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Sample records for non-intrusive characterization methods

  1. Non-Intrusive Optical Diagnostic Methods for Flowfield Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher M.; Terrell, Charles A.; Spraggins, Darrell; Lee, Ja. H.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1997-01-01

    Non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques such as Electron Beam Fluorescence (EBF), Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF), and Focusing Schlieren (FS) have been setup for high-speed flow characterization and large flowfield visualization, respectively. Fluorescence emission from the First Negative band of N2(+) with the (0,0) vibration transition (at lambda =391.44 nm) was obtained using the EBF technique and a quenching rate of N2(+)* molecules by argon gas was reported. A very high sensitivity FS system was built and applied in the High-Speed Flow Generator (HFG) at NASA LaRC. A LIF system is available at the Advanced Propulsion Laboratory (APL) on campus and a plume exhaust velocity measurement, measuring the Doppler shift from lambda = 728.7 nm of argon gas, is under way.

  2. Non-intrusive characterization methods for wastewater-affected groundwater plumes discharging to an alpine lake.

    PubMed

    Roy, James W; Robillard, Jasen M; Watson, Susan B; Hayashi, Masaki

    2009-02-01

    Streams and lakes in rocky environments are especially susceptible to nutrient loading from wastewater-affected groundwater plumes. However, the use of invasive techniques such as drilling wells, installing piezometers or seepage meters, to detect and characterize these plumes can be prohibitive. In this work, we report on the use of four non-intrusive methods for this purpose at a site in the Rocky Mountains. The methods included non-invasive geophysical surveys of subsurface electrical conductivity (EC), in-situ EC measurement of discharging groundwater at the lake-sediment interface, shoreline water sampling and nutrient analysis, and shoreline periphyton sampling and analysis of biomass and taxa relative abundance. The geophysical surveys were able to detect and delineate two high-EC plumes, with capacitively coupled ERI (OhmMapper) providing detailed two-dimensional images. In situ measurements at the suspected discharge locations confirmed the presence of high-EC water in the two plumes and corroborated their spatial extent. The nutrient and periphyton results showed that only one of the two high-EC plumes posed a current eutrophication threat, with elevated nitrogen and phosphorus levels, high localized periphyton biomass and major shifts in taxonomic composition to taxa that are commonly associated with anthropogenic nutrient loading. This study highlights the need to use non-intrusive methods in combination, with geophysical and water EC-based methods used for initial detection of wastewater-affected groundwater plumes, and nutrient or periphyton sampling used to characterize their ecological effects. PMID:18253851

  3. Characterization of mixed waste for sorting and inspection using non-intrusive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Ryon, R.W.; Bull, N.L.

    1994-12-01

    Characterization of mixed wastes (that is, radioactive and otherwise hazardous) requires that all hazardous, non-conforming, and radioactive materials be identified, localized, and quantified. With such information, decisions can be made regarding whether the item is treatable or has been adequately treated. Much of the required information can be gained without taking representative samples and analyzing them in a chemistry laboratory. Non-intrusive methods can be used to provide this information on-line at the waste treatment facility. Ideally, the characterization would be done robotically, and either automatically or semi-automatically in order to improve efficiency and safety. For the FY94 Mixed Waste Operations (MWO) project, a treatable waste item is defined as a homogeneous metal object that has external radioactive or heavy metal hazardous contamination. Surface treatment of some kind would therefore be the treatment method to be investigated. The authors developed sorting and inspection requirements, and assessed viable non-intrusive techniques to meet these requirements. They selected radiography, computed tomography and X-ray fluorescence. They have characterized selected mock waste items, and determined minimum detectable amounts of materials. They have demonstrated the efficiency possible by integrating radiographic with tomographic data. Here, they developed a technique to only use radiographic data where the material is homogeneous (fast), and then switching to tomography in those areas where heterogeneity is detected (slower). They also developed a tomographic technique to quantify the volume of each component of a mixed material. This is useful for such things as determining ash content. Lastly, they have developed a document in MOSAIC, an Internet multi-media browser. This document is used to demonstrate the ability to share data and information world-wide.

  4. Integrating Intrusive and Non-intrusive Characterization Methods To Achieve A Conceptual Site Model For The SLDA FUSRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, L.A.; Peterson, J.M.; Frothingham, D.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Lenart, W.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is addressing radiological contamination following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements at the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) site, which is a radiologically contaminated property that is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The SLDA is an 18-hectare (44- acre) site in Parks Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, about 37 kilometers (23 miles) east-northeast of Pittsburgh. According to historical record, radioactive wastes were disposed of at the SLDA in a series of trenches by the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Company (NUMEC) in the 1960's. The wastes originated from the nearby Apollo nuclear fuel fabrication facility, which began operations under NUMEC in the late 1950's and fabricated enriched uranium into naval reactor fuel elements. It is believed that the waste materials were buried in a series of pits constructed adjacent to one another in accordance with an Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) regulation that has since been rescinded. A CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process was completed for the SLDA site, and the results of the human health risk assessment indicated that the radiologically contaminated wastes could pose a risk to human health in the future. There are no historical records that provide the exact location of these pits. However, based on geophysical survey results conducted in the 1980's, these pits were defined by geophysical anomalies and were depicted on historical site drawings as trenches. At the SLDA site, a combination of investigative methods and tools was used in the RI/FS and site characterization activities. The SLDA site provides an excellent example of how historical documents and data, historical aerial photo analysis, physical sampling, and non-intrusive geophysical and gamma walkover surveys were used in combination to reduce the uncertainty in the location of the

  5. PFNA-based measurements for non-intrusive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Pentaleri, E.

    1994-12-31

    Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) is a non-intrusive technique for inspecting bulk samples whose size may range from that of a suitcase to that of a commercial-cargo truck trailer. In an earlier paper, the authors discussed techniques for performing PFNA-based TRU assays on waste drums, and described why such measurements would yield improved accuracy, sensitivity, and throughput over existing instruments. Here they describe a set of non-intrusive measurements useful for further improving the accuracy of TRU assay results, certifying compliance with waste acceptance criteria, or enhancing the control of waste-treatment processes. In principle, these measurements, based mainly upon the analysis of inelastic-neutron-scattering and neutron-capture gamma rays, can be performed concurrently with TRU-assay measurements. Based on the measurements described, a single PFNA-based waste inspection system would allow substantially complete non-intrusive characterization of waste containers to be performed.

  6. Non-intrusive method of measuring PCV blowby constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, M.E.; Ariga, S.; Boulard, R.; Lindamood, B.

    1994-10-01

    A technique is presented that has been successfully demonstrated to non-intrusively and quickly sample gases typically found in PCV systems. Color Detection Tubes (CDTs) were used with a simple sampling arrangement to monitor CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O(g) at the closure line, crankcase, and PCV line. Measurements were accurate and could be made instantaneously. Short Path Thermal Desorbtion Tubes (SPTDTs) were used at the same engine locations for the characterization of fuel- and oil-derived hydrocarbon (HC) fractions and required only 50 cc samples. High engine loads caused pushover of blowby vapors as indicated by increased concentrations of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O(g), and fuel HCs in the engines` fresh air inlets during WOT operation. Peak concentrations of blowby vapors were measured in the crankcase under no load and part throttle conditions. Oxygen concentrations always opposed the trends of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and H{sub 2}O(g). SPTDT data revealed that the PCV system consumes approximately 100-200 times more fuel vapors than oil vapors, on a mass basis; however, PCV-derived oil consumption represented almost 12 percent of total engine oil consumption under no load conditions. 8 refs., 17 figs.

  7. A Non-Intrusive Method for Monitoring the Degradation of MOSFETs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Feng; Zheng, Yu; Guan, Yong; Wang, Guo-Hui; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Highly reliable embedded systems have been widely applied in the fields of aerospace, nuclear power, high-speed rail, etc., which are related to security and economic development. The reliability of the power supply directly influences the security of the embedded system, and has been the research focus of numerous electronic information and energy studies. The degradation of power modules occupies a dominant position among the key factors affecting the power supply reliability. How to dynamically determine the degradation state and forecast the remaining useful life of working power modules is critical. Therefore, an online non-intrusive method of obtaining the degradation state of MOSFETs based on the Volterra series is proposed. It uses the self-driving signal of MOSFETs as a non-intrusive incentive, and extracts the degradation characteristics of MOSFETs by the frequency-domain kernel of the Volterra series. Experimental results show that the identification achieved by the method agrees well with the theoretical analysis. PMID:24434873

  8. A non-intrusive method for monitoring the degradation of MOSFETs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Feng; Zheng, Yu; Guan, Yong; Wang, Guo-Hui; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Highly reliable embedded systems have been widely applied in the fields of aerospace, nuclear power, high-speed rail, etc., which are related to security and economic development. The reliability of the power supply directly influences the security of the embedded system, and has been the research focus of numerous electronic information and energy studies. The degradation of power modules occupies a dominant position among the key factors affecting the power supply reliability. How to dynamically determine the degradation state and forecast the remaining useful life of working power modules is critical. Therefore, an online non-intrusive method of obtaining the degradation state of MOSFETs based on the Volterra series is proposed. It uses the self-driving signal of MOSFETs as a non-intrusive incentive, and extracts the degradation characteristics of MOSFETs by the frequency-domain kernel of the Volterra series. Experimental results show that the identification achieved by the method agrees well with the theoretical analysis. PMID:24434873

  9. A method to screen obstructive sleep apnea using multi-variable non-intrusive measurements.

    PubMed

    de Silva, S; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C

    2011-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious sleep disorder. The current standard OSA diagnosis method is polysomnography (PSG) testing. PSG requires an overnight hospital stay while physically connected to 10-15 channels of measurement. PSG is expensive, inconvenient and requires the extensive involvement of a sleep technologist. As such, it is not suitable for community screening. OSA is a widespread disease and more than 80% of sufferers remain undiagnosed. Simplified, unattended and cheap OSA screening methods are urgently needed. Snoring is commonly associated with OSA but is not fully utilized in clinical diagnosis. Snoring contains pseudo-periodic packets of energy that produce characteristic vibrating sounds familiar to humans. In this paper, we propose a multi-feature vector that represents pitch information, formant information, a measure of periodic structure existence in snore episodes and the neck circumference of the subject to characterize OSA condition. Snore features were estimated from snore signals recorded in a sleep laboratory. The multi-feature vector was applied to a neural network for OSA/non-OSA classification and K-fold cross-validated using a random sub-sampling technique. We also propose a simple method to remove a specific class of background interference. Our method resulted in a sensitivity of 91 ± 6% and a specificity of 89 ± 5% for test data for AHI(THRESHOLD) = 15 for a database consisting of 51 subjects. This method has the potential as a non-intrusive, unattended technique to screen OSA using snore sound as the primary signal. PMID:21383492

  10. Research on optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wenan

    2014-06-01

    In the field of oil well logging, real-time monitoring of the fluid flow parameter provides a scientific basis for oil and gas optimization exploration and increase in reservoir recovery, so a non-intrusive flow test method based on turbulent vibration was proposed. The specific length of the sensor fiber wound tightly around the outer wall of the pipe was connected with the optical fiber gratings at both ends, and the sensor fiber and the optical fiber gratings composed the flow sensing unit. The dynamic pressure was generated by the turbulence when fluid flows through the pipe, and the dynamic pressure resulted in the light phase shift of the sensor fiber. The phase information was demodulated by the fiber optic interferometer technology, time division multiplexing technology, and phase generated carrier modulation and demodulation techniques. The quadratic curve relationship between the phase change and flow rate was found by experimental data analysis, and the experiment confirmed the feasibility of the optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusion and achieved the real-time monitoring of the fluid flow.

  11. Research on optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-hui; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wen-an

    2013-09-01

    In the field of oil well logging, real-time monitoring of fluid flow parameter provides a scientific basis for oil and gas optimization exploration and increase of reservoir recovery, so the non-intrusive flow test method based on turbulent vibration is proposed. The specific length of sensor fiber wound tightly around the outer wall of the pipe is connected with the optical fiber gratings at both ends, the sensor fiber and the optical fiber gratings compose the flow sensing unit. The dynamic pressure is generated by the turbulence when fluid flows through the pipe, and the dynamic pressure results in the light phase shift of the sensor fiber. The phase information is demodulated by fiber optic interferometer technology, time division multiplexing technology and Phase Generated Carrier modulation and demodulation techniques. The quadratic curve relationship between phase change and flow rate is found by experimental data analysis, and the experiment confirms the feasibility of optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusive and implements the realtime monitoring of flow.

  12. Non-intrusive hybrid interval method for uncertain nonlinear systems using derivative information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuang-Zhuang; Wang, Tian-Shu; Li, Jun-Feng

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new non-intrusive hybrid interval method using derivative information for the dynamic response analysis of nonlinear systems with uncertain-but-bounded parameters and/or initial conditions. This method provides tighter solution ranges compared to the existing polynomial approximation interval methods. Interval arithmetic using the Chebyshev basis and interval arithmetic using the general form modified affine basis for polynomials are developed to obtain tighter bounds for interval computation. To further reduce the overestimation caused by the "wrapping effect" of interval arithmetic, the derivative information of dynamic responses is used to achieve exact solutions when the dynamic responses are monotonic with respect to all the uncertain variables. Finally, two typical numerical examples with nonlinearity are applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid interval method, in particular, its ability to effectively control the overestimation for specific timepoints.

  13. Evaluation of descriptive and non-intrusive geophysical methods for the identification of saturation area dynamics and their controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenhuis, T. S.; Dahlke, H. E.; Harpold, A. A.

    2006-12-01

    In the Catskill Mountains of New York State runoff is most commonly generated from groundwater seeps, causing parts of the landscape to saturate. Groundwater seeps and frequently saturated near stream areas are important source waters for streams, but can also be contaminant-contributing areas in agricultural fields. Knowledge of the landscape position of these saturation areas, the spatial/temporal evolution of runoff generation and the connectivity to surface water bodies are important parameters to consider. Many water quality models and risk assessment techniques should rely on these principles when assessing non-point source pollution in agricultural watersheds. However, there is little research that has comprehensively studied the spatial/temporal dynamics of these saturated areas and provides methods that meet the present needs in hydrology and hydrological modelling applications. To characterize the spatial extent of saturated areas a study was conducted on a 2.44 ha hillslope in the Town Brook watershed in the Catskill Mountains. Various non-intrusive methods were used consisting of vegetation surveys, GPS mapping and electromagnetic induction (EMI) and compared to existing information obtained from ground water table measurements and remotely sensed data. To better understand the location of the saturated area we characterized the soil profile with Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Geoseismic surveys. The non-intrusive methods could not agree with the observed patterns of the saturated areas nor with a simple distributed model that used only topography and low-resolution soil information. For a better characterization of these areas additional information about soil characteristics and preferential flow paths was needed. The latter could be obtained with the Geoseismic and Ground Penetrating Radar. These instruments were capable of measuring the local depth to the shallow hard pan and the presence of natural pipes that carried large amounts of water via

  14. Development of heat transfer method for non-intrusive pressure measurement in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.T.; Holderbaum, G.S.; Philips, D.B.; Stulen, F.B.; Eberle, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    A method for non-intrusive measurement of internal pressures in flowing and non-flowing natural gas distribution pipelines has been developed. The method is based on temperature changes observed at various locations on the outside wall of the pipe in response to a circumferential band of heat applied to it. Because of the complex flow patterns in the pipe, the pressure-related phenomena induce second-order effects on the heat transfer to the gas or liquid in the pipeline. Experimental results from both laboratory and field measurements have been compared with predictions from TEMPEST, a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) model, to aid in understanding the flow characteristics. In this method, a 2.5-in. band or ring heater device placed around the outer circumference of the pipe is used to apply that to the outer wall of the pipe. The effect of heat input ranging from 250 to 1,000 watts has been evaluated for pipe diameters ranging from 4 in. to 12 in. The expected range of Reynolds numbers spans the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes, thus adding significant complexity to the problem. Results have shown that a heater power of about 1,000 watts for flowing gas and 250 watts for non-flowing gas enables an acceptable estimate of pressures for most cases. The method can be used to effectively determine whether a pipe is filled with gas or liquid. It can also indicate whether the gas is flowing or static. For flowing gas, upstream-to-downstream and top-to-bottom temperature differences at the surface of the pipe are jointly used to determine gas flow rate and pressure. For no-flow conditions, the upstream-to-downstream temperature difference is zero, and pressures ranging from 0 to 150 psig can be differentiated solely by the temperatures along the outside wall of the pipe.

  15. A Proposed Non-Intrusion Method for Estimating the Specific Yield for a Regional Groundwater System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chang, L.; Hwang, C.; Tsai, J.; Yeh, W.

    2013-12-01

    In Taiwan, groundwater resources play an important role in the management of regional water supply. However, because the lack of proper management over the last several decades, over-pumping of groundwater occurred, which resulted in serious land subsidence in the coastal areas. To properly manage the coastal aquifers, an accurately estimation of the specific yield (Sy) for the aquifer is needed. The traditional pumping test is costly. In this paper, we present a cost-saving, non-intrusive, geophysical method for estimating Sy. The method is based on gravity measurements and uses theories derived from geophysics. Because gravity variation is a function of the mass variation of materials, the gravity measurements correlate with the mass variation of the shallow groundwater in the neighborhood of the measurements. Comparing the groundwater level variations and gravity measurements between the droughts and flooding seasons, Sy can be interpreted. The proposed method combines MODFLOW with a numerical integration procedure that calculates the gravity variations. Heterogeneous parameters (Sy) can be assigned to MODFLOW cells. An inverse procedure is then applied to interpret and identify the Sy value around the gravity station. The proposed methodology is applied to the Choshui alluvial fan, one of the most important groundwater basins in Taiwan. Three gravity measurement stations, 'GS01', 'GS02' and 'GS03', were established. The location of GS01 is in the neighborhood of a groundwater observation well where pumping test data are available. The Sy value estimated from the gravitation measurements collected from GS01 compares favorably with that obtained from the traditional pumping test. The comparison verifies the correctness and accuracy of the proposed method. We then use the gravity measurements collected from GS02 and GS03 to estimate the Sy values in the areas where there exist no pumping test data. Using the estimated values obtained from gravity measurements, the

  16. A proposed non-intrusive method for finding coefficients of slip and molecular reflectivity in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, D. A.; Rosenberger, F. E.

    1989-01-01

    A proposed experimental program to look at a series of vapor transport properties measured along solid and liquid surfaces is described. The research objectives proposed are: (1) with accuracy otherwise unobtainable on ground, to determine the coefficient of slip measured between gases and the surfaces of liquids and solids; (2) for the first time, to classify and tabulate dominant surface effects found for a variety of solids, particularly those crystalized by vapor transport; and (3) to extend understanding of settling rates predicted for cosmic dust and condensed vapor falling through planetary atmospheres. The method used to obtain these objectives, has aided, to an order of magnitude, understanding of various liquid-gas interfaces such as oil and water. But to date, no similar characterization has proved successful for solids or liquids of uncertain densities. Likewise, no data exist in either ground-based research or as part of a microgravity program that, when collected with the high accuracy expected in low gravity, could definitely settle outstanding questions in kinetic theory, molecular dynamics, and cosmic physics.

  17. A mass balance method for non-intrusive measurements of surface-air trace gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denmead, O. T.; Harper, L. A.; Freney, J. R.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Leuning, R.; Sharpe, R. R.

    A mass balance method is described for calculating gas production from a surface or volume source in a small test plot from measurements of differences in the horizontal fluxes of the gas across upwind and downwind boundaries. It employs a square plot, 24 m×24 m, with measurements of gas concentration at four heights (up to 3.5 m) along each of the four boundaries. Gas concentrations are multiplied by the appropriate vector winds to yield the horizontal fluxes at each height on each boundary. The difference between these fluxes integrated over downwind and upwind boundaries represents production. Illustrations of the method, which involve exchanges of methane and carbon dioxide, are drawn from experiments with landfills, pastures and grazing animals. Tests included calculation of recovery rates from known gas releases and comparisons with a conventional micrometeorological approach and a backward dispersion model. The method performed satisfactorily in all cases. Its sensitivity for measuring exchanges of CO 2, CH 4 and N 2O in various scenarios was examined. As employed by us, the mass balance method can suffer from errors arising from the large number of gas analyses required for a flux determination, and becomes unreliable when there are light winds and variable wind directions. On the other hand, it is non-disturbing, has a simple theoretical basis, is independent of atmospheric stability or the shape of the wind profile, and is appropriate for flux measurement in situations where conventional micrometeorological methods can not be used, e.g. for small plots, elevated point sources, and heterogeneous surface sources.

  18. Method for non-intrusively identifying a contained material utilizing uncollided nuclear transmission measurements

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.; Stephens, Alan G.; Grover, S. Blaine

    2001-11-20

    An improved nuclear diagnostic method identifies a contained target material by measuring on-axis, mono-energetic uncollided particle radiation transmitted through a target material for two penetrating radiation beam energies, and applying specially developed algorithms to estimate a ratio of macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a neutron beam, or a ratio of linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a gamma-ray beam. Alternatively, the measurements are used to derive a minimization formula based on the macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two neutron beam energies, or the linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two gamma-ray beam energies. A candidate target material database, including known macroscopic neutron cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients for target materials at the selected neutron or gamma-ray beam energies, is used to approximate the estimated ratio or to solve the minimization formula, such that the identity of the contained target material is discovered.

  19. Method for Non-Intrusively Identifying a Contained Material Utilizing Uncollided Nuclear Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, John L.; Stephens, Alan G.; Grover Blaine S.

    1999-02-26

    An improved nuclear diagnostic method identifies a contained target material by measuring on-axis, mono-energetic uncollided particle radiation transmitted through a target material for two penetrating radiation beam energies, and applying specially developed algorithms to estimate a ratio of macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a neutron beam, or a ratio of linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a gamma-ray beam. Alternatively, the measurements are used to derive a minimization formula based on the macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two neutron beam energies, or the linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two gamma-ray beam energies. A candidate target material database, including known macroscopic neutron cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients for target materials at the selected neutron or gamma-ray beam energies, is used to approximate the estimated ratio or to solve the minimization formula, such that the identity of the contained target material is discovered.

  20. The domain interface method: a general-purpose non-intrusive technique for non-conforming domain decomposition problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafiero, M.; Lloberas-Valls, O.; Cante, J.; Oliver, J.

    2016-04-01

    A domain decomposition technique is proposed which is capable of properly connecting arbitrary non-conforming interfaces. The strategy essentially consists in considering a fictitious zero-width interface between the non-matching meshes which is discretized using a Delaunay triangulation. Continuity is satisfied across domains through normal and tangential stresses provided by the discretized interface and inserted in the formulation in the form of Lagrange multipliers. The final structure of the global system of equations resembles the dual assembly of substructures where the Lagrange multipliers are employed to nullify the gap between domains. A new approach to handle floating subdomains is outlined which can be implemented without significantly altering the structure of standard industrial finite element codes. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm is demonstrated through a patch test example and a number of tests that highlight the accuracy of the methodology and independence of the results with respect to the framework parameters. Considering its high degree of flexibility and non-intrusive character, the proposed domain decomposition framework is regarded as an attractive alternative to other established techniques such as the mortar approach.

  1. Non-intrusive refrigerant charge indicator

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Kweller, Esher

    2005-03-22

    A non-intrusive refrigerant charge level indicator includes a structure for measuring at least one temperature at an outside surface of a two-phase refrigerant line section. The measured temperature can be used to determine the refrigerant charge status of an HVAC system, and can be converted to a pressure of the refrigerant in the line section and compared to a recommended pressure range to determine whether the system is under-charged, properly charged or over-charged. A non-intrusive method for assessing the refrigerant charge level in a system containing a refrigerant fluid includes the step of measuring a temperature at least one outside surface of a two-phase region of a refrigerant containing refrigerant line, wherein the temperature measured can be converted to a refrigerant pressure within the line section.

  2. A non-intrusive partitioned approach to couple smoothed particle hydrodynamics and finite element methods for transient fluid-structure interaction problems with large interface motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Leduc, Julien; Nunez-Ramirez, Jorge; Combescure, Alain; Marongiu, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    We propose a non-intrusive numerical coupling method for transient fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems simulated by means of different discretization methods: smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and finite element (FE) methods for the fluid and the solid sub-domains, respectively. As a partitioned coupling method, the present algorithm can ensure a zero interface energy during the whole period of numerical simulation, even in the presence of large interface motion. In other words, the time integrations of the two sub-domains (second order Runge-Kutta scheme for fluid and Newmark integrator for solid) are synchronized. Thanks to this energy-conserving feature, one can preserve the minimal order of accuracy in time and the numerical stability of the FSI simulations, which are validated with a 1D and a 2D trivial numerical test cases. Additionally, some other 2D FSI simulations involving large interface motion have also been carried out with the proposed SPH-FE coupling method. Finally, an example of aquaplaning problem is given in order to show the feasibility of such coupling method in multi-dimensional applications with complicated structural geometries.

  3. Transient Torque Method: A Fast and Non-Intrusive Technique to Simultaneously Determine Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity of Semiconducting and Metallic Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhu, S.

    2003-01-01

    A transient torque method was developed to rapidly and simultaneously determine the viscosity and electrical conductivity of semiconducting or metallic melts. The experimental setup is similar to that for the oscillation cup technique. The melt sample is sealed inside a fused silica ampoule, and the ampoule is suspended by a long quartz fiber to form a torsional oscillation system. A rotating magnetic field is used to induce a rotating flow in the conductive melt, which causes the ampoule to rotate along its axis. A sensitive angular detector is used to measure the deflection angle of the ampoule. Based on the transient behavior of the deflection angle as the rotating magnetic field is applied, the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the melt can be obtained simultaneously by numerically fitting the data to a set of governing equations. The transient torque viscometer was applied successfully to measure the viscosity and electrical conductivity of high purity mercury at 53.4 C. The results were in excellent agreement with the published data. The main advantage of the technique is that the measurement can be completed in one or two minutes, as opposed to the one or two-hour measurement time required by the oscillation cup technique. The method is non-intrusive; capable of rapid measurement of the viscosity of toxic, high vapor pressure melts at elevated temperatures. In addition, the transient torque viscometer can also be operated as an oscillation cup viscometer if desired.

  4. A Novel Non-Intrusive Method to Resolve the Thermal-Dome-Effect of Pyranometers: Radiometric Calibration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lau, K. M.; Hansell, R. A.; Butler, J. J.; Cooper, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally the calibration equation for pyranometers assumes that the measured solar irradiance is solely proportional to the thermopile's output voltage; therefore only a single calibration factor is derived. This causes additional measurement uncertainties because it does not capture sufficient information to correctly account for a pyranometer's thermal effect. In our updated calibration equation, temperatures from the pyranometer's dome and case are incorporated to describe the instrument's thermal behavior, and a new set of calibration constants are determined, thereby reducing measurement uncertainties. In this paper, we demonstrate why a pyranometer's uncertainty using the traditional calibration equation is always larger than a-few-percent, but with the new approach can become much less than 1% after the thermal issue is resolved. The highlighted calibration results are based on NIST-traceable light sources under controlled laboratory conditions. The significance of the new approach lends itself to not only avoiding the uncertainty caused by a pyranometer's thermal effect but also the opportunity to better isolate and characterize other instrumental artifacts, such as angular response and non-linearity of the thermopile, to further reduce additional uncertainties. We also discuss some of the implications, including an example of how the thermal issue can potentially impact climate studies by evaluating aerosol's direct-radiative effect using field measurements with and without considering the pyranometer's thermal effect. The results of radiative transfer model simulation show that a pyranometer's thermal effect on solar irradiance measurements at the surface can be translated into a significant alteration of the calculated distribution of solar energy inside the column atmosphere.

  5. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  6. Nuclear data needs for non-intrusive inspection.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. L.; Michlich, B. J.

    2000-11-29

    Various nuclear-based techniques are being explored for use in non-intrusive inspection. Their development is motivated by the need to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons, to thwart trafficking in illicit narcotics, to stop the transport of explosives by terrorist organizations, to characterize nuclear waste, and to deal with various other societal concerns. Non-intrusive methods are sought in order to optimize inspection speed, to minimize damage to packages and containers, to satisfy environmental, health and safety requirements, to adhere to legal requirements, and to avoid inconveniencing the innocent. These inspection techniques can be grouped into two major categories: active and passive. They almost always require the use of highly penetrating radiation and therefore are generally limited to neutrons and gamma rays. Although x-rays are widely employed for these purposes, their use does not constitute nuclear technology and therefore is not discussed here. This paper examines briefly the basic concepts associated with nuclear inspection and investigates the related nuclear data needs. These needs are illustrated by considering four of the methods currently being developed and tested.

  7. Non-intrusive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Edward F.; Bergman, John W.

    2001-05-22

    A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

  8. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.; Schweppe, Fred C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each.

  9. Detection techniques for non-intrusive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Non-intrusive testing using nuclear techniques began with neutron activation. Other industrial applications gradually developed over the years. Explosives, hidden by terrorists, and the sophisticated concealment of contraband by smugglers have motivated the development of new technology for rapid real-time inspection systems. The basic nuclear techniques that have been proposed are reviewed. The applicable detectors are compared. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.; Schweppe, F.C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each. 9 figs.

  11. INEL cold test pit demonstration of improvements in information derived from non-intrusive geophysical methods over buried waste sites. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-08

    The objectives of this research project were to lay the foundation for further improvement in the use of geophysical methods for detection of buried wastes, and to increase the information content derived from surveys. Also, an important goal was to move from mere detection to characterization of buried wastes. The technical approach to achieve these objectives consisted of: (1) Collect a data set of high spatial density; (2) Acquire data with multiple sensors and integrate the interpretations inferred from the various sensors; (3) Test a simplified time domain electromagnetic system; and (4) Develop imaging and display formats of geophysical data readily understood by environmental scientists and engineers. The breadth of application of this work is far reaching. Not only are uncontrolled waste pits and trenches, abandoned underground storage tanks, and pipelines found throughout most US DOE facilities, but also at military installations and industrial facilities. Moreover, controlled land disposal sites may contain ``hot spots`` where drums and hazardous material may have been buried. The technologies addressed by the R&D will benefit all of these activities.

  12. INEL cold test pit demonstration of improvements in information derived from non-intrusive geophysical methods over buried waste sites. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-29

    Under Contract between US DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Blackhawk Geosciences Division of Coleman Research Corporation (BGD-CRC), geophysical investigations were conducted to improve the detection of buried wastes. Site characterization is a costly and time consuming process with the most costly components being drilling, sampling, and chemical analysis of samples. There is a focused effort at US DOE and other agencies to investigate methodologies that reduce costs and shorten the time between characterization and clean-up. These methodologies take the form of employing non-invasive (geophysical) and minimal invasive (e.g., cone penetrometer driving) techniques of characterization, and implementing a near real-time, rational decision-making process (Expedited Site Characterization). Over the Cold Test Pit (CTP) at INEL, data were acquired with multiple sensors on a dense grid. Over the CTP the interpretations inferred from geophysical data are compared with the known placement of various waste forms in the pit. The geophysical sensors employed were magnetics, frequency and time domain electromagnetics, and ground penetrating radar. Also, because of the high data density acquired, filtering and other data processing and imaging techniques were tested. The conclusions derived from the geophysical surveys were that pit boundaries, berms between cells within the pit, and individual objects placed in the pit were best mapped by the new Geonics EM61 time domain EM metal detector. Part of the reason for the effectiveness of the time domain metal detector is that objects buried in the pit are dominantly metallic. Also, the utility of geophysical data is significantly enhanced by dimensional and 3-dimensional imaging formats. These images will particularly assist remediation engineers in visualizing buried wastes.

  13. Non-intrusive measurements in a rocket engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhangi, S.; Gylys, V. T.; Jensen, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years analytical tools to characterize combustor flow have been developed in order to support design. To facilitate anchoring of combustion related physical models and the CFD codes in which they are incorporated, considerable development and application of non-intrusive combustion diagnostic capabilities has occurred. Raman spectroscopy can be used to simultaneously detect all polyatomic molecules present in significant concentrations and to determine gas temperature. This is because all molecules possess a distinct temperature dependent Raman spectrum. A multi-point diagnostic system for non-intrusive temperature and species profiling in rocket engines has been developed at Rocketdyne. In the present effort, the system has been undergoing validation for application to rocket engine component testing. A 4 inch diameter windowed combustor with a coaxial gas-gas injector was chosen for this series of validation experiments. Initially an excimer-pumped tunable dye laser and later a solid state Nd-Yag laser served as excitation sources. The Raman signal was dispersed by a monochromator and detected by a gated, intensified Charged Coupled Device (CCD) array. Experiments were carried out prior to each series of hot fire tests to ensure that the Raman signal detected was due to a spontaneous rather than a stimulated Raman emission process. Over sixty hot fire tests were conducted during the first series of tests with the excimer/dye laser. All hot fire testing was at a mixture ratio of 0.5 and chamber pressures of approximately 100 and approximately 300 psia. The Raman spectra of hydrogen, water vapor and oxygen recorded during single element hot fire tests were reduced and analyzed. A significant achievement was the attainment of single shot Raman spectra in cold flow tests. Unfortunately, the single shot signal-to-noise ratio deteriorated to an unacceptable level during the hot fire testing. Attempts to obtain temperature data from the hydrogen Q1-branch

  14. Non-intrusive temperature measurement using microscale visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamarthy, Pramod; Garimella, Suresh V.; Wereley, Steven T.

    2009-07-01

    μPIV is a widely accepted tool for making accurate measurements in microscale flows. The particles that are used to seed the flow, due to their small size, undergo Brownian motion which adds a random noise component to the measurements. Brownian motion introduces an undesirable error in the velocity measurements, but also contains valuable temperature information. A PIV algorithm which detects both the location and broadening of the correlation peak can measure velocity as well as temperature simultaneously using the same set of images. The approach presented in this work eliminates the use of the calibration constant used in the literature (Hohreiter et al. in Meas Sci Technol 13(7):1072-1078, 2002), making the method system-independent, and reducing the uncertainty involved in the technique. The temperature in a stationary fluid was experimentally measured using this technique and compared to that obtained using the particle tracking thermometry method and a novel method, low image density PIV. The method of cross-correlation PIV was modified to measure the temperature of a moving fluid. A standard epi-fluorescence μPIV system was used for all the measurements. The experiments were conducted using spherical fluorescent polystyrene-latex particles suspended in water. Temperatures ranging from 20 to 80°C were measured. This method allows simultaneous non-intrusive temperature and velocity measurements in integrated cooling systems and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  15. Nuclear data for non-intrusive inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bendahan, J.; Loveman, R.; Gozani, T.

    1994-12-31

    Non-intrusive inspection systems based on nuclear techniques utilize the interaction of neutrons and gamma rays to determine the elemental constituents of the inspected object. The Thermal Neutron Analysis System has been used to detect explosives and narcotics concealed in passenger luggage and small objects. More recently the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis technique is being used to detect contraband in large cargo containers and has been proposed for the characterization of waste drums. The design of these systems requires the utilization of simulation codes where the accuracy of the results depends largely on the nuclear libraries. Several nuclear data evaluations were reviewed and compared with existing data to identify the most accurate ones. Large discrepancies were found among the various nuclear libraries, mainly in the production cross sections and angular distributions of gamma rays, stimulated by neutron interactions. An experimental program was carried out to correct and complement the required data. Evaluations of gamma-ray production cross sections for carbon, oxygen and chlorine are reviewed and compared with existing and new experimental data.

  16. Non-intrusive rattle noise detection in non-stationary conditions by an angle/time cyclostationary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Sophie; Rémond, Didier; Antoni, Jérôme; Sauvage, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes an original non-intrusive approach to detect and quantify rattle noise in automotive gearboxes operating under non-stationary conditions by means of vibration or instantaneous angular speed measurements. Rattle noise is produced by vibro impacts between teeth of unloaded gears excited by the engine acyclism. It appears during acceleration or deceleration phases and its detection requires the analysis of non-stationary signals. In order to take advantage of the repetitive nature of the impacts, an angle/time cyclostationary approach is introduced. Rattle noise is thus characterized through the angle/time duality: the cyclic frequency expressed in events per revolution is directly linked to the periodicity of the impacts while their frequency content is expressed in Hertz. The proposed detection method uses an order/frequency spectral coherence and may be applied either on vibration signals or instantaneous angular speed signals. For validation purposes, a specific instrumentation of a gearbox is set up. The relative speed of the unloaded meshing gears is observed by means of optical encoders to directly detect the instants of impact which then serve as a basis for validation of the non-intrusive detection method proposed in this paper.

  17. Non-intrusive measurement techniques for hydroelectric applicants

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, R.; Lemon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Non-intrusive acoustic methods for measuring flows, originally developed for oceanographic applications, are being used in and around hydroelectric dams. The acoustic methods can be categorized as either back-scattering or forward-scattering. The first, using the back-scattered signal, measures the Doppler shift of the returning echo to determine the along-beam component of flow. These instruments are generally called Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). Three beam solutions allow computation of the velocity components. Time gating the return provides a velocity profile with bin segments as small as 0.25 in. In areas of strong magnetic deviation, often the case beside large dams, a gyrocompass can be used to provide directional orientation. The velocity data can also be used to quickly compute river or channel discharge. Typical applications and several case studies are presented. The second acoustic technique is based on a forward-scattering phenomenon known as scintillation. This technique has been used on the Fraser River to monitor flows, and properties of the signal have recently been correlated with the biomass of upstream-migrating salmon. Acoustic scintillation flow measurements are well suited to applications with limited space in the along-flow direction. Applications to hydroelectric dams include turbine intake flow measurements, and a system has been developed to measure flow along fish diversion screens.

  18. Non-intrusive measurements of bubble size and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassin, A. L.; Nikitopoulos, D. E.

    1995-06-01

    A non-intrusive measuring technique based on video-imaging has been developed for the measurement of bubble size, velocity and frequency. Measurements carried out with this method have been compared to those obtained by an optimized phase-Doppler system in standard configuration, for a wide range of bubble sizes produced from single injectors in a quiescent environment. The two measuring techniques have yielded velocities and frequencies that are in very good agreement while the size of spherical bubbles was consistently measured by both methods. The phase-Doppler system was also used to size oblate-spheroidal bubbles moving with their equatorial plane parallel to the scattering plane, yielding measurements reasonably close to the average radius of curvature of the bubbles in the neighborhood of the equatorial plane, as calculated from the video-imaging data. Both methods were used for detailed velocity measurements of the bubble-stream in the neighborhood of the injector tip. The observed bubble-velocity variation with the distance from the injector tip does not always display the usual increasing trend leading into the terminal velocity. When injection conditions are near the transition from discrete to jet injection mode and the bubbles are small, the latter decelerate into a terminal velocity due to direct interaction of successive bubbles at the injector tip. The measured terminal velocities of bubble-chains for a variety of bubble sizes and injection frequencies, are successfully predicted by using a far-field wake approximation to account for the drafting effect which is responsible for bubble-chain velocities higher than those of single bubbles.

  19. Non-intrusive detection of rotating stall in pump-turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botero, F.; Hasmatuchi, V.; Roth, S.; Farhat, M.

    2014-10-01

    When operated far from their optimum conditions, pump-turbines may exhibit strong hydrodynamic instabilities, often called rotating stall, which lead to substantial increase of vibration and risk of mechanical failure. In the present study, we have investigated the flow filed in a model of radial pump-turbine with the help of tuft visualization, wall pressure measurement and structure-borne noise monitoring. As the rotation speed is increased, the machine is brought from its optimum operation to runaway with zero torque on the shaft. The runaway operation is characterized by a significant increase of pressure fluctuation at the rotor-stator interaction frequency. As the speed is further increased, the flow exhibits sub-synchronous instability, which rotates at 70% of the rotation frequency. Tuft visualization clearly shows that, as the instability evolves, the flow in a given distributor channel suddenly stalls and switches to reverse pumping mode in periodic way. We have also investigated the monitoring of the rotating stall with the help of vibration signals. A specific signal processing method, based on amplitude demodulation, was developed. The use of 2 accelerometers allows for the identification of the optimum carrier frequency by computing the cyclic coherence of vibration signals. This non-intrusive method is proved to be efficient in detecting the rotating stall instability and the number of stall cells. We strongly believe that it could be implemented in full scale pump-turbines.

  20. Adaptive non-intrusive terahertz identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2006-05-01

    In the recent years, multifarious devices, systems and applications working in the THz frequency domain have been brought to life. Many of them are meant for security and military purposes, such as non-invasive detection of explosives, weapons, biological and chemical agents, etc. The problem, however, is not only with the detection and ever-increasing accuracy of measurements but often with understanding of what is seen; discriminating between the objects and the materials they are made of. It seems especially important to create an automatic or semi-automatic system and thus release the operator from constant watching. The proposed solution is an adaptive intelligent system based on usage of THz waves as the probing signal by means of mathematical statistics. Time series analysis is one of the forms that is employed in this research. The adaptivity of the system to various objects under investigation is based on the data base installed as well as on the possibility of changing of the detection system's parameters and modes of operation depending on the signal received from the identified objects. In other words, the suggested method allows for the detection system to switch from, say, the metal object mode to the pharmaceutical one and so forth.

  1. Non-intrusive calibration for three-dimensional particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schosser, Constantin; Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    This letter introduces a non-intrusive calibration scheme for three-dimensional (3D) optical flow velocimetry techniques. For these 3D techniques, including tomographic PIV and 3D-PTV, calibration targets need to be imaged within the measurement volume at different depth positions. However, for domains with limited access and with small dimensions, it is difficult or impossible to place a calibration target. Therefore, a non-intrusive calibration approach is proposed to overcome these drawbacks, by employing light reflections of a continuous wave laser in the measurement domain. The laser is translated to different locations, yielding a set of calibration points, comprising the spatial coordinates of the light reflections and their corresponding sensor coordinates.

  2. Study of a non-intrusive electron beam radius diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; DeVolder, B.G.; Goldstein, J.C.; Snell, C.M.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have evaluated the usefulness and limitation of a non-intrusive beam radius diagnostic which is based on the measurement of the magnetic moment of a high-current electron beam in an axisymmetric focusing magnetic field, and relates the beam root-mean-square (RMS) radius to the change in magnetic flux through a diamagnetic loop encircling the beam. An analytic formula that gives the RMS radius of the electron beam at a given axial position and a given time is derived and compared with results from a 2-D particle-in-cell code. The study has established criteria for its validity and optimal applications.

  3. Non-intrusive speed sensor. [space shuttle main engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, J.; Wyett, L.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs.

  4. Non-intrusive measurement of internal pressure and flow in pipelines using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Pedro; Filograno, Massimo L.; Senent, Fernando D.; Corredera, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we propose and demonstrate a non-intrusive measurement method for internal pressure and water flow in hydraulic pipeline systems. Fiber Bragg Gratings are used to measure deformations in the external side of pipes under different working conditions for two different experiments. In the first experiment a PVC sewerage pipeline with a diameter of 90 mm was subjected to a variable air pressures up to 4 bars; in the second a PVC sewerage pipeline with a diameter of 32 mm was subjected to a water flow between 10 and 35 liters per minute.

  5. Non-intrusive Shock Measurements Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Shannon M.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Stud mount accelerometers are widely used by the aerospace industry to measure shock environments during hardware qualification. The commonly used contact-based sensors, however, interfere with the shock waves and distort the acquired signature, which is a concern not actively discussed in the community. To alleviate these interference issues, engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are investigating the use of non-intrusive sensors, specifically Laser Doppler Vibrometers, as alternatives to the stud mounted accelerometers. This paper will describe shock simulation tests completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, compare the measurements from stud mounted accelerometers and Laser Doppler Vibrometers, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of introducing Laser Doppler Vibrometers as alternative sensors for measuring shock environments.

  6. Non-Intrusive Impedance-Based Cable Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A non-intrusive electrical cable tester determines the nature and location of a discontinuity in a cable through application of an oscillating signal to one end of the cable. The frequency of the oscillating signal is varied in increments until a minimum, close to zero voltage is measured at a signal injection point which is indicative of a minimum impedance at that point. The frequency of the test signal at which the minimum impedance occurs is then employed to determine the distance to the discontinuity by employing a formula which relates this distance to the signal frequency and the velocity factor of the cable. A numerically controlled oscillator is provided to generate the oscillating signal, and a microcontroller automatically controls operation of the cable tester to make the desired measurements and display the results. The device is contained in a portable housing which may be hand held to facilitate convenient use of the device in difficult to access locations.

  7. Nuclear resonance fluorescence imaging in non-intrusive cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertozzi, William; Ledoux, Robert J.

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence is able to non-intrusively interrogate a region space and measure the isotopic content of the material in that space for any element with atomic number greater than that of helium. The technique involves exposing material to a continuous energy distribution of photons and detecting the scattered photons that have a discrete energy distribution unique to an isotope. The interrogating photons, which range from 2 to 8 MeV, are the most penetrating probes and can "see" through many inches of steel. Determination of the chemical components of the material occupying a region of space greatly enhances the identification of threats such as explosives, fissile materials, toxic materials and weapons of mass destruction. Systems can be designed to involve minimal operator intervention, to minimize dose to the sample, and to provide high throughput at commercial seaports, airports and other entry points.

  8. Non-intrusive flow measurements on a reentry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.; Satavicca, D. A.; Zimmermann, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the utility of various non-intrusive techniques for the measurement of the flow field on the windward side of the Space Shuttle or a similar re-entry vehicle. Included are linear (Rayleigh, Raman, Mie, Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Resonant Doppler Velocimetry) and nonlinear (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman, Laser Induced Fluorescence) light scattering, electron beam fluorescence, thermal emission and mass spectroscopy. Flow field properties are taken from a nonequilibrium flow model by Shinn, Moss and Simmonds at NASA Langley. Conclusions are, when possible, based on quantitative scaling of known laboratory results to the conditions projected. Detailed discussion with researchers in the field contributed further to these conclusions and provided valuable insights regarding the experimental feasibility of each of the techniques.

  9. Non-intrusive Ensemble Kalman filtering for large scale geophysical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amour, Idrissa; Kauranne, Tuomo

    2016-04-01

    Advanced data assimilation techniques, such as variational assimilation methods, present often challenging implementation issues for large-scale models, both because of computational complexity and because of complexity of implementation. We present a non-intrusive wrapper library that addresses this problem by isolating the direct model and the linear algebra employed in data assimilation from each other completely. In this approach we have adopted a hybrid Variational Ensemble Kalman filter that combines Ensemble propagation with a 3DVAR analysis stage. The inverse problem of state and covariance propagation from prior to posterior estimates is thereby turned into a time-independent problem. This feature allows the linear algebra and minimization steps required in the variational step to be conducted outside the direct model and no tangent linear or adjoint codes are required. Communication between the model and the assimilation module is conducted exclusively via standard input and output files of the model. This non-intrusive approach is tested with the comprehensive 3D lake and shallow sea model COHERENS that is used to forecast and assimilate turbidity in lake Säkylän Pyhäjärvi in Finland, using both sparse satellite images and continuous real-time point measurements as observations.

  10. Reduction of Motion Artifacts and Improvement of R Peak Detecting Accuracy Using Adjacent Non-Intrusive ECG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Minho; Jeong, Jae Jin; Kim, Seung Hun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Non-intrusive electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring has many advantages: easy to measure and apply in daily life. However, motion noise in the measured signal is the major problem of non-intrusive measurement. This paper proposes a method to reduce the noise and to detect the R peaks of ECG in a stable manner in a sitting arrangement using non-intrusive sensors. The method utilizes two capacitive ECG sensors (cECGs) to measure ECG, and another two cECGs located adjacent to the sensors for ECG are added to obtain the information on motion. Then, active noise cancellation technique and the motion information are used to reduce motion noise. To verify the proposed method, ECG was measured indoors and during driving, and the accuracy of the detected R peaks was compared. After applying the method, the sum of sensitivity and positive predictivity increased 8.39% on average and 26.26% maximally in the data. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the motion noise was reduced and that more reliable R peak positions could be obtained by the proposed method. The robustness of the new ECG measurement method will elicit benefits to various health care systems that require noninvasive heart rate or heart rate variability measurements. PMID:27196910

  11. Reduction of Motion Artifacts and Improvement of R Peak Detecting Accuracy Using Adjacent Non-Intrusive ECG Sensors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minho; Jeong, Jae Jin; Kim, Seung Hun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Non-intrusive electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring has many advantages: easy to measure and apply in daily life. However, motion noise in the measured signal is the major problem of non-intrusive measurement. This paper proposes a method to reduce the noise and to detect the R peaks of ECG in a stable manner in a sitting arrangement using non-intrusive sensors. The method utilizes two capacitive ECG sensors (cECGs) to measure ECG, and another two cECGs located adjacent to the sensors for ECG are added to obtain the information on motion. Then, active noise cancellation technique and the motion information are used to reduce motion noise. To verify the proposed method, ECG was measured indoors and during driving, and the accuracy of the detected R peaks was compared. After applying the method, the sum of sensitivity and positive predictivity increased 8.39% on average and 26.26% maximally in the data. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the motion noise was reduced and that more reliable R peak positions could be obtained by the proposed method. The robustness of the new ECG measurement method will elicit benefits to various health care systems that require noninvasive heart rate or heart rate variability measurements. PMID:27196910

  12. A Non-Intrusive GMA Welding Process Quality Monitoring System Using Acoustic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cayo, Eber Huanca; Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo Absi

    2009-01-01

    Most of the inspection methods used for detection and localization of welding disturbances are based on the evaluation of some direct measurements of welding parameters. This direct measurement requires an insertion of sensors during the welding process which could somehow alter the behavior of the metallic transference. An inspection method that evaluates the GMA welding process evolution using a non-intrusive process sensing would allow not only the identification of disturbances during welding runs and thus reduce inspection time, but would also reduce the interference on the process caused by the direct sensing. In this paper a nonintrusive method for weld disturbance detection and localization for weld quality evaluation is demonstrated. The system is based on the acoustic sensing of the welding electrical arc. During repetitive tests in welds without disturbances, the stability acoustic parameters were calculated and used as comparison references for the detection and location of disturbances during the weld runs. PMID:22399990

  13. Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring Approaches for Disaggregated Energy Sensing: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Zoha, Ahmed; Gluhak, Alexander; Imran, Muhammad Ali; Rajasegarar, Sutharshan

    2012-01-01

    Appliance Load Monitoring (ALM) is essential for energy management solutions, allowing them to obtain appliance-specific energy consumption statistics that can further be used to devise load scheduling strategies for optimal energy utilization. Fine-grained energy monitoring can be achieved by deploying smart power outlets on every device of interest; however it incurs extra hardware cost and installation complexity. Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) is an attractive method for energy disaggregation, as it can discern devices from the aggregated data acquired from a single point of measurement. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of NILM system and its associated methods and techniques used for disaggregated energy sensing. We review the state-of-the art load signatures and disaggregation algorithms used for appliance recognition and highlight challenges and future research directions. PMID:23223081

  14. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  15. Non-Intrusive Techniques of Inspections During the Pre-Launch Phase of Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rejkumar; Bardina, Jorge E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a method of non-intrusive local inspection of surface and sub-surface conditions, interfaces, laminations and seals in both space vehicle and ground operations with an integrated suite of imaging sensors during pre-launch operations. It employs an advanced Raman spectrophotometer with additional spectrophotometers and lidar mounted on a flying robot to constantly monitor the space hardware as well as inner surface of the vehicle and ground operations hardware. This paper addresses a team of micro flying robots with necessary sensors and photometers to monitor the entire space vehicle internally and externally. The micro flying robots can reach altitude with least amount of energy, where astronauts have difficulty in reaching and monitoring the materials and subsurface faults. The micro flying robot has an embedded fault detection system which acts as an advisory system and in many cases micro flying robots act as a Supervisor to fix the problems. As missions expand to a sustainable presence in the Moon, and extend for durations longer than one year in lunar outpost, the effectiveness of the instrumentation and hardware has to be revolutionized if NASA is to meet high levels of mission safety, reliability, and overall success. The micro flying robot uses contra-rotating propellers powered by an ultra-thin, ultrasonic motor with currently the world's highest power weight ratio, and is balanced in mid-air by means of the world's first stabilizing mechanism using a linear actuator. The essence of micromechatronics has been brought together in high-density mounting technology to minimize the size and weight. The robot can take suitable payloads of photometers, embedded chips for image analysis and micro pumps for sealing cracks or fixing other material problems. This paper also highlights advantages that this type of non-intrusive techniques offer over costly and monolithic traditional techniques.

  16. Non-Intrusive Electric Appliances Load Monitoring System-Experiment for Real Household-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Katsuhisa; Nakano, Yukio; Kondo, Syuhei

    This paper presents applying results of four estimation algorithms of non-intrusive monitoring system for real household. We conclude that all algorithms have practicable ability. 1) support vector machine(SVM): SVM was used to estimate ON/OFF states for fluorescent and refrigerator. SVM has the performance equivalent to best performance of sigmoid function networks(SFN). However, SVM has high estimating ability constantly. 2) RBF networks(RBFN): RBFN was used to estimate power consumption for air conditioner. RBFN has the performance equivalent to best performance of SFN. However, RBFN has high estimating ability constantly. 3) step change detection method(SCD): SCD was used to estimate ON/OFF states and power consumption for IH cooking range. SCD does not need the necessary learning process for SFN and has higher estimating ability than SFN. 4) spectrum reference method(SRM): SRM was used to estimate working conditions for rice cocker and washing machine. SRM is able to estimate these working conditions that cannot be estimated by earlier methods.

