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Sample records for non-invasive blood perfusion

  1. Non-invasive and quantitative evaluation of peripheral vascular resistances in rats by combined NMR measurements of perfusion and blood pressure using ASL and dynamic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Jacques C; Giacomini, Eric; Baligand, Céline; Fromes, Yves; Carlier, Pierre G

    2010-02-01

    The in vivo determination of peripheral vascular resistances (VR) is crucial for the assessment of arteriolar function. It requires simultaneous determination of organ perfusion (F) and arterial blood pressure (BP). A fully non-invasive method was developed to measure systolic and diastolic BP in the caudal artery of rats based on dynamic NMR angiography. A good agreement was found between the NMR approach and the gold standard techniques (linear regression slope = 0.98, R(2) = 0.96). This method and the ASL-MRI measurement of skeletal muscle perfusion were combined into one single NMR experiment to quantitatively evaluate the local vascular resistances in the calf muscle of anaesthetized rats, in vivo and non-invasively 1) at rest: VR = 7.0 +/- 1.0 mmHg x min 100 g x ml(-1), F = 13 +/- 3 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and mean BP (MBP) = 88 +/- 10 mmHg; 2) under vasodilator challenge (milrinone): VR = 3.7 +/- 1.1 mmHg min x 100 g ml(-1), F = 21 +/- 4 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and MBP = 75 +/- 14 mmHg; 3) under vasopressor challenge (norepinephrine): VR = 9.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg min 100 g ml(-1), F = 14 +/- 3 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and MBP = 137 +/- 2 mmHg. PMID:19795372

  2. Acute changes in liver tumour perfusion measured non-invasively with arterial spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S Peter; Ramasawmy, Rajiv; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Wells, Jack A; Robson, Mathew; Rajkumar, Vineeth; Lythgoe, Mark F; Pedley, R Barbara; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive measures of tumour vascular perfusion are desirable, in order to assess response to vascular targeting (or modifying) therapies. In this study, hepatic arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated to measure acute changes in perfusion of colorectal cancer in the liver, in response to vascular disruption therapy with OXi4503. Methods: SW1222 and LS174T tumours were established in the liver of MF1 nu/nu mice via intrasplenic injection. Perfusion and R2* MRI measurements were acquired with an Agilent 9.4T horizontal bore scanner, before and at 90 min after 40 mg kg−1 OXi4503. Results: A significant decrease in SW1222 tumour perfusion was observed (−43±33%, P<0.005). LS174T tumours had a significantly lower baseline level of perfusion. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI showed a significant increase in R2* in LS174T tumours (28±25%, P<0.05). An association was found between the change in tumour perfusion and the proximity to large vessels, with pre-treatment blood flow predictive of subsequent response. Histological evaluation confirmed the onset of necrosis and evidence of heterogeneous response between tumour deposits. Conclusions: Hepatic ASL-MRI can detect acute response to targeted tumour vascular disruption entirely non-invasively. Hepatic ASL of liver tumours has potential for use in a clinical setting. PMID:27031853

  3. An optical approach for non-invasive blood clot testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brill, Alexander; Fine, Ilya; Harmelin, Alon

    2007-02-01

    Physiological blood coagulation is an essential biological process. Current tests for plasma coagulation (clotting) need to be performed ex vivo and require fresh blood sampling for every test. A recently published work describes a new, noninvasive, in vivo approach to assess blood coagulation status during mechanical occlusion1. For this purpose, we have tested this approach and applied a controlled laser beam to blood micro-vessels of the mouse ear during mechanical occlusion. Standard setup for intravital transillumination videomicroscopy and laser based imaging techniques were used for monitoring the blood clotting process. Temporal mechanical occlusion of blood vessels in the observed area was applied to ensure blood flow cessation. Subsequently, laser irradiation was used to induce vascular micro-injury. Changes in the vessel wall, as well as in the pattern of blood flow, predispose the area to vascular thrombosis, according to the paradigm of Virchow's triad. In our experiments, two elements of Virchow's triad were used to induce the process of clotting in vivo, and to assess it optically. We identified several parameters that can serve as markers of the blood clotting process in vivo. These include changes in light absorption in the area of illumination, as well as changes in the pattern of the red blood cells' micro-movement in the vessels where blood flow is completely arrested. Thus, our results indicate that blood coagulation status can be characterized by non-invasive, in vivo methodologies.

  4. Hybrid CARS for Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Pestov, Dmitry; Zhang, Aihua; Murawski, Robert; Sokolov, Alexei; Welch, George; Laane, Jaan; Scully, Marlan

    2007-10-01

    We develop a spectroscopy technique that combines the advantages of both the frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the time-resolved CARS. We use broadband preparation pulses to get an instantaneous coherent excitation of multiplex molecular vibration levels and subsequent optically shaped time-delayed narrowband probing pulse to detect these vibrations. This technique can suppress the nonresonant background and retrieve the molecular fingerprint signal efficiently and rapidly. We employ this technique to glucose detection, the final goal of which is accurate, non-invasive (i.e. painless) and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration in the Diabetes diagnosis to replace the current glucose measurement process, which requires painful fingerpricks and therefore cannot be performed more than a few times a day. We have gotten the CARS spectra of glucose aqueous solution down to 2 mM.

  5. Continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure monitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Thulesius, O; Yamaguchi, H; Mino, M; Konishi, K

    1994-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of continuous non-invasive finger arterial pressure measurement using the volume-clamp technique (Finapres). This study was designed to compare finger arterial pressure with brachial blood pressure estimated by the auscultatory method in 217 children (90 boys and 127 girls) aged 4-16 years and in 38 adults (aged 18-45 years). Finger and brachial artery pressure readings were obtained consecutively from the ipsilateral side in the supine position. Finger arterial pressure waveforms were recorded in all children except 4 with small and thin fingers. There was good agreement for systolic pressure with only a slight underestimation of 1.9 mmHg and 5.1 mmHg lower for diastolic pressure. This difference most probably reflects inaccuracy of the auscultatory cuff method rather than an error in the Finapres. There was large inter-individual variability in Finapres recordings which might be due to differences in vasomotor tone, as demonstrated by systolic amplification in 5 patients with anorexia. However, Finapres showed a small within-subject variability (3.8 mmHg for systolic and 4.1 mmHg for diastolic pressure) determined in 5 patients during phenylephrine infusion, and as good reproducibility as the auscultatory method. These results suggest that finger arterial pressure measurement in children older than 6 years of age has similar accuracy as that in adults, and that this method is useful for clinical applications in children, especially for the non-invasive evaluation of autonomic control and cardiovascular reflexes involving transient and rapid blood pressure changes. PMID:7919764

  6. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed. PMID:24059574

  7. A novel, microscope based, non invasive Laser Doppler flowmeter for choroidal blood flow assessment

    PubMed Central

    Strohmaier, C; Werkmeister, RM; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Schroedl, F; Brandtner, H; Radner, W; Schmetterer, L; Kiel, JW; Grabnerand, G; Reitsamer, HA

    2015-01-01

    Impaired ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous ocular diseases like glaucoma or AMD. The purpose of the present study was to introduce and validate a novel, microscope based, non invasive laser Doppler flowmeter (NILDF) for measurement of blood flow in the choroid. The custom made NI-LDF was compared with a commercial fiber optic based laser Doppler flowmeter (Perimed PF4000). Linearity and stability of the NI-LDF were assessed in a silastic tubing model (i.d. 0.3 mm) at different flow rates (range 0.4 – 3 ml/h). In a rabbit model continuous choroidal blood flow measurements were performed with both instruments simultaneously. During blood flow measurements ocular perfusion pressure was changed by manipulations of intraocular pressure via intravitreal saline infusions. The NILDF measurement correlated linearly to intraluminal flow rates in the perfused tubing model (r = 0.99, p<0.05) and remained stable during a 1 hour measurement at a constant flow rate. Rabbit choroidal blood flow measured by the PF4000 and the NI-LDF linearly correlated with each other over the entire measurement range (r = 0.99, y = x* 1,01 – 12,35 P.U., p < 0,001). In conclusion, the NI-LDF provides valid, semi quantitative measurements of capillary blood flow in comparison to an established LDF instrument and is suitable for measurements at the posterior pole of the eye. PMID:21443871

  8. Comparison of non-invasive and invasive blood pressure in aeromedical care.

    PubMed

    McMahon, N; Hogg, L A; Corfield, A R; Exton, A D

    2012-12-01

    Blood pressure measurement is an essential physiological measurement for all critically ill patients. Previous work has shown that non-invasive blood pressure is not an accurate reflection of invasive blood pressure measurement. In a transport environment, the effects of motion and vibration may make non-invasive blood pressure less accurate. Consecutive critically ill patients transported by a dedicated aeromedical retrieval and critical care transfer service with simultaneous invasive and non-invasive blood pressure measurements were analysed. Two sets of measurements were recorded, first in a hospital environment before departure (pre-flight) and a second during aeromedical transport (in-flight). A total of 56 complete sets of data were analysed. Bland-Altman plots showed limits of agreement (precision) for pre-flight systolic blood pressure were -37.3 mmHg to 30.0 mmHg, and for pre-flight mean arterial pressure -20.5 mmHg to 25.0 mmHg. The limits of agreement for in-flight systolic blood pressure were -40.6 mmHg to 33.1 mmHg, while those for in-flight mean blood pressure in-flight were -23.6 mmHg to 24.6 mmHg. The bias for the four conditions ranged from 0.5 to -3.8 mmHg. There were no significant differences in values between pre-flight and in-flight blood pressure measurements for all categories of blood pressure measurement. Thus, our data show that non-invasive blood pressure is not a precise reflection of invasive intra-arterial blood pressure. Mean blood pressure measured non-invasively may be a better marker of invasive blood pressure than systolic blood pressure. Our data show no evidence of non-invasive blood pressures being less accurate in an aeromedical transport environment. PMID:23033983

  9. Tissue-informative mechanism for wearable non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sung Hun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Dae Jung; Bien, Franklin; Kim, Jae Joon

    2014-01-01

    Accurate continuous direct measurement of the blood pressure is currently available thru direct invasive methods via intravascular needles, and is mostly limited to use during surgical procedures or in the intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive methods that are mostly based on auscultation or cuff oscillometric principles do provide relatively accurate measurement of blood pressure. However, they mostly involve physical inconveniences such as pressure or stress on the human body. Here, we introduce a new non-invasive mechanism of tissue-informative measurement, where an experimental phenomenon called subcutaneous tissue pressure equilibrium is revealed and related for application in detection of absolute blood pressure. A prototype was experimentally verified to provide an absolute blood pressure measurement by wearing a watch-type measurement module that does not cause any discomfort. This work is supposed to contribute remarkably to the advancement of continuous non-invasive mobile devices for 24-7 daily-life ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring. PMID:25331013

  10. Tissue-Informative Mechanism for Wearable Non-invasive Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung Hun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Dae Jung; Bien, Franklin; Kim, Jae Joon

    2014-10-01

    Accurate continuous direct measurement of the blood pressure is currently available thru direct invasive methods via intravascular needles, and is mostly limited to use during surgical procedures or in the intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive methods that are mostly based on auscultation or cuff oscillometric principles do provide relatively accurate measurement of blood pressure. However, they mostly involve physical inconveniences such as pressure or stress on the human body. Here, we introduce a new non-invasive mechanism of tissue-informative measurement, where an experimental phenomenon called subcutaneous tissue pressure equilibrium is revealed and related for application in detection of absolute blood pressure. A prototype was experimentally verified to provide an absolute blood pressure measurement by wearing a watch-type measurement module that does not cause any discomfort. This work is supposed to contribute remarkably to the advancement of continuous non-invasive mobile devices for 24-7 daily-life ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring.

  11. A new method of non-invasive blood pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liangling; Yang, Yongming; Yu, Chengbo; Guo, Qiaohui; Zhu, Gang

    2005-12-01

    Blood pressure reflects a person's health.It is proposed here that the method of detecting blood pressure may be the key to improving the precision of blood pressure measurements. The oscillometric blood pressure measurement technique is widely used in automatic blood pressure measurement instruments correctly. A method of blood pressure measurement by oscillometric method is first presented. In the oscillometric method, the basic principle of the "feature point" method and the "amplitude characteristic ratios" method is also explained and discussed here. A new method of blood pressure measurement, namely the coefficient difference comparative method, is proposed here,which is based on the feature point method and amplitude characteristic ratios method. The method is proved both effective and reliable through the analysis of many cases and clinical tests. Utilizing Visual C++, software for this new and novel method was developed and passed criterion simulation apparatus test. When applied in hospital situation, its error was +/-5%. It is concluded that the oscillometric blood pressure measurement method can provide better means of blood pressure measurements reference for doctors.

  12. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  13. Temperature influence on non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2009-02-01

    Regular monitoring of blood sugar level is important for the management of diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is a promising approach and this involves some form of contact with the body skin. It is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environment and physiological conditions and the temperature has an influence on the glucose measurement. In this paper, in-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement were studied. The in-vitro results from FTIR spectrometer show that sample temperature has significant influence on water absorption, which significantly affects the glucose absorption measurement. The in-vivo results show that when skin temperature around the measurement site is taken into consideration, the prediction of blood glucose level greatly improves.

  14. Non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Beyerl, D

    1982-05-01

    Comparison of transcutaneous (TC) monitoring of blood oxygen levels to arterial blood gas analyses was made on patients at rest with room air, during exercise, and at rest with oxygen. Three different transcutaneous monitors were evaluated: Novametrix TC O2 Mette, Biochem Sensomat, and Radiometer TC M1. The Hewlett-Packard ear oximeter for measuring oxygen saturation was also compared to oxygen saturation values calculated on the Severinghaus slide rule. Using at least one measured PO2 as a baseline, either TC monitoring or ear oximetry were valuable tools in monitoring pulmonary function. PMID:7102718

  15. Optical non-invasive monitoring of skin blood pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spīgulis, Jānis

    2005-08-01

    Time resolved detection and analysis of the skin backscattered optical signals (remission photoplethysmography or PPG) provide rich information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for reliable cardiovascular assessment. The single- and multi-channel PPG concepts are discussed in this work. Simultaneous data flow from several body locations allows one to study the heartbeat pulse wave propagation in real time and evaluate the vascular resistance. Portable single-, dual- and four-channel PPG monitoring devices with special software have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The clinical studies confirmed their potential in the monitoring of heart arrhythmias, drug tests, steady-state cardiovascular assessment, body fitness control, and express diagnostics of the arterial occlusions.

  16. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring during clinical anaesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Paul D; Grint, Nicola; Dugdale, Alexandra

    2010-03-01

    Monitoring blood pressure during anaesthesia is widely recommended in man and animals. The accuracy of any device used to measure blood pressure is an important consideration when selecting monitoring equipment, the ANSI/AAMI SP10 standard is widely cited in this respect in recent veterinary publications. Blood pressure was monitored using invasive and non-invasive techniques during clinical anaesthesia in 19 dogs. The results were compared using Bland-Altman analysis. The bias (and limits of agreement) between invasive and non-invasive measurement was 7.1 mmHg (+/-34.7) for systolic blood pressure, -1.8 mmHg (+/-27.4) for mean blood pressure and 6.9 mmHg (+/-27.5) for diastolic blood pressure. In a clinical setting the bias between invasive and non-invasive measurement techniques was similar or smaller than laboratory reports, however the limits of agreement were considerably wider suggesting that care should be exercised when interpreting NIBP values. PMID:20306347

  17. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, B. M.; O'Flynn, B.; Mathewson, A.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  18. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy for non-invasive, micro-vascular cerebral blood flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) uses the temporal fluctuations of near-infrared (NIR) light to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) non-invasively. Here, we provide a brief history of DCS applications in brain with an emphasis on the underlying physical ideas, common instrumentation and validation. Then we describe recent clinical research that employs DCS-measured CBF as a biomarker of patient well-being, and as an indicator of hemodynamic and metabolic response to functional stimuli. PMID:23770408

  19. Continuous non-invasive monitoring improves blood pressure stability in upright position: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Simanova, Alena; Tovarnicka, Tereza; Sevcikova, Silvie; Kletecka, Jakub; Zatloukal, Jan; Pradl, Richard; Chytra, Ivan; Kasal, Eduard

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the standard-of-care during low and intermediate risk anaesthesia, yet it could lead to delayed recognition of BP fluctuations. Perioperative hypotension is known to be associated with postoperative complications. Continuous, non-invasive methods for BP monitoring have been developed recently. We have tested a novel non-invasive, continuous monitor (using the volume clamp method) to assist with maintaining BP in safe ranges for patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. Forty adult patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in an upright position were included in this prospective randomised controlled trial. Patients were equally allocated to the group with continuous monitoring of BP using the CNAP® Monitor and to the control group managed using an intermittent oscillometric BP cuff. The absolute and proportional time spent outside the range of ±20% of the target BP along with other hemodynamic and clinical parameters were evaluated. The continuous monitoring decreased the anaesthesia time spent below -20% pressure range [absolute: 12 min (4-20) vs. 27 min (16-34); p=0.001; relative to procedure length: 14% (7-20) vs. 33.5% (17.5-53); p=0.003]. No significant differences were observed in postoperative morbidity or in hospital length of stay. Continuous non-invasive BP monitoring via the CNAP® Monitor allows for better BP management in patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. In our randomised trial the time spent in hypotension was significantly shorter using continuous monitoring. PMID:24841333

  20. Investigation of opportunities of the optical non-invasive diagnostics method for the blood sugar control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovskaia, Elena A.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    The relevance of noninvasive method for determining the blood sugar is caused by necessity of regular monitoring of glucose levels in diabetic patients blood. Traditional invasive method is painful, because it requires a finger pricking. Despite the active studies in the field of non-invasive medical diagnostics, to date the painless and inexpensive instrument for blood sugar control for personal use doesn't exist. It's possible to measure the concentration of glucose in the blood with help of spectrophotometry method. It consists of registering and analyzing the spectral characteristics of the radiation which missed, reflected or absorbed by the object. The authors proposed a measuring scheme for studying the spectral characteristics of the radiation, missed by earlobe. Ultra-violet, visible and near infrared spectral ranges are considered. The paper presents the description of construction and working principles of the proposed special retaining clip and results of experiment with real patient.

