syndrome (scleroderma plus simple biliary cirrhosis), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, thyrotoxicosis of simple hypothyroidism, and total or partial lipodystrophy. The lacrymal and salivary condition is almost constant during systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, simple biliary cirrhosis and mixed connectivity. From the point of view of autoimmune pathology, the Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome might constitute either an autonomous condition when found in isolation or represent the exocrine glandular expression of a dysimmunitary disease with which it is associated. PMID:910105

  4. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended. PMID:17102943

  5. Evolving Strategies for Cancer and Autoimmunity: Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Peter J. L.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Anderson, Graham; Nawaf, Maher G.; Gaspal, Fabrina M.; Withers, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Although current thinking has focused on genetic variation between individuals and environmental influences as underpinning susceptibility to both autoimmunity and cancer, an alternative view is that human susceptibility to these diseases is a consequence of the way the immune system evolved. It is important to remember that the immunological genes that we inherit and the systems that they control were shaped by the drive for reproductive success rather than for individual survival. It is our view that human susceptibility to autoimmunity and cancer is the evolutionarily acceptable side effect of the immune adaptations that evolved in early placental mammals to accommodate a fundamental change in reproductive strategy. Studies of immune function in mammals show that high affinity antibodies and CD4 memory, along with its regulation, co-evolved with placentation. By dissection of the immunologically active genes and proteins that evolved to regulate this step change in the mammalian immune system, clues have emerged that may reveal ways of de-tuning both effector and regulatory arms of the immune system to abrogate autoimmune responses whilst preserving protection against infection. Paradoxically, it appears that such a detuned and deregulated immune system is much better equipped to mount anti-tumor immune responses against cancers. PMID:24782861

  6. Microarray analysis of autoimmune diseases by machine learning procedures.

    PubMed

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Calvo, Borja; Inza, Iñaki; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor; Ucar, Eduardo; Bernales, Irantzu; Fullaondo, Asier; Larrañaga, Pedro; Zubiaga, Ana M

    2009-05-01

    Microarray-based global gene expression profiling, with the use of sophisticated statistical algorithms is providing new insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We have applied a novel statistical technique for gene selection based on machine learning approaches to analyze microarray expression data gathered from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), two autoimmune diseases of unknown genetic origin that share many common features. The methodology included a combination of three data discretization policies, a consensus gene selection method, and a multivariate correlation measurement. A set of 150 genes was found to discriminate SLE and PAPS patients from healthy individuals. Statistical validations demonstrate the relevance of this gene set from an univariate and multivariate perspective. Moreover, functional characterization of these genes identified an interferon-regulated gene signature, consistent with previous reports. It also revealed the existence of other regulatory pathways, including those regulated by PTEN, TNF, and BCL-2, which are altered in SLE and PAPS. Remarkably, a significant number of these genes carry E2F binding motifs in their promoters, projecting a role for E2F in the regulation of autoimmunity. PMID:19423430

  7. Why is the thyroid so prone to autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Saranac, L; Zivanovic, S; Bjelakovic, B; Stamenkovic, H; Novak, M; Kamenov, B

    2011-01-01

    The thyroid gland plays a major role in the human body; it produces the hormones necessary for appropriate energy levels and an active life. These hormones have a critical impact on early brain development and somatic growth. At the same time, the thyroid is highly vulnerable to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs). They arise due to the complex interplay of genetic, environmental, and endogenous factors, and the specific combination is required to initiate thyroid autoimmunity. When the thyroid cell becomes the target of autoimmunity, it interacts with the immune system and appears to affect disease progression. It can produce different growth factors, adhesion molecules, and a large array of cytokines. Preventable environmental factors, including high iodine intake, selenium deficiency, and pollutants such as tobacco smoke, as well as infectious diseases and certain drugs, have been implicated in the development of AITDs in genetically predisposed individuals. The susceptibility of the thyroid to AITDs may come from the complexity of hormonal synthesis, peculiar oligoelement requirements, and specific capabilities of the thyroid cell's defense system. An improved understanding of this interplay could yield novel treatment pathways, some of which might be as simple as identifying the need to avoid smoking or to control the intake of some nutrients. PMID:21346360

  8. Autoimmune Diabetes: An Overview of Experimental Models and Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    You, Sylvaine; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from a chronic and selective destruction of insulin-secreting ?-cells within the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas by autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The use of animal models of T1D was instrumental for deciphering the steps of the autoimmune process leading to T1D. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and the bio-breeding (BB) rat spontaneously develop the disease similar to the human pathology in terms of the immune responses triggering autoimmune diabetes and of the genetic and environmental factors influencing disease susceptibility. The generation of genetically modified models allowed refining our understanding of the etiology and the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present review, we provide an overview of the experimental models generated and used to gain knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the breakdown of self-tolerance in T1D and the progression of the autoimmune response. Immunotherapeutic interventions designed in these animal models and translated into the clinical arena in T1D patients will also be discussed. PMID:26530798