  17. PUQ: A code for non-intrusive uncertainty propagation in computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Martin; Haley, Benjamin; McLennan, Michael; Koslowski, Marisol; Murthy, Jayathi; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    We present a software package for the non-intrusive propagation of uncertainties in input parameters through computer simulation codes or mathematical models and associated analysis; we demonstrate its use to drive micromechanical simulations using a phase field approach to dislocation dynamics. The PRISM uncertainty quantification framework (PUQ) offers several methods to sample the distribution of input variables and to obtain surrogate models (or response functions) that relate the uncertain inputs with the quantities of interest (QoIs); the surrogate models are ultimately used to propagate uncertainties. PUQ requires minimal changes in the simulation code, just those required to annotate the QoI(s) for its analysis. Collocation methods include Monte Carlo, Latin Hypercube and Smolyak sparse grids and surrogate models can be obtained in terms of radial basis functions and via generalized polynomial chaos. PUQ uses the method of elementary effects for sensitivity analysis in Smolyak runs. The code is available for download and also available for cloud computing in nanoHUB. PUQ orchestrates runs of the nanoPLASTICITY tool at nanoHUB where users can propagate uncertainties in dislocation dynamics simulations using simply a web browser, without downloading or installing any software.

  18. A non-intrusive and continuous-in-space technique to investigate the wave transformation and breaking over a breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Simone; Grazia Badas, Maria; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    To design longshore breakwaters, the evaluation of the wave motion transformations over the structures and of the energy they are able to absorb, dissipate and reflect is necessary. To characterize features and transformations of monochromatic wave trains above a breakwater, both submerged and emerged, we have designed and developed a non-intrusive and continuous-in-space technique, based on Image Analysis, and carried out an experimental campaign, in a laboratory flume equipped with a wave-maker, in order to test it. The investigation area was lighted with a light sheet and images were recorded by a video-camera. The working fluid was seeded with non buoyant particles to make it bright and clearly distinct from dark background and breakwater. The technique, that is based on a robust algorithm to identify the free surface, has showed to properly work also in prohibitive situations for traditional resistive probes (e.g., very shallow waters and/or breaking waves) and to be able to measure the free surface all over the investigation field in a non-intrusive way. Two kind of analysis were mainly performed, a statistical and a spectral one. The peculiarities of the measurement technique allowed to describe the whole wave transformation and to supply useful information for design purposes.

  19. Characterization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Methods discussed in this compilation of notes and diagrams are Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and other surface analysis techniques (auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and scanning tunnelling microscopy). A comparative evaluation of different techniques is performed. In-vacuo and in-situ analyses are described.

  20. Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring of HVAC Components using Signal Unmixing

    SciTech Connect

    Rahimpour, Alireza; Qi, Hairong; Fugate, David L; Kuruganti, Teja

    2015-01-01

    Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning units (HVAC) are a major electrical energy consumer in buildings. Monitoring of the operation and energy consumption of HVAC would increase the awareness of building owners and maintenance service providers of the condition and quality of performance of these units, enabling conditioned-based maintenance which would help achieving higher energy efficiency. In this paper, a novel non-intrusive load monitoring method based on group constrained non-negative matrix factorization is proposed for monitoring the different components of HVAC unit by only measuring the whole building aggregated power signal. At the first level of this hierarchical approach, power consumption of the building is decomposed to energy consumption of the HVAC unit and all the other electrical devices operating in the building such as lighting and plug loads. Then, the estimated power signal of the HVAC is used for estimating the power consumption profile of the HVAC major electrical loads such as compressors, condenser fans and indoor blower. Experiments conducted on real data collected from a building testbed maintained at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) demonstrate high accuracy on the disaggregation task.

  1. Extracting Features from an Electrical Signal of a Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Marisa B.; de Almeida, Ana; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Martins, António

    Improving energy efficiency by monitoring household electrical consumption is of significant importance with the present-day climate change concerns. A solution for the electrical consumption management problem is the use of a non-intrusive load monitoring system (NILM). This system captures the signals from the aggregate consumption, extracts the features from these signals and classifies the extracted features in order to identify the switched on appliances. An effective device identification (ID) requires a signature to be assigned for each appliance. Moreover, to specify an ID for each device, signal processing techniques are needed for extracting the relevant features. This paper describes a technique for the steady-states recognition in an electrical digital signal as the first stage for the implementation of an innovative NILM. Furthermore, the final goal is to develop an intelligent system for the identification of the appliances by automated learning. The proposed approach is based on the ratio value between rectangular areas defined by the signal samples. The computational experiments show the method effectiveness for the accurate steady-states identification in the electrical input signals.

  2. Non-Intrusive Magneto-Optic Detecting System for Investigations of Air Switching Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guogang; Dong, Jinlong; Liu, Wanying; Geng, Yingsan

    2014-07-01

    In current investigations of electric arc plasmas, experiments based on modern testing technology play an important role. To enrich the testing methods and contribute to the understanding and grasping of the inherent mechanism of air switching arcs, in this paper, a non-intrusive detecting system is described that combines the magneto-optic imaging (MOI) technique with the solution to inverse electromagnetic problems. The detecting system works in a sequence of main steps as follows: MOI of the variation of the arc flux density over a plane, magnetic field information extracted from the magneto-optic (MO) images, arc current density distribution and spatial pattern reconstruction by inverting the resulting field data. Correspondingly, in the system, an MOI set-up is designed based on the Faraday effect and the polarization properties of light, and an intelligent inversion algorithm is proposed that involves simulated annealing (SA). Experiments were carried out for high current (2 kA RMS) discharge cases in a typical low-voltage switchgear. The results show that the MO detection system possesses the advantages of visualization, high resolution and response, and electrical insulation, which provides a novel diagnostics tool for further studies of the arc.

  3. Electrical signature analysis applications for non-intrusive automotive alternator diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, C.W.

    1996-03-01

    Automotive alternators are designed to supply power for automobile engine ignition systems as well as charge the storage battery. This product is used in a large market where consumers are concerned with acoustic noise and vibration that comes from the unit. as well as overall quality and dependability. Alternators and generators in general are used in industries other than automotive, such as transportation and airline industries and in military applications. Their manufacturers are interested in pursuing state-of-the-art methods to achieve higher quality and reduced costs. Preliminary investigations of non-intrusive diagnostic techniques utilizing the inherent voltage signals of alternators have been performed with promising results. These techniques are based on time and frequency domain analyses of specially conditioned signals taken from several alternators under various test conditions. This paper discusses investigations that show correlations of the alternator output voltage to airborne noise production. In addition these signals provide insight into internal magnetic characteristics that relate to design and/or assembly problems.

  4. Non-Intrusive Measurement Techniques Applied to the Hybrid Solid Fuel Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauty, F.

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of the solid fuel regression rate and the time evolution of the grain geometry are requested for hybrid motor design and control of its operating conditions. Two non-intrusive techniques (NDT) have been applied to hybrid propulsion : both are based on wave propagation, the X-rays and the ultrasounds, through the materials. X-ray techniques allow local thickness measurements (attenuated signal level) using small probes or 2D images (Real Time Radiography), with a link between the size of field of view and accuracy. Beside the safety hazards associated with the high-intensity X-ray systems, the image analysis requires the use of quite complex post-processing techniques. The ultrasound technique is more widely used in energetic material applications, including hybrid fuels. Depending upon the transducer size and the associated equipment, the application domain is large, from tiny samples to the quad-port wagon wheel grain of the 1.1 MN thrust HPDP motor. The effect of the physical quantities has to be taken into account in the wave propagation analysis. With respect to the various applications, there is no unique and perfect experimental method to measure the fuel regression rate. The best solution could be obtained by combining two techniques at the same time, each technique enhancing the quality of the global data.

  5. Theoretical fast non-intrusive 3-D temperature distribution measurement within scattering medium from flame emission image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qun-xing; Yan, Fei Wang Jian-hua; Chi, Yong

    2013-04-01

    A new approach to inverse radiation analysis is presented for non-intrusive 3-D flame temperature reconstruction using flame emission images from four CCD camera detectors installed on the furnace wall. The scattering from participating medium in the flame was considered by combining the discrete radiative transfer method with the discrete ordinate method. A modified minimum residual algorithm was employed to calculate the least squares solution of the ill-conditioned inverse problem. A numerical test problem simulating real temperature measurements in an industrial furnace was used to assess the performance of the proposed method. These assessments indicate that this method is capable of reconstructing 3-D temperature distributions fast and accurately, even with noisy flame emission data. Such a capability has potential in real-time temperature measurement for combustion optimization and pollution emission control.

  6. Hierarchically Structured Non-Intrusive Sign Language Recognition. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieren, Jorg; Zieren, Jorg; Kraiss, Karl-Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a hierarchically structured approach at the nonintrusive recognition of sign language from a monocular frontal view. Robustness is achieved through sophisticated localization and tracking methods, including a combined EM/CAMSHIFT overlap resolution procedure and the parallel pursuit of multiple hypotheses about hands position and movement. This allows handling of ambiguities and automatically corrects tracking errors. A biomechanical skeleton model and dynamic motion prediction using Kalman filters represents high level knowledge. Classification is performed by Hidden Markov Models. 152 signs from German sign language were recognized with an accuracy of 97.6%.

  7. An ultraviolet laser source and spectral imaging filters for non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Noah D. M.

    1998-05-01

    This dissertation details the development of new state- of-the-art tools which enable ultraviolet non-intrusive laser based diagnostics. A laser source and three new optical filters are developed, characterized, and demonstrated in application to flowfield diagnostics. The laser produces high power (50mJ/pulse), spectrally near transform limited, spatially near diffraction limited, tunable output in the vicinity of 250 nm. A notch absorption band and two narrow passband spectral filters feature exceptional spectral resolution, high throughput, and maintain imaging capabilities. Pairing the laser and filters makes possible unique spatially resolved flowfield measurements via ultraviolet Rayleigh and Raman scattering based techniques. The laser source is an injection-seeded, frequency- tripled, cavity-locked, titanium:sapphire source. It features a new cavity locking scheme, which allows it to be tuned rapidly and discontinuously without losing its narrowband spectral profile. The first spectral filter is a narrow band, notch absorption filter that is based upon a ground state absorption of mercury. The filter acts to strongly suppress a narrow spectral band (on a GHz scale), while efficiently passing light spectrally shifted by a GHz or less. The filter is characterized, modeled, and combined with the laser to demonstrate ultraviolet filtered Rayleigh scattering for flowfield visualization and velocity measurements of a Mach 2 free jet. The second filter is a narrow passband imaging filter, designed for rotational Raman scattering based measurements. It features an ultranarrow passband (less than 1cm-1) and has the ability to suppress strong background scattering (Rayleigh scattering and surface reflections) while maintaining 2-D imaging capabilities. This filter is characterized, modeled, and applied in measurements of individual pure rotational Raman lines of oxygen and nitrogen in room air. The third filter, also for rotational Raman imaging, simultaneously

  8. Non-intrusive Experimental Study on Nuclear Fuel Assembly Response to Seismic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Noah A.

    length run times needed to capture the effect of the seismic transients on the fluid velocity field. A custom DIC system is used to non-intrusively measure the structural displacements at the same time the PIV measurements are recorded. With this non-intrusive system, simultaneous full field fluid velocity measurements and structural response measurements to seismic forcing are obtained for the first time. Furthermore, the RIM facility allows for fluid measurements within the fuel bundle that have not been accessible before. This work presents data on fluid structure interaction (FSI) measurements in still fluid, and with axial flow at Reynolds number typical to a PWR, with seismic forcing from a shake table. Analysis of the cases in still water will show development of a vertical pulsatile flow, in addition to a cross flow, created by the horizontal oscillations of the fuel bundle driving pressure gradients in both the vertical and spanwise directions. Furthermore in still water the onset of vortices being shed from the bundle oscillations is found to occur at a critical Keulegan Carpenter number which has a direct impact on bundle dynamics. The insights from the still water cases are paramount in improving the understanding of what occurs in the more complex case with axial flow, where the vertical pulsatile flow is found to be prevalent as well. Additionally this data provides for the first time high spatial and temporal full field fluid velocity measurements that can be used for validation of numerical codes.

  9. Non-intrusive ultrasonic liquid-in-line detector for small diameter tubes. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.

    1980-09-24

    An arrangement for detecting liquids in a line, using non-intrusive ultrasonic techniques is disclosed. In this arrangement, four piezoelectric crystals are arranged in pairs about a 0.078 inch o.d. pipe. An ultrasonic tone burst is transmitted along the pipe, between crystal pairs, and the amplitude of the received tone burst indicates the absence/presence of liquid in the pipe.

  10. Non-intrusive ultrasonic liquid-in-line detector for small diameter tubes

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.

    1982-01-01

    An arrangement for deleting liquid in a line, using non-intrusive ultrasonic techniques is disclosed. In this arrangement, four piezoelectric crystals are arranged in pairs about a 0.072 inch o.d. pipe. An ultrasonic tone burst is transmitted along the pipe, between crystal pairs, and the amplitude of the received tone burst indicates the absence/presence of liquid in the pipe.

  11. Non-intrusive head movement analysis of videotaped seizures of epileptic origin.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bappaditya; Eng, How-Lung; Lu, Haiping; Chan, Derrick W S; Ng, Yen-Ling

    2012-01-01

    In this work we propose a non-intrusive video analytic system for patient's body parts movement analysis in Epilepsy Monitoring Unit. The system utilizes skin color modeling, head/face pose template matching and face detection to analyze and quantify the head movements. Epileptic patients' heads are analyzed holistically to infer seizure and normal random movements. The patient does not require to wear any special clothing, markers or sensors, hence it is totally non-intrusive. The user initializes the person-specific skin color and selects few face/head poses in the initial few frames. The system then tracks the head/face and extracts spatio-temporal features. Support vector machines are then used on these features to classify seizure-like movements from normal random movements. Experiments are performed on numerous long hour video sequences captured in an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit at a local hospital. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system in pediatric epilepsy monitoring and seizure detection. PMID:23367311

  12. Evaluation and analysis of non-intrusive techniques for detecting illicit substances

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.; Demirgian, J.C.; Kunz, T.D.; Ulvick, S.J.; Cui, J.

    1995-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) have been tasked by the Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center of the Office of National Drug Control Policy to conduct evaluations and analyses of technologies for the non-intrusive inspection of containers for illicit substances. These technologies span the range of nuclear, X-ray, and chemical techniques used in nondestructive sample analysis. ANL has performed assessments of nuclear and X-ray inspection concepts and undertaken site visits with developers to understand the capabilities and the range of applicability of candidate systems. ANL and HARC have provided support to law enforcement agencies (LEAs), including participation in numerous field studies. Both labs have provided staff to assist in the Narcotics Detection Technology Assessment (NDTA) program for evaluating drug detection systems. Also, the two labs are performing studies of drug contamination of currency. HARC has directed technical evaluations of automated ballistics imaging and identification systems under consideration by law enforcement agencies. ANL and HARC have sponsored workshops and a symposium, and are participating in a Non-Intrusive Inspection Study being led by Dynamics Technology, Incorporated.

  13. Non-intrusive optical study of gas and its exchange in human maxillary sinuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, L.; Andersson, M.; Svensson, T.; Cassel-Engquist, M.; Svanberg, K.; Svanberg, S.

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel non-intrusive technique based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to investigate human maxillary sinuses in vivo. The technique relies on the fact that free gases have much sharper absorption features (typical a few GHz) than the surrounding tissue. Molecular oxygen was detected at 760 nm. Volunteers have been investigated by injecting near-infrared light fibre-optically in contact with the palate inside the mouth. The multiply scattered light was detected externally by a handheld probe on and around the cheek bone. A significant signal difference in oxygen imprint was observed when comparing volunteers with widely different anamnesis regarding maxillary sinus status. Control measurements through the hand and through the cheek below the cheekbone were also performed to investigate any possible oxygen offset in the setup. These provided a consistently non-detectable signal level. The passages between the nasal cavity and the maxillary sinuses were also non-intrusively optically studied, to the best of our knowledge for the first time. These measurements provide information on the channel conductivity which may prove useful in facial sinus diagnostics. The results suggest that a clinical trial together with an ear-nose-throat (ENT) clinic should be carried out to investigate the clinical use of the new technique.

  14. A Web-Based Non-Intrusive Ambient System to Measure and Classify Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Rampa, Luca; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs P

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of older adults in the global population is increasing. This demographic shift leads to an increasing prevalence of age-associated disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. With the progression of the disease, the risk for institutional care increases, which contrasts with the desire of most patients to stay in their home environment. Despite doctors’ and caregivers’ awareness of the patient’s cognitive status, they are often uncertain about its consequences on activities of daily living (ADL). To provide effective care, they need to know how patients cope with ADL, in particular, the estimation of risks associated with the cognitive decline. The occurrence, performance, and duration of different ADL are important indicators of functional ability. The patient’s ability to cope with these activities is traditionally assessed with questionnaires, which has disadvantages (eg, lack of reliability and sensitivity). Several groups have proposed sensor-based systems to recognize and quantify these activities in the patient’s home. Combined with Web technology, these systems can inform caregivers about their patients in real-time (eg, via smartphone). Objective We hypothesize that a non-intrusive system, which does not use body-mounted sensors, video-based imaging, and microphone recordings would be better suited for use in dementia patients. Since it does not require patient’s attention and compliance, such a system might be well accepted by patients. We present a passive, Web-based, non-intrusive, assistive technology system that recognizes and classifies ADL. Methods The components of this novel assistive technology system were wireless sensors distributed in every room of the participant’s home and a central computer unit (CCU). The environmental data were acquired for 20 days (per participant) and then stored and processed on the CCU. In consultation with medical experts, eight ADL were classified

  15. Non-intrusive measurement of inner bore temperature of small arms using integrated ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, D.; Pimentel, R.; Lord, M.; Beauchesne, A.; Kruger, S. E.; Stowe, R.; Wong, F.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Management of thermal input to a small arms weapons system is a significant design and operational constraint. A collaborative project was initiated with the objective to measure non-intrusively the inner bore barrel temperature of a small arm during actual firing. The approach uses integrated ultrasonic transducers (IUTs) and the velocity temperature dependence of the longitudinal wave propagating through thickness. IUT is successfully implemented on a small arm at 3 locations and results from several firing tests are presented. The small but systematic increase in ultrasonic time delay of less than 1 ns after each firing shot is reliably measured, in agreement with a simple 1D model of heat conduction, and measured temperature rises are consistent with the thicknesses at the different locations. The evaluation of the peak inner bore temperatures using IUT and their validation using eroding surface thermocouples at the same locations in the barrel are discussed.

  16. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system-for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave. PMID:27527183

  17. Laser spectroscopy for totally non-intrusive detection of oxygen in modified atmosphere food packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocola, L.; Fedel, M.; Poletto, L.; Tondello, G.

    2015-04-01

    A device for measuring the oxygen concentration inside packages in modified atmosphere working in a completely non-intrusive way has been developed and tested. The device uses tunable diode laser spectroscopy in a geometry similar to a short distance LIDAR: A laser beam is sent through the top film of a food package, and the absorption is measured by detecting the light scattered by the bottom of the container or by a portion of the food herein contained. The device can operate completely in a contactless way from the package, and the distances of absorption both outside and inside the package are measured with a triangulation system. The performances of the device have been tested for various types of containers, and absolute values for the oxygen concentration have been compared with standard albeit destructive measurements.

  18. Non-intrusive Packet-Layer Model for Monitoring Video Quality of IPTV Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Takanori

    Developing a non-intrusive packet-layer model is required to passively monitor the quality of experience (QoE) during service. We propose a packet-layer model that can be used to estimate the video quality of IPTV using quality parameters derived from transmitted packet headers. The computational load of the model is lighter than that of the model that takes video signals and/or video-related bitstream information such as motion vectors as input. This model is applicable even if the transmitted bitstream information is encrypted because it uses transmitted packet headers rather than bitstream information. For developing the model, we conducted three extensive subjective quality assessments for different encoders and decoders (codecs), and video content. Then, we modeled the subjective video quality assessment characteristics based on objective features affected by coding and packet loss. Finally, we verified the model's validity by applying our model to unknown data sets different from training data sets used above.

  19. Non-intrusive gesture recognition system combining with face detection based on Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Wang, Yuanqing; Xu, Liujing; Cao, Liqun; Han, Lei; Zhou, Biye; Li, Minggao

    2014-11-01

    A non-intrusive gesture recognition human-machine interaction system is proposed in this paper. In order to solve the hand positioning problem which is a difficulty in current algorithms, face detection is used for the pre-processing to narrow the search area and find user's hand quickly and accurately. Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is used for gesture recognition. A certain number of basic gesture units are trained as HMM models. At the same time, an improved 8-direction feature vector is proposed and used to quantify characteristics in order to improve the detection accuracy. The proposed system can be applied in interaction equipments without special training for users, such as household interactive television

  20. Evolution of optically nondestructive and data-non-intrusive credit card verifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Intaravanne, Yuttana

    2010-04-01

    Since the deployment of the credit card, the number of credit card fraud cases has grown rapidly with a huge amount of loss in millions of US dollars. Instead of asking more information from the credit card's holder or taking risk through payment approval, a nondestructive and data-non-intrusive credit card verifier is highly desirable before transaction begins. In this paper, we review optical techniques that have been proposed and invented in order to make the genuine credit card more distinguishable than the counterfeit credit card. Several optical approaches for the implementation of credit card verifiers are also included. In particular, we highlight our invention on a hyperspectral-imaging based portable credit card verifier structure that offers a very low false error rate of 0.79%. Other key features include low cost, simplicity in design and implementation, no moving part, no need of an additional decoding key, and adaptive learning.

  1. Evaluation of non-intrusive flow measurement techniques for a re-entry flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.; Santavicca, D. A.; Zimmermann, M.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates various non-intrusive techniques for the measurement of the flow field on the windward side of the Space Shuttle orbiter or a similar reentry vehicle. Included are linear (Rayleigh, Raman, Mie, Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Resonant Doppler Velocimetry) and nonlinear (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman, Laser-Induced Fluorescence) light scattering, electron-beam fluorescence, thermal emission, and mass spectroscopy. Flow-field properties were taken from a nonequilibrium flow model by Shinn, Moss, and Simmonds at the NASA Langley Research Center. Conclusions are, when possible, based on quantitative scaling of known laboratory results to the conditions projected. Detailed discussion with researchers in the field contributed further to these conclusions and provided valuable insights regarding the experimental feasibility of each of the techniques.

  2. Non-intrusive tunable resonant microwave cavity for optical detected magnetic resonance of NV centres in nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Bradac, Carlo; Volz, Thomas; Tobar, Michael E.; Castelletto, Stefania

    2013-12-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres is usually achieved by applying a microwave field delivered by micron-size wires, strips or antennas directly positioned in very close proximity (~ μm) of the nanodiamond crystals. The microwave field couples evanescently with the ground state spin transition of the NV centre (2.87 GHz at zero magnetic field), which results in a reduction of the centre photoluminescence. We propose an alternative approach based on the construction of a dielectric resonator. We show that such a resonator allows for the efficient detection of NV spins in nanodiamonds without the constraints associated to the laborious positioning of the microwave antenna next to the nanodiamonds, providing therefore improved flexibility. The resonator is based on a tunable Transverse Electric Mode in a dielectric-loaded cavity, and we demonstrate that the resonator can detect single NV centre spins in nanodiamonds using less microwave power than alternative techniques in a non-intrusive manner. This method can achieve higher precision measurement of ODMR of paramagnetic defects spin transition in the micro to millimetre-wave frequency domain. Our approach would permit the tracking of NV centres in biological solutions rather than simply on the surface, which is desirable in light of the recently proposed applications of using nanodiamonds containing NV centres for spin labelling in biological systems with single spin and single particle resolution.

  3. Non intrusive sensors -- An answer to annulus pressure monitoring in subsea wellhead equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamek, F.C.; Jennings, C.; Aarskog, A.

    1995-12-01

    On offshore platform and jackup surface wellhead completions, there is the potential for leakage from the high pressure production tubing and casing strings into the low pressure outer casing string, or from poor cementing jobs. Historically, these completions maintain the capability of regularly monitoring wellhead annulus pressure so that appropriate action can be taken should a leak be detected. In the past, subsea completions have been oil producers, however, gas production, extreme reservoir pressures, and deeper waters are becoming common place. Although subsea wellhead technology and reliability have significantly improved with the introduction of the metal-to-metal sealing system, the potential for annulus pressure buildup still exists. Up to the present, the ability to monitor pressure beyond the first casing string has been virtually non-existent. This paper describes the design, development, testing, and application of non intrusive sensor technology for pressure measurement in subsea wellheads and production trees. The data and test results define and describe the phenomenon of ``inverse magnetostriction``. This phenomenon allows magnetic sensors to non intrusively penetrate three to four inches of steel in a subsea wellhead housing and measure annulus pressure from less than 30 psi to more than 15,000 psi. In addition, test data, charts, and graphs illustrate the sensor`s capability of differentiating between pressure, tension, compression, and bending stress imposed on the wellhead. The electronic interface description details how the data is obtained from the sensors, stored, and later transmitted to existing control systems or to the user interface at the surface via an ROV.

  4. Contextualising Water Use in Residential Settings: A Survey of Non-Intrusive Techniques and Approaches.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Davide; Gluhak, Alex; McCann, Julie A; Beach, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Water monitoring in households is important to ensure the sustainability of fresh water reserves on our planet. It provides stakeholders with the statistics required to formulate optimal strategies in residential water management. However, this should not be prohibitive and appliance-level water monitoring cannot practically be achieved by deploying sensors on every faucet or water-consuming device of interest due to the higher hardware costs and complexity, not to mention the risk of accidental leakages that can derive from the extra plumbing needed. Machine learning and data mining techniques are promising techniques to analyse monitored data to obtain non-intrusive water usage disaggregation. This is because they can discern water usage from the aggregated data acquired from a single point of observation. This paper provides an overview of water usage disaggregation systems and related techniques adopted for water event classification. The state-of-the art of algorithms and testbeds used for fixture recognition are reviewed and a discussion on the prominent challenges and future research are also included. PMID:27213397

  5. Contextualising Water Use in Residential Settings: A Survey of Non-Intrusive Techniques and Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carboni, Davide; Gluhak, Alex; McCann, Julie A.; Beach, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Water monitoring in households is important to ensure the sustainability of fresh water reserves on our planet. It provides stakeholders with the statistics required to formulate optimal strategies in residential water management. However, this should not be prohibitive and appliance-level water monitoring cannot practically be achieved by deploying sensors on every faucet or water-consuming device of interest due to the higher hardware costs and complexity, not to mention the risk of accidental leakages that can derive from the extra plumbing needed. Machine learning and data mining techniques are promising techniques to analyse monitored data to obtain non-intrusive water usage disaggregation. This is because they can discern water usage from the aggregated data acquired from a single point of observation. This paper provides an overview of water usage disaggregation systems and related techniques adopted for water event classification. The state-of-the art of algorithms and testbeds used for fixture recognition are reviewed and a discussion on the prominent challenges and future research are also included. PMID:27213397

  6. PELAN for non-intrusive inspection of ordnance, containers, and vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holslin, Daniel T.; Shyu, Chaur-Ming; Sullivan, Robert A.; Vourvopoulos, George

    2006-05-01

    When neutrons interact with nuclei, the resulting energy of the interaction can be released in the form of gamma rays, whose energy is characteristic of the nucleus involved in the reaction. The PELAN (Pulsed Elemental Analysis with Neutrons) system uses a pulsed neutron generator and an integral thermalizing shield that induce reactions that cover most of the entire neutron energy range. The neutron generator uses a d-T reaction, which releases fast 14 MeV neutrons responsible for providing information on chemical elements such as C, N, and O. During the time period between pulses, the fast neutrons undergo multiple elastic and inelastic interactions that lower their energy making them easier to be captured by chemical elements, such as H and Cl. The PELAN system has been used for a number of applications where non-intrusive, non-destructive interrogation is needed. This report illustrates examples of its performance in interrogations for unexploded ordnance (UXO), landmines, large vehicle bombs and illicit drug detection.

  7. New Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive monitoring of the supply chain for nuclear materials has historically been hampered by non-intrusive inspection systems that have such large false alarm rates that they are impractical in the flow of commerce. Passport Systems, Inc. (Passport) has developed an active interrogation system which detects fissionable material, high Z material, and other contraband in land, sea and air cargo. Passport's design utilizes several detection modalities including high resolution imaging, passive radiation detection, effective-Z (EZ-3D™) anomaly detection, Prompt Neutrons from Photofission (PNPF), and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) isotopic identification. These technologies combine to: detect fissionable, high-Z, radioactive and contraband materials, differentiate fissionable materials from high-Z shielding materials, and isotopically identify actinides, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), and other contraband (e.g. explosives, drugs, nerve agents). Passport's system generates a 3-D image of the scanned object which contains information such as effective-Z and density, as well as a 2-D image and isotopic and fissionable information for regions of interest.

  8. Experiments using non-intrusive particle tracing techniques for granular chute flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosato, A.D.; Dave, R.N.; Fischer, I.S.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this contract was to develop a system capable of non-intrusively tracking the motion of an individual particle for the study of granular flows down inclined chutes. The result of the project is a system capable of following the three-dimensional translational and rotational motion of an individual particle embedded with a flowing granular material. The basic system consists of a sphere embedded with three orthogonal transmitters emitting at different frequencies which induce voltages in an antenna array surrounding the flow regime. Analysis of the induced voltage signals within the framework of a derived model yields both the position and orientation of the sphere. Tests were performed in a small scale model chute as well as in a cylindrical vibrated granular bed, which clearly demonstrates the capability of the system. As a result of discussions at meetings held semi-annually for the Granular Flow Advanced Research Objectives (GFARO) contractors, it was deemed necessary to pursue an additional experimental program as part of this contract related to the measurement of sphere collision properties. The outcome of the work (reported in Appendix C) is the determination of certain properties which are needed for use in computer simulations and theory.

  9. Non-intrusive detection of methanol in gas phase using infrared degenerate four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Sahlberg, A. L.; Nilsson, H.; Lundgren, E.; Zetterberg, J.

    2015-11-01

    Sensitive and non-intrusive detection of gas-phase methanol with high spatial and temporal resolution has for the first time been reported using mid-infrared degenerate four-wave mixing (IR-DFWM). IR-DFWM spectra of methanol have been successfully recorded in nitrogen-diluted gas flows at room temperature and at 300 °C, by probing ro-vibrational transitions belonging to the fundamental C-H stretching modes, ν 2 and ν 9, and the O-H stretching mode, ν 1. The detection limit of methanol vapor at room temperature and atmospheric pressure is estimated to be 250 ppm with the present setup. Potential interference from CH4 and CO2 is discussed from recorded IR-DFWM spectra of CH4 and CO2, and it was found that detection of methanol free from CH4 and CO2 interference is possible. These results show the potential of the detection of methanol with IR-DFWM for applications in both combustion and catalytic environments, such as CO2 hydrogenation and CH4 oxidation.

  10. [INVITED] Non-intrusive optical imaging of face to probe physiological traits in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Manar D.; Bobzien, Jonna L.; Harrington, John W.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2016-03-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) can impair non-verbal communication including the variety and extent of facial expressions in social and interpersonal communication. These impairments may appear as differential traits in the physiology of facial muscles of an individual with ASD when compared to a typically developing individual. The differential traits in the facial expressions as shown by facial muscle-specific changes (also known as 'facial oddity' for subjects with ASD) may be measured visually. However, this mode of measurement may not discern the subtlety in facial oddity distinctive to ASD. Earlier studies have used intrusive electrophysiological sensors on the facial skin to gauge facial muscle actions from quantitative physiological data. This study demonstrates, for the first time in the literature, novel quantitative measures for facial oddity recognition using non-intrusive facial imaging sensors such as video and 3D optical cameras. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved that pilot study has been conducted on a group of individuals consisting of eight participants with ASD and eight typically developing participants in a control group to capture their facial images in response to visual stimuli. The proposed computational techniques and statistical analyses reveal higher mean of actions in the facial muscles of the ASD group versus the control group. The facial muscle-specific evaluation reveals intense yet asymmetric facial responses as facial oddity in participants with ASD. This finding about the facial oddity may objectively define measurable differential markers in the facial expressions of individuals with ASD.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence for the non-intrusive diagnostics of a fuel droplet burning under microgravity in a drop shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Katsumasa; Segawa, Daisuke; Kadota, Toshikazu

    1999-10-01

    The laser-induced-fluorescence method has been employed for remote, non-intrusive and instantaneous measurements of a fuel droplet burning under microgravity. A fuel droplet was doped with naphthalene and TMPD. The fluorescence emission spectra from a droplet subjected to the incident nitrogen laser beam were measured with an image-intensifying optical multichannel analyser. The microgravity was generated in a capsule of a 100 m drop shaft. The results showed that the newly developed diagnostic system could be applied successfully for the simultaneous measurements of droplet temperature and diameters of the droplet, flame and soot shell under microgravity. The droplet temperature was determined from the measured ratio of fluorescence emission intensities at two different wavelengths. The soot shell was located in the vicinity of the droplet surface deep inside the flame during the early stage of the burning and moved away from the droplet with the elapse of time.

  12. Preliminary experimental results for a non-intrusive scheme for the detection of flaws in metal pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, K.; Shinde, S.; Suhail, M.; Vyas, A.; Zieher, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    An acoustic pulse echo scheme for non-intrusive detection of flaws in metal pipelines has been investigated in the laboratory. The primary pulse is generated by a pulsed magnetic field enclosing a short section of a free pipe. The detection is by an electrostatic detector surrounding a short section of the pipe. Reflected pulses from thin areas, with a longitudinal extension of about one pipe radius and a reduction of the wall thickness of 40%, can be detected clearly.

  13. A New, Non-Intrusive Ultrasonic TPS Recession Measurement Needed to Determine the Thermal Structure of the Upper Atmosphere of Venus, Saturn, Uranus or Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, J. A.; Stackpoole, M.; Venkatapathy, E.; Yuhas, D. E.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes new, non-intrusive ultrasonic instrumentation for measuring recession of ablative TPS during atmospheric entry and providing in-depth temperature profiles. The principles of operation and ablative TPS testing will be discussed.

  14. Predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech for cochlear implant listeners with a non-intrusive intelligibility measure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2012-01-01

    Reverberation is known to reduce the temporal envelope modulations present in the signal and affect the shape of the modulation spectrum. A non-intrusive intelligibility measure for reverberant speech is proposed motivated by the fact that the area of the modulation spectrum decreases with increasing reverberation. The proposed measure is based on the average modulation area computed across four acoustic frequency bands spanning the signal bandwidth. High correlations (r = 0.98) were observed with sentence intelligibility scores obtained by cochlear implant listeners. Proposed measure outperformed other measures including an intrusive speech-transmission index based measure. PMID:23710246

  15. Characterization Methods of Encapsulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibing; Law, Daniel; Lian, Guoping

    , reliable methods which can be used to characterize these properties of encapsulates are vital. In this chapter, the state-of-art of these methods, their principles and applications, and release mechanisms are described as follows.

  16. Non-Intrusive Sensor for In-Situ Measurement of Recession Rate of Ablative and Eroding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, George (Inventor); Tiliakos, Nicholas (Inventor); Benel, Gabriel (Inventor); Thomson, Clint (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A non-intrusive sensor for in-situ measurement of recession rate of heat shield ablatives. An ultrasonic wave source is carried in the housing. A microphone is also carried in the housing, for collecting the reflected ultrasonic waves from an interface surface of the ablative material. A time phasing control circuit is also included for time-phasing the ultrasonic wave source so that the waves reflected from the interface surface of the ablative material focus on the microphone, to maximize the acoustic pressure detected by the microphone and to mitigate acoustic velocity variation effects through the material through a de-coupling process that involves a software algorithm. A software circuit for computing the location off of which the ultrasonic waves scattered to focus back at the microphone is also included, so that the recession rate of the heat shield ablative may be monitored in real-time through the scan-focus approach.

  17. Investigation of non-premixed flame combustion characters in GO2/GH2 shear coaxial injectors using non-intrusive optical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jian; Yu, NanJia; Cai, GuoBiao

    2015-12-01

    Single-element combustor experiments are conducted for three shear coaxial geometry configuration injectors by using gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) as propellants. During the combustion process, several spatially and timeresolved non-intrusive optical techniques, such as OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), high speed imaging, and infrared imaging, are simultaneously employed to observe the OH radical concentration distribution, flame fluctuations, and temperature fields. The results demonstrate that the turbulent flow phenomenon of non-premixed flame exhibits a remarkable periodicity, and the mixing ratio becomes a crucial factor to influence the combustion flame length. The high speed and infrared images have a consistent temperature field trend. As for the OH-PLIF images, an intuitionistic local flame structure is revealed by single-shot instantaneous images. Furthermore, the means and standard deviations of OH radical intensity are acquired to provide statistical information regarding the flame, which may be helpful for validation of numerical simulations in future. Parameters of structure configurations, such as impinging angle and oxygen post thickness, play an important role in the reaction zone distribution. Based on a successful flame contour extraction method assembled with non-linear anisotropic diffusive filtering and variational level-set, it is possible to implement a fractal analysis to describe the fractal characteristics of the non-premixed flame contour. As a result, the flame front cannot be regarded as a fractal object. However, this turbulent process presents a self-similarity characteristic.

  18. Non-Intrusive Device for Real-Time Circulatory System Assessment with Advanced Signal Processing Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, E.; Postolache, O.; Girão, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a device that uses three cardiography signals to characterize several important parameters of a subject's circulatory system. Using electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmogram, and ballistocardiogram, three heart rate estimates are acquired from beat-to-beat time interval extraction. Furthermore, pre-ejection period, pulse transit time (PTT), and pulse arrival time (PAT) are computed, and their long-term evolution is analyzed. The system estimates heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) from the heart rate and PAT time series, to infer the activity of the cardiac autonomic system. The software component of the device evaluates the frequency content of HRV and BPV, and also their fractal dimension and entropy, thus providing a detailed analysis of the time series' regularity and complexity evolution, to allow personalized subject evaluation.

  19. Counting in the dark: non-intrusive laser scanning for population counting and identifying roosting bats.

    PubMed

    Azmy, Suzanna Noor; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Shafie, Nur Juliani; Ariffin, Azman; Majid, Zulkepli; Ismail, Muhamad Nor Akmal; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir

    2012-01-01

    Population surveys and species recognition for roosting bats are either based on capture, sight or optical-mechanical count methods. However, these methods are intrusive, are tedious and, at best, provide only statistical estimations. Here, we demonstrated the successful use of a terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) laser scanner for remotely identifying and determining the exact population of roosting bats in caves. LIDAR accurately captured the 3D features of the roosting bats and their spatial distribution patterns in minimal light. The high-resolution model of the cave enabled an exact count of the visibly differentiated Hipposideros larvatus and their roosting pattern within the 3D topology of the cave. We anticipate that the development of LIDAR will open up new research possibilities by allowing researchers to study roosting behaviour within the topographical context of a cave's internal surface, thus facilitating rigorous quantitative characterisations of cave roosting behaviour. PMID:22826802

  20. Counting in the dark: Non-intrusive laser scanning for population counting and identifying roosting bats

    PubMed Central

    Azmy, Suzanna Noor; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Shafie, Nur Juliani; Ariffin, Azman; Majid, Zulkepli; Ismail, Muhamad Nor Akmal; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir

    2012-01-01

    Population surveys and species recognition for roosting bats are either based on capture, sight or optical-mechanical count methods. However, these methods are intrusive, are tedious and, at best, provide only statistical estimations. Here, we demonstrated the successful use of a terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) laser scanner for remotely identifying and determining the exact population of roosting bats in caves. LIDAR accurately captured the 3D features of the roosting bats and their spatial distribution patterns in minimal light. The high-resolution model of the cave enabled an exact count of the visibly differentiated Hipposideros larvatus and their roosting pattern within the 3D topology of the cave. We anticipate that the development of LIDAR will open up new research possibilities by allowing researchers to study roosting behaviour within the topographical context of a cave's internal surface, thus facilitating rigorous quantitative characterisations of cave roosting behaviour. PMID:22826802

  1. Non-Intrusive and Quick Response Thermometry Using Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukaki, Toshiharu

    By using laser-induced thermal acoustics, we demonstrate a non-invasive and remote method to measure the speed of sound and temperature ranging from 278 K to 341 K in distilled water at atmospheric pressure. The accuracies of the measured speed of sound and temperature were found to be 3% and 4%, respectively. Single-shot precisions based on three standard deviations of 20 samples were within 4% for the speed of sound and the temperature. The time resolution for each measurement was 300 ns.

  2. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Scudiere, Matthew B.

    1993-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  3. A plasma-based non-intrusive point source for acoustic beamforming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Bertolucci, Brandon; Li, Jian; Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2015-05-01

    A laser-generated plasma acoustic point source is used to directly measure the point spread function (PSF) of a microphone phased array. In beamforming analysis of microphone phased array data, the true acoustic field is convolved with the array's PSF. By directly measuring the PSF, corrections to the array analysis can be computed and applied. The acoustic source is measured in an open-jet aeroacoustic facility to evaluate the effects of sampling rate, microphone installation, source shift, reflections, shear layer refraction and model presence. Results show that measurements exhibit behavior consistent with theory with regard to source shift and shear layer refraction. Application of a measured PSF in beamforming analysis shows that the process provides an effective in situ method for array calibration both with and without flow and allows for corrections to incorporate reflections and scattering. The technique improves the agreement of beamforming results with the true spectrum of a known source, especially in the presence of reflections.

  4. Aerosol characterization with lidar methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Matsui, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol component analysis methods for characterizing aerosols were developed for various types of lidars including polarization-sensitive Mie scattering lidars, multi-wavelength Raman scattering lidars, and multi-wavelength highspectral- resolution lidars. From the multi-parameter lidar data, the extinction coefficients for four aerosol components can be derived. The microphysical parameters such as single scattering albedo and effective radius can be also estimated from the derived aerosol component distributions.

  5. Advanced Fine Particulate Characterization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Lingbu Kong; Alexander Azenkeng; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Edwin Olson; Jill MacKenzie; A.M. Rokanuzzaman

    2007-01-31

    The characterization and control of emissions from combustion sources are of significant importance in improving local and regional air quality. Such emissions include fine particulate matter, organic carbon compounds, and NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} gases, along with mercury and other toxic metals. This project involved four activities including Further Development of Analytical Techniques for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} Characterization and Source Apportionment and Management, Organic Carbonaceous Particulate and Metal Speciation for Source Apportionment Studies, Quantum Modeling, and High-Potassium Carbon Production with Biomass-Coal Blending. The key accomplishments included the development of improved automated methods to characterize the inorganic and organic components particulate matter. The methods involved the use of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for the inorganic fraction and a combination of extractive methods combined with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure to characterize the organic fraction. These methods have direction application for source apportionment studies of PM because they provide detailed inorganic analysis along with total organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) quantification. Quantum modeling using density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to further elucidate a recently developed mechanistic model for mercury speciation in coal combustion systems and interactions on activated carbon. Reaction energies, enthalpies, free energies and binding energies of Hg species to the prototype molecules were derived from the data obtained in these calculations. Bimolecular rate constants for the various elementary steps in the mechanism have been estimated using the hard-sphere collision theory approximation, and the results seem to indicate that extremely fast kinetics could be involved in these surface reactions. Activated carbon was produced from a blend of lignite coal from the Center Mine in North Dakota and

  6. Detection of ethene and other hydrocarbons in gas turbine engine exhaust using non-intrusive FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigone, Giovanni M.; Welch, Michael A.; Hilton, Moira; Miller, Michael N.; Wilson, Christopher W.

    2003-04-01

    obtained by traversing the probe across a horizontal plane through the centerline could be compared with non-intrusive measurements made by scanning vertically. Adjustments have been made to account for the 20 cm downstream offset in measurement planes of the probe and the spectrometer behind the nozzle exit.

  7. Damage assessment using advanced non-intrusive inspection methods: integration of space, UAV, GPR, and field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Pilakoutas, Kypros; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2014-08-01

    The predominant approach for conducting road condition surveys and analyses is still largely based on extensive field observations. However, visual assessment alone cannot identify the actual extent and severity of damage. New non-invasive and cost-effective non-destructive (NDT) remote sensing technologies can be used to monitor road pavements across their life cycle, including remotely sensed aerial and satellite visual and thermal image (AI) data, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Spectroscopy and Ground Penetrating Radar (GRP). These non-contact techniques can be used to obtain surface and sub-surface information about damage in road pavements, including the crack depth, and in-depth structural failure. Thus, a smart and cost-effective methodology is required that integrates several of these non-destructive/ no-contact techniques for the damage assessment and monitoring at different levels. This paper presents an overview of how an integration of the above technologies can be used to conduct detailed road condition surveys. The proposed approach can also be used to predict the future needs for road maintenance; this information is proven to be valuable to a strategic decision making tools that optimizes maintenance based on resources and environmental issues.

  8. Characterization methods for fractured glacial tills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a literature review of methods successfully employed to characterize finegrained and fractured or unfractured glacial deposits. Descriptions and examples are given for four major categories of characterization methods: physical, hydraulic, chemical, and indirect. Characterization methods have evolved significantly within the past ten years; however, there still exists uncertainty about the reliability of individual characterization methods applied to till deposits. Therefore, a combination of methods is best, the choice of which depends on the objectives of the work. Sampling methods, sampling scales, and reporting methods are extremely important and should be considered when interpreting and comparing results between sites. Recognition of these issues is necessary to ensure that decisions regarding the transport of fluids in fractured tills are not based on the assumption that poorly permeable tills are always an inhibitor of subsurface flow.

  9. Evaluation of Electrochemical Methods for Electrolyte Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents summer research efforts in an attempt to develop an electrochemical method of characterizing electrolytes. The ultimate objective of the characterization would be to determine the composition and corrosivity of Martian soil. Results are presented using potentiodynamic scans, Tafel extrapolations, and resistivity tests in a variety of water-based electrolytes.

  10. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V. |; Morrison, H.F. |

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Minimizing Characterization - Derived Waste at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Amidon, M. B.; Reboul, S. H.

    2002-02-25

    Environmental restoration activities at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) utilize innovative site characterization approaches and technologies that minimize waste generation. Characterization is typically conducted in phases, first by collecting large quantities of inexpensive data, followed by targeted minimally invasive drilling to collect depth-discrete soil/groundwater data, and concluded with the installation of permanent multi-level groundwater monitoring wells. Waste-reducing characterization methods utilize non-traditional drilling practices (sonic drilling), minimally intrusive (geoprobe, cone penetrometer) and non-intrusive (3-D seismic, ground penetration radar, aerial monitoring) investigative tools. Various types of sensor probes (moisture sensors, gamma spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, laser induced and X-ray fluorescence) and hydrophobic membranes (FLUTe) are used in conjunction with depth-discrete sampling techniques to obtain high-resolution 3-D plume profiles. Groundwater monitoring (short/long-term) approaches utilize multi-level sampling technologies (Strata-Sampler, Cone-Sipper, Solinst Waterloo, Westbay) and low-cost diffusion samplers for seepline/surface water sampling. Upon collection of soil and groundwater data, information is portrayed in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) format for interpretation and planning purposes. At the SRS, the use of non-traditional drilling methods and minimally/non intrusive investigation approaches along with in-situ sampling methods has minimized waste generation and improved the effectiveness and efficiency of characterization activities.

  12. Combustion behaviors of GO2/GH2 swirl-coaxial injector using non-intrusive optical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GuoBiao, Cai; Jian, Dai; Yang, Zhang; NanJia, Yu

    2016-06-01

    This research evaluates the combustion behaviors of a single-element, swirl-coaxial injector in an atmospheric combustion chamber with gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) as the propellants. A brief simulated flow field schematic comparison between a shear-coaxial injector and the swirl-coaxial injector reveals the distribution characteristics of the temperature field and streamline patterns. Advanced optical diagnostics, i.e., OH planar laser-induced fluorescence and high-speed imaging, are simultaneously employed to determine the OH radical spatial distribution and flame fluctuations, respectively. The present study focuses on the flame structures under varying O/F mixing ratios and center oxygen swirl intensities. The combined use of several image-processing methods aimed at OH instantaneous images, including time-averaged, root-mean-square, and gradient transformation, provides detailed information regarding the distribution of the flow field. The results indicate that the shear layers anchored on the oxygen injector lip are the main zones of chemical heat release and that the O/F mixing ratio significantly affects the flame shape. Furthermore, with high-speed imaging, an intuitionistic ignition process and several consecutive steady-state images reveal that lean conditions make it easy to drive the combustion instabilities and that the center swirl intensity has a moderate influence on the flame oscillation strength. The results of this study provide a visualized analysis for future optimal swirl-coaxial injector designs.

  13. Non-Intrusive Cable Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A cable tester is described for low frequency testing of a cable for faults. The tester allows for testing a cable beyond a point where a signal conditioner is installed, minimizing the number of connections which have to be disconnected. A magnetic pickup coil is described for detecting a test signal injected into the cable. A narrow bandpass filter is described for increasing detection of the test signal. The bandpass filter reduces noise so that a high gain amplifier provided for detecting a test signal is not completely saturate by noise. To further increase the accuracy of the cable tester, processing gain is achieved by comparing the signal from the amplifier with at least one reference signal emulating the low frequency input signal injected into the cable. Different processing techniques are described evaluating a detected signal.

  14. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Ericsson, Maria; Distel, Robert J; Ivanov, Alexander R; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize ECVs. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some ECVs-specific evidence. Characterization of ECVs has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, flow cytometry, cryo-electron microscopy instruments, and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face. PMID:22973237

  15. Alternative Methods for Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Ericsson, Maria; Distel, Robert J.; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell–cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize ECVs. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some ECVs-specific evidence. Characterization of ECVs has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, flow cytometry, cryo-electron microscopy instruments, and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face. PMID:22973237

  16. Characterization methods for ultrasonic test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, L.J.; Becker, F.L.; Bowey, R.E.; Doctor, S.R.; Gribble, R.P.; Posakony, G.J.

    1982-07-01

    Methods for the characterization of ultrasonic transducers (search units) and instruments are presented. The instrument system is considered as three separate components consisting of a transducer, a receiver-display, and a pulser. The operation of each component is assessed independently. The methods presented were chosen because they provide the greatest amount of information about component operation and were not chosen based upon such conditions as cost, ease of operation, field implementation, etc. The results of evaluating a number of commercially available ultrasonic test instruments are presented.

  17. Method Of Characterizing An Electrode Binder

    DOEpatents

    Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Coco, Isabelle; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1999-05-11

    In a method of characterizing a polymer binder for cell electrodes in contact with an electrolyte and including a current collector and a paste containing an electrochemically active material and said binder, a spreading coefficient of the binder on the active material is calculated from the measured angle of contact between standard liquids and the active material and the binder, respectively. An interaction energy of the binder with the electrolyte is calculated from the measured angle of contact between the electrolyte and the binder. The binder is selected such that the spreading coefficient is less than zero and the interaction energy is at least 60 mJ/m.sup.2.

  18. Neural network method for characterizing video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuangquan; Zhao, Dazun

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents a neural network method for characterizing color video camera. A multilayer feedforward network with the error back-propagation learning rule for training, is used as a nonlinear transformer to model a camera, which realizes a mapping from the CIELAB color space to RGB color space. With SONY video camera, D65 illuminant, Pritchard Spectroradiometer, 410 JIS color charts as training data and 36 charts as testing data, results show that the mean error of training data is 2.9 and that of testing data is 4.0 in a 2563 RGB space.

  19. Automated Weld Characterization Using the Thermoelectric Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effective assessment of the integrity of welds is a complicated NDE problem that continues to be a challenge. To be able to completely characterize a weld, detailed knowledge of its tensile strength, ductility, hardness, microstructure, macrostructure, and chemical composition is needed. NDE techniques which can provide information on any of these features are extremely important. In this paper, we examine a seldom used approach based on the thermoelectric (TE) effect for characterizing welds and their associated heat affected zone (HAZ). The thermoelectric method monitors the thermoelectric power which is sensitive to small changes in the kinetics of the conduction electrons near the Fermi surface that can be caused by changes in the local microstructure. The technique has been applied to metal sorting, quality testing, flaw detection, thickness gauging of layers, and microscopic structural analysis. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique for characterizing welds, a series of tungsten-inert-gas welded Inconel-718 samples were scanned with a computer controlled TE probe. The samples were then analyzed using a scanning electron microscope and Rockwell hardness tests to characterize the weld and the associated HAZ. We then correlated the results with the TE measurements to provide quantitative information on the size of the HAZ and the degree of hardness of the material in the weld region. This provides potentially valuable information on the strength and fatigue life of the weld. We begin the paper by providing a brief review of the TE technique and then highlight some of the factors that can effect the measurements. Next, we provide an overview of the experimental procedure and discuss the results. Finally, we summarize our findings and consider areas for future research.

  20. A method for characterizing photon radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, J.J.; Hsu, H.H.; Hsieh, F.H.; Borak, T.B.

