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Sample records for non-equilibrium air plasma

  1. Numerical Analysis of MHD Accelerator with Non-Equilibrium Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwari, M.; H. Qazi, H.; Sukarsan; Harada, N.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator is proposed as a next generation propulsion system. It can be used to increase the performance of a propulsion system. The objective of this study is to investigate the performance of MHD accelerator using non-equilibrium air plasma as working gas. In this study, the fundamental performance of MHD accelerator such as flow performance and electrical performance is evaluated at different levels of applied magnetic field using 1-D numerical simulation. The numerical simulation is developed based on a set of differential equations with MHD approximation. To solve this set of differential equations the MacCormack scheme is used. A specified channel designed and developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Centre is used in the numerical simulation. The composition of the simulated air plasma consists of seven species, namely, N2, N, O2, O, NO, NO+, and e-. The performance of the non-equilibrium MHD accelerator is also compared with the equilibrium MHD accelerator.

  2. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N2 and 20% O2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 1013 cm-3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the flash

  3. Non-Equilibrium Transitions of Heliospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in Space Physics theory have established the connection between non-extensive Statistical Mechanics and space plasmas by providing a theoretical basis for the empirically derived kappa distributions commonly used to describe the phase space distribution functions of these systems [1]. The non-equilibrium temperature and the kappa index that govern these distributions are the two independent controlling parameters of non-equilibrium systems [1-3]. The significance of the kappa index is primarily given by its role in identifying the non-equilibrium stationary states, and measuring their "thermodynamic distance" from thermal equilibrium [4], while its physical meaning is connected to the correlation between the system's particles [5]. For example, analysis of the IBEX high Energetic Neutral Atom spectra [6] showed that the vast majority of measured kappa indices are between ~1.5 and ~2.5, consistent with the far-equilibrium "cavity" of minimum entropy discovered by Livadiotis & McComas [2]. Spontaneous procedures that can increase the entropy, move the system gradually toward equilibrium, that is the state with the maximum (infinite) kappa index. Other external factors that may decrease the entropy, move the system back to states further from equilibrium where the kappa indices are smaller. Newly formed pick-up ions can play this critical role in the solar wind and other space plasmas. We have analytically shown that their highly ordered motion can reduce the average entropy in the plasma beyond the termination shock, inside the inner heliosheath [7]. Non-equilibrium transitions have a key role in understanding the governing thermodynamical processes of space plasmas. References 1. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2009, JGR, 114, 11105. 2. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010a, ApJ, 714, 971. 3. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010c, in AIP Conf. Proc. 9, Pickup Ions Throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond, ed. J. LeRoux, V. Florinski, G. P. Zank, & A

  4. Radiation temperature of non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.

    1991-07-01

    In fusion devices measurements of the radiation temperature T{sub r} ({omega}, k) near the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub C} and the second harmonic 2{omega}{sub C} in directions nearly perpendicular to the confining magnetic field B (i.e., k {approx} k {perpendicular}) serve to map out the electron temperature profiles T{sub e}(r,t). For optically thick plasma at thermodynamic equilibrium T{sub r} = T{sub e}. However, there is increasing experimental evidence for the presence of non-equilibrium electron distributions (such as a drifting Maxwellian with appreciable values of the streaming parameter {omicron} = v{sub d}/v{sub t}, a bi- Maxwellian, and anisotropic Maxwellian with T {perpendicular} {ne} T {parallel}, etc.,) in tokamak plasmas, especially in the presence of radio-frequency heating. Here, we examine (both non-relativistically and relativistically) the dependence of T{sub r} on {omicron}, T{perpendicular}/T{parallel}, T{sub h}/T{sub b}, n{sub h}/n{sub b}etc., where n{sub b}, n{sub h}, T{sub b}, T{sub h} are the densities and temperatures, respectively, of the bulk and the hot components of the bi-Maxwellian plasma. Our bi-Maxwellian results predict that the ratio T{sub r}/T{sub e} is a very sensitive function of the ratios n{sub h}/n{sub b} and T{sub h}/T{sub b}. Further, these relativistic and non-relativistic results satisfy the well-known limit c {yields} {infinity} correspondence principle'', showing that the intensity of the emission and absorption line is independent of the line broadening mechanism. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Non-equilibrium plasma reactors for organic solvent destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.L.; Beltran, M.R.; Kravets, Z.

    1997-12-31

    Two non-equilibrium plasma reactors were evaluated for their ability to destroy three widely used organic solvents, i.e., 2-butanone, toluene and ethyl acetate. The catalyzed plasma reactor (CPR) with 6 mm glass beads destroys 98% of 50 ppm toluene in air at 24 kV/cm and space velocities of 1,400 v/v/hr. Eighty-five percent of ethyl acetate and 2-butanone are destroyed under the same conditions. The tubular plasma reactor (TPR) has an efficiency of 10% to 20% lower than that of a CPR under the same conditions. The 1,400 v/v/hr in a CPR is equal to a residence time of 2.6 seconds in a TPR. The operating temperatures, corona characteristics, as well as the kinetics of VOC destruction in both TPR and CPR were studied.

  6. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  7. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  8. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  9. Modelling spectral properties of non-equilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2010-02-01

    A model to predict the emissivity and absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen plasma is presented in detail. Non-equilibrium plasma is studied through coupling of the model with a collisional-radiative code for the excited states population as well as with the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function.

  10. Plasma diagnostics of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, Alexey; Scott, David; Keidar, Michael; Shneider, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Intensive development and biomedical application of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jet (NEAPJ) facilitates rapid growth of the plasma medicine field. The NEAPJ facility utilized at the George Washington University (GWU) demonstrated efficacy for treatment of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). In this work we review recent advances of the research conducted at GWU concerned with the development of NEAPJ diagnostics including Rayleigh Microwave Scattering setup, method of streamer scattering on DC potential, Rogowski coils, ICCD camera and optical emission spectroscopy. These tools allow conducting temporally-resolved measurements of plasma density, electrical potential, charge and size of the streamer head, electrical currents flowing though the jet, ionization front propagation speed etc. Transient dynamics of plasma and discharge parameters will be considered and physical processes involved in the discharge will be analyzed including streamer breakdown, electrical coupling of the streamer tip with discharge electrodes, factors determining NEAPJ length, cross-sectional shape and propagation path etc.

  11. Non-equilibrium plasma experiments at The Pennsylvania State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The authors have recently established the capability at The Pennsylvania State University to generate non-equilibrium plasma in atmospheric-pressure air and liquids such as water and saline. The plasma is generated using a high-voltage pulser (Pacific-Electronics PT-55), which is capable of voltage pulses of 75-ns width, peak voltage >50 kV, with rise-times on the order of nanoseconds. The electrodes are tungsten wires of various diameters (50 μm, 175 μm, 254 μm) insulated with nylon tubing. The spacing of the electrodes is controlled with translating mounts with resolution of tens of microns. Spectroscopy (Ocean Optics Model HR2000) is presently used for line identification only. Current and voltage vs. time will be measured with a 500-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope, a high-voltage probe and a shunt resistor connected to the ground side of the circuit. Research directions presently being pursued include the effects of solution electrical conductivity on plasma production and propellant ignition studies. Data from several types of experiments will be presented.

  12. Tailoring non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas for healthcare technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas operated at ambient atmospheric pressure are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. This includes the unique opportunity to deliver short-lived highly reactive species such as atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can initiate a wide range of reactions in biochemical systems, both therapeutic and toxic. The toxicological implications are not clear, e.g. potential risks through DNA damage. It is anticipated that interactions with biological systems will be governed through synergies between two or more species. Suitable optimized plasma sources are improbable through empirical investigations. Quantifying the power dissipation and energy transport mechanisms through the different interfaces from the plasma regime to ambient air, towards the liquid interface and associated impact on the biological system through a new regime of liquid chemistry initiated by the synergy of delivering multiple energy carrying species, is crucial. The major challenge to overcome the obstacles of quantifying energy transport and controlling power dissipation has been the severe lack of suitable plasma sources and diagnostic techniques. Diagnostics and simulations of this plasma regime are very challenging; the highly pronounced collision dominated plasma dynamics at very small dimensions requires extraordinary high resolution - simultaneously in space (microns) and time (picoseconds). Numerical simulations are equally challenging due to the inherent multi-scale character with very rapid electron collisions on the one extreme and the transport of chemically stable species characterizing completely different domains. This presentation will discuss our recent progress actively combining both advance optical diagnostics and multi-scale computer simulations.

  13. Non-equilibrium Flows of Reacting Air Components in Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevich, S. S.; Sinitsyn, K. A.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of non-equilibrium flows of reacting air mixtures in nozzles. State-to-state approach based on the solution of the equations for vibrational level populations of molecules and atomic concentrations coupled to the gas dynamics equations is used. For the 5-component air mixture (N2, O2, NO, N, O) non-equilibrium distributions and gasdynamical parameters are calculated for different conditions in a nozzle throat. The influence of various kinetic processes on distributions and gas dynamics parameters is studied. The paper presents the comparison of the results with ones obtained for binary mixtures of molecules and atoms and various models of elementary processes.

  14. Model of opacity and emissivity of non-equilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politov, V. Y.

    2008-05-01

    In this work the model describing absorption and emission properties of the non-equilibrium plasma is presented. It is based on the kinetics equations for populations of the ground, singly and doubly excited states of multi-charged ions. After solving these equations, the states populations together with the spectroscopic data, supplied in the special database for a lot ionization stages, are used for building the spectral distributions of plasma opacity and emissivity in STA approximation. Results of kinetics simulation are performed for such important X-ray converter as gold, which is investigated intensively in ICF-experiments.

  15. Debye screening under non-equilibrium plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Heyl, M.

    2016-04-01

    As has been revealed in a number of more recent astrophysical papers, in most of the tenuous space plasmas Maxwellian distribution functions cannot be expected for ions or electrons because of the lack of efficient relaxation processes. Many of the classical characteristics of plasmas, such as plasma frequency or Debye length, are calculated on the basis of the assumption, however, that Maxwellians prevail, which under most of the relevant astrophysical plasma conditions is not the case. We here therefore consider this specific problem of Debye shieldings of single charges in a plasma for the case of prevailing non-equilibrium distribution functions for ions and electrons. As typical non-equilibrium functions, so-called Kappa functions were considered with clear preference, and we therefore study here the Debye shielding in a plasma with Kappa-distributed electrons and ions. We show that the so-called Debye shielding increases with increasing extent of the high-velocity tail of the electron distribution function, or in other words, with lower Kappa index of the underlying Kappa function. In our calculations we demonstrate that the Debye lengths become enlarged by about a factor of 10 with respect to its classically expexted value if highly suprathermal electron distributions prevail with Kappa indices close to 1.5.

  16. A simple generator of a stationary flow of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, P.; Barinov, Yu; Faure, G.; Shkol'nik, S.

    2012-02-01

    A simple design of a plasma discharge set up, providing a stationary flow of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma is proposed. The non-equilibrium state of plasma is maintained by using a cathode with a weakly conducting liquid like tap water. The anode is formed with a cooled metal ring-shaped inserted in a dielectric barrel. This assembly is fixed at ~ 1 cm above the water surface. The velocity of the air flow through the anode hole may be changed from 0 m/s up to ~ 10 m/s. The studied discharge in the open air gap between the tap water surface and the anode ring is powered by direct current I ~ 0.1 A. The voltage on the air gap is >= 1 kV. Measurements of current-voltage characteristics at different flow velocities were carried out. Spectra of radiation of the discharge column and the torch above the anode were measured. The measurement results were compared with the results of radiation spectra modeling for non-equilibrium plasma of humid air. The comparison made possible to determine the characteristics of plasma. The characteristics of the plasma depending on the speed of the airflow and the current are studied.

  17. Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Vladimir I.; Fisher, Dimitri V.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2007-05-01

    We describe a model for self-consistent computations of ionic level populations and the radiation field in transient non-equilibrium plasmas. In this model, the plasma density effects are described using the effective-statistical-weights (ESW) formalism based on the statistics of the microscopic environment of individual ions. In comparison to earlier work, the ESW formalism is expanded to a self-consistent treatment of the radiative transfer. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the atomic-kinetics and radiative transfer computations may be performed for an arbitrary distribution of the free electrons. A plasma is presented by a finite number of cells, each with uniform thermodynamic parameters. The radiation field in each cell is computed by accounting for the radiation of entire plasma and of external sources. To demonstrate the predictions of the ESW approach and their difference from those of the traditional approach we apply the model to high-density plasmas. Based on hydrodynamic simulations of a laser-matter interaction, we use the model to analyze spectral line shapes, where the effects caused by the spatial dependence of the plasma flow velocity are demonstrated. In single-cell simulations, for acceleration of the computations, the model utilizes recently derived formula for the cell volume-average and direction-average specific intensity of radiation.

  18. Non Equilibrium Fluctuations In The Degenerated Polarizable Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belyi, V. V.; Kukharenko, Yu. A.

    2009-04-23

    The quantum plasma of Bose and Fermi particles is considered. A scheme of equation linearization for density matrix with the exchange interaction taken in account is proposed and the equation solution is found. An expression for Hartree- Fock dielectric permittivity with the exchange interaction is obtained. This interaction is taken into account in the exchange scattering amplitude. With the use of obtained solutions the non-equilibrium spectral function of electric field fluctuations in presence of exchange interaction and medium polarization is found. It is shown that in the state of thermodynamic equilibrium a Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem holds. An expression for the system's response to an external electric field in presence of exchange interaction is given.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharge for High Speed Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Anandhanarayanan, Karupannasamy; Krishnamurthy, Rajah; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation of hypersonic flow control using plasma discharge technique is carried out using an in-house developed code CERANS-TCNEQ. The study is aimed at demonstrating a proof of concept futuristic aerodynamic flow control device. The Kashiwa Hypersonic and High Temperature wind tunnel study of plasma discharge over a flat plate had been considered for numerical investigation. The 7-species, 18-reaction thermo-chemical non-equilibrium, two-temperature air-chemistry model due Park is used to model the weakly ionized flow. Plasma discharge is modeled as Joule heating source terms in both the translation-rotational and vibrational energy equations. Comparison of results for plasma discharge at Mach 7 over a flat plate with the reference data reveals that the present study is able to mimic the exact physics of complex flow such as formation of oblique shock wave ahead of the plasma discharge region with a resultant rise in surface pressure and vibrational temperature up to 7000 K demonstrating the use of non-equilibrium plasma discharge for flow control at hypersonic speeds.

  20. Synthesis of Silane and Silicon in a Non-equilibrium Plasma Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The original objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of high volume, low-cost production of high purity silane or solar cell grade silicon using a non equilibrium plasma jet. The emphasis was changed near the end of the program to determine the feasibility of preparing photovoltaic amorphous silicon films directly using this method. The non equilibrium plasma jet should be further evaluated as a technique for producing high efficiency photovoltaic amorphous silicon films.

  1. Diagnostics of transient non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a renewed interest in last decades for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation, material processing and synthesis to envisioned medical applications such as wound healing. While most low pressure plasmas are diffuse, atmospheric pressure plasmas are often filamentary in nature. The existence of these filaments is correlated with strong gradients in plasma properties both in space and time that can significantly affect the plasma chemistry. As these filaments are often randomly appearing in space and time, it poses great challenges for diagnostics often requiring the stabilization of the filament to study the in situ plasma kinetics. In this contribution, diagnostics of a stabilized nanosecond pulsed plasma filament in a pin-pin geometry and a filament in a nanosecond pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet will be presented. We will focus on electron kinetics and OH and H radical production in water containing plasmas. The extension of these diagnostics to plasmas in liquids will also be discussed. The author acknowledges support from NSF PHYS1500135, Department of Energy Plasma Science Center through the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (Contract No. DE-SC0001939), University of Minnesota and STW (Netherlands).

  2. Carbon Dioxide reduction by non-equilibrium electrocatalysis plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouroux, J.; Cavadias, S.; Doubla, A.

    2011-03-01

    A possible strategy to increase the added value from CCS, is to consider it as a raw material for the production of liquid fuels, or chemical products. The most studied ways related to CO2 reduction, with formation of molecules such as CH3OH or syngas, is the reaction with H2 (exothermic reaction needing catalytic activation), or CH4 (endothermic reaction taking place at high temperature) with the use of a catalyst. The synthesis of CH3OH is performed on Lewis acid type sites (default of electrons) Cu/Zn/Al2O3. However the products of the reaction i.e. the water and methanol molecules, are very polar, resulting in a very low desorption rate. So in this reaction the key step is water desorption (Lewis basis). The increase of temperature in order to increase this desorption rate, leads to a cracking and the deposition of carbon in the catalyst, limiting its lifetime. Plasma driven catalysis allows firstly, a vibrational activation of CO2, H2 or CH4 through electron-molecule collisions, making easier their dissociation at low temperature and secondly expels water from the catalyst sites by supplying electrons (electropolarisation). The results show an increase of the yield in CH3OH with plasma and catalyst, confirming the action of the plasma. However energy consumption remains relatively high.

  3. Numerical analysis of the non-equilibrium plasma flow in the gaseous electronics conference reference reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijie, Yang; Ning, Zhou; Quanhua, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The capacitively coupled plasma in the gaseous electronics conference reference reactor is numerically investigated for argon flow using a non-equilibrium plasma fluid model. The finite rate chemistry is adopted for the chemical non-equilibrium among species including neutral metastable, whereas a two-temperature model is employed to resolve the thermal non-equilibrium between electrons and heavy species. The predicted plasma density agrees very well with experimental data for the validation case. A strong thermal non-equilibrium is observed between heavy particles and electrons due to its low collision frequency, where the heavy species remains near ambient temperature for low pressure and low voltage conditions (0.1 Torr, 100 V). The effects of the operating parameters on the ion flux are also investigated, including the electrode voltage, chamber pressure, and gas flow rate. It is found that the ion flux can be increased by either elevating the electrode voltage or lowering the gas pressure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11372325, 11475239).

  4. Non-linear optical diagnostic studies of high pressure non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Picosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) is used for study of vibrational energy loading and relaxation kinetics in high pressure nitrogen and air nsec pulsed non-equilibrium plasmas in a pin-to-pin geometry. It is found that ˜33% of total discharge energy in a single pulse in air at 100 torr couples directly to nitrogen vibration by electron impact, in good agreement with master equation modeling predictions. However in the afterglow the total quanta in vibrational levels 0 -- 9 is found to increase by a factor of approximately 2 and 4 in nitrogen and air, respectively, a result in direct contrast to modeling results which predict the total number of quanta to be essentially constant. More detailed comparison between experiment and model show that the VDF predicted by the model during, and directly after, the discharge pulse is in good agreement with that determined experimentally, however for time delays exceeding ˜10 μsec the experimental and predicted VDFs diverge rapidly, particularly for levels v = 2 and greater. Specifically modeling predicts a rapid drop in population of high levels due to net downward V-V energy transfer whereas the experiment shows an increase in population in levels 2 and 3 and approximately constant population for higher levels. It is concluded that a collisional process is feeding high vibrational levels at a rate which is comparable to the rate at which population of the high levels is lost due to net downward V-V. A likely candidate for the source of additional vibrational quanta is the quenching of metastable electronic states of nitrogen to highly excited vibrational levels of the ground electronic state. Recent progress in the development and application of psec coherent Raman electric field and spontaneous Thomson scattering diagnostics for study of high pressure nsec pulsed plasmas will also be presented.

  5. A numerical model of non-equilibrium thermal plasmas. II. Governing equations

    SciTech Connect

    Li HePing; Zhang XiaoNing; Xia Weidong

    2013-03-15

    Governing equations and the corresponding physical properties of the plasmas are both prerequisites for studying the fundamental processes in a non-equilibrium thermal plasma system numerically. In this paper, a kinetic derivation of the governing equations used for describing the complicated thermo-electro-magneto-hydrodynamic-chemical coupling effects in non-equilibrium thermal plasmas is presented. This derivation, which is achieved using the Chapman-Enskog method, is completely consistent with the theory of the transport properties reported in the previous paper by the same authors. It is shown, based on this self-consistent theory, that the definitions of the specific heat at constant pressure and the reactive thermal conductivity of two-temperature plasmas are not necessary. The governing equations can be reduced to their counterparts under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and local chemical equilibrium (LCE) conditions. The general method for the determination of the boundary conditions of the solved variables is also discussed briefly. The two papers establish a self-consistent physical-mathematical model that describes the complicated physical and chemical processes in a thermal plasma system for the cases both in LTE or LCE conditions and under non-equilibrium conditions.

  6. Analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Lani, A.; Panesi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This work addresses the modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma discharges. In the proposed computational model, the electromagnetic induction equation is solved together with the set of Navier-Stokes equations in order to compute the electromagnetic and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles, with the method of Chapman and Enskog. Particle ambipolar diffusive fluxes are found by solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations with a simple iterative method. Two physico-mathematical formulations are used to model the chemical reaction processes: (1) A Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) formulation and (2) a thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) formulation. In the TCNEQ model, thermal non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules is accounted for. The electronic states of the chemical species are assumed in equilibrium with the vibrational temperature, whereas the rotational energy mode is assumed to be equilibrated with translation. Three different physical models are used to account for the coupling of chemistry and energy transfer processes. Numerical simulations obtained with the LTE and TCNEQ formulations are used to characterize the extent of non-equilibrium of the flow inside the Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute. Each model was tested using different kinetic mechanisms to assess the sensitivity of the results to variations in the reaction parameters. A comparison of temperatures and composition profiles at the outlet of the torch demonstrates that the flow is in non-equilibrium for operating conditions characterized by pressures below 30 000 Pa, frequency 0.37 MHz, input power 80 kW, and mass flow 8 g/s.

  7. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-04-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  8. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  9. Multi-Modality Pulsed AC Source for Medical Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, Daniel; Gilbert, James

    2014-10-01

    A burgeoning field has developed around the use of non-equilibrium (``cold'') plasmas for various medical applications, including wound treatment, surface sterilization, non-thermal hemostasis, and selective cell destruction. Proposed devices typically utilize pulsed DC power sources, which have no other therapeutic utility, and may encounter significant regulatory restrictions regarding their safety for use in patient care. Additionally, dedicated capital equipment is difficult for healthcare facilities to justify. In this work, we have demonstrated for the first time the generation of non-equilibrium plasma using pulsed AC output from a specially-designed electrosurgical generator. The ability to power novel non-equilibrium plasma devices from a piece of equipment already ubiquitous in operating theatres should significantly reduce the barriers to adoption of plasma devices. We demonstrate the ability of a prototype device, coupled to this source, to reduce bacterial growth in vitro. Such a system could allow a single surgical instrument to provide both non-thermal sterilization and thermal tissue dissection.