  1. Modelling, verification, and calibration of a photoacoustics based continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Praful P.; Sanki, Pradyut K.; Sarangi, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at an excitation wavelength of 905 nm for making continuous non-invasive blood glucose measurements. The theoretical background of the measurement technique is verified through simulation. An apparatus is fabricated for performing photoacoustic measurements in vitro on glucose solutions and in vivo on human subjects. The amplitude of the photoacoustic signals measured from glucose solutions is observed to increase with the solution concentration, while photoacoustic amplitude obtained from in vivo measurements follows the blood glucose concentration of the subjects, indicating a direct proportionality between the two quantities. A linear calibration method is applied separately on measurements obtained from each individual in order to estimate the blood glucose concentration. The estimated glucose values are compared to reference glucose concentrations measured using a standard glucose meter. A plot of 196 measurement pairs taken over 30 normal subjects on a Clarke error grid gives a point distribution of 82.65% and 17.35% over zones A and B of the grid with a mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) of 11.78% and a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 15.27 mg/dl (0.85 mmol/l). The results obtained are better than or comparable to those obtained using photoacoustic spectroscopy based methods or other non-invasive measurement techniques available. The accuracy levels obtained are also comparable to commercially available continuous glucose monitoring systems.

  2. Modelling, verification, and calibration of a photoacoustics based continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Pai, Praful P; Sanki, Pradyut K; Sarangi, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at an excitation wavelength of 905 nm for making continuous non-invasive blood glucose measurements. The theoretical background of the measurement technique is verified through simulation. An apparatus is fabricated for performing photoacoustic measurements in vitro on glucose solutions and in vivo on human subjects. The amplitude of the photoacoustic signals measured from glucose solutions is observed to increase with the solution concentration, while photoacoustic amplitude obtained from in vivo measurements follows the blood glucose concentration of the subjects, indicating a direct proportionality between the two quantities. A linear calibration method is applied separately on measurements obtained from each individual in order to estimate the blood glucose concentration. The estimated glucose values are compared to reference glucose concentrations measured using a standard glucose meter. A plot of 196 measurement pairs taken over 30 normal subjects on a Clarke error grid gives a point distribution of 82.65% and 17.35% over zones A and B of the grid with a mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) of 11.78% and a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 15.27 mg/dl (0.85 mmol/l). The results obtained are better than or comparable to those obtained using photoacoustic spectroscopy based methods or other non-invasive measurement techniques available. The accuracy levels obtained are also comparable to commercially available continuous glucose monitoring systems. PMID:26133859

  3. Fibre optic sensor for non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure during MRI scanning.

    PubMed

    Myllylä, Teemu S; Elseoud, Ahmed Abou; Sorvoja, Hannu S S; Myllylä, Risto A; Harja, Juha M; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2011-01-01

    This report focuses on designing and implementing a non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measuring device capable of being used during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Based on measuring pulse wave velocity in arterial blood, the device uses the obtained result to estimate diastolic blood pressure. Pulse transit times are measured by two fibre optical accelerometers placed over the chest and carotid artery. The fabricated accelerometer contains two static fibres and a cantilever beam, whose free end is angled at 90 degrees to act as a reflecting surface. Optical fibres are used for both illuminating the surface and receiving the reflected light. When acceleration is applied to the sensor, it causes a deflection in the beam, thereby changing the amount of reflected light. The sensor's output voltage is proportional to the intensity of the reflected light. Tests conducted on the electronics and sensors inside an MRI room during scanning proved that the device is MR- compatible. No artifacts or distortions were detected. PMID:20401906

  4. Non-invasive measurement of the blood pressure pulse using multiple PPGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, John; Pennington, Gary

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US, may be spotted early on by looking at photoplethysmogram (PPG) data. This experiment explores a new method of continuously monitoring the blood pressure pulse with PPG data. In contrast to the traditional sphygmomanometer (cuff) method, which yields only the systolic and diastolic pressure during measurement, this method tracks the blood pressure pulse wave in a non-invasive continuous manner. This procedure allows for fast, inexpensive, and detailed analysis of the patient's blood pressure implementable on a large scale. We also explore the second derivative of the PPG data. In combination with the above method, the patient's heart risk can be effectively detected. We acknowledge Fisher Endowment Grant support from the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, Towson University.

  5. Non-invasive blood sampling from primates using laboratory-bred blood-sucking bugs (Dipetalogaster maximus; Reduviidae, Heteroptera).

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Ruth; Voigt, Christian C

    2006-10-01

    Primates are easily stressed by the conventional veterinary blood sampling routine and consequently, measured blood parameters may be biased. In this study, we tested blood-sucking bugs (Dipetalogaster maximus) on one lemur and two ape species (Microcebus murinus, Pongo abelii, Pan paniscus) as an alternative, non-invasive technique for bleeding primates. Within time periods of between 6 and 62 min we obtained blood volumes of 0.01-2.4 ml in 11 out of 12 trials from all three species. Therefore, we conclude that these bugs represent a new, gentle and effective tool for bleeding captive primates without stress. PMID:16741605

  6. Non-invasive blood glucose monitoring with Raman spectroscopy: prospects for device miniaturization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with diabetes has reached over 350 million, and still continues to increase. The need for regular blood glucose monitoring sparks the interest in the development of modern detection technologies. One of those methods, which allows for noninvasive measurements, is Raman spectroscopy. The ability of infrared light to penetrate deep into tissues allows for obtaining measurements through the skin without its perforation. This paper presents the limitations and possibilities of non-invasive blood glucose monitoring with Raman spectroscopy. Especially focusing on the possibilities for device miniaturization. Such device incorporates a Raman spectrometer, a fiber-optical probe, and a computing device (microcontroller, smartphone, etc.) which calculates the glucose concentration using specialized algorithms. Simplification of device design, as well as turbidity correction technique and a new proposed method of synchronized detection are described.

  7. High Definition Oscillometry: Non-invasive Blood Pressure Measurement and Pulse Wave Analysis.

    PubMed

    Egner, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure has become increasingly important in research. High-Definition Oscillometry (HDO) delivers not only accurate, reproducible and thus reliable blood pressure but also visualises the pulse waves on screen. This allows for on-screen feedback in real time on data validity but even more on additional parameters like systemic vascular resistance (SVR), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume variances (SVV), rhythm and dysrhythmia. Since complex information on drug effects are delivered within a short period of time, almost stress-free and visible in real time, it makes HDO a valuable technology in safety pharmacology and toxicology within a variety of fields like but not limited to cardiovascular, renal or metabolic research. PMID:26091643

  8. Method and apparatus for non-invasive monitoring of blood glucose

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Graham H.; Watson, Roger M.; Noell, J. Oakey

    1992-06-09

    A new and improved method and apparatus are provided for non-invasive monitoring of changes in blood glucose concentration in a tissue specimen and particularly in an individual. The method uses acoustic velocity measurements for monitoring the effect of glucose concentration upon the density and adiabatic compressibility of the serum. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic velocity measurements are made through the earlobe of a subject by means of an acoustic probe or monitor which includes a transducer for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic energy pulses to and from the blood flowing in the subject's earlobe and a reflector for facilitating reflection of the acoustic pulses from the blood. The probe is designed in such a way that when properly affixed to an ear, the transducer is positioned flush against the anterior portion of an earlobe while the reflector is positioned flush against the interior portion of the earlobe. A microthermocouple is provided on the probe for monitoring the internal temperature of the blood being sampled. An electrical system, essentially comprising a frequency generator, a time intervalometer and an oscilloscope, is linked to the glucose monitoring probe. The electrical system analyzes selected ones of the pulses reflected from the blood sample in order to determine therefrom the acoustic velocity of the blood which, in turn, provides a representation of the blood glucose concentration levels at the time of the acoustic velocity measurements.

  9. Limitations of Stroke Volume Estimation by Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Monitoring in Hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Altitude and gravity changes during aeromedical evacuations induce exacerbated cardiovascular responses in unstable patients. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is difficult to perform in this environment with limited access to the patient. We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of stroke volume estimation by finger photoplethysmography (SVp) in hypergravity. Methods Finger arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveforms were recorded continuously in ten healthy subjects before, during and after exposure to +Gz accelerations in a human centrifuge. The protocol consisted of a 2-min and 8-min exposure up to +4 Gz. SVp was computed from ABP using Liljestrand, systolic area, and Windkessel algorithms, and compared with reference values measured by echocardiography (SVe) before and after the centrifuge runs. Results The ABP signal could be used in 83.3% of cases. After calibration with echocardiography, SVp changes did not differ from SVe and values were linearly correlated (p<0.001). The three algorithms gave comparable SVp. Reproducibility between SVp and SVe was the best with the systolic area algorithm (limits of agreement −20.5 and +38.3 ml). Conclusions Non-invasive ABP photoplethysmographic monitoring is an interesting technique to estimate relative stroke volume changes in moderate and sustained hypergravity. This method may aid physicians for aeronautic patient monitoring. PMID:25798613

  10. Peripheral venous blood oxygen saturation can be non-invasively estimated using photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Khan, Musabbir; Pretty, Christopher G; Amies, Alexander C; Elliott, Rodney B; Suhaimi, Fatanah M; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of peripheral venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) is currently performed using invasive catheters or direct blood draw. The purpose of this study was to non-invasively determine SvO2 using a variation of pulse oximetry techniques. Artificial respiration-like modulations applied to the peripheral vascular system were used to infer regional SvO2 using photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. To achieve this modulation, an artificial pulse generating system (APG) was developed to generate controlled, superficial perturbations on the finger using a pneumatic digit cuff. These low pressure and low frequency modulations affect blood volumes in veins to a much greater extent than arteries due to significant arterial-venous compliance differences. Ten healthy human volunteers were recruited for proof-ofconcept testing. The APG was set at a modulation frequency of 0.2 Hz (12 bpm) and 45-50 mmHg compression pressure. Initial analysis showed that induced blood volume changes in the venous compartment could be detected by PPG. Estimated arterial oxygen saturation (97% [IQR=96.1%-97.4%]) matches published values (95%-99%). Estimated venous oxygen saturation (93.2% [IQR=91.-93.9%]) agrees with reported ranges (92%-95%) measured in peripheral regions. The median difference between the two saturations was 3.6%, while the difference between paired measurements in each subject was statistically significant (p=0.002). These results demonstrate the feasibility of this method for real-time, low cost, non-invasive estimation of SvO2. Further validation of this method is warranted. PMID:26737758

  11. Calibration of oscillometric non-invasive devices for monitoring blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Il; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Ahn, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    Blood pressure is one of the most important vital signs used to monitor a patient’s medical condition and is widely measured in hospitals and at home. Automatic, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitoring devices measure systolic and diastolic blood pressures from the analysis of cuff pressure oscillations caused by periodic variations of blood pressure in an artery. Currently, clinical validation by comparing them to the auscultatory reference has been used to verify the performance of NIBP devices. However, there are presently no calibration methods for NIBP devices. Here, we propose an SI-traceable calibration method for oscillometric NIBP devices. The calibration system generates pressure-pulses at pre-determined cuff pressures, and with pre-determined amplitude, to the device-under-test. The uncertainty of each pulse is analyzed and used for the calculation of blood pressure (BP) uncertainty. The maximum uncertainty for systolic and diastolic BP using the newly developed calibration system is (0.74 and 0.60) mmHg (k = 2) depending on the pressure and amplitude of each pulse, as well as the number of pulses applied. The present method can be used for calibration of oscillometric NIBP devices.

  12. Clinical non-invasive measurement of effective pulmonary capillary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winter, S M

    1995-01-01

    Since traditional pulmonary function testing is centered on measurements of air flow and lung volume, a method to assess the pulmonary circulation might improve our ability to evaluate diseases that impact upon pulmonary hemodynamics. We have developed a PC based application that rapidly calculates pulmonary blood flow. Subjects rebreath a mixture of 10% argon and 3.5% freon for 20 seconds. Gas concentrations at the mouth are monitored by a clinical mass spectrometer and signals are acquired and processed with off-the-shelf hardware. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique, patients with pulmonary artery catheters were assessed by standard thermodilution methods and the rebreathing test. Measurements using this non-invasive technology closely corelate with invasive thermodilution methods (r = 0.980) and show equivalent reproducibility (average standard error = 2.5%). This application of signal processing technology can extend the role of pulmonary function testing to include routine evaluation of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:8583166

  13. 14 Years of Polish Experience in Non-Invasive Prenatal Blood Group Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Orzińska, Agnieszka; Guz, Katarzyna; Dębska, Marzena; Uhrynowska, Małgorzata; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Wielgo, Mirosław; Brojer, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Blood cell antigens may cause maternal alloimmunization leading to fetal/newborn disorders. Non-invasive prenatal diagnostics (NIPD) of the blood group permits the determination of feto-maternal incompatibility. Aim To evaluate 14 years of blood group NIPD at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine (IHTM) in Warsaw. Methods Plasma DNA from 536 RhD-negative, 24 Rhc-negative, 26 RhE-negative, 43 K-negative, and 42 HPA-1a-negative pregnant women was examined by real-time PCR to detect RHD, RHCE*c, RHCE*E, RHCE*C, KEL*01 and HPA*1A, respectively. We tested for CCR5, SRY or bi-allelic polymorphisms and quantified the total or fetal DNA. Results The results of fetal antigen status prediction by NIPD in all but one case (false-positive result of KEL*01) were correct taking neonate serology as a reference. It was confirmed that all negative results of NIPD contained fetal DNA except for four cases where there was no difference between the parents' polymorphisms. Conclusions A fetal genotype compatible with the mother was determined in 25% of all pregnancies tested at the IHTM for the fetal blood group. These cases were not at risk of disease, so it was possible to avoid invasive procedures. PMID:26733766

  14. Red blood cell as a universal optoacoustic sensor for non-invasive temperature monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Elena V.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) temperature imaging could provide improved spatial resolution and temperature sensitivity as compared to other techniques of non-invasive thermometry used during thermal therapies for safe and efficient treatment of lesions. However, accuracy of the reported optoacoustic methods is compromised by biological variability and heterogeneous composition of tissues. We report our findings on the universal character of the normalized temperature dependent optoacoustic response (ThOR) in blood, which is invariant with respect to hematocrit at the isosbestic point of hemoglobin. The phenomenon is caused by the unique homeostatic compartmentalization of blood hemoglobin exclusively inside erythrocytes. On the contrary, the normalized ThOR in aqueous solutions of hemoglobin showed linear variation with respect to its concentration and was identical to that of blood when extrapolated to the hemoglobin concentration inside erythrocytes. To substantiate the conclusions, we analyzed optoacoustic images acquired from the samples of whole and diluted blood as well as hemoglobin solutions during gradual cooling from +37 to −15 °C. Our experimental methodology allowed direct observation and accurate measurement of the temperature of zero optoacoustic response, manifested as the sample's image faded into background and then reappeared in the reversed (negative) contrast. These findings provide a framework necessary for accurate correlation of measured normalized optoacoustic image intensity and local temperature in vascularized tissues independent of tissue composition. PMID:25316928

  15. Red blood cell as a universal optoacoustic sensor for non-invasive temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena V.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2014-09-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) temperature imaging could provide improved spatial resolution and temperature sensitivity as compared to other techniques of non-invasive thermometry used during thermal therapies for safe and efficient treatment of lesions. However, accuracy of the reported optoacoustic methods is compromised by biological variability and heterogeneous composition of tissues. We report our findings on the universal character of the normalized temperature dependent optoacoustic response (ThOR) in blood, which is invariant with respect to hematocrit at the isosbestic point of hemoglobin. The phenomenon is caused by the unique homeostatic compartmentalization of blood hemoglobin exclusively inside erythrocytes. On the contrary, the normalized ThOR in aqueous solutions of hemoglobin showed linear variation with respect to its concentration and was identical to that of blood when extrapolated to the hemoglobin concentration inside erythrocytes. To substantiate the conclusions, we analyzed optoacoustic images acquired from the samples of whole and diluted blood as well as hemoglobin solutions during gradual cooling from +37 to -15 °C. Our experimental methodology allowed direct observation and accurate measurement of the temperature of zero optoacoustic response, manifested as the sample's image faded into background and then reappeared in the reversed (negative) contrast. These findings provide a framework necessary for accurate correlation of measured normalized optoacoustic image intensity and local temperature in vascularized tissues independent of tissue composition.