    1999-04-01

    Uncertainty in dosimetric and exposure rate measurements can increase in areas where multi-directional and low-energy photons (< 100 keV) exist because of variations in energy and angular measurement response. Also, accurate measurement of external exposures in spatially non-uniform fields may require multiple dosimetry. Therefore, knowledge of the photon fields in the workplace is required for full understanding of the accuracy of dosimeters and instruments, and for determining the need for multiple dosimeters. This project was designed to develop methods to characterize photon radiation fields in the workplace, and to test the methods in a plutonium facility. The photon field at selected work locations was characterized using TLDs and a collimated NaI(Tl) detector from which spatial variations in photon energy distributions were calculated from measured spectra. Laboratory results showed the accuracy and utility of the method. Field measurement results combined with observed work patterns suggested the following: (1) workers are exposed from all directions, but not isotropically, (2) photon energy distributions were directionally dependent, (3) stuffing nearby gloves into the glovebox reduced exposure rates significantly, (4) dosimeter placement on the front of the chest provided for a reasonable estimate of the average dose equivalent to workers` torsos, (5) justifiable conclusions regarding the need for multiple dosimetry can be made using this quantitative method, and (6) measurements of the exposure rates with ionization chambers pointed with open beta windows toward the glovebox provided the highest measured rates, although absolute accuracy of the field measurements still needs to be assessed.

  1. REVIEW OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS USED FOR CHARACTERIZING BRINE POCKETS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, S. N.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Pant (WIPP) is a deep geologic repository built and operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for disposal of radioactive transuranic waste. The repository is located in the southeastern part of New Mexico at 658.5 m from the surface in the bedded salt deposit (Salado Formation) of the Delaware Basin. Pressurized brine reservoirs were encountered while drilling (1mile north) into the Castile Formation which underlies the WIPP repository. Typically these pockets are located below 1000m which precludes use of high resolution surface geophysical methods. The operator decided to use direct borehole logging and time domain electromagnetic induction method (TDEM) to characterize the possible existence of brine pockets under the WIPP underground workings. The scope of the present review is limited to TDEM analysis only. The geophysical loggings of boreholes are an integral part of subsurface drilling and provide isolated point-samples of the drilled interior. The geophysical logs are typically records of the electrical properties (resistivity logs) of the subsurface strata and logging process is relatively more direct and intrusive. The TDEM is a surface geophysical technique which is non-intrusive with low spatial frequency resolution and provides averaged information about the subsurface units. In the TDEM method, electrical impulses are provided into the subsurface via large electrical coils on the surface. The recording of subsequent transient decay functions from receiver coils provides the data used in the analysis. Due to the depth involved at the WIPP site large transmitter loops (500m by 500m) were required. The primary geophysical characteristic being exploited to investigate the brines at the WIPP site is related to the fact that the brine saturated rocks are electrically more conductive than the bedded salt deposit overlying the Castile Formation. Typically the TDEM data are processed and analyzed to generate geoelectric profiles

  2. Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for characterizing optical materials, using steps and equipment for generating a coherent laser light, filtering the light to remove high order spatial components, collecting the filtered light and forming a parallel light beam, splitting the parallel beam into a first direction and a second direction wherein the parallel beam travelling in the second direction travels toward the material sample so that the parallel beam passes through the sample, applying various physical quantities to the sample, reflecting the beam travelling in the first direction to produce a first reflected beam, reflecting the beam that passes through the sample to produce a second reflected beam that travels back through the sample, combining the second reflected beam after it travels back though the sample with the first reflected beam, sensing the light beam produced by combining the first and second reflected beams, and processing the sensed beam to determine sample characteristics and properties.

  3. A method for characterizing volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Bayhurst, G.K.; Wohletz, K.H.; Mason, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The development of an automated program for characterization of particles using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS) has greatly reduced the time required for analysis of particulate samples. The SEM system provides a digital representation of all particles scanned such that further measurement of the size, shape, and area are a product of image processing. The EDS and associated software provides information as to the particles' chemical composition. The data obtained from the SEM by this method are reduced by computer to obtain distribution graphs for size, density, shape, and mineralogy. These SEM results have been tested by comparisons with results obtained by traditional optical microscopy, which supports the results and provide details concerning crystallinity and glass content. This method was applied to the ash that damaged the engines from the KLM 747 flight of December 15, 1989 while encountering the ash cloud from Redoubt Volcano. The sample was collected from the pitot-static system and had not been exposed to any engine parts that might have changed its characteristics. The sample analysis presented here demonstrates the capabilities and information obtainable from out automated SEM technique. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Adaptive characterization method for desktop color printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hui-Liang; Zheng, Zhi-Huan; Jin, Chong-Chao; Du, Xin; Shao, Si-Jie; Xin, John H.

    2013-04-01

    With the rapid development of multispectral imaging technique, it is desired that the spectral color can be accurately reproduced using desktop color printers. However, due to the specific spectral gamuts determined by printer inks, it is almost impossible to exactly replicate the reflectance spectra in other media. In addition, as ink densities can not be individually controlled, desktop printers can only be regarded as red-green-blue devices, making physical models unfeasible. We propose a locally adaptive method, which consists of both forward and inverse models, for desktop printer characterization. In the forward model, we establish the adaptive transform between control values and reflectance spectrum on individual cellular subsets by using weighted polynomial regression. In the inverse model, we first determine the candidate space of the control values based on global inverse regression and then compute the optimal control values by minimizing the color difference between the actual spectrum and the predicted spectrum via forward transform. Experimental results show that the proposed method can reproduce colors accurately for different media under multiple illuminants.

  5. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  6. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  7. Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves and Standard Penetration Test for Sub-Soil Characterization: A Comparison Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) is a method used for sub-soil characterization. SASW has the advantage of being non-intrusive and non-invasive. Commonly used in current geotechnical engineering for being faster and cheaper than other laboratory tests. Standard Penetration test (SPT), which is used to obtain stratigraphic profiles of the sub-soil, contrary to SASW test, is invasive, destructive and not less important, expensive. The SASW method uses dispersive characteristics of Rayleigh waves in stratified or half-space media to obtain their physical parameters and henceforward its characterization. From this, a soil profile is estimated. A comparison between a geophysical method, Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW), and the N-value obtained from a classic geotechnical test (SPT) to estimate and characterize the in-site sub-soil properties at Patillas Dam, Puerto Rico, will be given in this work.

  8. Non-Intrusive, Laser-Based Imaging of Jet-A Fuel Injection and Combustion Species in High Pressure, Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Randy J.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Anderson, Robert C.; deGroot, Wilhelmus A.

    2001-01-01

    The emphasis of combustion research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is on collaborating with industry to design and test gas-turbine combustors and subcomponents for both sub- and supersonic applications. These next-generation aircraft combustors are required to meet strict international environmental restrictions limiting emissions. To meet these goals, innovative combustor concepts require operation at temperatures and pressures far exceeding those of cur-rent designs. New and innovative diagnostic tools are necessary to characterize these flow streams since existing methods are inadequate. The combustion diagnostics team at GRC has implemented a suite of highly sensitive, nonintrusive optical imaging methods to diagnose the flowfields of these new engine concepts. By using optically accessible combustors and flametubes, imaging of fuel and intermediate combustion species via planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) at realistic pressures are now possible. Direct imaging of the fuel injection process through both planar Mie scattering and PLIF methods is also performed. Additionally, a novel combination of planar fuel fluorescence imaging and computational analysis allows a 3-D examination of the flowfield, resulting in spatially and temporally resolved fuel/air volume distribution maps. These maps provide detailed insight into the fuel injection process at actual conditions, thereby greatly enhancing the evaluation of fuel injector performance and other combustion phenomena. Stable species such as CO2, O2, N2O. and hydrocarbons are also investigated by a newly demonstrated 1-D, spontaneous Raman spectroscopic method. This visible wavelength Raman technique allows the acquisition of quantitative. stable species concentration measurements from the flow.

  9. Non-Intrusive, Laser-Based Imaging of Jet-A Fuel Injection and Combustion Species in High Pressure, Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; deGroot, W. A.

    2000-01-01

    The emphasis of combustion research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is on collaborating with industry to design and test gas-turbine combustors and subcomponents for both sub- and supersonic applications. These next-generation aircraft combustors are required to meet strict international environmental restrictions limiting emissions. To meet these goals, innovative combustor concepts require operation at temperatures and pressures far exceeding those of current designs. New and innovative diagnostic tools are necessary to characterize these flow streams since existing methods are inadequate. The combustion diagnostics team at GRC has implemented a suite of highly sensitive, nonintrusive optical imaging methods to diagnose the flowfields of these new engine concepts. By using optically accessible combustors and flame-tubes, imaging of fuel and intermediate combustion species via planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) at realistic pressures are now possible. Direct imaging of the fuel injection process through both planar Mie scattering and PLIF methods is also performed. Additionally, a novel combination of planar fuel fluorescence imaging and computational analysis allows a 3-D examination of the flowfield, resulting in spatially and temporally resolved fuel/air volume distribution maps. These maps provide detailed insight into the fuel injection process at actual conditions, thereby greatly enhancing the evaluation of fuel injector performance and other combustion phenomena. Stable species such as CO2, O2, N2, H2O, and hydrocarbons are also investigated by a newly demonstrated 1-D, spontaneous Raman spectroscopic method. This visible wavelength Raman technique allows the acquisition of quantitative, stable species concentration measurements from the flow.

  10. Non-intrusive OSNR measurement of polarization-multiplexed signals with spectral shaping and subject to fiber non-linearity with minimum channel spacing of 37.5GHz.

    PubMed

    Gariépy, Daniel; Searcy, Steven; He, Gang; Tibuleac, Sorin

    2016-09-01

    A non-intrusive OSNR measurement technique relying on the detailed spectral comparison of an optical signal with its "noise-free" spectrum is described, including mathematical basis, validity conditions and algorithmic steps. The technique's performance is experimentally demonstrated with 100G PM-QPSK and 200G PM-16QAM signals subject to fiber non-linearity induced by 100G PM-QPSK and 10G NRZ-OOK neighbors. The OSNR measurement performance is also demonstrated when root-raised cosine spectral shaping is applied to the signals, with channel spacings of 50GHz and 37.5GHz. Experimental results for OSNR levels up to 30dB and launch powers up to 3dB above the optimum BER launch conditions are shown for different system and signal configurations. PMID:27607623

  11. General Characterization Methods for Photoelectrochemical Cells for Solar Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinjian; Cai, Lili; Ma, Ming; Zheng, Xiaolin; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2015-10-12

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting is a very promising technology that converts water into clean hydrogen fuel and oxygen by using solar light. However, the characterization methods for PEC cells are diverse and a systematic introduction to characterization methods for PEC cells has rarely been attempted. Unlike most other review articles that focus mainly on the material used for the working electrodes of PEC cells, this review introduces general characterization methods for PEC cells, including their basic configurations and methods for characterizing their performance under various conditions, regardless of the materials used. Detailed experimental operation procedures with theoretical information are provided for each characterization method. The PEC research area is rapidly expanding and more researchers are beginning to devote themselves to related work. Therefore, the content of this Minireview can provide entry-level knowledge to beginners in the area of PEC, which might accelerate progress in this area. PMID:26365789

  12. Comparison of Module Performance Characterization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    KROPOSKI,B.; MARION,W.; KING,DAVID L.; BOYSON,WILLIAM EARL; KRATOCHVIL,JAY A.

    2000-10-03

    The rating and modeling of photovoltaic PW module performance has been of concern to manufacturers and system designers for over 20 years. Both the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have developed methodologies to predict module and array performance under actual operating conditions. This paper compares the two methods of determining the performance of PV modules, The methods translate module performance to actual or reference conditions using slightly different approaches. The accuracy of both methods is compared for both hourly, daily, and annual energy production over a year of data recorded at NREL in Golden, CO. The comparison of the two methods will be presented for five different PV module technologies.

  13. A thermoluminescent method for aerosol characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    A thermoluminescent method has been used to study the interactions of aerosols with ozone. The preliminary results show that ozone reacts with many compounds found in aerosols, and that the thermoluminescence curves obtained from ozonated aerosols are characteristic of the aerosol. The results suggest several important applications of the thermoluminescent method: development of a detector for identification of effluent sources; a sensitive experimental tool for study of heterogeneous chemistry; evaluation of importance of aerosols in atmospheric chemistry; and study of formation of toxic, electronically excited species in airborne particles.

  14. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Samuel E.; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing “minigene” in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest. PMID:26721495

  15. Methods of characterization of synthetic opal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryukin, A. V.; Akhmadeev, A. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2013-12-01

    We developed methods for determination of thickness, number of layers and filling fraction of silica particles for synthetic opals. We show that the filling fraction is considerably less than for ideal close-packed structure, which is important for practical and theoretical applications.

  16. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Loren A.; Michel, David J.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  17. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Sampling and Analysis Methods Manual (Methods Manual) provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP.

  18. Dialysis: a characterization method of aggregation tendency.

    PubMed

    Pesarrodona, Mireia; Unzueta, Ugutz; Vázquez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    All researchers immersed in the world of recombinant protein production are in agreement that often the production and purification process of a protein can become a nightmare due to an unexpected behavior of the protein at different protocol stages. Once the protein is purified, scientists know that they still cannot relax. There is a decisive last step missing: performing a protein dialysis in a suitable buffer for subsequent experimental trials. Here is when we can find proteins that precipitate during dialysis by buffer-related factors (ionic strength, pH, etc.), which are intrinsic to each protein and are difficult to predict. How can we find the buffer in which a protein is more stable and with less tendency to precipitate? In this chapter we go over possible factors affecting the protein precipitation tendency during the dialysis process and describe a general dialysis protocol with tricks to reduce protein aggregation. Furthermore, we propose a fast method to detect the most appropriate buffer for the stability of a particular protein, performing microdialysis on a battery of different buffers to measure afterwards precipitation by a colorimetric method, and thus being able to choose the most suitable buffer for the dialysis of a given protein. PMID:25447873

  19. ASTM test methods for composite characterization and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the American Society for Testing and Materials is given. Under the topic of composite materials characterization and evaluation, general industry practice and test methods for textile composites are presented.

  20. A computational method for automated characterization of genetic components.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Boyan; Dalchau, Neil; Grant, Paul K; Pedersen, Michael; Emmott, Stephen; Haseloff, Jim; Phillips, Andrew

    2014-08-15

    The ability to design and construct synthetic biological systems with predictable behavior could enable significant advances in medical treatment, agricultural sustainability, and bioenergy production. However, to reach a stage where such systems can be reliably designed from biological components, integrated experimental and computational techniques that enable robust component characterization are needed. In this paper we present a computational method for the automated characterization of genetic components. Our method exploits a recently developed multichannel experimental protocol and integrates bacterial growth modeling, Bayesian parameter estimation, and model selection, together with data processing steps that are amenable to automation. We implement the method within the Genetic Engineering of Cells modeling and design environment, which enables both characterization and design to be integrated within a common software framework. To demonstrate the application of the method, we quantitatively characterize a synthetic receiver device that responds to the 3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone signal, across a range of experimental conditions. PMID:24628037

  1. Method for material characterization in a non-anechoic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pometcu, L.; Sharaiha, A.; Benzerga, R.; Tamas, R. D.; Pouliguen, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a characterization method for extracting the reflection coefficient of materials and the real part of their permittivity. The characterization is performed in a real environment, as opposed to the classical measurement methods that require an anechoic chamber. In order to reduce the effects of the multipath propagation, a free space bistatic measurement was performed at different distances material-antennas in far field. By using a Teflon sample and a commercial absorbing material sample, measurements have been performed in order to validate the characterization technique.

  2. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Suermann, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits.

  3. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  4. Semi-automated potentiometric titration method for uranium characterization.

    PubMed

    Cristiano, B F G; Delgado, J U; da Silva, J W S; de Barros, P D; de Araújo, R M S; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    The manual version of the potentiometric titration method has been used for certification and characterization of uranium compounds. In order to reduce the analysis time and the influence of the analyst, a semi-automatic version of the method was developed in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission. The method was applied with traceability assured by using a potassium dichromate primary standard. The combined standard uncertainty in determining the total concentration of uranium was around 0.01%, which is suitable for uranium characterization. PMID:22154105

  5. New Laboratory Methods for Characterizing the Immersion Factors for Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; DAlimonte, Davide; vaderLinde, Dirk; Brown, James W.

    2003-01-01

    The experimental determination of the immersion factor, I(sub f)(lambda), of irradiance collectors is a requirement of any in-water radiometer. The eighth SeaWiFS Intercalibration Round-Robin Experiment (SIRREX-8) showed different implementations, at different laboratories, of the same I(sub f)(lambda) measurement protocol. The different implementations make use of different setups, volumes, and water types. Consequently, they exhibit different accuracies and require different execution times for characterizing an irradiance sensor. In view of standardizing the characterization of I(sub f)(lambda) values for in-water radiometers, together with an increase in the accuracy of methods and a decrease in the execution time, alternative methods are presented, and assessed versus the traditional method. The proposed new laboratory methods include: a) the continuous method, in which optical measurements taken with discrete water depths are substituted by continuous profiles created by removing the water from the water vessel at a constant flow rate (which significantly reduces the time required for the characterization of a single radiometer); and b) the Compact Portable Advanced Characterization Tank (ComPACT) method, in which the commonly used large tanks are replaced by a small water vessel, thereby allowing the determination of I(sub f)(lambda) values with a small water volume, and more importantly, permitting I(sub f)(lambda) characterizations with pure water. Intercomparisons between the continuous and the traditional method showed results within the variance of I(sub f) (lambda) determinations. The use of the continuous method, however, showed a much shorter realization time. Intercomparisons between the ComPACT and the traditional method showed generally higher I(sub f)(lambda) values for the former. This is in agreement with the generalized expectations of a reduction in scattering effects, because of the use of pure water with the ComPACT method versus the use of

  6. Novel scanner characterization method for color measurement and diagnostics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bong-Sun; Bala, Raja; Sharma, Gaurav

    2006-02-01

    We propose a novel scanner characterization approach for applications requiring color measurement of hardcopy output in printer calibration, characterization, and diagnostic applications. It is assumed that a typical printed medium comprises the three basic colorants C, M, Y. The proposed method is particularly advantageous when additional colorants are used in the print (e.g. black (K)). A family of scanner characterization targets is constructed, each varying in C, M, Y and at a fixed level of K. A corresponding family of 3-D scanner characterizations is derived, one for each level of K. Each characterization maps scanner RGB to a colorimetric representation such as CIELAB, using standard characterization techniques. These are then combined into a single 4-D characterization mapping RGBK to CIELAB. A refinement of the technique improves performance significantly by using a function of the scanned values for K (e.g. the scanner's green channel response to printed K) instead of the digital K value directly. This makes this new approach more robust with respect to variations in printed K over time. Secondly it enables, with a single scanner characterization, accurate color measurement of prints from different printers within the same family. Results show that the 4-D characterization technique can significantly outperform standard 3-D approaches especially in cases where the image being scanned is a patch target made up of unconstrained CMYK combinations. Thus the algorithm finds particular use in printer characterization and diagnostic applications. The method readily generalizes to printed media containing other (e.g "hi-fi") colorants, and also to other image capture devices such as digital cameras.

  7. Exploration soil gas methods that reduce site characterization costs

    SciTech Connect

    Pyron, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    Initial site characterization of impacted or suspected sites is the most important portion of an integrated environmental remediation program. By use of passive soil gas (PSG) characterization methods, the author has saved his clients significant sums of money by expediting the characterization phase of a project, thus eliminating unnecessary drilling and sampling. He has also been able to advance remedial response by allowing better design of the characterization program. Several commercial products are available which incorporate the principals of the PSG methodology described herein. Using a decidedly low tech approach, the PSG methodology described herein can be used to identify impacted areas on a given site prior to installation of soil borings and monitorings wells. The method is low impact and does not attract unwanted attention to a potentially impacted site. Given the passive nature of the method; it allows a more accurate evaluation of subsurface soil gas conditions, and allows placement of subsequent subsurface tests (whether soil borings or monitoring wells) in optium positions for accurate characterization. This approach minimizes the number of wells needed to characterize a site, eliminates over-characterization and unnecessary drilling, and provides lateral data which in turn allows a client to determine the extent of any liability on a select property. By identifying the extent of his problem, the client can more realistically evaluate his liability and project a budget for completion of remediation. It also allows him to more easily identify the most effective remediation approach. The PSG method allows rapid characterization and priortization of multiple sites, thus allowing a more effective use of environmental budgets.

  8. Technical Advice and Support for the Joint Integrated Non-Intrusive Inspection (JINII) Program Task 2.2 Transmission Digital Radiography (DR)

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H; Chinn, D; Pincus, C

    2011-03-03

    The Cargo Advanced Automated Radiography System (CAARS) program aims to utilize advanced radiographic systems to detect radiological and nuclear threats. Validation of initial design and testing concepts is a precondition for prototype system development and large-scale deployment. As expected, Depleted Uranium (DU) is a valid surrogate for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in CAARS Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) performance field-tests of transmission radiography systems. Dual-energy transmission measurements of DU are nearly identical to SNM, and are distinct from lower Z materials, provided the samples are matched to equal areal density. Results from an alternative method, using samples of equal thickness, showed sample discrimination by material density, rather than by atomic number (Z). The transmission measurements of DU and SNM were made with equipment that is nearly identical to current field systems. X-ray source beams at endpoint energies of 5.4 MeV and 9.6 MeV were used to measure transmission through the selected sample materials. The ratio of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient times length ({micro}L) at 5.4 MeV, to {micro}L at 9.6 MeV is a metric for atomic number based discrimination of materials. The measured ratios were compared with computed values based on LLNL photon cross section data and LLNL developed models of x-ray detector characteristics. Measured ratios for DU differed from HEU by an average of 0.25%, and from WGPu by 0.08%, which is within the noise level of 0.4 to 0.5%. For comparison, measured ratios for Sn differed from HEU by 3.2%, and from WGPu by 3.6%, well beyond the measurement noise. Measured ratios for W differed from HEU by 0.01%, and from WGPu by 0.32%. The measured ratio values presented in Table 1 demonstrate the feasibility of using a threshold ratio to discriminate low-Z (Z < 72) from high-Z (Z {ge} 72) materials (as defined by CAARS specification). In the case of our test system, a threshold ratio of 1

  9. Elucidating diversity of exosomes: biophysical and molecular characterization methods.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Zamila; Bhat, Anjali; Sharma, Shivani; Sharma, Aman

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are cell-secreted nanovesicles present in biological fluids in normal and diseased conditions. Owing to their seminal role in cell-cell communication, emerging evidences suggest that exosomes are fundamental regulators of various diseases. Due to their potential usefulness in disease diagnosis, robust isolation and characterization of exosomes is critical in developing exosome-based assays. In the last few years, different exosome characterization methods, both biophysical and molecular, have been developed to characterize these tiny vesicles. Here, in this review we summarize: first, biophysical techniques based on spectroscopy (e.g., Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering) and other principles, for example, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy; second, antibody-based molecular techniques including flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and third, nanotechnology-dependent exosome characterization methodologies. PMID:27488053

  10. Characterization of IPMC actuators using standard testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, D.; Espinosa, R.; Moreno, L.; Baselga, J.

    2006-03-01

    In response to a clear need, the research community on EAP (Electroactive Polymer) has just started to work on a standard test methodology to characterize EAP actuators. A very general test methodology for EAPs, covering the characterization procedures for extensional and bending actuators was recently presented. In the present work, well known IPMC samples are characterized following such test methodology. Also, additional tests, not covered by the preliminary standard are included. These tests are conducted using the EAP Unit Tester, a test bench specifically designed for the characterization of EAP actuators. Rather than presenting new material's results, the paper focuses on the instrumentation, procedures and form of presenting results. Although the paper is focused on IPMC the method can be extrapolated to other bending actuators.

  11. Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. . Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. ); Hills, R.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

  12. Bayesian methods for characterizing unknown parameters of material models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Emery, J. M.; Grigoriu, M. D.; Field Jr., R. V.

    2016-02-04

    A Bayesian framework is developed for characterizing the unknown parameters of probabilistic models for material properties. In this framework, the unknown parameters are viewed as random and described by their posterior distributions obtained from prior information and measurements of quantities of interest that are observable and depend on the unknown parameters. The proposed Bayesian method is applied to characterize an unknown spatial correlation of the conductivity field in the definition of a stochastic transport equation and to solve this equation by Monte Carlo simulation and stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). As a result, the Bayesian method is also employed tomore » characterize unknown parameters of material properties for laser welds from measurements of peak forces sustained by these welds.« less

  13. Porosity and Variations in Microgravity Aerogel Nano-Structures. 2; New Laser Speckle Characterization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, A. J.; Ayers, M. R.; Sibille, L.; Smith, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    The transition from sol to gel is a process that is critical to the properties of engineered nanomaterials, but one with few available techniques for observing the dynamic processes occurring during the evolution of the gel network. Specifically, the observation of various cluster aggregation models, such as diffusion-limited and reaction-limited cluster growth can be quite difficult. This can be rather important as the actual aggregation model can dramatically influence the mechanical properties of gels, and is significantly affected by the presence of convective flows, or their absence in microgravity. We have developed two new non-intrusive optical methods for observing the aggregation processes within gels in real time. These make use of the dynamic behavior of laser speckle patterns produced when an intense laser source is passed through a gelling sol. The first method is a simplified time-correlation measurement, where the speckle pattern is observed using a CCD camera and information on the movement of the scattering objects is readily apparent. This approach is extremely sensitive to minute variations in the flow field as the observed speckle pattern is a diffraction-based image, and is therefore sensitive to motions within the sol on the order of the wavelength of the probing light. Additionally, this method has proven useful in determining a precise time for the gel-point, an event often difficult to measure. Monitoring the evolution of contrast within the speckle field is another method that has proven useful for studying aeration. In this case, speckle contrast is dependent upon the size (correlation length) and number of scattering centers, increasing with increasing size, and decreasing with increasing numbers. The dynamic behavior of cluster growth in gels causes both of these to change simultaneously with time, the exact rate of which is determined by the specific aggregation model involved. Actual growth processes can now be observed, and the

  14. Characterizations of biobased materials using acoustic emission methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, the Eastern Regional Research Center (ERRC) has demonstrated that acoustic emission (AE) is a powerful tool for characterizing the properties of biobased materials with fibrous and composite structure. AE often reveals structural information of a material that other methods cannot o...

  15. [Synchrotron-based characterization methods applied to ancient materials (I)].

    PubMed

    Anheim, Étienne; Thoury, Mathieu; Bertrand, Loïc

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at presenting the first results of a transdisciplinary research programme in heritage sciences. Based on the growing use and on the potentialities of micro- and nano-characterization synchrotron-based methods to study ancient materials (archaeology, palaeontology, cultural heritage, past environments), this contribution will identify and test conceptual and methodological elements of convergence between physicochemical and historical sciences. PMID:25200450

  16. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  17. Overview of geotechnical methods to characterize rock masses

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-12-01

    The methods that are used to characterize discontinuous rock masses from a geotechnical point of view are summarized. Emphasis is put on providing key references on each subject. The topics of exploration, in-situ stresses, mechanical properties, thermal properties, and hydraulic properties are addressed.

  18. Comparison of spectral analysis methods for characterizing brain oscillations

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Sederberg, Per B.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Spectral analysis methods are now routinely used in electrophysiological studies of human and animal cognition. Although a wide variety of spectral methods has been used, the ways in which these methods differ are not generally understood. Here we use simulation methods to characterize the similarities and differences between three spectral analysis methods: wavelets, multitapers and Pepisode. Pepisode is a novel method that quantifies the fraction of time that oscillations exceed amplitude and duration thresholds. We show that wavelets and Pepisode used side-by-side helps to disentangle length and amplitude of a signal. Pepisode is especially sensitive to fluctuations around its thresholds, puts frequencies on a more equal footing, and is sensitive to long but low-amplitude signals. In contrast, multitaper methods are less sensitive to weak signals, but are very frequency-specific. If frequency-specificity is not essential, then wavelets and Pepisode are recommended. PMID:17292478

  19. Numerical methods for characterization of synchrotron radiation based on the Wigner function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Numerical characterization of synchrotron radiation based on the Wigner function method is explored in order to accurately evaluate the light source performance. A number of numerical methods to compute the Wigner functions for typical synchrotron radiation sources such as bending magnets, undulators and wigglers, are presented, which significantly improve the computation efficiency and reduce the total computation time. As a practical example of the numerical characterization, optimization of betatron functions to maximize the brilliance of undulator radiation is discussed.

  20. Methods of high throughput biophysical characterization in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Razinkov, Vladimir I; Treuheit, Michael J; Becker, Gerald W

    2013-03-01

    Discovery and successful development of biopharmaceutical products depend on a thorough characterization of the molecule both before and after formulation. Characterization of a formulated biotherapeutic, typically a protein or large peptide, requires a rigorous assessment of the molecule's physical stability. Stability of a biotherapeutic includes not only chemical stability, i.e., degradation of the molecule to form undesired modifications, but also structural stability, including the formation of aggregates. In this review, high throughput biophysical characterization techniques are described according to their specific applications during biopharmaceutical discovery, development and manufacturing. The methods presented here are classified according to these attributes, and include spectroscopic assays based on absorbance, polarization, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance instrumentation, calorimetric methods, dynamic and static light scattering techniques, several visible particle counting and sizing methods, new viscosity assay, based on light scattering and mass spectrometry. Several techniques presented here are already implemented in industry; but, many high throughput biophysical methods are still in the initial stages of implementation or even in the prototype stage. Each technique in this report is judged by the specific application of the method through the biopharmaceutical development process. PMID:22725690

  1. Methods to Characterize Ricin for the Development of Reference Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sook-Kyung; Hancock, Diane K.; Wang, Lili; Cole, Kenneth D.; Reddy, Prasad T.

    2006-01-01

    Ricin is an abundant protein from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis. Because of its high toxicity and the simplicity of producing mass quantities, ricin is considered a biological terrorism agent. We have characterized ricin extensively with a view to develop Reference Materials that could be used to test and calibrate detection devices. The characterization of ricin includes: 1) purity test of a commercial batch of ricin using electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels, 2) biological activity assay by measuring its ability to inhibit protein synthesis, 3) quantitation of protein concentration by amino acid analysis, 4) detection of ricin by an immunoassay using a flow cytometer, and 5) detection of ricin genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction using nine different primer sets. By implementing these five methods of characterization, we are in a position to develop a reference material for ricin. PMID:27274935

  2. Integral structural-functional method for characterizing microbial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    An original integral structural-functional method has been proposed for characterizing microbial communities. The novelty of the approach is the in situ study of microorganisms based on the growth kinetics of microbial associations in liquid nutrient broth media under selective conditions rather than on the level of taxa or large functional groups. The method involves the analysis of the integral growth model of a periodic culture. The kinetic parameters of such associations reflect their capacity of growing on different media, i.e., their physiological diversity, and the metabolic capacity of the microorganisms for growth on a nutrient medium. Therefore, the obtained parameters are determined by the features of the microbial ecological strategies. The inoculation of a dense medium from the original inoculate allows characterizing the taxonomic composition of the dominants in the soil community. The inoculation from the associations developed on selective media characterizes the composition of syntrophic groups, which fulfill a specific function in nature. This method is of greater information value than the classical methods of inoculation on selective media.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Inverse Methods in Eddy Current Pit Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2010-02-01

    A sensitivity analysis was performed for a pit characterization problem to quantify the impact of potential sources for variation on the performance of inverse methods. Certain data processing steps, including careful feature extraction, background clutter removal and compensation for variation in the scan step size through the tubing, were found to be critical to achieve good estimates of the pit depth and diameter. Variance studied in model probe dimensions did not adversely affect performance.

  4. Characterizing lentic freshwater fish assemblages using multiple sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing fish assemblages in lentic ecosystems is difficult, and multiple sampling methods are almost always necessary to gain reliable estimates of indices such as species richness. However, most research focused on lentic fish sampling methodology has targeted recreationally important species, and little to no information is available regarding the influence of multiple methods and timing (i.e., temporal variation) on characterizing entire fish assemblages. Therefore, six lakes and impoundments (48–1,557 ha surface area) were sampled seasonally with seven gear types to evaluate the combined influence of sampling methods and timing on the number of species and individuals sampled. Probabilities of detection for species indicated strong selectivities and seasonal trends that provide guidance on optimal seasons to use gears when targeting multiple species. The evaluation of species richness and number of individuals sampled using multiple gear combinations demonstrated that appreciable benefits over relatively few gears (e.g., to four) used in optimal seasons were not present. Specifically, over 90 % of the species encountered with all gear types and season combinations (N = 19) from six lakes and reservoirs were sampled with nighttime boat electrofishing in the fall and benthic trawling, modified-fyke, and mini-fyke netting during the summer. Our results indicated that the characterization of lentic fish assemblages was highly influenced by the selection of sampling gears and seasons, but did not appear to be influenced by waterbody type (i.e., natural lake, impoundment). The standardization of data collected with multiple methods and seasons to account for bias is imperative to monitoring of lentic ecosystems and will provide researchers with increased reliability in their interpretations and decisions made using information on lentic fish assemblages.

  5. Optical method for the surface topographic characterization of Fresnel lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Antón, Juan Carlos; Gómez Pedrero, José Antonio; Alonso Fernández, José; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Fresnel lenses and other faceted or micro-optic devices are increasingly used in multiple applications like solar light concentrators and illumination devices. As applications are more exigent this characterization is of increasing importance. We present a technique to characterize the surface topography of optical surfaces. It is especially well adapted to Fresnel lenses where abrupt surface slopes are usually difficult to handle in conventional techniques. The method is based on a new photometric strategy able to codify the height information in terms of optical absorption in a liquid. A detailed topographic map is simple to acquire by capturing images of the surface. Some experimental results are presented. A single pixel height resolution of ~0.1 μm is achieved for a height range of ~50 μm. A surface slope analysis is also made achieving a resolution of ~+/-0.15°.

  6. Method for the characterization of Fresnel lens flux transfer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Antón, Juan Carlos; Vázquez Moliní, Daniel; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Gómez Pedrero, José Antonio; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Álvarez

    2011-10-01

    Fresnel lenses and other faceted or micro-optic devices are increasingly used in multiple applications like solar light concentrators and illumination devices, just to name some representative. However, it seems to be a certain lack of adequate techniques for the assessment of the performance of final fabricated devices. As applications are more exigent this characterization is a must. We provide a technique to characterize the performance of Fresnel lenses, as light collection devices. The basis for the method is a configuration where a camera images the Fresnel lens aperture. The entrance pupil of the camera is situated at the focal spot or the conjugate of a simulated solar source. In this manner, detailed maps of the performance of different Fresnel lenses are obtained for different acceptance angles.

  7. A Novel Method for Characterizing Spacesuit Mobility Through Metabolic Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, spacesuit mobility has been characterized by directly measuring both range of motion and joint torque of individual anatomic joints. The work detailed herein aims to improve on this method, which is often prone to uncertainly, lack of repeatability, and a general lack of applicability to real-world functional tasks. Specifically, the goal of this work is to characterize suited mobility performance by directly measuring the metabolic performance of the occupant. Pilot testing was conducted in 2013, employing three subjects performing a range of functional tasks in two different suits prototypes, the Mark III and Z-1. Cursory analysis of the results shows the approach has merit, with consistent performance trends toward one suit over the other. Forward work includes the need to look at more subjects, a refined task set, and another suit in a different mass/mobility regime to validate the approach.

  8. Molecular Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Characterization of Human Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haifeng; Hu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a group of viral agents that afflict people of all age groups. The viruses are now recognized as the most common causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis and foodborne viral illness worldwide. However, they have been considered to play insignificant roles in the disease burden of acute gastroenteritis for the past decades until the recent advent of new and more sensitive molecular diagnostic methods. The availability and application of the molecular diagnostic methods have led to enhanced detection of noroviruses in clinical, food and environmental samples, significantly increasing the recognition of noroviruses as an etiologic agent of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis. This article aims to summarize recent efforts made for the development of molecular methods for the detection and characterization of human noroviruses. PMID:27335620

  9. Molecular Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Characterization of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haifeng; Hu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a group of viral agents that afflict people of all age groups. The viruses are now recognized as the most common causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis and foodborne viral illness worldwide. However, they have been considered to play insignificant roles in the disease burden of acute gastroenteritis for the past decades until the recent advent of new and more sensitive molecular diagnostic methods. The availability and application of the molecular diagnostic methods have led to enhanced detection of noroviruses in clinical, food and environmental samples, significantly increasing the recognition of noroviruses as an etiologic agent of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis. This article aims to summarize recent efforts made for the development of molecular methods for the detection and characterization of human noroviruses. PMID:27335620

  10. Current Experimental Methods for Characterizing Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao

    2016-04-19

    Protein molecules often interact with other partner protein molecules in order to execute their vital functions in living organisms. Characterization of protein-protein interactions thus plays a central role in understanding the molecular mechanism of relevant protein molecules, elucidating the cellular processes and pathways relevant to health or disease for drug discovery, and charting large-scale interaction networks in systems biology research. A whole spectrum of methods, based on biophysical, biochemical, or genetic principles, have been developed to detect the time, space, and functional relevance of protein-protein interactions at various degrees of affinity and specificity. This article presents an overview of these experimental methods, outlining the principles, strengths and limitations, and recent developments of each type of method. PMID:26864455

  11. Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

  12. A multidisciplinary approach to landslide structure characterization: integration of seismic tomography survey and high resolution LiDar data with the Sloping Local Base Level method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travelletti, Julien; Samyn, Kevin; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Grandjean, Gilles; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2010-05-01

    A challenge to progress in the understanding of landslides is to precisely define their 3D geometry and structure as an input for volume estimation and further hydro-mechanical modelling. The objective of this work is to present a multidisciplinary approach to the geometrical modelling of the La Valette landslide by integrating seismic tomography survey (P and S wave) and high resolution LiDar data with the Sloping Local Base Level (SLBL) method. The La Valette landslide, triggered in March 1982, is one of the most important slope instability in the South French Alps. Its dimensions are 1380 m length and 290 m width, and the total volume is estimated at 3.5 106 m3. Since 2002, an important activity of the upper part of the landslide is observed, and consisted mainly in the retrogression of the crown through the opening of an important fracture over several meters and rotational slumps. The failed mass is currently loading the upper part of the mudslide and is a potential threat for the 170 residential communities. A seismic tomography survey combined to airborne and terrestrial LiDar data analysis have been carried out to identify the geological structures and discontinuities and characterize the stability of the failing mass. Seismic tomography allows direct and non-intrusive measurements of P and S waves velocities which are key parameters for the analysis of the mechanical properties of reworked and highly fissured masses. 4 seismic lines have been performed (3 of them in the direction of the slope and the other perpendicular). The 2 longest devices are composed of 24 geophones spaced by 5 meters and have a sufficient investigation depth for a large scale characterization of the landslide's structure with depth. The 2 shortest devices, composed of 24 geophones spaced by 2 meters bring information about the fracturing degree between the moving material of the landslide and the competent rock. 100gr of pentrite for each shot were used as seismic sources. The

  13. A novel method for material characterization of reusable products.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Lorena M; Diyamandoglu, Vasil

    2016-06-01

    Product reuse contributes favorably to waste management and resource recovery by diverting products from terminal disposal to second-hand urban markets. Many organizations with social mission incorporate in their activities the process of reuse, thus making valuable products available to second-hand customers through their thrift stores. Data management and product classification are an important aspect of quantitative analysis of second-hand products circulating through reuse organizations. The New York City Center for Materials Reuse has, for the last 10years, organized the reuse activities of most not for profit organizations, and collected valuable information on the strengths and weaknesses of their operations. One such finding is the casual, and inconsistent approach used by these organizations to keep a record of the level and value of the reuse efforts they undertake. This paper describes a novel methodology developed to standardize record keeping and characterize commonly reused post-consumer products by assessing the outgoing product flow from reuse organizations. The approach groups material composition of individual products into main product categories, creating a simplified method to characterize products. Furthermore, by linking product categories and material composition, the method creates a matrix to help identify the material composition of products handled by reuse organizations. As part of the methodology, whenever adequate data are not available about certain types of products, a process identified as "field characterization study" is proposed and incorporated in the implementation to develop meaningful and useful data on the weight and material composition. Finally, the method incorporates the estimation of the environmental impact of reuse using standard models available through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other worldwide entities. The diversified weight and size of products poses a challenge to the statistical significance

  14. Non-contact method for characterization of a rotational table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Moure Shattuck, Judson, III; Parisi, Vincent M.; Smerdon, Arryn J.

    2007-04-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) uses and evaluates a variety of helmet-mounted trackers for incorporation into their high performance aircraft. The primary head tracker technologies commercially available are magnetic trackers, inertial trackers, and optical trackers. Each head tracker has a unique method of determining the pilot's head position within the cockpit of the aircraft. Magnetic trackers generally have a small head mounted size and minimal head weight. Because they sense a generated magnetic field, their accuracy can be affected by other magnetic fields or ferrous components within the cockpit. Inertial trackers cover the entire head motion box but require constant motion in order to accommodate drifting of the inertial sensors or a secondary system that updates the inertial system, often referred to as a hybrid system. Although optical head trackers (OHT) are immune to magnetic fields some of their limitations may be daylight/night vision goggle (NVG) compatibility issues and, depending on system configuration, may require numerous emitters and/or receivers to cover a large head motion box and provide a wide field of regard. The Dynamic Tracker Test Fixture (DTTF) was designed by the Helmet Mounted Sensory Technology (HMST) laboratory to accurately measure azimuth rotation in both static and dynamic conditions for the purpose of determining the accuracy of a variety of head trackers. Before the DTTF could be used as an evaluation tool, it required characterization to determine the amount and location of any induced elevation or roll as the table rotated in azimuth. Optimally, the characterization method would not affect the DTTF's movement so a non-contact method was devised. This paper describes the characterization process and its results.

  15. Method and apparatus for characterizing reflected ultrasonic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a method of and apparatus for characterizing the amplitudes of a sequence of reflected pulses R1, R2, and R3 by converting them into corresponding electric signals E1, E2, and E3 to substantially the same value during each sequence thereby restoring the reflected pulses R1, R2, and R3 to their initial reflection values by timing means, an exponential generator, and a time gain compensator. Envelope and baseline reject circuits permit the display and accurate location of the time spaced sequence of electric signals having substantially the same amplitude on a measurement scale on a suitable video display or oscilloscope.

  16. Soft ionization device with characterization systems and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Various configurations of characterization systems such as ion mobility spectrometers and mass spectrometers are disclosed that are coupled to an ionization device. The ionization device is formed of a membrane that houses electrodes therein that are located closer to one another than the mean free path of the gas being ionized. Small voltages across the electrodes generate large electric fields which act to ionize substantially all molecules passing therethrough without fracture. Methods to manufacture the mass spectrometer and ion mobility spectrometer systems are also described.

  17. Tensor analysis methods for activity characterization in spatiotemporal data

    SciTech Connect

    Haass, Michael Joseph; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Ochoa, Edward M.

    2014-03-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition offers unique advantages for activity characterization in spatio-temporal datasets because these methods are compatible with sparse matrices and maintain multiway structure that is otherwise lost in collapsing for regular matrix factorization. This report describes our research as part of the PANTHER LDRD Grand Challenge to develop a foundational basis of mathematical techniques and visualizations that enable unsophisticated users (e.g. users who are not steeped in the mathematical details of matrix algebra and mulitway computations) to discover hidden patterns in large spatiotemporal data sets.

  18. Apparatus and method for characterizing conductivity of materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1988-04-13

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 8 figs.

  19. Characterization and Developmental History of Problem Solving Methods in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harbort, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    The central thesis of this paper is the importance of the framework in which information is structured. It is technically important in the design of systems; it is also important in guaranteeing that systems are usable by clinicians. Progress in medical computing depends on our ability to develop a more quantitative understanding of the role of context in our choice of problem solving techniques. This in turn will help us to design more flexible and responsive computer systems. The paper contains an overview of some models of knowledge and problem solving methods, a characterization of modern diagnostic techniques, and a discussion of skill development in medical practice. Diagnostic techniques are examined in terms of how they are taught, what problem solving methods they use, and how they fit together into an overall theory of interpretation of the medical status of a patient.

  20. Nondestructive characterization methods for monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic solid oxide fuel cells (MSOFCS) represent a potential breakthrough in fuel cell technology, provided that reliable fabrication methods can be developed. Fabrication difficulties arise in several steps of the processing: First is the fabrication of uniform thin (305 {mu}m) single-layer and trilayer green tapes (the trilayer tapes of anode/electrolyte/cathode and anode/interconnect/cathode must have similar coefficients of thermal expansion to sinter uniformly and to have the necessary electrochemical properties); Second is the development of fuel and oxidant channels in which residual stresses are likely to develop in the tapes; Third is the fabrication of a ``complete`` cell for which the bond quality between layers and the quality of the trilayers must be established; and Last, attachment of fuel and oxidant manifolds and verification of seal integrity. Purpose of this report is to assess nondestructive characterization methods that could be developed for application to laboratory, prototype, and full-scale MSOFCs.

  1. Characterizing Awake and Anesthetized States Using a Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, M; Behnam, H; Shalbaf, R; Jelveh Moghadam, H

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing between awake and anesthetized states is one of the important problems in surgery. Vital signals contain valuable information that can be used in prediction of different levels of anesthesia. Some monitors based on electroencephalogram (EEG) such as the Bispectral (BIS) index have been proposed in recent years. This study proposes a new method for characterizing between awake and anesthetized states. We validated our method by obtaining data from 25 patients during the cardiac surgery that requires cardiopulmonary bypass. At first, some linear and non-linear features are extracted from EEG signals. Then a method called "LLE"(Locally Linear Embedding) is used to map high-dimensional features in a three-dimensional output space. Finally, low dimensional data are used as an input to a quadratic discriminant analyzer (QDA). The experimental results indicate that an overall accuracy of 88.4 % can be obtained using this method for classifying the EEG signal into conscious and unconscious states for all patients. Considering the reliability of this method, we can develop a new EEG monitoring system that could assist the anesthesiologists to estimate the depth of anesthesia accurately. PMID:26573650

  2. Improved method for pointing characterization of large radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.

    2000-07-01

    In order to upgrade existing large radio telescopes or develop new ones, it is necessary to employ sophisticated active controls to meet the higher requirements on surface precision and pointing accuracy. However, in order for these high- performance controllers to maintain stability, they require an accurate characterization of the telescope structure. A finite element model (FEM) is sufficient to prove controller concepts, but does not have the level of accuracy required for final controller implementation. This results in a need for experimental characterization of the structure. A significant problem is that the structural behavior of the telescope is typically measured at the encoders, while the critical performance is the actual pointing on the sky. Conventional pointing measurements are excellent for obtaining the actual pointing direction, but are insufficient for structural characterization. Conversely, conventional physical measurements are excellent for determining structural behavior, but are not suitable for high accuracy calculation of the final pointing. We describe a new method for taking pointing measurements to quantify the static and dynamic tracking errors in the telescope. This is accomplished by combining pointing measurements at a high sample rate with simultaneous data taken from sensors on the structure. In the simplest form, the method allows improvement of the telescope controller and some indication of the relative importance of static and dynamic effects. More complete implementations of the approach can provide information about the major contributors of pointing error, improvements to the FEM, and extraction of the force distribution history on the structure. Such data will be essential if future telescope upgrades and designs are to take advantage of complex control and metrology.

  3. Physical and chemical methods for the characterization of hazardous wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C. W.; Maskarinec, M. P.; Lee, D. W.

    Numerous test methods have been proposed and developed to evaluate the hazards associated with handling and disposal of wastes in landfills. The major concern is the leaching of toxic constituents from the wastes. The fate of hazardous constituents in landfilled wastes is highly dependent on the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste. Thus, the primary objective in the selection of waste characterization procedures should be focused on those methods that gauge the fate of the waste's hazardous constituents in a specific landfill environment. Waste characterization in the United States has centered around the characteristics of ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity. The strategy employed in the development of most regulatory waste characterization procedures has been a pass or fail approach, usually tied to some form of a mismanagement scenario for that waste. For example, USEPA has chosen the disposal of a waste in a municipal waste landfill as a mismanagement scenario for the development of the waste leaching tests to determine the toxicity characteristic. Many wastes, such as large-volume utility wastes or mining wastes, are not disposed of in municipal waste landfills. As a consequence, more effort is needed in the development of waste leaching tests that determine the long-term leaching characteristics of that waste in the landfill environment in which the waste is to be disposed. Waste leaching models also need to be developed and tested as to their ability to simulate actual disposal environments. These models need to be compared with laboratory leaching tests, and, if practical, coupled with groundwater transport models.

  4. Apparatus and method for characterizing ultrafast polarization varying optical pulses

    DOEpatents

    Smirl, Arthur; Trebino, Rick P.

    1999-08-10

    Practical techniques are described for characterizing ultrafast potentially ultraweak, ultrashort optical pulses. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of signals from nonlinear optical materials characterization experiments, whose signals are generally too weak for full characterization using conventional techniques.

  5. Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Yoram

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to increase water savings and show better ecological control of natural vegetation by developing hydrogeological-geophysical methods for characterizing the permeability and content of water in soil. The ground penetrating radar (GPR) tool was developed and used as the surface geophysical method for monitoring water content. Initial results using the tool suggest that surface GPR is a viable technique for obtaining precision volumetric water content profile estimates, and that laboratory-derived petrophysical relationships could be applied to field-scale GPR data. A field-scale bacterial transport study was conducted within an uncontaminated sandy Pleistocene aquifer to evaluate the importance of heterogeneity in controlling the transport of bacteria. Geochemical, hydrological, geological, and geophysical data were collected to characterize the site prior to and after chemical and bacterial injection experiments. Study results shows that, even within the fairly uniform shallow marine deposits of the narrow channel focus area, heterogeneity existed that influenced the chemical tracer transport over lateral distances of a few meters and vertical distances of less than a half meter. The interpretation of data suggest that the incorporation of geophysical data with limited hydrological data may provide valuable information about the stratigraphy, log conductivity values, and the spatial correlation structure of log conductivity, which have traditionally been obtainable only by performing extensive and intrusive hydrological sampling.

  6. Method to characterize dielectric properties of powdery substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhkala, M.; Juuti, J.; Jantunen, H.

    2013-07-01

    An open ended coaxial cavity method for dielectric characterization of powdery substance operating at 4.5 GHz in TEM mode is presented. Classical mixing rules and electromagnetic modeling were utilized with measured effective permittivities and Q factors to determine the relative permittivity and dielectric loss tangent of different powders with ɛr up to 30. The modeling enabled determination of the correction factor for the simplified equation for the relative permittivity of an open ended coaxial resonator and mixing rules having the best correlation with experiments. SiO2, Al2O3, LTCC CT 2000, ZrO2, and La2O3 powders were used in the experiments. Based on the measured properties and Bruggeman symmetric and Looyenga mixing rules, the determined dielectric characteristics of the powders exhibited good correlation with values in the literature. The presented characterization method enabled the determination of dielectric properties of powdery substances within the presented range, and therefore could be applied to various research fields and applications where dielectric properties of powders need to be known and controlled.

  7. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  8. A method for distinctly marking honey bees, Apis mellifera originating from multiple apiary locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inexpensive and non-intrusive marking methods are essential to track natural behavior of insects for biological experiments. An inexpensive, easy to construct, and easy to install bee marking device is described. The device is mounted at the entrance of a standard honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymen...

  9. Impulse response method for characterization of echogenic liposomesa)

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Jason L.; Luan, Ying; van Rooij, Tom; Kooiman, Klazina; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K.