  10. Influence of dielectric materials on radial uniformity in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akinori; Komori, Kyohei

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma has been utilized for various technological applications such as surface treatment, materials processing, bio-medical and bio-logical applications. For optimum control of the plasma for the above applications, numerous experimental and theoretical investigations on the plasma have been reported. Especially, controlling radial uniformity of the plasma are very important for utilizing materials processing. In this paper, an axially-symmetric three-dimensional fluid model, which is composed of the continuity equation for charged and neutral species, the Poisson equation, and the energy conservation equation for electrons, of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma has been developed. Then, influence of dielectric properties (e.g. relative permittivity, secondary electron emission coefficient, etc.) of dielectric materials on radial plasma uniformity (i.e. radial distributions of electron density, ion density, electric field in the plasma) was examined. This work was partly supported by KAKENHI (No. 26420247), and a ``Grant for Advanced Industrial Technology Development (No. 11B06004d)'' in 2011 from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  11. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  12. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355 nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  13. Coupled discretization of multicomponent diffusion problems in equilibrium and non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; Ten Thije Boonkkamp, Jan; van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2013-09-01

    Solving balance equations is the essence of any fluid simulation of reactive, multicomponent plasmas. For plasmas in chemical non-equilibrium, balance equations are solved for all species of interest. When reactions are very fast with respect to transport time scales - and the plasma approaches chemical equilibrium - species abundances can be obtained from equilibrium relations. However, in many cases, balance equations still need to be solved for the elements, since the elemental composition can vary significantly in reactive multicomponent plasmas. Both in equilibrium and in non-equilibrium the species diffusive fluxes in these balance equations are governed by the Stefan-Maxwell equations. The use of Stefan-Maxwell diffusion leads to a coupled set of balance equations. Furthermore, this coupled set of equations is subject to charge and mass conservation constraints. Due to these complications the set of balance equations is often artificially decoupled to fit in the traditional finite volume discretization schemes and the constraints are explicitly applied. This approach can lead to very poor convergence behavior. We will present a new approach using a finite volume discretization scheme that takes into account the coupling and treats the constraints implicitly.

  14. Dimension reduction of non-equilibrium plasma kinetic models using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; Parente, Alessandro; Kozák, Tomáš; Bogaerts, Annemie; Degrez, Gérard

    2015-04-01

    The chemical complexity of non-equilibrium plasmas poses a challenge for plasma modeling because of the computational load. This paper presents a dimension reduction method for such chemically complex plasmas based on principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is used to identify a low-dimensional manifold in chemical state space that is described by a small number of parameters: the principal components. Reduction is obtained since continuity equations only need to be solved for these principal components and not for all the species. Application of the presented method to a CO2 plasma model including state-to-state vibrational kinetics of CO2 and CO demonstrates the potential of the PCA method for dimension reduction. A manifold described by only two principal components is able to predict the CO2 to CO conversion at varying ionization degrees very accurately.

  15. Synthesis of silane and silicon in a non-equilibrium plasma jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.; Felder, W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using a non-equilibrium hydrogen plasma jet as a chemical synthesis tool was investigated. Four possible processes were identified for further study: (1) production of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic surfaces, (2) production of SiHCl3 from SiCl4, (3) production of SiH4 from SiHCl3, and (4) purification of SiCl4 by metal impurity nucleation. The most striking result was the recognition that the strongly adhering silicon films, amorphous or polycrystalline, produced in our studies could be the basis for preparing a photovoltaic surface directly; this process has potential advantages over other vapor deposition processes.

  16. An unstructured shock-fitting solver for hypersonic plasma flows in chemical non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, R.; Bonfiglioli, A.; D'Angola, A.; Colonna, G.; Paciorri, R.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD solver, using Residual Distribution Schemes on unstructured grids, has been extended to deal with inviscid chemical non-equilibrium flows. The conservative equations have been coupled with a kinetic model for argon plasma which includes the argon metastable state as independent species, taking into account electron-atom and atom-atom processes. Results in the case of an hypersonic flow around an infinite cylinder, obtained by using both shock-capturing and shock-fitting approaches, show higher accuracy of the shock-fitting approach.

  17. On non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets and plasma bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinpei

    2012-10-01

    Because of the enhanced plasma chemistry, atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas (APNPs) have been widely studied for several emerging applications such as biomedical applications. For the biomedical applications, plasma jet devices, which generate plasma in open space (surrounding air) rather than in confined discharge gaps only, have lots of advantages over the traditional dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices. For example, it can be used for root canal disinfection, which can't be realized by the traditional plasma device. On the other hand, currently, the working gases of most of the plasma jet devices are noble gases or the mixtures of the noble gases with small amount of O2, or air. If ambient air is used as the working gas, several serious difficulties are encountered in the plasma generation process. Amongst these are high gas temperatures and disrupting instabilities. In this presentation, firstly, a brief review of the different cold plasma jets developed to date is presented. Secondly, several different plasma jet devices developed in our lab are reported. The effects of various parameters on the plasma jets are discussed. Finally, one of the most interesting phenomena of APNP-Js, the plasma bullet is discussed and its behavior is described. References: [1] X. Lu, M. Laroussi, V. Puech, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 034005 (2012); [2] Y. Xian, X. Lu, S. Wu, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 123702 (2012); [3] X. Pei, X. Lu, J. Liu, D. Liu, Y. Yang, K. Ostrikov, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, J. Phys. D 45, 165205 (2012).

  18. Application of non-equilibrium plasmas in treatment of wool fibers and seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran

    2003-10-01

    While large effort is under way to achieve stable, large area, non-equilibrium plasma reactors operating at atmospheric pressure we should still consider application of low pressure reactors, which provide well defined, easily controlled reactive plasmas. Therefore, the application of low pressure rf plasmas for the treatment of wool and seed was investigated. The studies were aimed at establishing optimal procedure to achieve better wettability, dyeability and printability of wool. Plasma treatment led to a modification of wool fiber topography and formation of new polar functional groups inducing the increase of wool hydrophylicity. Plasma activation of fiber surface was also used to achieve better binding of biopolymer chitosan to wool in order to increase the content of favorable functional groups and thus improving sorption properties of recycled wool fibers for heavy metal ions and acid dyes. In another study, the increase of germination percentage of seeds induced by plasmas was investigated. We have selected dry (unimbibed) Empress tree seeds (Paulownia tomentosa Steud.). Empress tree seed has been studied extensively and its mechanism of germination is well documented. Germination of these seeds is triggered by light in a limited range of wavelengths. Interaction between activated plasma particles and seed, inside the plasma reactor, leads to changes in its surface topography, modifies the surface layer and increases the active surface area. Consequently, some bioactive nitrogeneous compounds could be bound to the activated surface layer causing the increment of germination percentage.

  19. Tracing non-equilibrium plasma dynamics on the attosecond timescale in small clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, Ulf; Georgescu, Ionut; Rost, Jan M.

    2008-02-01

    It is shown by microscopic calculations that the energy absorption of a rare-gas cluster from a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) pulse can be traced with time-delayed extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond probe pulses by measuring the kinetic energy of the electrons detached by the probe pulse. By means of this scheme we demonstrate that, for pump pulses as short as one femtosecond, the charging of the cluster proceeds during the formation of an electronic nano-plasma inside the cluster. Using moderate harmonics for the VUV and high harmonics for the XUV pulse from the same near-infrared laser source, this scheme with well defined time delays between pump and probe pulses should be experimentally realizable. Going to even shorter pulse durations we predict that pump and probe pulses of about 250 attoseconds can induce and monitor non-equilibrium dynamics of the nano-plasma.

  20. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A. Alfuhaid, S. A. Panesi, M.; Cambier, J.-L.

    2015-10-07

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled system of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.

  1. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, A.; Alfuhaid, S. A.; Cambier, J.-L.; Panesi, M.

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled system of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.

  2. Inactivation Process of Penicillium digitatum Spores Treated with Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Mori, Takumi; Iseki, Sachiko; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores treated with a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma, the spores were observed using a fluorescent microscope and compared with those treated with ultraviolet (UV) light or moist heat. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as cell membranes in the spores treated with the plasma were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes, while the organelles were never stained in the spores treated with UV light or moist heat. Moreover, DPPP staining revealed that organelles were oxidized by plasma treatment unlike UV light or moist heat treatments. These results suggest that only plasma treatment induces a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles without a major deformation of the membranes through the penetration of reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma into the cell.

  3. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Yu; Unno, Yasuko; Okazaki, Ken

    2001-12-01

    Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas were investigated extensively through energy balance analysis, emission spectroscopy of the rotational band of CH (A2Δ→X2Π), and gas chromatographic analysis. Two plasma sources were examined: methane-fed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APG). The DBD features filamentary microdischarges accompanied by surface discharge along a dielectric barrier. As a result, 60% of the input power was measured as heat transfer to the dielectric electrode, whereas 20% was to the metallic electrode. Consequently, feed gas average temperature was increased only by 20-40 K. On the other hand, rotational temperature of the corresponding emission region exceeded average gas temperature by 100 K. In APG, heat transfer to electrodes was dominated by formation of negative glow regardless of whether the electrode was covered by a dielectric. However, negative glow tended to be thinner and more intense when it formed on a metallic electrode, leading to slightly higher metallic heating. Rotational temperature in APG was close to average gas temperature since APG does not show radial localization of plasma. Energy efficiency for methane decomposition process to produce ethane, ethylene, and hydrogen was about 1% regardless of the plasma source. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms depend strongly on the plasma spatial structure rather than flow fields or feed gas physical properties.

  4. Effect of ozone on sterilization of Penicillium digitatum using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Iseki, Sachiko; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    Methyl bromide has been sprayed to the crops for protecting from insects and virus, but has high ozone depletion potential. Thus, the development of substitute-technology has been strongly required. We have investigated a plasma sterilization for spores of Penicillium digitatum, which causes green mold disease of the crops, using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. The sterilization was caused by UV light, ozone, O and OH radicals. In this study, ozone density was measured and the effect to sterilization was discussed. The plasma was generated at an alternative current of 6kV and Ar gas flow rate of 3L/min. In order to investigate the sterilization mechanism of ozone, the absolute density of ozone was measured using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and was from 2 to 8 ppm. The sterilization by this plasma was larger than that by the ozonizer (03:600ppm). It is confirmed that the effect of ozone to the sterilization of Penicillium digitatum would be small.

  5. Physics and chemistry of non-equilibrium, atmospheric pressure plasmas containing fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiawan

    The physics and chemistry of low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas containing fluorine have been investigated with current, voltage, and power measurements, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and optical emission spectroscopy. The plasma source consisted of two closely spaced metal electrodes, supplied with radio-frequency power at 13.56 MHz. The fluorine atom concentration was measured in the downstream region of a carbon tetrafluoride and helium plasma using infrared spectroscopy. The gas discharge generated 1.2 x 10 15 cm-3 of F atoms, which is ˜100 times higher than that found in low-pressure plasmas. A numerical model of the plasma indicated that most of the F atoms were generated by the reaction of CF4 with metastable helium atoms. It was discovered that the atmospheric pressure, radio-frequency plasma could be made to undergo sheath breakdown with conversion from an alpha- to a gamma-mode discharge. With 0.4 vol% nitrogen in helium, this transition was accompanied by a 40% drop in voltage, a 12% decrease in current, and a surge in power density from 25 to 2083 W/cm3. The shift in intense plasma emission from the bulk gas to the surface of the electrodes was documented by optical techniques. When the plasma was operated in the alpha and gamma modes, 5.2% and 15.2% of the N2 was dissociated into atoms, respectively. In the latter case, the low dissociation efficiency was ascribed to the nonuniform structure of the plasma across the gap. In plasmas containing 1.0 vol% carbon tetrafluoride and sulfur hexafluoride, the alpha to gamma transition occurred smoothly with no discharge contraction. The electron density in these plasmas equaled 6.0 x 1011 cm-3, compared to 1.9 x 1013 cm -3 in pure helium. The drop in plasma density was due to fast electron attachment processes caused by the electronegative molecules, which also resulted in a high density of negative ions, up to 1013 cm-3. In addition, the non-equilibrium, atmospheric pressure plasma was used to

  6. The stationary non-equilibrium plasma of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2016-06-01

    The statistical properties of the two-component plasma of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons measured by the AMS-02 experiment on the International Space Station and the HESS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are analyzed. Stationary non-equilibrium distributions defining the relativistic electron-positron plasma are derived semi-empirically by performing spectral fits to the flux data and reconstructing the spectral number densities of the electronic and positronic components in phase space. These distributions are relativistic power-law densities with exponential cutoff, admitting an extensive entropy variable and converging to the Maxwell-Boltzmann or Fermi-Dirac distributions in the non-relativistic limit. Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons constitute a classical (low-density high-temperature) plasma due to the low fugacity in the quantized partition function. The positron fraction is assembled from the flux densities inferred from least-squares fits to the electron and positron spectra and is subjected to test by comparing with the AMS-02 flux ratio measured in the GeV interval. The calculated positron fraction extends to TeV energies, predicting a broad spectral peak at about 1 TeV followed by exponential decay.

  7. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian

    2014-03-14

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10 cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5 Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  8. A numerical model of non-equilibrium thermal plasmas. I. Transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang XiaoNing; Xia WeiDong; Li HePing; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2013-03-15

    A self-consistent and complete numerical model for investigating the fundamental processes in a non-equilibrium thermal plasma system consists of the governing equations and the corresponding physical properties of the plasmas. In this paper, a new kinetic theory of the transport properties of two-temperature (2-T) plasmas, based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation using a modified Chapman-Enskog method, is presented. This work is motivated by the large discrepancies between the theories for the calculation of the transport properties of 2-T plasmas proposed by different authors in previous publications. In the present paper, the coupling between electrons and heavy species is taken into account, but reasonable simplifications are adopted, based on the physical fact that m{sub e}/m{sub h} Much-Less-Than 1, where m{sub e} and m{sub h} are, respectively, the masses of electrons and heavy species. A new set of formulas for the transport coefficients of 2-T plasmas is obtained. The new theory has important physical and practical advantages over previous approaches. In particular, the diffusion coefficients are complete and satisfy the mass conversation law due to the consideration of the coupling between electrons and heavy species. Moreover, this essential requirement is satisfied without increasing the complexity of the transport coefficient formulas. Expressions for the 2-T combined diffusion coefficients are obtained. The expressions for the transport coefficients can be reduced to the corresponding well-established expressions for plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium for the case in which the electron and heavy-species temperatures are equal.

  9. Developments in Power efficient dissociation of CO2 using non-equilibrium plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sanden, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Sustainable energy generation by means of, either photovoltaic conversion, concentrated solar power or wind, will certainly form a significant part of the energy mix in 2025. The intermittency as well as the temporal variation and the regional spread of this energy source, however, requires a means to store and transport energy on a large scale. In this presentation the means of storage will be addressed of sustainable energy transformed into fuels and the prominent role plasma science and technology can play in this great challenge. The storage of sustainable energy in these so called solar fuels, e.g. hydrocarbons and alcohols, by means of artificial photosynthesis from the feedstock CO2 and H2O, will enable a CO2 neutral power generation infrastructure, which is close to the present infrastructure based on fossil fuels. The challenge will be to achieve power efficient dissociation of CO2 or H2O or both, after which traditional chemical conversion (Fisher-Tropsch, Sabatier, etc.) towards fuels can take place. A promising route is the dissociation or activation of CO2 by means of plasma, possible combined with catalysis. Taking advantage of non-equilibrium plasma conditions to reach optimal energy efficiency we have started a solar fuels program at the beginning of 2012 focusing on CO2 plasma dissociation into CO and O2. The plasma is generated in a low loss microwave cavity with microwave powers up to 10 kW using a supersonic expansion to quench the plasma and prevent vibrational-translational relaxation losses. New ideas on the design of the facility and results on power efficient conversion (more then 50%) of large CO2 flows (up to 75 standard liter per minute with 11% conversion) at low gas temperatures will be presented.

  10. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems. PMID:26170423

  11. Application Of Highly Non-Equilibrium Plasma For Modification Of Biomedical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozetic, M.

    2010-07-01

    Non-equilibrium processing of organic materials enables modification of surface properties without changing bulk characteristics of materials. Heavily nonequilibrium state of gas is obtained in a variety of discharges, but electrode-less high frequency discharges are particularly useful. Such discharges often provide plasma with a low ionization fraction (often below 10^-5), but the dissociation fraction is often close to 100%. Neutral atoms readily react with organic materials even at room temperature. Depending on the type of organic material, both surface morphology and functionality are modified. The technique is particularly suitable for improvement of biocompatibility as well as for controlled degradation of biological cells. Several examples on the functionalization of polymer materials will be presented. Furthermore, extremely high etching selectivity of neutral oxygen atoms allows for modification of the surface roughness which, in combination with extremely high density of polar surface functional groups leads to super-hydrophilic character of some polymers. An interesting application of such technology is for modification of the surface properties of vascular grafts. Plasma treated artificial blood vessels exhibit excellent anti-thrombogenic properties as well as good ability for growing of endothelial cells. The same technique is applied for selective removal of some organic materials from biological cells. Proper treatment allows for revealing the internal structure of biological cells. Examples of treatment of different bacteria are presented.

  12. Analyses on the Ionization Instability of Non-Equilibrium Seeded Plasma in an MHD Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chi Kien

    2016-06-01

    Recently, closed cycle magnetohydrodynamic power generation system research has been focused on improving the isentropic efficiency and the enthalpy extraction ratio. By reducing the cross-section area ratio of the disk magnetohydrodynamic generator, it is believed that a high isentropic efficiency can be achieved with the same enthalpy extraction. In this study, the result relating to a plasma state which takes into account the ionization instability of non-equilibrium seeded plasma is added to the theoretical prediction of the relationship between enthalpy extraction and isentropic efficiency. As a result, the electron temperature which reaches the seed complete ionization state without the growth of ionization instability can be realized at a relatively high seed fraction condition. However, the upper limit of the power generation performance is suggested to remain lower than the value expected in the low seed fraction condition. It is also suggested that a higher power generation performance may be obtained by implementing the electron temperature range which reaches the seed complete ionization state at a low seed fraction.

  13. Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran; Mason, Nigel; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2007-06-01

    Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts and Institute of Physics, Belgrade. Each Symposium has sought to highlight a key topic of plasma research and the 5th EU - Japan symposium explored the role of Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas since these are key elements of plasma processing. Other aspects of technologies for manufacturing integrated circuits were also considered. Unlike bio-medicine and perhaps politics, in plasma processing free radicals are `good radicals' but their kinetics are difficult to understand since there remains little data on their collisions with electrons and ions. One of the goals of the symposium was to facilitate communication between experimentalists and theorists in binary collision physics with plasma modellers and practitioners of plasma processing in order to optimize efforts to provide much needed data for both molecules and radicals of practical importance. The non-equilibrium nature of plasmas is critical in the efficient manufacturing of high resolution structures by anisotropic plasma etching on Si wafers since they allow separate control of the directionality and energy of ions and provide a high level of separation between the mean energies of electrons and ions. As nanotechnologies become practical, plasma processing may play a key role, not only in manufacturing of integrated circuits, but also for self-organization of massively parallel manufacturing of nanostructures. In this Symposium the key issues that are hindering the development of such new, higher resolution technologies were discussed and some possible solutions were proposed. In particular, damage control, fast neutral etching, processes at surface and modeling of profiles were addressed in several of the lectures. A wide range of topics are covered in this book including atomic and molecular collision physics - primarily focused towards formation and analysis of radicals, basic swarm data and breakdown kinetics, basic kinetics of RF and DC

  14. Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran; Mason, Nigel; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2007-06-01

    Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts and Institute of Physics, Belgrade. Each Symposium has sought to highlight a key topic of plasma research and the 5th EU - Japan symposium explored the role of Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas since these are key elements of plasma processing. Other aspects of technologies for manufacturing integrated circuits were also considered. Unlike bio-medicine and perhaps politics, in plasma processing free radicals are `good radicals' but their kinetics are difficult to understand since there remains little data on their collisions with electrons and ions. One of the goals of the symposium was to facilitate communication between experimentalists and theorists in binary collision physics with plasma modellers and practitioners of plasma processing in order to optimize efforts to provide much needed data for both molecules and radicals of practical importance. The non-equilibrium nature of plasmas is critical in the efficient manufacturing of high resolution structures by anisotropic plasma etching on Si wafers since they allow separate control of the directionality and energy of ions and provide a high level of separation between the mean energies of electrons and ions. As nanotechnologies become practical, plasma processing may play a key role, not only in manufacturing of integrated circuits, but also for self-organization of massively parallel manufacturing of nanostructures. In this Symposium the key issues that are hindering the development of such new, higher resolution technologies were discussed and some possible solutions were proposed. In particular, damage control, fast neutral etching, processes at surface and modeling of profiles were addressed in several of the lectures. A wide range of topics are covered in this book including atomic and molecular collision physics - primarily focused towards formation and analysis of radicals, basic swarm data and breakdown kinetics, basic kinetics of RF and DC

  15. Practical and theoretical considerations on the use of ICCD imaging for the characterization of non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherardi, Matteo; Puač, Nevena; Marić, Dragana; Stancampiano, Augusto; Malović, Gordana; Colombo, Vittorio; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade the use of ICCD cameras as a means for characterizing non-equilibrium plasmas has been steadily increasing. Due to their high sensitivity and high speed gateability, ICCD cameras enable time-resolved studies of the anatomy and, when adopted in conjunction with filters, monochromators, spectrometers or laser systems, time-resolved investigation of physical and chemical properties of non-equilibrium plasma discharges. This paper is meant as an introduction to ICCD technology and its use as a plasma diagnostic technique, discussing the experimental problems typically associated with its use and providing the readers with practical examples and suggestions on how to address them. In particular, the issues of ICCD camera synchronization with the voltage pulse driving the plasma discharge and of investigating small volume discharges are addressed, focusing mainly on the case of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets. Finally, a possible way to achieve absolute calibration of plasma discharge emission is presented and discussed. A wide range of data, mostly unpublished, is provided here to illustrate the points.

  16. Laboratory studies of kinetic instabilities under double plasma resonance condition in a mirror-confined non-equilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Zaitsev, Valery

    2016-04-01

    Plasma instabilities in magnetic traps on the Sun are the sources of powerful broadband radio emission (the so-called type IV bursts) which is interpreted as the excitation of plasma waves by fast electrons in the upper hybrid resonance frequency followed by transformation in electromagnetic waves. In the case of double plasma resonance condition when the frequency of the upper hybrid resonance coincides with one of the electron gyrofrequency harmonics the instability increment of plasma waves is greatly increased. This leads to the appearance of bright narrow-band radio emission near the harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency - the so-called zebra patterns. With the use of non-equilibrium mirror-confined plasma produced by the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge we provide the possibility to study plasma instabilities under double plasma resonance condition in the laboratory. In the experiment such conditions are fulfilled just after ECR heating switch-off, i.e. in the very beginning of a dense plasma decay phase. The observed instability is accompanied by a pulse-periodic generation of a powerful electromagnetic radiation at a frequency close to the upper hybrid resonance frequency and a second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency, and synchronous precipitations of fast electrons from the trap ends. It is shown that the observed instability is due to the excitation of plasma waves at a double plasma resonance in decaying plasma of the ECR discharge. Possible manifestations of double plasma resonance effect are not rare in astrophysical plasmas. The phenomenon of zebra pattern is observed not only on the Sun, but in the decametric radiation of the Jupiter, kilometric radiation of the Earth and even in the radio emissions of pulsars. Thus, verification of the effect of double plasma resonance in a laboratory plasma experiments is a very relevant task.

  17. Dynamical properties of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets and their applications to plasma processing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsuhisa; Satoshi, Ikawa; Furusho, Hitoshi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2007-11-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets are discussed with the emphasis on their physics and applications. Plume-like plasmas, which may be called plasma jets, have been generated in a discharge system consisting of a dielectric/metal tube (through which He gas flows at the atmospheric pressure) and a single electrode attached to the tube, to which low-frequency, high-voltage pulses (˜10kV, ˜10kHz) are applied. With visible light images taken by a high-speed ICCD camera, it has been confirmed that the plasma jet consists of a series of small ``plasma bullets'' that are emitted intermittently from the powered electrode in sync with the positive voltage pulses. The observed ``plasma bullet'' may be interpreted as a fast moving ionization front. The plasma jets are energetic enough to generate highly reactive charge-neutral radicals but their gas temperatures remain low. Therefore the plasma jets are ideal for processing of liquid based materials at low temperatures and some examples of process applications, such as reduction of cations, polymerization of liquid monomers, and sterilization, will be also presented.