  16. Non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: technical possibilities and problems.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Sabellek, W; Schulte, K L; Gotzen, R

    1990-12-01

    Non-invasive automatic 24-h indirect ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure and the heart rate was performed in 2010 subjects at the Department of Internal Medicine, Klinikum Steglitz, Free University of Berlin, Germany, from 1983 to 1990. Blood pressure profiles were obtained using seven different monitors, Pressurometer III (Del Mar Avionics), Physioport (Natic), Accutracker (Oxford), Blutdrucksystem (Medizintechnik), SL 5200, SL 90202 and SL 90207 (SpaceLabs). The monitors were equipped with auscultatory and/or oscillometric devices, provided accurate readings and were repeatedly used up to eight times in some patients. Up to 100 data points per 24 h provided diurnal blood pressure profiles for over 91% of the patients in clinical and non-clinical situations. Early identification of borderline hypertensives at risk of cardiovascular disease and detailed information on the efficacy of different antihypertensive regimens may in part justify the high costs of the monitors. Although disturbance to sleep remained a problem in more than 20% of the patients investigated, the new, lighter, quieter monitors (e.g. SpaceLabs 90207 at 380 g) were well received by patients and nurses. In the future, simultaneous registration with 24-h ECG may help in identifying the effects of different antihypertensive therapies on blood pressure variability and the periodicity of the heart rate. PMID:2081997

  17. [An automatic non-invasive method for the measurement of systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Morel, D; Suter, P

    1981-01-01

    A new automatic apparatus for the measurement of arterial pressure by a non-invasive technique was compared with direct intra-arterial measurement in 20 adult patients in a surgical intensive care unit. The apparatus works on the basis of the principle of oscillometry. Blood pressure is determined with a microprocessor by analysis of the amplitude of the oscillations produced by a cuff which is inflated then deflated automatically. Thus mean arterial pressure corresponds to the maximum amplitude. Systolic and diastolic pressures are deduced by extrapolation to zero of the amplitudes on either side of the maximum reading. Mean arterial pressure (AP) proved to be very reliable within the limits studied: 8.0 - 14.7 kPa (60 - 110 mmHg) with a difference in mean direct AP and indirect AP of 0,09 +/- 0.9 kPa SD (0.71 +/- 7 mmHg) and a coefficient of linear correlation between the two methods of r = 0.82. This non-invasive technique determined systolic arterial pressure (sAP) in a less reliable fashion than AP when compared with the invasive technique, with a tendency to flatten the extreme values. The correlation coefficient here was 0.68. Finally, diastolic arterial pressure (dAP) showed a better degree of agreement through with a difference in mean indirect AP and mean direct AP of 1.0 +/- 0.8 kPa (7.6 +/- 6.0 mmHg). These results indicate a good degree of agreement for measurements of mean arterial pressure, clinically the most important, between the two methods used. Measurements of diastolic pressure and above all of diastolic pressure seemed to be less in agreement. This difference could be due to an error in determination of the automatic apparatus tested or to the peripheral site (radial artery) of the intra-arterial catheter used, itself falsifying the humeral arterial pressure. PMID:6113805

  18. Non invasive blood flow measurement in cerebellum detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy earlier than psychometric tests

    PubMed Central

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; Cauli, Omar; Andrés-Costa, Maria-Jesús; González, Olga; Serra, Miguel A; Sánchez-González, Javier; Aliaga, Roberto; Giner-Durán, Remedios; Belloch, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether non invasive blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling in several brain regions detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood flow (BF) was analyzed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) in different brain areas of 14 controls, 24 cirrhotic patients without and 16 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Images were collected using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Achieva 3T-TX, Philips, Netherlands). Pulsed ASL was performed. Patients showing MHE were detected using the battery Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) consisting of five tests. Different cognitive and motor functions were also assessed: alterations in selective attention were evaluated using the Stroop test. Patients and controls also performed visuo-motor and bimanual coordination tests. Several biochemical parameters were measured: serum pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-18), 3-nitrotyrosine, cGMP and nitrates+nitrites in plasma, and blood ammonia. Bivariate correlations were evaluated. RESULTS: In patients with MHE, BF was increased in cerebellar hemisphere (P = 0.03) and vermis (P = 0.012) and reduced in occipital lobe (P = 0.017). BF in cerebellar hemisphere was also increased in patients without MHE (P = 0.02). Bimanual coordination was impaired in patients without MHE (P = 0.05) and much more in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Visuo-motor coordination was impaired only in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Attention was slightly affected in patients without MHE and more strongly in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). BF in cerebellar hemisphere and vermis correlated with performance in most tests of PHES [(number connection tests A (NCT-A), B (NCT-B)and line tracing test] and in the congruent task of Stroop test. BF in frontal lobe correlated with NCT-A. Performance in bimanual and visuomotor coordination tests correlated only with BF in cerebellar hemisphere. BF in occipital lobe correlates with performance in the PHES battery and with

  19. Plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive and continuous monitoring of extracellular component of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Takatani, Setsuo

    2012-04-01

    To achieve the quantitative optical non-invasive diagnosis of blood during extracorporeal circulation therapies, the instrumental technique to extract extracellular spectra from whole blood was developed. In the circuit, the continuous blood flow was generated by a centrifugal blood pump. The oxygen saturation was maintained 100% by an oxygenator. The developed glass optical flow cell was attached to the outlet tubing of the oxygenator. The halogen lamp including the light from 400 to 900 nm wavelength was used for the light source. The light was guided into an optical fiber. The light emitted by the fiber was collimated and emitted to the flow cell flat surface at the incident angle of 45 degrees. The light just reflected on the boundary between inner surface of the flow cell and plasma at 45 degrees was detected by the detection fiber. The detected light was analyzed by a spectral photometer. The obtained spectrum from 400 to 600nm wavelength was not changed with respect to the hematocrit. In contrast, the signal in the spectral range was changed when the plasma free hemoglobin increased. By using two spectral range, 505+/-5 nm and 542.5+/-2.5 nm, the differential spectrum was correlated with the free hemoglobin at R2=0.99. On the other hand, as for the hematocrit, the differential spectrum was not correlated at R2=0.01. Finally, the plasma free hemoglobin was quantified with the accuracy of 22+/-19mg/dL. The result shows that the developed plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy (PSRS) can extract the plasma spectrum from flowing whole blood.

  20. A non-invasive technique to bleed incubating birds without trapping: A blood-sucking bug in a hollow egg

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, P.H.; Voigt, C.C.; Arnold, J.M.; Nagel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a non-invasive technique to obtain blood samples from incubating birds without trapping and handling. A larval instar of the blood-sucking bug Dipetalogaster maximus (Heteroptera) was put in a hollowed artificial egg which was placed in a common tern Sterna hirundo) nest. A gauze-covered hole in the egg allowed the bug to draw blood from the brood patch of breeding adults. We successfully collected 68 blood samples of sufficient amount (median=187 ??l). The daily success rate was highest during the early breeding season and averaged 34% for all trials. We could not detect any visible response by the incubating bird to the sting of the bug. This technique allows for non-invasive blood collection from bird species of various sizes without disturbance. ?? Dt. Ornithologen-Gesellschaft e.V. 2005.

  1. Evaluation of the cerebrovascular pressure reactivity index using non-invasive finapres arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, M; Schmidt, E; Kim, D J; Haubrich, C; Czosnyka, Z; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M

    2010-09-01

    A pressure reactivity index (PRx) can be assessed in patients with continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) as a moving correlation coefficient between slow fluctuations of these two signals within a low frequency bandwidth. The study aimed to investigate whether the invasive ABP monitoring can be replaced with non-invasive measurement of ABP using a Finapres plethysmograph (fABP) to calculate the fPRx. There is a well-defined group of patients, suffering from hydrocephalus and undergoing CSF pressure monitoring, which may benefit from such a measurement. 41 simultaneous day-by-day monitoring of ICP, ABP and fABP were performed for about 30 min in 10 head injury patients. A Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used to compare PRx and fPRx calculations. Performance metrics and the McNemary test were used to determine whether fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functioning and disturbed cerebrovascular pressure reactivity. The fPRx correlated with PRx (R(Spearman) = 0.92, p < 0.001; bias = -0.04; lower and upper limits of agreement: -0.26 and 0.17, respectively). The fPRx distinguished between active and passive reactivity in more than 89% cases. The fPRx can be used with care for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in patients for whom invasive ABP measurement is not feasible. The fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functional and deranged reactivity. PMID:20664157

  2. Non-invasive detection of fasting blood glucose level via electrochemical measurement of saliva.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sarul; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Anand, Sneh; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning techniques such as logistic regression (LR), support vector machine (SVM) and artificial neural network (ANN) were used to detect fasting blood glucose levels (FBGL) in a mixed population of healthy and diseased individuals in an Indian population. The occurrence of elevated FBGL was estimated in a non-invasive manner from the status of an individual's salivary electrochemical parameters such as pH, redox potential, conductivity and concentration of sodium, potassium and calcium ions. The samples were obtained from 175 randomly selected volunteers comprising half healthy and half diabetic patients. The models were trained using 70 % of the total data, and tested upon the remaining set. For each algorithm, data points were cross-validated by randomly shuffling them three times prior to implementing the model. The performance of the machine learning technique was reported in terms of four statistically significant parameters-accuracy, precision, sensitivity and F1 score. SVM using RBF kernel showed the best performance for classifying high FBGLs with approximately 85 % accuracy, 84 % precision, 85 % sensitivity and 85 % F1 score. This study has been approved by the ethical committee of All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India with the reference number: IEC/NP-278/01-08-2014, RP-29/2014. PMID:27350930

  3. Relating external compressing pressure to mean arterial pressure in non-invasive blood pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Chin, K Y; Panerai, R B

    2015-01-01

    Arterial volume clamping uses external compression of an artery to provide continuous non-invasive measurement of arterial blood pressure. It has been assumed that mean arterial pressure (MAP) corresponds to the point where unloading leads to the maximum oscillation of the arterial wall as reflected by photoplethysmogram (PPG), an assumption that has been challenged. Five subjects were recruited for the study (three males, mean age (SD) = 32 (15) years). The PPG waveform was analysed to identify the relationship between the external compressing pressure, PPG pulse amplitude and MAP. Two separate tests were carried out at compression step intervals of 10 mmHg and 2 mmHg, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two tests. The bias between the compressing pressure and the MAP was -4.7 ± 5.63 mmHg (p < 0.001) showing a normal distribution. Further research is needed to identify optimal algorithms for estimation of MAP using PPG associated with arterial compression. PMID:25429784

  4. Functional photoacoustic tomography for non-invasive imaging of cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume in rat brain in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Xie, Xueyi; Ku, Geng; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2005-04-01

    Based on the multi-wavelength laser-based photoacoustic tomography, non-invasive in vivo imaging of functional parameters, including the hemoglobin oxygen saturation and the total concentration of hemoglobin, in small-animal brains was realized. The high sensitivity of this technique is based on the spectroscopic differences between oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin while its spatial resolution is bandwidth-limited by the photoacoustic signals rather than by the optical diffusion as in optical imaging. The point-by-point distributions of blood oxygenation and blood volume in the cerebral cortical venous vessels, altered by systemic physiological modulations including hyperoxia, normoxia and hypoxia, were visualized successfully through the intact skin and skull. This technique, with its prominent intrinsic advantages, can potentially accelerate the progress in neuroscience and provide important new insights into cerebrovascular physiology and brain function that are of great significance to the neuroscience community.

  5. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  6. Non invasive blood flow assessment in diabetic foot ulcer using laser speckle contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthy, A. K.; Sujatha, N.; Reddy, M. Ramasubba; Narayanamoorthy, V. B.

    2014-03-01

    Measuring microcirculatory tissue blood perfusion is of interest for both clinicians and researchers in a wide range of applications and can provide essential information of the progress of treatment of certain diseases which causes either an increased or decreased blood flow. Diabetic ulcer associated with alterations in tissue blood flow is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations. A technique which can detect the onset of ulcer and provide essential information on the progress of the treatment of ulcer would be of great help to the clinicians. A noninvasive, noncontact and whole field laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique has been described in this paper which is used to assess the changes in blood flow in diabetic ulcer affected areas of the foot. The blood flow assessment at the wound site can provide critical information on the efficiency and progress of the treatment given to the diabetic ulcer subjects. The technique may also potentially fulfill a significant need in diabetic foot ulcer screening and management.

  7. A Non-Invasive Method to Assess Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Nan; He, Peng; Qin, Chunchang; Yang, Deyu; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) can adversely impact cerebrovascular hemodynamics but cannot be practically measured in most clinical settings. Here, we aimed to establish a representative mathematical model for CPP in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease. Methods A total of 100 patients (54 males and 46 females between 60–80 years of age) with suspected cerebrovascular disease and no obvious cerebrovascular stenosis were selected for invasive CPP monitoring via catheterization of the middle segment of the common carotid arteries and openings of the vertebral arteries bilaterally. Curves were function-fitted using MATLAB 7.0, and data was statistically processed by SPSS 20.0. Results MATLAB 7.0 constructed eighth-order Fourier functions that fit all recorded CPP curves. Since the coefficients of the 100 functions were significantly different, all functions were standardized to derive one representative function. By manipulating the heart rate and maximum/minimum CPP of the representative function, estimated CPP curves can be constructed for patients with differing heart rates, intracranial pressures (ICPs) and blood pressures. Conclusions CPP can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function that can be constructed from a patient’s brachial artery blood pressure (BABP), ICP and heart rate. This function is representative of geriatric patients with cerebrovascular disease and can be used in the future study of cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:25789855

  8. Speckle contrast optical spectroscopy, a non-invasive, diffuse optical method for measuring microvascular blood flow in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Claudia P.; Varma, Hari M.; Kristoffersen, Anna K.; Dragojevic, Tanja; Culver, Joseph P.; Durduran, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new, non-invasive, diffuse optical technique, speckle contrast optical spectroscopy (SCOS), for probing deep tissue blood flow using the statistical properties of laser speckle contrast and the photon diffusion model for a point source. The feasibility of the method is tested using liquid phantoms which demonstrate that SCOS is capable of measuring the dynamic properties of turbid media non-invasively. We further present an in vivo measurement in a human forearm muscle using SCOS in two modalities: one with the dependence of the speckle contrast on the source-detector separation and another on the exposure time. In doing so, we also introduce crucial corrections to the speckle contrast that account for the variance of the shot and sensor dark noises. PMID:25136500

  9. Non-Invasive measurement of blood pressure - Why we should look at BP traces rather than listen to Korotkoff sounds.

    PubMed

    Celler, Branko G; Basilakis, Jim; Goozee, Kathryn; Ambikairajah, Eliathamby

    2015-08-01

    Accurate non-invasive measurement of blood pressure in unsupervised environments continues to be a challenge, particularly in the presence of movement artefact, electrical noise and most importantly cardiac arrhythmia which are common in those aged over 65 suffering from a range of chronic conditions. Large intra personal variability in signal morphometry and amplitudes further complicates the development of reliable signal processing algorithms for NIBP measurement. In this paper we demonstrate the effect of this variability and propose that the traditional methods of human blood pressure determination by sphygmomanometry should no longer be considered a gold standard for the calibration of NIBP devices. PMID:26737650

  10. Non-invasive in situ simultaneous measurement of multi-parameter mechanical properties of red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Huang, Yao-Xiong; Ji, Tao; Tu, Mei; Mao, Xuan; Chen, Wen-Xin; Chen, Guang-Wei

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new dynamic image analyzing technique that will give us the ability to measure the viscoelastic parameters of individual living red blood cells non-invasively, in situ and in real time. With this technique, the bending modulus KC, the shear elasticity mu and their ratio were measured under different temperatures, oxygen partial pressures and osmotic pressures. The results not only show the effects of external conditions on mechanical properties of cell membranes including deformability, flexibility, adhesive ability and plasticity, but also demonstrate that the technique can be used to measure cell membrane parameters continuously under several physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:15944754

  11. From Korotkoff and Marey to automatic non-invasive oscillometric blood pressure measurement: does easiness come with reliability?

    PubMed

    Benmira, A; Perez-Martin, A; Schuster, I; Aichoun, I; Coudray, S; Bereksi-Reguig, F; Dauzat, M

    2016-01-01

    The auscultatory technique remains the point of reference for the validation of non-invasive blood pressure measurement devices, although the exact origin of the Korotkoff sounds is still debated and comparison with intra-arterial measurement shows limits and pitfalls. Automatic oscillometric devices are now widely used by nurses, physicians, and patients. However, many available devices have not been duly validated. Moreover, they calculate systolic and diastolic blood pressures using undisclosed algorithms. Therefore, these devices are not interchangeable, and their reliability may be questionable in some clinical situations. Nevertheless, oscillometry is increasingly used, beside NIBP, for the assessment of central blood pressure and systemic arterial wall stiffness. Awareness of its limits and causes of error is all the more necessary. PMID:26641026

  12. Non-Invasive Microbial Metabolic Activity Sensing at Single Cell Level by Perfusion of Calcein Acetoxymethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Christina E. M.; Singh, Abhijeet; Helfrich, Stefan; Grünberger, Alexander; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast microscopy cannot give sufficient information on bacterial metabolic activity, or if a cell is dead, it has the fate to die or it is in a viable but non-growing state. Thus, a reliable sensing of the metabolic activity helps to distinguish different categories of viability. We present a non-invasive instantaneous sensing method using a fluorogenic substrate for online monitoring of esterase activity and calcein efflux changes in growing wild type bacteria. The fluorescent conversion product of calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CAM) and its efflux indicates the metabolic activity of cells grown under different conditions at real-time. The dynamic conversion of CAM and the active efflux of fluorescent calcein were analyzed by combining microfluidic single cell cultivation technology and fluorescence time lapse microscopy. Thus, an instantaneous and non-invasive sensing method for apparent esterase activity was created without the requirement of genetic modification or harmful procedures. The metabolic activity sensing method consisting of esterase activity and calcein secretion was demonstrated in two applications. Firstly, growing colonies of our model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum were confronted with intermittent nutrient starvation by interrupting the supply of iron and carbon, respectively. Secondly, bacteria were exposed for one hour to fatal concentrations of antibiotics. Bacteria could be distinguished in growing and non-growing cells with metabolic activity as well as non-growing and non-fluorescent cells with no detectable esterase activity. Microfluidic single cell cultivation combined with high temporal resolution time-lapse microscopy facilitated monitoring metabolic activity of stressed cells and analyzing their descendants in the subsequent recovery phase. Results clearly show that the combination of CAM with a sampling free microfluidic approach is a powerful tool to gain insights in the metabolic activity of growing and non

  13. Observational study comparing non-invasive blood pressure measurement at the arm and ankle during caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Drake, M J P; Hill, J S

    2013-05-01

    Upper-arm non-invasive blood pressure measurement during caesarean section can be uncomfortable and unreliable because of movement artefact in the conscious parturient. We aimed to determine whether ankle blood pressure measurement could be used instead in this patient group by comparing concurrent arm and ankle blood pressure measured throughout elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia in 64 term parturients. Bland-Altman analysis of mean difference (95% limits of agreement [range]) between the ankle and arm was 11.2 (-20.3 to +42.7 [-67 to +102]) mmHg for systolic arterial pressure, -0.5 (-21.0 to +19.9 [-44 to +91]) mmHg for mean arterial pressure and -3.8 (-25.3 to +17.8 [-41 to +94]) mmHg for diastolic arterial pressure. Although ankle blood pressure measurement is well tolerated and allows greater mobility of the arms than measurement from the arm, the degree of discrepancy between the two sites is unacceptable to allow routine use of ankle blood pressure measurement, especially for systolic arterial pressure. However, ankle blood pressure measurement may be a useful alternative in situations where arm blood pressure measurement is difficult or impossible. PMID:23480469

  14. Non-invasive method for the aortic blood pressure waveform estimation using the measured radial EBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivoshei, Andrei; Lamp, Jürgen; Min, Mart; Uuetoa, Tiina; Uuetoa, Hasso; Annus, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents a method for the Central Aortic Pressure (CAP) waveform estimation from the measured radial Electrical Bio-Impedance (EBI). The method proposed here is a non-invasive and health-safe approach to estimate the cardiovascular system parameters, such as the Augmentation Index (AI). Reconstruction of the CAP curve from the EBI data is provided by spectral domain transfer functions (TF), found on the bases of data analysis. Clinical experiments were carried out on 30 patients in the Center of Cardiology of East-Tallinn Central Hospital during coronary angiography on patients in age of 43 to 80 years. The quality and reliability of the method was tested by comparing the evaluated augmentation indices obtained from the invasively measured CAP data and from the reconstructed curve. The correlation coefficient r = 0.89 was calculated in the range of AICAP values from 5 to 28. Comparing to the traditional tonometry based method, the developed one is more convenient to use and it allows long-term monitoring of the AI, what is not possible with tonometry probes.