    2015-01-01

    An optical characterization method is presented based on the use of the impulse response to characterize the damping imparted by the shell of an air-filled ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). The interfacial shell viscosity was estimated based on the unforced decaying response of individual echogenic liposomes (ELIP) exposed to a broadband acoustic impulse excitation. Radius versus time response was measured optically based on recordings acquired using an ultra-high-speed camera. The method provided an efficient approach that enabled statistical measurements on 106 individual ELIP. A decrease in shell viscosity, from 2.1 × 10−8 to 2.5 × 10−9 kg/s, was observed with increasing dilatation rate, from 0.5 × 106 to 1 × 107 s−1. This nonlinear behavior has been reported in other studies of lipid-shelled UCAs and is consistent with rheological shear-thinning. The measured shell viscosity for the ELIP formulation used in this study [κs = (2.1 ± 1.0) × 10−8 kg/s] was in quantitative agreement with previously reported values on a population of ELIP and is consistent with other lipid-shelled UCAs. The acoustic response of ELIP therefore is similar to other lipid-shelled UCAs despite loading with air instead of perfluorocarbon gas. The methods described here can provide an accurate estimate of the shell viscosity and damping for individual UCA microbubbles. PMID:25920822

  10. Spectroscopic Methods of Remote Sensing for Vegetation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy (IS), often referred to as hyperspectral remote sensing, is one of the latest innovations in a very long history of spectroscopy. Spectroscopic methods have been used for understanding the composition of the world around us, as well as, the solar system and distant parts of the universe. Continuous sampling of the electromagnetic spectrum in narrow bands is what separates IS from previous forms of remote sensing. Terrestrial imaging spectrometers often have hundreds of channels that cover the wavelength range of reflected solar radiation, including the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) regions. In part due to the large number of channels, a wide variety of methods have been applied to extract information from IS data sets. These can be grouped into several broad classes, including: multi-channel indices, statistical procedures, full spectrum mixing models, and spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic methods carry on the more than 150 year history of laboratory-based spectroscopy applied to material identification and characterization. Spectroscopic methods of IS relate the positions and shapes of spectral features resolved by airborne and spaceborne sensors to the biochemical and physical composition of vegetation in a pixel. The chlorophyll 680nm, water 980nm, water 1200nm, SWIR 1700nm, SWIR 2100nm, and SWIR 2300nm features have been the subject of study. Spectral feature analysis (SFA) involves isolating such an absorption feature using continuum removal (CR) and calculating descriptors of the feature, such as center position, depth, width, area, and asymmetry. SFA has been applied to quantify pigment and non-pigment biochemical concentrations in leaves, plants, and canopies. Spectral feature comparison (SFC) utilizes CR of features in each pixel's spectrum and linear regression with continuum-removed features in reference spectra in a library of known vegetation types to map vegetation species and communities. SFC has

  11. Characterization of a Vortex Shaking Method for Aerosolizing Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Deye, Gregory; Turkevich, Leonid A.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of well-dispersed, well-characterized fibers is important in toxicology studies. A vortex-tube shaking method is investigated using glass fibers to characterize the generated aerosol. Controlling parameters that were studied included initial batch amounts of glass fibers, preparation of the powder (e.g., preshaking), humidity, and airflow rate. Total fiber number concentrations and aerodynamic size distributions were typically measured. The aerosol concentration is only stable for short times (t < 10 min) and then falls precipitously, with concomitant changes in the aerosol aerodynamic size distribution; the plateau concentration and its duration both increase with batch size. Preshaking enhances the initial aerosol concentration and enables the aerosolization of longer fibers. Higher humidity strongly affects the particle size distribution and the number concentration, resulting in a smaller modal diameter and a higher number concentration. Running the vortex shaker at higher flow rates (Q > 0.3 lpm), yields an aerosol with a particle size distribution representative of the batch powder; running the vortex shaker at a lower aerosol flow rate (Q ~ 0.1 lpm) only aerosolizes the shorter fibers. These results have implications for the use of the vortex shaker as a standard aerosol generator. PMID:26635428

  12. Raman spectroscopic instrumentation and plasmonic methods for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuki

    The advent of nanotechnology has led to incredible growth in how we consume, make and approach advanced materials. By exploiting nanoscale material properties, unique control of optical, thermal, mechanical, and electrical characteristics becomes possible. This thesis describes the development of a novel localized surface plasmon resonant (LSPR) color sensitive photosensor, based on functionalization of gold nanoparticles onto tianium dioxide nanowires and sensing by a metal-semiconducting nanowire-metal photodiode structure. This LSPR photosensor has been integrated into a system that incorporates Raman spectroscopy, microfluidics, optical trapping, and sorting flow cytometry into a unique material characterization system called the microfluidic optical fiber trapping Raman sorting flow cytometer (MOFTRSFC). Raman spectroscopy is utilized as a powerful molecular characterization technique used to analyze biological, mineralogical and nanomaterial samples. To combat the inherently weak Raman signal, plasmonic methods have been applied to exploit surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), increasing Raman intensity by up to 5 orders of magnitude. The resultant MOFTRSFC system is a prototype instrument that can effectively trap, analyze, and sort micron-sized dielectric particles and biological cells. Raman spectroscopy has been presented in several modalities, including the development of a portable near-infrared Raman spectrometer and other emerging technologies.

  13. Novel method for mechanical characterization of polymeric nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Naraghi, Mohammad; Chasiotis, Ioannis; Kahn, Harold; Wen, Yongkui; Dzenis, Yuris

    2007-08-01

    A novel method to perform nanoscale mechanical characterization of highly deformable nanofibers has been developed. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) test platform with an on-chip leaf-spring load cell that was tuned with the aid of a focused ion beam was built for fiber gripping and force measurement and it was actuated with an external piezoelectric transducer. Submicron scale tensile tests were performed in ambient conditions under an optical microscope. Engineering stresses and strains were obtained directly from images of the MEMS platform, by extracting the relative rigid body displacements of the device components by digital image correlation. The accuracy in determining displacements by this optical method was shown to be better than 50 nm. In the application of this method, the mechanical behavior of electrospun polyacrylonitrite nanofibers with diameters ranging from 300 to 600 nm was investigated. The stress-strain curves demonstrated an apparent elastic-perfectly plastic behavior with elastic modulus of 7.6+/-1.5 GPa and large irreversible strains that exceeded 220%. The large fiber stretch ratios were the result of a cascade of periodic necks that formed during cold drawing of the nanofibers. PMID:17764356

  14. Novel method for mechanical characterization of polymeric nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraghi, Mohammad; Chasiotis, Ioannis; Kahn, Harold; Wen, Yongkui; Dzenis, Yuris

    2007-08-01

    A novel method to perform nanoscale mechanical characterization of highly deformable nanofibers has been developed. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) test platform with an on-chip leaf-spring load cell that was tuned with the aid of a focused ion beam was built for fiber gripping and force measurement and it was actuated with an external piezoelectric transducer. Submicron scale tensile tests were performed in ambient conditions under an optical microscope. Engineering stresses and strains were obtained directly from images of the MEMS platform, by extracting the relative rigid body displacements of the device components by digital image correlation. The accuracy in determining displacements by this optical method was shown to be better than 50nm. In the application of this method, the mechanical behavior of electrospun polyacrylonitrite nanofibers with diameters ranging from 300to600nm was investigated. The stress-strain curves demonstrated an apparent elastic-perfectly plastic behavior with elastic modulus of 7.6±1.5GPa and large irreversible strains that exceeded 220%. The large fiber stretch ratios were the result of a cascade of periodic necks that formed during cold drawing of the nanofibers.

  15. Genetic Algorithms: A New Method for Neutron Beam Spectral Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Freeman

    2000-06-04

    A revolutionary new concept for solving the neutron spectrum unfolding problem using genetic algorithms (GAs) has recently been introduced. GAs are part of a new field of evolutionary solution techniques that mimic living systems with computer-simulated chromosome solutions that mate, mutate, and evolve to create improved solutions. The original motivation for the research was to improve spectral characterization of neutron beams associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GA unfolding technique has been successfully applied to problems with moderate energy resolution (up to 47 energy groups). Initial research indicates that the GA unfolding technique may well be superior to popular unfolding methods in common use. Research now under way at Kansas State University is focused on optimizing the unfolding algorithm and expanding its energy resolution to unfold detailed beam spectra based on multiple foil measurements. Indications are that the final code will significantly outperform current, state-of-the-art codes in use by the scientific community.

  16. High Pressure NMR Methods for Characterizing Functional Substates of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2015-01-01

    Proteins usually exist in multiple conformational states in solution. High pressure NMR spectroscopy is a well-suited method to identify these states. In addition, these states can be characterized by their thermodynamic parameters, the free enthalpies at ambient pressure, the partial molar volumes, and the partial molar compressibility that can be obtained from the analysis of the high pressure NMR data. Two main types of states of proteins exist, functional states and folding states. There is a strong link between these two types, the functional states represent essential folding states (intermediates), other folding states may have no functional meaning (optional folding states). In this chapter, this concept is tested on the Ras protein, an important proto-oncogen in humans where all substates required by theory can be identified experimentally by high pressure NMR spectroscopy. Finally, we show how these data can be used to develop allosteric inhibitors of proteins. PMID:26174382

  17. Optofluidic nanotweezer methods for characterizing nanoparticles and viruses (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, David

    2016-03-01

    Direct measurements of the strength of particle interactions are critical for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-newton scale interaction forces on sub-micrometer particles due to signal detection limits, thermal noise, and throughput. We have recently developed a technique for making direct mechanical measurements of the force and work associated with the steric and electrostatic effects that stabilize colloidal nanoparticles. "Nanophotonic Force Microscopy", as we call it, is unique in that it uses statistical methods to provide direct measurements of these forces at the individual particle scale, while still being sufficiently high-throughput to produce meaningful population level data. In this talk I will introduce the technology, it's advantages, and some of the major uses. Specific case studies will include label-free monitoring of binding of individual antibodies onto single viruses and the measurement of the strength of nanoparticle coatings used for steric stabilization.

  18. An electromagnetic induction method for underground target detection and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, L.C.; Cress, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    An improved capability for subsurface structure detection is needed to support military and nonproliferation requirements for inspection and for surveillance of activities of threatening nations. As part of the DOE/NN-20 program to apply geophysical methods to detect and characterize underground facilities, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated an electromagnetic induction (EMI) project to evaluate low frequency electromagnetic (EM) techniques for subsurface structure detection. Low frequency, in this case, extended from kilohertz to hundreds of kilohertz. An EMI survey procedure had already been developed for borehole imaging of coal seams and had successfully been applied in a surface mode to detect a drug smuggling tunnel. The SNL project has focused on building upon the success of that procedure and applying it to surface and low altitude airborne platforms. Part of SNL`s work has focused on improving that technology through improved hardware and data processing. The improved hardware development has been performed utilizing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. In addition, SNL`s effort focused on: (1) improvements in modeling of the basic geophysics of the illuminating electromagnetic field and its coupling to the underground target (partially funded using LDRD funds) and (2) development of techniques for phase-based and multi-frequency processing and spatial processing to support subsurface target detection and characterization. The products of this project are: (1) an evaluation of an improved EM gradiometer, (2) an improved gradiometer concept for possible future development, (3) an improved modeling capability, (4) demonstration of an EM wave migration method for target recognition, and a demonstration that the technology is capable of detecting targets to depths exceeding 25 meters.

  19. Method to characterize collective impact of factors on indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Teuerle, Marek; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2015-02-01

    One of the most important problems in studies of building environment is a description of how it is influenced by various dynamically changing factors. In this paper we characterized the joint impact of a collection of factors on indoor air quality (IAQ). We assumed that the influence is reflected in the temporal variability of IAQ parameters and may be deduced from it. The proposed method utilizes mean square displacement (MSD) analysis which was originally developed for studying the dynamics in various systems. Based on the MSD time-dependence descriptor β, we distinguished three types of the collective impact of factors on IAQ: retarding, stabilizing and promoting. We presented how the aggregated factors influence the temperature, relative humidity and CO2 concentration, as these parameters are informative for the condition of indoor air. We discovered, that during a model day there are encountered one, two or even three types of influence. The presented method allows us to study the impacts from the perspective of the dynamics of indoor air.

  20. Mechanical characterization of unplasticised polyvinylchloride thick pipes by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylova, E.; Potelon, B.; Reddy, S.; Toal, V.; Smith, C.

    2004-06-01

    In this work a number of techniques (electronic speckle pattern interferometry, holographic interferometry, strain gauge and finite element method) are brought to bear in order to establish consistency in the results of strain measurement. This is necessary if optical non-destructive testing methods, such as those used here, are to gain acceptance for routine industrial use. The FE model provides a useful check. Furthermore, ESPI fringe data facilitates the extension of FE models, an approach that is of growing importance in component testing. The use of in-plane and out-of-plane sensitive electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) for non-destructive material characterization of thick unplasticised polyvinylchloride (uPVC) pipes is presented. A test rig has been designed for stressing pipes by internal pressure. ESPI gives a complete mapping of the displacement field over the area imaged by the video camera. The results for the strain of uPVC obtained from ESPI data and from strain gauges are in good agreement. The value of Young's modulus has been obtained from the fringe data and compared with results obtained using holographic interferometry and from strain gauge measurements. The FE model also produces fringe data that is consistent with the ESPI results.

  1. A spatiotemporal characterization method for the dynamic cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Alhussein, Ghada; Shanti, Aya; Farhat, Ilyas A H; Timraz, Sara B H; Alwahab, Noaf S A; Pearson, Yanthe E; Martin, Matthew N; Christoforou, Nicolas; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-05-01

    The significant gap between quantitative and qualitative understanding of cytoskeletal function is a pressing problem; microscopy and labeling techniques have improved qualitative investigations of localized cytoskeleton behavior, whereas quantitative analyses of whole cell cytoskeleton networks remain challenging. Here we present a method that accurately quantifies cytoskeleton dynamics. Our approach digitally subdivides cytoskeleton images using interrogation windows, within which box-counting is used to infer a fractal dimension (Df ) to characterize spatial arrangement, and gray value intensity (GVI) to determine actin density. A partitioning algorithm further obtains cytoskeleton characteristics from the perinuclear, cytosolic, and periphery cellular regions. We validated our measurement approach on Cytochalasin-treated cells using transgenically modified dermal fibroblast cells expressing fluorescent actin cytoskeletons. This method differentiates between normal and chemically disrupted actin networks, and quantifies rates of cytoskeletal degradation. Furthermore, GVI distributions were found to be inversely proportional to Df , having several biophysical implications for cytoskeleton formation/degradation. We additionally demonstrated detection sensitivity of differences in Df and GVI for cells seeded on substrates with varying degrees of stiffness, and coated with different attachment proteins. This general approach can be further implemented to gain insights on dynamic growth, disruption, and structure of the cytoskeleton (and other complex biological morphology) due to biological, chemical, or physical stimuli. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27015595

  2. Apparatus and method for characterizing ultrafast polarization varying optical pulses

    DOEpatents

    Smirl, A.; Trebino, R.P.

    1999-08-10

    Practical techniques are described for characterizing ultrafast potentially ultraweak, ultrashort optical pulses. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of signals from nonlinear optical materials characterization experiments, whose signals are generally too weak for full characterization using conventional techniques. 2 figs.

  3. A Novel Method for Characterizing Spacesuit Mobility through Metabolic Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane; Norcross, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Spacesuit mobility has historically been defined and characterized by a combination of range of motion and joint torque of the individual anatomical joints when performing isolated motions meant to drive that joint only in a given orthogonal plane. While this has been the standard approach for several decades, there are numerous shortcomings that suit designers and engineers would like to see rectified. First, the lack of a standardized method for collecting both range of motion and joint torque translates to many different test setups, procedures and methods of data analysis. Second, all of these previously used methods for data collection lack some degree of repeatability, even within the same test setup and the same conductor; in addition, attempts at higher fidelity data collection techniques require high overhead and cost with minimal improvement. Lastly, isolated motions in standard anatomical planes are not representative of real-world tasks that a crewmember would be performing during an EVA, be it microgravity or surface exploration based. To address these shortcomings, options are being explored within the Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch to ascertain the feasibility of an alternative approach to defining mobility - one that is more repeatable, lower overhead, and more tied to functional EVA tasks. This paper serves to document the first attempt at such an alternative option - one that looks at the metabolic energy-cost of a spacesuit. In other words, can we objectively compare the mobility of a spacesuit by evaluating the metabolic cost of that suit to the wearer while performing a battery of functional EVA tasks?

  4. Site characterization for calibration of radiometric sensors using vicarious method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Shailesh; Rathore, L. S.; Mohapatra, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Mitra, A. K.; Bhatla, R.; Singh, R. S.; Desai, Yogdeep; Srivastava, Shailendra S.

    2016-05-01

    Radiometric performances of earth observation satellite/sensors vary from ground pre-launch calibration campaign to post launch period extended to lifetime of the satellite due to launching vibrations. Therefore calibration is carried out worldwide through various methods throughout satellite lifetime. In India Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) calibrates the sensor of Resourcesat-2 satellite by vicarious method. One of these vicarious calibration methods is the reflectance-based approach that is applied in this study for radiometric calibration of sensors on-board Resouresat-2 satellite. The results of ground-based measurement of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance are made at Bap, Rajasthan Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) site. Cal/Val observations at site were carried out with hyper-spectral Spectroradiometer covering spectral range of 350nm- 2500nm for radiometric characterization of the site. The Sunphotometer/Ozonometer for measuring the atmospheric parameters has also been used. The calibrated radiance is converted to absolute at-sensor spectral reflectance and Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) radiance. TOA radiance was computed using radiative transfer model `Second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum' (6S), which can accurately simulate the problems introduced by the presence of the atmosphere along the path from Sun to target (surface) to Sensor. The methodology for band averaged reflectance retrieval and spectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6S code to predict TOA radiance which compare with Resourcesat-2 radiance. Spectral signature and its reflectance ratio indicate the uniformity of the site. Thus the study proves that the selected site is suitable for vicarious calibration of sensor of Resourcesat-2. Further the study demonstrates the procedure for similar exercise for site selection for Cal/Val analysis of other satellite over India

  5. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Fan W; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R; Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Spicer, James B

    2015-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements

  6. Characterizing a nonclassical carbene with coupled cluster methods: cyclobutylidene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Agarwal, Jay; Schaefer Iii, Henry F

    2016-09-21

    Carbenes represent a special class of reactive compounds that possess a lone pair of electrons on a carbon atom. Among the myriad examples of carbenes in the literature, cyclobutylidene stands out as a unique nonclassical compound that includes transannular interaction between opposing C1 and C3 carbon atoms within a four-membered ring. On its lowest potential energy surface (X[combining tilde](1)A'), cyclobutylidene quickly rearranges, following three reaction paths: (i) 1,2-H migration; (ii) 1,2-C migration; and, (iii) 1,3-H migration. Herein, this reactivity is examined with high-level coupled-cluster methods [up to CCSDT(Q)]. At this level of theory, combined with extrapolation techniques to obtain energies at the complete basis set (CBS) limit, the long-standing disparity between theoretical and experimental results is resolved. Specifically, cyclobutylidene is predicted to prefer 1,2-C migration rather than 1,2-H migration. Rate constants for the three reaction paths are obtained from canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) and yield reasonable agreement with existing experimental results. Further characterization of cyclobutylidene is also reported: the singlet-triplet gap (ΔES-T) is found to be -9.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSDT(Q)/CBS level of theory, and anharmonic vibrational frequencies are determined with second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2). PMID:27539444

  7. Scalable methods for representing, characterizing, and generating large graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-07-01

    Goal - design methods to characterize and identify a low dimensional representation of graphs. Impact - enabling predictive simulation; monitoring dynamics on graphs; and sampling and recovering network structure from limited observations. Areas to explore are: (1) Enabling technologies - develop novel algorithms and tailor existing ones for complex networks; (2) Modeling and generation - Identify the right parameters for graph representation and develop algorithms to compute these parameters and generate graphs from these parameters; and (3) Comparison - Given two graphs how do we tell they are similar? Some conclusions are: (1) A bad metric can make anything look good; (2) A metric that is based an edge-by edge prediction will suffer from the skewed distribution of present and absent edges; (3) The dominant signal is the sparsity, edges only add a noise on top of the signal, the real signal, structure of the graph is often lost behind the dominant signal; and (4) Proposed alternative: comparison based on carefully chosen set of features, it is more efficient, sensitive to selection of features, finding independent set of features is an important area, and keep an eye on us for some important results.

  8. An enhanced capillary electrophoresis method for characterizing natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Barbara A; Cheng, Wei Ran; Lam, Buuan; Cooper, William J; Simpson, Andre J

    2013-02-21

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous and is one of the most complex naturally occurring mixtures. NOM plays an essential role in the global carbon cycle; atmospheric and natural water photochemistry; and the long-range transport of trace compounds and contaminants. There is a dearth of separation techniques capable of resolving this highly complex mixture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of ultrahigh resolution counterbalance capillary electrophoresis to resolve natural organic matter. The new separation strategy uses a low pH, high concentration phosphate buffer to reduce the capillary electroosmotic flow (EOF). Changing the polarity of the electrodes reverses the EOF to counterbalance the electrophoretic mobility. Sample stacking further improves the counterbalance separation. The combination of these conditions results in an electropherogram comprised up to three hundred peaks superimposed on the characteristic "humic hump" of NOM. Fraction collection, followed by three-dimensional emission excitation spectroscopy (EEMs) and UV spectroscopy generated a distinct profile of fluorescent and UV absorbing components. This enhanced counterbalance capillary electrophoresis method is a potentially powerful technique for the characterization and separation of NOM and complex environmental mixtures in general. PMID:23289095

  9. Methods for Characterization of Batteries Using Acoustic Interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Shoham

    Batteries are a ubiquitous form of electrochemical energy storage, but thus far the methods for measuring the mechanical properties of batteries and their component materials in operando have lagged far behind the methods for measuring the corresponding electrical properties. In this thesis, I demonstrate methods for determining the changes in materials properties of an electrochemical energy storage cell both ex situ and in operando.. I begin by establishing the impact of micro-scale morphology changes on the macro-scale dynamic mechanical response in commercial alkaline AA cells. Using a bounce test, the coefficient of restitution (COR) of the cell is shown to increase non-linearly as a function of state of charge (SOC). I show that the reason for the increase in the COR stems from the spatially-dependent oxidation of the Zn anode, with an initial increase corresponding to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO-clad Zn particles spanning the radius of the anode. The subsequent saturation of the COR is shown to result from the ultimate solidification and desiccation of the Zn anode. Building from this, I present a generalized in operando solution for materials characterization in batteries using ultrasonic interrogation. The materials properties of battery components change during charge and discharge, resulting in a change in the sound speed of the materials. By attaching transducers to a battery during cycling and sending ultrasonic pulses through each cell I observe the changes in the time of flight (ToF) of the pulses, both in reflection and transmission. I show that the changes in ToF correspond to both SOC and state of health (SOH) in a variety of battery chemistries and geometries, and detail a corresponding acoustic conservation law model framework. Finally, I perform these electrochemical acoustic time of flight (EAToF) experiments on commercial alkaline AA cells. By correlating the results with energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) data and

  10. Method for characterizing viscoelasticity of human gluteal tissue.

    PubMed

    Then, C; Vogl, T J; Silber, G

    2012-04-30

    Characterizing compressive transient large deformation properties of biological tissue is becoming increasingly important in impact biomechanics and rehabilitation engineering, which includes devices interfacing with the human body and virtual surgical guidance simulation. Individual mechanical in vivo behaviour, specifically of human gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue compressed with finite strain, has, however, been sparsely characterised. Employing a combined experimental and numerical approach, a method is presented to investigate the time-dependent properties of in vivo gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue. Specifically, displacement-controlled ramp-and-hold indentation relaxation tests were performed and documented with magnetic resonance imaging. A time domain quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) formulation with Prony series valid for finite strains was used in conjunction with a hyperelastic model formulation for soft tissue constitutive model parameter identification and calibration of the relaxation test data. A finite element model of the indentation region was employed. Strong non-linear elastic but linear viscoelastic tissue material behaviour at finite strains was apparent for both adipose and passive skeletal muscle mechanical properties with orthogonal skin and transversal muscle fibre loading. Using a force-equilibrium assumption, the employed material model was well suited to fit the experimental data and derive viscoelastic model parameters by inverse finite element parameter estimation. An individual characterisation of in vivo gluteal adipose and muscle tissue could thus be established. Initial shear moduli were calculated from the long-term parameters for human gluteal skin/fat: G(∞,S/F)=1850 Pa and for cross-fibre gluteal muscle tissue: G(∞,M)=881 Pa. Instantaneous shear moduli were found at the employed ramp speed: G(0,S/F)=1920 Pa and G(0,M)=1032 Pa. PMID:22360834

  11. Airborne and Ground-Based Optical Characterization of Legacy Underground Nuclear Test Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigil, S.; Craven, J.; Anderson, D.; Dzur, R.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Sussman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Detecting, locating, and characterizing suspected underground nuclear test sites is a U.S. security priority. Currently, global underground nuclear explosion monitoring relies on seismic and infrasound sensor networks to provide rapid initial detection of potential underground nuclear tests. While seismic and infrasound might be able to generally locate potential underground nuclear tests, additional sensing methods might be required to further pinpoint test site locations. Optical remote sensing is a robust approach for site location and characterization due to the ability it provides to search large areas relatively quickly, resolve surface features in fine detail, and perform these tasks non-intrusively. Optical remote sensing provides both cultural and surface geological information about a site, for example, operational infrastructure, surface fractures. Surface geological information, when combined with known or estimated subsurface geologic information, could provide clues concerning test parameters. We have characterized two legacy nuclear test sites on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), U20ak and U20az using helicopter-, ground- and unmanned aerial system-based RGB imagery and light detection and ranging (lidar) systems. The multi-faceted information garnered from these different sensing modalities has allowed us to build a knowledge base of how a nuclear test site might look when sensed remotely, and the standoff distances required to resolve important site characteristics.

  12. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: Comparison of methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muldoon, M.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of ???10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head - and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  13. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Maureen; Bradbury, Ken R

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of approximately 10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid. PMID:16324008

  14. Effective method of characterizing specific liquid fluorocarbon interactions using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ravi, S; Amoros, J; Arockia Jayalatha, K

    2008-05-22

    Several studies have used the analytical results available for structure factor, osmotic pressure, vapor pressure, and suspension viscosity to characterize nanoparticle interactions. In this work a novel attempt has been made to characterize seven different types of liquid per fluorocarbon nanoparticles (LPFC-np) by estimating packing factor, segment diameter, chemical potential, Rao's constant, and adiabatic and isothermal compressibilities using experimental ultrasonic velocity as input. The segment diameter has also been examined by using experimental surface tension and viscosity for comparison. The calculations were extended for different temperatures involving four different equations of state. We have tested the sensitivity of all these parameters to a very small change in the heat capacity ratio. This extensive calculation helps to make a reasonable description about the interactions among the LPFC-np. Also a better correlation could be determined between the interaction of ultrasound with LPFC-np (as a facilitator) and the pure absorption (propagation) of ultrasound by the entire system. PMID:18422360

  15. Isolation independent methods of characterizing phage communities 2: characterizing a metagenome.

    PubMed

    Wommack, K Eric; Bench, Shellie R; Bhavsar, Jaysheel; Mead, David; Hanson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Current appreciation of the vast expanse of prokaryotic diversity has largely come through molecular phylogenetic exploration of sequence diversity within the universally conserved gene for small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rDNA). A plethora of methodologies for characterizing the diversity and composition of bacterial communities is based on sequence polymorphisms within this single gene. By comparison, no gene is universally shared among viruses or bacteriophages, which has prevented broad scale characterization of viral diversity within microbial ecosystems. With the reduction in DNA sequencing costs and wide availability of bioinformatics software, the tools of whole genome shotgun sequencing are now beginning to be applied to the characterization of genetic diversity within whole microbial communities. Such metagenomic approaches are ideally suited to the characterization of natural assemblages of viruses, because of the typically small, coding-dense nature of viral genomes. Data from a limited number of characterized viral metagenome libraries within a range of microbial ecosystems indicates that viral assemblages are comprised of between approximately 1,000 to a million different genotypes. Furthermore, viral assemblages typically contain a large proportion of completely novel genes and are likely to be the largest reservoir of unexplored genetic diversity on earth. Here, we present a conceptual framework for characterization of viral assemblages through metagenomic approaches. PMID:19082562

  16. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Wise, Barry M.

    2003-08-12

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  17. Method for characterization of the redox condition of cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2015-12-22

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize an in situ redox indicator that is present in the cementitious materials as formed. The in situ redox indicator leaches from cementitious material and, when the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions can be utilized to determine the redox condition of the material. The in situ redox indicator can exhibit distinct characteristics in the leachate depending upon the redox condition of the indicator.

  18. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Wise, Barry M [Manson, WA

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  19. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  20. Characterization of copper nanoparticles synthesized by a novel microbiological method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Ratnika; Bhadauria, Seema; Gaur, M. S.; Pasricha, Renu

    2010-12-01

    The exploitation of various biomaterials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered as green technology as it does not involve any harmful chemicals. The present study reports the synthesis of copper nanoparticles which involves non-pathogenic bacterial strain Pseudomonas stutzeri, isolated from soil. These copper nanoparticles are further characterized for size and shape distributions by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques. The results showed that the particles are spherical and quite stable in nature and shows surface plasmon resonance clearly featured in the optical spectra in visible region.

  1. Apparatus and method for the characterization of respirable aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Douglas K.; Hodges, Bradley W.; Bush, Jesse D.; Mishima, Jofu

    2016-05-31

    An apparatus for the characterization of respirable aerosols, including: a burn chamber configured to selectively contain a sample that is selectively heated to generate an aerosol; a heating assembly disposed within the burn chamber adjacent to the sample; and a sampling segment coupled to the burn chamber and configured to collect the aerosol such that it may be analyzed. The apparatus also includes an optional sight window disposed in a wall of the burn chamber such that the sample may be viewed during heating. Optionally, the sample includes one of a Lanthanide, an Actinide, and a Transition metal.

  2. EVALUATING AND OPTIMIZING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE METHODS FOR CHARACTERIZING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of EM methods for measuring airborne asbestos fiber concentrations and size distributions was carried out by studying a large number of variables and subprocedures in a five-phase program using elaborate statistically designed experiments. Observations were analyzed by...

  3. Resonance methods for the characterization of dust particles in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Carstensen, Jan; Piel, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The fundamentals of the `resonance method' are presented. The method relies on evaluating the dynamic response of one or more dust particles in the sheath of a laboratory plasma to small external perturbations. It allows one to make in situ high-precision measurements of particle properties. It is shown that the particle mass and charge and the strength of the interaction between two particles can be measured. Technical requirements, limitations and application examples are presented and discussed.

  4. Development of Methods of Characterizing Coal in Its Plastic State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    Coal in its plastic state (typically 400-460 C) was examined by the isothermal Gieseler plastometry of seven selected coals of widely varying plastic properties. Kinetic models were proposed for the isothermal plastometric curves. Plastic behavior was compared with a variety of laboratory analyses and characterizations of these coals, including classical coal analysis; mineral analysis; microstructural analysis (extractable fractions, surface area measurement, and petrographic analysis); and thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis, thermomechanical analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry). The phenomenon of a sharp, large, poorly reproducible exotherm in the differential scanning calorimetric analysis of coking coals was examined. Several coal extrudates show mineral distribution, organic maceral composition and overall calorific value to be little affected by 800 F extrusion. Volatile matter and plastic properties are moderately reduced, and the network structure (as gauged by extractables) appears to be slightly degraded in the extrusion process.

  5. Co-validation of three methods for optical characterization of point-focus concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendelin, T. J.; Grossman, J. W.

    Three different methods for characterizing point-focus solar concentrator optical performance have been developed for specific applications. These methods include a laser ray trace technique called the Scanning Hartmann Optical Test, a video imaging process called the 2f Technique and actual on-sun testing in conjunction with optical computer modeling. Three concentrator test articles, each of a different design, were characterized using at least two of the methods and, in one case, all three. The results of these tests are compared in order to validate the methods. Excellent agreement is observed in the results, suggesting that the techniques provide consistent and accurate characterizations of solar concentrator optics.

  6. Co-validation of three methods for optical characterization of point-focus concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelin, T.J.; Grossman, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    Three different methods for characterizing point-focus solar concentrator optical performance have been developed for specific applications. These methods include a laser ray trace technique called the Scanning Hartmann Optical Test, a video imaging process called the 2f Technique and actual on-sun testing in conjunction with optical computer modeling. Three concentrator test articles, each of a different design, were characterized using at least two of the methods and, in one case, all three. The results of these tests are compared in order to validate the methods. Excellent agreement is observed in the results, suggesting that the techniques provide consistent and accurate characterizations of solar concentrator optics.

  7. Toward an automated method for optical coherence tomography characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, Mathias; Beckley, Amber M.; Benboujja, Fouzi; Dubois, Sylvain; Noiseux, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in biomedical applications, robust yet simple methods for calibrating and benchmarking a system are needed. We present here a procedure based on a calibration object complemented with an algorithm that analyzes three-dimensional OCT datasets to retrieve key characteristics of an OCT system. The calibration object combines state-of-the-art tissue phantom material with a diamond-turned aluminum multisegment mirror. This method is capable of determining rapidly volumetric field-of-view, axial resolution, and image curvature. Moreover, as the phantom material mimics biological tissue, the system's signal and noise levels can be evaluated in conditions close to biological experiments. We believe this method could improve OCT quantitative data analysis and help OCT data comparison for longitudinal or multicenter studies.

  8. Toward an automated method for optical coherence tomography characterization.

    PubMed

    Strupler, Mathias; Beckley, Amber M; Benboujja, Fouzi; Dubois, Sylvain; Noiseux, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in biomedical applications, robust yet simple methods for calibrating and benchmarking a system are needed. We present here a procedure based on a calibration object complemented with an algorithm that analyzes three-dimensional OCT datasets to retrieve key characteristics of an OCT system. The calibration object combines state-of-the-art tissue phantom material with a diamond-turned aluminum multisegment mirror. This method is capable of determining rapidly volumetric field-of-view, axial resolution, and image curvature. Moreover, as the phantom material mimics biological tissue, the system’s signal and noise levels can be evaluated in conditions close to biological experiments. We believe this method could improve OCT quantitative data analysis and help OCT data comparison for longitudinal or multicenter studies. PMID:26720874

  9. [Characterization of flowability of pharmaceutical powders based on multivariate analysis method].

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Zhao, Li-Jie; Xiong, Yao-Kun; Li, Xiao-Hai; Wang, Song-Tao; Feng, Yi; Xu, De-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    The main methods of characterizing the flowability of pharmaceutical powders include repose angle method, HR method, Carr's index method, Jenike flow function method, fractal dimension method, and mass flow rate method, etc. Regarding powders with different flowabilities as the research subject, comprehensive features of pharmaceutical materials were investigated and characterized. The multivariate analysis method was employed to evaluate and analyze flowability values of the tested pharmaceutical materials. Comparing with the method of the mass flow rate, it was feasible to use multivariate analysis method to evaluate the flowability of powders. Simultaneously, the flowability of pharmaceutical materials could be ranked and definitely quantified, and critical values be determined according to the actual production, which has promoted the previous methods dependent only on the single parameter, i.e. repose angle and compression degree methods. A relatively objective standard method of evaluating flowability of powders is formed. PMID:23227556

  10. Stability Characterization of Quinazoline Derivative BG1188 by Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militaru, Andra; Smarandache, Adriana; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Damian, Victor; Ganea, Paul; Alibert, Sandrine; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian

    2011-08-01

    3-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-6-nitroquinazolin-4(3H)-one, labeled BG1188, is a new synthesized compound, out of a series of quinazoline derivatives developed to fight the multidrug resistance of antibiotics acquired by bacteria. A characterization of the BG1188 powder was made using FTIR spectra in order to evidence the functional groups in the medicine's molecule. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra were used to study the stability of the BG1188 solutions in two solvents and at different temperatures. BG1188 concentration in ultrapure water was varied between 2×10-3 M (stock solution) and 10-6 M. The concentration recommended by higher activity on bacteria was 10-3 M. For the same reason, this was the utilized concentration of BG1188 in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Time stability was characterized by comparing the time evolution of the UV-Vis absorption spectra of the BG1188 solutions in ultrapure de-ionized water or in DMSO. The spectra were recorded daily for about 4 months after the preparation for the BG1188 solutions in ultrapure water. Generally, samples are stable within the experimental errors at concentrations higher than 10-5 M, but the stability time interval may vary from 119 days at 10-4 M to 34 days at 10-5 M. Time evolution of the absorption spectra at 10-3 M in ultrapure water shows reproducibility within the measuring errors (±1.045%) for time intervals up to 1032 hours (more than 40 days) after preparation. On the other hand, BG1188 solutions in DMSO may be considered unstable because the absorption spectra modify in terms of peak shapes and intensities, indicating that the samples exhibit modifications immediately after preparation. Regardless the solvent used, some aggregation phenomena took place and wire-like aggregates were observed in all the solutions with the naked eye. These aggregates were analyzed, tentatively, using optical microscopy and FTIR.

  11. Microbiological characterization of vermicomposts by the method of multisubstrate testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Byzov, B. A.

    2008-11-01

    A new modification of the method of multisubstrate testing (MST, BIOLOG) is suggested. It is based on the kinetic description of bacterial growth on nutrient media during 50 h. The results of the MST represent a set of three parameters (the initial optical density, the maximum specific growth rate, and the maximum optical density) of an equation describing the growth of microbial communities on individual substrates. Methods of multivariate statistics (cluster and discriminant analyses) have been used to compare these parameters for 24 organic substrates. It is supposed that a more detailed description of the growth of microorganisms should improve the information capacity of the MST method. The effect of earthworms on vermicomposting has been studied experimentally with the MST method. An empirical rule allowing one to distinguish between vermicomposts and ordinary composts using the results of MST is suggested. Manure, earthy matter from the intestinal tracts of earthworms ( Eisenia andrei), and their coprolites have been subjected to MST. A functional similarity between manure and fresh coprolites has been found. Also, three different lots of industrial vermicomposts have been compared. The cluster analysis has demonstrated a significant difference between them. The clusters depend on the nature of the initial substrates used for preparing these vermicomposts. Thus, unification of the initial substrates used for composting is necessary to obtain standardized vermicomposts.

  12. Quantitative, Qualitative and Geospatial Methods to Characterize HIV Risk Environments

    PubMed Central

    Conners, Erin E.; West, Brooke S.; Roth, Alexis M.; Meckel-Parker, Kristen G.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Staines-Orozco, Hugo; Clapp, John D.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, ‘place’, including physical and geographical characteristics as well as social meanings, is recognized as an important factor driving individual and community health risks. This is especially true among marginalized populations in low and middle income countries (LMIC), whose environments may also be more difficult to study using traditional methods. In the NIH-funded longitudinal study Mapa de Salud, we employed a novel approach to exploring the risk environment of female sex workers (FSWs) in two Mexico/U.S. border cities, Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez. In this paper we describe the development, implementation, and feasibility of a mix of quantitative and qualitative tools used to capture the HIV risk environments of FSWs in an LMIC setting. The methods were: 1) Participatory mapping; 2) Quantitative interviews; 3) Sex work venue field observation; 4) Time-location-activity diaries; 5) In-depth interviews about daily activity spaces. We found that the mixed-methodology outlined was both feasible to implement and acceptable to participants. These methods can generate geospatial data to assess the role of the environment on drug and sexual risk behaviors among high risk populations. Additionally, the adaptation of existing methods for marginalized populations in resource constrained contexts provides new opportunities for informing public health interventions. PMID:27191846

  13. Quantitative, Qualitative and Geospatial Methods to Characterize HIV Risk Environments.

    PubMed

    Conners, Erin E; West, Brooke S; Roth, Alexis M; Meckel-Parker, Kristen G; Kwan, Mei-Po; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Staines-Orozco, Hugo; Clapp, John D; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, 'place', including physical and geographical characteristics as well as social meanings, is recognized as an important factor driving individual and community health risks. This is especially true among marginalized populations in low and middle income countries (LMIC), whose environments may also be more difficult to study using traditional methods. In the NIH-funded longitudinal study Mapa de Salud, we employed a novel approach to exploring the risk environment of female sex workers (FSWs) in two Mexico/U.S. border cities, Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez. In this paper we describe the development, implementation, and feasibility of a mix of quantitative and qualitative tools used to capture the HIV risk environments of FSWs in an LMIC setting. The methods were: 1) Participatory mapping; 2) Quantitative interviews; 3) Sex work venue field observation; 4) Time-location-activity diaries; 5) In-depth interviews about daily activity spaces. We found that the mixed-methodology outlined was both feasible to implement and acceptable to participants. These methods can generate geospatial data to assess the role of the environment on drug and sexual risk behaviors among high risk populations. Additionally, the adaptation of existing methods for marginalized populations in resource constrained contexts provides new opportunities for informing public health interventions. PMID:27191846

  14. Synthesis and characterization of catalysts and electrocatalysts using combinatorial methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Ramnarayanan

    This thesis documents attempts at solving three problems. Bead-based parallel synthetic and screening methods based on matrix algorithms were developed. The method was applied to search for new heterogeneous catalysts for dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane. The most powerful use of the method to date was to optimize metal adsorption and evaluate catalysts as a function of incident energy, likely to be important in the future, should availability of energy be an optimization parameter. This work also highlighted the importance of order of addition of metal salts on catalytic activity and a portion of this work resulted in a patent with UOP LLC, Desplaines, Illinois. Combinatorial methods were also investigated as a tool to search for carbon-monoxide tolerant anode electrocatalysts and methanol tolerant cathode electrocatalysts, resulting in discovery of no new electrocatalysts. A physically intuitive scaling criterion was developed to analyze all experiments on electrocatalysts, providing insight for future experiments. We attempted to solve the CO poisoning problem in polymer electrolyte fuel cells using carbon molecular sieves as a separator. This approach was unsuccessful in solving the CO poisoning problem, possibly due to the tendency of the carbon molecular sieves to concentrate CO and CO 2 in pore walls.

  15. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, Joshua G; Wiest, Heather K; Mascarenas, David D. L.; Macknelly, David

    2010-10-21

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. This harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as a replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modelling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  16. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, Joshua G; Wiest, Heather K; Mascarenas, David D; Park, Gyuhae

    2011-01-24

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  17. Characterization and engineering of ferroelectric microstructures by interferometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.; Paturzo, M.; Alfieri, D.; De Natale, P.; de Angelis, M.; De Nicola, S.; Finizio, A.; Pierattini, G.

    2005-08-01

    In the last years lithium niobate (LN) has become one of the most important optical material in optoelectronics and nonlinear optics for its large electro-optics and nonlinear optical coefficients. Ferroelectric materials are employed in several electrooptic, acousto-optic, and nonlinear optical devices, as modulator of light, beam deflector, optical frequency converters, or tuneable sources of coherent light for spectroscopic applications. Manipulation of ferroelectric domains into gratings, matrices, or other shapes is possible. Fabrication of new ordered microstructures in LN samples through domain engineering followed by differential etching has been developed recently for applications in the fields of optics and optoelectronics. These microstructures have a range of applications in optical ridge waveguides, alignment structures, V-grooves, micro-tips and micro-cantilever beams and precise control of the surface quality and topography is required of for photonic band-gap structures. Moreover engineering ferroelectric domains by an electrical poling technique represent a key process for the construction of a wide range of photonic devices. Therefore, a thorough understanding of material properties and of the poling process are crucial issues. We will show that interferometric approach based on Digital Holography can provide a very useful tool for investigation and characterization of materials and of the engineered structures.

  18. SIMS image processing methods for petroleum cracking catalyst characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Leta, D.P.; Lamberti, W.A.; Disko, M.M.; Kugler, E.L.; Varady, W.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The technique of Imaging Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) has proven to be very well suited to the characterization of fluidized petroleum cracking catalysts (FCC). The ability to view elemental distributions with 0.5 micron spatial resolution at concentrations in the ppm range mates well with the submicron phases and low concentration contaminants present in commercial multi-component FCC particles. The use of ultra-low light level imaging systems with the intrinsically sensitive SIMS technique makes real time viewing of many of the elements important in FCC catalysts possible. Aluminum, silicon and the rare earth elements serve to define the major phases present within each catalyst particle, while the transition row elements and all of the alkali and alkaline elements may be seen at trace concentrations. Of particular importance is the use of the technique to study the distributions of nickel and vanadium which are the most deleterious of the contaminant metals. Modern image processing computers and software now allow the rapid quantitative analysis of SIMS elemental images in order to more clearly reveal the locations of the catalyst phases and the quantitative distributions of the contaminant metals on those phases. Although the analysis techniques discussed in this study may be applied to any of the contaminant elements, for simplicity the authors will limit their examples to the major catalyst elements, and the nickel and vanadium contaminants.

  19. A method for dynamic system characterization using hydraulic series resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongshin; Chesler, Naomi C; Beebe, David J

    2006-05-01

    The pressure required to drive flow through a microfluidic device is an important characteristic of that device. We present a method to measure the flow rate through microfluidic components and systems, including micropumps and microvalves. The measurement platform is composed of two pressure sensors and a glass tube, which provides series resistance. The principle of the measurement is the fluid dynamical equivalent of Ohm's law, which defines the relationship between current, resistance, and voltage that are analogues to flow rate, hydraulic resistance, and pressure drop, respectively. Once the series resistance is known, it is possible to compute the flow rate through a device based on pressure alone. In addition, the dynamic system characteristics of the device-resistance and capacitance-can be computed. The benefits of this method are its simple configuration, capability of measuring flow rate accurately from the more easily measured pressure, and the ability to predict the dynamic response of microfluidic devices. PMID:16652179

  20. Characterization of Meta-Materials Using Computational Electromagnetic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Shin, Joon

    2005-01-01

    An efficient and powerful computational method is presented to synthesize a meta-material to specified electromagnetic properties. Using the periodicity of meta-materials, the Finite Element Methodology (FEM) is developed to estimate the reflection and transmission through the meta-material structure for a normal plane wave incidence. For efficient computations of the reflection and transmission over a wide band frequency range through a meta-material a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) approach is also developed. Using the Nicholson-Ross method and the Genetic Algorithms, a robust procedure to extract electromagnetic properties of meta-material from the knowledge of its reflection and transmission coefficients is described. Few numerical examples are also presented to validate the present approach.

  1. Evolute-based Hough transform method for characterization of ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Kaytanli, B; Valentine, M T

    2013-03-01

    We propose a novel and algorithmically simple Hough transform method that exploits the geometric properties of ellipses to enable the robust determination of the ellipse position and properties. We make use of the unique features of the evolute created by Hough voting along the gradient vectors of a two-dimensional image to determine the ellipse centre, orientation and aspect ratio. A second one-dimensional voting is performed on the minor axis to uniquely determine the ellipse size. This reduction of search space substantially simplifies the algorithmic complexity. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we present analysis of single and multiple ellipsoidal particles, including polydisperse and imperfect ellipsoids, in both simulated images and electron micrographs. Given its mathematical simplicity, ease of implementation and reasonable algorithmic completion time, we anticipate that the proposed method will be broadly useful for image processing of ellipsoidal particles, including their detection and tracking for studies of colloidal suspensions, and for applications to drug delivery and microrheology. PMID:23301634

  2. Characterization of shallow ocean sediments using the airborne electromagnetic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Won, I. J.; Smits, K.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey data collected in Cape Cod Bay are used to derive continuous profiles of water depth, electrical depth, water conductivity, and bottom sediment conductivity. Through a few well-known empirical relationships, the conductivities are used, in turn, to derive density, porosity, sound speed, and acoustic reflectivity of the ocean bottom. A commercially available Dighem III AEM system was used for the survey without any significant modification. The helicopter-borne system operated at 385 and 7200 Hz; both were in a horizontal coplanar configuration. The interpreted profiles show good agreement with available ground truth data. Where no such data are available, the results appear to be very reasonable. Compared with the shipborne electrode array method, the AEM method can determine the necessary parameters at a much higher speed with a better lateral resolution over a wide range of water depths from 0 to perhaps 100 m. The bottom sediment conductivity that can be measured by the AEM method is closely related to physical properties of sediments, such as porosity, density, sound speed, and, indirectly, sediment types that might carry broad implications for various offshore activities.

  3. An alternative method to characterize the surface urban heat island.

    PubMed

    Martin, Philippe; Baudouin, Yves; Gachon, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    An urban heat island (UHI) is a relative measure defined as a metropolitan area that is warmer than the surrounding suburban or rural areas. The UHI nomenclature includes a surface urban heat island (SUHI) definition that describes the land surface temperature (LST) differences between urban and suburban areas. The complexity involved in selecting an urban core and external thermal reference for estimating the magnitude of a UHI led us to develop a new definition of SUHIs that excludes any rural comparison. The thermal reference of these newly defined surface intra-urban heat islands (SIUHIs) is based on various temperature thresholds above the spatial average of LSTs within the city's administrative limits. A time series of images from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) from 1984 to 2011 was used to estimate the LST over the warm season in Montreal, Québec, Canada. Different SIUHI categories were analyzed in consideration of the global solar radiation (GSR) conditions that prevailed before each acquisition date of the Landsat images. The results show that the cumulative GSR observed 24 to 48 h prior to the satellite overpass is significantly linked with the occurrence of the highest SIUHI categories (thresholds of +3 to +7 °C above the mean spatial LST within Montreal city). The highest correlation (≈0.8) is obtained between a pixel-based temperature that is 6 °C hotter than the city's mean LST (SIUHI + 6) after only 24 h of cumulative GSR. SIUHI + 6 can then be used as a thermal threshold that characterizes hotspots within the city. This identification approach can be viewed as a useful criterion or as an initial step toward the development of heat health watch and warning system (HHWWS), especially during the occurrence of severe heat spells across urban areas. PMID:25234752

  4. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  5. An alternative method to characterize the surface urban heat island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philippe; Baudouin, Yves; Gachon, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    An urban heat island (UHI) is a relative measure defined as a metropolitan area that is warmer than the surrounding suburban or rural areas. The UHI nomenclature includes a surface urban heat island (SUHI) definition that describes the land surface temperature (LST) differences between urban and suburban areas. The complexity involved in selecting an urban core and external thermal reference for estimating the magnitude of a UHI led us to develop a new definition of SUHIs that excludes any rural comparison. The thermal reference of these newly defined surface intra-urban heat islands (SIUHIs) is based on various temperature thresholds above the spatial average of LSTs within the city's administrative limits. A time series of images from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) from 1984 to 2011 was used to estimate the LST over the warm season in Montreal, Québec, Canada. Different SIUHI categories were analyzed in consideration of the global solar radiation (GSR) conditions that prevailed before each acquisition date of the Landsat images. The results show that the cumulative GSR observed 24 to 48 h prior to the satellite overpass is significantly linked with the occurrence of the highest SIUHI categories (thresholds of +3 to +7 °C above the mean spatial LST within Montreal city). The highest correlation (≈0.8) is obtained between a pixel-based temperature that is 6 °C hotter than the city's mean LST (SIUHI + 6) after only 24 h of cumulative GSR. SIUHI + 6 can then be used as a thermal threshold that characterizes hotspots within the city. This identification approach can be viewed as a useful criterion or as an initial step toward the development of heat health watch and warning system (HHWWS), especially during the occurrence of severe heat spells across urban areas.

  6. Characterization of the Space Shuttle Ascent Debris using CFD Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2005-01-01

    After video analysis of space shuttle flight STS-107's ascent showed that an object shed from the bipod-ramp region impacted the left wing, a transport analysis was initiated to determine a credible flight path and impact velocity for the piece of debris. This debris transport analysis was performed both during orbit, and after the subsequent re-entry accident. The analysis provided an accurate prediction of the velocity a large piece of foam bipod ramp would have as it impacted the wing leading edge. This prediction was corroborated by video analysis and fully-coupled CFD/six degree of freedom (DOF) simulations. While the prediction of impact velocity was accurate enough to predict critical damage in this case, one of the recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) for return-to-flight (RTF) was to analyze the complete debris environment experienced by the shuttle stack on ascent. This includes categorizing all possible debris sources, their probable geometric and aerodynamic characteristics, and their potential for damage. This paper is chiefly concerned with predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of a variety of potential debris sources (insulating foam and cork, nose-cone ablator, ice, ...) for the shuttle ascent configuration using CFD methods. These aerodynamic characteristics are used in the debris transport analysis to predict flight path, impact velocity and angle, and provide statistical variation to perform risk analyses where appropriate. The debris aerodynamic characteristics are difficult to determine using traditional methods, such as static or dynamic test data, due to the scaling requirements of simulating a typical debris event. The use of CFD methods has been a critical element for building confidence in the accuracy of the debris transport code by bridging the gap between existing aerodynamic data and the dynamics of full-scale, in-flight events.

  7. Wafer warpage characterization measurement with modified fringe reflection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yi; Ku, Yi-Sha

    2015-05-01

    We have demonstrated a modified fringe reflection method to compensate the warpage measurement errors caused by the height difference between optical reference mirror and wafer sample surface. We have used a linearity analysis approach to obtain the parabolic height errors for a 4-inch sapphire wafer warpage measurement, which is around 1.48 μm of 100 μm height difference. The experimental results shows the warp discrepancy of 6-inch sapphire wafer is less than 1 μm compared with the reference Tropel instrument.

  8. Characterization of Diesel Soot Aggregates by Scattering and Extinction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimoto, Takeyuki

    2006-07-01

    Characteristics of diesel soot particles sampled from diesel exhaust of a common-rail turbo-charged diesel engine are quantified by scattering and extinction diagnostics using newly build two laser-based instruments. The radius of gyration representing the aggregates size is measured by the angular distribution of scattering intensity, while the soot mass concentration is measured by a two-wavelength extinction method. An approach to estimate the refractive index of diesel soot by an analysis of the extinction and scattering data using an aggregates scattering theory is proposed.