  18. Study of a non-equilibrium plasma pinch with application for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Agry, Ahmad Farouk

    The Non-Equilibrium Plasma Pinch (NEPP), also known as the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is well known as a source of energetic ions, relativistic electrons and neutrons as well as electromagnetic radiation extending from the infrared to X-ray. In this dissertation, the operation of a 15 kJ, Mather type, NEPP machine is studied in detail. A large number of experiments are carried out to tune the machine parameters for best performance using helium and hydrogen as filling gases. The NEPP machine is modified to be able to extract the copious number of electrons generated at the pinch. A hollow anode with small hole at the flat end, and a mock magnetron without biasing magnetic field are built. The electrons generated at the pinch are very difficult to capture, therefore a novel device is built to capture and transport the electrons from the pinch to the magnetron. The novel cup-rod-needle device successfully serves the purpose to capture and transport electrons to monitor the pinch current. Further, the device has the potential to field emit charges from its needle end acting as a pulsed electron source for other devices such as the magnetron. Diagnostics tools are designed, modeled, built, calibrated, and implemented in the machine to measure the pinch dynamics. A novel, UNLV patented electromagnetic dot sensors are successfully calibrated, and implemented in the machine. A new calibration technique is developed and test stands designed and built to measure the dot's ability to track the impetus signal over its dynamic range starting and ending in the noise region. The patented EM-dot sensor shows superior performance over traditional electromagnetic sensors, such as Rogowski coils. On the other hand, the cup-rod structure, when grounded on the rod side, serves as a diagnostic tool to monitor the pinch current by sampling the actual current, a quantity that has been always very challenging to measure without perturbing the pinch. To the best of our knowledge, this method

  19. Non-equilibrium modeling of UV laser induced plasma on a copper target in the presence of Cu2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Oumeziane, Amina; Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2016-03-01

    This work is a contribution to the understanding of UV laser ablation of a copper sample in the presence of Cu2+ species as well as electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plasma. This particular study extends a previous paper and develops a 1D hydrodynamic model to describe the behavior of the laser induced plume, including the thermal non-equilibrium between electrons and heavy particles. Incorporating the formation of doubly charged ions (Cu2+) in such an approach has not been considered previously. We evaluate the effect of the presence of doubly ionized species on the characteristics of the plume, i.e., temperature, pressure, and expansion velocity, and on the material itself by evaluating the ablation depth and plasma shielding effects. This study evaluates the effects of the doubly charged species using a non-equilibrium hydrodynamic approach which comprises a contribution to the understanding of the governing processes of the interaction of ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses with metals and the parameter optimization depending on the intended application.

  20. Synthesis of calcium oxalate crystals in culture medium irradiated with non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Octahedral particulates several tens of microns in size were synthesized in a culture medium irradiated through contact with a plume of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (NEAPP). The particulates were identified in the crystalline phase as calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). The original medium contained constituents such as NaCl, d-glucose, CaCl2, and NaHCO3 but not oxalate or oxalic acid. The oxalate was clearly synthesized and crystallized in the medium as thermodynamically unstable COD crystals after the NEAPP irradiation.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Plasma Applications for Water Purification Supporting Human Spaceflight and Terrestrial Point-of-Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.; Foster, John E.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    2016 NASA Glenn Technology Day Panel Presentation on May 24, 2016. The panel description is: Environmental Impact: NASA Glenn Water Capabilities Both global water scarcity and water treatment concerns are two of the most predominant environmental issues of our time. Glenn researchers share insights on a snow sensing technique, hyper spectral imaging of Lake Erie algal blooms, and a discussion on non-equilibrium plasma applications for water purification supporting human spaceflight and terrestrial point-of-use. The panel moderator will be Bryan Stubbs, Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance.

  2. Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2014-03-13

    Our main activity has been doing lab experiments where plasmas having morphology and behavior similar to solar and astrophysical plasmas are produced and studied. The solar experiment is mounted on one end of a large vacuum chamber while the astrophysical jet experiment is mounted on the other end. Diagnostics are shared between the two experiments. The solar experiment produces arched plasma loops that behave very much like solar corona loops. The astrophysical jet experiment produces plasma jets that are very much like astrophysical jets. We have also done work on plasma waves, including general wave dispersions, and specific properties of kinetic Alfven waves and of whistler waves.

  3. Non-equilibrium magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.

    2011-04-20

    Colloidal dispersions of interacting particles subjected to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial self-assembled patterns and complex collective behavior. A fundamental issue is how collective ordering in such non-equilibrium systems arises from the dynamics of discrete interacting components. In addition, from a practical viewpoint, by working in regimes far from equilibrium new self-organized structures which are generally not available through equilibrium thermodynamics can be created. In this review spontaneous self-assembly phenomena in magnetic colloidal dispersions suspended at liquid-air interfaces and driven out of equilibrium by an alternating magnetic field are presented. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered self-assembled structures emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex unconventional magnetic ordering. Nontrivial self-induced hydrodynamic fields accompany each out-of-equilibrium pattern. Spontaneous symmetry breaking of the self-induced surface flows leading to a formation of self-propelled microstructures has been discovered. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of the amplitude equation (Ginzburg-Landau type equation) for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. To understand the fundamental microscopic mechanisms governing self-assembly processes in magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces a first-principle model for a non-equilibrium self-assembly is presented. The latter model allows us to capture in detail the entire process of out-of-equilibrium self-assembly in the system and reproduces most of the observed phenomenology.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis and Stochastic Simulations of Non-equilibrium Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George E.

    2009-11-05

    We study parametric uncertainties involved in plasma flows and apply stochastic sensitivity analysis to rank the importance of all inputs to guide large-scale stochastic simulations. Specifically, we employ different gradient-based sensitivity methods, namely Morris, multi-element probabilistic collocation method (ME-PCM) on sparse grids, Quasi-Monte Carlo, and Monte Carlo methods. These approaches go beyond the standard ``One-At-a-Time" sensitivity analysis and provide a measure of the nonlinear interaction effects for the uncertain inputs. The objective is to perform systematic stochastic simulations of plasma flows treating only as {\\em stochastic processes} the inputs with the highest sensitivity index, hence reducing substantially the computational cost. Two plasma flow examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the stochastic sensitivity analysis. The first one is a two-fluid model in a shock tube while the second one is a one-fluid/two-temperature model in flow past a cylinder.

  5. Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Massot, Marc; Graille, Benjamin; Magin, Thierry E.

    2011-05-20

    We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

  6. Gallium nitride nanoneedles grown in extremely non-equilibrium nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangla, O.; Roy, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, gallium nitride (GaN) nanoneedles are grown on quartz substrates using the high fluence ions of GaN produced by hot, dense and extremely non-equlibrium nitrogen plasma in a modified dense plasma focus device. The formation of nanoneedles is obtained from the scanning electron microscopy with mean size of the head of nanoneedles ~ 70 nm. The nanoneedles are found to be poly-crystalline when studied structurally through the X-ray diffraction. The optical properties of nanoneedles studied using absorption spectra which show more absorption for nanoneedles depsoited one shot of ions irradiation. In addition, the band gap of nanoneedles is found to be increased as compared to bulk GaN. The obtained nanoneedles with increased band gap have potential applications in detector systems.

  7. Non-equilibrium radiation during SiC-CO2 plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémare, Noémie; Jouen, Samuel; Boubert, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The radiation of a pure CO2 inductive plasma was recorded between 190 and 920 nm during its interaction with a SiC sample under a pressure equal to 6 kPa and an estimated global specific enthalpy close to 12 MJ kg-1. The plasma electronic excitation was found to be out of equilibrium. The main radiators were found to be O, C, C2 and, mainly, CO. The radiation is especially significant where the plasma chemically interacts with the material revealing a stronger electronic excitation close to the surface. Excitation temperatures were also found to increase in the chemical boundary layer, which is four times smaller than the thermal boundary layer. This raises questions about the energy exchange processes of the excited states and about chemical behaviour independent of their respective ground states. The surface is found to be covered by an inhomogeneous silica layer revealing a passive oxidation, but also by bubble structures, indicative of the transition towards active oxidation. The surface temperature is estimated to be 1800-1900 K. Raman spectroscopy measurements on the surface and optical spectroscopy measurements in the boundary layer provide proof of carbon production coming from the SiC.

  8. Computation of non-equilibrium flow downstream of a plasma torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harle, Christophe; Varghese, Philip L.; Carey, Graham F.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible reacting flow in an axisymmetric geometry are presented for a nitrogen plasma torch with both thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new axisymmetric finite element/finite volume formulation in which the convective flux is treated by an extension of the approximate Riemann solver due to Osher. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with a previous solution of the same problem using a different computational scheme. Results obtained using two different models of nonthermal dissociation rates are compared to experimental data.

  9. Thermophysical properties of nitrogen plasmas under thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Weizong; Rong Mingzhe; Yan, J. D.; Spencer, Joseph W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-11-15

    Calculated thermophysical properties of nitrogen plasmas in and out of thermal equilibrium are presented. The cut-off of the partition functions due to the lowering of the ionization potential has been taken into account, together with the contributions from different core excited electronic states. The species composition and thermodynamic properties are determined numerically using the Newton-Raphson iterative method, taking into account the corrections due to Coulomb interactions. The transport properties including diffusion coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity are calculated using the most recent collision interaction potentials by adopting Devoto's electron and heavy particle decoupling approach, expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) in the framework of Chapman-Enskog method. Results are presented in the pressure range of 0.1 atm-10 atm and in electron temperature range from 300 to 40 000 K, with the ratio of electron temperature to heavy-particle temperature varied from 1 to 20. Results are compared with those from previous works, and the influences of different definitions of the Debye length are discussed.

  10. Electric Field Measurements in Non-Equilibrium Electric Discharge Plasmas Using Picosecond Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.

    This dissertation presents the results of development of a picosecond four wave mixing technique and its use for electric field measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. This technique is similar to coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and is well suited for electric field measurements in high pressure plasmas with high spatial and temporal resolution. The results show that the signal intensity scales proportionally to the square of the electric field, the signal is emitted as a coherent beam, and is polarized parallel to the electric field vector, making possible electric field vector component measurements. The signal is generated when a collinear pair of pump and Stokes beams, which are generated in a stimulated Raman shifting cell (SRS), generate coherent excitation of molecules into a higher energy level, hydrogen for the present work. The coherent excitation mixes with a dipole moment induced by an external electric field. The mixing of these three "waves'" allows the molecules to radiate at their Raman frequency, producing a fourth, signal, wave which is proportional to the square of the electric field. The time resolution of this technique is limited by the coherence decay time of the molecules, which is a few hundred picoseconds.

  11. Enhanced nonlinear iterative techniques applied to a non-equilibrium plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, D.A.; McHugh, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    We study the application of enhanced nonlinear iterative methods to the steady-state solution of a system of two-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction partial differential equations that describe the partially-ionized plasma flow in the boundary layer of a tokamak fusion reactor. This system of equations is characterized by multiple time and spatial scales, and contains highly anisotropic transport coefficients due to a strong imposed magnetic field. We use Newton`s method to linearize the nonlinear system of equations resulting from an implicit, finite volume discretization of the governing partial differential equations, on a staggered Cartesian mesh. The resulting linear systems are neither symmetric nor positive definite, and are poorly conditioned. Preconditioned Krylov iterative techniques are employed to solve these linear systems. We investigate both a modified and a matrix-free Newton-Krylov implementation, with the goal of reducing CPU cost associated with the numerical formation of the Jacobian. A combination of a damped iteration, one-way multigrid and a pseudo-transient continuation technique are used to enhance global nonlinear convergence and CPU efficiency. GMRES is employed as the Krylov method with Incomplete Lower-Upper(ILU) factorization preconditioning. The goal is to construct a combination of nonlinear and linear iterative techniques for this complex physical problem that optimizes trade-offs between robustness, CPU time, memory requirements, and code complexity. It is shown that a one-way multigrid implementation provides significant CPU savings for fine grid calculations. Performance comparisons of the modified Newton-Krylov and matrix-free Newton-Krylov algorithms will be presented.

  12. Analysis of H atoms in a negative ion source plasma with the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, S.; Shibata, T.; Terasaki, R.; Kameyama, N.; Hatayama, A.; Bacal, M.; Tsumori, K.

    2012-02-15

    In negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection, it is important to calculate H atom flux onto the plasma grid (PG) surface for the evaluation of H{sup -} production on the PG surface. We have developed a neutral (H{sub 2} molecules and H atoms) transport code. In the present study, the neutral transport code is applied to the analysis of the H{sub 2} and H transport in a NIFS-R and D ion source in order to calculate the flux onto the PG surface. Taking into account non-equilibrium feature of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), i.e., the fast electron component, we have done the neutral transport simulation. The results suggest that the precise evaluation of the EEDF, especially in the energy range 15 eV < E < 30 eV is important for the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} molecules by the electron impact collision and the resultant H atom flux on the PG.

  13. Antibody immobilization on poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers advantageously carried out by means of a non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolci, L. S.; Liguori, A.; Merlettini, A.; Calzà, L.; Castellucci, M.; Gherardi, M.; Colombo, V.; Focarete, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the comparison between a conventional wet-chemical method and a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma process for the conjugation of biomolecules on the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers is reported. Physico-chemical and morphological characteristics of chemically and plasma functionalized mats are studied and compared with those of pristine mats. The efficiency in biomolecules immobilization is assessed by the covalent conjugation of an antibody (anti-CD10) on the functionalized PLLA fibers. The achieved results highlight that the proposed plasma process enables antibodies to be successfully immobilized on the surface of PLLA fibers, demonstrating that non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma can be an effective, highly flexible and environmentally friendly alternative to the still widely employed wet-chemical methods for the conjugation of biomolecules onto biomaterials.

  14. THE DIAGNOSTIC O VI ABSORPTION LINE IN DIFFUSE PLASMAS: COMPARISON OF NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION STRUCTURE SIMULATIONS TO FUSE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    De Avillez, Miguel A.; Breitschwerdt, Dieter

    2012-12-20

    The nature of the interstellar O VI in the Galactic disk is studied by means of a multi-fluid hydrodynamical approximation, tracing the detailed time-dependent evolution of the ionization structure of the plasma. Our focus is to explore the signature of any non-equilibrium ionization condition present in the interstellar medium using the diagnostic O VI ion. A detailed comparison between the simulations and FUSE data is carried out by taking lines of sight (LOS) measurements through the simulated Galactic disk, covering an extent of 4 kpc from different vantage points. The simulation results bear a striking resemblance with the observations: (1) the N(O VI) distribution with distance and angle fall within the minimum and maximum values of the FUSE data; (2) the column density dispersion with distance is constant for all the LOS, showing a mild decrease at large distances; (3) O VI has a clumpy distribution along the LOS; and (4) the time-averaged midplane density for distances >400 pc has a value of (1.3-1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} cm{sup -3}. The highest concentration of O VI by mass occurs in the thermally stable (10{sup 3.9} K < T {<=} 10{sup 4.2} K; 20%) and unstable (10{sup 4.2} K < T < 10{sup 5} K; 50%) regimes, both well below its peak temperature in collisional ionization equilibrium, with the corresponding volume filling factors oscillating with time between 8%-20% and 4%-5%, respectively. These results may also be relevant for intergalactic metal absorption systems at high redshifts.

  15. Kinetics of plasma-assisted combustion: effect of non-equilibrium excitation on the ignition and oxidation of combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigations of the effect of atomic particles, and electronically and vibrationally excited molecules on the induction delay time and on the shift in the ignition temperature threshold of combustible mixtures is presented. The addition of oxygen and hydrogen atoms to combustible mixtures may cause a significant reduction in the ignition delay time. However, at relatively low initial temperatures, the non-equilibrium effect of the addition of atomic particles in ground electronic states is not pronounced. At the same time, the effect of excited O(1D) atoms on the oxidation and reforming of combustible mixtures is quite significant due to the high rates of reactions of O(1D) atoms with hydrogen and hydrocarbon molecules. In fuel–air mixtures, collisions with O(1D) atoms determine, under certain conditions, the dissociation of hydrocarbon molecules. Singlet oxygen molecules, O2(a1Δ g ), participate both in chain initiation and chain branching reactions, but the effect of O2(a1Δ g ) on the ignition processes is generally less important compared to oxygen atoms. The reactions of vibrationally excited molecules and the processes of VT-relaxation in combustible mixtures are discussed. The production of vibrationally excited N 2(v) molecules in fuel–air mixtures at relatively low electric field is very important. However, at the moment, the effect of the reactions of N 2(v) molecules on the oxidation and ignition of combustible mixtures is not completely clear, and requires further investigation. Therefore, with present knowledge, to reduce the ignition delay time and decrease the temperature threshold of combustive mixtures, the use of gas discharge systems with relatively high E/N values is recommended. In this case the reactions of electronically excited {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(\\text{A}{}3Σu+,\\text{B}{}3{{\\Pi}g},\\text{C}{}3{{\\Pi}u},\\text{a}{}\\prime 1Σu-\\right) molecules, and atomic particles in ground and

  16. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  17. Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Vaibhav; Kennedy, Eric; Mackie, John; Holdsworth, Clovia; Molloy, Scott; Kundu, Sazal; Stockenhuber, Michael; Dlugogorski, Bogdan

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process. PMID:25127387

  18. Numerical simulation of non-equilibrium plasma flow in a cylindrical MPD thruster using a high-order flux-difference splitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangar, Mahdy; Ebrahimi, Reza; Shams, Mehrzad

    2014-10-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational algorithm is developed to simulate the plasma flow field in a self-field MPD thruster, in order to determine the flow behavior and the electromagnetic characteristics distribution. The convective flux vector is computed by using Roe's scheme in combination with Powell's eigensystem technique, and a new modified MUSCL technique called OMUSCL2 is employed to obtain the stable high-accuracy solution. Madrane-Tadmor entropy correction is used to prevent unrealistic expansion shocks near the electrodes tips. To accurately capture the physics of plasma in the system, different physical-chemical sub-models including multi-level non-equilibrium ionization model, generalized Ohm's law for partially ionized plasma, micro-instabilities effects, two-temperature model, and a real equation of state are considered. Numerical results of plasma flow simulation in a cylindrical lab-scale thruster, with mass flow rate of 6 g/s and total discharge current of 8 kA, are presented and comparison with experimental data shows good agreement between the predicted and measured contours of enclosed current and electric potential. The estimated thrust is 16.34 N which exhibits less than 5% difference compared with measured value. Furthermore, this simulation properly predicts the experimentally observed argon jet structure.

  19. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken.

  20. Synthesis of Vertically-Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Micro Structure of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Kuma; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Okazaki, Ken; Heberlein, Joachim; Kortshagen, Uwe

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is recognized as one of the viable fabrication techniques of carbon nanotubes. The outstanding advantage of PECVD is that free-standing, vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) are synthesized due to the electric field normal to the substrate. This feature draws intense attention for the fabrication of nanoelectronic devices such as high-resolution scanning nanoprobes, interconnects, and field emission devices. However, carbon nanotubes synthesized in PECVD are overwhelmingly carbon nanofibers (CNFs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with measurable structural defects. Tremendous interest in the preparation and characterization of vertically-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) and related applications had not been realized in the scope of PECVD until recently. Here we present a fabrication technique of high-purity vertically-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes using atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. By now, we have developed the atmospheric pressure radio-frequency discharge (APRFD) for this purpose. Although densely mono-dispersed Fe-Co catalysts of a few nanometers is primarily responsible for VA-SWNT growth, carbon precipitation was virtually absent in the thermal CVD regime at 700°C. On the other hand, high-yield VA-SWNTs were grown at 4 μm min-1 by applying the atmospheric pressure radio-frequency discharge. The results proved that cathodic ion sheath adjacent to the substrates, where a large potential drop exists, also plays an essential role for the controlled growth of SWNTs, while ion damage to the VA-SWNTs is inherently avoided due to high collision frequency among molecules in atmospheric pressure. In this paper, operation regime of APRFD and tentative reaction mechanisms for VA-SWNT growth are discussed along with optical imaging of near substrate region of APRFD.

  1. Numerical study on the spontaneous condensation flow in an air cryogenic turbo-expander using equilibrium and non-equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wan; Niu, Lu; Chen, Liang; Chen, Shuangtao; Zhang, Xingqun; Hou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty of data measurement in cryogenic environments and the complicated mechanism of nucleation process have restricted the design of wet type turbo-expander for cryogenic liquid plants. In this paper, equilibrium and non-equilibrium models are used to model the spontaneous condensation flow in a cryogenic turbo-expander along the main stream passage including nozzle, impeller and diffuser. The comparison shows a distinct difference of the predicted wetness fraction distribution along the streamline between the equilibrium model and the non-equilibrium model. In non-equilibrium model, the distributions of supercooling and nucleation rate along the length of turbo-expander are given for the analysis of flow characteristics. The comparison of outlet wetness fraction with the experimental data is also provided for verification and discussion. Both the effects of the rotation on nucleation and the effects of the nucleation on flow along suction side of the impeller are investigated.

  2. Non-equilibrium DMFT - Polaritonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatsch, Andreas; Frank, Regine

    Non-equilibrium physics recently really becomes important with the progress of ultrafast laser sciences. However in our understanding there is still a gap between equilibrium physics and the non-equilibrium, even though numerical methods have been advanced in recent years. We compare in this talk novel results at hand with equilibrium physics. The comparison will show that especially theoretical efforts are needed to explain many - so far - unresolved problems and to predict novel research on the basis of ab initio computing. We specifically discuss several non-equilibrium extensions of DMFT, numerical methods as well as semi-analytical solvers.

  3. Exploring Chemical and Thermal Non-equilibrium in Nitrogen Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma torches operating with nitrogen are of special importance as they can operate with usual tungsten based refractory electrodes and offer radical rich non-oxidizing high temperature environment for plasma chemistry. Strong gradients in temperature as well as species densities and huge convective fluxes lead to varying degrees of chemical non-equilibrium in associated regions. An axi-symmetric two-temperature chemical non-equilibrium model of a nitrogen plasma torch has been developed to understand the effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium in arcs. A 2-D finite volume CFD code in association with a non-equilibrium property routine enabled extraction of steady state self-consistent distributions of various plasma quantities inside the torch under various thermal and chemical non-equilibrium conditions. Chemical non-equilibrium has been incorporated through computation of diffusive and convective fluxes in each finite volume cell in every iteration and associating corresponding thermodynamic and transport properties through the scheme of 'chemical non-equilibrium parameter' introduced by Ghorui et. al. Recombination coefficient data from Nahar et. al. and radiation data from Krey and Morris have been used in the simulation. Results are presented for distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity, current density, electric potential, species densities and chemical non-equilibrium effects. Obtained results are compared with similar results under LTE.

  4. Non-equilibrium nanosecond-pulsed plasma generation in the liquid phase (water, PDMS) without bubbles: fast imaging, spectroscopy and leader-type model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Danil; Seepersad, Yohan; Pekker, Mikhail; Shneider, Mikhail; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we report the results on study of the non-equilibrium nanosecond discharge generation in liquid media. Here we studied the discharge in both water and silicon transformer oil, and present our findings on discharge behaviour depending on global (applied) electric, discharge emission spectrum and shadow imaging of the discharge. We also discuss possible scenarios of non-equilibrium nanosecond discharge development and suggest that the discharge operates in a leader-type regime supported by the electrostriction effect—creation of nano-sized pores in liquid due to high local electric field.