  9. ADAM17 at the interface between inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Sabrina; D'Amore, Massimo; Sisto, Margherita

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17), originally identified as tumor necrosis factor-a converting enzyme (TACE) for its ability as sheddase of TNF-? inspired scientists to attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ADAM17 implication in diseased conditions. In recent years, it has become evident that this protease can modify many non matrix substrates, such as cytokines (e.g. TNF-?), cytokine receptors (e.g. IL-6R and TNF-R), ligands of ErbB (e.g. TGF-? and amphiregulin) and adhesion proteins (e.g. Lselectin and ICAM-1). Several recent studies have described experimental model system to better understand the role of specific signaling molecules, the interplay of different signals and tissue interactions in regulating ADAM17-dependent cleavage of most relevant substrates in inflammatory diseases. The central question is whether ADAM17 can influence the outcome of inflammation and if so, how it performs this regulation in autoimmunity, since inflammatory autoimmune diseases are often characterized by deregulated metalloproteinase activities. This review will explore the latest research on the influence of ADAM17 on the progression of inflammatory processes linked to autoimmunity and its role as modulator of inflammation. PMID:25171914

  10. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis--pathogenesis, pathology and management.

    PubMed

    Neumann, William L; Coss, Elizabeth; Rugge, Massimo; Genta, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic progressive inflammatory condition that results in the replacement of the parietal cell mass by atrophic and metaplastic mucosa. A complex interaction of autoantibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and sensitized T cells progressively destroy the parietal cells, inducing hypochlorhydria and then achlorhydria, while autoantibodies against the intrinsic factor impair the absorption of vitamin B??. The resulting cobalamin deficiency manifests with megaloblastic anaemia and neurological and systemic signs and symptoms collectively known as pernicious anaemia. Previously believed to be predominantly a disease of elderly women of Northern European ancestry, autoimmune gastritis has now been recognized in all populations and ethnic groups, but because of the complexity of the diagnosis no reliable prevalence data are available. For similar reasons, as well as the frequent and often unknown overlap with Helicobacter pylori infection, the risk of gastric cancer has not been adequately assessed in these patients. This Review summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathological aspects of autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis. We also provide practical advice for the diagnosis and management of patients with this disease. PMID:23774773

  11. Immunomodulatory strategies prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies and pathogenic T cells may reflect an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Whether immune modulatory strategies can protect against the development of emphysema is not known. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were immunized with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to induce autoimmune emphysema and treated with intrathymic HUVEC-injection and pristane. Measurements of alveolar airspace enlargement, cytokine levels, immuno histochemical, western blot analysis, and T cell repertoire of the lung tissue were performed. Results The immunomodulatory strategies protected lungs against cell death as demonstrated by reduced numbers of TUNEL and active caspase-3 positive cells and reduced levels of active caspase-3, when compared with lungs from HUVEC-immunized rats. Immunomodulatory strategies also suppressed anti-endothelial antibody production and preserved CNTF, IL-1alpha and VEGF levels. The immune deviation effects of the intrathymic HUVEC-injection were associated with an expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Pristane treatment decreased the proportion of T cells expressing receptor beta-chain, V?16.1 in the lung tissue. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that interventions classically employed to induce central T cell tolerance (thymic inoculation of antigen) or to activate innate immune responses (pristane treatment) can prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema. PMID:21162738

  12. Bushen Yisui Capsule ameliorates axonal injury in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ling; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Tao; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Qiuxia; Li, Kangning; Zhou, Li; Gong, Haiyang; Fan, Yongping; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary clinical study by our group demonstrated Bushen Yisui Capsule (formerly called Erhuang Formula) in combination with conventional therapy is an effective prescription for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. However, its effect on axonal injury during early multiple sclerosis remains unclear. In this study, a MOG35-55-immunized C57BL/6 mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was intragastrically administered Bushen Yisui Capsule. The results showed that Bushen Yisui Capsule effectively improved clinical symptoms and neurological function of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, amyloid precursor protein expression was down-regulated and microtubule-associated protein 2 was up-regulated. Experimental findings indicate that the disease-preventive mechanism of Bushen Yisui Capsule in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was mediated by amelioration of axonal damage and promotion of regeneration. But the effects of the high-dose Bushen Yisui Capsule group was not better than that of the medium-dose and low-dose Bushen Yisui Capsule group in preventing neurological dysfunction. PMID:25206652