  9. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional) and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir,’ have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality, and the unique flavor of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast. PMID:23805132

  10. Relationship of roughness of building stones on the effective thermal conductivity determined by transient hot-wire method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Merckx; Jean-Didier, Mertz; Patrick, Dudoignon; David, Giovannacci; Jean-Philippe, Garnier

    2013-04-01

    Alteration of inorganic materials in monuments is mainly related to relative humidity change in the porous network. Characterization of water content is a complex issue, specially in case of non-intrusive measurement. An innovative method is developed to quantify the water content using a direct calculation of the thermal conductivity. In order to validate the non-intrusive application to heritage stone, a control of the influence of the rock-sensor interface is required. The study was carried out on five sedimentary french rocks : three limestones (lithographic, oolithic and micritic), a sandstone of Fontainebleau and the so-called Tuffeau limestone. The textural properties are characterized by optical and electronical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The transient hot-wire method is useful to obtain a quick value of effective conductivity of material. Initially used in liquids and gas, It's now more and more used for solid materials. The calculation of one effective thermal conductivity is formulated by the slope of recorded DT/ln(t) diagrams. In case of continuous and homogeneous media, only one slope can be measured. For heterogeneous solids a typical curve present two slopes : the first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1s) mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus micro texture of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material. In the case of surface measurement, the first part of curve is relevant from the texture and roughness of the material. Roughness properties are determined by an interferometer system on different polished surfaces of the materials. For all studied stones, the arithmetic average roughness (Sa) is ranged between 44 µm and 1 µm, respectively for the coarse-grained limestone (Bretigny) and the finest one (Migné). According to the relative error of the apparatus (10%), the

  11. Lipid-hydrogel nanoparticles: Synthesis methods and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jennifer S.

    This dissertation focuses on the directed self-assembly of nanoscale soft matter particles using methods based on liposome-templating. Nanoscale liposomes, nano-sized hydrogel particles ("nanogels"), and hybrids of the two have enormous potential as carriers in drug delivery and nanotoxicity studies, and as nanovials for enzyme encapsulation and single molecule studies. Our goal is to develop assembly methods that produce stable nanogels or hybrid lipid-polymer nanoparticles, using liposomes as size and shape templates. First we describe a bulk method that employs liposomes to template relatively monodisperse nanogels composed of the biopolymer, alginate, which is a favorable material for nanogel formation because it uses a gentle ionic crosslinking mechanism that is suitable for the encapsulation of cells and biomolecules. Liposomes encapsulating sodium alginate are suspended in aqueous buffer containing calcium chloride, and thermal permeabilization of the lipid membrane facilitates transmembrane diffusion of Ca2+ ions from the surrounding buffer into the intraliposomal space, ionically crosslinking the liposome core. Subsequent lipid removal results in bare calcium alginate nanogels with a size distribution consistent with that of their liposome template. The second part of our study investigates the potential for microfluidic-directed formation of lipid-alginate hybrid nanoparticles by adapting the above bulk self-assembly procedure within a microfluidic device. Specifically we investigated the size control of alginate nanogel self-assembly under different flow conditions and concentrations. Finally, we investigate the microfluidic directed self-assembly of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, using phospholipids and an N-isopropylacrylamide monomer as the liposome and hydrogel precursors, respectively. Microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing is used to control the convective-diffusive mixing of the two miscible nanoparticle precursor solutions to form nanoscale

  12. Improved methods for analysis and biological characterization of fiber.

    PubMed

    Jeraci, J L; Van Soest, P J

    1990-01-01

    Dietary fibers are not uniform, chemically or in their nutritive and biological properties, the only common ground being their resistance to mammalian digestive enzymes. The AOAC method for total fiber is subject to inferences from ash, protein, tannins and resistant starches. These interferences can be reduced by urea enzymatic dialysis. The measurement of soluble and insoluble fiber is nutritionally relevant, since physical properties greatly modify dietary effects of fiber. Insoluble fiber is conveniently measured as neutral-detergent fiber. This procedure has been improved by reducing the starch interference and the time of analysis. Physical and biological properties of dietary fiber can be measured by using relevant procedures for hydration capacity, metal ion exchange capacity and rate of fermentation. The lignin and tannin content modify the characteristics of dietary fiber. PMID:1706559

  13. Characterization of Space Shuttle Ascent Debris Aerodynamics Using CFD Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2005-01-01

    An automated Computational Fluid Dynamics process for determining the aerodynamic Characteristics of debris shedding from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle during ascent is presented. This process uses Cartesian fully-coupled, six-degree-of-freedom simulations of isolated debris pieces in a Monte Carlo fashion to produce models for the drag and crossrange behavior over a range of debris shapes and shedding scenarios. A validation of the Cartesian methods against ballistic range data for insulating foam debris shapes at flight conditions, as well as validation of the resulting models, are both contained. These models are integrated with the existing shuttle debris transport analysis software to provide an accurate and efficient engineering tool for analyzing debris sources and their potential for damage.

  14. PSF and MTF measurement methods for thick CCD sensor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, P. Z.; Kotov, I.; Frank, J.; O'Connor, P.; Radeka, V.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2010-07-01

    Knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) of the sensors to be used in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) camera is essential for optimal extraction of subtle galaxy shape distortions caused by gravitational weak lensing. We have developed a number of techniques for measuring the PSF of candidate CCD sensors to be used in the LSST camera, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. The two main optical PSF measurement techniques that we use are the direct Virtual Knife Edge (VKE) scan as developed by Karcher, et al.1 and the indirect interference fringe method after Andersen and Sorensen2 that measures the modulation transfer function (MTF) directly. The PSF is derived from the MTF by Fourier transform. Other non-optical PSF measurement techniques that we employ include 55Fe x-ray cluster image size measurements and statistical distribution analysis, and cosmic ray muon track size measurements, but are not addressed here. The VKE technique utilizes a diffraction-limited spot produced by a Point-Projection Microscope (PPM) that is scanned across the sensor with sub-pixel resolution. This technique closely simulates the actual operating condition of the sensor in the telescope with the source spot size having an f/# close to the actual telescope design value. The interference fringe method uses a simple equal-optical-path Michelson-type interferometer with a single-mode fiber source that produces interference fringes with 100% contrast over a wide spatial frequency range sufficient to measure the MTF of the sensor directly. The merits of each measurement technique and results from the various measurement techniques on prototype LSST sensors are presented and compared.

  15. PSF and MTF Measurement Methods for Thick CCD Sensor Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Kotov, I.; Frank, J.; O'Connor, P.; Radeka, V.; Lawrence, D.M.

    2010-06-30

    Knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) of the sensors to be used in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) camera is essential for optimal extraction of subtle galaxy shape distortions caused by gravitational weak lensing. We have developed a number of techniques for measuring the PSF of candidate CCD sensors to be used in the LSST camera, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. The two main optical PSF measurement techniques that we use are the direct Virtual Knife Edge (VKE) scan as developed by Karcher, et al. and the indirect interference fringe method after Andersen and Sorensen that measures the modulation transfer function (MTF) directly. The PSF is derived from the MTF by Fourier transform. Other non-optical PSF measurement techniques that we employ include {sup 55}Fe x-ray cluster image size measurements and statistical distribution analysis, and cosmic ray muon track size measurements, but are not addressed here. The VKE technique utilizes a diffraction-limited spot produced by a Point-Projection Microscope (PPM) that is scanned across the sensor with sub-pixel resolution. This technique closely simulates the actual operating condition of the sensor in the telescope with the source spot size having an f/number close to the actual telescope design value. The interference fringe method uses a simple equal-optical-path Michelson-type interferometer with a single-mode fiber source that produces interference fringes with 100% contrast over a wide spatial frequency range sufficient to measure the MTF of the sensor directly. The merits of each measurement technique and results from the various measurement techniques on prototype LSST sensors are presented and compared.

  16. Investigation of optical methods for hydroyield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, J.A.; Lynch, C.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Two fiber optic techniques, the Linear Resistive Ladder (LRL) and the piezo-driven LED arrangement, were investigated and successfully demonstrated in the laboratory to be capable of being used for hydroyield measurements. Prototype linear arrangements for each of the above methods were constructed and placed in a designed UGT. The piezo-driven LED method appears very attractive as it showed the potential for becoming an all passive, non-intrusive'' treaty verification method capable of functioning at stress levels ranging from less than 1Kbar to 100 Kbars. Other optical methods using fiber optics for detection mechanisms and signal transmissions were also conceptually examined. 11 figs.

  17. An evaluation of rise time characterization and prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Leick D.

    1994-01-01

    One common method of extrapolating sonic boom waveforms from aircraft to ground is to calculate the nonlinear distortion, and then add a rise time to each shock by a simple empirical rule. One common rule is the '3 over P' rule which calculates the rise time in milliseconds as three divided by the shock amplitude in psf. This rule was compared with the results of ZEPHYRUS, a comprehensive algorithm which calculates sonic boom propagation and extrapolation with the combined effects of nonlinearity, attenuation, dispersion, geometric spreading, and refraction in a stratified atmosphere. It is shown there that the simple empirical rule considerably overestimates the rise time estimate. In addition, the empirical rule does not account for variations in the rise time due to humidity variation or propagation history. It is also demonstrated that the rise time is only an approximate indicator of perceived loudness. Three waveforms with identical characteristics (shock placement, amplitude, and rise time), but with different shock shapes, are shown to give different calculated loudness. This paper is based in part on work performed at the Applied Research Laboratories, the University of Texas at Austin, and supported by NASA Langley.

  18. Innovative methods for optimization and characterization of multilayer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzo, M. G.; Suman, M.; Monaco, G.; Windt, D. L.; Nicolosi, P.

    2009-05-01

    A numerical method to design multilayer coating (ML) is presented. The mathematical tool is based on an "evolutive strategy" algorithm which provides aperiodic solutions by maximizing input merit functions. It allows the optimization of any kind of structures, comprising interlayers and capping layers, and modelling also inter-diffusion and interface roughness. It has been applied to the design of MLs for different applications, as photolithography, space instrumentation and short pulse preservation/compression. The optimization allows the control of the standing wave distribution inside the ML. When the EUV radiation interacts with the structure, the superposition of the incident and reflected electromagnetic wave generates a standing wave field distribution in the ML. An aperiodic design allows the regulation of the distribution of this field, attributing specific properties to the ML. An experimental technique to recover standing wave intensity on top of the ML is also cited. The technique is based on electron photoemission measurements, which allow to determine both reflectivity as well as phase on top of ML. Thanks to this technique, both tests of the ML performances compliance with expected theoretical ones and of degradation through time can be carried on.

  19. Study Methods to Characterize and Implement Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The limits and conditions under which an infrared thermographic nondestructive evaluation can be utilized to assess the quality of aerospace hardware is demonstrated in this research effort. The primary focus of this work is on applying thermography to the inspection of advanced composite structures such as would be found in the International Space Station Instrumentation Racks, Space Shuttle Cargo Bay Doors, Bantam RP-1 tank or RSRM Nose Cone. Here, the detection of delamination, disbond, inclusion and porosity type defects are of primary interest. In addition to composites, an extensive research effort has been initiated to determine how well a thermographic evaluation can detect leaks and disbonds in pressurized metallic systems "i.e. the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzles". In either case, research into developing practical inspection procedures was conducted and thermographic inspections were performed on a myriad of test samples, subscale demonstration articles and "simulated" flight hardware. All test samples were fabricated as close to their respective structural counterparts as possible except with intentional defects for NDE qualification. As an added benefit of this effort to create simulated defects, methods were devised for defect fabrication that may be useful in future NDE qualification ventures.

  20. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, J. G.; Morris, B. J.; Meschter, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Crystals were prepared by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method with a wide range of crystal growth rates and temperature gradients adequate to prevent constitutional supercooling under diffusion-limited, steady-state, growth conditions. The longitudinal compositional gradients for different growth conditions and alloy compositions were calculated and compared with experimental data to develop a quantitative model of solute redistribution during the crystal growth of the alloys. Measurements were performed to ascertain the effect of growth conditions on radial compositional gradients. The pseudobinary HgTe-CdTe constitutional phase diagram was determined by precision differential-thermal-analysis measurements and used to calculate the segregation coefficient of Cd as a function of x and interface temperature. Experiments were conducted to determine the ternary phase equilibria in selected regions of the Hg-Cd-Te constitutional phase diagram. Electron and hole mobilities as functions of temperature were analyzed to establish charge-carrier scattering probabilities. Computer algorithms specific to Hg(1-x)CdxTe were developed for calculations of the charge-carrier concentration, charge-carrier mobilities, Hall coefficient, and Dermi Fermi energy as functions of x, temperature, ionized donor and acceptor concentrations, and neutral defect concentrations.

  1. Characterization and Classification of Lanthanides by Multivariate-Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horovitz, Ossi; Sârbu, Costel

    2005-03-01

    A chemometric study was conducted on a data set consisting of 18 characteristics, mainly physical properties of the 14 lanthanides and lanthanum, including Sc and Y. Classical methods of multivariate analysis, namely, principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were applied. The results obtained by using the Statistica software package are presented and discussed concerning the correlations between the properties and those between the elements themselves. The discussion and findings are based on the tables of correlation, the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of PCA, the 2D- and 3D-representations of the loadings of variables and scores of the elements corresponding to the first principal components, including also the dendrograms obtained by using CA. Loadings scatterplots are used as a display tool for examining the relationships between properties, looking for trends, grouping, or outliers. In the same way, the scatterplots of scores emphasized the difference between La and the lanthanides on the one side and Sc and Y on the other and support setting Lu as their homologue, rather than La. On the basis of these findings, a ”periodic system“ of the lanthanides is suggested that agrees well with chemical intuition.

  2. The Development of Testing Methods for Characterizing Emissions and Sources of Exposures from Polyurethane Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between onsite manufacture of spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI) and potential exposures is not well understood. Currently, no comprehensive standard test methods exist for characterizing and quantifying product emissions. Exposures to diisocyanate compoun...

  3. Development of method to characterize emissions from spray polyurethane foam insulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation updates symposium participants re EPA progress towards development of SPF insulation emissions characterization methods. The presentation highlights evaluation of experiments investigating emissions after application of SPF to substrates in micro chambers and i...

  4. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods

    PubMed Central

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  5. Characterization and diagnostic methods for geomagnetic auroral infrasound waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Justin J.

    Infrasonic perturbations resulting from auroral activity have been observed since the 1950's. In the last decade advances in infrasonic microphone sensitivity, high latitude sensor coverage, time series analysis methods and computational efficiency have elucidated new types of auroral infrasound. Persistent periods of infrasonic activity associated with geomagnetic sub-storms have been termed geomagnetic auroral infrasound waves [GAIW]. We consider 63 GAIW events recorded by the Fairbanks, AK infrasonic array I53US ranging from 2003 to 2014 and encompassing a complete solar cycle. We make observations of the acoustic features of these events alongside magnetometer, riometer, and all-sky camera data in an effort to quantify the ionospheric conditions suitable for infrasound generation. We find that, on average, the generation mechanism for GAIW is confined to a region centered about ~60 0 longitude east of the anti-Sun-Earth line and at ~770 North latitude. We note furthermore that in all cases considered wherein imaging riometer data are available, that dynamic regions of heightened ionospheric conductivity periodically cross the overhead zenith. Consistent features in concurrent magnetometer conditions are also noted, with irregular oscillations in the horizontal component of the field ubiquitous in all cases. In an effort to produce ionosphere based infrasound free from the clutter and unknowns typical of geophysical observations, an experiment was undertaken at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program [HAARP] facility in 2012. Infrasonic signals appearing to originate from a source region overhead were observed briefly on 9 August 2012. The signals were observed during a period when an electrojet current was presumed to have passed overhead and while the facilities radio transmitter was periodically heating the lower ionosphere. Our results suggest dynamic auroral electrojet currents as primary sources of much of the observed infrasound, with

  6. Semi-automatic version of the potentiometric titration method for characterization of uranium compounds.

    PubMed

    Cristiano, Bárbara F G; Delgado, José Ubiratan; da Silva, José Wanderley S; de Barros, Pedro D; de Araújo, Radier M S; Dias, Fábio C; Lopes, Ricardo T

    2012-09-01

    The potentiometric titration method was used for characterization of uranium compounds to be applied in intercomparison programs. The method is applied with traceability assured using a potassium dichromate primary standard. A semi-automatic version was developed to reduce the analysis time and the operator variation. The standard uncertainty in determining the total concentration of uranium was around 0.01%, which is suitable for uranium characterization and compatible with those obtained by manual techniques. PMID:22406220

  7. Assessment of Proper Bonding Methods and Mechanical Characterization FPGA CQFPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Milton C.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses fractured leads on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) during flight vibration. Actions taken to determine root cause and resolution of the failure include finite element analysis (FEA) and vibration testing and scanning electron microscopy (with X-ray microanalysis) and energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) failure assessment. Bonding methods for surface mount parts is assessed, including critical analysis and assessment of random fatigue damage. Regarding ceramic quad flat pack (CQFP) lead fracture, after disassembling the attitude control electronics (ACE) configuration, photographs showed six leads cracked on FPGA RTSX72SU-1 CQ208B package located on the RWIC card. An identical package (FPGA RTSX32SU-1 CQ208B) mounted on the RWIC did not results in cracked pins due to vibration. FPGA lead failure theories include workmanship issues in the lead-forming, material defect in the leads of the FPGA packages, and the insecure mounting of the board in the card guides, among other theories. Studies were conducted using simple calculations to determine the response and fatigue life of the package. Shorter packages exhibited more response when loaded by out-of-plane displacement of PCB while taller packages exhibit more response when loaded by in-plane acceleration of PCB. Additionally, under-fill did not contribute to reducing stress in leads due to out-of-plane PCB loading or from component twisting, as much as corner bonding. The combination of corner bond and under-fill is best to address mechanical and thermal S/C environment. Test results of bonded parts showed reduced (dampened) amplitude and slightly shifted peaks at the un-bonded natural frequency and an additional response at the bonded frequency. Stress due to PCBB out-of-plane loading was decreased on in the corners when only a corner bond was used. Future work may address CQFP fatigue assessment, including the investigation of discrepancy in predicted fatigue damage, as well as

  8. Novel method for fast characterization of high-surface-area electrocatalytic materials using carbon fiber microelectrode.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; Hodnik, N.; Hocevar, S. B.; van der Vliet, D.; Zorko, M.; Stamenovic, V. R.; Pihlar, B.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; National Inst. of Chemistry; Univ. Ljubljana

    2010-02-18

    A carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) was used for characterization of the nanoparticle catalysts as an alternative to the well-established rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. We found that the novel CFME method yielded comparable results to the RDE method when investigating the adsorption/desorption processes as well the specific activity for reactions such as the oxygen reduction reaction. Its major advantage over the RDE method is a fast sample preparation and rapid measurement, reducing significantly the time of a single sample characterization from 2-3 h to a favorable 5-10 min.

  9. Efficient Characterization of Parametric Uncertainty of Complex (Bio)chemical Networks.

    PubMed

    Schillings, Claudia; Sunnåker, Mikael; Stelling, Jörg; Schwab, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Parametric uncertainty is a particularly challenging and relevant aspect of systems analysis in domains such as systems biology where, both for inference and for assessing prediction uncertainties, it is essential to characterize the system behavior globally in the parameter space. However, current methods based on local approximations or on Monte-Carlo sampling cope only insufficiently with high-dimensional parameter spaces associated with complex network models. Here, we propose an alternative deterministic methodology that relies on sparse polynomial approximations. We propose a deterministic computational interpolation scheme which identifies most significant expansion coefficients adaptively. We present its performance in kinetic model equations from computational systems biology with several hundred parameters and state variables, leading to numerical approximations of the parametric solution on the entire parameter space. The scheme is based on adaptive Smolyak interpolation of the parametric solution at judiciously and adaptively chosen points in parameter space. As Monte-Carlo sampling, it is "non-intrusive" and well-suited for massively parallel implementation, but affords higher convergence rates. This opens up new avenues for large-scale dynamic network analysis by enabling scaling for many applications, including parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, and systems design. PMID:26317784

  10. A simple method for characterizing the RF properties of high-temperature superconductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.; Pandey, R. K.; Skrehot, M. K.; Li, M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method using a resonant strip in a rectangular waveguide has been devised for superconductive material characterization. The method has the advantages of simplicity; and it requires only a small piece of the superconductive material. The resonant frequency of the superconductive strip can be predicted theoretically.

  11. HPLC method to characterize cyanogen bromide collagen fractions containing pyridinoline groups.

    PubMed

    Bruno, R; Mazza, R; Calafiori, A R; Covello, C; Falbo, L; Martino, G; Marotta, M

    1997-01-01

    The HPLC method here described allows to separate CNBr collagen peptides within 2.5 h by reversed phase and gradient elution. The method is useful to determine both peptide bond and pyridinoline groups by absorbance spectophotometry. The fractions can be recovered and then submitted to other characterization techniques. PMID:10327703

  12. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Method for Characterizing Spectra from Foodborne Pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method, which provides both spatial and spectral characteristics of samples, can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based HMI method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilms formed by Salmon...

  13. Adaptive calibration of a three-microphone system for acoustic waveguide characterization under time-varying conditions.

    PubMed

    van Walstijn, Maarten; de Sanctis, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    The pressure and velocity field in a one-dimensional acoustic waveguide can be sensed in a non-intrusive manner using spatially distributed microphones. Experimental characterization with sensor arrangements of this type has many applications in measurement and control. This paper presents a method for measuring the acoustic variables in a duct under fluctuating propagation conditions with specific focus on in-system calibration and tracking of the system parameters of a three-microphone measurement configuration. The tractability of the non-linear optimization problem that results from taking a parametric approach is investigated alongside the influence of extraneous measurement noise on the parameter estimates. The validity and accuracy of the method are experimentally assessed in terms of the ability of the calibrated system to separate the propagating waves under controlled conditions. The tracking performance is tested through measurements with a time-varying mean flow, including an experiment conducted under propagation conditions similar to those in a wind instrument during playing. PMID:25234899

  14. Computer-enhanced photon tunneling microscopy for composite materials characterization and durability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinmeyer, James D.

    1996-11-01

    In an effort to reduce cost and maximize the utility of each test specimen, our laboratory has incorporated several types of non-intrusive techniques for surface analysis and sample characterization. The newest and one of the most promising techniques is computer enhanced photon tunneling microscopy. This paper describes our current photon tunneling microscopy system and its use in the characterization of polymer matrix composite materials surfaces. The technique of photon tunneling microscopy was first made available commercially through a licensee of the Polaroid Corporation in 1992. Our system was purchased in 1994 and has been used primarily to study the effects of accelerated aging on composite materials.

  15. An Innovative Method for Dynamic Characterization of Fan FilterUnit Operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2006-12-21

    Fan filter units (FFU) are widely used to deliver re-circulated air while providing filtration control of particle concentration in controlled environments such as cleanrooms, minienvironments, and operating rooms in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to document an innovative method for characterizing operation and control of an individual fan filter unit within its operable conditions. Built upon the draft laboratory method previously published [1] , this paper presents an updated method including a testing procedure to characterize dynamic operation of fan filter units, i.e., steady-state operation conditions determined by varied control schemes, airflow rates, and pressure differential across the units. The parameters for dynamic characterization include total electric power demand, total pressure efficiency, airflow rate, pressure differential across fan filter units, and airflow uniformity.

  16. Self-triggered method for characterization of single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, Thiago

    2016-03-01

    Single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs) are instruments capable of measuring light at the single-photon level. Some important features of these devices must be correctly characterized for reliable application. In this paper, I present a high-resolution self-triggered method for characterization of SPADs based on the analysis of the time intervals between consecutive detection events with the detector under continuous-wave illumination. The self-triggered method is employed for characterization of the detection dead time-a limiting feature for the maximum counting rate achievable under free-running or gated modes-and of the temporal gate width-an important parameter when the detector is operated under gated mode. The measurement results are presented and the method is experimentally validated. PMID:26974614

  17. Characterization of polarization-independent phase modulation method for practical plug and play quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Osung; Lee, Min-Soo; Woo, Min Ki; Park, Byung Kwon; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Yong-Su; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung

    2015-12-01

    We characterized a polarization-independent phase modulation method, called double phase modulation, for a practical plug and play quantum key distribution (QKD) system. Following investigation of theoretical backgrounds, we applied the method to the practical QKD system and characterized the performance through comparing single phase modulation (SPM) and double phase modulation. Consequently, we obtained repeatable and accurate phase modulation confirmed by high visibility single photon interference even for input signals with arbitrary polarization. Further, the results show that only 80% of the bias voltage required in the case of single phase modulation is needed to obtain the target amount of phase modulation.

  18. Characterizing collagen-based materials modified by glycation: a multiphoton optical image guided spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu-Jer; Granelli, Joseph; Flores, Christina; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2011-02-01

    In spite of the adverse ageing effects of glycation in vivo, in vitro this process is widely employed to increase stiffness and strength of tissues' and artificial scaffolds'. In-situ optical characterization methods that report on the structures within these materials could clarify the effects of glycation. We employed one-photon fluorescence and multiphoton microscopy method that combined two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals to characterize collagen hydrogels modified with glyceraldehyde, ribose and glucose. We observed an increase in the in situ fluorescence as well as structural alterations within the materials during the course of glycation.

  19. Microbial communities in the saturated groundwater environment I: Methods of isolation and characterization of heterotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kölbel-Boelke, J; Tienken, B; Nehrkorn, A

    1988-07-01

    In this paper we present a method of isolation and morphological and physiological characterization of groundwater bacteria based on numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis, and using a miniaturized test system (microtiter plates). Bacteria were isolated randomly on P-agar, and each strain was characterized in regard to 155 features. The media for biochemical differentiation are listed as well as methods of morphological discrimination. 246 strains of heterotrophic and oligotrophic bacteria, isolated from five water samples from different depths of the saturated groundwater area, were used for optimizing media and test reactions. PMID:24201530

  20. Test method development for structural characterization of fiber composites at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.; Edwards, B.

    1985-01-01

    Test methods used for structural characterization of polymer matrix composites can be applied to glass and ceramic matrix composites only at low temperatures. New test methods are required for tensile, compressive, and shear properties of fiber composites at high temperatures. A tensile test which should be useful to at least 1000 C has been developed and used to characterize the properties of a Nicalon/glass composite up to the matrix limiting temperature of 600 C. Longitudinal and transverse unidirectional composite data are presented and discussed.

  1. Using pre-screening methods for an effective and reliable site characterization at megasites.

    PubMed

    Algreen, Mette; Kalisz, Mariusz; Stalder, Marcel; Martac, Eugeniu; Krupanek, Janusz; Trapp, Stefan; Bartke, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    This paper illustrates the usefulness of pre-screening methods for an effective characterization of polluted sites. We applied a sequence of site characterization methods to a former Soviet military airbase with likely fuel and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) contamination in shallow groundwater and subsoil. The methods were (i) phytoscreening with tree cores; (ii) soil gas measurements for CH4, O2, and photoionization detector (PID); (iii) direct-push with membrane interface probe (MIP) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) sensors; (iv) direct-push sampling; and (v) sampling from soil and from groundwater monitoring wells. Phytoscreening and soil gas measurements are rapid and inexpensive pre-screening methods. Both indicated subsurface pollution and hot spots successfully. The direct-push sensors yielded 3D information about the extension and the volume of the subsurface plume. This study also expanded the applicability of tree coring to BTEX compounds and tested the use of high-resolution direct-push sensors for light hydrocarbons. Comparison of screening results to results from conventional soil and groundwater sampling yielded in most cases high rank correlation and confirmed the findings. The large-scale application of non- or low-invasive pre-screening can be of help in directing and focusing the subsequent, more expensive investigation methods. The rapid pre-screening methods also yielded useful information about potential remediation methods. Overall, we see several benefits of a stepwise screening and site characterization scheme, which we propose in conclusion. PMID:25982981

  2. Non-intrusive parameter identification procedure user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, G. D.; Jewell, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    Written in standard FORTRAN, NAS is capable of identifying linear as well as nonlinear relations between input and output parameters; the only restriction is that the input/output relation be linear with respect to the unknown coefficients of the estimation equations. The output of the identification algorithm can be specified to be in either the time domain (i.e., the estimation equation coefficients) or in the frequency domain (i.e., a frequency response of the estimation equation). The frame length ("window") over which the identification procedure is to take place can be specified to be any portion of the input time history, thereby allowing the freedom to start and stop the identification procedure within a time history. There also is an option which allows a sliding window, which gives a moving average over the time history. The NAS software also includes the ability to identify several assumed solutions simultaneously for the same or different input data.

  3. Small-angle X-ray scattering method to characterize molecular interactions: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Allec, Nicholas; Choi, Mina; Yesupriya, Nikhil; Szychowski, Brian; White, Michael R; Kann, Maricel G; Garcin, Elsa D; Daniel, Marie-Christine; Badano, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing biomolecular interactions is crucial to the understanding of biological processes. Existing characterization methods have low spatial resolution, poor specificity, and some lack the capability for deep tissue imaging. We describe a novel technique that relies on small-angle X-ray scattering signatures from high-contrast molecular probes that correlate with the presence of biomolecular interactions. We describe a proof-of-concept study that uses a model system consisting of mixtures of monomer solutions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as the non-interacting species and solutions of GNP dimers linked with an organic molecule (dimethyl suberimidate) as the interacting species. We report estimates of the interaction fraction obtained with the proposed small-angle X-ray scattering characterization method exhibiting strong correlation with the known relative concentration of interacting and non-interacting species. PMID:26160052

  4. A method of characterizing network topology based on the breadth-first search tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Wang, Nianxin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-05-01

    A method based on the breadth-first search tree is proposed in this paper to characterize the hierarchical structure of network. In this method, a similarity coefficient is defined to quantitatively distinguish networks, and quantitatively measure the topology stability of the network generated by a model. The applications of the method are discussed in ER random network, WS small-world network and BA scale-free network. The method will be helpful for deeply describing network topology and provide a starting point for researching the topology similarity and isomorphism of networks.

  5. Comparative advantages and limitations of the basic metrology methods applied to the characterization of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Linkov, Pavel; Artemyev, Mikhail; Efimov, Anton E; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Fabrication of modern nanomaterials and nanostructures with specific functional properties is both scientifically promising and commercially profitable. The preparation and use of nanomaterials require adequate methods for the control and characterization of their size, shape, chemical composition, crystalline structure, energy levels, pathways and dynamics of physical and chemical processes during their fabrication and further use. In this review, we discuss different instrumental methods for the analysis and metrology of materials and evaluate their advantages and limitations at the nanolevel. PMID:23934544

  6. A new experimental method for the accelerated characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of composite materials for a variety of practical structural applications is presented and the need for an accelerated characterization procedure is assessed. A new experimental and analytical method is presented which allows the prediction of long term properties from short term tests. Some preliminary experimental results are presented.

  7. Method of characterizing residual stress in ferromagnetic materials using a pulse histogram of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Grainger, John L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for characterizing residual uniaxial stress in a ferromagnetic test member by distinguishing between residual stresses resulting from positive (tension) forces and negative (compression) forces by using the distinct and known magnetoacoustic (MAC) and a magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) measurement circuit means. A switch permits the selective operation of the respective circuit means.

  8. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  9. COLLECTION OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER BY POROUS VEGETATION BARRIERS: SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript describes work done by A. Reff as part of a collaboration begun 3 years ago at Rutgers University with A. Tiwary who was then at the University of Nottingham. The work describes sampling and characterization methods for investigating the effects of vegetative bar...

  10. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  11. Reasoning Maps: A Generally Applicable Method for Characterizing Hypothesis-Testing Behaviour. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a generally applicable method for characterizing subjects' hypothesis-testing behaviour based on a synthesis that extends on previous work. Beginning with a transcript of subjects' speech and videotape of their actions, a Reasoning Map is created that depicts the flow of their hypotheses, tests, predictions, results, and…

  12. Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, A.B.; Craig, H.D.; Jenkins, T.F.; Sisk, W.E.

    1996-09-01

    A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

  13. Development of a method to characterize high-protein dairy powders using an ultrasonic flaw detector.

    PubMed

    Hauser, M; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-02-01

    Dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders plays a critical role for achieving functional and nutritional characteristics of a finished food product. Current methods for evaluating powder dissolution properties are time consuming, difficult to reproduce, and subjective. Ultrasound spectroscopy is a rapid and precise method, but requires expensive equipment and skilled technicians to carry out the tests. In the present study, an ultrasonic flaw detector (UFD) was used as an economical alternative to characterize the powder dissolution properties. The objective of study was to develop a method to characterize the dissolution behavior of milk protein concentrate (MPC) using a UFD. The experimental setup included a UFD connected to a 1-MHz immersion transducer that was kept a constant distance from a reflector plate. To validate the method, 2 batches of MPC80 from a commercial manufacturer were procured and stored at 25 and 40°C for 4 wk. Focus beam reflectance measurement and solubility index were used as reference methods. Relative ultrasound velocity and ultrasound attenuation were acquired during the dissolution of MPC samples. To characterize the MPC dissolution, 4 parameters including standard deviation of relative velocity, area under the attenuation curve, and peak attenuation were extracted from ultrasound data. As the storage temperature and time increased, the area under the attenuation curve and peak height decreased, indicating a loss of solubility. The proposed UFD-based method was able to capture the changes in dissolution of MPC during storage at 25 and 40°C. It was observed that a high-quality MPC had a low standard deviation and a larger area under the attenuation curve. As the MPC aged at 40°C, the particle dispersion rate decreased and, consequently, an increase in standard deviation and reduction in area were observed. Overall, the UFD can be a low-cost method to characterize the dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders. PMID

  14. A direct method for evaluating the concentration of boric acid in a fuel pool using scintillation detectors for joint-multiplicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Axell, Kåre; Pázsit, Imre; Nordlund, Anders; Sarwar, Rashed

    2013-06-01

    The present investigations are aimed at the development of a direct passive non-intrusive method for determining the concentration of boric acid in a spent fuel pool using scintillation detectors with the purpose of correcting joint-multiplicity measurement results. The method utilizes a modified relation between two gamma lines with energy of 480 keV and 2.23 MeV, respectively. The gamma line at 480 keV belongs to the thermal neutron capture in boron. The 2.23 MeV gamma line characterizes the capture of thermal neutrons in hydrogen. Thus, the relation between them can reveal the concentration of the boron in the fuel pool. In order to test this method, first MCNPX and MCNP-PoliMi simulations were performed. Then, based on the results of Monte Carlo simulations, the method was verified by an experimental study with a 241Am-Be source and EJ-309 scintillation detectors. The concentration of boron in water varied from 1550 ppm to 4000 ppm. The results of these tests are provided in the paper and they show that the spectral ratio between these two lines can in principle be used to determine the boron content.

  15. Motor degradation prediction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  16. Multiple line arrays for the characterization of aeroacoustic sources using a time-reversal method.

    PubMed

    Mimani, A; Doolan, C J; Medwell, P R

    2013-10-01

    This letter investigates the use of multiple line arrays (LAs) in a Time-Reversal Mirror for localizing and characterizing multipole aeroacoustic sources in a uniform subsonic mean flow using a numerical Time-Reversal (TR) method. Regardless of the original source characteristics, accuracy of predicting the source location can be significantly improved using at least two LAs. Furthermore, it is impossible to determine the source characteristics using a single LA, rather a minimum of two are required to establish either the monopole or dipole source nature, while four LAs (fully surrounding the source) are required for characterizing a lateral quadrupole source. PMID:24116538

  17. Filtration Characterization Method as Tool to Assess Membrane Bioreactor Sludge Filterability—The Delft Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lousada-Ferreira, Maria; Krzeminski, Pawel; Geilvoet, Stefan; Moreau, Adrien; Gil, Jose A.; Evenblij, Herman; van Lier, Jules B.; van der Graaf, Jaap H. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Prevention and removal of fouling is often the most energy intensive process in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs), responsible for 40% to 50% of the total specific energy consumed in submerged MBRs. In the past decade, methods were developed to quantify and qualify fouling, aiming to support optimization in MBR operation. Therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the lessons learned and how to proceed. In this article, five different methods for measuring MBR activated sludge filterability and critical flux are described, commented and evaluated. Both parameters characterize the fouling potential in full-scale MBRs. The article focuses on the Delft Filtration Characterization method (DFCm) as a convenient tool to characterize sludge properties, namely on data processing, accuracy, reproducibility, reliability, and applicability, defining the boundaries of the DFCm. Significant progress was made concerning fouling measurements in particular by using straight forward approaches focusing on the applicability of the obtained results. Nevertheless, a fouling measurement method is still to be defined which is capable of being unequivocal, concerning the fouling parameters definitions; practical and simple, in terms of set-up and operation; broad and useful, in terms of obtained results. A step forward would be the standardization of the aforementioned method to assess the sludge filtration quality. PMID:24957174

  18. Filtration characterization method as tool to assess membrane bioreactor sludge filterability-the delft experience.

    PubMed

    Lousada-Ferreira, Maria; Krzeminski, Pawel; Geilvoet, Stefan; Moreau, Adrien; Gil, Jose A; Evenblij, Herman; van Lier, Jules B; van der Graaf, Jaap H J M

    2014-01-01

    Prevention and removal of fouling is often the most energy intensive process in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs), responsible for 40% to 50% of the total specific energy consumed in submerged MBRs. In the past decade, methods were developed to quantify and qualify fouling, aiming to support optimization in MBR operation. Therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the lessons learned and how to proceed. In this article, five different methods for measuring MBR activated sludge filterability and critical flux are described, commented and evaluated. Both parameters characterize the fouling potential in full-scale MBRs. The article focuses on the Delft Filtration Characterization method (DFCm) as a convenient tool to characterize sludge properties, namely on data processing, accuracy, reproducibility, reliability, and applicability, defining the boundaries of the DFCm. Significant progress was made concerning fouling measurements in particular by using straight forward approaches focusing on the applicability of the obtained results. Nevertheless, a fouling measurement method is still to be defined which is capable of being unequivocal, concerning the fouling parameters definitions; practical and simple, in terms of set-up and operation; broad and useful, in terms of obtained results. A step forward would be the standardization of the aforementioned method to assess the sludge filtration quality. PMID:24957174

  19. Unidirectional growth of benzil crystal from solution by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, M; Shyju, T S; Indirajith, R; Gopalakrishnan, R

    2012-02-01

    Good quality <100> benzil single crystal with a diameter 18 mm and length 75 mm was successfully grown from solution by the unidirectional growth method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) for the first time in the literature. The seed crystals have been harvested from conventional solution growth technique and subsequently used for unidirectional growth. The grown crystal was subjected to various characterization studies. The results of UV-vis spectral analysis, photoluminescence, etching and microhardness studies were compared with conventional solution grown crystal to that of SR method grown crystal. The quality of SR method grown benzil crystal is better than conventional solution grown crystal. PMID:22088560

  20. Unidirectional growth of benzil crystal from solution by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, M.; Shyju, T. S.; Indirajith, R.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2012-02-01

    Good quality <1 0 0> benzil single crystal with a diameter 18 mm and length 75 mm was successfully grown from solution by the unidirectional growth method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) for the first time in the literature. The seed crystals have been harvested from conventional solution growth technique and subsequently used for unidirectional growth. The grown crystal was subjected to various characterization studies. The results of UV-vis spectral analysis, photoluminescence, etching and microhardness studies were compared with conventional solution grown crystal to that of SR method grown crystal. The quality of SR method grown benzil crystal is better than conventional solution grown crystal.

  1. Method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Yelton, William G; Kerr, Dayle R; Bouchier, Francis A

    2012-10-23

    A method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks can be used to optimize the operation of an analytical system. With a two-dimensional Peclet analysis, the quality and signal fidelity of peaks in a two-dimensional experimental space can be analyzed and scored. This method is particularly useful in determining optimum operational parameters for an analytical system which requires the automated analysis of large numbers of analyte data peaks. For example, the method can be used to optimize analytical systems including an ion mobility spectrometer that uses a temperature stepped desorption technique for the detection of explosive mixtures.

  2. Standardization of Nanoparticle Characterization: Methods for Testing Properties, Stability, and Functionality of Edible Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McClements, Jake; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-10

    There has been a rapid increase in the fabrication of various kinds of edible nanoparticles for oral delivery of bioactive agents, such as those constructed from proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and/or minerals. It is currently difficult to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of nanoparticle-based delivery systems because researchers use different analytical instruments and protocols to characterize them. In this paper, we briefly review the various analytical methods available for characterizing the properties of edible nanoparticles, such as composition, morphology, size, charge, physical state, and stability. This information is then used to propose a number of standardized protocols for characterizing nanoparticle properties, for evaluating their stability to environmental stresses, and for predicting their biological fate. Implementation of these protocols would facilitate comparison of the performance of nanoparticles under standardized conditions, which would facilitate the rational selection of nanoparticle-based delivery systems for different applications in the food, health care, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25850035

  3. SCMPSP: Prediction and characterization of photosynthetic proteins based on a scoring card method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Photosynthetic proteins (PSPs) greatly differ in their structure and function as they are involved in numerous subprocesses that take place inside an organelle called a chloroplast. Few studies predict PSPs from sequences due to their high variety of sequences and structues. This work aims to predict and characterize PSPs by establishing the datasets of PSP and non-PSP sequences and developing prediction methods. Results A novel bioinformatics method of predicting and characterizing PSPs based on scoring card method (SCMPSP) was used. First, a dataset consisting of 649 PSPs was established by using a Gene Ontology term GO:0015979 and 649 non-PSPs from the SwissProt database with sequence identity <= 25%.- Several prediction methods are presented based on support vector machine (SVM), decision tree J48, Bayes, BLAST, and SCM. The SVM method using dipeptide features-performed well and yielded - a test accuracy of 72.31%. The SCMPSP method uses the estimated propensity scores of 400 dipeptides - as PSPs and has a test accuracy of 71.54%, which is comparable to that of the SVM method. The derived propensity scores of 20 amino acids were further used to identify informative physicochemical properties for characterizing PSPs. The analytical results reveal the following four characteristics of PSPs: 1) PSPs favour hydrophobic side chain amino acids; 2) PSPs are composed of the amino acids prone to form helices in membrane environments; 3) PSPs have low interaction with water; and 4) PSPs prefer to be composed of the amino acids of electron-reactive side chains. Conclusions The SCMPSP method not only estimates the propensity of a sequence to be PSPs, it also discovers characteristics that further improve understanding of PSPs. The SCMPSP source code and the datasets used in this study are available at http://iclab.life.nctu.edu.tw/SCMPSP/. PMID:25708243

  4. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J. ); Caldwell, J.T. )

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Growth and characterization of nanostructured aerosol produced by diffusion flame and spray pyrolysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Hyung

    The present research is aimed at developing methods to characterize and study the growth of nano-particles and nano-structured materials. The thesis is divided into two parts. One part deals with the development of the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA), which is the principal method used in this study to characterize the size and electrical charge of particles formed in a high temperature flame. The second part of the thesis deals with the formation of nano-structured materials with zeolite-type structures. The particles are characterized to determine their size, porosity and surface area. It is well known that nano-sized aerosol particles from combustion sources are charged. Even though the basic charging mechanisms are reasonably well understood qualitatively, techniques for characterizing the charge and size distribution of aerosols from combustion sources are not well developed. In the present study, a method is developed to accurately measure the charge and size distribution of nano-sized combustion aerosols by means of a TDMA. From a series of TDMA measurements, the charge fraction of nano-sized soot particles from a flame is obtained as a function of equivalent mobility particle diameter ranging from 50 to 200nm. The method is then used to characterize the size and charge of combustion aerosols. The results are compared to theory, including the new theory developed in this study. To develop a new synthetic method of nano-structured aerosol particles, a thermal tubular reactor is employed. New spray-pyrolytic and aerosol-gel methods are developed to form nanoporous metal oxides, in which thermally stable and easily leached inorganic matrix is employed to extend the porosity of zeolite-typed materials. The characteristics of the nanoporous material, such as surface area and particle morphology are investigated as a function of relative humidity, temperature, and precursor fractions. The physical and chemical properties of materials synthesized are

  6. An automatic form error evaluation method for characterizing micro-structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. P.; Zhong, X.; Wong, Y. S.; Hong, G. S.; Lu, W. F.; Cheng, H. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-precision micro-structured surfaces are becoming increasingly important in a range of application areas, including engineering optics, biological products, metrology artifacts, data storage, etc. However, there is a lack of surface characterization methods for the micro-structured surfaces with sub-nanometer accuracy. Although some research studies have been conducted on 3D surface characterization, most of them are on freeform surfaces, which are difficult to be applied on the micro-structured surfaces because of their limited characterization accuracy and the repeated surface feature patterns in the micro-structured surfaces. In this paper, an automatic form error evaluation method (AFEEM) is presented to characterize the form accuracy of the micro-structured surfaces. The machined micro-structured surface can be measured by any 3D high resolution measurement instrument. The measurement data are converted and pre-processed for the AFEEM, which mainly consists of a coarse registration and a fine registration process. The coarse registration estimates an initial position of the measured surface for the fine registration by extracting the most perceptually salient points in the surfaces, computing the integral volume descriptor for each salient point, searching for the best triplet-point correspondence and calculating the coarse registration matrix. The fine registration aligns the measured surface to the designed surface by a proposed adaptive iterative closest point algorithm to guarantee sub-nanometer accuracy for surface characterization. A series of computer simulations and experimental studies were conducted to verify the AFEEM. Results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the AFEEM for characterizing the micro-structured surfaces.

  7. Methods for Characterizing Participants’ Nonmainstream Dialect Use in Child Language Research

    PubMed Central

    Oetting, Janna B.; McDonald, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Three different approaches to the characterization of research participants’ nonmainstream dialect use can be found in the literature. They include listener judgment ratings, type-based counts of nonmainstream pattern use, and token-based counts. In this paper, we examined these three approaches, as well as shortcuts to these methods, using language samples from 93 children previously described in J. Oetting and J. McDonald (2001). Nonmainstream dialects represented in the samples included rural Louisiana versions of Southern White English (SWE) and Southern African American English (SAAE). Depending on the method and shortcut used, correct dialect classifications (SWE or SAAE) were made for 88% to 97% of the participants; however, regression algorithms had to be applied to the type- and token-based results to achieve these outcomes. For characterizing the rate at which the participants produced the nonmainstream patterns, the token-based methods were found to be superior to the others, but estimates from all approaches were moderately to highly correlated with each other. When type- and/or token-based methods were used to characterize participants’ dialect type and rate, the number of patterns included in the analyses could be substantially reduced without significantly affecting the validity of the outcomes. These findings have important implications for future child language studies that are done within the context of dialect diversity. PMID:12069003

  8. Applications of PFNA-based measurements to mixed-waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, T.; Pentaleri, E.

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed fast neutron analysis (PFNA) is a non-intrusive characterization technique that has developed to a high level of technical maturity. PFNA is capable of providing detailed maps of key elemental spatial distributions throughout waste packages of various shapes. These spatial distributions can be combined to detect and assess the waste package content of specific materials of interest and to measure other important features such as the distribution of neutron moderating materials and the thermal energy that will be released upon combustion of the waste in a thermal treatment process.

  9. Borehole Fluid Logging Methods for Hydrogeologic Characterization: What Have We Learned in Twenty-Five Years?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedler, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, several methods have been developed and enhanced to improve the capability to characterize hydraulically conductive intervals in wellbores. The principal, and most commonly employed, methods include the heat pulse flow meter, the electromagnetic flow meter, and hydrophysical (or FEC) logging. The primary objective of each of these methods is to identify the depth of the water bearing (conductive) intervals and estimate the volumetric flow rate of each conductive interval under one or more pressure conditions. The pressure conditions under which measurements are taken include ambient (native), pumping or injection of the subject well and/or pumping a well proximate to the subject (cross-hole testing). During this period, these methods have been applied in effectively all of the hydrogeologic systems including fractured bedrock, fractured sandstones, porous alluvium, massive and fractured clays, karst, and volcanics. Project applications range from contaminant fate and transport, geotechnical, mining and water supply. These methods evaluate flow in the wellbore fluid column by applying either stationary and/or profile-type logging measurements. Each of these methods evaluates flow in a distinct and unique way and, as such, there are limitations associated with each measurement method. The analytical methods to reduce the field data to the stated objectives also vary in complexity between the different methods. Numerous field and laboratory comparative studies have been conducted to evaluate, compare and verify the results of these methods. This poster will present a summary of these methods, recent updates, variety of applications and associated limitations.

  10. A rapid method to characterize seabed habitats and associated macro-organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, T.J.; Cochrane, G.R.; Roberts, D.A.; Chezar, H.; Hatcher, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents a method for rapidly collecting, processing, and interrogating real-time abiotic and biotic seabed data to determine seabed habitat classifications. This is done from data collected over a large area of an acoustically derived seabed map, along multidirectional transects, using a towed small camera-sled. The seabed, within the newly designated Point Harris Marine Reserve on the northern coast of San Miguel Island, California, was acoustically imaged using sidescan sonar then ground-truthed using a towed small camera-sled. Seabed characterizations were made from video observations, and were logged to a laptop computer (PC) in real time. To ground-truth the acoustic mosaic, and to characterize abiotic and biotic aspects of the seabed, a three-tiered characterization scheme was employed that described the substratum type, physical structure (i.e., bedform or vertical relief), and the occurrence of benthic macrofauna and flora. A crucial advantage of the method described here, is that preliminary seabed characterizations can be interrogated and mapped over the sidescan mosaic and other seabed information within hours of data collection. This ability to rapidly process seabed data is invaluable to scientists and managers, particularly in modifying concurrent or planning subsequent surveys.

  11. Characterization of detector modulation-transfer function with noise, edge, and holographic methods.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robert A; Malac, Marek

    2013-06-01

    We developed a new method for characterization of detector performance used in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) based on the measured contrast of holographic fringes. The new method changes spatial frequency of the measured holographic fringes, generated by an electrostatic biprism and Schottky or cold field-emission gun, to sample the modulation-transfer function (MTF) of the detector. The MTF of a Gatan Ultrascan™ 1000 charged-coupled detector (CCD) is evaluated using the new method and the results are compared to the established noise and slanted-edge method results. Requirements for accuracy of the edge and noise MTF methods are discussed. We consider issues surrounding incomplete read-out and how it affects the gain reference normalization of the detector. We evaluate how the MTF affects optimization of experimental parameters in the TEM. PMID:23603855

  12. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods to characterize anomalous microstructures in titanium-6aluminum-4vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Mark Patrick

    The main objective of this dissertation is to confirm through research the following hypothesis: "The use of nondestructive evaluation tools allows the detection of different microstructure types and allows the identification of microstructure anomalies (interior and surface) in metals and alloys." The work was conducted on Ti-6A1-4V forged bar stock, presenting a case study for a high performance structural alloy. Ti-6A1-4V is a good model material, which cannot tolerate microstructure anomalies in demanding applications. The alloy is well established with extensive documentation on physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. It is also available in many different microstructures, readily generated by heat treating. This dissertation addresses issues concerning microstructure characterization and the identification of microstructural anomalies. Specifically, this work includes (i) background research on the identification of ultrasonic and electrical characteristics of five different TP6A1-4V microstructures; (ii) an application of ultrasonic backscattering measurements to detect diffusion bonded Ti-6A1-4V microstructure changes, to simulate locally isolated remnant cast structure for billet NDI; (iii) original research on laser interferometric detection for ultrasonic phase mapping to characterize macroscopic texture in Ti-6A1-4V; and (iv) original research on eddy current electrical conductivity mapping in titanium alloys. Three original NDE methods were developed to evaluate microstructure and microstructure anomalies in Ti-6A1-4V. First, a forward scattering measurement technique was developed to spatially map the incoherent grain scattering in the forward propagation direction. These results showed, for the first time, that mapping of the forward scatter provides a basis for characterization of texture in polycrystalline titanium alloys. Second, a laser interferometric system was developed to map the signal amplitude and phase of the transmitted acoustic

  13. On the application of Allan variance method for Ring Laser Gyro performance characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L.C.

    1993-10-15

    This report describes the method of Allan variance and its application to the characterization of a Ring Laser Gyro`s (RLG) performance. Allan variance, a time domain analysis technique, is an accepted IEEE standard for gyro specifications. The method was initially developed by David Allan of the National Bureau of Standards to quantify the error statistics of a Cesium beam frequency standard employed as the US Frequency Standards in 1960`s. The method can, in general, be applied to analyze the error characteristics of any precision measurement instrument. The key attribute of the method is that it allows for a finer, easier characterization and identification of error sources and their contribution to the overall noise statistics. This report presents an overview of the method, explains the relationship between Allan variance and power spectral density distribution of underlying noise sources, describes the batch and recursive implementation approaches, validates the Allan variance computation with a simulation model, and illustrates the Allan variance method using data collected from several Honeywell LIMU units.

  14. Surface topography characterization of automotive cylinder liner surfaces using fractal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence K, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores the use of fractal approaches for the possible characterization of automotive cylinder bore surface topography by employing methods such as differential box counting method, power spectral method and structure function method. Three stage plateau honing experiments were conducted to manufacture sixteen cylinder liner surfaces with different surface topographies, for the study. The three fractal methods are applied on the image data obtained using a computer vision system and 3-D profile data obtained using vertical scanning white light interferometer from the cylinder liner surfaces. The computed fractal parameters (fractal dimension and topothesy) are compared and correlated with the measured 3-D Abbott-Firestone curve parameters (Sk, Spk, Svk, Sr1 and Sr2) that are currently used for the surface topography characterization cylinder liner surfaces. The analyses of the results indicated that the fractal dimension (D) computed using the vision data as well as 3-D profile data by employing three different fractal methods consistantly showed a negative correlation with the functional surface topographical parameters that represents roughness at peak (Spk),core (Sk) and valley (Svk) regions and positive correlation with the upper bearing area (Sr1) and lower bearing area (Sr2) of the automotive of cylinder bore surface.