  5. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  6. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  7. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  8. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  9. Ultrahigh-speed etching of SiO{sub 2} with ultrahigh selectivity over Si in microwave-excited non equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakawa, Koji; Hori, Masaru; Goto, Toshio; Den, Shoji; Katagiri, Toshirou; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2004-07-26

    Etching of a SiO{sub 2} film [Boro-phospho silicate glass (BPSG)] has been performed in a continuous-wave microwave-excited nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma using a microgap discharge. A NF{sub 3}/He gas mixture with added H{sub 2}O was employed as the feed gas. An ultrahigh etch rate for SiO{sub 2} (BPSG) of 14 {mu}m/min and an ultrahigh selectivity over Si(SiO{sub 2}/Si) of 200 was obtained. A mechanism for the selective etching is proposed based on results obtained using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and spatially imaged optical emission spectroscopy with an intensified charge-coupled device camera. This process could offer a breakthrough for ultrahigh-speed, damage-free micromachining of SiO{sub 2} in microelectromechanical system devices.

  10. Decreased expression levels of cell cycle regulators and matrix metalloproteinases in melanoma from RET-transgenic mice by single irradiation of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Machiko; Omata, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Chihiro; Yajima, Ichiro; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kato, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Since effective therapies for melanoma with BRAFV600E mutation are being developed, interest has been shown in the development of therapies for melanoma without BRAFV600E mutation. Recently, interest has also been shown in medical application of non-nequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPPs). We previously suggested that repeated NEAPP irradiation to spontaneously developed benign melanocytic tumors in RFP-RET-transgenic mice (RET-mice) not only suppresses tumor growth but also prevents malignant transformation. In this study, we first confirmed that transcript expression levels of tumor growth regulators (CyclinD1, D2, E1, E2, G2 and PCNA but not CyclinG1) and tumor invasion regulators [Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9 and -14 and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM)] in melanomas were significantly higher than those in benign melanocytic tumors in RET-mice. We then showed that transcript expression levels of CyclinE1, G1 and G2 and MMP-2 and -9 in melanomas from RET-mice were significantly decreased by single NEAPP irradiation, whereas transcript expression levels of CyclinD1, D2, E2, PCNA, MCAM and MMP-14 were comparable in untreated and NEAPP-treated melanomas. Since no BrafV600E mutation melanomas have been found in RET-mice, our results suggest that single NEAPP irradiation is a potential therapeutic tool for melanoma without BRAFV600E mutation through modulation of the expression levels of tumor growth and invasion regulators. PMID:26464684

  11. Non-equilibrium Transport of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiao-Hsuan; Taylor, Jacob

    Non-equilibrium Transport of Light The thermalization of light under conditions of parametric coupling to a bath provides a robust chemical potential for light. We study non-equilibrium transport of light using non-equilibrium Green's function approach under the parametric coupling scheme, and explore a potential photonic analogue to the Landauer transport equation. Our results provide understandings of many-body states of photonic matter with chemical potential imbalances. The transport theory of light paves the way for quantum simulation and even practical applications of diode-like circuits using quantum photonic sources in the microwave and optical domain.

  12. Mathematical modeling of non-equilibrium sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliev, Ibragim A.; Mukhambetzhanov, Saltanbek T.; Sabitova, Gulnara S.; Sakhit, Anghyz E.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the system of equations modeling the process of non-equilibrium sorption. Difference approximation of differential problem by the implicit scheme is formulated. The solution of the difference problem is constructed using the sweep method. Based on the numerical results we can conclude the following: when the relaxation time decreases to 0, then the solution of non-equilibrium problem tends with increasing time to solution of the equilibrium problem.

  13. Theory for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Attard, Phil

    2006-08-21

    This paper reviews a new theory for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. This gives the non-equilibrium analogue of the Boltzmann probability distribution, and the generalization of entropy to dynamic states. It is shown that this so-called second entropy is maximized in the steady state, in contrast to the rate of production of the conventional entropy, which is not an extremum. The relationships of the new theory to Onsager's regression hypothesis, Prigogine's minimal entropy production theorem, the Langevin equation, the formula of Green and Kubo, the Kawasaki distribution, and the non-equilibrium fluctuation and work theorems, are discussed. The theory is worked through in full detail for the case of steady heat flow down an imposed temperature gradient. A Monte Carlo algorithm based upon the steady state probability density is summarized, and results for the thermal conductivity of a Lennard-Jones fluid are shown to be in agreement with known values. Also discussed is the generalization to non-equilibrium mechanical work, and to non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. As examples of the new theory two general applications are briefly explored: a non-equilibrium version of the second law of thermodynamics, and the origin and evolution of life. PMID:16883388

  14. Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1986-04-25

    Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    SciTech Connect

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J.

    1995-09-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness.

  16. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    Here, the fundamental problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS), where the two air masses at different temperatures, kept apart initially by a non-conducting horizontal interface in a 2D box, are allowed to mix. Upon removal of the partition, mixing is controlled by RTI, apart from mutual mass, momentum, and energy transfer. To accentuate the instability, the top chamber is filled with the heavier (lower temperature) air, which rests atop the chamber containing lighter air. The partition is positioned initially at mid-height of the box. As the fluid dynamical system considered is completely isolated from outside, the DNS results obtained without using Boussinesq approximation will enable one to study non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a finite reservoir undergoing strong irreversible processes. The barrier is removed impulsively, triggering baroclinic instability by non-alignment of density, and pressure gradient by ambient disturbances via the sharp discontinuity at the interface. Adopted DNS method has dispersion relation preservation properties with neutral stability and does not require any external initial perturbations. The complete inhomogeneous problem with non-periodic, no-slip boundary conditions is studied by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equation, without the Boussinesq approximation. This is important as the temperature difference between the two air masses considered is high enough (Δ T = 70 K) to invalidate Boussinesq approximation. We discuss non-equilibrium thermodynamical aspects of RTI with the help of numerical results for density, vorticity, entropy, energy, and enstrophy.

  17. Optical Properties in Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Price, D F; Lee, E; Tam, H; Springer, P T; Ng, A

    2006-01-05

    An open question about the dynamical behavior of materials is how phase transition occurs in highly non-equilibrium systems. One important class of study is the excitation of a solid by an ultrafast, intense laser. The preferential heating of electrons by the laser field gives rise to initial states dominated by hot electrons in a cold lattice. Using a femtosecond laser pump-probe approach, we have followed the temporal evolution of the optical properties of such a system. The results show interesting correlation to non-thermal melting and lattice disordering processes. They also reveal a liquid-plasma transition when the lattice energy density reaches a critical value.

  18. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    Can the fundamental processes that underlie molecular biology be understood and simulated by DNA nanotechnology? The early development of DNA nanotechnology by Ned Seeman was driven by the desire to find a solution to the protein crystallization problem. Much of the later development of the field was also driven by envisioned applications in computing and nanofabrication. While the DNA nanotechnology community has assembled a versatile tool kit with which DNA nanostructures of considerable complexity can be assembled, the application of this tool kit to other areas of science and technology is still in its infancy. This dissertation reports on the construction of non-equilibrium DNA nanotube dynamic to probe molecular processes in the areas of hydrodynamics and cytoskeletal behavior. As the first example, we used DNA nanotubes as a molecular probe for elongational flow measurement in different micro-scale flow settings. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of simple geometrical objects, such as a rigid DNA nanotube, is amenable to rigorous theoretical investigation. We measured the distribution of elongational flows produced in progressively more complex settings, ranging from the vicinity of an orifice in a microfluidic chamber to within a bursting bubble of Pacific ocean water. This information can be used to constrain theories on the origin of life in which replication involves a hydrodynamically driven fission process, such as the coacervate fission proposed by Oparin. A second theme of this dissertation is the bottom-up construction of a de novo artificial cytoskeleton with DNA nanotubes. The work reported here encompasses structural, locomotion, and control aspects of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal behavior. We first measured the kinetic parameters of DNA nanotube assembly and tested the accuracy of the existing polymerization models in the literature. Toward recapitulation of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal dynamics, we coupled the polymerization of DNA

  19. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  20. In command of non-equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Roduner, Emil; Radhakrishnan, Shankara Gayathri

    2016-05-21

    The second law of thermodynamics is well known for determining the direction of spontaneous processes in the laboratory, life and the universe. It is therefore often called the arrow of time. Less often discussed but just as important is the effect of kinetic barriers which intercept equilibration and preserve highly ordered, high energy non-equilibrium states. Examples of such states are many modern materials produced intentionally for technological applications. Furthermore, all living organisms fuelled directly by photosynthesis and those fuelled indirectly by living on high energy nutrition represent preserved non-equilibrium states. The formation of these states represents the local reversal of the arrow of time which only seemingly violates the second law. It has been known since the seminal work of Prigogine that the stabilisation of these states inevitably requires the dissipation of energy in the form of waste heat. It is this feature of waste heat dissipation following the input of energy that drives all processes occurring at a non-zero rate. Photosynthesis, replication of living organisms, self-assembly, crystal shape engineering and distillation have this principle in common with the well-known Carnot cycle in the heat engine. Drawing on this analogy, we subsume these essential and often sophisticated driven processes under the term machinery of life. PMID:27146424

  1. Turbulence modeling for non-equilibrium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    The work performed during this year has involved further assessment and extension of the k-epsilon-v(exp 2) model, and initiation of work on scalar transport. The latter is introduced by the contribution of Y. Shabany to this volume. Flexible, computationally tractable models are needed for engineering CFD. As computational technology has progressed, the ability and need to use elaborate turbulence closure models has increased. The objective of our work is to explore and develop new analytical frameworks that might extend the applicability of the modeling techniques. In past years the development of a method for near-wall modeling was described. The method has been implemented into a CFD code and its viability has been demonstrated by various test cases. Further tests are reported herein. Non-equilibrium near-wall models are needed for some heat transfer applications. Scalar transport seems generally to be more sensitive to non-equilibrium effects than is momentum transport. For some applications turbulence anisotropy plays a role and an estimate of the full Reynolds stress tensor is needed. We have begun work on scalar transport per se, but in this brief I will only report on an extension of the k-epsilon-v(exp 2) model to predict the Reynolds stress tensor.

  2. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  3. Non-equilibrium phenomena in disordered colloidal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter

    Colloidal particles are a convenient tool for studying a variety of non-equilibrium phenomena. I will discuss experiments that investigate the aging and non-equilibrium growth of disordered solids. In the first set of experiments, colloidal glasses are rapidly formed to study aging in jammed packings. A colloidal fluid, composed of micron-sized temperature-sensitive pNIPAM particles, is rapidly quenched into a colloidal glass. After the glass is formed, collective rearrangements occur as the glass ages. Particles that undergo irreversible rearrangements, which break nearest-neighbor pairings and allow the glass to relax, are identified. These irreversible rearrangements are accompanied by large clusters of fast moving particles; the number of particles involved in these clusters increases as the glass ages, leading to the slowing of dynamics that is characteristic of aging. In the second set of experiments, we study the role particle shape, and thus, interparticle interaction, plays in the formation of disordered solids with different structural and mechanical properties. Aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles with different shapes evaporate on glass slides. Convective flows during evaporation carry particles from drop center to drop edge, where they accumulate. The resulting particle deposits grow heterogeneously from the edge on the air-water interface. Three distinct growth processes were discovered in the evaporating colloidal suspensions by tuning particle shape-dependent capillary interactions and thus varying the microscopic rules of deposition. Mechanical testing of these particulate deposits reveals that the deposit bending rigidity increases as particles become more anisotropic in shape.

  4. A numerical study of high-pressure non-equilibrium streamers for combustion ignition application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breden, Douglas; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Idicheria, Cherian A.; Najt, Paul M.; Mahadevan, Shankar

    2013-08-01

    We present a computational simulation study of non-equilibrium streamer discharges in a coaxial electrode and a corona geometry for automotive combustion ignition applications. The streamers propagate in combustible fuel-air mixtures at high pressures representative of internal combustion engine conditions. The study was performed using a self-consistent, two-temperature plasma model with finite-rate plasma chemical kinetics. Positive high voltage pulses of order tens of kV and duration of tens of nanoseconds were applied to the powered inner cylindrical electrode which resulted in the formation and propagation of a cathode-directed streamer. The resulting spatial and temporal production of active radical species such as O, H, and singlet delta oxygen is quantified and compared for lean and stoichiometric fuel-air mixtures. For the coaxial electrode geometry, the discharge is characterized by a primary streamer that bridges the inter-electrode gap and a secondary streamer that develops in the wake of the primary streamer. Most of the radicals are produced in the secondary streamer. For the corona geometry, only the primary streamer is observed and the radicals are produced throughout the length of the primary streamer column. The stoichiometry of the mixture was observed to have a relatively small effect on both the plasma discharge structure and the resulting yield of radical species.

  5. Non-equilibrium electrodynamics in the large N expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.

    1994-02-01

    An effective action technique for the time evolution of a closed system consisting of a mean field interacting with charged fluctuations is presented, and applied specifically to Quantum Electrodynamics. The effective action of QED is first developed in a systematic expansion in 1/N where N is the number of distinct fermion species. Then by making use of the Schwinger-Keldysh closed time path (CTP) formulation of field theory, causality of the resulting equations of motion is ensured. In QED this technique may be used to study the quantum non-equilibrium effects of pair creation in strong electric fields and the scattering and transport processes of a relativistic e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} plasma. Numerical results for these processes in lowest order are presented. The renormalization procedure, connection to quantum transport theory and extension to QCD and other applications of the method are also discussed.

  6. Non equilibrium statistical mechanics of geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, F.

    2012-04-01

    Onsager first proposed to explain the self organization of turbulent flows using the statistical mechanics framework. Generalization of those ideas to the class of 2D-Euler and Quasi-Gestrophic models led to the Robert-Sommeria-Miller theory. This approach was successful in modeling many geophysical phenomena: the Great Red Spot of Jupiter [2, 1], drift of mesoscale ocean vortices [3, 1], self-organization of Quasi-Geostrophic dynamics in mid-basin jets similar to the Gulf-Stream and the Kuroshio [3, 1], and so on. However, this type of equilibrium theories fail to take into account forces and dissipation. This is a strong limitation for many geophysical phenomena. Interestingly, it is possible to circumvent these difficulties using the most modern theoretical development of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics: large deviation [4] and instanton theories. As an example, we will discuss geophysical turbulent flows which have more than one attractor (bistability or mutistability). For instance, paths of the Kuroshio [5], the Earth's magnetic field reversal, atmospheric flows [6], MHD experiments [7], 2D turbulence experiments [8, 9], 3D flows [10] show this kind of behavior. On Navier-Stokes and Quasi-Geostrophic turbulent flows, we predict the conditions for existence of rare transitions between attractors, and the dynamics of those transitions. We discuss how these results are probably connected to the long debated existence of multi-stability in the atmosphere and oceans, and how non-equilibrium statistical mechanics can allow to settle this issue. Generalization of statistical mechanics to more comprehensive hydrodynamical models, which include gravity wave dynamics and allow for the possibility of energy transfer through wave motion, would be extremely interesting. Namely, both are essential in understanding energy balance of geophysical flows. However, due to difficulties in essential theoretical parts of the statistical mechanics approach, previous methods

  7. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of gravitational screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Yokokura, Yuki

    2015-11-01

    We study the Einstein gravity equations projected on a timelike surface, which represents the time evolution of what we call a gravitational screen. We show that such a screen behaves like a viscous bubble with a surface tension and an internal energy, and that the Einstein equations take the same forms as non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations for a viscous bubble. We provide a consistent dictionary between gravitational and thermodynamic variables. In the non-viscous cases there are three thermodynamic equations that characterize a bubble dynamics: these are the first law, the Marangoni flow equation and the Young-Laplace equation. In all three equations the surface tension plays a central role: in the first law it appears as a work term per unit area, in the Marangoni flow its gradient drives a force, and in the Young-Laplace equation it contributes to a pressure proportional to the surface curvature. The gravity equations appear as a natural generalization of these bubble equations when the bubble itself is viscous and dynamical. In particular, this approach shows that the mechanism of entropy production for the viscous bubble is mapped onto the production of gravitational waves. We also review the relationship between surface tension and temperature, and discuss black-hole thermodynamics.

  8. Non-equilibrium diffusion combustion of a fuel droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurenkova, Veronika V.

    2012-06-01

    A mathematical model for the non-equilibrium combustion of droplets in rocket engines is developed. This model allows to determine the divergence of combustion rate for the equilibrium and non-equilibrium model. Criterion for droplet combustion deviation from equilibrium is introduced. It grows decreasing droplet radius, accommodation coefficient, temperature and decreases on decreasing diffusion coefficient. Also divergence from equilibrium increases on reduction of droplet radius. Droplet burning time essentially increases under non-equilibrium conditions. Comparison of theoretical and experimental data shows that to have adequate solution for small droplets it is necessary to use the non-equilibrium model.

  9. Spectroscopic temperature measurements of air breakdown plasma using a 110 GHz megawatt gyrotron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hummelt, J. S.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2012-12-15

    Temperature measurements are presented of a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy. A plasma is created with a focused 110 GHz 3 {mu}s pulse gyrotron beam in air that produces power fluxes exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Rotational and vibrational temperatures are spectroscopically measured over a pressure range of 1-100 Torr as the gyrotron power is varied above threshold. The temperature dependence on microwave field as well as pressure is examined. Rotational temperature measurements of the plasma reveal gas temperatures in the range of 300-500 K and vibrational temperatures in the range of 4200-6200 K. The vibrational and rotational temperatures increase slowly with increasing applied microwave field over the range of microwave fields investigated.

  10. Experimental studies in non-equilibrium physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressman, John Robert, Jr.

    This work is a collection of three experiments aimed at studying different facets of non-equilibrium dynamics. Chapter I concerns strongly compressible turbulence, which turns out to be very different from incompressible turbulence. The focus is on the dispersion of contaminants in such a flow. This type of turbulence can be studied, at very low mach number, by measuring the velocity fields of particles that float on a turbulently stirred body of water. It turns out that in the absence of incompressibility, the turbulence causes particles to cluster rather than to disperse. The implications of the observations are far reaching and include the transport of pollutants on the oceans surface, phytoplankton growth, as well as industrial applications. Chapter II deals with the effects of polymer additives on drag reduction and turbulent suppression, a well-known phenomenon that is not yet understood. In an attempt to simplify the problem, the effects of a polymer additive were investigated in a vortex street formed in a flowing soap film. Measurements suggest that an increase in elongational viscosity is responsible for a substantial reduction in periodic velocity fluctuations. This study also helps to illuminate the mechanism responsible for vortex separation in the wake of a bluff body. Chapter III describes an experiment designed to test a theoretical approach aimed at generalizing the classical fluctuation dissipation theorem (FDT). This theorem applies to systems driven only slightly away from thermal equilibrium, whereas ours, a liquid crystal under-going electroconvection, is so strongly driven, that the FDT does not apply. Both theory and experiment focus on the flux in global power fluctuations. Physical limitations did not permit a direct test of the theory, however it was possible to establish several interesting characteristics of the system: the source of the fluctuations is the transient defect structures that are generated when the system is driven hard

  11. Is it possible to deduce the ground state OH density from relative optical emission intensities of the OH(A 2Σ+-X 2Πi) transition in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas?—An analysis of self-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Ding, Yanjun; Sadeghi, Nader; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of absolute densities of reactive species and radicals such as OH is of growing interest for many plasma applications. In this paper, we extend the use of a self-absorption model for atomic emission spectroscopy to molecular emission spectroscopy. The proposed analysis of self-absorbed molecular emission spectra is a simple and inexpensive method to determine OH(X) densities and rotational temperatures compared to laser induced fluorescence. We compare the recorded absolute OH density in a non-equilibrium diffuse atmospheric-pressure RF glow discharge by this method with broadband UV absorption considering a number of rotational lines with J‧  ⩽  6.5, the detection limit of the line integrated OH(X) density with this method is of the order of 2  ×  1019 m‑2. The accuracy of the density is sensitive to the rotational temperature of the OH(A) state and the non-equilibrium rotational population distribution.

  12. Non-equilibrium transport in the quantum dot: quench dynamics and non-equilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Adrian; Andrei, Natan

    We calculate the non-equilibrium current driven by a voltage drop across a quantum dot. The system is described by the two lead Anderson model at zero temperature with on-site Coulomb repulsion and non-interacting, linearized leads. We prepare the system in an initial state consisting of a free Fermi sea in each lead with the voltage drop given as the difference between the two Fermi levels. We quench the system by coupling the dot to the leads at t =0 and following the time evolution of the wavefunction. In the long time limit a new type of Bethe Ansatz wavefunction emerges, which satisfies the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with the two Fermi seas serving as the boundary conditions. The solution describes the non-equilibrium steady state of the system. We use this solution to compute the infinite time limit of the expectation value of the current operator at a given voltage, yielding the I-V characteristic. The calculation is non-perturbative and exact. Research supported by NSF Grant DMR 1410583.

  13. Dielectric function of non-equilibrium warm dense gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuan

    2009-06-01

    Warm dense matter lies in a regime where densities are near the solid density and temperatures are between 0.1 and 100 eV. The behavior of such systems is dominated by electron degeneracy, excited electronic states and ion-ion correlations, rendering them a truly daunting many-body problem. Interest in Warm Dense Matter has been growing among broad disciplines as driven by the fundamental urge to understand the convergence between plasma and condensed matter physics, and the practical need to understand dynamic behavior in the transformation of a cold solid into a high energy density plasma. A recent advance in this emerging field is the single state measurements of optical properties of non-equilibrium warm dense gold created by isochoric laser heating. This unveils for the first time the behavior of intraband and interband transitions in warm dense gold at high energy densities, providing a unique opportunity to examine effects of electron band structure and electron distribution. This talk is a review of the experimental technique and the new findings. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. [4pt] In collaboration with Andrew Ng, Tadashi Ogitsu, Eric Schwegler, David Prendergast, Byong-ick Cho, Phil Heimann, Tommy Ao, Klaus Widmann, Duncan Hanson, Ingrid Koslow, and Gilbert Collins.

  14. Non-equilibrium Ionization Modeling of Simulated Pseudostreamers in a Solar Corona Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon; Reeves, Katharine K.; Murphy, Nicholas A.

    2015-04-01

    Time-dependent ionization is important for diagnostics of coronal streamers, where the thermodynamic time scale could be shorter than the ionization or recombination time scales, and ions are therefor in non-equilibrium ionization states. In this work, we perform post-processing time-dependent ionization calculations for a three dimensional solar corona and inner heliosphere model from Predictive Sciences Inc. (Mikić & Linker 1999) to analyze the influence of non-equilibrium ionization on emission from coronal streamers. Using the plasma temperature, density, velocity and magnetic field distributions provided by the 3D MHD simulation covering the Whole Sun Month (Carrington rotation CR1913, 1996 August 22 to September 18), we calculate non-equilibrium ionization states in the region around a pseudostreamer. We then obtain the synthetic emissivities with the non-equilibrium ion populations. Under the assumption that the corona is optically thin, we also obtain intensity profiles of several emission lines. We compare our calculations with intensities of Lyman-alpha lines and OVI lines from SOHO/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations at 14 different heights. The results show that intensity profiles of both Lyman-alpha and OVI lines match well UVCS observations at low heights. At large heights, OVI intensites are higher for non-equilibrium ionization than equilibrium ionization inside this pseudostreamer. The assumption of ionization equilibrium would lead to a underestimate of the OVI intensity by about ten percent at a height of 2 solar radii, and the difference between these two ionization cases increases with height. The intensity ratio of OVI 1032 line to OVI 1037 lines is also obtained for non-equilibrium ionization modeling.

  15. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  16. Portable nanosecond pulsed air plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-08-22

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas are of great importance in many emerging biomedical and materials processing applications. The redundancy of a vacuum system opens the gateway for highly portable plasma systems, for which air ideally becomes the plasma-forming gas and remote plasma processing is preferred to ensure electrical safety. Typically, the gas temperature observed in air plasma greatly exceeds that suitable for the processing of thermally liable materials; a large plasma-sample distance offers a potential solution but suffers from a diluted downstream plasma chemistry. This Letter reports a highly portable air plasma jet system which delivers enhanced downstream chemistry without compromising the low temperature nature of the discharge, thus forming the basis of a powerful tool for emerging mobile plasma applications.