  13. Suppression of systemic autoimmunity by the innate immune adaptor STING

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Campbell, Allison M.; Chan, Jennie; Schattgen, Stefan A.; Orlowski, Gregory M.; Nayar, Ribhu; Huyler, Annie H.; Nündel, Kerstin; Mohan, Chandra; Berg, Leslie J.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic DNA-sensing pathways that signal via Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) mediate immunity to pathogens and also promote autoimmune pathology in DNaseII- and DNaseIII-deficient mice. In contrast, we report here that STING potently suppresses inflammation in a model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lymphoid hypertrophy, autoantibody production, serum cytokine levels, and other indicators of immune activation were markedly increased in STING-deficient autoimmune-prone mice compared with STING-sufficient littermates. As a result, STING-deficient autoimmune-prone mice had significantly shorter lifespans than controls. Importantly, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent systemic inflammation during 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD)-mediated peritonitis was similarly aggravated in STING-deficient mice. Mechanistically, STING-deficient macrophages failed to express negative regulators of immune activation and thus were hyperresponsive to TLR ligands, producing abnormally high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This hyperreactivity corresponds to dramatically elevated numbers of inflammatory macrophages and granulocytes in vivo. Collectively these findings reveal an unexpected negative regulatory role for STING, having important implications for STING-directed therapies. PMID:25646421

  14. Is pregnancy a risk factor for rheumatic autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Wendy; Somers, Emily C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the association of pregnancy with the risk of subsequent development of rheumatic autoimmune diseases in women, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Recent findings There is a small but growing literature related to the risk of autoimmune rheumatic disease in association with pregnancy history. However, results conflict both in terms of the direction and magnitude of risk of disease in relationship to prior pregnancy history. Although anecdotal evidence tends to favor the premise that pregnancy is protective against certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, the heterogeneity of results precludes the ability to confirm an association in either direction. There is indication that time elapsed since pregnancy may influence risk, with the postpartum year being of particular relevance. Summary To date, a clear pattern has not emerged regarding pregnancy and the future risk of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This topic requires greater study, and given the strong female preponderance of these diseases, future research efforts should seek to resolve this important issue. PMID:24646947

  15. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis restores immune tolerance during autoimmune insulitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Nadine; Kaber, Gernot; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Gebe, John A.; Preisinger, Anton; Falk, Ben A.; Sunkari, Vivekananda G.; Gooden, Michel D.; Vernon, Robert B.; Bogdani, Marika; Kuipers, Hedwich F.; Day, Anthony J.; Campbell, Daniel J.; Wight, Thomas N.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that abundant deposits of the extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) are characteristic of autoimmune insulitis in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but the relevance of these deposits to disease was unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that HA is critical for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Using the DO11.10xRIPmOVA mouse model of T1D, we determined that HA deposits are temporally and anatomically associated with the development of insulitis. Moreover, treatment with an inhibitor of HA synthesis, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), halted progression to diabetes even after the onset of insulitis. Similar effects were seen in the NOD mouse model, and in these mice, 1 week of treatment was sufficient to prevent subsequent diabetes. 4-MU reduced HA accumulation, constrained effector T cells to nondestructive insulitis, and increased numbers of intraislet FOXP3+ Tregs. Consistent with the observed effects of 4-MU treatment, Treg differentiation was inhibited by HA and anti-CD44 antibodies and rescued by 4-MU in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. These data may explain how peripheral immune tolerance is impaired in tissues under autoimmune attack, including islets in T1D. We propose that 4-MU, already an approved drug used to treat biliary spasm, could be repurposed to prevent, and possibly treat, T1D in at-risk individuals. PMID:26368307

  16. Somatic symptom disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... related disorders; Somatization disorder; Somatiform disorders; Briquet syndrome; Illness anxiety disorder ... a history of abuse. SSD is similar to illness anxiety disorder . This is when a person is ...

  17. Personality disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Personality disorders are a group of mental conditions in which a person has a long-term pattern ... Causes of personality disorders are unknown. Genetic and environmental factors are thought to play a role. Mental health professionals categorize these ...

  18. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... GAD) that explains the signs, symptoms, and treatment. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: When Unwanted Thoughts Take Over A brochure on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) that explains the signs, symptoms, and treatments. ...

  19. Eating Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay healthy. ... about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

  20. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood ... They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side ...