  15. Field Demonstrations of Five Geophysical Methods that Could Be Used to Characterize Deposits of Alluvial Aggregate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Burton, B.L.; Lucius, J.E.; Haines, S.S.; Fitterman, D.V.; Witty, J.A.; Carlson, D.; Milburn, B.; Langer, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey and Martin Marietta Aggregates, Inc., conducted field demonstrations of five different geophysical methods to show how these methods could be used to characterize deposits of alluvial aggregate. The methods were time-domain electromagnetic sounding, electrical resistivity profiling, S-wave reflection profiling, S-wave refraction profiling, and P-wave refraction profiling. All demonstrations were conducted at one site within a river valley in central Indiana, where the stratigraphy consisted of 1 to 2 meters of clay-rich soil, 20 to 35 meters of alluvial sand and gravel, 1 to 6 meters of clay, and multiple layers of limestone and dolomite bedrock. All geophysical methods, except time-domain electromagnetic sounding, provided information about the alluvial aggregate that was consistent with the known geology. Although time-domain electromagnetic sounding did not work well at this site, it has worked well at other sites with different geology. All of these geophysical methods complement traditional methods of geologic characterization such as drilling.

  16. Method for characterizing the coking tendencies of baseoils and additive-treated oils

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a method of characterizing the coking tendency of baseoil. The method consists the steps of: (a) subjecting the baseoil to conditions which accelerate asphaltene coke precursor formation in the baseoil, and (b) characterizing the coking tendency of the baseoil by determining (i) the onset and progression of asphaltene coke precursor formation as a function of time or (ii) the progression of asphaltene coke precursor formation as a function of time, wherein a faster onset of asphaltene coke precursor formation and a higher rate of asphaltene coke precursor formation or a higher rate of asphaltene coke precursor formation indicates a higher coking tendency of the baseoil than a slower onset of asphaltene coke precursor formation and a lower rate of asphaltene coke precursor formation or a lower rate of asphaltene coke precursor formation.

  17. Ptychographic phase retrieval method for characterizing ultra-precise ellipsoidal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, Yoko; Saito, Takahiro; Mimura, Hidekazu

    2015-10-01

    Focusing and imaging optics can be characterized by evaluating the wavefront error of the focused beam. We have bean developing a ptychographic phase retrieval method using a visible laser to measure the wavefront error. In this study, the measurement accuracy of the method is increased by improving both the phase retrieval algorithm and the experimental setup. The system is applied to the characterization of an ellipsoidal mirror used for the focusing of soft X-rays. The posture of the mirror can be measured with a resolution of 1.4 μrad. The wavefront error originating from the surface profile error can be detected with an accuracy of 0.01λ (root mean square).

  18. "METHOD": A tool for mechanical, electrical, thermal, and optical characterization of single lens module design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, Pierre; Dominguez, Cesar; Voarino, Philippe; Garcia-Linares, Pablo; Weick, Clement; Lemiti, Mustapha; Baudrit, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    The optical characterization and electrical performance evaluation are essential in the design and optimization of a concentrator photovoltaic system. The geometry, materials, and size of concentrator optics are diverse and different environmental conditions impact their performance. CEA has developed a new concentrator photovoltaic system characterization bench, METHOD, which enables multi-physics optimization studies. The lens and cell temperatures are controlled independently with the METHOD to study their isolated effects on the electrical and optical performance of the system. These influences can be studied in terms of their effect on optical efficiency, focal distance, spectral sensitivity, electrical efficiency, or cell current matching. Furthermore, the irradiance map of a concentrator optic can be mapped to study its variations versus the focal length or the lens temperature. The present work shows this application to analyze the performance of a Fresnel lens linking temperature to optical and electrical performance.

  19. A Novel Method for Characterization of Superconductors: Physical Measurements and Modeling of Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, B. F.; Moorjani, K.; Phillips, T. E.; Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Dolecek, Q. E.

    1993-01-01

    A method for characterization of granular superconducting thin films has been developed which encompasses both the morphological state of the sample and its fabrication process parameters. The broad scope of this technique is due to the synergism between experimental measurements and their interpretation using numerical simulation. Two novel technologies form the substance of this system: the magnetically modulated resistance method for characterizing superconductors; and a powerful new computer peripheral, the Parallel Information Processor card, which provides enhanced computing capability for PC computers. This enhancement allows PC computers to operate at speeds approaching that of supercomputers. This makes atomic scale simulations possible on low cost machines. The present development of this system involves the integration of these two technologies using mesoscale simulations of thin film growth. A future stage of development will incorporate atomic scale modeling.

  20. The characterization of carbon nanotube infused glass fibers by single filament fragmentation test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Andrew Michael

    Single filament fragmentation tests were completed for individual glass fibers with varying surface treatments and carbon nanostructure infusions. Fiber fragmentation was analyzed by embedding a single filament into a standard tensile interface, which provided shear stress transfer between a conventional epoxy resin system and the constituent filament. Established single filament fragmentation techniques were used to characterize fiber and interface properties. A novel method of comparing fibers is introduced by correlating bundle tow test results to fiber fragmentation critical length data to qualitatively relate fiber performance. Photoelastic birefringent stress fringes were processed at select fiber fragmentation locations to further characterize the fiber-resin, or fiber-carbon nanostructure-resin, interface. Overall, the performance matrix qualitative comparison method, coupled with stress fringe analysis, proved to be an effective means of qualitatively evaluating fiber and processing parameters, and efficiently identifies the most fruitful path forward for optimized fiber development.

  1. Optimal mask characterization by Surrogate Wafer Print (SWaP) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.; Hoellein, Ingo; Peters, Jan Hendrick; Ackmann, Paul; Connolly, Brid; West, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, definition of mask specifications is done completely by the mask user, while characterization of the mask relative to the specifications is done completely by the mask maker. As the challenges of low-k1 imaging continue to grow in scope of designs and in absolute complexity, the inevitable partnership between wafer lithographers and mask makers has strengthened as well. This is reflected in the jointly owned mask facilities and device manufacturers' continued maintenance of fully captive mask shops which foster the closer mask-litho relationships. However, while some device manufacturers have leveraged this to optimize mask specifications before the mask is built and, therefore, improve mask yield and cost, the opportunity for post-fabrication partnering on mask characterization is more apparent and compelling. The Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) has been investigating the concept of assessing how a mask images, rather than the mask's physical attributes, as a technically superior and lower-cost method to characterize a mask. The idea of printing a mask under its intended imaging conditions, then characterizing the imaged wafer as a surrogate for traditional mask inspections and measurements represents the ultimate method to characterize a mask's performance, which is most meaningful to the user. Surrogate wafer print (SWaP) is already done as part of leading-edge wafer fab mask qualification to validate defect and dimensional performance. In the past, the prospect of executing this concept has generally been summarily discarded as technically untenable and logistically intractable. The AMTC published a paper at BACUS 2007 successfully demonstrating the performance of SWaP for the characterization of defects as an alternative to traditional mask inspection [1]. It showed that this concept is not only feasible, but, in some cases, desirable. This paper expands on last year's work at AMTC to assess the full implementation of SWaP as an

  2. Method for in situ characterization of a medium of dispersed matter in a continuous phase

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, E.N.

    1995-03-07

    A method is described for the in situ characterization of a medium of a dispersed phase in a continuous phase, including the steps of adding a fluorescent dye to one phase capable of producing fluorescence therein when the fluorescent dye is optically excited, optically exciting the fluorescent dye at a wavelength to produce fluorescence in the one phase, and monitoring the fluorescence to distinguish the continuous phase from the dispersed phase. 2 figs.

  3. Method for in situ characterization of a medium of dispersed matter in a continuous phase

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Eric N.

    1995-01-01

    A method for in situ characterization of a medium of a dispersed phase in a continuous phase, including the steps of adding a fluorescent dye to one phase capable of producing fluorescence therein when the fluorescent dye is optically excited, optically exciting the fluorescent dye at a wavelength to produce fluorescence in the one phase, and monitoring the fluorescence to distinguish the continuous phase from the dispersed phase.

  4. Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.W.; Molz, F.J.; Brame, S.E.; Falta, R.W.

    2003-02-07

    Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

  5. Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

    2003-02-07

    Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

  6. Characterization by mass cytometry of different methods for the preparation of muscle mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Spada, Filomena; Fuoco, Claudia; Pirrò, Stefano; Paoluzi, Serena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Gargioli, Cesare; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-09-25

    Biological processes that are mediated by cell-cell interactions in heterogeneous populations are best approached by methods that have single cell resolution. Most of these methods rely on the preparation, from solid tissues, of cell suspensions by enzymatic digestion, followed by analysis of single cell reactivity to an antibody panel that allows the discrimination of cell populations and characterization of their activation state. Thus for any specific biological problem, both efficient and at the same time mild, protocols for cell separation, together with tissue specific panels of antibodies, need to be developed and optimized. Here we characterize an antibody panel that permits the discrimination of mononuclear muscle cell populations by mass cytometry and use it to characterize the cell populations obtained by three different cell extraction procedures from muscle fibers. We show that our panel of antibodies, albeit limited and incomplete, is sufficient to discriminate most of the mononuclear muscle cell populations and that each cell extraction method yields heterogeneous cell populations with a different relative abundance of the distinct cell types. PMID:26773739

  7. Electrically conductive proppant and methods for detecting, locating and characterizing the electrically conductive proppant

    DOEpatents

    Cannan, Chad; Bartel, Lewis; Palisch, Terrence; Aldridge, David

    2015-01-13

    Electrically conductive proppants and methods for detecting, locating, and characterizing same are provided. The electrically conductive proppant can include a substantially uniform coating of an electrically conductive material having a thickness of at least 500 nm. The method can include injecting a hydraulic fluid into a wellbore extending into a subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to open a fracture therein, injecting into the fracture a fluid containing the electrically conductive proppant, electrically energizing the earth at or near the fracture, and measuring three dimensional (x, y, and z) components of electric and magnetic field responses at a surface of the earth or in an adjacent wellbore.

  8. Characterizing a novel and sensitive method to measure dsRNA in soil.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Joshua R; Zapata, Fatima; Dubelman, Samuel; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Jensen, Peter D; Levine, Steven L

    2016-10-01

    Performing environmental assessments for double-stranded RNA-based agricultural products require the development of sensitive and selective methods to measure biodegradation rates of dsRNAs. We developed and characterized a novel analytical procedure that uses a molecular hybridization assay (QuantiGene(®)) to accurately measure dsRNA extracted from diverse soils. In this report, we utilize this method to demonstrate that two dsRNAs with distinct size, structure, and sequence degrade rapidly in soil with indistinguishable kinetics. PMID:27441991

  9. Electro-Optical Sensing Apparatus and Method for Characterizing Free-Space Electromagnetic Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Libelo, Louis Francis; Wu, Qi

    1999-09-14

    Apparatus and methods for characterizing free-space electromagnetic energy, and in particular, apparatus/method suitable for real-time two-dimensional far-infrared imaging applications are presented. The sensing technique is based on a non-linear coupling between a low-frequency electric field and a laser beam in an electro-optic crystal. In addition to a practical counter-propagating sensing technique, a co-linear approach is described which provides longer radiated field--optical beam interaction length, thereby making imaging applications practical.

  10. Nonlinear optical characterization of ZnS thin film synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Sreeja V.; V, Sabitha P.; Anila, E. I.; R, Reshmi; John, Manu Punnan; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2014-10-01

    ZnS thin film was prepared by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis (CSP) method. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction method and Z scan technique. XRD pattern showed that ZnS thin film has hexagonal structure with an average size of about 5.6nm. The nonlinear optical properties of ZnS thin film was studied by open aperture Z-Scan technique using Q-switched Nd-Yag Laser at 532nm. The Z-scan plot showed that the investigated ZnS thin film has saturable absorption behavior. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturation intensity were also estimated.

  11. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods. PMID:26995732

  12. Nonlinear optical characterization of ZnS thin film synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    G, Sreeja V; Anila, E. I. R, Reshmi John, Manu Punnan; V, Sabitha P; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2014-10-15

    ZnS thin film was prepared by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis (CSP) method. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction method and Z scan technique. XRD pattern showed that ZnS thin film has hexagonal structure with an average size of about 5.6nm. The nonlinear optical properties of ZnS thin film was studied by open aperture Z-Scan technique using Q-switched Nd-Yag Laser at 532nm. The Z-scan plot showed that the investigated ZnS thin film has saturable absorption behavior. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturation intensity were also estimated.

  13. Methods for characterizing the fate and effects of nano zerovalent iron during groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenqing; Fan, Dimin; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G; Nurmi, James T; Wu, Yuxin; Williams, Kenneth H

    2015-10-01

    The emplacement of nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) for groundwater remediation is usually monitored by common measurements such as pH, total iron content, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) by potentiometry. However, the interpretation of such measurements can be misleading because of the complex interactions between the target materials (e.g., suspensions of highly reactive and variably aggregated nanoparticles) and aquifer materials (sediments and groundwater), and multiple complications related to sampling and detection methods. This paper reviews current practice for both direct and indirect characterizations of nZVI during groundwater remediation and explores prospects for improving these methods and/or refining the interpretation of these measurements. To support our recommendations, results are presented based on laboratory batch and column studies of nZVI detection using chemical, electrochemical, and geophysical methods. Chemical redox probes appear to be a promising new method for specifically detecting nZVI, based on laboratory tests. The potentiometric and voltammetric detections of iron nanoparticles, using traditional stationary disc electrodes, rotating disc electrodes, and flow-through cell disc electrodes, provide insight for interpreting ORP measurements, which are affected by solution chemistry conditions and the interactions between iron nanoparticles and the electrode surface. The geophysical methods used for characterizing ZVI during groundwater remediation are reviewed and its application for nZVI detection is assessed with results of laboratory column experiments. PMID:25841976

  14. Complementary MS Methods Assist Conformational Characterization of Antibodies with Altered S-S Bonding Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lisa M.; Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Kumar, Sandeep; Sperry, Justin B.; Carroll, James A.; Gross, Michael L.

    2013-06-01

    As therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) become a major focus in biotechnology and a source of the next-generation drugs, new analytical methods or combination methods are needed for monitoring changes in higher order structure and effects of post-translational modifications. The complexity of these molecules and their vulnerability to structural change provide a serious challenge. We describe here the use of complementary mass spectrometry methods that not only characterize mutant mAbs but also may provide a general framework for characterizing higher order structure of other protein therapeutics and biosimilars. To frame the challenge, we selected members of the IgG2 subclass that have distinct disulfide isomeric structures as a model to evaluate an overall approach that uses ion mobility, top-down MS sequencing, and protein footprinting in the form of fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP). These three methods are rapid, sensitive, respond to subtle changes in conformation of Cys → Ser mutants of an IgG2, each representing a single disulfide isoform, and may be used in series to probe higher order structure. The outcome suggests that this approach of using various methods in combination can assist the development and quality control of protein therapeutics.

  15. X-ray based methods for non-destructive testing and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Randolf; Fuchs, Theobald; Uhlmann, Norman

    2008-06-01

    The increasing complexity and miniaturization in the field of new materials as well as in micro-production requires in the same way improvements and technical advances in the field of micro-NDT to provide better quality data and more detailed knowledge about the internal structures of micro-components. Therefore, non-destructive methods like radioscopy, ultrasound, optical or thermal imaging increasingly gain in importance with respect to ongoing product and material development in the different phases like material characterization, production control or module reliability testing. Because of the manifold different application fields, i.e., certain physical NDT methods applied to material inspection, characterization or reliability testing, this contribution will focus on the radioscopic-based methods related to their most important applications. Today, in modern industrial quality control, X-ray transmission is used in two different ways: Two-dimensional radioscopic transmission imaging (projection technique), usually applied to inline inspection tasks in application fields like lightweight material production, electronic component soldering or food production. Computed tomography (CT) for generation of three-dimensional data, representing spatial information and density distribution of objects. CT application fields are on the one hand the understanding of production process failure or component and module inspection (completeness) and on the other hand the dimensional measuring of hidden geometrical outlines (metrology). This paper demonstrates the methods including technical set-ups (X-ray source and detector), imaging and reconstruction results and the methods for high speed and high-resolution volume data generation and evaluation.

  16. Complementary MS Methods Assist Conformational Characterization of Antibodies with Altered S–S Bonding Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lisa M.; Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Kumar, Sandeep; Sperry, Justin B.; Carroll, James A.; Gross, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    As therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) become a major focus in biotechnology and a source of the next-generation drugs, new analytical methods or combination methods are needed for monitoring changes in higher order structure and effects of post-translational modifications. The complexity of these molecules and their vulnerability to structural change provide a serious challenge. We describe here the use of complementary mass spectrometry methods that not only characterize mutant mAbs but also may provide a general framework for characterizing higher order structure of other protein therapeutics and biosimilars. To frame the challenge, we selected members of the IgG2 subclass that have distinct disulfide isomeric structures as a model to evaluate an overall approach that uses ion mobility, top-down MS sequencing, and protein footprinting in the form of fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP). These three methods are rapid, sensitive, respond to subtle changes in conformation of Cys→Ser mutants of an IgG2, each representing a single disulfide isoform, and may be used in series to probe higher order structure. The outcome suggests that this approach of using various methods in combination can assist the development and quality control of protein therapeutics. PMID:23483515

  17. Growth and characterization of unidirectional (100) KDP single crystal by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, S; Ramasamy, P

    2009-01-01

    Unidirectional (100) potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KDP) single crystals were grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. The (100) oriented seed crystals were mounted at the bottom of the glass ampoules and the crystals of 20mm diameter, 30 mm height and 15 mm diameter, 65 mm height were grown by SR method. The grown crystals were characterized by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry anlaysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, dielectric and microhardness studies. The high-resolution X-ray diffractometry anlaysis indicates that the crystalline perfection is excellent without having any very low angle internal structural grain boundaries. The SR method-grown unidirectional KDP has 15% higher transmittance compared to conventional method-grown crystals. The dielectric constant was higher and the dielectric loss was less in SR method-grown crystal. The crystals grown by SR method have much higher hardness value than conventional method-grown crystals. The quality of the crystal grown by SR method is better than conventional method-grown crystal. PMID:18805048

  18. Characterization of <0 1 0> directed KAP single crystals grown by Sankaranarayanan Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Pandian, M.; Balamurugan, N.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2008-08-01

    Single crystals of potassium acid phthalate (KAP), a semi-organic compound, have been grown at an average growth rate of 4 mm/day from aqueous solution by using the uniaxial crystal growth method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR). Transparent, cylindrical KAP crystal of size 70 mm length and 15 mm diameter was grown. The grown crystals were characterized by etching and UV-vis NIR analysis. HRXRD analysis indicates that the crystalline perfection of SR method-grown KAP is good. The KAP crystals grown by SR method have 9% higher transmittance than conventional method-grown crystal. The microhardness test was carried out on the (0 1 0) face and a load-dependent hardness was observed. TG-DTA evaluated the thermal properties of the grown crystal. KAP was found to be thermally stable up to 290 °C. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the crystal were studied as function of frequency and temperature.

  19. Characterizing a proton beam with two different methods in beam halo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong-Ping; Fu, Shi-Nian; Peng, Jun; Cheng, Peng; Huang, Tao; Li, Peng; Li, Fang; Li, Jian; Liu, Hua-Chang; Liu, Mei-Fei; Meng, Ming; Meng, Cai; Mu, Zhen-Cheng; Rong, Lin-Yan; Ouyang, Hua-Fu; Sun, Biao; Wang, Bo; Tian, Jian-Min; Wang, Biao; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Tao-Guang; Xu, Xin-An; Xin, Wen-Qu; Zhao, Fu-Xiang; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Wen-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    In beam halo experiments, it is very important to correctly characterize the RFQ output proton beam. In order to simulate the beam dynamics properly, we must first know the correct initial beam parameters. We have used two different methods, quadrupole scans and multi-wire scanners to determine the transverse phase-space properties of the proton beam. The experimental data were analyzed by fitting to the 3-D nonlinear simulation code IMPACT. For the quadrupole scan method, we found that the RMS beam radius and the measured beam-core profiles agreed very well with the simulations. For the multi-wire scanner method, we choose the case of a matched beam. By fitting the IMPACT simulation results to the measured data, we obtained the Courant-Snyder parameters and the emittance of the beam. The difference between the two methods is about eight percent, which is acceptable in our experiments.

  20. Instructional Review: An Introduction to Optical Methods for Characterizing Liquid Crystals at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Carlton, Rebecca J.; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2013-01-01

    This Instructional Review describes methods and underlying principles that can be used to characterize both the orientations assumed spontaneously by liquid crystals (LCs) at interfaces and the strength with which the LCs are held in those orientations (so-called anchoring energies). The application of these methods to several different classes of LC interfaces is described, including solid and aqueous interfaces as well as planar and non-planar interfaces (such as those that define a LC-in-water emulsion droplet). These methods, which enable fundamental studies of the ordering of LCs at polymeric, chemically-functionalized and biomolecular interfaces, are described in this article at a level that can be easily understood by a non-expert reader such as an undergraduate or graduate student. We focus on optical methods because they are based on instrumentation that is found widely in research and teaching laboratories. PMID:23347378

  1. Reasoning maps: a generally applicable method for characterizing hypothesis-testing behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian

    This paper presents a generally applicable method for characterizing subjects' hypothesis-testing behaviour based on a synthesis that extends on previous work. Beginning with a transcript of subjects' speech and videotape of their actions, a Reasoning Map is created that depicts the flow of their hypotheses, tests, predictions, results, and conclusions. The methods are described and then applied to a group of three undergraduate biology students testing hypothesis in an inquiry-based laboratory exercise, the Red and White Yeast Lab. Analysis of hypothesis-testing behaviour via Reasoning Maps reveals most of the features explored in previous studies in a unified context. In addition, Reasoning Maps allow analysis of higher-order patterns in hypothesis testing that are not possible using existing methods. We have designed these methods so that they will provide a common language for analysing and understanding hypothesis testing that will allow global comparisons of behaviour.

  2. Treatability and characterization of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in South African waters using newly developed methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, T. I.; Krause, R. W. M.; Haarhoff, J.; Mamba, B. B.

    Managing the removal of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) or problematic components from water has become increasingly important. NOM is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds of human origin and derived from plant and microbial residues. The inadequate removal of NOM has a bearing on the capacity of the other treatment processes to remove organic micro-pollutants or inorganic species that may be present in the water. In addition the action of certain disinfection processes has been shown to lead to the formation of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs). Owing to the complexity, in composition and structure, of NOM, the techniques currently employed for its characterization have a number of limitations, both in terms of quantification and removal of the NOM within short periods of time. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and Fluorescence Emission Excitation Matrices (FEEM) were used to characterize NOM from various water samples collected around South Africa. Characterization results gave an indication of the character of NOM present in all the water samples. FEEM and UV-Vis results indicated that most of the water samples were aromatic in nature, since they had high hydrophobic and humic acid-like materials content. Generally, the characterization data indicated a varying composition of NOM amongst the various sampling points. The polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) was then employed as a rapid NOM characterization tool. The characterization under PRAM is based on preferential adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions onto solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents. The PRAM also allows the separation of DOM into fractions by polarity, hence reducing the molecular heterogeneity of NOM and thus aiding the removal of specific NOM fractions from water. The PRAM provided a quick characterization of the NOM character. However, DOC quantification by the PRAM analysis was hindered by excessive carbon leaching

  3. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules.

    PubMed

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature. PMID:26329215

  4. Optical characterization of anti reflective sol-gel coatings fabricated using dip coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Juškevičius, K.; Maciulevičius, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Beganskienė, A.; Kazadojev, I.; Kareiva, A.; Perednis, D.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in further development of sol-gel method which can produce ceramics and glasses using chemical precursors at relative low-temperatures. The applications for sol-gel derived products are numerous. Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry with Laser Research Center of Vilnius University and Institute of Physics continues an ongoing research effort on the synthesis, deposition and characterization of porous solgel. Our target is highly optically resistant anti-reflective (AR) coatings for general optics and nonlinear optical crystals. In order to produce AR coatings a silica (SiO II) sol-gel has been dip coated on the set of fused silica substrates. The optical properties and structure of AR-coatings deposited from hydrolysed tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) sol were characterized in detail in this study. The influence of different parameters on the formation of colloidal silica antireflective coatings by dip-coating technique has been investigated. All samples were characterized performing, transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, ellipsometric, total scattering and laser-induced damage threshold measurements. Herewith we present our recent results on synthesis of sol-gel solvents, coating fabrication and characterization of their optical properties.

  5. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature.

  6. Characterization of uncertainties in atmospheric trace gas inversions using hierarchical Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A. L.; Rigby, M.; Zammit-Mangion, A.; Manning, A. J.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Harth, C. M.; Kim, K.-R.; Krummel, P. B.; Li, S.; Mühle, J.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Park, S.; Salameh, P. K.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present a hierarchical Bayesian method for atmospheric trace gas inversions. This method is used to estimate emissions of trace gases as well as "hyper-parameters" that characterize the probability density functions (PDFs) of the a priori emissions and model-measurement covariances. By exploring the space of "uncertainties in uncertainties", we show that the hierarchical method results in a more complete estimation of emissions and their uncertainties than traditional Bayesian inversions, which rely heavily on expert judgment. We present an analysis that shows the effect of including hyper-parameters, which are themselves informed by the data, and show that this method can serve to reduce the effect of errors in assumptions made about the a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties. We then apply this method to the estimation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions over 2012 for the regions surrounding four Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) stations. We find that improper accounting of model representation uncertainties, in particular, can lead to the derivation of emissions and associated uncertainties that are unrealistic and show that those derived using the hierarchical method are likely to be more representative of the true uncertainties in the system. We demonstrate through this SF6 case study that this method is less sensitive to outliers in the data and to subjective assumptions about a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties than traditional methods.

  7. Characterization of uncertainties in atmospheric trace gas inversions using hierarchical Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A. L.; Rigby, M.; Zammit-Mangion, A.; Manning, A. J.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Harth, C. M.; Kim, K.-R.; Krummel, P. B.; Li, S.; Mühle, J.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Park, S.; Salameh, P. K.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    We present a hierarchical Bayesian method for atmospheric trace gas inversions. This method is used to estimate emissions of trace gases as well as "hyper-parameters" that characterize the probability density functions (PDF) of the a priori emissions and model-measurement covariances. By exploring the space of "uncertainties in uncertainties", we show that the hierarchical method results in a more complete estimation of emissions and their uncertainties than traditional Bayesian inversions, which rely heavily on expert judgement. We present an analysis that shows the effect of including hyper-parameters, which are themselves informed by the data, and show that this method can serve to reduce the effect of errors in assumptions made about the a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties. We then apply this method to the estimation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions over 2012 for the regions surrounding four Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) stations. We find that improper accounting of model representation uncertainties, in particular, can lead to the derivation of emissions and associated uncertainties that are unrealistic and show that those derived using the hierarchical method are likely to be more representative of the true uncertainties in the system. We demonstrate through this SF6 case study that this method is less sensitive to outliers in the data and to subjective assumptions about a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties, than traditional methods.

  8. Subsurface and Surface Characterization using an Information Framework Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel-Ojo, Olusola

    inelastic deformations under the influence of an underlying geologic southward plate motion within the theory of plate tectonics. It also explains the impact of a history of heavy pumpage of groundwater during the agricultural and urbanization era. Thus the persistent scatterer interferometry method offers an attractive, non-intrusive, cost-effective augmentation of the conventional method of monitoring groundwater for water resource development and stability of soil mass.

  9. The Transmission Factor Method: in-situ Characterization of Getter Coated Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Bonucci, Antonio; Conte, Andrea; Manini, Paolo; Raimondi, Stefano

    2007-01-19

    Particle accelerators and synchrotron light source need low residual pressure during operating conditions. In specific applications like narrow-gap insertion devices, NEG coating has proved to be very effective. ASTM F798-82 standard is the common characterization method for the sorption performance of getters. In the case of getter coated pipes, the measurement is conducted 'offline' on a sample (coupon), suitably positioned inside the chamber to be coated and removed after the process. Although this approach is suitable to guarantee the control of the process, in-situ characterization should be useful to evaluate residual pressure during the operating conditions. A different measurement technique (Transmission Factor Method) is here described. It is based on the measurement of pressures ratio at the inlet and the outlet of a coated pipe, under a flow of test gas. A calibration curve is calculated using a modellistic approach and permits to evaluate sticking probability of the coated surface from the pressure ratio. Preliminary experimental results about the characterization of this getter will be shown. Keywords: Getter sorption measurement.

  10. Methods for characterizing x-ray detectors for use at the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Hargrove, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Simanovskaia, N.; Holder, J. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Hahn, D.; Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.

    2012-10-01

    Gated and streaked x-ray detectors generally require corrections in order to counteract instrumental effects in the data. The method of correcting for gain variations in gated cameras fielded at National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described. Four techniques for characterizing the gated x-ray detectors are described. The current principal method of characterizing x-ray instruments is the production of controlled x-ray emission by laser-generated plasmas as a dedicated shot at the NIF. A recently commissioned pulsed x-ray source has the potential to replace the other characterization systems. This x-ray source features a pulsed power source consisting of a Marx generator, capacitor bank that is charged in series and discharged in parallel, producing up to 300 kV. The pulsed x-ray source initially suffered from a large jitter (˜60 ns), but the recent addition of a pulsed laser to trigger the spark gap has reduced the jitter to ˜5 ns. Initial results show that this tool is a promising alternative to the other flat fielding techniques.

  11. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Battiste, Richard L.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  12. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  13. Methods for characterizing x-ray detectors for use at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Khan, S F; Benedetti, L R; Hargrove, D R; Glenn, S M; Simanovskaia, N; Holder, J P; Barrios, M A; Hahn, D; Nagel, S R; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K

    2012-10-01

    Gated and streaked x-ray detectors generally require corrections in order to counteract instrumental effects in the data. The method of correcting for gain variations in gated cameras fielded at National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described. Four techniques for characterizing the gated x-ray detectors are described. The current principal method of characterizing x-ray instruments is the production of controlled x-ray emission by laser-generated plasmas as a dedicated shot at the NIF. A recently commissioned pulsed x-ray source has the potential to replace the other characterization systems. This x-ray source features a pulsed power source consisting of a Marx generator, capacitor bank that is charged in series and discharged in parallel, producing up to 300 kV. The pulsed x-ray source initially suffered from a large jitter (∼60 ns), but the recent addition of a pulsed laser to trigger the spark gap has reduced the jitter to ∼5 ns. Initial results show that this tool is a promising alternative to the other flat fielding techniques. PMID:23126940

  14. A novel preparation method for drug nanocrystals and characterization by ultrasonic spray-assisted electrostatic adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bing; Wang, Jun; Wang, Dunju; Zhu, Ziqiang; Qiao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Guangcheng; Nie, Fude

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a novel and continuous method for preparing a nanosized particle of drug crystals and to characterize its properties. Materials and methods A new apparatus was introduced to crystallize nanosized drug crystals of amitriptyline hydrochloride as a model drug. The samples were prepared in the pure state by ultrasonic spray, and elaborated deposition was completed via electrostatic adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the size of the particles; this was subsequently followed by differential scanning calorimetry. Results and discussion Nanoparticles of drug crystals were successfully prepared. The size of the drug crystals ranged from 20 nm to 400 nm; the particle size of amitriptyline hydrochloride was approximately 71 nm. The particles were spherical and rectangular in shape. Moreover, the melting point of the nanoparticles decreased from 198.2°C to 196.3°C when compared to raw particle crystals. Furthermore, the agglomeration effect was also attenuated as a result of electrostatic repulsion among each particle when absorbed, and depositing on the inner wall of the gathering unit occurred under the electrostatic effect. Conclusion Ultrasonic spray-assisted electrostatic adsorption is a very effective and continuous method to produce drug nanocrystals. This method can be applied to poorly water-soluble drugs, and it can also be a very effective alternative for industrial production. Once the working parameters are given, drug nanocrystals will be produced continuously. PMID:24143097

  15. Characterization of a new acne vulgaris treatment device combining light and thermal treatment methods

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeail; Kang, Heesung; Choi, Eung Ho; Nelson, J. Stuart; Jung, Byungjo

    2012-01-01

    Background/purpose Conventional treatment methods for acne vulgaris have various side effects such as the development of bacterial resistance, phototoxicity, vertigo, gastro-intestinal problems, and drug eruptions. To minimize such side effects, light and thermal methods have been alternately suggested. This study characterized a new acne vulgaris treatment device (AVTD) that combines both light and thermal methods and evaluated its clinical efficacy. Methods We characterized the thermal and light properties of the AVTD itself and evaluated its thermal characteristics in ex vivo porcine skin samples. The Arrhenius equation was used to calculate the skin thermal injury coefficient to confirm the skin safety of the AVTD. Finally, the clinical efficacy of the AVDT was evaluated by analyzing cross-polarization and erythema index images, which were obtained from 13 volunteers undergoing treatment with the AVTD. Results The temperature of the AVTD itself was maintained at 49.1 °C on the tip and 39.7 °C in the porcine skin samples. The peak intensity of the light-emitting diode (LED) light was observed at 468 nm. The skin safety of the AVTD was confirmed and 84.2% of the volunteers presented positive treatment results. Conclusion The treatment of acne using the AVTD resulted in a high treatment rate in a clinical study, minimizing side effects. On the basis of these results, we can be sure that the AVTD may be effectively used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. PMID:21585558

  16. Characterizing the uncertainty of classification methods and its impact on the performance of crowdsourcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribera, Javier; Tahboub, Khalid; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Video surveillance systems are widely deployed for public safety. Real-time monitoring and alerting are some of the key requirements for building an intelligent video surveillance system. Real-life settings introduce many challenges that can impact the performance of real-time video analytics. Video analytics are desired to be resilient to adverse and changing scenarios. In this paper we present various approaches to characterize the uncertainty of a classifier and incorporate crowdsourcing at the times when the method is uncertain about making a particular decision. Incorporating crowdsourcing when a real-time video analytic method is uncertain about making a particular decision is known as online active learning from crowds. We evaluate our proposed approach by testing a method we developed previously for crowd flow estimation. We present three different approaches to characterize the uncertainty of the classifier in the automatic crowd flow estimation method and test them by introducing video quality degradations. Criteria to aggregate crowdsourcing results are also proposed and evaluated. An experimental evaluation is conducted using a publicly available dataset.

  17. Development of methods for characterizing fetal and adult somatic mutations detected in human erythroid precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R.G.; Manchester, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The glycophorin A (GPA) assay was developed to quantify somatic mutations in humans by measuring the frequency of peripheral erythrocytes with mutant phenotypes that are presumed to be progeny of mutated erythroid precursor cells. This assay has been used to identify GPA variant cells in unexposed individuals at a frequency of {approximately}10 per million erythrocytes, and to demonstrate significant increases in variant frequency after mutagenic exposures. Characterization of the mutations responsible for these variant cells requires that the assay be modified to allow flow analysis and sorting of variant erythroid precursor cells that contain nucleic acids. Cord blood samples contain low levels of both reticulocytes and nucleated erythrocytes. We have developed enrichment methods using centrifugation that yield samples containing up to 30% nucleated erythrocytes, and immunomagnetic separation methods that yield samples containing up to 90% reticulocytes. Enrichment methods for these two cell types are also being developed for adult bone marrow samples. We have confirmed that enrichment and labeling with a nucleic acid-specific dye are compatible with GPA analysis of erythrocytes, reticulocytes, and nucleated erythrocytes. Enriched samples have been successfully used for flow cytometric detection of GPA variant reticulocytes in cord blood. PCR-based analysis methods are being developed for molecular characterization of sorted variant cells at the mRNA level.

  18. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for the characterization of "palo azul" (Eysenhardtia polystachya).

    PubMed

    Salinas-Hernández, Pastora; López-Bermúdez, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Barrientos, Damaris; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Romero-Romo, Mario A; Morales-Anzures, Fernando; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    The tree Eysenhardtia polystachya (Ortega) Sarg. has quite a wide popular use within the traditional Mexican medicine as herbal remedy. Popular practices constitute a relevant enough basis to design optimum analytical methods in order to determine basic principles of diverse medicinal plants. This has become one of the essentials needed to characterize such products, for which it is fundamentally important to develop an efficient and reliable separation method. This work presents the results concerning the development and optimization of a novel CE method for the separation of components from water/etanol (1:1) extracts of E. polystachya, using the following conditions, considered the best obtained: phosphate buffer 10 mM, 20 kV voltage, and pH 8.1 at 214 nm and 50 mM, 12.5 kV voltage with pH 8.1 at 426 nm. The optimization takes into account the parameters associated in the resulting electropherograms, such as number of peaks, migration times, and the Deltat(m) of the neighboring peaks. Under optimal conditions the separation intended was attained within 15 and 20 min for 214 and 426 nm, respectively. The characterization method developed was applied to the analysis of diverse extracts of E. polystachya. PMID:18266292

  19. Characterization of Sm-Doped Ceria Ceramics Synthesized by Two Different Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabaci, Aliye; Serin, Özgün

    2015-07-01

    Ceria-based materials have attracted much attention as electrolyte materials for low and intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In this study, we examined the effect of synthesis method on the microstructure and the ionic conductivity of ceria-based electrolytes. Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (SDC) electrolytes for SOFCs were prepared using the Pechini and cellulose templating (CT) methods. Microstructures of the calcined and sintered samples were characterized by XRD and SEM techniques. The XRD results indicate that a single-phase fluorite structure formed at the relatively low calcination temperature of 500 °C. The relative densities of the sintered pellets were higher than 90%, which was proved by the SEM images. Calcined powders were characterized by FTIR technique. The electrical properties of the samarium-doped ceria electrolytes were analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The total ionic conductivities are 3.02 × 10-2 and 3.42 × 10-2 S/cm at 750 °C for the SDC electrolytes prepared by the Pechini method and the CT method, respectively.

  20. Measurement and evaluation methods for beam characterization of commercial excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Hans Stephen; Rebhan, Ulrich; Mann, Klaus R.; Ohlenbusch, J.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes the specific requirements for measurement of excimer laser beam profiles for standardized characterization 'of commercial excimer lasers. A corresponding measurement system is presented which allows a simultaneous characterization of energy density distribution in the near field as well as in the focal plane of a lens (far field). Specially adapted UV-cameras make possible sings pulse diagnostic. Beam widths are calculated from the digitized camera data by different methods corresponding to the proposals of ISO 11146 (second moment, moving knife edge, and moving slit) and the results are compared. In particular, the influence of background signals as well as the typical shape of energy density distribution in the near field to the determined beam widths are analyzed.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of Fe-Co catalyst prepared via reverse microemulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Zabidi, Noor Asmawati; Abdul Aziz, Muhammad Nur Azizi; Ali, Sardar; Taha, Mohd Faisal

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the characterization of bimetallic catalyst systems comprising cobalt and iron on CNTs support prepared via reverse microemulsion method. The properties of the bimetallic catalyst were characterized using TEM, FESEM and N2 adsorption. Based on TEM analyses, the calculated average particle sizes ranged from 4.6 nm to 5.2 nm for the various catalyst compositions. The performance of the Co-based catalyst in a Fischer-Tropsch reaction was evaluated in a fixed-bed reactor at 220°C, 1 atm and H2/CO v/v ratio of 2:1 v/v and space velocity of 12 L/g.h. Amongst the catalysts tested, the 90Co10Fe/CNTs resulted in the highest CO conversion of 14.1% whereas the 100Co/CNTs resulted in the highest C5+ hydrocarbon selectivity.

  2. Characterizing night vision goggle noise using the method of paired comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, George A.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Heft, Eric L.; Goodyear, Charles D.

    2005-05-01

    Users of night vision goggles (NVGs) have reported differences in NVG noise across different as well as the same type of NVG. To better understand these differences, we attempted to characterize NVG noise by having subjects choose parameters in an NVG simulation to best match the noise in real NVGs. From our previous efforts, we observed interdependence of simulation parameters and variability across observers. This has lead us to use the method of paired comparisons as a process for characterizing NVG noise. The results suggest that people perceive NVG noise differently in terms of spatial, temporal, and contrast combinations. In addition, we provide a methodology for determining psychophysically the best parameter combinations in a simulation"s algorithm to match the real environment that the simulation represents.

  3. New Method for Characterizing the State of Optical and Opto-Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Saif, Babak; Feinberg, Lee; Chaney, David; Bluth, Marcel; Greenfield, Perry; Hack, Warren; Smith, Scott; Sanders, James

    2014-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) is a three mirror anastigmat consisting of a 6.5 m primary mirror (PM), secondary mirror (SM) and a tertiary mirror. The primary mirror is made out of 18 segments. The telescope and instruments will be assembled at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to make it the Optical Telescope Element-Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS). The OTIS will go through environmental testing at GSFC before being transported to Johnson Space Center for testing at cryogenic temperature. The objective of the primary mirror Center of Curvature test (CoC) is to characterize the PM before and after the environmental testing for workmanship. This paper discusses the CoC test including both a surface figure test and a new method for characterizing the state of the primary mirror using high speed dynamics interferometry.

  4. How many routes lead to migration? Comparison of methods to assess and characterize migratory movements.

    PubMed

    Cagnacci, Francesca; Focardi, Stefano; Ghisla, Anne; van Moorter, Bram; Merrill, Evelyn H; Gurarie, Eliezer; Heurich, Marco; Mysterud, Atle; Linnell, John; Panzacchi, Manuela; May, Roel; Nygård, Torgeir; Rolandsen, Christer; Hebblewhite, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Decreasing rate of migration in several species as a consequence of climate change and anthropic pressure, together with increasing evidence of space-use strategies intermediate between residency and complete migration, are very strong motivations to evaluate migration occurrence and features in animal populations. The main goal of this paper was to perform a relative comparison between methods for identifying and characterizing migration at the individual and population level on the basis of animal location data. We classified 104 yearly individual trajectories from five populations of three deer species as migratory or non-migratory, by means of three methods: seasonal home range overlap, spatio-temporal separation of seasonal clusters and the Net Squared Displacement (NSD) method. For migratory cases, we also measured timing and distance of migration and residence time on the summer range. Finally, we compared the classification in migration cases across methods and populations. All methods consistently identified migration at the population level, that is, they coherently distinguished between complete or almost complete migratory populations and partially migratory populations. However, in the latter case, methods coherently classified only about 50% of the single cases, that is they classified differently at the individual-animal level. We therefore infer that the comparison of methods may help point to 'less-stereotyped' cases in the residency-to-migration continuum. For cases consistently classified by all methods, no significant differences were found in migration distance, or residence time on summer ranges. Timing of migration estimated by NSD was earlier than by the other two methods, both for spring and autumn migrations. We suggest three steps to identify improper inferences from migration data and to enhance understanding of intermediate space-use strategies. We recommend (i) classifying migration behaviours using more than one method, (ii

  5. Characterization of Material Response During Arc-Jet Testing with Optical Methods Status and Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of ablation and recession of heat shield materials during arc jet testing is an important step towards understanding the governing processes during these tests and therefore for a successful extrapolation of ground test data to flight. The behavior of ablative heat shield materials in a ground-based arc jet facility is usually monitored through measurement of temperature distributions (across the surface and in-depth), and through measurement of the final surface recession. These measurements are then used to calibrate/validate materials thermal response codes, which have mathematical models with reasonably good fidelity to the physics and chemistry of ablation, and codes thus calibrated are used for predicting material behavior in flight environments. However, these thermal measurements only indirectly characterize the pyrolysis processes within an ablative material pyrolysis is the main effect during ablation. Quantification of pyrolysis chemistry would therefore provide more definitive and useful data for validation of the material response codes. Information of the chemical products of ablation, to various levels of detail, can be obtained using optical methods. Suitable optical methods to measure the shape and composition of these layers (with emphasis on the blowing layer) during arc jet testing are: 1) optical emission spectroscopy (OES) 2) filtered imaging 3) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and 4) absorption spectroscopy. Several attempts have been made to optically measure the material response of ablative materials during arc-jet testing. Most recently, NH and OH have been identified in the boundary layer of a PICA ablator. These species are suitable candidates for a detection through PLIF which would enable a spatially-resolved characterization of the blowing layer in terms of both its shape and composition. The recent emission spectroscopy data will be presented and future experiments for a qualitative and quantitative

  6. Using different chemical methods for deposition of copper selenide thin films and comparison of their characterization.

    PubMed

    Güzeldir, Betül; Sağlam, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    Different chemical methods such as Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR), spin coating and spray pyrolysis methods were used to deposite of copper selenide thin films on the glass substrates. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) spectroscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The XRD and SEM studies showed that all the films exhibit polycrystalline nature and crystallinity of copper selenide thin films prepared with spray pyrolysis greater than spin coating and SILAR methods. From SEM and AFM images, it was observed copper selenide films were uniform on the glass substrates without any visible cracks or pores. The EDX spectra showed that the expected elements exist in the thin films. Optical absorption studies showed that the band gaps of copper selenide thin films were in the range 2.84-2.93 eV depending on different chemical methods. The refractive index (n), optical static and high frequency dielectric constants (ε0, ε∞) values were calculated by using the energy bandgap values for each deposition method. The obtained results from different chemical methods revealed that the spray pyrolysis technique is the best chemical deposition method to fabricate copper selenide thin films. This absolute advantage was lead to play key roles on performance and efficiency electrochromic and photovoltaic devices. PMID:26037495

  7. An Evaluation of Fractal Surface Measurement Methods for Characterizing Landscape Complexity from Remote-Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Qiu, Hong-Lie; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Emerson, Charles W.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rapid increase in digital data volumes from new and existing sensors necessitates the need for efficient analytical tools for extracting information. We developed an integrated software package called ICAMS (Image Characterization and Modeling System) to provide specialized spatial analytical functions for interpreting remote sensing data. This paper evaluates the three fractal dimension measurement methods: isarithm, variogram, and triangular prism, along with the spatial autocorrelation measurement methods Moran's I and Geary's C, that have been implemented in ICAMS. A modified triangular prism method was proposed and implemented. Results from analyzing 25 simulated surfaces having known fractal dimensions show that both the isarithm and triangular prism methods can accurately measure a range of fractal surfaces. The triangular prism method is most accurate at estimating the fractal dimension of higher spatial complexity, but it is sensitive to contrast stretching. The variogram method is a comparatively poor estimator for all of the surfaces, particularly those with higher fractal dimensions. Similar to the fractal techniques, the spatial autocorrelation techniques are found to be useful to measure complex images but not images with low dimensionality. These fractal measurement methods can be applied directly to unclassified images and could serve as a tool for change detection and data mining.

  8. Seafloor sound-speed profile and interface dip angle characterization by the image source method.

    PubMed

    Pinson, S; Holland, C W

    2014-08-01

    The image source method is an efficient way to perform a sound-speed tomography for seafloor characterization. To date, however, it has been limited by a locally range-independent approximation. In other words, the layer boundary had to be parallel and flat within the Fresnel zone of the measurement system. Here the method is extended to take into account realistic variations of interface dip angles. To do so, the elliptical wavefront shape approximation of the reflected waves is used. This permits a fairly simple equation relating travel time to the sine of the dip angle, and consequently to an equation for the equivalent medium sound speed. The Radon transform is exploited to extract the dip angle. Simulations with varying layer dip angles and curvature provide insight into the strengths and limitations of the method. PMID:25096094

  9. A new method to characterize the complex mineralogy of ultimate wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Forestier, L. Le; Brown, W.L.; Libourel, G. |

    1995-12-31

    Ultimate wastes, resulting from the incineration of municipal solid wastes, contain high amounts of toxic elements that require stabilization before storage. However, whatever the stabilization processed involved, characterization of their crystal chemistry is essential. In this paper, the authors present a method which allows the determination of the mineralogy of ultimate wastes in detail. They present here an example of results from an ultimate waste, resulting from electrofiltration of fumes. This method is based on grain size and density separations coupled with X-ray diffraction, ICP-ES, ICP-MS, wet chemical methods and electron microprobe analyses. Despite the complexity of this waste, they show that it is possible, not only to determine its mineralogy, but also to give the modal proportions of each phase, and to provide some insights into the crystal chemistry of the main pollutants of this ultimate waste product.

  10. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W.; Stoyer, C.H.; James, B.A.

    1992-07-17

    The objectives of this research were to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain Overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizon, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. The work under this contract consisted of three tasks: (1) Selection of a test site and acquisition of a high density, 3-component data set over the test site; (2) development of finite element modeling algorithms for computing 3-D EM fields over 2-D EM fields over 2-D subsurface structures; and development of TEM 2-D subsurface imaging method. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, optical and magnetic properties of a nickel sulfide series by three different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Azam; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2013-07-01

    Two methods of thermal decomposition and hydrothermal routes were applied for synthesis of nickel sulfides of new precursor [Ni(TSC)2]Cl2 (TSC = thiosemicarbazide) and compared two methods with each other. Also another method by direct putting a mixed aqueous solution composed of NiCl2ṡ6H2O and TSC (H2NNHCSNH2) into an autoclave without presence of any surfactants was examined to investigate the morphology of products. The effect of the reaction temperature on phase and morphology of as-synthesized products was investigated. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Magnetization measurement indicates that NiS samples show a weak ferromagnetic behavior maybe due to nano-size effect.

  12. Multiscale characterization method for line edge roughness based on redundant second generation wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fei; Zhao Xuezeng; Li Ning

    2010-10-15

    We introduce a multiscale characterization method for line edge roughness (LER) based on redundant second generation wavelet transform. This method involves decomposing LER characteristics into independent bands with different spatial frequency components at different scales, and analyzing the reconstructed signals to work out the roughness exponent, the spatial frequency distribution characteristics, as well as the rms value. The effect of noise can be predicted using detailed signals in the minimum space of scale. This method was applied to numerical profiles for validation. Results show that according to the line edge profiles with similar amplitudes, the roughness exponent R can effectively reflect the degree of irregularity of LER and intuitively provide information on LER spatial frequency distribution.

  13. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of lithium cobalt oxide nanoparticles by modified sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Khomane, Ramdas B.; Agrawal, Amit C.; Kulkarni, B.D. Gopukumar, S. Sivashanmugam, A.

    2008-08-04

    Uniformly distributed nanoparticles of LiCoO{sub 2} have been synthesized through the simple sol-gel method in presence of neutral surfactant (Tween-80). The powders were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy and electrochemical method including charge-discharge cycling performance. The powder calcined at a temperature of 900 deg. C for 5 h shows pure phase layered LiCoO{sub 2}. The results show that the particle size is reduced in presence of surfactant as compared to normal sol-gel method. Also, the sample prepared in presence of surfactant and calcined at 900 deg. C for 5 h shows the highest initial discharge capacity (106 mAh g{sup -1}) with good cycling stability as compared to the sample prepared without surfactant which shows the specific discharge capacity of 50 mAh g{sup -1}.

  14. Methods to characterize selective sweeps using time serial samples: an ancient DNA perspective.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo

    2016-01-01

    With hundreds of ancient genomes becoming available this year, ancient DNA research has now entered the genomics era. Utilizing the temporal aspect of these new data, we can now address fundamental evolutionary questions such as the characterization of selection processes shaping the genomes. The temporal dimension in the data has spurred the development in the last 10 years of new methods allowing the detection of loci evolving non-neutrally but also the inference of selection coefficients across genomes capitalizing on these time serial data. To guide empirically oriented researchers towards the statistical approach most appropriate for their data, this article reviews several of those methods, discussing their underlying assumptions and the parameter ranges for which they have been developed. While I discuss some methods developed for experimental evolution, the main focus is ancient DNA. PMID:26613371

  15. Demonstration of the feasibility of a complete ellipsometric characterization method based on an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Battie, Yann; Robert, Stéphane; Gereige, Issam; Jamon, Damien; Stchakovsky, Michel

    2009-10-01

    Ellipsometry is an optical technique that is widely used for determining optical and geometrical properties of optical thin films. These properties are in general extracted from the ellipsometric measurement by solving an inverse problem. Classical methods like the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm are generally too long, depending on direct calculation and are very sensitive to local minima. In this way, the neural network has proved to be an efficient tool for solving these kinds of problems in a very short time. Indeed, it is rapid and less sensitive to local minima than the classical inversion method. We suggest a complete neural ellipsometric characterization method for determining the index dispersion law and the thickness of a simple SiO(2) or photoresist thin layer on Si, SiO(2), and BK7 substrates. The influence of the training couples on the artificial neural network performance is also discussed. PMID:19798371

  16. Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2006-02-21

    An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

  17. Photovoltaic module and array performance characterization methods for all system operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides new test methods and analytical procedures for characterizing the electrical performance of photovoltaic modules and arrays. The methods use outdoor measurements to provide performance parameters both at standard reporting conditions and for all operating conditions encountered by typical photovoltaic systems. Improvements over previously used test methods are identified, and examples of the successful application of the methodology are provided for crystalline- and amorphous-silicon modules and arrays. This work provides an improved understanding of module and array performance characteristics, and perhaps most importantly, a straight- forward yet rigorous model for predicting array performance at all operating conditions. For the first time, the influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, solar angle-of- incidence, and temperature coefficients are all addressed in a practical way that will benefit both designers and users of photovoltaics.

  18. Fast slit-scan method for MTF and MRTD characterization in the HITL environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James L.