  15. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  16. Evaluation of a computer program for non-invasive determination of pulmonary shunt and ventilation-perfusion mismatch.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Geoffrey G; Fung, Nick L S; Jones, J Gareth

    2014-12-01

    We describe a three-compartment model (shunt and two perfused compartments) to analyse the relationship between inspired oxygen (FIO2) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) in terms of pulmonary shunt and ventilation-perfusion ratio (VA/Q). The program was tested using 24 exact datasets, each with six pairs of FIO2 and SaO2 data points with known VA/Q and shunt, generated by a complex calculator of gas exchange. Additional datasets were created by adding noise and rounding the exact sets, and by reducing the number of data points per dataset. The importance of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve and the arterio-venous difference in oxygen content (avDO2) were also tested. Analysis using the three compartment model was more accurate than the two compartment model and less affected by data degradation. The absolute error in shunt estimation was never more than 2.2 % for the exact and rounded datasets, but the error in VA/Q estimation was -29 to 19 % of the true value (10th-90th centiles). The characteristics of the well-ventilated compartment were not determined accurately. At extremes of cardiac output, an assumed value of avDO2 resulted in significant errors. It is probably advantageous to correct for foetal haemoglobin in neonatal datasets. Analysis of FIO2 versus SaO2 datasets using a three compartment model provides accurate estimates of shunt and VA/Q when arterio-venous difference in oxygen content is known. The estimates may have value as objective measures of gas exchange, and as a visual guide for oxygen therapy. PMID:24402641

  17. Respiratory rate estimation from the oscillometric waveform obtained from a non-invasive cuff-based blood pressure device.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, M A F; Santos, M D; Arteta, C; Domingos, J S; Maraci, M A; Clifford, G D

    2014-01-01

    The presence of respiratory activity in the electrocardiogram (ECG), the pulse oximeter's photoplethysmo-graphic and continuous arterial blood pressure signals is a well-documented phenomenon. In this paper, we demonstrate that such information is also present in the oscillometric signal acquired from automatic non-invasive blood pressure monitors, and may be used to estimate the vital sign respiratory rate (RR). We propose a novel method that combines the information from the two respiratory-induced variations (frequency and amplitude) via frequency analysis to both estimate RR and eliminate estimations considered to be unreliable because of poor signal quality. The method was evaluated using data acquired from 40 subjects containing ECG, respiration and blood pressure waveforms, the latter acquired using an in-house built blood pressure device that is able to connect to a mobile phone. Results demonstrated a good RR estimation accuracy of our method when compared to the reference values extracted from the reference respiration waveforms (mean absolute error of 2.69 breaths/min), which is comparable to existing methods in the literature that extract RR from other physiological signals. The proposed method has been implemented in Java on the Android device for use in an mHealth platform. PMID:25570824

  18. A non-invasive blood glucose meter design using multi-type sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D.; Nguyen, Hienvu; Roveda, Janet

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a design of a multi optical modalities blood glucose monitor. The Monte Carlo tissues optics simulation with typical human skin model suggests the SNR ratio for a detector sensor is 104 with high sensitivity that can detect low blood sugar limit at 1 mMole/dL ( <20 mg/dL). A Bayesian filtering algorithm is proposed for multisensor fusion to identify whether e user has the danger of having diabetes. The new design has real time response (on the average of 2 minutes) and provides great potential to perform real time monitoring for blood glucose.

  19. Non-invasive estimation and control of inlet pressure in an implantable rotary blood pump for heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Alomari, A H; Savkin, A V; Ayre, P J; Lim, E; Mason, D G; Salamonsen, R F; Fraser, J F; Lovell, N H

    2011-08-01

    We propose a dynamical model for mean inlet pressure estimation in an implantable rotary blood pump during the diastolic period. Non-invasive measurements of pump impeller rotational speed (ω), motor power (P), and pulse width modulation signal acquired from the pump controller were used as inputs to the model. The model was validated over a wide range of speed ramp studies, including (i) healthy (C1), variations in (ii) heart contractility (C2); (iii) afterload (C2, C3, C4), and (iv) preload (C5, C6, C7). Linear regression analysis between estimated and extracted mean inlet pressure obtained from in vivo animal data (greyhound dogs, N = 3) resulted in a highly significant correlation coefficients (R(2) = 0.957, 0.961, 0.958, 0.963, 0.940, 0.946, and 0.959) and mean absolute errors of (e = 1.604, 2.688, 3.667, 3.990, 2.791, 3.215, and 3.225 mmHg) during C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, and C7, respectively. The proposed model was also used to design a controller to regulate mean diastolic pump inlet pressure using non-invasively measured ω and P. In the presence of model uncertainty, the controller was able to track and settle to the desired input within a finite number of sampling periods and minimal error (0.92 mmHg). The model developed herein will play a crucial role in developing a robust control system of the pump that detects and thus avoids undesired pumping states by regulating the inlet pressure within a predefined physiologically realistic limit. PMID:21666292

  20. Non-invasive measurement of pulmonary blood flow during prone positioning in patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reutershan, Jörg; Schmitt, Andre; Dietz, Klaus; Fretschner, Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    In the daily clinical routine at the bedside, information on effective pulmonary blood flow (PBF) is limited and requires invasive monitoring, including a pulmonary artery catheter, to determine both cardiac output and intrapulmonary shunt. Therefore we evaluated a non-invasive method for the measurement of PBF in a clinical setting, including 12 patients with acute respiratory failure (acute respiratory distress syndrome) undergoing prone positioning. PBF was determined before (baseline), during and after prone positioning, by using a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new photoacoustic gas analyser. Values were compared with the cardiac output corrected for intrapulmonary shunt (COeff). Responders to prone positioning were defined according to the improvement of arterial oxygenation. A total of 84 measurements were performed. PBF values correlated well with COeff (R2=0.96; P<0.0001). Bias and limits of agreement (+/- 2 S.D.) for all measurements were -0.11 +/- 0.76 litre/min. At baseline, responders showed significantly lower PBF levels than non-responders (4.8 +/- 1.0 compared with. 6.4 +/- 1.2 litre/min; P=0.03). During prone positioning, PBF increased continuously in responders and remained high after patients had been returned to the supine position. PBF was unaffected in non-responders. Mean total increase in PBF was 1.2 +/- 0.2 litre/min in responders compared with -0.4 +/- 0.2 litre/min in non-responders (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the investigated rebreathing system allows for a non-invasive determination of PBF at the bedside. The accuracy of the measurements is comparable with the thermodilution method. It is able to reliably reflect changes in PBF induced by prone positioning. Moreover, measuring PBF might be a promising tool to identify responders to prone therapy. PMID:12877652

  1. Relative indexes of cutaneous blood perfusion measured by real-time laser Doppler imaging (LDI) in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Seyed Jafari, S Morteza; Schawkat, Megir; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Shafighi, Maziar

    2014-07-01

    We used real-time LDI to study regional variations in microcirculatory perfusion in healthy candidates to establish a new methodology for global perfusion body mapping that is based on intra-individual perfusion index ratios. Our study included 74 (37 female) healthy volunteers aged between 22 and 30 years (mean 24.49). Imaging was performed using a recent microcirculation-imaging camera (EasyLDI) for different body regions of each volunteer. The perfusion values were reported in Arbitrary Perfusion Units (APU). The relative perfusion indexes for each candidate's body region were then obtained by normalization with the perfusion value of the forehead. Basic parameters such as weight, height, and blood pressure were also measured and analyzed. The highest mean perfusion value was reported in the forehead area (259.21APU). Mean perfusion in the measured parts of the body correlated positively with mean forehead value, while there was no significant correlation between forehead blood perfusion values and room temperature, BMI, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p=0.420, 0.623, 0.488, 0.099, respectively). Analysis of the data showed that perfusion indexes were not significantly different between male and female volunteers except for the ventral upper arm area (p=.001). LDI is a non-invasive, fast technique that opens several avenues for clinical applications. The mean perfusion indexes are useful in clinical practice for monitoring patients before and after surgical interventions. Perfusion values can be predicted for different body parts for patients only by taking the forehead perfusion value and using the perfusion index ratios to obtain expected normative perfusion values. PMID:24788075

  2. Non-invasive functional imaging of Cerebral Blood Volume with Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Hua, Jun; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) based on changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) can directly probe vasodilatation and vasoconstriction during brain activation or physiologic challenges, and can provide important insights into the mechanism of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal changes. At present, the most widely used CBV fMRI technique in humans is called Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI and this article provides a technical review of this method. VASO MRI utilizes T1 differences between blood and tissue to distinguish these two compartments within a voxel and uses blood-nulling inversion recovery sequence to yield an MR signal proportional to 1-CBV. As such, vasodilatation will result in a VASO signal decrease and vasoconstriction will have the reverse effect. The VASO technique can be performed dynamically with a temporal resolution comparable to several other fMRI methods such as BOLD or Arterial-Spin-Labeling (ASL), and is particularly powerful when conducted in conjunction with these complementary techniques. The pulse sequence and imaging parameters of VASO can be optimized such that the signal change is predominantly of CBV origin, but careful considerations should be taken to minimize other contributions, such as those from the BOLD effect, CBF, and CSF. Sensitivity of the VASO technique remains to be the primary disadvantage when compared to BOLD, but this technique is increasingly demonstrating utility in neuroscientific and clinical applications. PMID:23355392

  3. [Non invasive prenatal diagnosis. Fetal nucleic acid analysis in maternal blood].

    PubMed

    Sesarini, Carla; Argibay, Pablo; Otaño, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    Current prenatal diagnosis of monogeneic and chromosomal diseases, includes invasive procedures which carry a small but significant risk. For many years, analysis of fetal cells in maternal circulation has been studied, however it has failed its clinical use due to the scarcity of these cells and their persistance after delivery. For more than a decade, the presence of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal blood has been identified. These fetal DNA fragments would derive from the placenta and are not detected after delivery, making them a source of fetal material for carrying out diagnosis techniques using maternal blood. However, the vast majority of cell free DNA in maternal circulation is of maternal origin, with the fetal component contributing from 3% to 6% and rising towards term. Available methodologies do not allow separation of fetal from maternal cell free DNA, so current applications have been focused on the analysis of genes not present in the mother, such as Y chromosome sequences, or RHD gene in RhD-negative women, or paternal or de novo mutations. Also, the detection of cell-free fetal RNA in maternal blood offers the possibility of obtaining information regarding genetic expression profiles of embrionic tissues, and using genes expressed only at the feto-placental unit, controls for the presence of fetal material could be established, regardless of maternal genetic tissue. The present article describes the evidences regarding the passage of fetal nucleic acids to maternal circulation, its current prenatal diagnosis application and possible future perspectives. PMID:21163745

  4. Regression approach to non-invasive determination of bilirubin in neonatal blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    A statistical ensemble of structural and biophysical parameters of neonatal skin was modeled based on experimental data. Diffuse scattering coefficients of the skin in the visible and infrared regions were calculated by applying a Monte-Carlo method to each realization of the ensemble. The potential accuracy of recovering the bilirubin concentration in dermis (which correlates closely with that in blood) was estimated from spatially resolved spectrometric measurements of diffuse scattering. The possibility to determine noninvasively the bilirubin concentration was shown by measurements of diffuse scattering at λ = 460, 500, and 660 nm at three source-detector separations under conditions of total variability of the skin biophysical parameters.

  5. Integrating Sphere Finger-Photoplethysmography: Preliminary Investigation towards Practical Non-Invasive Measurement of Blood Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Kenta; Yamakoshi, Yasuhiro; Rolfe, Peter; Kiyohara, Daiki; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare conventional photoplethysmography (PPG) in a finger with PPG using an integrating sphere (ISPPG) to enhance scattered light collection. Two representative wavelengths were used; 1160 nm, a window through the absorption spectra of water and alcohol, and 1600 nm around where water absorption is high and there is an absorption peak of blood glucose. Simultaneous transmission-type measurements were made with conventional PPG and with ISPPG for each wavelength in the tips of index fingers of both hands in a total of 10 healthy young male and female volunteers (21.7 ± 1.6 years old). During a 5 min period in which subjects were in a relaxed state we determined the signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, and the PPG detectability (or sensitivity) by the two techniques. SNR during the test period was significantly higher with ISPPG as compared with conventional PPG, especially for the 1600 nm wavelength. PPG signals with 1600 nm could scarcely be detected by conventional PPG, while they could be detected with good sensitively by ISPPG. We conclude that under controlled conditions ISPPG has better SNR and higher sensitivity than conventional transmission PPG, especially in wavelength regions where water absorption is high but where there is potential for practical measurement of blood constituents including glucose. PMID:26636974

  6. Novel Non-invasive Estimation of Coronary Blood Flow using Contrast Advection in Computed Tomography Angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Parastou; Seo, Jung-Hee; Rahsepar, Amirali; George, Richard; Lardo, Albert; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising tool for assessment of coronary stenosis and plaque burden. Recent studies have shown the presence of axial contrast concentration gradients in obstructed arteries, but the mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is not well understood. We use computational fluid dynamics to study intracoronary contrast dispersion and the correlation of concentration gradients with intracoronary blood flow and stenotic severity. Data from our CFD patient-specific simulations reveals that contrast dispersions are generated by intracoronary advection effects, and therefore, encode the coronary flow velocity. This novel method- Transluminal Attenuation Flow Encoding (TAFE) - is used to estimate the flowrate in phantom studies as well as preclinical experiments. Our results indicate a strong correlation between the values estimated from TAFE and the values measured in these experiments. The flow physics of contrast dispersion associated with TAFE will be discussed. This work is funded by grants from Coulter Foundation and Maryland Innovation Initiative. The authors have pending patents in this technology and RM and ACL have other financial interests associated with TAFE.

  7. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement: values, problems and applicability in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Mietsch, M; Einspanier, A

    2015-07-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus, C. j.) is an established primate model in biomedical research and for human-related diseases. Monitoring of cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP) is important for the health surveillance of these experimental animals and the quantification of diseases or pharmaceutical substances influencing BP. Measurement guidelines for C. j. do not exist yet; therefore, the present study was carried out to establish a practicable protocol based on recommendations of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM). Furthermore, BP data of 49 marmosets (13.8-202.4 months of age) were obtained via high-definition oscillometry to further knowledge of physiological parameters and gender-related differences in this primate. The thighs proved to be the most suitable measurement localization, since systolic values were less variable (left 4.03 ± 2.90%, right 5.96 ± 2.77%) compared with the tail (12.7 ± 6.96%). BP values were similar in the morning and in the afternoon (P > 0.05). Data were highly reproducible within and between several sessions on three consecutive days (P > 0.05) as well as over the course of 20 months (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the measurement time for females was significantly shorter than for males (5:14 ± 1:59 min versus 6:50 ± 1:58 min, P = 0.007). Measurement recommendations for the common marmoset were successfully established. Standardized values enabled a reliable comparison of BP parameters, e.g. for cardiovascular, toxicological or metabolic research. PMID:25552521

  8. Non-invasive estimation of blood pressure using ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an experimental setup for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using diagnostic ultrasound. The setup resembles a realistic clinical setup utilizing a single array transducer for transmit and receive. The ambient pressure sensitivity of SonoVue (Bracco, Milano, Italy) was measured twice using two different acoustic driving pressures, which were selected based on a preliminary experiment. To compensate for variations in bubble response and to make the estimates more robust, the relation between the energy of the subharmonic and the fundamental component was chosen as a measure over the subharmonic peak amplitude. The preliminary study revealed the growth stage of the subharmonic component to occur at acoustic driving pressures between 300 and 500 kPa. Based on this, the pressure sensitivity was investigated using a driving pressure of 485 and 500 kPa. At 485 kPa, a linear pressure sensitivity of 0.42 dB/kPa was found having a linear correlation coefficient of 0.94. The second measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series were 0.42 and 0.25 dB/kPa with linear correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.93, respectively.