  17. Electrolytes: transport properties and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents a review on the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to transport in electrolyte solutions, and some recent experimental work and results for mutual diffusion in electrolyte solutions.

  18. Statistical physics of shear flow: a non-equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Complex fluids are easily and reproducibly driven into non-equilibrium steady states by the action of shear flow. The statistics of the microstructure of non-equilibrium fluids is important to the material properties of every complex fluid that flows, e.g. axle grease on a rotating bearing; blood circulating in capillaries; molten plastic flowing into a mould; the non-equilibrium onion phase of amphiphiles used for drug delivery; the list is endless. Such states are as diverse and interesting as equilibrium states, but are not governed by the same statistics as equilibrium materials. I review some recently discovered principles governing the probabilities of various types of molecular re-arrangements taking place within a sheared fluid. As well as providing new foundations for the study of non-equilibrium matter, the principles are applied to some simple models of particles interacting under flow, showing that the theory exhibits physically convincing behaviour.

  19. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  20. Three Modes of Air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operating in air have gained a high interest due to its various applications in industry and biomedical. The presented air plasma jet system is consisted of stainless steel hollow needle electrode of 1 mm inner diameter which is covered with a quartz tube with a 1 mm diameter side hole. The hole is above the tube nozzle by 5 mm and it is covered by a copper ring which is connected to the ground. The needle is connected to sinusoidal 27 kHz high voltage power supply (25 kV) though a current limiting resistor of 50 k Ω. The tested distance between the needle tip and the side hole was 1 mm or 2.1 mm gape. The electric and plasma jet formation characteristics show three modes of operations. Through these modes the plasma length changes with air flow rate to increase in the first mode and to confine inside the quartz tube in the second mode, then it start to eject from the nozzle again and increase with flow rate to reach a maximum length of 7 mm at 4.5 SLM air flow rate in the third mode. The measured gas temperature of the plasma jet can approach room temperature (300 K). Moreover, the plasma jet emission spectra shows the presence of reactive O and OH radical in the plasma jet. These results indicate that the generated air plasma jet can be used a plasma sterilization.

  1. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  2. Detection of Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations in Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacanu, Alexandru; Broedersz, Chase; Gladrow, Jannes; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Active force generation at the molecular scale in cells can result in stochastic non-equilibrium dynamics on mesoscpopic scales. Molecular motors such as myosin can drive steady-state stress fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. Here, we present a non-invasive technique to probe non-equilibrium fluctuations in an active gel using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are semiflexible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence in the near infrared. Both thermal and active motor-induced forces in the network induce transverse fluctuations of SWNTs. We demonstrate that active driven shape fluctuations of the SWNTs exhibit dynamics that reflect the non-equilibrium activity, in particular the emergence of correlations between the bending modes. We discuss the observation of breaking of detailed balance in this configurational space of the SWNT probes. Supported by National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Student Fellowship (NDSEG).

  3. Modeling non-equilibrium phase transitions in isentropically compressed Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J; Smith, R

    2005-09-19

    We report here on modeling of non-equilibrium phase transitions in Bi samples isentropically compressed to 120 GPa by a ramped drive, which is produced using the Janus laser. In the experiments, the Bi samples are attached to windows of LiF or sapphire, and the velocity history of the sample-window interface is recorded with line VISAR. The 1D response of the targets is modeled using a multiphase Bi EOS, the Andrews-Hayes method for non-equilibrium transitions, and a Boettger-Wallace kinetics model. The pressure drive is deduced by back integration of VISAR data from shots performed with Al samples.

  4. DSMC predictions of non-equilibrium reaction rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-04-01

    A set of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) chemical-reaction models recently proposed by Bird and based solely on the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels of the species involved is applied to calculate nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates for atmospheric reactions in hypersonic flows. The DSMC non-equilibrium model predictions are in good agreement with theoretical models and experimental measurements. The observed agreement provides strong evidence that modeling chemical reactions using only the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels provides an accurate method for predicting non-equilibrium chemical-reaction rates.

  5. Stochastic linearization of turbulent dynamics of dispersive waves in equilibrium and non-equilibrium state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shixiao W.; Lu, Haihao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing dispersive wave turbulence in the long time dynamics is central to understanding of many natural phenomena, e.g., in atmosphere ocean dynamics, nonlinear optics, and plasma physics. Using the β-Fermi–Pasta–Ulam nonlinear system as a prototypical example, we show that in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium steady state the turbulent state even in the strongly nonlinear regime possesses an effective linear stochastic structure in renormalized normal variables. In this framework, we can well characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics, which are dominated by long-wavelength renormalized waves. We further demonstrate that the energy flux is nearly saturated by the long-wavelength renormalized waves in non-equilibrium steady state. The scenario of such effective linear stochastic dynamics can be extended to study turbulent states in other nonlinear wave systems.

  6. Review of Non-Equilibrium Plasmadynamics to Predict Energy Transfer in Arcjet Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krier, Herman

    1998-10-01

    Both chemical and thermal processes in an electrothermal arcjet are described as non-equilibrium. Arc current is converted to electron thermal energy through ohmic dissipation. The electrons transfer thermal energy to heavy species in the arc plasma through collisions. This energy is then converted to kinetic energy (and thrust) as the fluid accelerates through the nozzle. The paper presents an axisymmetric, steady, laminar, continuum flow model, supporting a two-temperature kinetic and chemical non-equilibrium, formulated for a direct current arcjet with variabe mixture ratios of nitrogen and hydrogen. Seven species (ions, atoms, electons) assumed with finite rate chemistry accounted for. The model predictions are compared to experiments with a NASA 1 kW hydrazine propellant arcjet.Background information.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Volumetric Response of Shocked Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad

    2009-06-01

    Polymers are well known for their non-equilibrium deviatoric behavior. However, recent investigations involving both high rate shock experiments and equilibrium measured thermodynamic quantities have reminded us that the volumetric behavior also exhibits a non-equilibrium response. An area where this work should be important is the impact of glassy polymers. At the time of impact and near the impact surface, the polymer's volumetric response will be described as being Hugoniot-like, i.e., standard shock Hugoniot jump conditions apply. However, at later times, release waves from neighboring free surfaces will cause the polymer's volumetric response to be far from Hugoniot. In this talk, experiments showing the non-equilibrium behavior will be described. Following that discussion, a continuum-level theory is proposed that will allow us to bridge the equilibrium and non-equilibrium behaviors with a single model that can go seamlessly from one regime to the other.[4pt] In collaboration with Philip Rae and Dana Dattelbaum, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Strongly Non-equilibrium Dynamics of Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter

    Nanoconfined DNA exhibits a wide-range of fascinating transient and steady-state non-equilibrium phenomena. Yet, while experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behavior of nanochannel confined DNA, non-equilibrium behavior remains largely unexplored. In particular, while the DNA extension along the nanochannel is the key observable in equilibrium experiments, in the non-equilibrium case it is necessary to measure and model not just the extension but the molecule's full time-dependent one-dimensional concentration profile. Here, we apply controlled compressive forces to a nanochannel confined molecule via a nanodozer assay, whereby an optically trapped bead is slid down the channel at a constant speed. Upon contact with the molecule, a propagating concentration ``shockwave'' develops near the bead and the molecule is dynamically compressed. This experiment, a single-molecule implementation of a macroscopic cylinder-piston apparatus, can be used to observe the molecule response over a range of forcings and benchmark theoretical description of non-equilibrium behavior. We show that the dynamic concentration profiles, including both transient and steady-state response, can be modelled via a partial differential evolution equation combining nonlinear diffusion and convection. Lastly, we present preliminary results for dynamic compression of multiple confined molecules to explore regimes of segregation and mixing for multiple chains in confinement.

  9. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  10. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, Aaron; Johnston, Chris; Cruden, Brett

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents measurements and simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation relevant to high-speed Earth entry data obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79 N2 : 21 O2) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08 N2 : 20.95 O2 : 0.04 CO2 : 0.93 Ar). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to promote discussion about various aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance profiles integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the VUV through to the NIR, were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURAHARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50 and over-predict by as much as 20 depending on the shock speed. DPLRNEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40 and over-predict by as much as 12 depending on the shock speed. In terms of an upper bound estimate for the absolute error in wall-directed heat flux, at the lower speeds investigated in this paper, 8 to 9 km/s, even

  11. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  12. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity. PMID:23306058

  13. Towards Non-Equilibrium Dynamics with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbert, Ariel; Jubin, Sierra; Doret, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Atomic systems are superbly suited to the study of non-equilibrium dynamics. These systems' exquisite isolation from environmental perturbations leads to long relaxation times that enable exploration of far-from-equilibrium phenomena. One example of particular relevance to experiments in trapped ion quantum information processing, metrology, and precision spectroscopy is the approach to thermal equilibrium of sympathetically cooled linear ion chains. Suitable manipulation of experimental parameters permits exploration of the quantum-to-classical crossover between ballistic transport and diffusive, Fourier's Law conduction, a topic of interest not only to the trapped ion community but also for the development of microelectronic devices and other nanoscale structures. We present progress towards trapping chains of multiple co-trapped calcium isotopes geared towards measuring thermal equilibration and discuss plans for future experiments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. This work is supported by Cottrell College Science Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and by Williams College.

  14. Persistent Probability Currents in Non-equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Royce; Mellor, Andrew; Mobilia, Mauro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Weiss, Jeffrey

    For many interesting phenomena in nature, from all life forms to the global climate, the fundamental hypothesis of equilibrium statistical mechanics does not apply. Instead, they are perhaps better characterized by non-equilibrium steady states, evolving with dynamical rules which violate detailed balance. In particular, such dynamics leads to the existence of non-trivial, persistent probability currents - a principal characteristic of non-equilibrium steady states. In turn, they give rise to the notion of 'probability angular momentum'. Observable manifestations of such abstract concepts will be illustrated in two distinct contexts: a heterogeneous nonlinear voter model and our ocean heat content. Supported in part by grants from the Bloom Agency (Leeds, UK) and the US National Science Foundation: OCE-1245944. AM acknowledges the support of EPSRC Industrial CASE Studentship, Grant No. EP/L50550X/1.

  15. The thermal vacuum for non-equilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Ryosuke; Kuwahara, Yukiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiya

    Our purpose is to construct a theoretical description of non-equilibrium steady state (NESS), employing thermo field dynamics (TFD). TFD is the operator-based formalism of thermal quautum field theory, where every degree of freedom is doubled and thermal averages are given by expectation values of the thermal vacuum. To specify the thermal vacuum for NESS is a non-trivial issue, and we attempt it on the analogy between the superoperator formalism and TFD. Using the thermal vacuum thus obtained, we analyze the NESS which is realized in the two-reservoir model. It will be shown that the NESS vacuum of the model coincides with the fixed point solutions of the quantum transport equation derived by the self-consistent renormalization of the self-energy in non-equilibrium TFD.

  16. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  17. Boltzmann equation solver adapted to emergent chemical non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Birrell, Jeremiah; Wilkening, Jon; Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-15

    We present a novel method to solve the spatially homogeneous and isotropic relativistic Boltzmann equation. We employ a basis set of orthogonal polynomials dynamically adapted to allow for emergence of chemical non-equilibrium. Two time dependent parameters characterize the set of orthogonal polynomials, the effective temperature T(t) and phase space occupation factor ϒ(t). In this first paper we address (effectively) massless fermions and derive dynamical equations for T(t) and ϒ(t) such that the zeroth order term of the basis alone captures the particle number density and energy density of each particle distribution. We validate our method and illustrate the reduced computational cost and the ability to easily represent final state chemical non-equilibrium by studying a model problem that is motivated by the physics of the neutrino freeze-out processes in the early Universe, where the essential physical characteristics include reheating from another disappearing particle component (e{sup ±}-annihilation)

  18. The entropy concept for non-equilibrium states.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Elliott H; Yngvason, Jakob

    2013-10-01

    In earlier work, we presented a foundation for the second law of classical thermodynamics in terms of the entropy principle. More precisely, we provided an empirically accessible axiomatic derivation of an entropy function defined on all equilibrium states of all systems that has the appropriate additivity and scaling properties, and whose increase is a necessary and sufficient condition for an adiabatic process between two states to be possible. Here, after a brief review of this approach, we address the question of defining entropy for non-equilibrium states. Our conclusion is that it is generally not possible to find a unique entropy that has all relevant physical properties. We do show, however, that one can define two entropy functions, called S - and S +, which, taken together, delimit the range of adiabatic processes that can occur between non-equilibrium states. The concept of comparability of states with respect to adiabatic changes plays an important role in our reasoning. PMID:24101892

  19. Construction of a Non-Equilibrium Thermal Boundary Layer Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Drummond; Ebadi, Alireza; Ma, Allen; White, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    A thermally conductive, electrically heated wall-plate forming the bottom wall of a wind tunnel has been constructed and validation tests have been performed. The wall-plate is a sectioned wall design, where each section is independently heated and controlled. Each section consists of an aluminum 6061 plate, an array of resistive heaters affixed to the bottom of the aluminum plate, and a calcium silicate holder used for thermal isolation. Embedded thermocouples in the aluminum plates are used to monitor the wall temperature and for feedback control of wall heating. The wall-plate is used to investigate thermal transport in both equilibrium and non-equilibrium boundary layers. The non-equilibrium boundary layer flow investigated is oscillatory flow produced by a rotor-stator mechanism placed downstream of the test section of the wind tunnel.

  20. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    For Earth re-entry at velocities between 8 and 11.5 km/s, the accuracy of NASA's computational uid dynamic and radiative simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation is assessed through comparisons with measurements. These measurements were obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79% N2 : 21% O2 by mole) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08% N2 : 20.95% O2 : 0.04% CO2 : 0.93% Ar by mole). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth re-entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to examine critical aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance pro les integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) through to the Near Infra-Red (NIR), were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURA/HARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40% and over-predict by as much as 12% depending on the shock speed. DPLR/NEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50% and over-predict by as much as 20% depending

  1. A hydrodynamic approach to non-equilibrium conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Denis; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We develop a hydrodynamic approach to non-equilibrium conformal field theory. We study non-equilibrium steady states in the context of one-dimensional conformal field theory perturbed by the T\\bar{T} irrelevant operator. By direct quantum computation, we show, to first order in the coupling, that a relativistic hydrodynamic emerges, which is a simple modification of one-dimensional conformal fluids. We show that it describes the steady state and its approach, and we provide the main characteristics of the steady state, which lies between two shock waves. The velocities of these shocks are modified by the perturbation and equal the sound velocities of the asymptotic baths. Pushing this approach further, we are led to conjecture that the approach to the steady state is generically controlled by the power law t -1/2, and that the widths of the shocks increase with time according to t 1/3.

  2. Foundations and Application of Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Gregory

    2011-11-01

    Non-equilibrium thermodynamics provides a powerful but still unfamiliar way to peer into the properties of systems yet unexplored and holds promise for ready application to important engineered systems. This talk will consider some of the challenges, promises, and progress made toward an intuitive statistical theory of non-equilibrium behavior as well as recent work applying it. We will briefly discuss large deviations and the formalism of Freidlin and Wentzell for perturbed dynamical systems, which recasts certain questions about stochastic processes in the form of Hamiltonian mechanics. The methods and their applicability are illustrated by analyzing transitions between different stable states of a chemical reaction network, supplemented by a fast numerical solution of escape trajectories. We conclude with the prospects for using the ideas and methods in the design of more efficient and reliable grid computing platforms, which are crucial both to modern science and the operation of entire industries.

  3. Approach to non-equilibrium behaviour in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kripfganz, J.; Perlt, H.

    1989-05-01

    We study the real-time evolution of quantum field theoretic systems in non-equilibrium situations. Results are presented for the example of scalar /lambda//phi//sup 4/ theory. The degrees of freedom are discretized by studying the system on a torus. Short-wavelength modes are integrated out to one-loop order. The long-wavelength modes considered to be the relevant degrees of freedom are treated by semiclassical phase-space methods. /copyright/ 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  4. Modeling MOSFET surface capacitance behavior under non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Abhishek; Jindal, R. P.

    2005-06-01

    A normalized analytical solution for the capacitance associated with a MOSFET surface under non-equilibrium conditions is presented. It is shown that this model can be mapped into an equivalent equilibrium problem with 98% accuracy for near intrinsic samples (UB ≅ 2). The precision becomes even better for highly doped semiconductors. The physics behind this transformation is explained and nomograms generated to present data in a highly normalized form.

  5. Structure of Non-Equilibrium Adsorbed Polymer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Ben; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2004-03-01

    Equilibrium polymer adsorption has been widely studied theoretically. Many experiments however implicate strong non-equilibrium effects for monomer sticking energies somewhat larger than kT, the most common case. The structure and slow dynamics in these layers is not understood. We analyze theoretically non-equilibrium layers from dilute solutions in the limit of irreversible monomer adsorption. We find the density profile ˜ z-4/3 and loop distribution ˜ s-11/5 of the resulting layer are no different to equilibrium. However, single chain statistics are radically different: the layer consists of a flat inner portion of fully collapsed chains plus an outer part whose chains make only fN surface contacts where N is chain length. The contact fractions f follow a broad distribution, P(f) ˜ f-4/5, consistent with experiment [H. M. Schneider et al, Langmuir 12, 994 (1996)], and the lateral size R of adsorbed chains is of order the bulk coil size, R ˜ N^3/5. For equilibrium layers, by contrast, P has a unique peak at a value of f of order unity, while R ˜ N^1/2 is significantly less. The relaxation of a non-equilibrium layer towards equilibrium thus entails chain shrinkage and tighter binding. We speculate that the observed decrease of bulk-layer chain exchange rates with increasing aging reflects these internal layer dynamics.

  6. Novel mapping in non-equilibrium stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heseltine, James; Kim, Eun-jin

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the time-evolution of a non-equilibrium system in view of the change in information and provide a novel mapping relation which quantifies the change in information far from equilibrium and the proximity of a non-equilibrium state to the attractor. Specifically, we utilize a nonlinear stochastic model where the stochastic noise plays the role of incoherent regulation of the dynamical variable x and analytically compute the rate of change in information (information velocity) from the time-dependent probability distribution function. From this, we quantify the total change in information in terms of information length { L } and the associated action { J }, where { L } represents the distance that the system travels in the fluctuation-based, statistical metric space parameterized by time. As the initial probability density function’s mean position (μ) is decreased from the final equilibrium value {μ }* (the carrying capacity), { L } and { J } increase monotonically with interesting power-law mapping relations. In comparison, as μ is increased from {μ }*,{ L } and { J } increase slowly until they level off to a constant value. This manifests the proximity of the state to the attractor caused by a strong correlation for large μ through large fluctuations. Our proposed mapping relation provides a new way of understanding the progression of the complexity in non-equilibrium system in view of information change and the structure of underlying attractor.

  7. Non-equilibrium fission processes in intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Loveland, W.; Casey, C.; Xu, Z.; Seaborg, G.T.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L.

    1989-04-01

    We have measured the target fragment yields, angular and energy distributions for the interaction of 12-16 MeV/A/sup 32/S with /sup 165/Ho and /sup 197/Au and for the interaction of 32 and 44 MeV/A /sup 40/Ar with /sup 197/Au. The Au fission fragments associated with the peripheral collision peak in the folding angle distribution originate in a normal, ''slow'' fission process in which statistical equilibrium has been established. At the two lowest projectile energies, the Au fission fragments associated with the central collision peak in the folding angle distribution originate in part from ''fast'' (/tau//approximately//sup /minus/23/s), non-equilibrium processes. Most of the Ho fission fragments originate in non- equilibrium processes. The fast, non-equilibrium process giving rise to these fragments has many of the characteristics of ''fast fission'', but the cross sections associated with these fragments are larger than one would expect from current theories of ''fast fission. '' 14 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Non-equilibrium Numerical Analysis of Microwave-supported Detonation Threshold Propagating through Diatomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Microwave-supported Detonation (MSD), one type of Microwave-supported Plasma (MSP), is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for beam-powered space propulsion systems. In this study, I numerically simulate MSD waves propagating through a diatomic gas. In order to evaluate the threshold of beam intensity, I use the physical-fluid dynamics scheme, which has been developed for simulating unsteady and non-equilibrium LSD waves propagating through a hydrogen gas.

  9. Novel non-equilibrium modelling of a DC electric arc in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeva, M.; Benilov, M. S.; Almeida, N. A.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel non-equilibrium model has been developed to describe the interplay of heat and mass transfer and electric and magnetic fields in a DC electric arc. A complete diffusion treatment of particle fluxes, a generalized form of Ohm’s law, and numerical matching of the arc plasma with the space-charge sheaths adjacent to the electrodes are applied to analyze in detail the plasma parameters and the phenomena occurring in the plasma column and the near-electrode regions of a DC arc generated in atmospheric pressure argon for current levels from 20 A up to 200 A. Results comprising electric field and potential, current density, heating of the electrodes, and effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium are presented and discussed. The current–voltage characteristic obtained is in fair agreement with known experimental data. It indicates a minimum for arc current of about 80 A. For all current levels, a field reversal in front of the anode accompanied by a voltage drop of (0.7–2.6) V is observed. Another field reversal is observed near the cathode for arc currents below 80 A.

  10. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing.

  12. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, S.; Kuo, S. P.; Murata, R. M.; Chen, C. Y.; Saxena, D.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-01

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  13. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, S.; Murata, R. M.; Saxena, D.; Kuo, S. P.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-15

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  14. Fluctuation-induced dissipation in non-equilibrium moving systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad; Golestanian, Ramin; Jaffe, Robert; Kardar, Mehran

    2013-03-01

    Quantum fluctuations in moving systems lead to nontrivial effects such as dissipation and radiation. We consider moving bodies--a single rotating object or multiple objects in relative motion--and derive the frictional force by using techniques from non-equilibrium statistical physics as well as quantum optics. The radiation to the environment is obtained as a general expression in terms of the scattering matrix which is a powerful analytical tool. We apply our general formulas to several examples of systems out of equilibrium due to their motion.

  15. Is Soret equilibrium a non-equilibrium effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würger, Alois

    2013-04-01

    Recent thermophoretic experiments on colloidal suspensions revived an old debate, namely whether the Soret effect is properly described by thermostatics, or necessarily requires non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Based on colloidal transport theory and the entropy production of the related viscous flow, our analysis leads to the conclusion that the equilibrium approach may work for small ions, yet fails for colloidal particles and polymers. Regarding binary molecular mixtures, our results shed some doubt on the validity of thermostatic approaches that derive the Soret coefficient from equilibrium potentials.

  16. Exploiting non-equilibrium phase separation for self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Michael; Tricard, Simon; Whitesides, George M; Geissler, Phillip L

    2016-02-01

    Demixing can occur in systems of two or more particle species that experience different driving forces, e.g., mixtures of self-propelled active particles or of oppositely charged colloids subject to an electric field. Here we show with macroscopic experiments and computer simulations that the forces underlying such non-equilibrium segregation can be used to control the self-assembly of particles that lack attractive interactions. We demonstrate that, depending on the direction, amplitude and frequency of a periodic external force acting on one particle species, the structures formed by a second, undriven species can range from compact clusters to elongated, string-like patterns. PMID:26658789

  17. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2013-07-01

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  18. The non-equilibrium nature of culinary evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinouchi, Osame; Diez-Garcia, Rosa W.; Holanda, Adriano J.; Zambianchi, Pedro; Roque, Antonio C.