    1996-06-01

    A method based on the line scan of a narrow slit pattern is described for MTF and MRTD determinations. A digital signal analyzer and automatic computer worksheet are utilized for executing this methodology. This single-scan procedure can replace a series of measurements with different sized bar patterns, and it facilitates rapid imaging system characterization for weapons scheduled for intensive hardware-in-the-loop testing. The challenge of this method was to overcome the practical data processing problems encountered. MRTD determinations using the slit-scan method agree very well with conventional bar pattern measurements and has been validated for a variety of imaging sensors. The automatic worksheet analysis determines MTF and both the objective, line scan MRTD as well as the 'eye-brain MRTD' based on a human vision model.

  19. An improved matrix separation method for characterization of ultrapure germanium (8N).

    PubMed

    Reddy, M A; Shekhar, R; Jai Kumar, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    An improved matrix separation method has been described to characterize ultrapure germanium of 8N (99.999999%) purity. In this method, temperature of the reaction vessel in which in-situ generated chlorine gas reacts with germanium solid material directly is optimized to quantitatively remove Ge matrix from all its impurities. Optimized reaction temperature has been found to be 230±5°C. Recovery studies on more than 60 elements have been carried out at the optimized temperature. Recoveries of all the analytes except As, Se, Sn, Hg, Tl are found to be quantitative. The method has been examined for various amounts of Ge material and found to be suitable even for 10g of Ge sample and provides low parts per billion and trillion levels of process blanks. Determination of concentrations of impurities has been done by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) and high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (HR-CS-GFAAS). In the absence of certified reference materials for ultrapure germanium, accuracy of the proposed method is established by spike recovery tests. Precision of this method is found to vary from 7% to 50% for concentrations between 4 and 0.004ngg(-1). Limits of detection (LOD) for the target analytes are found to be between 6 and 0.011ngmL(-1) or 1.8-0.003ngg(-1) for the proposed procedure. The method has been successfully applied for that characterization of ultrapure germanium material of 8N purity. PMID:27474273

  20. Ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors for electronic canopy characterization in vineyards: advances to improve pesticide application methods.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Canopy characterization is a key factor to improve pesticide application methods in tree crops and vineyards. Development of quick, easy and efficient methods to determine the fundamental parameters used to characterize canopy structure is thus an important need. In this research the use of ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors have been compared with the traditional manual and destructive canopy measurement procedure. For both methods the values of key parameters such as crop height, crop width, crop volume or leaf area have been compared. Obtained results indicate that an ultrasonic sensor is an appropriate tool to determine the average canopy characteristics, while a LIDAR sensor provides more accuracy and detailed information about the canopy. Good correlations have been obtained between crop volume (C(VU)) values measured with ultrasonic sensors and leaf area index, LAI (R(2) = 0.51). A good correlation has also been obtained between the canopy volume measured with ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors (R(2) = 0.52). Laser measurements of crop height (C(HL)) allow one to accurately predict the canopy volume. The proposed new technologies seems very appropriate as complementary tools to improve the efficiency of pesticide applications, although further improvements are still needed. PMID:22319405

  1. Electrostatic force microscopy as a broadly applicable method for characterizing pyroelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2012-06-15

    A general method based on the combination of electrostatic force microscopy with thermal cycling of the substrate holder is presented for direct, nanoscale characterization of the pyroelectric effect in a range of materials and sample configurations using commercial atomic force microscope systems. To provide an example of its broad applicability, the technique was applied to the examination of natural tourmaline gemstones. The method was validated using thermal cycles similar to those experienced in ambient conditions, where the induced pyroelectric response produced localized electrostatic surface charges whose magnitude demonstrated a correlation with the iron content and heat dissipation of each gemstone variety. In addition, the surface charge was shown to persist even at thermal equilibrium. This behavior is attributed to constant, stochastic cooling of the gemstone surface through turbulent contact with the surrounding air and indicates a potential utility for energy harvesting in applications including environmental sensors and personal electronics. In contrast to previously reported methods, ours has a capacity to carry out such precise nanoscale measurements with little or no restriction on the sample of interest, and represents a powerful new tool for the characterization of pyroelectric materials and devices. PMID:22595697

  2. Integrated Particle Handling Methods for Multiplexed Microbial Identification and Characterization in Sediments and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Darrell P. Chandler; Ann E. Jarrell; Craig S. Criddle

    2004-03-17

    Molecular methods are still relatively ineffectual for monitoring community dynamics during bioremediation, due primarily to the cost, technical difficulty and retrospective nature of the analyses. For nucleic acid analyses to meaningfully contribute to bioremediation efforts they must not only contribute to the fundamental understanding of microbial ecology, but also be formatted in such a manner that infield analysis can be achieved. The objective of this project is therefore to develop an integrated microbial and nucleic acid detection method and prototype system for the characterization and analysis of subsurface sediments, focusing on the molecular detection of metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria and activity in sediments obtained from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center. We are meeting this objective by combining environmental molecular microbiology with renewable surface techniques, microfluidic systems and microparticle analytical chemistry. The fluidic systems are used to evaluate hypotheses on the integrated biochemistry that is necessary to directly detect 16S rRNA from metal-reducing microbial communities on a suspension microarray, without using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These investigations include the use of peptide nucleic acid capture and detection probes and 'tunable surface' concepts to increase nucleic acid capture and detection efficiency and/or mitigate interferences due to co-extracted humic acids. The unified microparticle sample preparation method and suspension array is then used to characterize the 16S rRNA metal- and sulfate-reducing microbial community in FRC sediments before and after biostimulation.

  3. The strength characterization of Al/Si interfaces with a hybrid nanoindentation/FEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shuman; Qi, Yue; Perry, Thomas A.; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical property characterization of the reinforcement/matrix interface in a metal matrix composite (MMC) is entailed for tailoring the interface in the microstructure design of the composite. In this work we developed a hybrid method to characterize the interface strength of an MMC, combining a nanoindentation experiment and a finite element analysis. The nanoindentation experiment was carried out by indenting individual reinforcement particles on a free surface with a nanoindenter. The dependence of indentation response on the interface properties was systematically studied through the finite element analysis with cohesive zone modeling of the interface failure. The interface strength could then be extracted from the comparison between the experimental and FEM results. With this method, the shear strength of an Al/Si interface was measured approximately 240MPa which compares well with the lower bound of an atomistic simulation with a modified EAM potential. The intrinsic fracture toughness of the interface crack tip surrounded by densely populated dislocations was measured 0.25 J/m2. We also studied the effect of the strontium modification on the interface strength with this hybrid method.

  4. Ultrasonic and LIDAR Sensors for Electronic Canopy Characterization in Vineyards: Advances to Improve Pesticide Application Methods

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Canopy characterization is a key factor to improve pesticide application methods in tree crops and vineyards. Development of quick, easy and efficient methods to determine the fundamental parameters used to characterize canopy structure is thus an important need. In this research the use of ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors have been compared with the traditional manual and destructive canopy measurement procedure. For both methods the values of key parameters such as crop height, crop width, crop volume or leaf area have been compared. Obtained results indicate that an ultrasonic sensor is an appropriate tool to determine the average canopy characteristics, while a LIDAR sensor provides more accuracy and detailed information about the canopy. Good correlations have been obtained between crop volume (CVU) values measured with ultrasonic sensors and leaf area index, LAI (R2 = 0.51). A good correlation has also been obtained between the canopy volume measured with ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors (R2 = 0.52). Laser measurements of crop height (CHL) allow one to accurately predict the canopy volume. The proposed new technologies seems very appropriate as complementary tools to improve the efficiency of pesticide applications, although further improvements are still needed. PMID:22319405

  5. Characterization of Essential Oils from Helichrysum odoratissimum Using Different Drying Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asekun, O. T.; Grierson, D. S.; Afolayan, A. J.

    Helichrysum odoratissimum is one of the most commonly used medicinal plants in South Africa. The essential oil from the herb was extracted and characterized for the first time using different drying methods. The oils isolated from fresh, air-dried, sun-dried and oven-dried aerial parts of the plant yielded 0.28, 0.46, 0.33 and 0.36%, respectively. The fresh leaf oil was characterized by a high content of oxygenated monoterpenes with the main constituents as p-menthone (35.4%), pulegone (34.2%) and 1, 8-cineole (13.0%). The dried plant oils had limonene (31.6-22.6%), µ-caryophyllene (13.0-12.0%) and µ-pinene (10.0-7.7%) as their major constituents. Generally, the yield and chemical profile of H. odoratissimum were affected by the drying methods utilized. There were noteworthy chemical alterations in the major components of the essential oils using different methods of drying. The compounds pulegone and menthone were reported as potentially harmful compounds, hence their substantial reduction in the dried oils as compared to the fresh leaf oil is noteworthy as it aids reduction of toxicity in the oils.

  6. Electrostatic force microscopy as a broadly applicable method for characterizing pyroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2012-06-01

    A general method based on the combination of electrostatic force microscopy with thermal cycling of the substrate holder is presented for direct, nanoscale characterization of the pyroelectric effect in a range of materials and sample configurations using commercial atomic force microscope systems. To provide an example of its broad applicability, the technique was applied to the examination of natural tourmaline gemstones. The method was validated using thermal cycles similar to those experienced in ambient conditions, where the induced pyroelectric response produced localized electrostatic surface charges whose magnitude demonstrated a correlation with the iron content and heat dissipation of each gemstone variety. In addition, the surface charge was shown to persist even at thermal equilibrium. This behavior is attributed to constant, stochastic cooling of the gemstone surface through turbulent contact with the surrounding air and indicates a potential utility for energy harvesting in applications including environmental sensors and personal electronics. In contrast to previously reported methods, ours has a capacity to carry out such precise nanoscale measurements with little or no restriction on the sample of interest, and represents a powerful new tool for the characterization of pyroelectric materials and devices.

  7. Simulation and characterization of stress in FinFETs using novel LKMC and nanobeam diffraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiluan, Guo; Guilei, Wang; Chao, Zhao; Jun, Luo

    2015-08-01

    A new simulation method and test instrument has been adopted to verify the traditional stress simulation in FinFET. First, a new algorithm named lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (LKMC) is used to simulate the SiGe epitaxy in source/drain regions and the stress distribution is consequently extracted after the LKMC simulation. Systematic comparison between the traditional polyhedron method and the LKMC method is carried out. The results confirm that extracted stress from both methods is consistent, which verifies the validity of traditional polyhedron method for the purpose of simulating stress in FinFET. In the following experiment, p-type FinFETs with SiGe stressors in source/drain regions are fabricated. The nano beam diffraction (NBD) method is employed to characterize the strain in Si fin. The strain value from the NBD test agrees well with the value extracted from traditional polyhedron simulation. Project supported by the “National S&T Major Project 02”, the Opening Project of Microelectronics Devices & Bulk Si FinFET Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. 2013ZX02303007-001).

  8. A robust segmentation and tracking method for characterizing GNSS signals reception environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, A.; Meurie, C.; Ruichek, Y.; Marais, J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper is focused on the characterization of GNSS signals reception environment by estimation of the percentage of visible sky in real-time. On previous works, a new segmentation technique based on a color watershed using an adaptive combination of color and texture information was proposed. This information was represented by two morphological gradients, a classical color gradient and a morphological texture gradient based on mathematical morphology or co-occurrence matrices. The segmented images were then classified into two regions: sky and not-sky. However, this approach has high computational cost and thus, cannot be applied in real-time. On this paper, we present this adaptive segmentation method with a texture gradient calculated by the Gabor filter and a region-tracking method based on a block-matching estimation. This last step reduces the execution time of the application in order to respect the real-time conditions. Since the application works for fish-eye images, a calibration and rectification method is required before tracking and is also presented on this paper. The calibration method presented is based on the straight line condition and thus does not use real word coordinates. This prevents measurement errors. The tracking results are compared to the results of the classification method (which has already been evaluated on previous works). The evaluation shows that the proposed method has a very low error and decreases the execution time by ten times.

  9. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. I: behavioral effects.

    PubMed Central

    Cory-Slechta, D A; Crofton, K M; Foran, J A; Ross, J F; Sheets, L P; Weiss, B; Mileson, B

    2001-01-01

    Alterations in nervous system function after exposure to a developmental neurotoxicant may be identified and characterized using neurobehavioral methods. A number of methods can evaluate alterations in sensory, motor, and cognitive functions in laboratory animals exposed to toxicants during nervous system development. Fundamental issues underlying proper use and interpretation of these methods include a) consideration of the scientific goal in experimental design, b) selection of an appropriate animal model, c) expertise of the investigator, d) adequate statistical analysis, and e) proper data interpretation. Strengths and weaknesses of the assessment methods include sensitivity, selectivity, practicality, and variability. Research could improve current behavioral methods by providing a better understanding of the relationship between alterations in motor function and changes in the underlying structure of these systems. Research is also needed to develop simple and sensitive assays for use in screening assessments of sensory and cognitive function. Assessment methods are being developed to examine other nervous system functions, including social behavior, autonomic processes, and biologic rhythms. Social behaviors are modified by many classes of developmental neurotoxicants and hormonally active compounds that may act either through neuroendocrine mechanisms or by directly influencing brain morphology or neurochemistry. Autonomic and thermoregulatory functions have been the province of physiologists and neurobiologists rather than toxicologists, but this may change as developmental neurotoxicology progresses and toxicologists apply techniques developed by other disciplines to examine changes in function after toxicant exposure. PMID:11250808

  10. Polarization characterization of PZT disks and of embedded PZT plates by thermal wave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Eydam, Agnes Suchaneck, Gunnar Gerlach, Gerald; Esslinger, Sophia; Schönecker, Andreas; Neumeister, Peter

    2014-11-05

    In this work, the thermal wave method was applied to characterize PZT disks and embedded PZT plates with regard to the polarization magnitude and spatial homogeneity. The samples were exposed to periodic heating by means of a laser beam and the pyroelectric response was determined. Thermal relaxation times (single time constants or distributions of time constants) describe the heat losses of the PZT samples to the environment. The resulting pyroelectric current spectrum was fitted to the superposition of thermal relaxation processes. The pyroelectric coefficient gives insight in the polarization distribution. For PZT disks, the polarization distribution in the surface region showed a characteristic decrease towards the electrodes.

  11. Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Strontium Carbonate Nanostructures via Simple Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari-Fard, Zahra; Sabet, Mohammad; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2016-02-01

    Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) nanostructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal method by Sr(NO3)2, ethylenediamine and hydrazine as reagents. The products were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Different parameter's effects on the product size and morphology were investigated. It was found that reagent concentration, reaction time and temperature play key roles in morphology of the obtained product.

  13. Space processing of crystalline materials: A study of known methods of electrical characterization of semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A literature survey is presented covering nondestructive methods of electrical characterization of semiconductors. A synopsis of each technique deals with the applicability of the techniques to various device parameters and to potential in-flight use before, during, and after growth experiments on space flights. It is concluded that the very recent surge in the commercial production of large scale integrated circuitry and other semiconductor arrays requiring uniformity on the scale of a few microns, involves nondestructive test procedures which could well be useful to NASA for in-flight use in space processing.

  14. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  15. Optical method and system for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2011-02-22

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  16. Optical method for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2010-08-24

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  17. Optical method and system for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2008-03-04

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  18. Optical method for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  19. Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nanophase zirconia : reverse micelle method and neutron scattering study.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.

    1998-11-23

    Zirconia is an important transition-metal oxide for catalytic applications. It has been widely used in automotive exhaust treatment, methanol synthesis, isomerization, alkylation, etc. [1]. Nanophase materials have unique physiochemical properties such as quantum size effects, high surface area, uniform morphology, narrow size distribution, and improvement of sintering rates[2]. Microemulsion method provides the means for controlling the microenvironment under which specific chemical reactions may occur in favoring the formation of homogeneous, nanometer-size particles. In this paper, we report the synthesis of nanophase zirconia and the characterization of the microemulsions as well as the powders by small- and wide-angle neutron scattering techniques.

  1. New high resolution Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) characterization method for resistive RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, M.; Diaz, J.; Crespo-Yepes, A.; Gonzalez, M. B.; Martin-Martinez, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Nafria, M.; Campabadal, F.; Aymerich, X.

    2016-01-01

    Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) is one of the main reliability problems of resistive switching-based memories. To understand the physics behind RTN, a complete and accurate RTN characterization is required. The standard equipment used to analyse RTN has a typical time resolution of ∼2 ms which prevents evaluating fast phenomena. In this work, a new RTN measurement procedure, which increases the measurement time resolution to 2 μs, is proposed. The experimental set-up, together with the recently proposed Weighted Time Lag (W-LT) method for the analysis of RTN signals, allows obtaining a more detailed and precise information about the RTN phenomenon.

  2. Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred W.; Bridges, Robert A.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Lorinovich, Caitlin J.; Lu, Silong

    2003-02-07

    This project involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field, California. Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contained approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley.

  3. Method and apparatus for off-gas composition sensing

    DOEpatents

    Ottesen, David Keith; Allendorf, Sarah Williams; Hubbard, Gary Lee; Rosenberg, David Ezechiel

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for non-intrusive collection of off-gas data in a steelmaking furnace includes structure and steps for transmitting a laser beam through the off-gas produced by a steelmaking furnace, for controlling the transmitting to repeatedly scan the laser beam through a plurality of wavelengths in its tuning range, and for detecting the laser beam transmitted through the off-gas and converting the detected laser beam to an electrical signal. The electrical signal is processed to determine characteristics of the off-gas that are used to analyze and/or control the steelmaking process.

  4. Application of optical methods to characterize textile materials and their influence on the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strese, Helene; Kuck, Monika; Benken, Rainer; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Fluhr, Joachim W.; Meinke, Martina C.; Benderoth, Christian; Frankowski, Gottfried; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    The skin is not only the largest organ of the human body, but it is also a barrier to the environment. The major part of the human skin is in constant contact with textile materials. The objective of this study was to characterize textile materials and to investigate their influence on the skin properties. For this purpose, two different textile materials (polyamide and polyester) were objectively characterized by optical coherence tomography and surface structure 3D-profilometry. In addition, subjective textile properties like haptic sensation and stiffness, as tactile characteristics felt by volunteers, were analyzed. The objective textile characteristics and subjective parameters were compared to the barrier properties measured by in vivo laser scanning microscopy . Comparable results were achieved between barrier properties and subjective assessment in relation to the textile characteristics in favor of the polyester fabric. Consequently, the optical method used in dermatology for the analysis of the skin can be applied to characterize and evaluate textile fabrics and their interaction with human skin in vivo.

  5. A method for detecting and characterizing outbreaks of infectious disease from clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gregory F; Villamarin, Ricardo; Rich Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Millett, Nicholas; Espino, Jeremy U; Wagner, Michael M

    2015-02-01

    Outbreaks of infectious disease can pose a significant threat to human health. Thus, detecting and characterizing outbreaks quickly and accurately remains an important problem. This paper describes a Bayesian framework that links clinical diagnosis of individuals in a population to epidemiological modeling of disease outbreaks in the population. Computer-based diagnosis of individuals who seek healthcare is used to guide the search for epidemiological models of population disease that explain the pattern of diagnoses well. We applied this framework to develop a system that detects influenza outbreaks from emergency department (ED) reports. The system diagnoses influenza in individuals probabilistically from evidence in ED reports that are extracted using natural language processing. These diagnoses guide the search for epidemiological models of influenza that explain the pattern of diagnoses well. Those epidemiological models with a high posterior probability determine the most likely outbreaks of specific diseases; the models are also used to characterize properties of an outbreak, such as its expected peak day and estimated size. We evaluated the method using both simulated data and data from a real influenza outbreak. The results provide support that the approach can detect and characterize outbreaks early and well enough to be valuable. We describe several extensions to the approach that appear promising. PMID:25181466

  6. Reservoir characterization and process monitoring with EM methods. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.

    1995-05-01

    During the past five years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the authors have applied the EM induction method to the problem of petroleum reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) monitoring. The goal is to develop practical tools for determining the electrical resistivity distribution between boreholes at a useful scale for reservoir characterization. During FY94 the authors conducted their largest field test to date. They applied crosshole and surface-to-borehole EM techniques to reservoir characterization at the Los Hills No. 3 oil field making three sets of measurements during the initial phase of the steam drive.From these data they were able to determine the resistivity and configuration of the oil sands, between the observation wells, and provide an image of the subsurface resistivity changes due to the steam drive. They also conducted a waterflood experiment at the Richmond Field Station facility using the borehole-to-surface EM technique. For this test they injected a small quantity of saltwater, and applied the Em technique to monitor the progress of the injected plume. Data collection for this experiment is complete but the results are yet to be interpreted. Finally, a project to understand EM propagation through steel casing was initiated in 1994. The goals of the experiment are to determine the limits and applications for crosswell EM surveys through steel well casing.

  7. Innovative Field Methods for Characterizing the Hydraulic Properties of a Complex Fractured Rock Aquifer (Ploemeur, Brittany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Longuevergne, L.; Lavenant, N.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Schuite, J.; Boudin, F.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic properties of heterogeneous and complex aquifers often requires field scale investigations at multiple space and time scales to better constrain hydraulic property estimates. Here, we present and discuss results from the site of Ploemeur (Brittany, France) where complementary hydrological and geophysical approaches have been combined to characterize the hydrogeological functioning of this highly fractured crystalline rock aquifer. In particular, we show how cross-borehole flowmeter tests, pumping tests and frequency domain analysis of groundwater levels allow quantifying the hydraulic properties of the aquifer at different scales. In complement, we used groundwater temperature as an excellent tracer for characterizing groundwater flow. At the site scale, measurements of ground surface deformation through long-base tiltmeters provide robust estimates of aquifer storage and allow identifying the active structures where groundwater pressure changes occur, including those acting during recharge process. Finally, a numerical model of the site that combines hydraulic data and groundwater ages confirms the geometry of this complex aquifer and the consistency of the different datasets. The Ploemeur site, which has been used for water supply at a rate of about 106 m3 per year since 1991, belongs to the French network of hydrogeological sites H+ and is currently used for monitoring groundwater changes and testing innovative field methods.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Aluminum-Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites Produced Using Different Dispersion Methods.

    PubMed

    Simões, Sónia; Viana, Filomena; Reis, Marcos A L; Vieira, Manuel F

    2016-06-01

    This research focuses on characterization of the impact of dispersion methods on aluminum-carbon nanotubes (Al-CNTs) nanocomposite structure. Nanocomposites were produced by a conventional powder metallurgy process after the dispersion of the CNTs on the Al powders, using two approaches: (1) the dispersion of CNTs and mixture with Al powders were performed in a single step by ultrasonication; and (2) the CNTs were previously untangled by ultrasonication and then mixed with Al powders by ball milling. Microstructural characterization of Al-CNT nanocomposites was performed by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Microstructural characterization revealed that the use of ball milling for mixing CNTs with Al powders promoted the formation of CNT clusters of reduced size, more uniformly dispersed in the matrix, and a nanocomposite of smaller grain size. However, the results of HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy show that ball milling causes higher damage to the CNT structure. The strengthening effect of the CNT is attested by the increase in hardness and tensile strength of the nanocomposites. PMID:26954879

  9. Detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Klebsiella pneumoniae: comparison of phenotypic characterization methods

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Hasan; ul-Haq, Ikram; Mahmood, Saqib; Zafar, Aizza; Mohsin Javed, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing K. pneumoniae is a serious threat to the patients. This manuscript shows the comparison of phenotypic characterization methods used for ESBL K. pneumoniae and frequency distribution of these isolates in various clinical samples. Methodology: Eleven different types of pathological samples collected on various time intervals were analyzed. K. pneumoniae were identified with API 20E system (bioMerieux) and initial screening of ESBL K. pneumoniae was performed using the ceftazidime antimicrobial disc. Double-disc synergy test (DDST) and CLSI confirmatory test were compared for the phenotypic detection of ESBL K. pneumoniae. Results: A total number of 214 ESBL producing K. pneumoniae were isolated from various clinical samples. Frequency distribution of ESBL producing K. pneumoniae was found to be highest among blood 117 (54.7%) and urine 46 (21.5%) samples. Data regarding the use of various interventions among these patients showed most common presence of intravenous line 209 (97.7%) and urinary catheters 46 (21.5%). Comparison of DDST and CLSI confirmatory test showed that the DDST detected 145 (67.8%) isolates while 213 (99.5%) ESBL K. pneumoniae were characterized by CLSI confirmatory test. Conclusion: The use of CLSI confirmatory test is very efficient in the early detection of ESBL K. pneumoniae especially when the facilities for molecular characterization are not available. PMID:24353625

  10. Monte Carlo solution for uncertainty propagation in particle transport with a stochastic Galerkin method

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, B. C.; Prinja, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The stochastic Galerkin method (SGM) is an intrusive technique for propagating data uncertainty in physical models. The method reduces the random model to a system of coupled deterministic equations for the moments of stochastic spectral expansions of result quantities. We investigate solving these equations using the Monte Carlo technique. We compare the efficiency with brute-force Monte Carlo evaluation of uncertainty, the non-intrusive stochastic collocation method (SCM), and an intrusive Monte Carlo implementation of the stochastic collocation method. We also describe the stability limitations of our SGM implementation. (authors)

  11. Alternative Method to Characterize Corn Grain by Means of Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Ricardo Rico; Aguilar, Claudia Hernández; Pacheco, Arturo Dominguez; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Canseco, Miguel Angel

    2013-09-01

    The application of photothermal (PT) techniques to obtain the optical and thermal properties of different materials has been widely reported in the literature. Among the PT techniques, photoacoustic spectroscopy stands out because this technique has been used to characterize different types of materials in solid, liquid, and gaseous phases, as well as homogeneous and inhomogeneous samples as biological materials which present great complexity in their structure. In particular, the seeds and corn kernels comprise different structural components such as endosperm, pericarp, embryo, and pedicel. The color attribute is very important in the grains because it gives information about the chemical composition and nutritional quality attributes which are important in consumer acceptance. In this investigation optical absorption spectra of corn grains were obtained by using photoacoustic spectroscopy in a wavelength range from 325 nm to 800 nm. Two varieties of corn grains were studied, establishing a complete block design at random for the measurements. From the obtained optical absorption spectra, the optical absorption coefficient () was calculated as a function of the wavelength for each sample. A complementary study of the percentage of reflectance for these samples was carried out by using ultraviolet/visible spectrometry with an integrating sphere. The data were subjected to an analysis of the variance using software of the statistical analysis system. The results revealed significant differences () between corn varieties in the range of 325 nm to 670 nm. The application of the photoacoustic spectroscopy technique as an alternative to conventional methods for the characterization of maize grain through an analysis of could be important for characterizing non-homogeneous materials like grains of corn, whose characterization is relevant in the food industry.

  12. Nondestructive Methods to Characterize Rock Mechanical Properties at Low-Temperature: Applications for Asteroid Capture Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Kara A.

    Recent government initiatives and commercial activities have targeted asteroids for in situ material characterization, manipulation, and possible resource extraction. Most of these activities and missions have proposed significant robotic components, given the risks and costs associated with manned missions. To successfully execute these robotic activities, detailed mechanical characteristics of the target space bodies must be known prior to contact, in order to appropriately plan and direct the autonomous robotic protocols. Unfortunately, current estimates of asteroid mechanical properties are based on limited direct information, and significant uncertainty remains specifically concerning internal structures, strengths, and elastic properties of asteroids. One proposed method to elucidate this information is through in situ, nondestructive testing of asteroid material immediately after contact, but prior to any manipulation or resource extraction activities. While numerous nondestructive rock characterization techniques have been widely deployed for terrestrial applications, these methods must be adapted to account for unique properties of asteroid material and environmental conditions of space. For example, asteroid surface temperatures may range from -100°C to 30°C due to diurnal cycling, and these low temperatures are especially noteworthy due to their deleterious influence on non-destructive testing. As a result, this thesis investigates the effect of low temperature on the mechanical characteristics and nondestructive technique responses of rock material. Initially, a novel method to produce low temperature rock samples was developed. Dry ice and methanol cooling baths of specific formulations were used to decrease rock to temperatures ranging from -60°C to 0°C. At these temperatures, shale, chalk, and limestone rock samples were exposed to several nondestructive and conventional mechanical tests, including Schmidt hammer, ultrasonic pulse velocity, point

  13. Investigation of methods for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion tartets

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, J.J.; Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate methods for fabricating, characterizing and transporting cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets on a continuous basis. A microprocessor-based data acquisition system has been built that converts a complete target image to digital data, which are then analyzed by automated software procedures. The low temperatures required to freeze the hydrogen isotopes contained in a target is provided by a cryogenic cold chamber capable of attaining 15 K. A new method for target manipulation and positioning is studied that employs molecular gas beams to levitate a target and an electrostatic quadrupole structure to provide for its lateral containment. Since the electrostatic target-positioning scheme requires that the targets be charged, preliminary investigation has been carried out for a target-charging mechanism based on ion-bombardment.

  14. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W. ); Stoyer, C.H. ); James, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizons, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. Accomplishments for this past year are presented for the following tasks: (1) site selection and acquisition of high density, 3-component TEM data set over test site; (2) finite element forward modeling; and (3) TEM 2-D subsurface imaging.

  15. Contract Specification in Java: Classification, Characterization, and a New Marker Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Tsun; Cheng, Yu Chin; Hsieh, Chin-Yun

    Design by Contract (DBC), originated in the Eiffel programming language, is generally accepted as a practical method for building reliable software. Currently, however, few languages have built-in support for it. In recent years, several methods have been proposed to support DBC in Java. We compare eleven DBC tools for Java by analyzing their impact on the developer's programming activities, which are characterized by seven quality attributes identified in this paper. It is shown that each of the existing tools fails to achieve some of the quality attributes. This motivates us to develop ezContract, an open source DBC tool for Java that achieves all of the seven quality attributes. ezContract achieves streamlined integration with the working environment. Notably, standard Java language is used and advanced IDE features that work for standard Java programs can also work for the contract-enabled programs. Such features include incremental compilation, automatic refactoring, and code assist.

  16. Investigation of layered systems and temperature-dependent thermophysical characterization by photothermal methods with periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirtoc, M.

    2010-03-01

    The salient features of periodically modulated photoacoustic (PA), photothermal radiometry (PTR) and photopyroelectric (PPE) methods are reviewed with emphasis on their use for characterization of layered samples. Using a general one-dimensional (1-D) heat diffusion model, explicit solutions for up to six layers are given in terms of thermal impedances. Two typical model configurations can be transformed and combined using symmetry properties in order to match a particular excitation/cell configuration couple. Different special cases allow for simultaneous measurement of two thermal parameters. For temperature-dependent investigations the direct temperature-conversion feature of the PPE method is advantageous. We show results on the temperature calibration of LiTaO3 and PVDF pyroelectric sensors.

  17. Methods for validating the presence of and characterizing proteins deposited onto an array

    DOEpatents

    Schabacker, Daniel S.

    2010-09-21

    A method of determining if proteins have been transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array comprising staining the array with a total protein stain and imaging the array, optionally comparing the staining with a standard curve generated by staining known amounts of a known protein on the same or a similar array; a method of characterizing proteins transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array including staining the array with a post-translational modification-specific (PTM-specific) stain and imaging the array and, optionally, after staining the array with a PTM-specific stain and imaging the array, washing the array, re-staining the array with a total protein stain, imaging the array, and comparing the imaging with the PTM-specific stain with the imaging with the total protein stain; stained arrays; and images of stained arrays.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of the oxide nanoparticles obtained by the polymeric precursor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raba, A. M.; Bautista, J.; Murillo, E.

    2016-02-01

    Niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) nanoparticles were prepared by the polymeric precursor method using citric acid as a chelating agent and ethylene glycol as a polymerizing agent. The powders obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the presence of HNO3, HCl or NH4OH in the employed aqueous solution favour the solubility of the used precursor salt, as well as also inside the oxide phase formation. The initial Nb2O5 powders were amorphous. The amorphous powders heated at 500°C contained Nb2O5 TT-phase, whereas at 650°C the Nb2O5 T-phase was obtained. In this way an increase in the synthesis temperature is related to the increase of the crystallinity, according to the values of the crystallite sizes that were estimated using the Scherrer method.

  19. Metal-organic frameworks: structure, properties, methods of synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butova, V. V.; Soldatov, M. A.; Guda, A. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-03-01

    This review deals with key methods of synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The modular structure affords a wide variety of MOFs with different active metal sites and organic linkers. These compounds represent a new stage of development of porous materials in which the pore size and the active site structure can be modified within wide limits. The set of experimental methods considered in this review is sufficient for studying the short-range and long-range order of the MOF crystal structure, determining the morphology of samples and elucidating the processes that occur at the active metal site in the course of chemical reactions. The interest in metal-organic frameworks results, first of all, from their numerous possible applications, ranging from gas separation and storage to chemical reactions within the pores. The bibliography includes 362 references.

  20. Alternative method to characterize continuous and discontinuous phase transitions in surface reaction models.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique A; da Silva, Roberto; Santos, Eder D; Gomes, Paulo F; Arashiro, Everaldo

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we revisited the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model to study its phase transitions and critical exponents through time-dependent Monte Carlo simulations. We use a method proposed recently to locate the nonequilibrium second-order phase transitions and that has been successfully used in systems with defined Hamiltonians and with absorbing states. This method, which is based on optimization of the coefficient of determination of the order parameter, was able to characterize the continuous phase transition of the model, as well as its upper spinodal point, a pseudocritical point located near the discontinuous phase transition. The static critical exponents β, ν_{∥}, and ν_{⊥}, as well as the dynamic critical exponents θ and z for the continuous transition point, were also estimated and are in excellent agreement with results found in literature. PMID:27627268

  1. Size separation method for absorption characterization in brown carbon: Application to an aged biomass burning sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lorenzo, Robert A.; Young, Cora J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of brown carbon (BrC) in atmospheric aerosols is derived from biomass burning (BB) and is primarily composed of extremely low volatility organic carbons. We use two chromatographic methods to compare the contribution of large and small light-absorbing BrC components in aged BB aerosols with UV-vis absorbance detection: (1) size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and (2) reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography. We observe no evidence of small molecule absorbers. Most BrC absorption arises from large molecular weight components (>1000 amu). This suggests that although small molecules may contribute to BrC absorption near the BB source, analyses of aerosol extracts should use methods selective to large molecular weight compounds because these species may be responsible for long-term BrC absorption. Further characterization with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to SEC demonstrates an underestimation of the molecular size determined through MS as compared to SEC.

  2. Accurate and rapid optical characterization of an anisotropic guided structure based on a neural method.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stéphane; Battie, Yann; Jamon, Damien; Royer, Francois

    2007-04-10

    Optimal performances of integrated optical devices are obtained by the use of an accurate and reliable characterization method. The parameters of interest, i.e., optical indices and thickness of the waveguide structure, are calculated from effective indices by means of an inversion procedure. We demonstrate how an artificial neural network can achieve such a process. The artificial neural network used is a multilayer perceptron. The first result concerns a simulated anisotropic waveguide. The accuracy in the determination of optical indices and waveguide thickness is 5 x 10(-5) and 4 nm, respectively. Then an experimental application on a silica-titania thin film is performed. In addition, effective indices are measured by m-lines spectroscopy. Finally, a comparison with a classical optimization algorithm demonstrates the robustness of the neural method. PMID:17384718

  3. Characterizing abrupt changes in the stock prices using a wavelet decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Marco Antonio Leonel; Yoneyama, Takashi

    2007-09-01

    Abrupt changes in the stock prices, either upwards or downwards, are usually preceded by an oscillatory behavior with frequencies that tend to increase as the moment of transition becomes closer. The wavelet decomposition methods may be useful for analysis of this oscillations with varying frequencies, because they provide simultaneous information on the frequency (scale) and localization in time (translation). However, in order to use the wavelet decomposition, certain requirements have to be satisfied, so that the linear and cyclic trends are eliminated by standard least squares techniques. The coefficients obtained by the wavelet decomposition can be represented in a graphical form. A threshold can then be established to characterize the likelihood of a short-time abrupt change in the stock prices. Actual data from the São Paulo Stock Exchange (Bolsa de Valores de São Paulo) were used in this work to illustrate the proposed method.

  4. Development of a method for characterizing changes in coal and mineral surfaces resulting from beneficiation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Seward, K.J.; Dawson, M.R.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    A novel method was developed for characterizing changes in coal and mineral surfaces resulting from sonication and other cleaning processes. This method employs a unique flow-cell to permit the dynamic measurement of dye adsorption on coal and mineral particle surfaces. The rates and extents of adsorption of ionic dyes on Illinois No. 6 coal were found to be dependent on mineral content and particle size of ground coal samples. A significant correlation was observed between the adsorbed quantity of dye and the total mineral content of coal. In preliminary experiments with methylene blue dye, clay was found to absorb significantly more of the dye than quartz, pyrite, calcite, or clean coal'' surfaces. By using dyes of differing adsorption selectivity, it is demonstrated that sonication reduces the apparent mineral content on the surface of coal. 9 refs., 7 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. A simple method for characterizing and engineering thermal relaxation of an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijian; Zhu, Jiangang; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yang, Lan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal properties of a photonic resonator are determined not only by intrinsic properties of materials, such as thermo-optic coefficient, but also by the geometry and structure of the resonator. Techniques for characterization and measurement of thermal properties of individual photonic resonator will benefit numerous applications. In this work, we demonstrate a method to optically measure the thermal relaxation time and effective thermal conductance of a whispering gallery mode microcavity using optothermal effect. Two nearby optical modes within the cavity are optically probed, which allows us to quantify the thermal relaxation process of the cavity by analyzing changes in the transmission spectra induced by optothermal effect. We show that the effective thermal conductance can be experimentally deduced from the thermal relaxation measurement, and it can be tailored by changing the geometric parameters of the cavity. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the proposed analytical modeling. This method can be applied to various resonators in different forms.

  6. Characterizing the complex permittivity of high-κ dielectrics using enhanced field method

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Hsien-Wen; Wong, Wei-Syuan; Chang, Tsun-Hsu

    2015-11-15

    This paper proposed a method to characterize the complex permittivities of samples based on the enhancement of the electric field strength. The enhanced field method significantly improves the measuring range and accuracy of the samples’ electrical properties. Full-wave simulations reveal that the resonant frequency is closely related to the dielectric constant of the sample. In addition, the loss tangent can be determined from the measured quality factor and the just obtained dielectric constant. Materials with low dielectric constant and very low loss tangent are measured for benchmarking and the measured results agree well with previous understanding. Interestingly, materials with extremely high dielectric constants (ε{sub r} > 50), such as titanium dioxide, calcium titanate, and strontium titanate, differ greatly as expected.

  7. Characterization of activated sludge exocellular polymers using several cation-associated extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul; Novak, John T

    2007-04-01

    Evaluation of prior research and preliminary investigations in our laboratory led to the development of an extraction strategy that can be used to target different cations in activated sludge floc and extract their associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The methods we used were the cation exchange resin (CER) procedure, base extraction, and sulfide addition to extract EPS linked with divalent cations, Al, and Fe, respectively. A comparison of sludge cations before and after CER extraction revealed that most of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were removed while Fe and Al remained intact, suggesting that this method is highly selective for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)-bound EPS. The correlation between sludge Fe and sulfide-extracted EPS was indicative of selectivity of this method for Fe-bound EPS. The base extraction was less specific than the other methods but it was the method releasing the largest amount of Al into the extract, indicating that the method extracted Al-bound EPS. Concomitantly, the composition of extracted EPS and the amino acid composition differed for the three methods, indicating that EPS associated with different metals were not the same. The change in EPS following anaerobic and aerobic digestion was also characterized by the three extraction methods. CER-extracted EPS were reduced after aerobic digestion while they changed little by anaerobic digestion. On the other hand, anaerobic digestion was associated with the decrease in sulfide-extracted EPS. These results suggest that different types of cation-EPS binding mechanisms exist in activated sludge and that each cation-associated EPS fraction imparts unique digestion characteristics to activated sludge. PMID:17346764

  8. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefel, Denis E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  9. Comparison of Different Classification Methods for Analyzing Electronic Nose Data to Characterize Sesame Oils and Blends

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaolong; Li, Hui; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) was used to characterize sesame oils processed by three different methods (hot-pressed, cold-pressed, and refined), as well as blends of the sesame oils and soybean oil. Seven classification and prediction methods, namely PCA, LDA, PLS, KNN, SVM, LASSO and RF, were used to analyze the e-nose data. The classification accuracy and MAUC were employed to evaluate the performance of these methods. The results indicated that sesame oils processed with different methods resulted in different sensor responses, with cold-pressed sesame oil producing the strongest sensor signals, followed by the hot-pressed sesame oil. The blends of pressed sesame oils with refined sesame oil were more difficult to be distinguished than the blends of pressed sesame oils and refined soybean oil. LDA, KNN, and SVM outperformed the other classification methods in distinguishing sesame oil blends. KNN, LASSO, PLS, and SVM (with linear kernel), and RF models could adequately predict the adulteration level (% of added soybean oil) in the sesame oil blends. Among the prediction models, KNN with k = 1 and 2 yielded the best prediction results. PMID:26506350

  10. Development of complementary HPLC-DAD/APCI MS methods for chemical characterization of pharmaceutical packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Petruševski, V; Jolevska, S T; Ribarska, J T; Chachorovska, M; Petkovska, A; Ugarković, S

    2016-05-30

    The chemical characterization of plastics for pharmaceutical packaging has been subject to ever increasing regulatory scrutiny, the reasons for which being: a) plastic additives and degradation products can be extremely hazardous to the patients' health (especially patients on chronic therapy) and b) they offer no therapeutic or formulatory benefit whatsoever. The last decade has seen the issuing of several books, monographs and guidelines dealing with extractables and leachables, however the amount of scientific work done so far is still fairly small (the majority of it performed by only a few research groups), with only a small number of methods published in the literature. This work focuses on developing a set of two complementary HPLC-DAD/APCI MS methods for simultaneous separation, detection, identification and quantification of a wide variety of packaging additives and degradants, the second method specifically targeting a group of compounds known as polymeric hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS), which are known to be notoriously difficult to separate and analyze with standard analytical techniques. The methods are capable of detecting plastic additives present in low ppb concentrations, from samples extracted in solvents with various polarities and pH values. Both methods were developed and optimized using system suitability mixtures comprised of 9 additives commonly encountered in plastic materials, and their practical applicability tested on a variety of extracts from low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polypropylene (PP), where several additives were successfully separated, detected and identified. PMID:26966896

  11. Comparison of different classification methods for analyzing electronic nose data to characterize sesame oils and blends.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiaolong; Li, Hui; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) was used to characterize sesame oils processed by three different methods (hot-pressed, cold-pressed, and refined), as well as blends of the sesame oils and soybean oil. Seven classification and prediction methods, namely PCA, LDA, PLS, KNN, SVM, LASSO and RF, were used to analyze the e-nose data. The classification accuracy and MAUC were employed to evaluate the performance of these methods. The results indicated that sesame oils processed with different methods resulted in different sensor responses, with cold-pressed sesame oil producing the strongest sensor signals, followed by the hot-pressed sesame oil. The blends of pressed sesame oils with refined sesame oil were more difficult to be distinguished than the blends of pressed sesame oils and refined soybean oil. LDA, KNN, and SVM outperformed the other classification methods in distinguishing sesame oil blends. KNN, LASSO, PLS, and SVM (with linear kernel), and RF models could adequately predict the adulteration level (% of added soybean oil) in the sesame oil blends. Among the prediction models, KNN with k = 1 and 2 yielded the best prediction results. PMID:26506350

  12. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  13. Application of an alkylammonium method for characterization of phyllosilicates in CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Yang, S. V.

    1994-01-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicates, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period in the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is important because of the important physico-chemical information they hold, e.g., from well characterized phyllosilicates, thermodynamic stability relations and hence the conditions of formation of phyllosilicates in the parent body of the meteorite can be predicted. Although we are at a rudimentary level of understanding of the minerals resulting from the aqueous alteration in the early solar nebula, we know that the most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentines, smectites, chlorites, and micas. The characterization of fine grained minerals in meteorites and IDP's rely heavily on electron beam instruments, especially transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Typically, phyllosilicates are identified by a combination of high resolution imaging of basal spacings, electron diffraction analysis, and chemical analysis. Smectites can be difficult to differentiate from micas because the smectites loose their interlayer water and the interlayers collapse to the same basal spacing as mica in the high vacuum of the TEM. In high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) images, smectite basal spacings vary from 1 nm up to 1.5 nm, while micas show 1 or 2 nm basal spacings. Not only is it difficult to differentiate smectites from micas, but there is no way of identifying different classes of smectites in meteorites and IDP's. To differentiate smectites from micas and also to recognize the charge differences among smectites, an alkylammonium method can be employed because the basal spacings of alkylammonium saturated smectites expand as a function of alkylamine chain

  14. Application of an alkylammonium method for characterization of phyllosilicates in CI chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Yang, S. V.

    1994-03-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicates, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period in the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is important because of the important physico-chemical information they hold, e.g., from well characterized phyllosilicates, thermodynamic stability relations and hence the conditions of formation of phyllosilicates in the parent body of the meteorite can be predicted. Although we are at a rudimentary level of understanding of the minerals resulting from the aqueous alteration in the early solar nebula, we know that the most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentines, smectites, chlorites, and micas. The characterization of fine grained minerals in meteorites and IDP's rely heavily on electron beam instruments, especially transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Typically, phyllosilicates are identified by a combination of high resolution imaging of basal spacings, electron diffraction analysis, and chemical analysis. Smectites can be difficult to differentiate from micas because the smectites loose their interlayer water and the interlayers collapse to the same basal spacing as mica in the high vacuum of the TEM. In high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) images, smectite basal spacings vary from 1 nm up to 1.5 nm, while micas show 1 or 2 nm basal spacings. Not only is it difficult to differentiate smectites from micas, but there is no way of identifying different classes of smectites in meteorites and IDP's. To differentiate smectites from micas and also to recognize the charge differences among smectites, an alkylammonium method can be employed because the basal spacings of alkylammonium saturated smectites expand as a function of alkylamine chain

  15. Revised Methods for Characterizing Stream Habitat in the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Waite, Ian R.; D'Arconte, Patricia J.; Meador, Michael R.; Maupin, Molly A.; Gurtz, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    Stream habitat is characterized in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program as part of an integrated physical, chemical, and biological assessment of the Nation's water quality. The goal of stream habitat characterization is to relate habitat to other physical, chemical, and biological factors that describe water-quality conditions. To accomplish this goal, environmental settings are described at sites selected for water-quality assessment. In addition, spatial and temporal patterns in habitat are examined at local, regional, and national scales. This habitat protocol contains updated methods for evaluating habitat in NAWQA Study Units. Revisions are based on lessons learned after 6 years of applying the original NAWQA habitat protocol to NAWQA Study Unit ecological surveys. Similar to the original protocol, these revised methods for evaluating stream habitat are based on a spatially hierarchical framework that incorporates habitat data at basin, segment, reach, and microhabitat scales. This framework provides a basis for national consistency in collection techniques while allowing flexibility in habitat assessment within individual Study Units. Procedures are described for collecting habitat data at basin and segment scales; these procedures include use of geographic information system data bases, topographic maps, and aerial photographs. Data collected at the reach scale include channel, bank, and riparian characteristics.

  16. Methods for discovery and characterization of cell subsets in high dimensional mass cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Diggins, Kirsten E; Ferrell, P Brent; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-07-01

    The flood of high-dimensional data resulting from mass cytometry experiments that measure more than 40 features of individual cells has stimulated creation of new single cell computational biology tools. These tools draw on advances in the field of machine learning to capture multi-parametric relationships and reveal cells that are easily overlooked in traditional analysis. Here, we introduce a workflow for high dimensional mass cytometry data that emphasizes unsupervised approaches and visualizes data in both single cell and population level views. This workflow includes three central components that are common across mass cytometry analysis approaches: (1) distinguishing initial populations, (2) revealing cell subsets, and (3) characterizing subset features. In the implementation described here, viSNE, SPADE, and heatmaps were used sequentially to comprehensively characterize and compare healthy and malignant human tissue samples. The use of multiple methods helps provide a comprehensive view of results, and the largely unsupervised workflow facilitates automation and helps researchers avoid missing cell populations with unusual or unexpected phenotypes. Together, these methods develop a framework for future machine learning of cell identity. PMID:25979346

  17. Encouraging the use of seismic methods for the hydrogeophysical characterization of the critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, S.; Bodet, L.; Chalikakis, K.; Flipo, N.; Longuevergne, L.; Guérin, R.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization, study and monitoring of hydrosystems mainly rely on piezometric and log data, e.g. on local information. Fortunately, hydrogeophysics provide appropriate tools to interpolate boreholes information and to image heterogeneities in the critical zone. When electrical and electromagnetic methods predominate in such context, we recently suggested the use of classical seismic methods not only to provide a characterization of the subsurface geometry, but also to estimate the mechanical properties of the critical zone influenced by its water content. We tested, on two critical zone observatories with distinct hydrogeological characteristics, the simultaneous estimation of pressure (P-) and shear (S-) wave seismic velocities (VP and VS, respectively) from P-wave travel-time tomography and surface-wave dispersion inversion respectively. On both sites, e.g. a fractured environment with strong discontinuities and a continuous multi-layered hydrosystem, we were able to image spatial and/or temporal variations of VP/VS ratio, whose evolution was strongly associated to the water content observed locally.

  18. Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Jones, V.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

  19. Methods for discovery and characterization of cell subsets in high dimensional mass cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Diggins, Kirsten E.; Ferrell, P. Brent; Irish, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The flood of high-dimensional data resulting from mass cytometry experiments that measure more than 40 features of individual cells has stimulated creation of new single cell computational biology tools. These tools draw on advances in the field of machine learning to capture multi-parametric relationships and reveal cells that are easily overlooked in traditional analysis. Here, we introduce a workflow for high dimensional mass cytometry data that emphasizes unsupervised approaches and visualizes data in both single cell and population level views. This workflow includes three central components that are common across mass cytometry analysis approaches: 1) distinguishing initial populations, 2) revealing cell subsets, and 3) characterizing subset features. In the implementation described here, viSNE, SPADE, and heatmaps were used sequentially to comprehensively characterize and compare healthy and malignant human tissue samples. The use of multiple methods helps provide a comprehensive view of results, and the largely unsupervised workflow facilitates automation and helps researchers avoid missing cell populations with unusual or unexpected phenotypes. Together, these methods develop a framework for future machine learning of cell identity. PMID:25979346

  20. Syntheses and structural characterization of two new nanostructured Bi(III) supramolecular polymers via sonochemical method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Wei; Haji-Hasani, Ensieh; Morsali, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Two new bismuth(III) coordination supramolecular polymers, {[Bi2(Hbpp)(bpp)(μ-I)2I6](Hbpp)·MeOH}n (1) and [Bi(Hbpp)(Br4)] (2), (bpp=1,3-di(pyridin-4-yl)propane) were prepared and were structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Single crystalline one-dimensional materials were prepared using a heat gradient applied a solution of the reagents using the branched tube method. The structural determination by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that compounds 1 and 2 form monoclinic polymers with symmetry space group P21 in the solid state. These new nanostructured Bi(III) supramolecular compounds, {[Bi2(Hbpp)(bpp)(μ-I)2I6](Hbpp)·MeOH} (1) and [Bi(Hbpp)(Br4)] (2), were also synthesized by sonochemical method. The nanostructures were characterized by Field Emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and IR spectroscopy. PMID:26964932

  1. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy as an orthogonal method to characterize protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Joyce J.; Pardeshi, Neha N.; Mulder, Anke M.; Mulligan, Sean K.; Quispe, Joel; On, Kathy; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Carpenter, John F.; Schneemann, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of protein-based therapeutics is a challenging problem in the biopharmaceutical industry. Of particular concern are implications for product efficacy and clinical safety due to potentially increased immunogenicity of the aggregates. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize biophysical and morphological features of antibody aggregates formed upon controlled environmental stresses. TEM results were contrasted with results obtained in parallel by independent methods, including size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, microflow imaging and nanoparticle tracking. For TEM, stressed samples were imaged by negative staining and in the frozen-hydrated state. In both cases, aggregates appeared amorphous but differed in fine structural detail. Specifically, negatively stained aggregates were compact and consisted of smaller globular structures that had a notable three dimensional character. Elements of the native IgG structure were retained, suggesting that the aggregates were not assembled from denatured protein. In contrast, aggregates in frozen-hydrated samples appeared as extended, branched protein networks with large surface area. Using multiple scales of magnification, a wide range of particle sizes was observed and semi-quantitatively characterized. The detailed information provided by TEM extended observations obtained with the independent methods, demonstrating the suitability of TEM as a complementary approach to submicron particle analysis. PMID:25231267

  3. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  4. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets. PMID:26329210

  5. Characterization of the surfaces of sparingly soluble minerals by constant composition dissolution kinetics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, B.E.; Nancollas, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    Calcium phosphates are utilized in many applications both as ceramics and as plasma sprayed coatings on metallic substrates. Although conventional physical analytical chemical methods of characterization such as X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and microscopic examination may indicate the exclusive presence of the thermodynamically most stable calcium phosphate phase, hydroxyapatite, small amounts of other calcium-containing phases (such as tetracalcium and tricalcium phosphates, and calcium oxide) and impurities (possibly resulting from contaminants in the plasma spray chamber) may be present. Coating impurities play a very important role in the initial reactions that take place when the materials are brought into contact with aqueous media. The presence of multiple phases may result in changes in solution molar calcium to phosphate ratios, which will also modify the thermodynamic driving forces (super/under saturations, or {sigma}) during the reactions. The Dual Constant Composition (DCC) method offers a very sensitive characterization technique for establishing not only the existence of these phases, but, simultaneously, their dissolution kinetics profiles. Since resorption is the major reparative mechanism in vivo, the dissolution kinetics results are of considerable interest. By carefully selecting solution compositions, the DCC approach can also be used for the controlled removal of surface phases.