  9. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  10. Overview of Five-Years of Experience Performing Non-Invasive Fetal Sex Assessment in Maternal Blood

    PubMed Central

    Perlado-Marina, Sara; Bustamante-Aragones, Ana; Horcajada, Laura; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria Jose; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Ruiz Ramos, Marta; Plaza, Javier; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the presence of fetal DNA in maternal blood, non-invasive fetal sex determination has been the test most widely translated into clinical practice. To date there is no agreement between the different laboratories performing such tests in relation to which is the best protocol. As a consequence there are almost as many protocols as laboratories offering the service, using different methodologies and thus obtaining different diagnostic accuracies. By the end of 2007, after a validation study performed in 316 maternal samples collected between the 5th and 12th week of gestation, the fetal sex determination was incorporated into clinical practice in our Service. The test is performed in the first trimester of pregnancy, and it is offered as part of the genetic counseling process for couples at risk of X-linked disorders. As a general rule and in order to avoid misdiagnosis, two samples at different gestational ages are tested per patient. The analysis is performed by the study of the SRY gene by RT-PCR. Two hundred and twenty six pregnancies have been tested so far in these 5 years. Neither false positives nor false negatives diagnoses have been registered, thus giving a diagnostic accuracy of 100%. PMID:26835681

  11. Overview of Five-Years of Experience Performing Non-Invasive Fetal Sex Assessment in Maternal Blood.

    PubMed

    Perlado-Marina, Sara; Bustamante-Aragones, Ana; Horcajada, Laura; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria Jose; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Ruiz Ramos, Marta; Plaza, Javier; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the presence of fetal DNA in maternal blood, non-invasive fetal sex determination has been the test most widely translated into clinical practice. To date there is no agreement between the different laboratories performing such tests in relation to which is the best protocol. As a consequence there are almost as many protocols as laboratories offering the service, using different methodologies and thus obtaining different diagnostic accuracies. By the end of 2007, after a validation study performed in 316 maternal samples collected between the 5th and 12th week of gestation, the fetal sex determination was incorporated into clinical practice in our Service. The test is performed in the first trimester of pregnancy, and it is offered as part of the genetic counseling process for couples at risk of X-linked disorders. As a general rule and in order to avoid misdiagnosis, two samples at different gestational ages are tested per patient. The analysis is performed by the study of the SRY gene by RT-PCR. Two hundred and twenty six pregnancies have been tested so far in these 5 years. Neither false positives nor false negatives diagnoses have been registered, thus giving a diagnostic accuracy of 100%. PMID:26835681

  12. DNA methylome profiling of maternal peripheral blood and placentas reveal potential fetal DNA markers for non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Junyu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xu, Mingqing; Xia, Shihui; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Utilizing epigenetic (DNA methylation) differences to differentiate between maternal peripheral blood (PBL) and fetal (placental) DNA has been a promising strategy for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have yet to be fully ascertained. In the present study, we performed genome-wide comparative methylome analysis between maternal PBL and placental DNA from pregnancies of first trimester by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays. A total of 36 931 DMRs and 45 804 differentially methylated sites (DMSs) covering the whole genome, exclusive of the Y chromosome, were identified via MeDIP-Seq and Infinium 450k array, respectively, of which 3759 sites in 2188 regions were confirmed by both methods. Not only did we find the previously reported potential fetal DNA markers in our identified DMRs/DMSs but also we verified fully the identified DMRs/DMSs in the validation round by MassARRAY EpiTYPER. The screened potential fetal DNA markers may be used for NIPT on aneuploidies and other chromosomal diseases, such as cri du chat syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, these potential markers may have application in the early diagnosis of placental dysfunction, such as pre-eclampsia. PMID:24996894

  13. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  14. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  15. Non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure using the Philips Intellivue MP50 monitor cannot replace invasive blood pressure techniques in surgery patients under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghu; Zang, Guanghui; Fan, Longchang; Zheng, Lei; Dai, Jinzhen; Wang, Xueren; Xia, Wei; Liu, Jihong; Zhang, Chuanhan

    2013-07-01

    The Philips Intellivue MP50 monitor provides a method for non-invasive, near-continuous blood pressure (BP) monitoring and is designed to be an alternative to direct intra-arterial BP (IABP) measurement. However, no studies have specifically compared non-invasive and invasive BP measurements using the monitor. The present retrospective study observed 515 patients undergoing surgery with general anesthesia, whose invasive (intra-radial, femoral or dorsalis pedis artery) and non-invasive (oscillometric) BP (NIBP) were monitored simultaneously using the monitor. These data were analyzed using correlations, regressions and Bland-Altman plots. The patients were placed in a supine position during surgery. The correlation data for invasive BP and NIBP measurements were: for intra-radial measurements, r(2)=0.51 (bias and precision, 11.04±15.22 and 14.76±11.64 mmHg, respectively) for systolic BP (SBP) and r(2)=0.27 (6.17±11.95 and 9.77±9.25 mmHg, respectively) for diastolic BP (DBP); for intra-femoral measurements: r(2)=0.57 (14.79±14.55 and 17.15±11.68 mmHg, respectively) for SBP and r(2)=0.45 (4.12±9.70 and 7.49±7.40 mmHg, respectively) for DBP; and for intra-dorsalis pedis measurements: r(2)=0.33 (13.00±16.81 and 17.34±12.28 mmHg, respectively) for SBP and r(2)=0.30 (0.17±11.27 and 8.44±7.46 mmHg, respectively) for DBP. According to this data, the NIBP measured by the Philips Intellivue MP50 monitor showed low positive correlations and poor agreement with the IABP, as calculated by Bland-Altman analysis. Therefore, the use of oscillometric BP measured by the monitor in surgery patients under general anesthesia is not generally recommended. PMID:23935710

  16. A systematic approach for the accurate non-invasive estimation of blood glucose utilizing a novel light-tissue interaction adaptive modelling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybynok, V. O.; Kyriacou, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges of the 21st century. The obesity epidemic, sedentary lifestyles and an ageing population mean prevalence of the condition is currently doubling every generation. Diabetes is associated with serious chronic ill health, disability and premature mortality. Long-term complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations, make the greatest contribution to the costs of diabetes care. Many of these long-term effects could be avoided with earlier, more effective monitoring and treatment. Currently, blood glucose can only be monitored through the use of invasive techniques. To date there is no widely accepted and readily available non-invasive monitoring technique to measure blood glucose despite the many attempts. This paper challenges one of the most difficult non-invasive monitoring techniques, that of blood glucose, and proposes a new novel approach that will enable the accurate, and calibration free estimation of glucose concentration in blood. This approach is based on spectroscopic techniques and a new adaptive modelling scheme. The theoretical implementation and the effectiveness of the adaptive modelling scheme for this application has been described and a detailed mathematical evaluation has been employed to prove that such a scheme has the capability of extracting accurately the concentration of glucose from a complex biological media.

  17. Newly developed photon-cell interactive Monte Carlo (pciMC) simulation for non-invasive and continuous diagnosis of blood during extracorporeal circulation support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Takatani, Setsuo

    2011-07-01

    We have sought for non-invasive diagnosis of blood during the extracorporeal circulation support. To achieve the goal, we have newly developed a photon-cell interactive Monte Carlo (pciMC) model for optical propagation through blood. The pciMC actually describes the interaction of photons with 3-dimentional biconcave RBCs. The scattering is described by micro-scopical RBC boundary condition based on geometric optics. By using pciMC, we modeled the RBCs inside the extracorporeal circuit will be oriented by the blood flow. The RBCs' orientation was defined as their long axis being directed to the center of the circulation tube. Simultaneously the RBCs were allowed to randomly rotate about the long axis direction. As a result, as flow rate increased, the orientation rate increased and converged to approximately 22% at 0.5 L/min flow rate and above. And finally, by using this model, the pciMC non-invasively and absolutely predicted Hct and hemoglobin with the accuracies of 0.84+/-0.82 [HCT%] and 0.42+/-0.28 [g/dL] respectively against measurements by a blood gas analyzer.

  18. A comparison of non-invasive continuous finger blood pressure measurement (Finapres) with intra-arterial pressure during prolonged head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M E; Williams, T R; Sutton, R

    1995-11-01

    Simultaneous intra-radial and non-invasive (Finapres, Ohmeda) blood pressures were compared during prolonged head-up tilt, in eight patients (mean age 49 years) with malignant vasovagal syncope. Twelve tilts were performed, of which eight resulted in vasovagal syncope. The mean bias (difference between Finapres and intra-arterial pressures) for systolic pressure was +0.7 mmHg (standard deviation 11.3 mmHg) and for diastolic pressure was +5.4 mmHg (standard deviation 7 mmHg). The within-tilt precision (standard deviation of the bias) of the non-invasive measurements varied between 2.9-12.4 mmHg (median 4.5 mmHg) for systolic comparisons, and 1.6-8.4 mmHg (median 4.4 mmHg) for diastolic comparisons. In all but one tilt highly significant positive increases in both systolic (median 7.1 mmHg) and diastolic bias (median 8.1 mmHg) occurred on tilt with respect to resting pre-tilt levels. Independent of the absolute level of agreement, the non-invasive measurements followed changes in intra-arterial pressure closely, with 89% of beat-to-beat changes in systolic pressure, and 95% of beat-to-beat changes in diastolic pressure followed to within +/- 2 mmHg. This study suggests that the Finapres is well suited for use during diagnostic tilt testing, demonstrating an acceptable within-tilt precision and closely following pressure changes during vasovagal syncope. PMID:8881861

  19. Emerging stool-based and blood-based non-invasive DNA tests for colorectal cancer screening: the importance of cancer prevention in addition to cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can be undertaken utilizing a variety of distinct approaches, which provides both opportunities and confusion. Traditionally, there has often been a trade-off between the degree of invasiveness of a screening test and its ability to prevent cancer, with fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and optical colonoscopy (OC) at each end of the spectrum. CT colonography (CTC), although currently underutilized for CRC screening, represents an exception since it is only minimally invasive, yet provides accurate evaluation for advanced adenomas. More recently, the FDA approved a multi-target stool DNA test (Cologuard) and a blood-based test (Epi proColon) for average-risk CRC screening. This commentary will provide an overview of these two new non-invasive tests, including the clinical indications, mechanism of action, and diagnostic performance. Relevance to radiology practice, including a comparison with CTC, will also be discussed. PMID:27259335

  20. Non-invasive blood glucose measurement by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis through the mucous membrane of the lip: application of a chalcogenide optical fiber system.

    PubMed

    Uemura, T; Nishida, K; Sakakida, M; Ichinose, K; Shimoda, S; Shichiri, M

    1999-01-01

    Non-invasive blood glucose measurement through the mucous membrane of the lip was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism. To achieve easy attachment and easy control of attachment pressure of the ATR prism to the mucous membrane of the lip, a chalcogenide optical fiber with an ATR prism built in the tip was used. The same glucose-specific peaks at wave numbers of 1080 and 1033 cm-1 as glucose solutions were found in a spectrum through the mucous membrane of the lip. With a constant pressure of the ATR prism to the mucous membrane of the lip of 6.7 x 10(3) dyn/cm2, coefficients of variation of measurements within the day and of day-to-day measurements were 3.8 and 5.4% respectively. To eliminate baseline drifts and interference of body constituents other than glucose, the difference absorbances at 1080 cm-1 between spectra measured at the postprandial state and background spectrum obtained at the fasting state as an individual characteristic were evaluated. Following i.v. pulsatile injection of glucose, the difference absorbances at 1080 cm-1 nicely followed the changes in blood glucose concentrations with a time delay of 4 min. In daily blood glucose monitoring, a highly significant correlation between the difference absorbances and increases in blood glucose concentrations above the fasting level was obtained (r = 0.920, P < 0.01). From these experiments, it was suggested that FT-IR spectroscopy with a chalcogenide optical fiber could be useful clinically for non-invasive monitoring of glucose through the mucous membrane of the lip. PMID:10450500

  1. A novel non-invasive electrochemical biosensing device for in situ determination of the alcohol content in blood by monitoring ethanol in sweat.

    PubMed

    Gamella, M; Campuzano, S; Manso, J; González de Rivera, G; López-Colino, F; Reviejo, A J; Pingarrón, J M

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive, passive and simple to use skin surface based sensing device for determining the blood's ethanol content (BAC) by monitoring transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) is designed and developed. The proposed prototype is based on bienzyme amperometric composite biosensors that are sensitive to the variation of ethanol concentration. The prototype correlates, through previous calibration set-up, the amperometric signal generated from ethanol in sweat with its content in blood in a short period of time. The characteristics of this sensor device permit determination of the ethanol concentration in isolated and in continuous form, giving information of the BAC of a subject either in a given moment or its evolution during long periods of time (8h). Moreover, as the measurements are performed in a biological fluid, the evaluated individual is not able to alter the result of the analysis. The maximum limit of ethanol in blood allowed by legislation is included within the linear range of the device (0.0005-0.6 g L(-1)). Moreover, the device shows higher sensitivity than the breathalyzers marketed at the moment, allowing the monitoring of the ethanol content in blood to be obtained just 5 min after ingestion of the alcoholic drink. The comparison of the obtained results using the proposed device in the analysis of 40 volunteers with those provided by the gas chromatographic reference method for determination of BAC pointed out that there were no significant differences between both methods. PMID:24331037

  2. Skin Blood Perfusion and Oxygenation Colour Affect Perceived Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Ian D.; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice. PMID:19337378

  3. Utility of the microculture method for Leishmania detection in non-invasive samples obtained from a blood bank.

    PubMed

    Ates, Sezen Canim; Bagirova, Malahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kocazeybek, Bekir; Kosan, Erdogan

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the role of donor blood has taken an important place in epidemiology of Leishmaniasis. According to the WHO, the numbers of patients considered as symptomatic are only 5-20% of individuals with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. In this study for detection of Leishmania infection in donor blood samples, 343 samples from the Capa Red Crescent Blood Center were obtained and primarily analyzed by microscopic and serological methods. Subsequently, the traditional culture (NNN), Immuno-chromatographic test (ICT) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were applied to 21 samples which of them were found positive with at least one method. Buffy coat (BC) samples from 343 blood donors were analyzed: 15 (4.3%) were positive by a microculture method (MCM); and 4 (1.1%) by smear. The sera of these 343 samples included 9 (2.6%) determined positive by ELISA and 7 (2%) positive by IFAT. Thus, 21 of (6.1%) the 343 subjects studied by smear, MCM, IFAT and ELISA techniques were identified as positive for leishmaniasis at least one of the techniques and the sensitivity assessed. According to our data, the sensitivity of the methods are identified as MCM (71%), smear (19%), IFAT (33%), ELISA (42%), NNN (4%), PCR (14%) and ICT (4%). Thus, with this study for the first time, the sensitivity of a MCM was examined in blood donors by comparing MCM with the methods used in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. As a result, MCM was found the most sensitive method for detection of Leishmania parasites in samples obtained from a blood bank. In addition, the presence of Leishmania parasites was detected in donor bloods in Istanbul, a non-endemic region of Turkey, and these results is a vital importance for the health of blood recipients. PMID:23806567

  4. Aberrant methylation of PCDH10 and RASSF1A genes in blood samples for non-invasive diagnosis and prognostic assessment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pimson, Charinya; Pientong, Chamsai; Promthet, Supannee; Putthanachote, Nuntiput; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Assessment of DNA methylation of specific genes is one approach to the diagnosis of cancer worldwide. Early stage detection is necessary to reduce the mortality rate of cancers, including those occurring in the stomach. For this purpose, tumor cells in circulating blood offer promising candidates for non-invasive diagnosis. Transcriptional inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, like PCDH10 and RASSF1A, by methylation is associated with progression of gastric cancer, and such methylation can therefore be utilized as a biomarker. Methods. The present research was conducted to evaluate DNA methylation in these two genes using blood samples of gastric cancer cases. Clinicopathological data were also analyzed and cumulative survival rates generated for comparison. Results. High frequencies of PCDH10 and RASSF1A methylations in the gastric cancer group were noted (94.1% and 83.2%, respectively, as compared to 2.97% and 5.45% in 202 matched controls). Most patients (53.4%) were in severe stage of the disease, with a median survival time of 8.4 months after diagnosis. Likewise, the patients with metastases, or RASSF1A and PCDH10 methylations, had median survival times of 7.3, 7.8, and 8.4 months, respectively. A Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that cumulative survival was significantly lower in those cases positive for methylation of RASSF1A than in their negative counterparts. Similarly, whereas almost 100% of patients positive for PCDH10 methylation had died after five years, none of the negative cases died over this period. Notably, the methylations of RASSF1A and PCDH10 were found to be higher in the late-stage patients and were also significantly correlated with metastasis and histology. Conclusions. PCDH10 and RASSF1A methylations in blood samples can serve as potential non-invasive diagnostic indicators in blood for gastric cancer. In addition to RASSF1A methylation, tumor stage proved to be a major prognostic factor in terms of survival rates. PMID

  5. Identification of informative bands in the short-wavelength NIR region for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    PubMed Central

    Uwadaira, Yasuhiro; Ikehata, Akifumi; Momose, Akiko; Miura, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    The “glucose-linked wavelength” in the short-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) region, in which the light intensity reflected from the hand palm exhibits a good correlation to the blood glucose value, was investigated. We performed 391 2-h carbohydrate tolerance tests (CTTs) using 34 participants and a glucose-linked wavelength was successfully observed in almost every CTT; however, this wavelength varied between CTTs even for the same person. The large resulting data set revealed the distribution of the informative wavelength. The blood glucose values were efficiently estimated by a simple linear regression with clinically acceptable accuracies. The result suggested the potential for constructing a personalized low-invasive blood glucose sensor using short-wavelength NIR spectroscopy. PMID:27446701