    2008-07-01

    Food is an essential part of civilization, with a scope that ranges from the biological to the economic and cultural levels. Here, we study the statistics of ingredients and recipes taken from Brazilian, British, French and Medieval cookery books. We find universal distributions with scale invariant behaviour. We propose a copy-mutate process to model culinary evolution that fits our empirical data very well. We find a cultural 'founder effect' produced by the non-equilibrium dynamics of the model. Both the invariant and idiosyncratic aspects of culture are accounted for by our model, which may have applications in other kinds of evolutionary processes.

  19. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  20. Non-equilibrium steady state in the hydro regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourhasan, Razieh

    2016-02-01

    We study the existence and properties of the non-equilibrium steady state which arises by putting two copies of systems at different temperatures into a thermal contact. We solve the problem for the relativistic systems that are described by the energy-momentum of a perfect hydro with general equation of state (EOS). In particular, we examine several simple examples: a hydro with a linear EOS, a holographic CFT perturbed by a relevant operator and a barotropic fluid, i.e., P=P({E}) . Our studies suggest that the formation of steady state is a universal result of the hydro regime regardless of the kind of fluid.

  1. Laser Initiated, RF Sustained Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, John; Giar, Ryan; Hummelt, Jason; Way, Jesse

    2009-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes by focusing 193 nm, 260 mJ, 10 MW high power UV laser radiation to 18 cm and 1.3 cm zones are examined. Quantum resonant multi-photon (REMPI) and collisional cascade ionization processes affect the breakdown and plasma formation. Our spectroscopic measurements show that REMPI (2+1) processes on nitrogen play a substantial role at lower pressures due to the high photon energy (6.4 eV). The REMPI process yields high density air plasmas (5 x 10^16/cc) for the 18 cm focus with the laser flux three orders of magnitude below the classical breakdown threshold intensity. Measurements of the f = 1.3 cm core laser plasma density (8x10^17/cc) and electron temperature decay via two color laser interferometry are made. The 18 cm focal length lens and its ionizing shock wave front are utilized to produce air seed plasma to initiate a large volume (500 cc) RF sustainment discharge coupled by means of a 6 cm diameter helical coil at up to 10 kW power levels.

  2. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  3. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  4. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  5. Non-equilibrium hot carrier dynamics in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Jermyn, Adam; Cortes, Emiliano; Maier, Stefan A.; Goddard, William A., III

    Decay of surface plasmons to hot carriers is a new direction that has attracted considerable fundamental and application interest, yet a fundamental understanding of ultrafast plasmon decay processes and the underlying microscopic mechanisms remain incomplete. Ultrafast experiments provide insights into the relaxation of non-equilibrium carriers at the tens and hundreds of femtoseconds time scales, but do not yet directly probe shorter times with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we report the first ab initio calculations of non equilibrium transport of plasmonic hot carriers in metals and experimental observation of the injection of these carriers into molecules tethered to the metal surface. Specifically, metallic nanoantennas functionalized with a molecular monolayer allow for the direct probing of electron injection via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the original and reduced molecular species. We combine first principles calculations of electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates with Boltzmann transport simulations to predict the ultrafast dynamics and transport of carriers in real materials. We also predict and compare the evolution of electron distributions in ultrafast experiments on noble metal nanoparticles.

  6. Light-induced electronic non-equilibrium in plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Kornbluth, Mordechai; Nitzan, Abraham; Seideman, Tamar

    2013-05-01

    We consider the transient non-equilibrium electronic distribution that is created in a metal nanoparticle upon plasmon excitation. Following light absorption, the created plasmons decohere within a few femtoseconds, producing uncorrelated electron-hole pairs. The corresponding non-thermal electronic distribution evolves in response to the photo-exciting pulse and to subsequent relaxation processes. First, on the femtosecond timescale, the electronic subsystem relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac distribution characterized by an electronic temperature. Next, within picoseconds, thermalization with the underlying lattice phonons leads to a hot particle in internal equilibrium that subsequently equilibrates with the environment. Here we focus on the early stage of this multistep relaxation process, and on the properties of the ensuing non-equilibrium electronic distribution. We consider the form of this distribution as derived from the balance between the optical absorption and the subsequent relaxation processes, and discuss its implication for (a) heating of illuminated plasmonic particles, (b) the possibility to optically induce current in junctions, and (c) the prospect for experimental observation of such light-driven transport phenomena. PMID:23656152

  7. The non-equilibrium and energetic cost of sensory adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, G.; Sartori, Pablo; Tu, Y.

    2011-03-24

    Biological sensory systems respond to external signals in short time and adapt to permanent environmental changes over a longer timescale to maintain high sensitivity in widely varying environments. In this work we have shown how all adaptation dynamics are intrinsically non-equilibrium and free energy is dissipated. We show that the dissipated energy is utilized to maintain adaptation accuracy. A universal relation between the energy dissipation and the optimum adaptation accuracy is established by both a general continuum model and a discrete model i n the specific case of the well-known E. coli chemo-sensory adaptation. Our study suggests that cellular level adaptations are fueled by hydrolysis of high energy biomolecules, such as ATP. The relevance of this work lies on linking the functionality of a biological system (sensory adaptation) with a concept rooted in statistical physics (energy dissipation), by a mathematical law. This has been made possible by identifying a general sensory system with a non-equilibrium steady state (a stationary state in which the probability current is not zero, but its divergence is, see figure), and then numerically and analytically solving the Fokker-Planck and Master Equations which describe the sensory adaptive system. The application of our general results to the case of E. Coli has shed light on why this system uses the high energy SAM molecule to perform adaptation, since using the more common ATP would not suffice to obtain the required adaptation accuracy.

  8. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  9. Modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in expanding flows by means of a collisional-radiative model

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A.; Lani, A.; Bultel, A.; Panesi, M.

    2013-07-15

    The effects of non-equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle flow are investigated by means of a collisional-radiative model. The gas undergoing the expansion is an air plasma and consists of atoms, molecules, and free electrons. In the present analysis, the electronic excited states of atomic and molecular species are treated as separate pseudo-species. Rotational and vibrational energy modes are assumed to be populated according to Boltzmann distributions. The coupling between radiation and gas dynamics is accounted for, in simplified manner, by using escape factors. The flow governing equations for the steady quasi-one-dimensional flow are written in conservative form and discretized in space by means of a finite volume method. Steady-state solutions are obtained by using a fully implicit time integration scheme. The analysis of the evolution of the electronic distribution functions reveals a substantial over-population of the high-lying excited levels of atoms and molecules in correspondence of the nozzle exit. The influence of optical thickness is also studied. The results clearly demonstrate that the radiative transitions, within the optically thin approximation, drastically reduce the over-population of high-lying electronic levels.

  10. Asphaltene Surface Erosion in Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, M.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, H.; Poveda C., J.; Reyes G., P.; Altuzar, P.

    2010-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during erosion of substrates of asphaltene. The amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an AC generator with a frequency of 60 Hz and an output power of about 60 W. The electron temperature was found to be 6.88 eV, and the ion density is about 3.5 × 1016 cm-3. As the asphaltene was exposed to the air plasma, the surface was etched. The emission from molecular bands CS2, O3, N2+, NO, O2, CS, S2, CN, C7H7, C2, H2, C2-, NiO, N2 and SO, and atomic line O, were observed and some of them were used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene weight was reduced gradually with an etching rate of about 0.844 mg/min, during the first 20 min.

  11. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  12. Characterizing the non-equilibrium ionization state of the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvia, Devin W.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton D.; Shull, J. Michael; Turk, Matthew; Reynolds, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common ions used to track metals in the intergalactic medium (IGM) is OVI. Ion species in the IGM are typically assumed to be in ionization equilibrium, but owing to the low density of the plasma they may be significantly out of equilibrium. Divergences from equilibrium would make estimates of the amount and evolution of metals in the IGM incorrect. Using a new software package for building and solving complex chemical networks coupled to cosmological hydrodynamic + N-body simulations, we investigate the non-equilibrium properties of the IGM. In particular, we explore how significantly the ionization structure of the IGM diverges from the equilibrium state as a function of time and physical environment. Motivated by the abundant observational data that probes the intergalactic medium via OVI absorption lines in quasar spectra, we track all ionization states of atomic oxygen alongside those of hydrogen and helium. We use the results of these non-equilibrium simulations to characterize the mass content and ionization properties of the IGM and help interpret current observations made by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph.

  13. Closure conditions for non-equilibrium multi-component models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S.; Hantke, M.; Richter, P.

    2016-07-01

    A class of non-equilibrium models for compressible multi-component fluids in multi-dimensions is investigated taking into account viscosity and heat conduction. These models are subject to the choice of interfacial pressures and interfacial velocity as well as relaxation terms for velocity, pressure, temperature and chemical potentials. Sufficient conditions are derived for these quantities that ensure meaningful physical properties such as a non-negative entropy production, thermodynamical stability, Galilean invariance and mathematical properties such as hyperbolicity, subcharacteristic property and existence of an entropy-entropy flux pair. For the relaxation of chemical potentials, a two-component and a three-component models for vapor-water and gas-water-vapor, respectively, are considered.

  14. Transient Features in Charge Fractionalization and Non-equilibrium Bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenow, Bernd; Schneider, Alexander; Milletari, Mirco

    2015-03-01

    In quantum Hall edge states and in other one-dimensional interacting systems, charge fractionalization can occur due to the fact that an injected charge pulse decomposes into eigenmodes propagating at different velocities. If the original charge pulse has some spatial width due to injection with a given source-drain voltage, a finite time is needed until the separation between the fractionalized pulses is larger than their width. In the formalism of non-equilibrium bosonization, the above physics is reflected in the separation of initially overlapping square pulses in the effective scattering phase. When expressing the single particle Green function as a functional determinant of counting operators containing the scattering phase, the time evolution of charge fractionalization is mathematically described by functional determinants with overlapping pulses. We develop a framework for the evaluation of such determinants, and compare our theoretical results with recent experimental findings. Supported by DFG Grant RO 2247/8-1.

  15. Non-equilibrium dynamics in driven Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Clark, Logan W.; Ha, Li-Chung; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We report recent progress on the study of non-equilibrium dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates using the shaken optical lattice or optically controlled Feshbach resonances. In the shaken lattice at sufficient shaking amplitude we observe a quantum phase transition from ordinary condensates to pseudo-spinor 1/2 condensates containing discrete domains with effective ferromagnetic interactions. We study the temporal and spatial Kibble-Zurek scaling laws for the dependence of this domain structure on the quench rate across the transition. Furthermore, we observe long-range density correlations within the ferromagnetic condensate. With optically controlled Feshbach resonances we demonstrate control of the interaction strength between atoms at timescales as short as ten nanoseconds and length scales smaller than the condensate. We find that making interactions attractive within only one region of the gas induces localized collapse of the condensate.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Steady States for Chains of Four Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, N.; Eckmann, J.-P.

    2016-07-01

    We study a chain of four interacting rotors (rotators) connected at both ends to stochastic heat baths at different temperatures. We show that for non-degenerate interaction potentials the system relaxes, at a stretched exponential rate, to a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). Rotors with high energy tend to decouple from their neighbors due to fast oscillation of the forces. Because of this, the energy of the central two rotors, which interact with the heat baths only through the external rotors, can take a very long time to dissipate. By appropriately averaging the oscillatory forces, we estimate the dissipation rate and construct a Lyapunov function. Compared to the chain of length three (considered previously by C. Poquet and the current authors), the new difficulty with four rotors is the appearance of resonances when both central rotors are fast. We deal with these resonances using the rapid thermalization of the two external rotors.

  17. Cavity Dephasing in Transmon Qubits from Non-equilibrium Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Lefebvre, Jay; Wellstood, Frederick; Palmer, Benjamin

    The dephasing times for transmon qubits in a 3D cavity can be limited by coupling of the cavity input and output lines to non-equilibrium noise from higher temperature stages. In our system, the dominant source of thermal photons in the cavity is the last microwave attenuator in the microwave input line which is mounted on the 20 mK stage. Guided by thermal and microwave simulations, we have fabricated microwave attenuators and tested them in a 3D transmon measurement system. The performance of the attenuators was quantified by measuring the Ramsey decay time of a transmon qubit as a function of the temperature of the mixing chamber and power dissipated in the attenuator. Based on the Ramsey decay times and properties of the transmon-cavity system, we estimate the effective output noise temperature of the attenuator and compare our results to simulations.

  18. Biological Implications of Dynamical Phases in Non-equilibrium Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2016-03-01

    Biology achieves novel functions like error correction, ultra-sensitivity and accurate concentration measurement at the expense of free energy through Maxwell Demon-like mechanisms. The design principles and free energy trade-offs have been studied for a variety of such mechanisms. In this review, we emphasize a perspective based on dynamical phases that can explain commonalities shared by these mechanisms. Dynamical phases are defined by typical trajectories executed by non-equilibrium systems in the space of internal states. We find that coexistence of dynamical phases can have dramatic consequences for function vs free energy cost trade-offs. Dynamical phases can also provide an intuitive picture of the design principles behind such biological Maxwell Demons.

  19. Thermal Non-equilibrium Consistent with Widespread Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Mok, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Time correlation analysis has been used to show widespread cooling in the solar corona; this cooling has been interpreted as a result of impulsive (nanoflare) heating. In this work, we investigate wide-spread cooling using a 3D model for a solar active region which has been heated with highly stratified heating. This type of heating drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions, meaning that though the heating is effectively steady, the density and temperature in the solution are not. We simulate the expected observations in narrowband EUV images and apply the time correlation analysis. We find that the results of this analysis are qualitatively similar to the observed data. We discuss additional diagnostics that may be applied to differentiate between these two heating scenarios.

  20. Complementary relations in non-equilibrium stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Nicholson, S. B.

    2015-08-01

    We present novel complementary relations in non-equilibrium stochastic processes. Specifically, by utilising path integral formulation, we derive statistical measures (entropy, information, and work) and investigate their dependence on variables (x, v), reference frames, and time. In particular, we show that the equilibrium state maximises the simultaneous information quantified by the product of the Fisher information based on x and v while minimising the simultaneous disorder/uncertainty quantified by the sum of the entropy based on x and v as well as by the product of the variances of the PDFs of x and v. We also elucidate the difference between Eulerian and Lagrangian entropy. Our theory naturally leads to Hamilton-Jacobi relation for forced-dissipative systems.

  1. Non-Equilibrium in Line-Tied Coronal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1996-05-01

    Parker's model of nonequilibrium and topological dissipation [E. N. Parker, ApJ 174, 499, 1972] is revisited. Within the framework of ideal reduced MHD equations, it is shown that there can be at most one smooth magnetostatic equilibrium for each continuous footpoint mapping between the two plates with the line-tied boundary condition. This implies that for a given amount of footpoint driving, if a coronal equilibrium becomes unstable, magnetic non-equilibrium and current sheets (tangential discontinuities) can be realized. The special case of island coalescence is considered analytically and numerically. Stability of an equilibrium containing current layers is also studied. Numerical results suggest that such an equilibrium becomes more unstable as the current increases. This is consistent with the tendency for the formation of true tangential discontinuities. This work is supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  2. Modeling Inflation Using a Non-Equilibrium Equation of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflation is a change in the prices of goods that takes place without changes in the actual values of those goods. The Equation of Exchange, formulated clearly in a seminal paper by Irving Fisher in 1911, establishes an equilibrium relationship between the price index P (also known as "inflation"), the economy's aggregate output Q (also known as "the real gross domestic product"), the amount of money available for spending M (also known as "the money supply"), and the rate at which money is reused V (also known as "the velocity of circulation of money"). This paper offers first a qualitative discussion of what can cause these factors to change and how those causes might be controlled, then develops a quantitative model of inflation based on a non-equilibrium version of the Equation of Exchange. Causal relationships are different from equations in that the effects of changes in the causal variables take time to play out-often significant amounts of time. In the model described here, wages track prices, but only after a distributed lag. Prices change whenever the money supply, aggregate output, or the velocity of circulation of money change, but only after a distributed lag. Similarly, the money supply depends on the supplies of domestic and foreign money, which depend on the monetary base and a variety of foreign transactions, respectively. The spreading of delays mitigates the shocks of sudden changes to important inputs, but the most important aspect of this model is that delays, which often have dramatic consequences in dynamic systems, are explicitly incorporated.macroeconomics, inflation, equation of exchange, non-equilibrium, Athena Project

  3. Non-equilibrium dynamics of glass-forming liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Díaz, Luis Enrique; Lázaro-Lázaro, Edilio; Olais-Govea, José Manuel; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2014-06-01

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible processes in glass-forming liquids [P. Ramírez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010)] is extended here to multi-component systems. The resulting theory describes the statistical properties of the instantaneous local particle concentration profiles nα(r, t) of species α in terms of the coupled time-evolution equations for the mean value overline{n}_α ({r},t) and for the covariance σ _{α β }({r},{r}^' };t)equiv overline{δ n_α ({r},t)δ n_β ({r}^' },t)} of the fluctuations δ n_α ({r},t) = n_α ({r},t)- overline{n}_α ({r},t). As in the monocomponent case, these two coarse-grained equations involve a local mobility function bα(r, t) for each species, written in terms of the memory function of the two-time correlation function C_{α β }({r},{r}^' };t,t^' }) equiv overline{δ n_α ({r},t)δ n_β ({r}^' },t^' })}. If the system is constrained to remain spatially uniform and subjected to a non-equilibrium preparation protocol described by a given temperature and composition change program T(t) and overline{n}_α (t), these equations predict the irreversible structural relaxation of the partial static structure factors Sαβ(k; t) and of the (collective and self) intermediate scattering functions Fαβ(k, τ; t) and F^S_{α β }(k,τ ;t). We illustrate the applicability of the resulting theory with two examples involving simple model mixtures subjected to an instantaneous temperature quench: an electroneutral binary mixture of equally sized and oppositely charged hard-spheres, and a binary mixture of soft-spheres of moderate size-asymmetry.

  4. Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in High Power Beam Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosto, Sebastiano

    2004-03-01

    The paper concerns some aspects of non-equilibrium materials processing with high power beams. Three examples show that the formation of metastable phases plays a crucial role to understand the effects of beam-matter interaction: (i) modeling of pulsed laser induced thermal sputtering; (ii) formation of metastable phases during solidification of the melt pool; (i) possibility of carrying out heat treatments by low power irradiation ``in situ''. The case (i) deals with surface evaporation and boiling processes in presence of superheating. A computer simulation model of thermal sputtering by vapor bubble nucleation in molten phase shows that non-equilibrium processing enables the rise of large surface temperature gradients in the boiling layer and the possibility of sub-surface temperature maximum. The case (ii) concerns the heterogeneous welding of Cu and AISI 304L stainless steel plates by electron beam irradiation. Microstructural investigation of the molten zone has shown that dwell times of the order of 10-1-10-3 s, consistent with moderate cooling rates in the range 10^3-10^5 K/s, entail the formation of metastable Cu-Fe phases. The case (iii) concerns electron beam welding and post-welding treatments of 2219 Al base alloy. Electron microscopy and positron annihilation have explained why post-weld heat transients induced by low power irradiation of specimens in the as welded condition enable ageing effects usually expected after some hours of treatment in furnace. The problem of microstructural instability is particularly significant for a correct design of components manufactured with high power beam technologies and subjected to severe acceptance standards to ensure advanced performances during service life.

  5. Numerical Analysis on Thermal Non-Equilibrium Process of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave in Axisymmetric Nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-28

    Numerical Analyses on Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP) have been performed for researching the mechanism of laser absorption occurring in the laser propulsion system. Above all, Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), categorized as one type of LSP, is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for performing highly effective propulsion. For simulating generation and propagation of LSD wave, I have performed thermal non-equilibrium analyses by Navier-stokes equations, using a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser into an inert gas, where the most important laser absorption mechanism for LSD propagation is Inverse Bremsstrahlung. As a numerical method, TVD scheme taken into account of real gas effects and thermal non-equilibrium effects by using a 2-temperature model, is applied. In this study, I analyze a LSD wave propagating through a conical nozzle, where an inner space of an actual laser propulsion system is simplified.

  6. Effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Michta, D; Graziani, F; Pruet, J; Luu, T

    2009-08-18

    We investigate the effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, Brehmsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and thermal-nuclear burning. We find that in inertial confinement fusion environments, deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  7. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, F.; Simonnet, E.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the dynamics of two-dimensional and quasi-geostrophic flows with stochastic forces. It exhibits extremely long correlations times, related to multi-scale dynamics, and collective behaviors such as bistability and multistability. We show that in regimes of weak forces and dissipation, dominated by the large scales inertial dynamics, equilibrium statistical mechanics provides extremely precise predictions for the self-organized large scale flows. This is true for amuch larger range of parameters than would have been expected, explaining a renewed interest for statistical mechanics approaches. Non-equilibrium theory, based on kinetic theories (or equivalently Mori-Zwanzig projections) gives explicit predictions for algebraic correlations of the velocity field, and for the large scale mean flow. We also describe briefly recent applications to ocean jets and vortices, explaining the detailed structure of inertial mid-basin jets and both the structure, and westward and poleward drifts of oceans rings and eddies. References: F. BOUCHET and E. SIMONNET, Random Changes of Flow Topology in Two-Dimensional and Geophysical Turbulence, Physical Review Letters 102 (2009), no. 9, 094504-+. F. BOUCHET and J. SOMMERIA, Emergence of intense jets and Jupiter's Great Red Spot as maximum-entropy structures, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 464 (2002), 165-207. A. VENAILLE and F. BOUCHET, Ocean rings and jets as statistical equilibrium states, submitted to JPO F. BOUCHET and A. VENAILLE, Statistical mechanics of two-dimensional and geophysical flows, submitted to Physics Reports Non-equilibrium phase transitions in the dynamics of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations with stochastic forces in a doubly periodic domain of aspect ratio d. The two main plots are the time series and probability density functions (PDFs) of the modulus of the largest scale Fourrier component, illustrating random changes between dipoles (|z1| close to 0.55) and unidirectional flows (|z1| close to 0.). The small

  8. Non-equilibrium Aspects of Quantum Integrable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, Natan

    The study of non-equilibrium dynamics of interacting many body systems is currently one of the main challenges of modern condensed matter physics, driven by the spectacular progress in the ability to create experimental systems - trapped cold atomic gases are a prime example - that can be isolated from their environment and be highly controlled. Many old and new questions can be addressed: thermalization of isolated systems, nonequilibrium steady states, the interplay between non equilibrium currents and strong correlations, quantum phase transitions in time, universality among others. In this talk I will describe nonequilibrium quench dynamics in integrable quantum systems. I'll discuss the time evolution of the Lieb-Liniger system, a gas of interacting bosons moving on the continuous infinite line and interacting via a short range potential. Considering a finite number of bosons on the line we find that for any value of repulsive coupling the system asymptotes towards a strongly repulsive gas for any initial state, while for an attractive coupling, the system forms a maximal bound state that dominates at longer times. In the thermodynamic limit -with the number of bosons and the system size sent to infinity at a constant density and the long time limit taken subsequently- I'll show that the density and density-density correlation functions for strong but finite positive coupling are described by GGE for translationally invariant initial states with short range correlations. As examples I'll discuss quenches from a Mott insulator initial state or a Newton's Cradle. Then I will show that if the initial state is strongly non translational invariant, e.g. a domain wall configuration, the system does not equilibrate but evolves into a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS). A related NESS arises when the quench consists of coupling a quantum dot to two leads held at different chemical potential, leading in the long time limit to a steady state current. Time permitting I

  9. Observing Organic Molecules in Interstellar Gases: Non Equilibrium Excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Faure, Alexandre; Remijan, Anthony; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2014-06-01

    In order to observe quantitatively organic molecules in interstellar gas, it is necessary to understand the relative importance of photonic and collisional excitations. In order to do so, collisional excitation transfer rates have to be computed. We undertook several such studies, in particular for H_2CO and HCOOCH_3. Both species are observed in many astrochemical environments, including star-forming regions. We found that those two molecules behave in their low-lying rotational levels in an opposite way. For cis methyl-formate, a non-equilibrium radiative transfer treatment of rotational lines is performed, using a new set of theoretical collisional rate coefficients. These coefficients have been computed in the temperature range 5 to 30 K by combining coupled-channel scattering calculations with a high accuracy potential energy surface for HCOOCH_3 -- He. The results are compared to observations toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud. A total of 2080 low-lying transitions of methyl formate, with upper levels below 25 K, were treated. These lines are found to probe a cold (30 K), moderately dense (n ˜ 104 cm-3) interstellar gas. In addition, our calculations indicate that all detected emission lines with a frequency below 30 GHz are collisionally pumped weak masers amplifying the background of Sgr B2(N). This result demonstrates the generality of the inversion mechanism for the low-lying transitions of methyl formate. For formaldehyde, we performed a similar non-equilibrium treatment, with H_2 as the collisional partner, thanks to the accurate H_2CO - H_2 potential energy surface . We found very different energy transfer rates for collisions with para-H_2 (J=0) and ortho-H_2 (J=1). The well-known absorption against the cosmological background of the 111→ 101 line is shown to depend critically on the difference of behaviour between para and ortho-H_2, for a wide range of H_2 density. We thank the CNRS-PCMI French national program for continuous support

  10. Non-equilibrium dynamics of glass-forming liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Díaz, Luis Enrique; Lázaro-Lázaro, Edilio; Olais-Govea, José Manuel; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2014-06-21

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible processes in glass-forming liquids [P. Ramírez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010)] is extended here to multi-component systems. The resulting theory describes the statistical properties of the instantaneous local particle concentration profiles n{sub α}(r, t) of species α in terms of the coupled time-evolution equations for the mean value n{sup ¯}{sub α}(r,t) and for the covariance σ{sub αβ}(r,r{sup ′};t)≡δn{sub α}(r,t)δn{sub β}(r{sup ′},t){sup ¯} of the fluctuations δn{sub α}(r,t)=n{sub α}(r,t)−n{sup ¯}{sub α}(r,t). As in the monocomponent case, these two coarse-grained equations involve a local mobility function b{sub α}(r, t) for each species, written in terms of the memory function of the two-time correlation function C{sub αβ}(r,r{sup ′};t,t{sup ′})≡δn{sub α}(r,t)δn{sub β}(r{sup ′},t{sup ′}){sup ¯}. If the system is constrained to remain spatially uniform and subjected to a non-equilibrium preparation protocol described by a given temperature and composition change program T(t) and n{sup ¯}{sub α}(t), these equations predict the irreversible structural relaxation of the partial static structure factors S{sub αβ}(k; t) and of the (collective and self) intermediate scattering functions F{sub αβ}(k, τ; t) and F{sub αβ}{sup S}(k,τ;t). We illustrate the applicability of the resulting theory with two examples involving simple model mixtures subjected to an instantaneous temperature quench: an electroneutral binary mixture of equally sized and oppositely charged hard-spheres, and a binary mixture of soft-spheres of moderate size-asymmetry.