  6. Characterization method for a multispectral high-dynamic-range imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duck Bong; Lee, Kwan H.

    2014-07-01

    An accurate characterization method for a multispectral high-dynamic-range (HDR) imaging system is proposed by combining multispectral and HDR imaging technologies. The multispectral HDR imaging system, which can acquire the visible spectrum at many wavelength bands, can provide an accurate color reproduction and physical radiance information of real objects. An HDR camera is used to capture an HDR image without multiple exposures and a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) is used to generate multispectral images. Due to its several limitations in the multispectral HDR imaging system, a carefully designed and an innovative characterization algorithm is presented by considering a logarithmic camera response of the HDR camera and different spectral transmittance of the LCTF. The proposed method efficiently and accurately recovers the full spectrum from the multispectral HDR images using a transformation matrix and provides device-independent color information (e.g., CIEXYZ and CIELAB). The transformation matrix is estimated by training the estimated sensor responses from a multispectral HDR imaging system and the reflectance measurements from a spectroradiometer using Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse matrix.

  7. Characterizing wave propagation to improve indoor step-level person localization using floor vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, Mostafa; Pan, Shijia; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize frequency-dependent wave propagation of footstep induced floor vibration to improve robustness of vibration-based occupant localization. Occupant localization is an essential part of many smart structure applications (e.g., energy management, patient/customer tracking, etc.). Exist- ing techniques include visual (e.g. cameras and IR sensors), acoustic, RF, and load-based approaches. These approaches have many deployment and operational requirements that limits their adaptation. To overcome these limitations, prior work has utilized footstep-induced vibrations to allow sparse sensor configuration and non-intrusive detection. However, frequency dependent propagation characteristics and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of footstep-induced vibrations change the shape of the signal. Furthermore, estimating the wave propagation velocity for forming the multilateration equations and localizing the footsteps is a challenging task. They, in turn, lead to large errors of localization. In this paper, we present a structural vibration based indoor occupant localization technique using improved time-difference-of-arrival between multiple vibration sensors. In particular we overcome signal distortion by decomposing the signal into frequency components and focusing on high energy components for accurate indoor localization. Such decomposition leverages the frequency-specific propagation characteristics and reduces the effect of low SNR (by choosing the components of highest energy). Furthermore, we develop a velocity calibration method that finds the optimal velocity which minimizes the localization error. We validate our approach through field experiments in a building with human participants. We are able to achieve an average localization error of less than 0.21 meters, which corresponds to a 13X reduction in error when compared to the baseline method using raw data.

  8. A Theoretical Method for Characterizing Nonlinear Effects in Paul Traps with Added Octopole Field.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-08-01

    In comparison with numerical methods, theoretical characterizations of ion motion in the nonlinear Paul traps always suffer from low accuracy and little applicability. To overcome the difficulties, the theoretical harmonic balance (HB) method was developed, and was validated by the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK) method. Using the HB method, analytical ion trajectory and ion motion frequency in the superimposed octopole field, ε, were obtained by solving the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME). The obtained accuracy of the HB method was comparable with that of the 4th RK method at the Mathieu parameter, q = 0.6, and the applicable q values could be extended to the entire first stability region with satisfactory accuracy. Two sorts of nonlinear effects of ion motion were studied, including ion frequency shift, Δβ, and ion amplitude variation, Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0). New phenomena regarding Δβ were observed, although extensive studies have been performed based on the pseudo-potential well (PW) model. For instance, the |Δβ| at ε = 0.1 and ε = -0.1 were found to be different, but they were the same in the PW model. This is the first time the nonlinear effects regarding Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0) are studied, and the associated study has been a challenge for both theoretical and numerical methods. The nonlinear effects of Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0) and Δβ were found to share some similarities at q < 0.6: both of them were proportional to ε, and the square of the initial ion displacement, z(0)(2). PMID:25924875

  9. Treatability Test Report: Characterization of Vadose Zone Carbon Tetrachloride Source Strength Using Tomographic Methods at the 216-Z-9 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Rohay, Virginia J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Parker, Kyle R.

    2012-09-28

    A treatability test was conducted in 2011 at the 216-Z-9 Trench to evaluate methods for collecting characterization information that supports refined assessment of SVE performance goals based on impact to groundwater. The characterization information can also provide input to operational strategies for continued SVE operation and decisions regarding closure of the SVE system or transition to other remedies, if necessary.

  10. Materials characterization and diagnosis using variable frequency microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.B.; Fathi, Z.; Tucker, D.A.; Hampton, M.L.; Garard, R.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Product quality control is a crucial part of manufacturing and usually involves materials characterization and diagnosis. Though various microwave assisted nondestructive evaluation (MA-NDE) systems have been fabricated for materials inspection, none of the systems can be applied to materials within a mold or reactor. A broadband variable frequency microwave based, resonant mode MA-NDE was studied as an alternative for characterization of materials within a cavity. The main advantage of the resonant mode MA-NDE are non-intrusive and volumetric diagnosis of the material inside a mold. The principles and possible applications of the resonant mode MA-NDE are discussed. Resonant mode MA-NDE was fully demonstrated by using Vari-Wave to trace material status during microwave curing of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol A (DGEBA)/Diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) epoxy samples.

  11. The use of fuzzy control system methods for characterizing expert judgment uncertainty distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Booker, J.M.; Bement, T.R.; Parkinson, W.J.; Meyer, M.A.; Jamshidi, M.

    1998-12-01

    Fuzzy logic methods permit experts to assess parameters affecting performance of components/systems in natural language terms more familiar to them (e.g., high, good, etc.). Recognizing that there is a cost associated with obtaining more precise information, the authors particular interest is in cases where the relationship between the condition of the system and its performance is not well understood, especially for some sets of possible operating conditions, and where developing a better understanding is very difficult and/or expensive. The methods allow the experts to make use of the level of precision with which they understand the underlying process. The authors consider and compare various methods of formulating the process just described, with an application in reliability analysis where expert information forms a significant (if not sole) source of data for reliability analysis. The flow of information through the fuzzy-control-systems based analysis is studied using a simple, hypothetical problem which mimics the structure used to elicit expert information in Parse. They also characterize the effect of using progressively more refined information and examine the use of fuzzy-based methods as data pooling/fusion mechanisms.

  12. Review: Some low-frequency electrical methods for subsurface characterization and monitoring in hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2012-02-10

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization techniques, which have potential inmany environmental and hydrogeological applications. They provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of electrical current due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redoxactive species. Under some conditions, this method can be used to visualize groundwater flow, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Time-lapse resistivity can be used to assess the permeability and dispersivity distributions and to monitor contaminant plumes. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to reversibly store electrical energy. It can be used to image permeability and to monitor chemistry of the pore water-minerals interface. These geophysical methods, reviewed in this paper, should always be used in concert with additional in-situ measurements (e.g. in-situ pumping tests, chemical measurements of the pore water), for instance through joint inversion schemes, which is an area of fertile on-going research.

  13. Fabrication of plasmonic thin films and their characterization by optical method and FDTD simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, A.; Uherek, F.; Å kriniarová, J.; Pudiš, D.; Weis, M.; Donoval, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present optical properties of thin metal films deposited on the glass substrates by the physical vapor deposition. Localized surface plasmon polaritons of different film thicknesses have been spectrally characterized by optical methods. Evidence of the Au nanoparticles in deposited thin films have been demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and their dimensions as well as separations have been evaluated. As a first approximation, the simulation model of deposited nanoparticles without assuming their dimension and separation distributions has been created. Simulation model defines relation between the nanoparticle dimensions and their separations. Model of deposited nanoparticles has been simulated by the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation method. The pulsed excitation has been used and transmission of optical radiation has been calculated from the spectral response by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analyses. Plasmonic extinctions have been calculated from measured spectral characteristics as well as simulated characteristics and compared with each other. The nanoparticle dimensions and separations have been evaluated from the agreement between the simulation and experimental spectral characteristics. Surface morphology of thin metal film has been used as an input for the detail simulation study based on the experimental observation of metal nanoparticle distribution. Hence, this simulation method includes appropriate coupling effects between nanoparticles and provides more reliable results. Obtained results are helpful for further deep understanding of thin metal films plasmonic properties and simulation method is demonstrated as a powerful tool for the deposition technology optimizations.

  14. Calibration independent generalized cavity method for microwave characterization of powdered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhishek Kumar; Azizurrahaman; Akhtar, Mohammad Jaleel

    2015-06-01

    A generalized cavity method relaxing the major assumptions of conventional cavity perturbation technique is presented for characterization of the powdered sample in the microwave frequency range. The unified method, which is based on the inverse optimization technique, eliminates the complexity of measurement caused due to the existence of sample holder and produces an accurate result. In this paper, an attractive numerical calibration approach is proposed in lieu of the practical calibration technique which usually requires either a set of standards or a number of reference samples. The sample holder especially made of borosilicate glass is designed to contain the powdered samples, and the X-band rectangular cavity is fabricated. For verification of the proposed technique, the pulverized alumina and polyethylene oxide with various packing fractions are measured using the fabricated cavity and the vector network analyzer. The dielectric constant of these samples is extracted using the proposed unified approach which is found to be in good agreement with the theoretical data obtained by Landau-Lifshitz and Looyenga model. The accuracy of the proposed generalized cavity method for powdered samples is found to be better than the conventional resonator methods available in the literature.

  15. Calibration independent generalized cavity method for microwave characterization of powdered materials.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhishek Kumar; Azizurrahaman; Akhtar, Mohammad Jaleel

    2015-06-01

    A generalized cavity method relaxing the major assumptions of conventional cavity perturbation technique is presented for characterization of the powdered sample in the microwave frequency range. The unified method, which is based on the inverse optimization technique, eliminates the complexity of measurement caused due to the existence of sample holder and produces an accurate result. In this paper, an attractive numerical calibration approach is proposed in lieu of the practical calibration technique which usually requires either a set of standards or a number of reference samples. The sample holder especially made of borosilicate glass is designed to contain the powdered samples, and the X-band rectangular cavity is fabricated. For verification of the proposed technique, the pulverized alumina and polyethylene oxide with various packing fractions are measured using the fabricated cavity and the vector network analyzer. The dielectric constant of these samples is extracted using the proposed unified approach which is found to be in good agreement with the theoretical data obtained by Landau-Lifshitz and Looyenga model. The accuracy of the proposed generalized cavity method for powdered samples is found to be better than the conventional resonator methods available in the literature. PMID:26144529

  16. Review: Some Low-Frequency Electrical Methods for Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring in Hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization. These methods are commonly used to solve hydrogeological problems in the shallow subsurface and provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of current mainly due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redox-active species. It can be used to visualize groundwater flow patterns, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to store electrical energy in terms of ion accumulations in the pore water. Electrical resistivity, time-domain and frequency-domain induced polarization methods can be used to image the permeability and the distribution of contaminants in the ground.

  17. Integration of Multiple Field Methods in Characterizing a Field Site with Bayesian Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoy, H.; Dietrich, P.; Osorio-Murillo, C. A.; Kalbacher, T.; Kolditz, O.; Ames, D. P.; Rubin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A hydraulic property of a field can be expressed as a space random function (SRF), and the parameters of that SRF can be constrained by the Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD). MAD is a general Bayesian inverse modeling technique that quantifies the uncertainty of SRF parameters by integrating various direct local data along with indirect non-local data. An example is given with a high-resolution 3D aquifer analog with known hydraulic conductivity (K) and porosity (n) at every location. MAD is applied using different combinations of simulated measurements of K, n, and different scales of hydraulic head that represent different field methods. The ln(K) and n SRF parameters are characterized with each of the method combinations to assess the influence of the methods on the SRFs and their implications. The forward modeling equations are solved by the numerical modeling software OpenGeoSys (opengeosys.org) and MAD is applied with the software MAD# (mad.codeplex.com). The inverse modeling results are compared to the aquifer analog for success evaluation. The goal of the study is to show how integrating combinations of multi-scale and multi-type measurements from the field via MAD can be used to reduce the uncertainty in field-scale SRFs, as well as point values, of hydraulic properties.

  18. A Novel Ultrasonic Method for Characterizing Microstructural Gradients in Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and time-of-flight (TOF) imaging that uses back surface reflections to gage volumetric material quality is highly suited for quantitative characterization of microstructural gradients including those due to pore fraction, density, fiber fraction, and chemical composition variations. However, a weakness of conventional pulse echo ultrasonic velocity and TOF imaging is that the image shows the effects of thickness as well as microstructural variations, unless the part is uniformly thick. This limits this imaging method's usefulness in practical applications. Prior studies have described a pulse echo TOF based ultrasonic imaging method that requires using a single transducer in combination with a reflector plate placed behind samples which, eliminates the effect of thickness variation in the image. In those studies, this method was successful at isolating ultrasonic variations due to material in plate like samples of silicon nitride, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite. In this study, the method is engineered for inspection of more complex shaped structures- those having (hollow) tubular or curved geometry. The experimental inspection technique and results are described as applied to a polymer matrix composite "proof of concept" tube that contains machined patches of various depths and an as manufactured monolithic silicon nitride ceramic tube that might be used in "real world" applications.

  19. Laser Diagnostic Methods to Characterize Soot Evolution in Diesel-relevant Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overheim, Steven; Fisher, Brian

    2014-11-01

    Soot particles are a harmful byproduct of diesel combustion and can be detrimental to the environment and our health. The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of how the soot formation, growth, and oxidation are directly related to the chemical structure of the fuel in a diffusion flame. Such understanding is expected to help with soot reduction methods in the future. A new method to analyze soot concentrations was developed combining previous successful methods of experimentation. The new method employs combined elastic scattering and extinction to characterize soot formation, growth, and oxidation throughout the flame. These concentrations are quantifiable through the use of a 532-nm Nd:YAG laser and carefully calibrated photodetectors as optical measuring tools. This study focused on the doping of the diffusion flame with toluene, which has an aromatic molecular structure. The diffusion flame is doped with a low concentration of toluene, 1000 ppm, in its fuel stream and compared to a methane-fueled base flame. By comparing the doped flame to the methane/oxygen base flame, the higher level of active soot formation in the doped flame was clearly observed. Future work on the project will entail further data analysis to convert measured signals into quantitative soot size and concentration information. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  20. Rayleigh wave propagation method for the characterization of a thin layer of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    An experimental method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was developed for quantifying the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of a small volume of expensive biomaterials over a broad frequency range. Synthetic silicone rubber and gelatin materials were fabricated and tested to evaluate the proposed method. Planar harmonic Rayleigh waves at different frequencies, from 80 to 4000 Hz, were launched on the surface of a sample composed of a substrate with known material properties coated with a thin layer of the soft material to be characterized. A transfer function method was used to obtain the complex Rayleigh wavenumber. An inverse wave propagation problem was solved and a complex nonlinear dispersion equation was obtained. The complex shear and elastic moduli of the sample materials were then calculated through the numerical solution of the obtained dispersion equation using the measured wavenumbers. The results were in good agreement with those of a previous independent study. The proposed method was found to be reliable and cost effective for the measurement of viscoelastic properties of a thin layer of expensive biomaterials, such as phonosurgical biomaterials, over a wide frequency range. PMID:23742382

  1. An adaptive wavelet stochastic collocation method for irregular solutions of stochastic partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Clayton G; Zhang, Guannan; Gunzburger, Max D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate predictive simulations of complex real world applications require numerical approximations to first, oppose the curse of dimensionality and second, converge quickly in the presence of steep gradients, sharp transitions, bifurcations or finite discontinuities in high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this paper we present a novel multi-dimensional multi-resolution adaptive (MdMrA) sparse grid stochastic collocation method, that utilizes hierarchical multiscale piecewise Riesz basis functions constructed from interpolating wavelets. The basis for our non-intrusive method forms a stable multiscale splitting and thus, optimal adaptation is achieved. Error estimates and numerical examples will used to compare the efficiency of the method with several other techniques.

  2. Layered Yb:YAG ceramics produced by two different methods: processing, characterization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostaša, Jan; Esposito, Laura; Biasini, Valentina; Piancastelli, Andreana; Vannini, Matteo; Toci, Guido

    2016-03-01

    The use of Yb:YAG ceramic gain media in solid state lasers has been of growing interest for high repetition rate and high power lasers. Probably the most important advantage of ceramic production technology in comparison with that of single crystals is the flexibility of shaping methods that allow the production of near-net-shape components with a welldefined internal structure. In the case of Yb:YAG with dopant distribution designed accordingly to the pumping and cooling geometry the efficiency of the laser device can be enhanced by mitigating thermal lensing effects. The presented work reports on Yb:YAG transparent ceramics composed of layers with different Yb doping produced by two different shaping methods: dry pressing of spray-dried powders and tape casting, all sintered under high vacuum. The selected geometry of materials was based on numerical simulations. Microstructure of the produced materials was characterized by SEM and EDX with a particular attention to the dopant content across the layers. The optical quality of produced ceramics was characterized and discussed in connection with the microstructure and laser emission results. Output power of nearly 7 W and slope efficiency 58.1 % were obtained in QCW regime from bilayered 0-10 %Yb:YAG. In the case of multilayered materials higher scattering losses were observed. The comparison between the two processing methods highlighted that the tape-cast materials provided higher optical uniformity and the diffusion zone between the single layers with different dopant content was about 150 nm compared to about 250 nm in samples produced by pressing of powders.

  3. Methodologies for the thermomechanical characterization of continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites: A review of test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.

    1994-05-01

    Requirements for thermomechanical characterization of ceramic matrix composite materials are reviewed. Feasibility of adapting existent room temperature test methods for polymer and metal matrix composites to test ceramic matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures is investigated.

  4. Characterization of working iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using quantitative diffraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansker, Linda Denise

    This study presents the results of the ex-situ characterization of working iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (F-TS) catalysts, reacted hundreds of hours at elevated pressures, using a new quantitative x-ray diffraction analytical methodology. Compositions, iron phase structures, and phase particle morphologies were determined and correlated with the observed reaction kinetics. Conclusions were drawn about the character of each catalyst in its most and least active state. The identity of the active phase(s) in the Fe F-TS catalyst has been vigorously debated for more than 45 years. The highly-reduced catalyst, used to convert coal-derived syngas to hydrocarbon products, is thought to form a mixture of oxides, metal, and carbides upon pretreatment and reaction. Commonly, Soxhlet extraction is used to effect catalyst-product slurry separation; however, the extraction process could be producing irreversible changes in the catalyst, contributing to the conflicting results in the literature. X-ray diffraction doesn't require analyte-matrix separation before analysis, and can detect trace phases down to 300 ppm/2 nm; thus, working catalyst slurries could be characterized as-sampled. Data were quantitatively interpreted employing first principles methods, including the Rietveld polycrystalline structure method. Pretreated catalysts and pure phases were examined experimentally and modeled to explore specific behavior under x-rays. Then, the working catalyst slurries were quantitatively characterized. Empirical quantitation factors were calculated from experimental data or single crystal parameters, then validated using the Rietveld method results. In the most active form, after pretreatment in H 2 or in CO at Pambient, well-preserved working catalysts contained significant amounts of Fe7C3 with trace alpha-Fe, once reaction had commenced at elevated pressure. Amounts of Fe3O 4 were constant and small, with carbide dpavg < 15 nm. Small amounts of Fe7C3 were found in unreacted

  5. Combined Active and Passive Seismic Methods To Characterize Strongmotion Sites in Washington and Oregon, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pileggi, D.; Cakir, R.; Lunedei, E.; Albarello, D.; Walsh, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the shear-wave velocity profile at strongmotion station sites is important for calibrating accelerograms in terms of local site effects. Surface-wave seismic prospecting methods (both in active and passive configurations) provide an effective tool for an inexpensive and deep penetrating seismic characterization of subsoil. We used a combination of active (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves, MASW) and passive (Extended Spectral AutoCorrelation, ESAC) array techniques along with the single-station ambient vibration measurements (Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios - HVSR) to characterize strong-motion sites in Washington and Oregon. The MASW analysis was used to better constrain the shallowest part of the Vs profile, while effective dispersion curve provided by ESAC and HVSR data allow us to extend the survey downwards (up to hundred meters of depth). The combined use of these data in the frame of global-search inversion algorithms (Genetic Algorithms) allows us to manage the extreme non-linearity of the inverse problem and mitigate problems associated with the non-uniqueness of the solution. A strict synergy between geologic surveys, boreholes (when the latter was available) and seismic surveys allows a further reduction of relevant uncertainties. Preliminary results show that; i) this combined methodology is a practical, inexpensive, and fast way to characterize multiple strong motion sites; ii) local geology and/or borehole information was combined to better constrain the inversion and to reduce the uncertainty in velocity profiles; and, iii) this combined methodology gives additional information of shear-wave velocities at greater depths.

  6. Nondestructive testing and characterization of residual stress field using an ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wentao; Xu, Chunguang; Pan, Qinxue; Song, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    To address the difficulty in testing and calibrating the stress gradient in the depth direction of mechanical components, a new technology of nondestructive testing and characterization of the residual stress gradient field by ultrasonic method is proposed based on acoustoelasticity theory. By carrying out theoretical analysis, the sensitivity coefficients of different types of ultrasonic are obtained by taking the low carbon steel(12%C) as a research object. By fixing the interval distance between sending and receiving transducers, the mathematical expressions of the change of stress and the variation of time are established. To design one sending-one receiving and oblique incidence ultrasonic detection probes, according to Snell law, the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) is excited at a certain depth of the fixed distance of the tested components. Then, the relationship between the depth of LCR wave detection and the center frequency of the probe in Q235 steel is obtained through experimental study. To detect the stress gradient in the depth direction, a stress gradient LCR wave detection model is established, through which the stress gradient formula is derived by the relationship between center frequency and detecting depth. A C-shaped stress specimen of Q235 steel is designed to conduct stress loading tests, and the stress is measured with the five group probes at different center frequencies. The accuracy of ultrasonic testing is verified by X-ray stress analyzer. The stress value of each specific depth is calculated using the stress gradient formula. Accordingly, the ultrasonic characterization of residual stress field is realized. Characterization results show that the stress gradient distribution is consistent with the simulation in ANSYS. The new technology can be widely applied in the detection of the residual stress gradient field caused by mechanical processing, such as welding and shot peening.

  7. Hydrothermal Alteration Mineralogy Characterized Through Multiple Analytical Methods: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, S.; Hynek, B. M.; Kierein-Young, K. S.; Avard, G.; Alvarado-Induni, G.

    2015-12-01

    Proper characterization of mineralogy is an essential part of geologic interpretation. This process becomes even more critical when attempting to interpret the history of a region remotely, via satellites and/or landed spacecraft. Orbiters and landed missions to Mars carry with them a wide range of analytical tools to aid in the interpretation of Mars' geologic history. However, many instruments make a single type of measurement (e.g., APXS: elemental chemistry; XRD: mineralogy), and multiple data sets must be utilized to develop a comprehensive understanding of a sample. Hydrothermal alteration products often exist in intimate mixtures, and vary widely across a site due to changing pH, temperature, and fluid/gas chemistries. These characteristics require that we develop a detailed understanding regarding the possible mineral mixtures that may exist, and their detectability in different instrument data sets. This comparative analysis study utilized several analytical methods on existing or planned Mars rovers (XRD Raman, LIBS, Mössbauer, and APXS) combined with additional characterization (thin section, VNIR, XRF, SEM-EMP) to develop a comprehensive suite of data for hydrothermal alteration products collected from Poás and Turrialba volcanoes in Costa Rica. Analyzing the same samples across a wide range of instruments allows for direct comparisons of results, and identification of instrumentation "blind spots." This provides insight into the ability of in-situ analyses to comprehensively characterize sites on Mars exhibiting putative hydrothermal characteristics, such as the silica and sulfate deposits at Gusev crater [eg: Squyres et al., 2008], as well as valuable information for future mission planning and data interpretation. References: Squyres et al. (2008), Detection of Silica-Rich Deposits on Mars, Science, 320, 1063-1067, doi:10.1126/science.1155429.

  8. Interferometric method for in-situ characterization of coating industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Alexandre F.; Horowitz, Flavio

    2001-09-01

    Optical monitoring (OM) during film production is considered for thermal vacuum and spin coating processes. During spin coating, OM has allowed identification of several phases during film formation, and characterization of the temporal dynamics may improve control and reproducibility in film production. For films grown under high vacuum, optical monitoring allows continuous inspection of the interference signal, with typical determination of optical thicknesses in multiples of quarterwaves. Long trial-and-error procedures are avoided, even under presence of density fluctuations during deposition. Instrumentation and metrologic aspects are presented. Examples are given of liquid film deposition for silicate sol-gel films and silicone oils, as well as of thermal evaporation of ZnSe and ZnS films. In these, we also performed an intercomparative analysis with the post- process, spectrophotometric envelope method. Optical interferometry monitoring is non-destructive, can be integrated to film manufacturing processes, allows precise metrological procedures, and can be applied to the real-time and in situ characterization of a wide variety of non- opaque, liquid or solid, films.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  10. Characterization of NaTaO3 synthesized by ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Cuchillo, O; Manzo-Robledo, A; Zanella, R; Elizondo-Villareal, N; Cruz-López, A

    2013-01-01

    NaTaO(3) perovskite-like materials were synthesized using sodium acetate and tantalum ethoxide as precursors in an ultrasonic bath at room temperature. The pristine sample was thermally treated at 600 °C and characterized using XRD, N(2) physisorption, DRS, SEM and TEM techniques. The structural characterization by X-ray powder diffraction revealed that the crystallization of the NaTaO(3) phase prepared at 600 °C showed agglomerates sizes in the micrometric scale, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, well-defined NaTaO(3) particles in the nanometric scale were determined using TEM. It was found that, for the treated sample, the band gap and BET area was 3.8 eV and 9.5m(2) g(-1), respectively. The annealed perovskite, deposited onto ITO glass, presented an important variation in the open circuit potential transient during UV light irradiation in neutral solution, compared with its counterpart prepared by solid-state method. These intrinsic properties, given by the preparation route, might be appropriate for increase its photocatalytic activity. PMID:22981167

  11. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous MgO by template-free hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Hongmei; Wu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yunfa; Boughton, R.I.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • A simple synthesis of porous MgO with diameter size from 3 to 10 μm without any templates. • Effect of temperature and time were investigated. • Systematic characterization by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, TEM, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm of MgO. • A possible formation and crystal growth mechanism of mesopores MgO is proposed. - Abstract: Mesoporous MgO particles have been synthesized through a novel template-free hydrothermal co-precipitation method using a Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution as the magnesium source and NaCO{sub 3} as precipitant. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption analysis. The results indicate that the MgO samples have a disordered mesoporous structure, a large BET surface area, and a large pore volume. The effect of reaction temperature on the MgO product BET surface area was studied. A possible formation and crystal growth mechanism for mesoporous MgO is proposed.

  12. Characterization of a method for quantitating food consumption for mutation assays in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, E.D.; Reeder, B.A.; Bruce, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Quantitation of food consumption is necessary when determining mutation responses to multiple chemical exposures in the sex-linked recessive lethal assay in Drosophila. One method proposed for quantitating food consumption by Drosophila is to measure the incorporation of 14C-leucine into the flies during the feeding period. Three sources of variation in the technique of Thompson and Reeder have been identified and characterized. First, the amount of food consumed by individual flies differed by almost 30% in a 24 hr feeding period. Second, the variability from vial to vial (each containing multiple flies) was around 15%. Finally, the amount of food consumed in identical feeding experiments performed over the course of 1 year varied nearly 2-fold. The use of chemical consumption values in place of exposure levels provided a better means of expressing the combined mutagenic response. In addition, the kinetics of food consumption over a 3 day feeding period for exposures to cyclophosphamide which produce lethality were compared to non-lethal exposures. Extensive characterization of lethality induced by exposures to cyclophosphamide demonstrate that the lethality is most likely due to starvation, not chemical toxicity.

  13. A novel image-based quantitative method for the characterization of NETosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenpu; Fogg, Darin K.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2015-01-01

    NETosis is a newly recognized mechanism of programmed neutrophil death. It is characterized by a stepwise progression of chromatin decondensation, membrane rupture, and release of bactericidal DNA-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Conventional ‘suicidal’ NETosis has been described in pathogenic models of systemic autoimmune disorders. Recent in vivo studies suggest that a process of ‘vital’ NETosis also exists, in which chromatin is condensed and membrane integrity is preserved. Techniques to assess ‘suicidal’ or ‘vital’ NET formation in a specific, quantitative, rapid and semiautomated way have been lacking, hindering the characterization of this process. Here we have developed a new method to simultaneously assess both ‘suicidal’ and ‘vital’ NETosis, using high-speed multi-spectral imaging coupled to morphometric image analysis, to quantify spontaneous NET formation observed ex-vivo or stimulus-induced NET formation triggered in vitro. Use of imaging flow cytometry allows automated, quantitative and rapid analysis of subcellular morphology and texture, and introduces the potential for further investigation using NETosis as a biomarker in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26003624

  14. Generalized four-point characterization method using capacitive and ohmic contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Brian S.; Zhou, Wang; Shah, Yash D.; Zhou, Chuanle; Işık, N.; Grayson, M.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a four-point characterization method is developed for samples that have either capacitive or ohmic contacts. When capacitive contacts are used, capacitive current- and voltage-dividers result in a capacitive scaling factor not present in four-point measurements with only ohmic contacts. From a circuit equivalent of the complete measurement system, one can determine both the measurement frequency band and capacitive scaling factor for various four-point characterization configurations. This technique is first demonstrated with a discrete element four-point test device and then with a capacitively and ohmically contacted Hall bar sample over a wide frequency range (1 Hz-100 kHz) using lock-in measurement techniques. In all the cases, data fit well to a circuit simulation of the entire measurement system, and best results are achieved with large area capacitive contacts and a high input-impedance preamplifier stage. An undesirable asymmetry offset in the measurement signal is described which can arise due to asymmetric voltage contacts.

  15. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

  16. Loregic: A Method to Characterize the Cooperative Logic of Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daifeng; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Sisu, Cristina; Cheng, Chao; Rozowsky, Joel; Meyerson, William; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    The topology of the gene-regulatory network has been extensively analyzed. Now, given the large amount of available functional genomic data, it is possible to go beyond this and systematically study regulatory circuits in terms of logic elements. To this end, we present Loregic, a computational method integrating gene expression and regulatory network data, to characterize the cooperativity of regulatory factors. Loregic uses all 16 possible two-input-one-output logic gates (e.g. AND or XOR) to describe triplets of two factors regulating a common target. We attempt to find the gate that best matches each triplet’s observed gene expression pattern across many conditions. We make Loregic available as a general-purpose tool (github.com/gersteinlab/loregic). We validate it with known yeast transcription-factor knockout experiments. Next, using human ENCODE ChIP-Seq and TCGA RNA-Seq data, we are able to demonstrate how Loregic characterizes complex circuits involving both proximally and distally regulating transcription factors (TFs) and also miRNAs. Furthermore, we show that MYC, a well-known oncogenic driving TF, can be modeled as acting independently from other TFs (e.g., using OR gates) but antagonistically with repressing miRNAs. Finally, we inter-relate Loregic’s gate logic with other aspects of regulation, such as indirect binding via protein-protein interactions, feed-forward loop motifs and global regulatory hierarchy. PMID:25884877

  17. [Preparation and characterization of activated carbon-silver composite with antibacterial behavior via vacuum impregnation method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon-silver composite (Ag/AC) for antibacterial performance by controlling silver release was prepared by silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. The antibacterial activity towards E. coil and resistance of water erosion was investigated through distilled water. Surface area and porosity analyzer, Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface morphology and pore properties. The results show that Ag0 was deposited on AC symmetrically. The content of silver supported and particle size were increased by the increasing of the concentration of CH3 COOAg, while specific surface area, total pore volume and average pore size were decreased. Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% which killed 10(7) CFU/mL concentration of E. coil in 120 min exhibited the similar antibacterial activity for E. coil with that prepared by traditional impregnation method. However, the silver loss of the Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% was 37.6%, showing much higher resistance to water erosion. High antibacterial activity and control silver release can be simultaneously realized by the silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. PMID:21404679

  18. Characterization of Olive Oil by Ultrasonic and Physico-chemical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alouache, B.; Khechena, F. K.; Lecheb, F.; Boutkedjirt, T.

    Olive oil excels by its nutritional and medicinal benefits. It can be consumed without any treatment. However, its quality can be altered by inadequate storage conditions or if it is mixed with other kinds of oils. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the ability of ultrasonic methods to characterize and control olive oil quality. By using of a transducer of 2.25 MHz nominal frequency, in pulse echo mode, ultrasonic parameters, such as propagation velocity and attenuation,have been measured for pure olive oil and for its mixtures with sunflower oil at different proportions. Mechanical properties, such as density and viscosity, have also been determined. The results of ultrasonic measurements are consistent with those obtained by physico-chemical methods, such as rancidity degree, acid index, UV specific extinction coefficient and viscosity. They show that the ultrasonic method allows to distinguish between mixtures at different proportions. The study allows concluding that ultrasound techniques can be considered as a useful complement to existing physico-chemical analysis techniques.

  19. Characterization of LaVerkin Springs water and methods for its reuse in energy development. [Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhauer, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    Analytical water data obtained from a 9-month test program at the LVS (LaVerkin Springs) site, which is located in Washington County, Southwestern Utah, were evaluated. Fresh water and the water after processing through various pretreatment steps and after ED (electrodialysis) desalting were characterized. Upgrading water quality by various physical and chemical treatment methods and by desalting processes was demonstrated by the LVS site test program. The relative merit of different methods of treatment, disposal, and reuse of LVS water were studied. The objectives of the study were to evaluate methods for preventing high salinity LVS water from entering the Virginia River and for utilizing the processed water in energy development. The disposal of water by (1) deep well injection, (2) use as a secondary coolant in a binary cooling tower, (3) use in solar salt-gradient ponds, and (4) use as a transport media for coal slurry pipelines were found to be technically feasible. Use of LVS water to transport coal to a consuming powerplant and subsequent reuse in a binary cooling tower and/or solar salt-gradient ponds would achieve both objectives of salt reduction and energy conservation. Because LVS water has a salt content of 9500 mg/L and a boron content of 5 mg/L, it cannot be directly used for irrigation.

  20. Preparation and characterization of guluronic acid oligosaccharides degraded by a rapid microwave irradiation method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Li, Chunxia; Zhao, Xia; Li, Guangsheng; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi

    2013-05-24

    Guluronic acid oligosaccharides (GOS) with degree of polymerization (DP) ranging from 1 to 10 were prepared by a rapid microwave degradation method. Polyguluronic acid, fractionated from alginate hydrolysate, was dissolved in dilute ammonia water at a concentration of 20 mg/mL (pH 5) and then hydrolyzed under microwave irradiation (1600 W) at 130°C for 15 min to produce GOS mixture. The GOS mixture was separated by a Bio-Gel P6 column and ten fractions were obtained. Each GOS fraction was further characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and 2D NMR spectroscopy techniques. The data showed that the GOS fractions were saturated oligoguluronates with general molecular formula C(6n)H(8n+2)O(6n+1) (n=1-10). This microwave degradation method was not only convenient, less time consuming, and environment-friendly, but also produced GOS with high yield (71%) and eliminating a desalting procedure compared to conventional acid hydrolysis method. PMID:23584235

  1. Robust diffraction correction method for high-frequency ultrasonic tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Balasundar

    2001-05-01

    The computation of quantitative ultrasonic parameters such as the attenuation or backscatter coefficient requires compensation for diffraction effects. In this work a simple and accurate diffraction correction method for skin characterization requiring only a single focal zone is developed. The advantage of this method is that the transducer need not be mechanically repositioned to collect data from several focal zones, thereby reducing the time of imaging and preventing motion artifacts. Data were first collected under controlled conditions from skin of volunteers using a high-frequency system (center frequency=33 MHz, BW=28 MHz) at 19 focal zones through axial translation. Using these data, mean backscatter power spectra were computed as a function of the distance between the transducer and the tissue, which then served as empirical diffraction correction curves for subsequent data. The method was demonstrated on patients patch-tested for contact dermatitis. The computed attenuation coefficient slope was significantly (p<0.05) lower at the affected site (0.13+/-0.02 dB/mm/MHz) compared to nearby normal skin (0.2+/-0.05 dB/mm/MHz). The mean backscatter level was also significantly lower at the affected site (6.7+/-2.1 in arbitrary units) compared to normal skin (11.3+/-3.2). These results show diffraction corrected ultrasonic parameters can differentiate normal from affected skin tissues.

  2. Characterization of gold kiwifruit pectin from fruit of different maturities and extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Yuliarti, Oni; Matia-Merino, Lara; Goh, Kelvin K T; Mawson, John; Williams, Martin A K; Brennan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Studies on gold kiwifruit pectins are limited. In this work, the characterization of pectin isolated from two different stages of maturity of gold kiwifruit, namely early harvested fruit (EHF) and main harvested fruit (MHF) isolated by three methods (acid, water, enzymatic) was carried out. Pectins isolated from MHF were higher in galacturonic acid content (52-59% w/w) and weight-average molecular weights (Mw, 1.7-3.8 × 10(6)g/mol) compared with EHF pectins (29-49% w/w and 0.2-1.7 × 10(6)g/mol respectively). Enzymatic treatment gave the highest yield but lowest in Mw, viscosity and mechanical spectra for both maturities. The pectin of both maturities was classified as high-methoxyl pectin with the degree of esterification ranged from 82% to 90%. Water-extracted MHF pectin molecules had the highest RMS radius (182.7 nm) and Mw (3.75 × 10(6)g/mol). The water extraction method appeared to retain the native state of pectin molecules compared with acid and enzymatic extraction methods based on the Mw and viscosity data. PMID:25053083

  3. HPLC method development, validation, and impurity characterization of a potent antitumor indenoisoquinoline, LMP776 (NSC 725776).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jennie; Liu, Mingtao; Yang, Chun; Wu, Xiaogang; Wang, Euphemia; Liu, Paul

    2016-05-30

    An HPLC method for the assay of a DNA topoisomerase inhibitor, LMP776 (NSC 725776), has been developed and validated. The stress testing of LMP776 was carried out in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines Q1A (R2) under acidic, alkaline, oxidative, thermolytic, and photolytic conditions. The separation of LMP776 from its impurities and degradation products was achieved within 40 min on a Supelco Discovery HS F5 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) with a gradient mobile phase comprising 38-80% acetonitrile in water, with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid in both phases. LC/MS was used to obtain mass data for characterization of impurities and degradation products. One major impurity was isolated through chloroform extraction and identified by NMR. The proposed HPLC assay method was validated for specificity, linearity (concentration range 0.25-0.75 mg/mL, r = 0.9999), accuracy (recovery 98.6-100.4%), precision (RSD ≤ 1.4%), and sensitivity (LOD 0.13 μg/mL). The validated method was used in the stability study of the LMP776 drug substance in conformance with the ICH Q1A (R2) guideline. PMID:26970596

  4. A stability indicating HPLC method for the determination of clobazam and its basic degradation product characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clobazam is used for the treatment of different types of seizure and epilepsy. The present research is undertaken to study the systematic forced degradation of clobazam and to identify its main degradation product under basic conditions. Methods The degradation of clobazam was studied under different conditions. Clobazam and its degradation products were separated using a Nova-Pak C18 column and a mixture of KH2PO4 50 mM (pH 8.5) and acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase with UV detection at 230 nm. Results The within-day and between-day precision values in the calibration range of 0.1-20 μg/ml were within 0.5-1.5%. Clobazam was relatively stable in solid from under exposure to visible and UV light and also heat. The clobazam aqueous solution of clobazam was more labile under exposure to visible and UV light. The bulk drug was significantly degraded under exposure to 2 M HCl, 0.1 M NaOH or 3% H2O2. Using the tablet powder, higher degradation rates were observed under different stress conditions. The main degradation product of clobazam under basic condition was subsequently characterized. Conclusion The developed method could be used for the determination of clobazam in the presence of its degradation products with acceptable precision and accuracy. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated in commercial dosage forms analysis. PMID:24919821

  5. The CACAO Method for Smoothing, Gap Filling, and Characterizing Seasonal Anomalies in Satellite Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, Aleixandre; Baret, F.; Weiss, M.; Kandasamy, S.; Vermote, E.

    2013-01-01

    Consistent, continuous, and long time series of global biophysical variables derived from satellite data are required for global change research. A novel climatology fitting approach called CACAO (Consistent Adjustment of the Climatology to Actual Observations) is proposed to reduce noise and fill gaps in time series by scaling and shifting the seasonal climatological patterns to the actual observations. The shift and scale CACAO parameters adjusted for each season allow quantifying shifts in the timing of seasonal phenology and inter-annual variations in magnitude as compared to the average climatology. CACAO was assessed first over simulated daily Leaf Area Index (LAI) time series with varying fractions of missing data and noise. Then, performances were analyzed over actual satellite LAI products derived from AVHRR Long-Term Data Record for the 1981-2000 period over the BELMANIP2 globally representative sample of sites. Comparison with two widely used temporal filtering methods-the asymmetric Gaussian (AG) model and the Savitzky-Golay (SG) filter as implemented in TIMESAT-revealed that CACAO achieved better performances for smoothing AVHRR time series characterized by high level of noise and frequent missing observations. The resulting smoothed time series captures well the vegetation dynamics and shows no gaps as compared to the 50-60% of still missing data after AG or SG reconstructions. Results of simulation experiments as well as confrontation with actual AVHRR time series indicate that the proposed CACAO method is more robust to noise and missing data than AG and SG methods for phenology extraction.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of linear and nonlinear methods characterizing interdependencies between brain signals

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Asl, Karim; Senhadji, Lotfi; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Wendling, Fabrice

    2006-01-01

    Brain functional connectivity can be characterized by the temporal evolution of correlation between signals recorded from spatially-distributed regions. It is aimed at explaining how different brain areas interact within networks involved during normal (as in cognitive tasks) or pathological (as in epilepsy) situations. Numerous techniques were introduced for assessing this connectivity. Recently, some efforts were made to compare methods performances but mainly qualitatively and for a special application. In this paper, we go further and propose a comprehensive comparison of different classes of methods (linear and nonlinear regressions, phase synchronization (PS), and generalized synchronization (GS)) based on various simulation models. For this purpose, quantitative criteria are used: in addition to mean square error (MSE) under null hypothesis (independence between two signals) and mean variance (MV) computed over all values of coupling degree in each model, we introduce a new criterion for comparing performances. Results show that the performances of the compared methods are highly depending on the hypothesis regarding the underlying model for the generation of the signals. Moreover, none of them outperforms the others in all cases and the performance hierarchy is model-dependent. PMID:17025676

  7. Data-Driven Computational Methods for Materials Characterization, Classification, and Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredig, Bryce

    Many major technological challenges facing contemporary society, in fields from energy to medicine, contain within them a materials discovery requirement. While, historically, these discoveries emerged from intuition and experimentation in the laboratory, modern computational methods and hardware hold the promise to dramatically accelerate materials discovery efforts. However, a number of key questions must be answered in order for computation to approach its full potential in new materials development. This thesis explores some of these questions, including: 1) How can we ensure that computational methods are amenable to as broad a range of materials as possible? 2) How can computational techniques assist experimental materials characterization? 3) Can computation readily predict properties indicative of real-world materials performance? 4) How do we glean actionable insights from the vast stores of data that computational methods generate? and 5) Can we lift some of the burdensome requirements for computational study of compounds that are entirely uncharacterized experimentally? In addressing these points, we turn frequently to concepts from statistics, computer science, and applied mathematics to shed new light on traditional topics in materials science, and offer a data-driven approach to steps in materials discovery.

  8. On the Use of Accelerated Test Methods for Characterization of Advanced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    2003-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing for material characterization of advanced polymer matrix composites is discussed. The experimental and analytical methods provided should be viewed as a set of tools useful in the screening of material systems for long-term engineering properties in aerospace applications. Consideration is given to long-term exposure in extreme environments that include elevated temperature, reduced temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. Analytical formulations useful for predictive models that are based on the principles of time-based superposition are presented. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for determining specific aging mechanisms.

  9. Characterization of black pigment used in 30 BC fresco wall paint using instrumental methods and chemometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Several standard powdered black pigments were characterized by means of thermogravimetry TG-DTG and allied techniques. These pigments were used to make standard plaster frescoes at this purpose prepared. The latter ones were subjected to Raman and reflectance analysis. The results obtained, together with TG data, were chemometrically processed and used to identify an analogous standard fresco fabricated by an unknown commercial black pigment, obtaining excellent results. Results The same colorimetric and reflectometric techniques, coupled with suitable chemometric techniques, were then successfully used to identify the type of black pigment present in an ancient roman fresco of the Imperial Age (30 B.C.). Conclusion TG-DTG resulted useful techniques to autenticate powdered black pigments.Colorimetry and Raman, but also the only colorimetry, were useful to identify an ancient black pigment in situ. PMID:22594437

  10. Characterization of PbS/PVA/GQDs nanocomposite prepared by chemical bath deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohidi, Tavakkol; Jamshidi-Ghaleh, Kazem; Mohammad-Rezaei, Rahim

    2014-10-01

    This work reports synthesis of PbS quantum dots (QDs) embedded in the poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) by the low cost and simple method of chemical bath deposition. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and optical studies; absorption and photoluminescence measurements. Results showed that in comparison with GQDs and PbS/PVA, photoluminescence intensity of PbS/PVA/GQDs was improved and this could be attributed to rigidity of the local environment, PVA passivation and energy transformation between GQDs and PbS QDs. These analyses determined good distribution of PbS QDs on GQDs planes which is promising for practical applications in nanotechnology.

  11. Methods and Systems for Characterization of an Anomaly Using Infrared Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for characterizing an anomaly in a material comprises (a) extracting contrast data; (b) measuring a contrast evolution; (c) filtering the contrast evolution; (d) measuring a peak amplitude of the contrast evolution; (d) determining a diameter and a depth of the anomaly, and (e) repeating the step of determining the diameter and the depth of the anomaly until a change in the estimate of the depth is less than a set value. The step of determining the diameter and the depth of the anomaly comprises estimating the depth using a diameter constant C.sub.D equal to one for the first iteration of determining the diameter and the depth; estimating the diameter; and comparing the estimate of the depth of the anomaly after each iteration of estimating to the prior estimate of the depth to calculate the change in the estimate of the depth of the anomaly.

  12. A novel method to characterize the elastic/plastic deformation response of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, R.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Porter, V.L.

    1996-07-01

    A novel experimental/numerical test method has been developed which allows accurate characterization of the elastic and large-strain plastic mechanical response of thin films. Silicon micromachining techniques have been used to fabricate isolated film features which are mechanically tested using our ultralow-load indentation test system. Macro-scale laboratory testing and finite element analysis were employed to optimize the design of the geometric feature used and to benchmark our analysis capabilities. A simple rigid-plastic geometric analysis of our test structure is developed and applied to the observed force-displacement response, allowing us to extract the uniaxial inelastic stress-strain response of micrometer-scale thin film structures. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the inelastic deformation behavior of metal alloy features of this size scale has been quantitatively determined.

  13. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phat Huynh, Trong; Giang Nguyen, Dang; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-12-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found.

  14. Reservoir characterization and process monitoring with EM methods. 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the past four years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the authors have applied the EM induction method to the problem of thermal front tracking during EOR operations. During this past year, they have also turned their attention to the larger, but related, problem of petroleum reservoir characterization. As in the past, this research is a collaborative effort. The main focus of activities at LLNL is hardware development, field measurement and geological interpretation of the results. The authors are dependent on others for theoretical and software development, geological information and the availability of sites to test field systems. Collaborative interdependency serves to make research dollars stretch further and allows completion of the tasks in a timely manner. In this annual report the authors discuss the progress in the development of numerical modeling codes, describe improvements to the field system and present some field results.

  15. Characterization Method for 3D Substructure of Nuclear Cell Based on Orthogonal Phase Images

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ying; Liang, Minjie; Hua, Tingting; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xin, Zhiduo; Wang, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    A set of optical models associated with blood cells are introduced in this paper. All of these models are made up of different parts possessing symmetries. The wrapped phase images as well as the unwrapped ones from two orthogonal directions related to some of these models are obtained by simulation technique. Because the phase mutation occurs on the boundary between nucleus and cytoplasm as well as on the boundary between cytoplasm and environment medium, the equation of inflexion curve is introduced to describe the size, morphology, and substructure of the nuclear cell based on the analysis of the phase features of the model. Furthermore, a mononuclear cell model is discussed as an example to verify this method. The simulation result shows that characterization with inflexion curve based on orthogonal phase images could describe the substructure of the cells availably, which may provide a new way to identify the typical biological cells quickly without scanning. PMID:26355740

  16. Methods for radiation detection and characterization using a multiple detector probe

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas William; Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2014-11-04

    Apparatuses, methods, and systems relating to radiological characterization of environments are disclosed. Multi-detector probes with a plurality of detectors in a common housing may be used to substantially concurrently detect a plurality of different radiation activities and types. Multiple multi-detector probes may be used in a down-hole environment to substantially concurrently detect radioactive activity and contents of a buried waste container. Software may process, analyze, and integrate the data from the different multi-detector probes and the different detector types therein to provide source location and integrated analysis as to the source types and activity in the measured environment. Further, the integrated data may be used to compensate for differential density effects and the effects of radiation shielding materials within the volume being measured.

  17. Preparation and characterization of amorphous manganese sulfide thin films by SILAR method

    SciTech Connect

    Pathan, H.M.; Kale, S.S.; Lokhande, C.D.; Han, Sung-Hwan . E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2007-08-07

    Manganese sulfide thin films were deposited by a simple and inexpensive successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using manganese acetate as a manganese and sodium sulfide as sulfide ion sources, respectively. Manganese sulfide films were characterized for their structural, surface morphological and optical properties by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and optical absorption measurement techniques. The as-deposited film on glass substrate was amorphous. The optical band gap of the film was found to be thickness dependent. As thickness increases optical band gap was found to be increase. The water angle contact was found to be 34{sup o}, suggesting hydrophilic nature of manganese sulfide thin films. The presence of Mn and S in thin film was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  18. Spectroscopic characterizations of Er doped LaPO4 submicron phosphors prepared by homogeneous precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltmarsh, N.; Kumar, G. A.; Kailasnath, M.; Shenoy, Vittal; Santhosh, C.; Sardar, D. K.

    2016-03-01

    Hexagonal shaped LaPO4 submicron particles doped with various concentrations of Er were successfully prepared by homogenous precipitation method using metal nitrates and ammonium phosphate. Particles of approximate particle size 125 nm and size distribution of 85 nm are obtained with good crystallinity. After heat treatment at 1200 °C for 2 h, the particles are characterized for their various optical properties such as absorption, emission, fluorescence decay and optical band gap. Optical absorption and emission data are numerically analyzed with the help of Judd-Ofelt model to evaluate various radiative spectral properties such as radiative decay rates, radiative quantum yield, emission cross-section and fluorescence branching ratios of various emission transitions. Though the radiative quantum yield of 1554 nm emission approaches the theoretical limit of 100%, the experimentally measured quantum yield is only 11% at 12 W/cm2 at 980 nm excitation power density in 2% Er doped LaPO4.

  19. Characterization of nano-sized SiC@Ni composite fabricated by electroless plating method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhan; Chen, Yigang

    2013-02-01

    A nano-sized SiC@Ni composite was prepared by simple electroless plating method. Nickel can be reduced by Na2H2PO2 under the catalysis of Pd to despite onto the surface of SiC nanoparticles. The composite structure was characterized by means of TEM images, XRD and the components were analyzed using EDS. The coating layer on the SiC particles was several nanometers thick and mainly in a form of fine Ni crystalline grain and amorphous Ni-P alloy. By increasing the concentration of Na2H2PO2 in the plating bath, the uniformity of the coating layer can be improved obviously. Both of the magnetism and crystallinity of Ni coatings depends on the P content in the coating which can be decreased by increasing the pH values of plating solutions. The SiC@Ni particles exhibited soft magnetic characteristics. PMID:23646660

  20. Characterizing the effects of silver alloying in chalcopyrite CIGS solar cells with junction capacitance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, Peter T.; Hanket, Gregory M.; Shafarman, William N.; Cohen, J. David

    2009-04-01

    A variety of junction capacitance-based characterization methods were used to investigate alloys of Ag into Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 photovoltaic solar cells over a broad range of compositions. These alloys show encouraging trends of increasing VOC with increasing Ag content, opening the possibility of wide-gap cells for use in tandem device applications. Drive level capacitance profiling (DLCP) has shown very low free carrier concentrations for all Ag-alloyed devices, in some cases less than 1014 cm-3, which is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that of CIGS devices. Transient photocapacitance spectroscopy has revealed very steep Urbach edges, with energies between 10 meV and 20 meV, in the Ag-alloyed samples. This is in general lower than the Urbach edges measured for standard CIGS samples and suggests a significantly lower degree of structural disorder.