  6. Time-resolved, single-cell analysis of induced and programmed cell death via non-invasive propidium iodide and counterstain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Christina E. M.; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Conventional propidium iodide (PI) staining requires the execution of multiple steps prior to analysis, potentially affecting assay results as well as cell vitality. In this study, this multistep analysis method has been transformed into a single-step, non-toxic, real-time method via live-cell imaging during perfusion with 0.1 μM PI inside a microfluidic cultivation device. Dynamic PI staining was an effective live/dead analytical tool and demonstrated consistent results for single-cell death initiated by direct or indirect triggers. Application of this method for the first time revealed the apparent antibiotic tolerance of wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum cells, as indicated by the conversion of violet fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CvAM). Additional implementation of this method provided insight into the induced cell lysis of Escherichia coli cells expressing a lytic toxin-antitoxin module, providing evidence for non-lytic cell death and cell resistance to toxin production. Finally, our dynamic PI staining method distinguished necrotic-like and apoptotic-like cell death phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae among predisposed descendants of nutrient-deprived ancestor cells using PO-PRO-1 or green fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CgAM) as counterstains. The combination of single-cell cultivation, fluorescent time-lapse imaging, and PI perfusion facilitates spatiotemporally resolved observations that deliver new insights into the dynamics of cellular behaviour. PMID:27580964

  7. Time-resolved, single-cell analysis of induced and programmed cell death via non-invasive propidium iodide and counterstain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Christina E M; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Conventional propidium iodide (PI) staining requires the execution of multiple steps prior to analysis, potentially affecting assay results as well as cell vitality. In this study, this multistep analysis method has been transformed into a single-step, non-toxic, real-time method via live-cell imaging during perfusion with 0.1 μM PI inside a microfluidic cultivation device. Dynamic PI staining was an effective live/dead analytical tool and demonstrated consistent results for single-cell death initiated by direct or indirect triggers. Application of this method for the first time revealed the apparent antibiotic tolerance of wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum cells, as indicated by the conversion of violet fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CvAM). Additional implementation of this method provided insight into the induced cell lysis of Escherichia coli cells expressing a lytic toxin-antitoxin module, providing evidence for non-lytic cell death and cell resistance to toxin production. Finally, our dynamic PI staining method distinguished necrotic-like and apoptotic-like cell death phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae among predisposed descendants of nutrient-deprived ancestor cells using PO-PRO-1 or green fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CgAM) as counterstains. The combination of single-cell cultivation, fluorescent time-lapse imaging, and PI perfusion facilitates spatiotemporally resolved observations that deliver new insights into the dynamics of cellular behaviour. PMID:27580964

  8. Reliability of the Dinamap non-invasive monitor in the measurement of blood pressure of ill Asian newborns.

    PubMed

    Chia, F; Ang, A T; Wong, T W; Tan, K W; Fung, K P; Lee, J; Khin, K

    1990-05-01

    Four hundred thirty-one paired sets of readings of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and 438 paired sets of readings of mean arterial BP from 49 ill newborns, including 21 very low birth weight infants, were analyzed for the extent and pattern of agreement and the linear relationship between the Dinamap oscillometric monitor and the direct intraarterial blood pressure readings. Agreement between the two methods was measured by the intraclass correlation, whereas the linear relationship was assessed by the product-moment correlation. The intraclass correlations for systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures were 0.696, 0.766, and 0.781, respectively. The product-moment correlations for systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures were 0.706, 0.768, and 0.786, respectively. BP measurements by the Dinamap monitor showed reasonably close agreement to those obtained by the intraarterial mean arterial pressure ranges above 40 mmHg. For mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg and lower, BP readings by the Dinamap monitor tended to be higher than those obtained by the intraarterial method. These findings appeared to be consistent regardless of the birth weight of the newborn. PMID:2340688

  9. Laser-Doppler flowmetry--a non-invasive and continuous method for blood flow evaluation in microvascular studies.

    PubMed

    Oberg, P A; Tenland, T; Nilsson, G E

    1984-01-01

    Skin viability has during the last decades been studied by a number of different techniques. Some of these are briefly presented in this paper. One method, based on the laser-Doppler principle, makes possible continuous and noninvasive measurement of blood flow in the outermost layer (1 mm) of the skin. The basic physical principles and the properties of this flowmeter are presented. Some clinical and research applications of laser-Doppler flowmetry in a number of medical disciplines are discussed. PMID:6236674

  10. Investigation on how to choose measurement sites for non-invasive near-infrared blood glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Zou, Da; Min, Xiaolin; Ma, Zhenhe; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    With the changing of human diet and the future of an aging society, the number of diabetic patients is growing rapidly and steadily. The major therapeutic method to that disease is monitoring the blood glucose concentration frequently to adjust the dose of the drugs and insulin. In order to avoid the painful finger prick, we choose the ear lobe as a measurement site with finger as a reference. Firstly, we compare the blood glucose concentration results of ear lobe and finger during an oral glucose tolerance test, the results showed a good correlation of the two sites. Secondly, the three-layered skin structure of finger and ear lobe has been studied by using optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. The result shows that the thickness of each layer at ear lobe is thinner. Finally, the difference between reflectance spectra of finger and ear lobe is compared due to the diverse skin thickness. The results still show a higher absorbance value for ear lobe. In conclusion, the ear lobe is an ideal measurement site for noninvasive blood glucose sensing.

  11. Non-invasive cerebral blood volume measurement during seizures using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eiju; Maki, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Fumio; Yamashita, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hideaki; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki

    2000-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic topography (NIRS) is widely recognized as a noninvasive method to measure the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) dynamics coupled with neuronal activities. We analyzed the rCBV change in the early phase of epileptic seizures in 12 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Seizure was induced by bemegride injection. We used eight-channel NIRS in nine cases and 24 channel in three cases. In all of the cases, rCBV increased rapidly after the seizure onset on the focus side. The increased rCBV was observed for about 30 - 60 s. The NIRS method can be applied to monitor the rCBV change continuously during seizures. Therefore, this method may be combined with ictal SPECT as one of the most reliable noninvasive methods of focus diagnosis.

  12. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  13. Non-invasive assessment of microvascular and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cynthia; Daskalakis, Constantine; Falkner, Bonita

    2013-01-01

    The authors have utilized capillaroscopy and forearm blood flow techniques to investigate the role of microvascular dysfunction in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Capillaroscopy is a non-invasive, relatively inexpensive methodology for directly visualizing the microcirculation. Percent capillary recruitment is assessed by dividing the increase in capillary density induced by postocclusive reactive hyperemia (postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density minus baseline capillary density), by the maximal capillary density (observed during passive venous occlusion). Percent perfused capillaries represents the proportion of all capillaries present that are perfused (functionally active), and is calculated by dividing postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density by the maximal capillary density. Both percent capillary recruitment and percent perfused capillaries reflect the number of functional capillaries. The forearm blood flow (FBF) technique provides accepted non-invasive measures of endothelial function: The ratio FBF(max)/FBF(base) is computed as an estimate of vasodilation, by dividing the mean of the four FBF(max) values by the mean of the four FBFbase values. Forearm vascular resistance at maximal vasodilation (FVR(max)) is calculated as the mean arterial pressure (MAP) divided by FBF(max). Both the capillaroscopy and forearm techniques are readily acceptable to patients and can be learned quickly. The microvascular and endothelial function measures obtained using the methodologies described in this paper may have future utility in clinical patient cardiovascular risk-reduction strategies. As we have published reports demonstrating that microvascular and endothelial dysfunction are found in initial stages of hypertension including prehypertension, microvascular and endothelial function measures may eventually aid in early identification, risk-stratification and prevention of end-stage vascular pathology, with its potentially fatal

  14. Liver glycogen storage diseases due to phosphorylase system deficiencies: diagnosis thanks to non invasive blood enzymatic and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Piraud, Monique; Dobbelaere, Dries; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Labrune, Philippe; Habes, Dalila; Bernard, Olivier; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) due to a deficient hepatic phosphorylase system defines a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that mainly manifests in children. We investigated 45 unrelated children in whom a liver GSD VI or IX was suspected on the basis of clinical symptoms including hepatomegaly, increased serum transaminases, postprandial lactatemia and/or mild fasting hypoglycemia. Liver phosphorylase and phosphorylase b kinase activities studied in peripheral blood cells allowed to suspect diagnosis in 37 cases but was uninformative in 5. Sequencing of liver phosphorylase genes was useful to establish an accurate diagnosis. Causative mutations were found either in the PYGL (11 patients), PHKA2 (26 patients), PHKG2 (three patients) or in the PHKB (three patients) genes. Eleven novel disease causative mutations, five missense (p.N188K, p.D228Y, p.P382L, p.R491H, p.L500R) and six truncating mutations (c.501_502ins361pb, c.528+2T>C, c.856-29_c.1518+614del, c.1620+1G>C, p.E703del and c.2313-1G>T) were identified in the PYGL gene. Seventeen novel disease causative mutations, ten missense (p.A42P, p.Q95R, p.G131D, p.G131V, p.Q134R, p.G187R, p.G300V, p.G300A, p.C326Y, p.W820G) and seven truncating (c.537+5G>A, p.G396DfsX28, p.Q404X, p.N653X, p.L855PfsX87, and two large deletions) were identified in the PHKA2 gene. Four novel truncating mutations (p.R168X, p.Q287X, p.I268PfsX12 and c.272-1G>C) were identified in the PHKG2 gene and three (c.573_577del, p.R364X, c.2427+3A>G) in the PHKB gene. Patients with PHKG2 mutations evolved towards cirrhosis. Molecular analysis of GSD VI or IX genes allows to confirm diagnosis suspected on the basis of enzymatic analysis and to establish diagnosis and avoid liver biopsy when enzymatic studies are not informative in blood cells. PMID:21646031

  15. [Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension: non-invasive measurement of blood flow in the portal vein with Doppler-duplex].

    PubMed

    Fernández, M; Chesta, J; Jirón, M I; Mánquez, P; Brahm, J

    1991-05-01

    Doppler-duplex has been widely used to quantify blood flow. Nevertheless, its usefulness in assessing portal vein flow (PVF) has been questioned due to technical problems: vessel cross sectional area measurements, interobserver variability, and PVF changes related to physiological events. This study was aimed to measure PVF in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, to estimate changes in PVF during the respiratory cycle, and to evaluate intraobserver variability of Doppler-duplex technique. Twenty-two patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension and 22 healthy subjects were included. One operator made 6 measurements of portal vein diameter (D) and mean flow velocity in inspiration and aspiration. Area of the vessel (A) and PVF were calculated by a microprocessor. Interobserver variability was estimated for each subject and a mean was determined for each group. In the control group, PVF was 901 +/- 39 ml/min in inspiration and 633 +/- 38 ml/min in aspiration; p < 0.001. In patients with cirrhosis PVF was 1303 +/- 121 ml/min in inspiration and 1003 +/- 96 ml/min in aspiration; p < 0.001. Intraobserver variability was 6.0 +/- 0.6% for D, 12.0 +/- 3% for MV and 18.3 +/- 1.6% for PVF in healthy subjects and 5.3 +/- 0.7% for D, 9.2 +/- 0.9% for MV and 15.2 +/- 1.5% for PVF in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. In conclusion, PVF is significantly increased in cirrhotics. PVF was higher in inspiration than espiration in both groups. The Doppler-duplex method evaluation of PVF has an important intraobserver variability (18.3 +/- 1.6%). Then, changes in PVF less than 20% are not accurately measured by this technique. PMID:1844290

  16. Method specificity of non-invasive blood pressure measurement: oscillometry and finger pulse pressure vs acoustic methods.

    PubMed

    De Mey, C; Schroeter, V; Butzer, R; Roll, S; Belz, G G

    1995-10-01

    1. The agreement of blood pressure measurements by stethoscope auscultation (SBPa, DBPa-IV and DBPa-V), oscillometry (Dinamap; SBPo, and DBPo) and digital photoplethysmography (Finapres; SBPf, and DBPf) with the graphical analysis of the analogue microphone signals of vascular wall motion sound (SBPg and DBPg) was evaluated in eight healthy subjects in the presence of responses to the intravenous infusion of 1 microgram min-1 isoprenaline. 2. In general, there was good agreement between the SBP/DBP-measurements based on auscultatory Korotkoff-I- and IV-criteria and the reference method; the average method difference in estimating the isoprenaline responses for SBPa-SBPg was: -1.1, 95% CI: -5.4 to 3.1 mm Hg with a within-subject between-method repeatability coefficient (REP) of 11.6 mm Hg and for DBPa-IV-DBPg: 3.5, 95% CI: -0.5 to 6.5 mm Hg, REP: 11.5 mm Hg. The ausculatation of Korotkoff-V substantially overestimated the isoprenaline induced reduction of DBP: method difference DBPa-V-DBPg: -11.3, 95% CI: -17.8 to -4.7 mm Hg, REP: 31.8 mm Hg. 3. Oscillometry yielded good approximations for the SBP response to isoprenaline (average method difference SBPo-SBPg: -2.9, 95% CI: -9.0 to 3.3 mm Hg, REP: 17.6 mm Hg) but was poorly sensitive with regard to the DBP responses: method difference DBPo-DBPg: 6.5, 95% CI: -1.3 to 14.3 mm Hg, REP: 25.7 mm Hg. 4. Whilst the finger pulse pressure agreed well with regard to DBP (method difference for the DBP responses to isoprenaline: DBPf-DBPg: 1.8, 95% CI: -5.1 to 8.6 mm Hg, REP: 18.5 mm Hg) it was rather unsatisfactory with regard to SBP (method difference SBPf-SBPg: -14.1, 95% CI: -28.2 to -0.1 mm Hg, REP: 49.9 mm Hg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8554929

  17. A non-invasive miniaturized-wireless laser-Doppler fiber optic sensor for understanding distal fingertip injuries in astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Pollonini, Luca; Rodriguez, Mikael; Opperman, Roedolph; Hochstein, Jason

    2009-02-01

    During extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or space walks astronauts over use their fingertips under pressure inside the confined spaces of gloves/space-suite. The repetitive hand motion is a probable cause for discomfort and injuries to the finger-tips. We describe a new wireless fiber-optic probe that can be integrated inside the astronaut glove for non-invasive blood perfusion measurements in distal finger tips. In this preliminary study, we present blood perfusion measurements while performing hand-grip exercises simulating the use of space tools.

  18. Analysis of peripheral blood dendritic cells as a non-invasive tool in the follow-up of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Crosignani, Andrea; Riva, Antonio; Della Bella, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a high propensity to establish chronic infections. Failure of HCV-infected individuals to activate effective antiviral immune responses is at least in part related to HCV-induced impairment of dendritic cells (DCs) that play a central role in activating T cell responses. Although the impact of HCV on DC phenotype and function is likely to be more prominent in the liver, major HCV-induced alterations are detectable in peripheral blood DCs (pbDCs) that represent the most accessible source of DCs. These alterations include numerical reduction, impaired production of inflammatory cytokines and increased production of immunosuppressive IL10. These changes in DCs are relevant to our understanding the immune mechanisms underlying the propensity of HCV to establish persistent infection. Importantly, the non-invasive accessibility of pbDCs renders the analysis of these cells a convenient procedure that can be serially repeated in patient follow-up. Accordingly, the study of pbDCs in HCV-infected patients during conventional treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin indicated that restoration of normal plasmacytoid DC count may represent an additional mechanism contributing to the efficacy of the dual therapy. It also identified the pre-treatment levels of plasmacytoid DCs and IL10 as putative predictors of response to therapy. Treatment of chronic HCV infection is changing, as new generation direct-acting antiviral agents will soon be available for use in interferon-free therapeutic strategies. The phenotypic and functional analysis of pbDCs in this novel therapeutic setting will provide a valuable tool for investigating mechanisms underlying treatment efficacy and for identifying predictors of treatment response. PMID:26819508

  19. Reflectance Photoplethysmography as Noninvasive Monitoring of Tissue Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Abay, Tomas Ysehak; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-09-01

    In the last decades, photoplethysmography (PPG) has been used as a noninvasive technique for monitoring arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (PO), whereas near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been employed for monitoring tissue blood perfusion. While NIRS offers more parameters to evaluate oxygen delivery and consumption in deep tissues, PO only assesses the state of oxygen delivery. For a broader assessment of blood perfusion, this paper explores the utilization of dual-wavelength PPG by using the pulsatile (ac) and continuous (dc) PPG for the estimation of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) by conventional PO. Additionally, the Beer-Lambert law is applied to the dc components only for the estimation of changes in deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), and total hemoglobin (tHb) as in NIRS. The system was evaluated on the forearm of 21 healthy volunteers during induction of venous occlusion (VO) and total occlusion (TO). A reflectance PPG probe and NIRS sensor were applied above the brachioradialis, PO sensors were applied on the fingers, and all the signals were acquired simultaneously. While NIRS and forearm SpO2 indicated VO, SpO2 from the finger did not exhibit any significant drop from baseline. During TO, all the indexes indicated the change in blood perfusion. HHb, HbO2, and tHb changes estimated by PPG presented high correlation with the same parameters obtained by NIRS during VO (r(2) = 0.960, r(2) = 0.821, and r(2) = 0.974, respectively) and during TO (r(2) = 0.988, r(2) = 0.940, and r(2) = 0.938, respectively). The system demonstrated the ability to extract valuable information from PPG signals for a broader assessment of tissue blood perfusion. PMID:25838515

  20. Comparison of high-definition oscillometry -- a non-invasive technology for arterial blood pressure measurement -- with a direct invasive method using radio-telemetry in awake healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Martel, Eric; Egner, Beate; Brown, Scott A; King, Jonathan N; Laveissiere, Arnaud; Champeroux, Pascal; Richard, Serge

    2013-12-01

    This study compared indirect blood pressure measurements using a non-invasive method, high-definition oscillometry (HDO), with direct measurements using a radio-telemetry device in awake cats. Paired measurements partitioned to five sub-ranges were collected in six cats using both methods. The results were analysed for assessment of correlation and agreement between the two methods, taking into account all pressure ranges, and with data separated in three sub-groups, low, normal and high ranges of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure. SBP data displayed a mean correlation coefficient of 0.92 ± 0.02 that was reduced for low SBP. The agreement level evaluated from the whole data set was high and slightly reduced for low SBP values. The mean correlation coefficient of DBP was lower than for SBP (ie, 0.81 ± 0.02). The bias for DBP between the two methods was 22.3 ± 1.6 mmHg, suggesting that HDO produced lower values than telemetry. These results suggest that HDO met the validation criteria defined by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus panel and provided a faithful measurement of SBP in conscious cats. For DBP, results suggest that HDO tended to underestimate DBP. This finding is clearly inconsistent with the good agreement reported in dogs, but is similar to outcomes achieved in marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys, suggesting that this is not related to HDO but is species related. The data support that the HDO is the first and only validated non-invasive blood pressure device and, as such, it is the only non-invasive reference technique that should be used in future validation studies. PMID:23813147

  1. The relationship between the mean arterial blood pressure values obtained with the Peñaz non invasive method and those obtained with the invasive intraarterial.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, R; Sánchez, R; Suárez, M; Dávila, A

    1989-01-01

    It was investigated the relationship between the mean arterial pressure values obtained through the Peñaz method (non invasive) with those obtained intraarterially (invasive) in patients under balanced general anesthesia with the aim of establishing the influence of the different anesthetic stages upon such relationship. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental and anesthetic maintenance with halothane and intermittent doses of fentanyl and a muscle relaxant. EKG, servo-plethysmograph, central venous and radial artery catheter, were placed in each patient thus obtaining in this manner HR, FAP, CVP and IAP readings. The relationship between finger arterial pressure and intraarterial pressure values was high in the different anesthetic stages. It was concluded that the readings obtained with the Peñaz method are not significantly affected by balanced general anesthesia. PMID:2488775

  2. Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Measurements of an Isolated Rat Liver and an Anesthetized Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Lee, Charles Y.; Diller, Thomas E.; Scott, Elaine P.