  11. Picosecond CARS measurements of nitrogen vibrational loading and rotational/translational temperature in non-equilibrium discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montello, A.; Yin, Z.; Burnette, D.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2013-11-01

    Picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to study vibrational energy loading and relaxation kinetics in nitrogen and air ns pulsed non-equilibrium plasmas, in both plane-to-plane and pin-to-pin geometries. In 10 kHz repetitively pulsed plane-to-plane plasmas, up to ˜50% of coupled discharge power is found to load vibrations, in good agreement with a master equation kinetic model. In the pin-to-pin geometry, ˜40% of total discharge energy in a single pulse in air at 100 Torr is found to couple directly to nitrogen vibrations by electron impact, also in good agreement with model predictions. Post-discharge, the total quanta in vibrational levels v = 0-9 is found to increase by ˜60% in air and by a factor of ˜3 in nitrogen, respectively, a result in direct contrast to modelling results which predict the total number of quanta to be essentially constant until ultimately decaying by V-T relaxation and mass diffusion. More detailed comparison between experiment and model show that the vibrational distribution function (VDF) predicted by the model during, and directly after, the discharge pulse is in good agreement with that determined experimentally. However, for time delays exceeding ˜1 µs, the experimental VDF shows populations of vibrational levels v ⩾ 2 greatly exceeding modelling results, which predict their predominant decay due to net downward V-V transfer and corresponding increase in v = 1 population. This is at variance with the experimental results, which show a significant monotonic increase in the populations of levels v = 2-9 at t ˜ 1-10 µs after the discharge pulse, both in nitrogen and air, before gradually switching to relaxation at t ˜ 10-100 µs. It is concluded that a collisional process is likely feeding high vibrational levels at a rate which is comparable to the rate at which population of the high levels is lost due to net downward V-V energy transfer. A likely candidate for the source of additional vibrational

  12. Energy Injection in a Non-Equilibrium Granular Gas Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, K.; Olafsen, J. S.

    2009-06-01

    Recent measurements involving a driven, novel bi-layer granular gas experiment demonstrate interesting behaviors in each of two segregated layers comprising the granular media. A lower layer of heavier dimers consisting of two monomers and a connecting rod are driven by a vertically oscillating plate. Above this dimer layer, a lighter layer of Delrin monomers is driven, not by the plate directly, but via collisions with the lower layer. Each layer is driven far from equilibrium and is influenced by particle collisions both within the layer (intralayer) and between layers (interlayer). The steady state dynamics in each layer demonstrate a non-equilibrium balance between the energy input from below and the dissipation through collisions. Interestingly enough, while the velocity statistics of the lower layer are driven strongly non-Gaussian by the energy input from the plate, the upper layer dynamics recapture robust Gaussian velocity statistics over a wide range of shaking parameters. The details of the energy injection into the upper layer are not well understood and could shed light on the conditions necessary to recapture a Maxwell-Boltzmann description in systems driven far from equilibrium. The dynamics of a single Delrin particle free to move on top of a high density lattice of dimers has been studied to evaluate the role of the interlayer collisions on the energy injection into this system. In this paper, the diffusion of the single tracer particle has been examined to better understand the influence of energy injection within the system.

  13. Non-equilibrium relaxation analysis in cluster algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonomura, Yoshihiko

    2014-03-01

    In Monte Carlo study of phase transitions, the critical slowing down has been a serious problem. In order to overcome this difficulty, two kinds of approaches have been proposed. One is the cluster algorithms, where global update scheme based on a percolation theory is introduced in order to refrain from the power-law behavior at the critical point. Another is the non-equilibrium relaxation method, where the power-law critical relaxation process is analyzed by the dynamical scaling theory in order to refrain from time-consuming equilibration. Then, the next step is to fuse these two approaches -- to investigate phase transitions with early-stage relaxation process of cluster algorithms. Since the dynamical scaling theory does not hold in cluster algorithms in principle, such attempt had been considered impossible. In the present talk we show that such fusion is actually possible using an empirical scaling form obtained from the 2D Ising models instead of the dynamical scaling theory. Applications to the q >= 3 Potts models, +/- J Ising models etc. will also be explained in the presentation.

  14. Non-equilibrium control of complex solids by nonlinear phononics.

    PubMed

    Mankowsky, Roman; Först, Michael; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We review some recent advances in the use of optical fields at terahertz frequencies to drive the lattice of complex materials. We will focus on the control of low energy collective properties of solids, which emerge on average when a high frequency vibration is driven and a new crystal structure induced. We first discuss the fundamentals of these lattice rearrangements, based on how anharmonic mode coupling transforms an oscillatory motion into a quasi-static deformation of the crystal structure. We then discuss experiments, in which selectively changing a bond angle turns an insulator into a metal, accompanied by changes in charge, orbital and magnetic order. We then address the case of light induced non-equilibrium superconductivity, a mysterious phenomenon observed in some cuprates and molecular materials when certain lattice vibrations are driven. Finally, we show that the dynamics of electronic and magnetic phase transitions in complex-oxide heterostructures follow distinctly new physical pathways in case of the resonant excitation of a substrate vibrational mode. PMID:27223639

  15. Numerical simulation of non-equilibrium transient flow during inhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    The flow in human upper airways may be laminar, transitional, or turbulent. Breadth-by-breadth and patient-specific variability is expected to have a significant influence on laminar-turbulent transition. The flow path of therapeutic drug aerosols may be strongly affected by the transition-induced unsteady structures. The unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically to simulate the flow through a channel-flow geometry representative of an airway segment. In order to trigger transition, small-amplitude disturbances are forced via wall blowing/suction. We perform multiple simulations with varying phase of the forced disturbances. Ensemble averaging then allows to compute mean and RMS values. A time-dependent channel center-line velocity serves to model the change in flow velocity during inhalation. The uncertainty associated with variability during breathing is quantified using non-intrusive stochastic collocation. Simulation results reveal that we have intervals in time and space with quasi-steady equilibrium and with strong non-equilibrium flow. The uncertainty associated with the breathing pattern may strongly affect the occurrence of laminar-turbulent transition, leading to large uncertainties when RMS values are peaking.

  16. A probability theory for non-equilibrium gravitational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    This paper uses dynamical invariants to describe the evolution of collisionless systems subject to time-dependent gravitational forces without resorting to maximum-entropy probabilities. We show that collisionless relaxation can be viewed as a special type of diffusion process in the integral-of-motion space. In time-varying potentials with a fixed spatial symmetry the diffusion coefficients are closely related to virial quantities, such as the specific moment of inertia, the virial factor and the mean kinetic and potential energy of microcanonical particle ensembles. The non-equilibrium distribution function is found by convolving the initial distribution function with the Green function that solves Einstein's equation for freely diffusing particles. Such a convolution also yields a natural solution to the Fokker-Planck equations in the energy space. Our mathematical formalism can be generalized to potentials with a time-varying symmetry, where diffusion extends over multiple dimensions of the integral-of-motion space. The new probability theory is in many ways analogous to stochastic calculus, with two significant differences: (i) the equations of motion that govern the trajectories of particles are fully deterministic, and (ii) the diffusion coefficients can be derived self-consistently from microcanonical phase-space averages without relying on ergodicity assumptions. For illustration we follow the cold collapse of N-body models in a time-dependent logarithmic potential. Comparison between the analytical and numerical results shows excellent agreement in regions where the potential evolution does not depart too strongly from the adiabatic regime.

  17. A non-equilibrium neutral model for analysing cultural change.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Anne; Shennan, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    Neutral evolution is a frequently used model to analyse changes in frequencies of cultural variants over time. Variants are chosen to be copied according to their relative frequency and new variants are introduced by a process of random mutation. Here we present a non-equilibrium neutral model which accounts for temporally varying population sizes and mutation rates and makes it possible to analyse the cultural system under consideration at any point in time. This framework gives an indication whether observed changes in the frequency distributions of a set of cultural variants between two time points are consistent with the random copying hypothesis. We find that the likelihood of the existence of the observed assemblage at the end of the considered time period (expressed by the probability of the observed number of cultural variants present in the population during the whole period under neutral evolution) is a powerful indicator of departures from neutrality. Further, we study the effects of frequency-dependent selection on the evolutionary trajectories and present a case study of change in the decoration of pottery in early Neolithic Central Europe. Based on the framework developed we show that neutral evolution is not an adequate description of the observed changes in frequency. PMID:23538207

  18. NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION IN THE BIFROST STELLAR ATMOSPHERE CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.

    2013-03-15

    The chromosphere and transition region have for the last 20 years been known to be quite dynamic layers of the solar atmosphere, characterized by timescales shorter than the ionization equilibrium timescales of many of the ions dominating emission in these regions. Due to the fast changes in the properties of the atmosphere, long ionization and recombination times can lead these ions to being found far from their equilibrium temperatures. A number of the spectral lines that we observe can therefore not be expected a priori to reflect information about local quantities such as the density or temperature, and interpreting observations requires numerical modeling. Modeling the ionization balance is computationally expensive and has earlier only been done in one dimension. However, one-dimensional models can primarily be used to investigate the possible importance of a physical effect, but cannot verify or disprove the importance of that effect in the fully three-dimensional solar atmosphere. Here, using the atomic database package DIPER, we extend one-dimensional methods and implement a solver for the rate equations of the full three-dimensional problem, using the numerical code Bifrost. We present our implementation and report on a few test cases. We also report on studies of the important C IV and Fe XII ions in a semi-realistic two-dimensional solar atmosphere model, focusing on differences between statistical equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionization results.

  19. Non-equilibrium control of complex solids by nonlinear phononics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankowsky, Roman; Först, Michael; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We review some recent advances in the use of optical fields at terahertz frequencies to drive the lattice of complex materials. We will focus on the control of low energy collective properties of solids, which emerge on average when a high frequency vibration is driven and a new crystal structure induced. We first discuss the fundamentals of these lattice rearrangements, based on how anharmonic mode coupling transforms an oscillatory motion into a quasi-static deformation of the crystal structure. We then discuss experiments, in which selectively changing a bond angle turns an insulator into a metal, accompanied by changes in charge, orbital and magnetic order. We then address the case of light induced non-equilibrium superconductivity, a mysterious phenomenon observed in some cuprates and molecular materials when certain lattice vibrations are driven. Finally, we show that the dynamics of electronic and magnetic phase transitions in complex-oxide heterostructures follow distinctly new physical pathways in case of the resonant excitation of a substrate vibrational mode.

  20. Non-Equilibrium Water-Glassy Polymer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Eric; Minelli, Matteo; Baschetti, Marco; Sarti, Giulio; Elabd, Yossef

    2012-02-01

    For many applications (e.g., medical implants, packaging), an accurate assessment and fundamental understanding of the dynamics of water-glassy polymer interactions is of great interest. In this study, sorption and diffusion of pure water in several glassy polymers films, such as poly(styrene) (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(lactide) (PLA), were measured over a wide range of vapor activities and temperatures using several experimental techniques, including quartz spring microbalance (QSM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Non-Fickian behavior (diffusion-relaxation phenomena) was observed by all three techniques, while FTIR-ATR spectroscopy also provides information about the distribution of the states of water and water transport mechanisms on a molecular-level. Specifically, the states of water are significantly different in PS compared to PMMA and PLA. Additionally, a purely predictive non-equilibrium lattice fluid (NELF) model was applied to predict the sorption isotherms of water in these glassy polymers.

  1. Thermal Non-Equilibrium Flows in Three Space Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yanni

    2016-01-01

    We study the equations describing the motion of a thermal non-equilibrium gas in three space dimensions. It is a hyperbolic system of six equations with a relaxation term. The dissipation mechanism induced by the relaxation is weak in the sense that the Shizuta-Kawashima criterion is violated. This implies that a perturbation of a constant equilibrium state consists of two parts: one decays in time while the other stays. In fact, the entropy wave grows weakly along the particle path as the process is irreversible. We study thermal properties related to the well-posedness of the nonlinear system. We also obtain a detailed pointwise estimate on the Green's function for the Cauchy problem when the system is linearized around an equilibrium constant state. The Green's function provides a complete picture of the wave pattern, with an exact and explicit leading term. Comparing with existing results for one dimensional flows, our results reveal a new feature of three dimensional flows: not only does the entropy wave not decay, but the velocity also contains a non-decaying part, strongly coupled with its decaying one. The new feature is supported by the second order approximation via the Chapman-Enskog expansions, which are the Navier-Stokes equations with vanished shear viscosity and heat conductivity.

  2. Non Equilibrium Transformations of Molecular Compounds Induced Mechanically

    SciTech Connect

    Descamps, M.; Willart, J. F.; Dudognon, E.

    2006-05-05

    Results clarifying the effects of mechanical milling on molecular solids are shortly reviewed. Special attention has been paid to the temperature of milling with regard to the glass transition temperature of the compounds. It is shown that decreasing the grinding temperature has for incidence to increase the amorphization tendency whereas milling above Tg produces a crystal-to-crystal transformation between polymorphic varieties. These observations contradict the usual proposition that grinding transforms the physical state only by a heating effect which induces a local melting. Equilibrium thermodynamics does not seem to be appropriate for describing the process. The driven alloys concept offers a more rational framework to interpret the effect of the milling temperature. Other results are presented which demonstrate the possibility for grinding to realize low temperature solid state alloying which offers new promising ways to stabilize amorphous molecular solids. In a second part the effect of dehydration of a molecular hydrate is described. It is shown that the rate of the dehydration process is a driving force for this other type of mechanical non equilibrium transformation.

  3. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  4. Non-Equilibrium Turbulence and Two-Equation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two-equation turbulence models are analyzed from the perspective of spectral closure theories. Kolmogorov theory provides useful information for models, but it is limited to equilibrium conditions in which the energy spectrum has relaxed to a steady state consistent with the forcing at large scales; it does not describe transient evolution between such states. Transient evolution is necessarily through nonequilibrium states, which can only be found from a theory of turbulence evolution, such as one provided by a spectral closure. When the departure from equilibrium is small, perturbation theory can be used to approximate the evolution by a two-equation model. The perturbation theory also gives explicit conditions under which this model can be valid, and when it will fail. Implications of the non-equilibrium corrections for the classic Tennekes-Lumley balance in the dissipation rate equation are drawn: it is possible to establish both the cancellation of the leading order Re1/2 divergent contributions to vortex stretching and enstrophy destruction, and the existence of a nonzero difference which is finite in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  5. Non-equilibrium Warm Dense Gold: Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This talk is an overview of a series of studies of non-equilibrium Warm Dense Matter using a broad range of measured properties of a single material, namely Au, as comprehensive benchmarks for theory. The measurements are made in fs-laser pump-probe experiments. For understanding lattice stability, our investigation reveals a solid phase at high energy density. This leads to the calculation of lattice dynamics using MD simulations and phonon hardening in DFT-MD simulations. For understanding electron transport in two-temperature states, AC conductivity is used to evaluate DFT-MD and Kubo-Greenwood calculations while DC conductivity is used to test Ziman calculations in a DFT average atom model. The electron density is also used to assess electronic structure calculations in DFT simulations. In our latest study of electron kinetics in states with a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution, three-body recombination is found to have a significant effect on electron thermalizaiton time. This is driving an effort to develop electron kinetics simulations using the Boltzmann equation method.

  6. New non-equilibrium matrix imbibition equation for double porosity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyukhov, Andrey; Pankratov, Leonid

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with the global Kondaurov double porosity model describing a non-equilibrium two-phase immiscible flow in fractured-porous reservoirs when non-equilibrium phenomena occur in the matrix blocks, only. In a mathematically rigorous way, we show that the homogenized model can be represented by usual equations of two-phase incompressible immiscible flow, except for the addition of two source terms calculated by a solution to a local problem being a boundary value problem for a non-equilibrium imbibition equation given in terms of the real saturation and a non-equilibrium parameter.

  7. Modeling of Non-equilibrium Processes in Oil Trunk Pipeline Using Godunov Type Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumskoi, S. I.; Sverchkov, A. M.

    The Article presents the numerical method of solving the system of one-dimensional non-stationary equations describing oil movement in the oil pipeline. The method is aimed at modeling the non-equilibrium and transitional processes in the oil pipelines in the normal and emergency modes. This new developed method can be applied for relaxation non-equilibrium flow case, that can't be modeling using another methods. Also this method is aimed at modeling the non-equilibrium and transitional processes in the liquefied hydrocarbon pipelines in the normal and emergency modes. Phase non-equilibrium flow is considered for boiling liquids transporting pipeline.

  8. New Simulator for Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Qorbani Nashaqi, K.; Jemai, K.; Vafaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to Gibbs phase rule and combination of first and second law of thermodynamics, hydrate in nature cannot be in equilibrium since they come from different parent phases. In this system hydrate formation and dissociation is affected by local variables such as pressure, temperature and composition with mass and energy transport restrictions. Available simulators have attempted to model hydrate phase transition as an equilibrium reaction. Although those which treated the processes of formation and dissociation as kinetics used model of Kim and Bishnoi based on laboratory PVT experiment, and consequently hard to accept up scaling to real reservoirs condition. Additionally, they merely check equilibrium in terms of pressure and temperature projections and disregard thermodynamic requirements for equilibrium especially along axes of concentrations in phases. Non-equilibrium analysis of hydrate involves putting aside all the phase transitions which are not possible and use kinetic evaluation to measure phase transitions progress in each grid block for each time step. This procedure is Similar to geochemical reservoir simulators logic. As a result RetrasoCodeBright has been chosen as hydrate reservoir simulator and our work involves extension of this code. RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) is able to handle competing processes of formation and dissociation of hydrates as pseudo reactions at each node and each time step according to the temperature, pressure and concentration. Hydrates can therefore be implemented into the structure as pseudo minerals, with appropriate kinetic models. In order to implement competing nature of phase transition kinetics of hydrate formation, we use classical nucleation theory based on Kvamme et al. as a simplified model inside RCB and use advanced theories to fit parameters for the model (PFT). Hydrate formation and dissociation can directly be observed through porosity changes in the specific areas of the porous media. In this work which is in

  9. Step-wise pulling protocols for non-equilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Van Anh

    The fundamental laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, and the deeper understandings of quantum mechanics have been rebuilt in recent years. It is partly because of the increasing power of computing resources nowadays, that allow shedding direct insights into the connections among the thermodynamics laws, statistical nature of our world, and the concepts of quantum mechanics, which have not yet been understood. But mostly, the most important reason, also the ultimate goal, is to understand the mechanisms, statistics and dynamics of biological systems, whose prevailing non-equilibrium processes violate the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, deviate from statistical mechanics, and finally complicate quantum effects. I believe that investigations of the fundamental laws of non-equilibrium dynamics will be a frontier research for at least several more decades. One of the fundamental laws was first discovered in 1997 by Jarzynski, so-called Jarzynski's Equality. Since then, different proofs, alternative descriptions of Jarzynski's Equality, and its further developments and applications have been quickly accumulated. My understandings, developments and applications of an alternative theory on Jarzynski's Equality form the bulk of this dissertation. The core of my theory is based on stepwise pulling protocols, which provide deeper insight into how fluctuations of reaction coordinates contribute to free-energy changes along a reaction pathway. We find that the most optimal pathways, having the largest contribution to free-energy changes, follow the principle of detailed balance. This is a glimpse of why the principle of detailed balance appears so powerful for sampling the most probable statistics of events. In a further development on Jarzynski's Equality, I have been trying to use it in the formalism of diagonal entropy to propose a way to extract useful thermodynamic quantities such temperature, work and free-energy profiles from far

  10. PREFACE: International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010 International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, T.; Matsuyama, A.; Ohta, T.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, S.

    2011-07-01

    Soft matter is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field covering a range of subject areas including physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics and engineering. Some of the important universal features of these materials are their mesoscopic structures and their dynamics. Due to the existence of such large-scale structures, which nevertheless exhibit interactions of the order of the thermal energy, soft matter can readily be taken out of equilibrium by imposing a weak external field such as an electric field, a mechanical stress or a shear flow. The importance of the coexistence of microscopic molecular dynamics and the mesoscopic/macroscopic structures and flows requires us to develop hierarchical approaches to understand the nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena, which is one of the central issues of current soft matter research. This special section presents selected contributions from the 'International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010' held from 17-20 August 2010 in Nara, Japan, which aimed to describe recent advances in soft matter research focusing especially on its nonequilibrium aspects. The topics discussed cover statics and dynamics of a wide variety of materials ranging from traditional soft matter like polymers, gels, emulsions, liquid crystals and colloids to biomaterials such as biopolymers and biomembranes. Among these studies, we highlighted the physics of biomembranes and vesicles, which has attracted great attention during the last decade; we organized a special session for this active field. The work presented in this issue deals with (1) structure formation in biomembranes and vesicles, (2) rheology of polymers and gels, (3) mesophases in block copolymers, (4) mesoscopic structures in liquid crystals and ionic liquids, and (5) nonequilibrium dynamics. This symposium was organized as part of a research project supported by the Grant-in-Aid for the priority area 'Soft Matter Physics' (2006-2010) from the Ministry of Education

  11. PREFACE: International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010 International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, T.; Matsuyama, A.; Ohta, T.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, S.

    2011-07-01

    Soft matter is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field covering a range of subject areas including physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics and engineering. Some of the important universal features of these materials are their mesoscopic structures and their dynamics. Due to the existence of such large-scale structures, which nevertheless exhibit interactions of the order of the thermal energy, soft matter can readily be taken out of equilibrium by imposing a weak external field such as an electric field, a mechanical stress or a shear flow. The importance of the coexistence of microscopic molecular dynamics and the mesoscopic/macroscopic structures and flows requires us to develop hierarchical approaches to understand the nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena, which is one of the central issues of current soft matter research. This special section presents selected contributions from the 'International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010' held from 17-20 August 2010 in Nara, Japan, which aimed to describe recent advances in soft matter research focusing especially on its nonequilibrium aspects. The topics discussed cover statics and dynamics of a wide variety of materials ranging from traditional soft matter like polymers, gels, emulsions, liquid crystals and colloids to biomaterials such as biopolymers and biomembranes. Among these studies, we highlighted the physics of biomembranes and vesicles, which has attracted great attention during the last decade; we organized a special session for this active field. The work presented in this issue deals with (1) structure formation in biomembranes and vesicles, (2) rheology of polymers and gels, (3) mesophases in block copolymers, (4) mesoscopic structures in liquid crystals and ionic liquids, and (5) nonequilibrium dynamics. This symposium was organized as part of a research project supported by the Grant-in-Aid for the priority area 'Soft Matter Physics' (2006-2010) from the Ministry of Education

  12. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  13. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: measurement and non-equilibrium effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, U.; Vogel, H.

    2010-12-01

    potential and water content shows hysteretic behavior, this is the fact not only for the initial relations, but also for the long-term, stable conditions. The non-equilibrium at transitional conditions has been observed before. It can be explained by a rearrangement of the liquid/gas interfaces: first these are dominated by the dynamic behavior and the accessibility of the pore space. The long term equilibrium then is more towards an energetic more favorable configuration. With our measurements we have now an easy tool to quantify it over a wide range of water saturation, and to describe quantitatively the dynamic of the process.

  14. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, H.; Flores, O.; C. Poveda, J.; Campillo, B.

    2012-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05) × 1016 m-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N+2, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar; and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  15. Modification of surfaces and surface layers by non equilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamson, G.; Brennan, W. J.; Clark, D. T.; Howard, J.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for using plasma in the synthesis and modification of materials in ways impossible by conventional routes are introduced. The equipment used in these methods is described. The chemical analysis of polymer surfaces undergoing modification by inert gas, hydrogen or oxygen plasmas is shown to give physical information regarding the relative roles of diffusion of active species and direct and radiative energy transfer from the plasma. Surface modification by plasma depositing a new material onto an existing substrate is discussed with particular reference to the deposition of amorphous carbon films. Applications of the unique properties of these films are outlined together with current understanding of these properties based on chemical and physical methods of analysis of both the films and the plasmas producing them. Finally, surface modification by ion beams is briefly illustrated using examples from the electronics and metals industries.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A micro-air corona discharge, which is one of the plasmas successfully used for gene transfection in terms of high transfection and cell viability rates, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. This non-equilibrium low temperature plasma is generated from the tip of a pulsed high voltage micro-tube (0.2 mm inner diameter and 0.7 mm for outer diameter) placed 2 mm in front of a petri dish containing deionized water and set on a grounded copper plate. The electron temperature, equal to about 6.75 eV near the electrode tip and decreased down to 3.4 eV near the plate, has been estimated, with an error bar of about 30%, from an interesting approach based on the experimental ratio of the closest nitrogen emission spectra of \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm and N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm. This is based on one hand on a balance equation between creations and losses of the excited upper levels of these two UV spectra and on the other hand on the electron impact rates of the creation of these upper levels calculated from solution of the multi-term Boltzmann equation. Then using the measured Hα spectrum, electron density n e has been estimated from Stark broadening versus the inter-electrode position with an average error bar of about 50%. n e  ≈  1  ×  1015 cm‑3 is near the tip coherent with the usual magnitude of electron density in the streamer head developed near the tip of the corona discharges. Rotational temperatures, estimated from comparison of synthetic and experimental spectra of OH(A  ‑  X), \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm, and N2(SPS) at 337 nm are respectively equal to 2350 K, 2000 K and 700 K in the gap space. This clearly underlines a thermal non-equilibrium of the corresponding excited species generated inside the thin streamer filaments. But, due to the high dilution of these species in the background gas, these high rotational temperatures do not affect the mean gas temperature that remains close to 300

  17. Non-equilibrium dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David

    This thesis describes experiments focused on investigating out-of-equilibrium phenomena in the Bose-Hubbard Model and exploring novel cooling techniques for ultracold gases in optical lattices. In the first experiment, we study quenches across the Mott-insulator-to-superfluid quantum phase transition in the 3D Bose-Hubbard Model. The quench is accomplished by continuously tuning the ratio of the Hubbard energies. We observe that the degree of excitation is proportional to the fraction of atoms that cross the phase boundary, and that the amount of excitations and energy produced during the quench have a power-law dependence on the quench rate. These phenomena suggest an excitation process analogous to the mechanism for defect generation in non-equilibrium classical phase transitions. This experiment constitutes the first observation of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in a quantum quench. We have reported our findings in Ref. [1]. In a second experiment, published in Ref. [2], we investigate dissipation as a method for cooling a strongly interacting gas. We introduce dissipation via a bosonic reservoir to a strongly interacting bosonic gas in the Mott-insulator regime of a 3D spin-dependent optical lattice. The lattice atoms are excited to a higher energy band using laser-induced Bragg transitions. A weakly interacting superfluid comprised of atoms in a state that does not experience the lattice potential acts as a dissipative bath that interacts with the lattice atoms through collisions. We measure the resulting bath-induced decay using the atomic quasimomentum distribution, and we compare the decay rate with predictions from a weakly interacting model with no free parameters. A competing intrinsic decay mechanism arising from collisions between lattice atoms is also investigated. The presence of intrinsic decay can not be accommodated within a non-interacting framework and signals that strong interactions may play a central role in the lattice-atom dynamics. The

  18. The Role of Diffusive Shock Acceleration on Non-Equilibrium Ionization in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel; Ellison, D.; Slane, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present new model simulations which show clear evidence for changes in the non-equilibrium ionization behind a supernova remnant forward shock undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration. The efficient acceleration of particles (i.e., cosmic rays) lowers the shock temperature and raises the density of the shocked gas, thus altering the ionization state of the plasma in comparison to the test-particle approximation where cosmic rays gain an insignificant fraction of the shock energy. The differences between the test-particle and efficient acceleration cases are substantial: in cases of higher efficiency, particular ion states are more populated at lower electron temperatures. We also present results which show that in the efficient shock acceleration case, higher ionization fractions are reached immediately behind the shock front, relative to those in the test particle case. We attribute this to the higher postshock densities which lead to higher ionization rates. We show that these spatial differences are resolvable with current and future X-ray missions, and can be used as diagnostics in estimating the acceleration efficiency in cosmic--ray modified shocks in Galactic supernova remnants such as Tycho and Cassiopeia A.

  19. Recent Advancements In The Numerical Simulation Of Non-Equilibrium Flows With Application To Monatomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, M. G.; Cambier, J.-L.; Bultel, A.; Magin, T. E.

    2011-05-01

    This paper summarizes our current efforts in developing numerical methods for the study of non- equilibrium, high-enthalpy plasma. We describe the general approach used in the model development, some of the problems to be solved and benchmarks showing current capabilities. In particular, we review the recent development of a collisional-radiative model coupled with a single-fluid, two-temperature convection model for the transport of shock-heated argon along with extensions to krypton and xenon. The model is used in a systematic approach to examine the effects of the collision cross sections on the shock structure, including the relaxation layer and subsequent radiative-cooling regime. We review recent results obtained and comparisons with previous experimental results obtained at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) and the Australian National University (ANU), which serve as benchmarks to the model. We also show results when unsteady and multi-dimensional effects are included, highlighting the importance of coupling between convective transport and kinetic processes in nonequilibrium flows. We then look at extending the model to both nozzle and external flows to study expansion regimes.

  20. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  1. Terahertz generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-K.; Kim, Jae Hun; Yang, C.-E.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hui Rongqing; Ruffin, Paul

    2008-12-08

    An investigation of the terahertz wave generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas is presented. First, it is demonstrated that the intensity of the terahertz wave increases as the number of air plasmas increases. Second, the physical mechanism of this enhancement effect of the terahertz generation is studied by quantitatively measuring the intensity of the generated terahertz wave as a function of phase difference between adjacent air plasmas. It is found out that the superposition is the main mechanism to cause this enhancement. Thus, the results obtained in this paper not only provide a technique to generate stronger terahertz wave but also enable a better understanding of the mechanism of the terahertz generation in air plasma.

  2. Infrared Signatures of Laser Induced Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Lu, Ryan; Ramirez, Ayax; Advanced Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser generated plasma in air is necessary for the development of potential applications which range from laser induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source. This work is focused mainly on the infrared spectrum. The influence of laser parameters (energy per pulse, pulse duration, repetition rate, wavelength and etc.) on the plasma formation and evolution has been investigated. Laser transmission losses through the air as well as through the breakdown plasma as well as their effect on infrared plasma signature are to be presented.

  3. Non-equilibrium Steady States in Kac's Model Coupled to a Thermostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Josephine

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the existence, uniqueness and convergence to non-equilibrium steady states in Kac's model with an external coupling. We work in both Fourier distances and Wasserstein distances. Our methods work in the case where the external coupling is not a Maxwellian equilibrium. This provides an example of a non-equilibrium steady state. We also study the behaviour as the number of particles goes to infinity and show quantitative estimates on the convergence rate of the first marginal.

  4. Thermal And Chemical Non-Equilibrium Effects In The Wake Of A Boundary-Layer Sized Object In Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Marcel; Stemmer, Christian; Adams, Nikolaus N.

    2011-05-01

    Investigations of hypersonic boundary-layer flows around a cubical obstacle with a height in the order of half the boundary layer thickness were carried out in this work. Special interest was laid on the influence of chemical non-equilibrium effects on the wake flow of the obstacle. Direct numerical simulations were conducted using three different gas models, a caloric perfect, an equilibrium and a chemical non-equilibrium gas model. The geometry was chosen as a wedge with a six degree half angle, according to the aborted NASA HyBoLT free flight experiment. At 0.5 m downstream of the leading edge, a surface trip was positioned. The free-stream flow was set to Mach 8.5 with air conditions taken from the 1976 standard atmosphere at an altitude of 42 km according to the predicted flight path. The simulations were done in three steps for all models. First, two-dimensional calculations of the whole configuration including the leading edge and the obstacle were conducted. These provide constant span-wise profiles for detailed, steady three-dimensional simulations around the close vicinity of the obstacle. A free-stream Mach number of about 6.3 occurs behind the shock. A cross-section in the wake of the object then delivers the steady inflow for detailed unsteady simulations of the wake. Perturbations at unstable frequencies, obtained from a bi-global secondary stability analysis, were added to these profiles. The solutions are time-Fourier transformed to investigate the unsteady downstream development of the different modes due to the interaction with the base-flow containing two counter-rotating vortices. Results will be presented that show the influence of the presence of chemical non-equilibrium on the instability in the wake of the object leading to a laminar or a turbulent wake.

  5. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  6. Effect of glow discharge air plasma on grain crops seed

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A.E.; Lazarenko, E.M.; Selemir, V.D.

    2000-02-01

    Oat and barley seeds have been exposed to both continuous and pulsed glow discharge plasmas in air to investigate the effects on germination and sprout growth. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the effect of plasma exposure on the percentage germination and length of sprout growth. A stimulating effect of plasma exposure was found together with a strong dependence on whether continuous or pulsed discharges were used.

  7. Spectral Modeling in Astrophysics - The Physics of Non-equilibrium Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, Gary; Williams, Robin

    2016-02-01

    Collisional-radiative spectral modeling plays a central role in astrophysics, probing phenomena ranging from the chemical evolution of the Universe to the energy production near supermassive black holes in distant quasars. The observed emission lines form in non-equilibrium clouds that have very low densities by laboratory standards, and are powered by energy sources which themselves are not in equilibrium. The spectrum is the result of a large number of microphysical processes, thermal statistics often do not apply, and analytical theory cannot be used. Numerical simulations are used to understand the physical state and the resulting spectrum. The greatest distinction between astrophysical modeling and conventional plasma simulations lies in the range of phenomena that must be considered. A single astronomical object will often have gas with kinetic temperatures of T˜10^6 K, 10^4 K, and T≤ 10^3 K, with the physical state ranging from molecular to fully ionized, and emitting over all wavelengths between the radio and x-ray. Besides atomic, plasma, and chemical physics, condensed matter physics is important because of the presence of small solid `grains' which affect the gas through catalytic reactions and the infrared emission they produce. The ionization, level populations, chemistry, and grain properties must be determined self-consistently, along with the radiation transport, to predict the observed spectrum. Although the challenge is great, so are the rewards. Numerical spectral simulations allow us to read the message contained in the spectrum emitted by objects far from the Earth that existed long ago.

  8. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  9. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-06-15

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  10. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Miles, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  11. Non-equilibrium Helium Ionization in an MHD Simulation of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11-18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  12. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Raheleh; Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron-electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current-voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron-electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U2 IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior.

  13. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  14. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  15. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Surface Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using non-equilibrium gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for the multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and AblatioN Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas mass conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and the carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  16. Non-equilibrium effects upon the non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, A.O.

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > Classical Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation. > Quantization process. > Quantum Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett equation. > A non-equilibrium quantum thermal force is predicted. - Abstract: We obtain a non-Markovian quantum master equation directly from the quantization of a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation describing the Brownian motion of a particle immersed in a generic environment (e.g. a non-thermal fluid). As far as the especial case of a heat bath comprising of quantum harmonic oscillators is concerned, we derive a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett master equation on the basis of which we work out the concept of non-equilibrium quantum thermal force exerted by the harmonic heat bath upon the Brownian motion of a free particle. The classical limit (or dequantization process) of this sort of non-equilibrium quantum effect is scrutinized, as well.

  17. The non-equilibrium phase diagrams of flow-induced crystallization and melting of polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Ju, Jianzhu; Yang, Junsheng; Ma, Zhe; Liu, Dong; Cui, Kunpeng; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Huang, Ningdong; Li, Liangbin

    2016-01-01

    Combining extensional rheology with in-situ synchrotron ultrafast x-ray scattering, we studied flow-induced phase behaviors of polyethylene (PE) in a wide temperature range up to 240 °C. Non-equilibrium phase diagrams of crystallization and melting under flow conditions are constructed in stress-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline δ, hexagonal and orthorhombic phases. The non-crystalline δ phase is demonstrated to be either a metastable transient pre-order for crystallization or a thermodynamically stable phase. Based on the non-equilibrium phase diagrams, nearly all observations in flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of PE can be well understood. The interplay of thermodynamic stabilities and kinetic competitions of the four phases creates rich kinetic pathways for FIC and diverse final structures. The non-equilibrium flow phase diagrams provide a detailed roadmap for precisely processing of PE with designed structures and properties. PMID:27609305

  18. The non-equilibrium phase diagrams of flow-induced crystallization and melting of polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ju, Jianzhu; Yang, Junsheng; Ma, Zhe; Liu, Dong; Cui, Kunpeng; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Huang, Ningdong; Li, Liangbin

    2016-01-01

    Combining extensional rheology with in-situ synchrotron ultrafast x-ray scattering, we studied flow-induced phase behaviors of polyethylene (PE) in a wide temperature range up to 240 °C. Non-equilibrium phase diagrams of crystallization and melting under flow conditions are constructed in stress-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline δ, hexagonal and orthorhombic phases. The non-crystalline δ phase is demonstrated to be either a metastable transient pre-order for crystallization or a thermodynamically stable phase. Based on the non-equilibrium phase diagrams, nearly all observations in flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of PE can be well understood. The interplay of thermodynamic stabilities and kinetic competitions of the four phases creates rich kinetic pathways for FIC and diverse final structures. The non-equilibrium flow phase diagrams provide a detailed roadmap for precisely processing of PE with designed structures and properties. PMID:27609305

  19. Non-equilibrium phase transition in reconstituted acto-myosin cortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Nikta; Abu Shah, Enas; Malik-Garbi, Maya; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Keren, Kinneret; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-03-01

    The cortical actin cytoskeleton is a quasi 2-D active material in which dynamics are dominated by rapid actin turnover and myosin-driven contractility. Here we present a reconstituted model system that emulates these processes in artificial cell-like compartments. By tuning physical and chemical parameters, we induce a non-equilibrium phase transition. We characterize the local dynamics of these reconstituted cortices by tracking embedded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We create high-resolution maps of the contractile actomyosin flows in a homogenous and during transition to an inhomogeneous steady state. We find evidence that connectivity percolation drives the non-equilibrium phase transition.

  20. Non-equilibrium spin-transfer torque in voltage-biased SFS and SFNFS Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Erhai

    2005-03-01

    We report theoretical results for the non-equilibrium spin current and spin-transfer torque in voltage biased SFS and SFNFS Josephson structures. We discuss the role and interplay of spin filtering, spin rotation and Andreev scattering. These processes lead to identifiable structures in the d.c. and a.c. components of the spin current and the spin-transfer torque. Our calculations are based on a recent formulation of the boundary conditions for non-equilibrium quasiclassical Riccati equations.^ ^ E. Zhao, T. Löfwander, and J. A. Sauls, Phys. Rev. B 70, 134510 (2004).

  1. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  2. Green's function approach to the non-equilibrium superconductivity near the critical line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipavský, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    In spite of the absent friction of super-currents, normal currents affect the superconducting condensate. The BCS approach with Bogoliubov-Valutin quasiparticles is not suited for description of the normal current near the critical line. We review an alternative theory of the non-equilibrium superconductivity dealing exclusively with normal-state quasiparticles. It is based on the Thouless T-matrix criterion, which is extended to non-equilibrium. The problem of selfconsistency of the T-matrix in the superconducting state is examined and solved with the help of the multiple-scattering theory.

  3. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Raheleh Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-15

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron–electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current–voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron–electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U{sup 2} IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior. -- Highlights: •We introduce for the first time the non-equilibrium method of STLS for Hubbard type models. •We determine the transport properties of SIAM using the non-equilibrium STLS method. •We compare our results with order-U2 IPT and NRG. •We show that non-equilibrium STLS, contrary to the GW and self-consistent RPA, produces the two Hubbard peaks in DOS. •We show that the method keeps the universal scaling behavior and correct

  4. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Chemistry and the Composition of the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    A high priority objective of the Mars Exploration Program is to Determine if life exists today (MEPAG Goal I, Objective A). The measurement of gases of biogenic origin may be an approach to detect the presence of microbial life on the surface or subsurface of Mars. Chemical thermodynamic calculations indicate that on both Earth and Mars, certain gases should exist in extremely low concentrations, if at all. Microbial metabolic activity is an important non-equilibrium chemistry process on Earth, and if microbial life exists on Mars, may be an important nonequilibrium chemistry process on Mars. The non-equilibrium chemistry of the atmosphere of Mars is discussed in this paper.

  5. Studying non-equilibrium many-body dynamics using one-dimensional Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Tim; Gring, Michael; Kuhnert, Maximilian; Rauer, Bernhard; Geiger, Remi; Mazets, Igor; Smith, David Adu; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Kitagawa, Takuya; Demler, Eugene

    2014-12-04

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems play an important role in many areas of physics. However, a general answer to the question of how these systems relax is still lacking. We experimentally study the dynamics of ultracold one-dimensional (1D) Bose gases. This reveals the existence of a quasi-steady prethermalized state which differs significantly from the thermal equilibrium of the system. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of non-equilibrium quantum many-body systems is a far richer process than has been assumed in the past.

  6. Non-equilibrium origin of high electrical conductivity in gallium zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zakutayev, Andriy Ginley, David S.; Lany, Stephan; Perry, Nicola H.; Mason, Thomas O.

    2013-12-02

    Non-equilibrium state defines physical properties of materials in many technologies, including architectural, metallic, and semiconducting amorphous glasses. In contrast, crystalline electronic and energy materials, such as transparent conductive oxides (TCO), are conventionally thought to be in equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate that high electrical conductivity of crystalline Ga-doped ZnO TCO thin films occurs by virtue of metastable state of their defects. These results imply that such defect metastability may be important in other functional oxides. This finding emphasizes the need to understand and control non-equilibrium states of materials, in particular, their metastable defects, for the design of novel functional materials.

  7. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L.N.; Raizer, Y.P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-30

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the 'tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam)

  8. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Raizer, Y. P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-01

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the `tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam).

  9. Portable microwave air plasma device for wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2015-06-01

    A portable microwave air plasma has been developed for safe and effective wound healing. The device is operated by a fixed microwave power and two different air gas flows (main and cooling air flow). It was found that the speeds of the two air flows determine the stability of the plasma jet and gas temperature and thereby regulate the concentrations of the individual reactive species. Two different regimes, i.e. the NO abundant (0.1 slm main air flow) and ozone abundant regimes (4 slm main air flow), were identified as suitable for wound healing without thermal damage and toxicity. These regimes show similar plasma characteristics (e.g. less than 40 °C at the treatment point, less than 4 ppm of NO2) except for different NO and ozone amounts. Both regimes show more than twice as fast wound healing speed compared with the untreated case without any histological damages. Faster healing speed with intrinsic ozone safety make the NO abundant regime the best operation regime for wound healing. Finally, the stability of the developed device was demonstrated by a one-hour continuous operation test with a 24 V battery.

  10. Non-equilibrium self-assembly of metals on diblock copolymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ward Antone

    Typically, the most perfectly ordered, self-assembled structures correspond to equilibrium states of the system. Here, I show that a high degree of order can arise out of strongly non-equilibrium conditions. I report on a systematic study of non-equilibrium aspects of the decoration of diblock copolymer ultrathin films by evaporated metals. I observe two distinct behaviors for selectively decorating the diblock copolymer: either the metal decorates the diblock copolymer template with nanoparticles or the metal decorates the template with nanowires. Remarkably, these nanowires remain stable under non-equilibrium conditions. I focus on results obtained with evaporated gold and silver on asymmetric polystyrene-b-polymethylmethacrylate (PS-b-PMMA). Gold and a number of other metals (indium, tin, lead, bismuth, aluminum) decorate the diblock copolymer with chains of nanoparticles and don't form wires. Silver forms chains of nanoparticles at low coverage (<30 A), but at high coverage (>100 A), silver forms nanowires. One can understand the formation of the chains of nanoparticles by understanding the equilibrium state of the system (metal + polymer). The silver nanowires, however, are highly non-equilibrium structures. To understand their formation, I modeled the self-assembly of the nanowires with a Monte Carlo simulation. This Monte Carlo simulation qualitatively agrees with the formation of the silver nanowires and their relaxation to equilibrium upon moderate heating.