    2008-01-01

    A simple, cost effective, and noninvasive blood perfusion system is tested in animal models. The system uses a small sensor to measure the heat transfer response to a thermal event (convective cooling) imposed on the tissue surface. Heat flux data are compared with a mathematical model of the tissue to estimate both blood perfusion and thermal contact resistance between the tissue and the probe. The perfusion system was evaluated for repeatability and sensitivity using isolated rat liver and exposed rat kidney tests. Perfusion in the isolated liver tests was varied by controlling the flow of the perfusate into the liver, and the perfusion in the exposed kidney tests was varied by temporarily occluding blood flow through the renal artery and vein. The perfusion estimated by the convective perfusion probe was in good agreement with that of the metered flow of the perfusate into the liver model. The liver tests indicated that the probe can be used to detect small changes in perfusion (0.005 ml/ml/s). The probe qualitatively tracked the changes in the perfusion in the kidney model due to occlusion of the renal artery and vein. PMID:19045542

  3. Non-invasive physiological measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, P.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of nondestructive type for monitoring the physiology of various organ systems. The topics covered are: non-invasive assessment of gastric activity; uterine activity, intestinal activity; monitoring of fetal cardiovascular system and bilirubin physiology of infants. Respiratory system of infants is monitored and ultrasonography of heart is discussed.

  4. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-03-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow.

  5. NADH fluorescence/UV reflectance ratio provides a semi-quantitative measure for NADH fluorometry of blood-perfused rat heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coremans, J. M. C. C.; Ince, C.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    1996-12-01

    A procedure for semi-quantitative analysis of NADH fluorescence image is presented which enables non-invasive monitoring of the metabolic state of tissue in vivo. In blood perfused tissue, the NADH fluorescence intensity can be disturbed by movement and by hemodynamic and oximetric effects. These factors alter the tissue absorbance of UV excitation light and thereby the NADH fluorescence excitation efficiency. Combination of the theories of front- face fluorimetry and Kubelka and Munk for description of NADH fluorescence (FNADH) and UV reflectance (R365d) of optically thick samples, predicts that the FNADH/R365d ratio provides adequate compensation for changes in tissue absorbance. The validity of this correction procedure is verified in tissue phantoms, in Langendorff perfused rat hearts and for rat hearts in vivo. Movement artifacts were eliminated using a CCD video camera with a biprism configuration for simultaneous measurement of fluorescence and reflectance images. Therefore, the FNADH/Rd ratio can be used to monitor the metabolic state of blood perfused tissue.

  6. Radionuclide Tracers for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Blood Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is performed most commonly using Tc-99m-sestamibi or tetrofosmin SPECT as well as Rb-82-rubidium or N-13-ammonia PET. Diseased-to-normal tissue contrast is determined by the tracer retention fraction, which decreases nonlinearly with flow. Reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced tracer retention, but the severity of perfusion defects is typically underestimated by 20% to 40%. Compared to SPECT, retention of the PET tracers is more linearly related to flow, and therefore, the perfusion defects are measured more accurately using N-13-ammonia or Rb-82. PMID:26590778

  7. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  8. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps. PMID:23469557

  9. Establishing baseline levels of trace elements in blood and skin of bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida: implications for non-invasive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Colleen E; Christopher, Steven J; Balmer, Brian C; Wells, Randall S

    2007-12-15

    Several major unusual mortality events occurring in recent years have increased the level of concern for the health of bottlenose dolphin populations along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Trace element concentrations were examined in a population of free-ranging dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, in order to develop a benchmark for future comparisons within and between populations. Whole blood (n=51) and skin (n=40) samples were collected through capture and release health assessment events during 2002-2004. Samples were analyzed for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, and Pb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and Hg via atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Trace element concentrations (wet mass) in skin were 2 to 45 times greater than blood, except Cu was approximately 1.5 times higher in blood. Statistically strong correlations (p<0.05) were found for V, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Hg between blood and skin demonstrating that these tissues can be used as effective non-lethal monitoring tools. The strongest correlation was established for Hg (r=0.9689) and concentrations in both blood and skin were above the threshold at which detrimental effects are observed in other vertebrate species. Female dolphins had significantly greater Hg concentrations in blood and skin and Pb concentrations in skin, relative to males. Calves exhibited significantly lower V, As, and Hg concentrations in blood and V and Hg concentrations in skin, relative to other age classes. Rubidium and Cu concentrations in skin were greatest in subadults and calves, respectively. In blood, V, Zn, and As concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Rb and Sr concentrations. In skin, Cu and Zn concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Mn, Rb, Cd, and Pb concentrations. The baseline concentrations and trends

  10. Markedly Decreased Blood Perfusion of Pancreatic Islets Transplanted Intraportally Into the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Henriksnäs, Johanna; Lau, Joey; Zang, Guangxiang; Berggren, Per-Olof; Köhler, Martin; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies indicate low revascularization of intraportally transplanted islets. This study aimed to quantify, for the first time, the blood perfusion of intrahepatically transplanted islets and elucidate necessary factors for proper islet graft revascularization at this site. Yellow chameleon protein 3.0 islets expressing fluorescent protein in all cells were transplanted. Graft blood perfusion was determined by microspheres. The vascular density and relative contribution of donor blood vessels in revascularization was evaluated using islets expressing green fluorescent protein under the Tie-2 promoter. Blood perfusion of intrahepatic islets was as a mean only 5% of that of native islets at 1-month posttransplantation. However, there was a marked heterogeneity where blood perfusion was less decreased in islets transplanted without prior culture and in many cases restored in islets with disrupted integrity. Analysis of vascular density showed that distorted islets were well revascularized, whereas islets still intact at 1-month posttransplantation were almost avascular. Few donor endothelial cells were observed in the new islet vasculature. The very low blood perfusion of intraportally transplanted islets is likely to predispose for ischemia and hamper islet function. Since donor endothelial cells do not expand posttransplantation, disruption of islet integrity is necessary for revascularization to occur by recipient blood vessels. PMID:22315321

  11. Non-invasive measurement of cholesterol in human blood by impedance technique: an investigation by 3D finite element field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, Ekaterina; Khan, Sanowar

    2013-06-01

    This paper concerns detection of particle concentration (e.g. cholesterol) in conductive media (e.g. human blood) by impedance technique. The technique is based on changes in the impedance measurement across a given conducting medium due to changes in the particle concentration. The impedance is calculated by calculating the current through the conducting media produced by electric field distribution between two electrodes. This is done by modelling and computation of 3D electric fields between the electrodes for known voltages applied between them using the well-known finite element method (FEM). The complexity of such FE models is attributed to particle distribution, their geometric and material parameters, and their shape and size which can be of many orders of magnitude smaller than the overall problem domain under investigation. This paper overcomes this problem by adopting an effective particle coagulation (aggregation) strategy in FE modelling without significantly affecting the accuracy of field computation.

  12. A New Imaging Platform for Visualizing Biological Effects of Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Electric-Field Cancer Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Corr, Stuart J.; Shamsudeen, Sabeel; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J.; Keshishian, Vazrik; Yokoi, Kenji; Savage, David J.; Meraz, Ismail M.; Kaluarachchi, Warna; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Raoof, Mustafa; Nguyen, Duy Trac; Zhang, Yingchun; Wilson, Lon J.; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Curley, Steven A.; Serda, Rita E.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel imaging platform to study the biological effects of non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) electric field cancer hyperthermia. This system allows for real-time in vivo intravital microscopy (IVM) imaging of radiofrequency-induced biological alterations such as changes in vessel structure and drug perfusion. Our results indicate that the IVM system is able to handle exposure to high-power electric-fields without inducing significant hardware damage or imaging artifacts. Furthermore, short durations of low-power (< 200 W) radiofrequency exposure increased transport and perfusion of fluorescent tracers into the tumors at temperatures below 41°C. Vessel deformations and blood coagulation were seen for tumor temperatures around 44°C. These results highlight the use of our integrated IVM-RF imaging platform as a powerful new tool to visualize the dynamics and interplay between radiofrequency energy and biological tissues, organs, and tumors. PMID:26308617

  13. An Acetone Nanosensor For Non-invasive Diabetes Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Yun, X.; Stanacevic, M.; Gouma, P. I.

    2009-05-01

    Diabetes is a most common disease worldwide. Acetone in exhaled breath is a known biomarker of Type- 1 diabetes. An exhaled breath analyzer has been developed with the potential to diagnose diabetes as a non-invasive alternative of the currently used blood-based diagnostics. This device utilizes a chemiresistor based on ferroelectric tungsten oxide nanoparticles and detects acetone selectively in breath-simulated media. Real-time monitoring of the acetone concentration is feasible, potentially making this detector a revolutionary, non- invasive, diabetes diagnostic tool.

  14. A pilot study using laser-based technique for non-invasive diagnostics of hypertensive conditions in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Karina S.; Ahmad, Shakil; Wang, Keqing; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Zhang, Lin; Rafailov, Edik U.; Ahmed, Asif

    2016-02-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is directly linked to preeclampsia, a maternal hypertensive condition that is life threating for both the mother and the baby. Epidemiological studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Here we report a new non-invasive diagnostic test for preeclampsia in mice that allows us to non-invasively assess the condition of the animals during the experiment and treatment in established models of preeclampsia. A laser-based multifunctional diagnostics system (LAKK-M) was chosen to carry out non-invasive analysis of multiple parameters. The device was used to simultaneously record the microcirculatory blood flow and oxygen saturation, as well as fluorescence levels of endogenous fluorophores. Preliminary experiments were conducted on adenoviral (Ad-)- mediated overexpression of sFlt-1 (Ad-sFlt-1) to mimic preeclampsialike symptoms in mice. The recorded data displayed the ability of the LAKK-M diagnostics device to detect significant differences in perfusion measurements between the control and Ad-sFlt-1 treatment. Preliminary results provide a potential avenue to employ these diagnostics technology to monitor and aid in maintaining control of live animal conditions throughout the experiment and treatment.

  15. Alginate/PEG based microcarriers with cleavable crosslinkage for expansion and non-invasive harvest of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunge; Qian, Yufeng; Zhao, Shuang; Yin, Yuji; Li, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    Porous microcarriers are increasingly used to expand and harvest stem cells. Generally, the cells are harvested via proteolytic enzyme treatment, which always leads to damages to stem cells. To address this disadvantage, a series of alginate/PEG (AL/PEG) semi-interpenetrating network microcarriers are prepared in this study. In this AL/PEG system, the chemically cross-linked alginate networks are formed via the reaction between carboxylic acid group of alginate and di-terminated amine groups of cystamine. PEG is introduced to modulate the degradation of microcarriers, which does not participate in this cross-linked reaction, while it interpenetrates in alginate network via physical interactions. In addition, chitosan are coated on the surface of AL/PEG to improve the mechanical strength via the electrostatic interactions. Biocompatible fibronectin are also coated on these microcarriers to modulate the biological behaviors of cells seeded in microcarriers. Results suggest that the size of AL/PEG microcarriers can be modulated via adjusting the contents and molecular weight of PEG. Moreover, the microcarriers are designed to be degraded with cleavage of disulfide crosslinkage. By changing the type and concentration of reductant, the ratio of AL to PEG, and the magnitude of chitosan coating, the degradation ability of AL/PEG microcarriers can be well controlled. In addition, AL/PEG microcarriers can support the attachment and proliferation of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs). More importantly, the expanded hUCB-MSCs can be detached from microcarriers after addition of reductant, which indeed reduce the cell damage caused by proteolytic enzyme treatment. Therefore, it is convinced that AL/PEG based microcarriers will be a promising candidate for large-scale expansion of hUCB-MSCs. PMID:27127027

  16. Non-invasive, neuron-specific gene therapy by focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Hua, Mu-Yi; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-08-10

    Focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced with microbubbles (MBs) is a promising technique for noninvasive opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to allow targeted delivery of therapeutic substances into the brain and thus the noninvasive delivery of gene vectors for CNS treatment. We have previously demonstrated that a separated gene-carrying liposome and MBs administration plus FUS exposure can deliver genes into the brain, with the successful expression of the reporter gene and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene. In this study, we further modify the delivery system by conjugating gene-carrying liposomes with MBs to improve the GDNF gene-delivery efficiency, and to verify the possibility of using this system to perform treatment in the 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced animal disease model. FUS-BBB opening was verified by contrast-enhanced MRI, and GFP gene expression was verified via in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Western blots as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were conducted to measure protein expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to test the Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-neuron distribution. Dopamine (DA) and its metabolites as well as dopamine active transporter (DAT) were quantitatively analyzed to show dopaminergic neuronal dopamine secretion/activity/metabolism. Motor performance was evaluated by rotarod test weekly. Results demonstrated that the LpDNA-MBs (gene-liposome-MBs) complexes successfully serve as gene carrier and BBB-opening catalyst, and outperformed the separated LpDNA/MBs administration both in terms of gene delivery and expression. TH-positive IHC and measurement of DA and its metabolites DOPAC and HVA confirmed improved neuronal function, and the proposed system also provided the best neuroprotective effect to retard the progression of motor-related behavioral abnormalities. Immunoblotting and histological staining further confirmed the expression of reporter genes in

  17. SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation Concludes Equivocal Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Studies to Increase Diagnostic Benefits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ing-Jou; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2016-01-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT/CT has been reported to enhance the detection of coronary artery disease in human. This advance has created important clinical applications to coronary artery disease diagnosis and management for areas where myocardial perfusion PET tracers are not available. We present 2 clinical cases that undergone a combined test of 1-day rest/dipyridamole-stress dynamic SPECT and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT scans using an integrated imaging protocol and demonstrate that flow parameters are capable to conclude equivocal myocardial perfusion SPECT studies, therefore increasing diagnostic benefits to add value in making clinical decisions. PMID:26053731

  18. Lumped-parameter tissue temperature-blood perfusion model of a cold-stressed fingertip.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, A; Stroschein, L A; Gonzalez, R R; Pandolf, K B

    1996-05-01

    A lumped-parameter model of a fingertip is presented. The semispherical model includes the effects of heat storage, heat exchange with the environment, and heat transport by blood perfusion. The thermal insulation on the surface of the fingertip is represented by the overall heat transfer coefficient that is calculated by common engineering formulas. The model is solved analytically for the simple case of constant blood perfusion rate. The general case of variable blood perfusion rates is solved by an Euler finite difference technique. At this stage, the model does not include active control mechanisms of blood perfusion. Thus the effects of cold-induced vasodilatation have to be superimposed and are modeled by symmetrical triangular waveforms because these were found to best depict the behavior of fingers exposed to cold environments. Results of this model were compared with experimental data obtained in two separate studies. One included 60-min infrared thermograms of the dorsal surface of bare hands of sedentary subjects horizontally suspended on a fish net in a 0 degree C environment. Another study, on gloved finger temperatures, involved 0 and -6.7 degrees C environments. Fingertip (nail bed) temperatures of both these studies were compared with model predictions. Blood perfusion rates were assumed and adjusted within physiologically reasonable limits. Comparison of measured and computed temperature records showed very good conformity in both cases studied. PMID:8727573

  19. A low-cost, small volume circuit for autologous blood normothermic perfusion of rabbit organs.

    PubMed

    Worner, Murray; Poore, Samuel; Tilkorn, Daniel; Lokmic, Zerina; Penington, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    We have designed a laboratory extracorporeal normothermic blood perfusion system for whole organs (e.g., kidney) that achieves pulsatile flow, low levels of hemolysis, and a blood priming volume of 60 mL or less. Using this uniquely designed extracorporeal circuit, we have achieved perfusion of two isolated ex vivo constructs. In the first experiment, we successfully perfused a rabbit epigastric flap based on the femoral vessels. In the second experiment, we were able to perfuse the isolated rabbit kidney for 48 h (range for all kidneys was 12-48 h) with excellent urine output, normal arterial blood gasses at 24 h, and normal ex vivo kidney histology at the conclusion of the experiments. These parameters have not been achieved before with any known or previously published laboratory extracorporeal circuits. The study has implications for prolonged organ perfusion prior to transplantation and for tissue engineering of vascularized tissues, such as by the perfusion of decellularized organs. PMID:23981068

  20. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  1. Detection and analysis of temperature-sensitive dermal blood perfusion dynamics and distribution by a hybrid camera system.

    PubMed

    Blanik, N; Paul, M; Blazek, V; Leonhardt, S

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present an application of two optical imaging modalities for non-invasive assessment of dermal perfusion. This hybrid setup consists of a photo-plethysmographic camera sensing in the visible spectrum and a thermal camera sensing in the infrared-C-band. This allows to combine the information of both sources complementarily: The extracted perfusion index as well as the skin surface temperature. The feasibility of the presented system is tested in two studies with local temperature stress on the forehead of a subject. In the first, a local cooling on the subject's forehead is monitored and further analyzed. In the second, skin perfusion reactions to heat are considered. For both experiments the results are compared to baseline measurements and non-affected areas in the field of view of the cameras. As results, the dependencies between temperature and perfusion change are presented. Further, influences of the stressor can be visualized in functional mappings of calculated perfusion indices. For the performed test, a linear correlation between temperature and perfusion change is obtained. PMID:26736773

  2. The Effects of Scraping Therapy on Local Temperature and Blood Perfusion Volume in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin-Yan; Yang, Jin-Sheng; Zhu, Bing; Yang, Li; Wang, Ying-Ying; Gao, Xin-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We aim to study the therapeutic effects of scraping by investigating the changes of temperature and local blood perfusion volume in healthy subjects after scraping stimulation, and to explore the mechanism of scraping stimulation from the points of microcirculation and energy metabolism. Methods. Twenty-three health subjects were included in this study. Local blood perfusion volume and body surface temperature was detected at 5 min before scraping stimulation, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 90 min after scraping using Laser Doppler imager and infrared thermograph. Results. Significant increase was noted in the blood perfusion volume in the scraping area within 90 minutes compared to the baseline level and non-scraping area (P < 0.001). Compared with non-scraping area, an increase of body temperature with an average of 1°C was observed after scraping stimulation (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Scraping can significantly improve the blood perfusion volume and increase the temperature in the scraping area, promoting the local blood circulation and energy metabolism. PMID:22666292

  3. Non-invasive imaging of microcirculation: a technology review

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sam; Nilsson, Jan; Sturesson, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Microcirculation plays a crucial role in physiological processes of tissue oxygenation and nutritional exchange. Measurement of microcirculation can be applied on many organs in various pathologies. In this paper we aim to review the technique of non-invasive methods for imaging of the microcirculation. Methods covered are: videomicroscopy techniques, laser Doppler perfusion imaging, and laser speckle contrast imaging. Videomicroscopy techniques, such as orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark-field imaging, provide a plentitude of information and offer direct visualization of the microcirculation but have the major drawback that they may give pressure artifacts. Both laser Doppler perfusion imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging allow non-contact measurements but have the disadvantage of their sensitivity to motion artifacts and that they are confined to relative measurement comparisons. Ideal would be a non-contact videomicroscopy method with fully automatic analysis software. PMID:25525397

  4. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  5. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-02-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  6. The relationship between red blood cell deformability metrics and perfusion of an artificial microvascular network

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Jose M.; Nielsen, Nathan D.; Vignes, Seth M.; Chen, Tanya G.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of red blood cells (RBC) to undergo a wide range of deformations while traversing the microvasculature is crucial for adequate perfusion. Interpretation of RBC deformability measurements performed in vitro in the context of microvascular perfusion has been notoriously difficult. This study compares the measurements of RBC deformability performed using micropore filtration and ektacytometry with the RBC ability to perfuse an artificial microvascular network (AMVN). Human RBCs were collected from healthy consenting volunteers, leukoreduced, washed and exposed to graded concentrations (0% – 0.08%) of glutaraldehyde (a non-specific protein cross-linker) and diamide (a spectrin-specific protein cross-linker) to impair the deformability of RBCs. Samples comprising cells with two different levels of deformability were created by adding non-deformable RBCs (hardened by exposure to 0.08% glutaraldehyde) to the sample of normal healthy RBCs. Ektacytometry indicated a nearly linear decline in RBC deformability with increasing glutaraldehyde concentration. Micropore filtration showed a significant reduction only for concentrations of glutaraldehyde higher than 0.04%. Neither micropore filtration nor ektacytometry measurements could accurately predict the AMVN perfusion. Treatment with diamide reduced RBC deformability as indicated by ektacytometry, but had no significant effect on either micropore filtration or the AMVN perfusion. Both micropore filtration and ektacytometry showed a linear decline in effective RBC deformability with increasing fraction of non-deformable RBCs in the sample. The corresponding decline in the AMVN perfusion plateaued above 50%, reflecting the innate ability of blood flow in the microvasculature to bypass occluded capillaries. Our results suggest that in vitro measurements of RBC deformability performed using either micropore filtration or ektacytometry may not represent the ability of same RBCs to perfuse microvascular networks

  7. Effects of vascular elastosis on uterine blood flow and perfusion in anesthetized mares.

    PubMed

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2015-04-01

    In the uterus of the mare, data obtained using transrectal Doppler ultrasonography indicate that uterine blood flow (UBF) is dynamic and changes throughout the estrous cycle. Degenerative lesions in the uterus are associated with subfertility and infertility. Among these lesions, vascular elastosis has been reported in aged, multiparous, and infertile mares. Angiosis of the uterine vasculature could potentially compromise UBF. The objectives of this experiment are to determine levels of UBF and perfusion of reproductively healthy mares and compare them to levels of subfertile/infertile mares affected by uterine vascular elastosis. Twenty mares were classified on the basis of degree of vascular degeneration and stage of cycle. A fluorescent microsphere technique was used to measure reproductive organ perfusion, where microspheres were injected into the left ventricle of the heart and became trapped in capillary beds in proportion to blood flow and tissue perfusion. The reproductive tract was removed, sectioned, and the fluorescent intensity evaluated to measure blood flow and perfusion. Additionally, full-thickness samples of the uterine wall were examined postmortem to further assess the degree of vascular degeneration in all layers of uterine wall. The mean value of uterine perfusion for the control mares during estrus (n = 5) was higher (P < 0.01) than that during diestrus (n = 5); 17.6 and 11.9 mL/min/100g, respectively. For the subfertile/infertile mares, the mean value of tissue perfusion was not different (P > 0.05) during estrus (n = 5) and diestrus (n = 5); 5.9 and 7.2 mL/min/100g, respectively. Uterine perfusion in subfertile/infertile mares affected by elastosis was lower than that of control mares during both estrus (P < 0.01) and diestrus (P < 0.01). The differences in baseline levels of perfusion between the control and elastosis groups indicate that elastosis of the uterine vasculature is associated with decreased uterine perfusion

  8. Non-invasive optoacoustic temperature determination during retinal cw-laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandulla, Jochen; Elsner, Hanno; Sandeau, Julien; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2006-02-01

    In almost all retinal laser treatments the therapeutic effect is initiated by a transient temperature increase. Due to differences in tissue properties and physiology like pigmentation and vascular blood flow an individually different temperature increase might occur with crucial effects on the therapeutic benefit of the treatment. In order to determine the individual retinal temperature increase during cw-laser irradiation in real-time we developed a non-invasive method based on optoacoustics. Simultaneously to the cw-laser irradiation (λ = 810 nm, P < 3 W, t = 60 s) pulses from a dye laser (λ = 500 nm, τ = 3.5 ns, Ε ~ 5 μJ) are applied concentrically to the cw-laser spot on the eyeground. The absorption of the pulses lead to a consequent heating and thermoelastic expansion of the tissue. This causes the emission of an ultrasonic pressure wave, which amplitude was found to be temperature dependent following in good approximation a 2 nd order polynomial. The pressure wave was measured by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens placed on the cornea. The experiments were performed in-vivo on rabbits. Simultaneous measurements with a miniaturized thermocouple showed a similar slope with a maximum local deviation of 0.4 °C for a temperature increase of 5.5 °C. On two rabbits measurements pre and post mortem at the same location were performed. The temperature increase after 60 s was found to raise by 12.0 % and 66.7 % post mortem, respectively. These data were used to calculate the influence of heat convection by blood circulation using a numerical model based on two absorbing layers and assuming a constant perfusion rate for the choriocapillaris and the choroid. Overall the presented optoacoustic method seems feasible for a non-invasive real-time determination of cw-laser induced retinal temperature increases and might serve as a temperature based dosimetry control during retinal laser treatments.

  9. Use of autologous blood as part of the perfusate for cardiopulmonary bypass: a priming technique.

    PubMed

    Myers, G J; Legare, J F; Sullivan, J A; Leadon, R B; Johnstone, R; Swyer, W; Squires, C; Power, C; Hirsch, G M

    2002-05-01

    In an attempt to replace the oncotic and protein coating capabilities of serum albumin in the perfusate, we established a priming protocol that used autologous blood as part of the perfusate solution. Prior to March 1, 1999, our standard priming protocol was 1650 ml of crystalloid with 250 ml of 5% serum albumin and 5,000 units of heparin. After removing albumin from our prime, our standard protocol was altered to include 40 ml of the patient's autologous blood in 1,800 ml of crystalloid and 10,000 units of heparin. To determine the intraoperative effects of using albumin/crystalloid primes (Group A), autologous blood/crystalloid primes (Group B) and crystalloid primes (Group C), a total of 178 patients were sequentially evaluated. Intraoperative parameters evaluated were total protein (TP), colloid osmotic pressure (COP), platelets (Plts) and fluid requirements during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During an overlapping 12-month period of time, 1,092 consecutive cardiac surgical cases using CPB (584 albumin prime; 508 autologous blood prime) were evaluated for clinical outcomes in terms of mortality and length of hospitalization. In addition, over a period of 15 months, 1,458 patients in both the autologous blood/crystalloid group and the crystalloid only group were evaluated for the incidence of high-pressure excursions (HPE) after going on bypass. Comparative reviews of TP, COP and Plts demonstrated no significant difference 10 min after the start of bypass between Groups A and B. However, in Group C, there was a statistically significant increase in the intraoperative fluid requirements during CPB, compared to both of the other groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of HPE, with an occurrence of 1.04% in the crystalloid only group and 1.11% in the autologous blood/crystalloid group. Autologous blood perfusates were identical to albumin perfusates in their platelet protection and reduction of fluid shifts during the intraoperative period

  10. Dynamic markers based on blood perfusion fluctuations for selecting skin melanocytic lesions for biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Stefanovska, Aneta; Pesce, Margherita; Marco Vezzoni, Gian; Loggini, Barbara; Pingitore, Raffaele; Ghiara, Fabrizio; Barachini, Paolo; Cervadoro, Gregorio; Romanelli, Marco; Rossi, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Skin malignant melanoma is a highly angiogenic cancer, necessitating early diagnosis for positive prognosis. The current diagnostic standard of biopsy and histological examination inevitably leads to many unnecessary invasive excisions. Here, we propose a non-invasive method of identification of melanoma based on blood flow dynamics. We consider a wide frequency range from 0.005-2 Hz associated with both local vascular regulation and effects of cardiac pulsation. Combining uniquely the power of oscillations associated with individual physiological processes we obtain a marker which distinguishes between melanoma and atypical nevi with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.9%. The method reveals valuable functional information about the melanoma microenvironment. It also provides the means for simple, accurate, in vivo distinction between malignant melanoma and atypical nevi, and may lead to a substantial reduction in the number of biopsies currently undertaken.

  11. The blood perfusion and NADH/FAD content combined analysis in patients with diabetes foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, Victor V.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Galstyan, Gagik R.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Abdulvapova, Zera N.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2016-03-01

    Skin blood microcirculation and the metabolism activity of tissue were examined on the patients with type 2 diabetes. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with 1064 nm laser light source and fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) with excitation light of 365 nm and 450 nm have been used to monitor the blood perfusion and the content of coenzymes NADH and FAD. Concluding, the proposed combined LDF and tissue FS approach allows to identify the significant violations in the blood microcirculation and metabolic activity for type 2 diabetes patients.

  12. Low frequency arterial wall movements for indirect blood pressure measurement in man. Validation of a method for non-invasive assessment of blood pressure under the influence of isoprenaline and angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Dietz, U; Belz, G G

    1991-05-01

    In order to measure blood pressure noninvasively, the second derivative of the low frequency wall movements of the brachial artery were registered with a piezo-electric pressure probe during deflation of a Riva-Rocci cuff along with the actual cuff pressure. Two characteristic phenomena of this signal have been suggested to reflect systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Appearance of a positive spike phenomenon (S) was suggested to indicate systolic blood pressure and disappearance of a negative preanacrotic notch (D) to indicate diastolic blood pressure. To prove the validity of these suggestions, these phenomena were assessed in 10 young healthy males during isoprenaline and angiotensin induced changes of blood pressure. Intraarterial (A. radialis) and auscultatory (A. brachialis) blood pressures were recorded simultaneously. Determination of systolic blood pressure with the S phenomenon agreed well with invasive and auscultatory results. Invasive diastolic values agreed well with the cuff pressure at the last signal before disappearance of the preanacrotic notch (D1). Data from auscultation agreed less well with the D1 phenomenon. With increasing doses of isoprenaline, the diastolic measurements (D1) tended to be lower than the invasive ones. However, this discrepancy was far discreeter than that seen with ordinary auscultatory blood pressure measurement. We therefore conclude that registrations of low frequency arterial wall movements yield distinct characteristic spike phenomena useful for measurement of blood pressure in good agreement with the invasive method. In addition, the method provides clearly documented records and should be useful in situations which rely on a valid indirect method. PMID:1898428

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of blood perfusion in tissue and phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Bolt, Rene A.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2001-06-01

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed a very sensitive photo-acoustical detector. PVDF has been used as piezo-electric material. In this detector also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. Resolution is about 20 (m in depth and about 50-100 m laterally). We use 532 nm light. We will show how photoacoustics can be used for measuring the thickness of tissue above bone. We will also report measurements on tissue phantoms: e.g. a vessel delta from the epigastric artery branching of a Wistar rat, filled with an artificial blood-resembling absorber. The measurements have been carried out on phantoms containing vessels at several depths. Signal processing was enhanced by Fourier processing of the data.

  14. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    PubMed

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance. PMID:26835653

  15. Non-Invasive Neuromodulation for Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuhan; Marmura, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Migraine and other chronic headache disorders are common and if inadequately treated, can lead to significant disability. The effectiveness of medications can be limited by side effects, drug interactions, and comorbid diseases necessitating alternative methods. Technological developments in the past 5 years have made it possible to use non-invasive methods of neuromodulation to treat primary headache disorders. This field includes technologies such as supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation (STS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and non-invasive vagal nerve stimulation (nVNS). Existing trials show these modalities are safe and well tolerated and can be combined with standard pharmacotherapy. We review the technologies, biological rationales, and trials involving non-invasive neuromodulation for the treatment of primary headache disorders. PMID:26750126

  16. Non-invasive Intratracheal Instillation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Muñoz, Guadalupe; Looney, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    The intratracheal instillation technique is used to deliver a variety of agents to the lungs ranging from pathogens (bacteria, viruses), toxins, to therapeutic agents. To model lung inflammation and injury, LPS can be administrated via intranasal, intratracheal, or aerosol approaches. Each technique has its limitations. The intratracheal technique can involve the non-invasive instillation method (via the oro-tracheal route) or a direct injection into the trachea. Here, we describe an optimized method for direct visual instillation of LPS via the non-invasive oro-tracheal route.

  17. Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Response to Reduced Ocular Perfusion Pressure by alteration of either the Blood Pressure or Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Cull, Grant A; Fortune, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that blood flow autoregulation in the optic nerve head has less reserve to maintain normal blood flow in the face of blood pressure-induced ocular perfusion pressure decrease than a similar magnitude intraocular pressure-induced ocular perfusion pressure decrease. Materials and Methods Twelve normal nonhuman primates were anesthetized by continuous intravenous infusion of pentobarbital. Optic nerve blood flow was monitored by laser speckle flowgraphy. In the first group of animals (n=6), the experimental eye intraocular pressure was maintained at 10 mmHg using a saline reservoir connected to the anterior chamber. The blood pressure was gradually reduced by a slow injection of pentobarbital. In the second group (n=6), the intraocular pressure was slowly increased from 10 mmHg to 50 mmHg by raising the reservoir. In both experimental groups, optic nerve head blood flow was measured continuously. The blood pressure and intraocular pressure were simultaneously recorded in all experiments. Results The optic nerve head blood flow showed significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.021, repeat measures analysis of variance). It declined significantly more in the blood pressure group compared to the intraocular pressure group when the ocular perfusion pressure was reduced to 35 mmHg (P<0.045) and below. There was also a significant interaction between blood flow changes and the ocular perfusion pressure treatment (P=0.004, adjusted Greenhouse & Geisser univariate test), indicating the gradually enlarged blood flow difference between the two groups was due to the ocular perfusion pressure decrease. Conclusions The results show that optic nerve head blood flow is more susceptible to an ocular perfusion pressure decrease induced by lowering the blood pressure compared with that induced by increasing the intraocular pressure. This blood flow autoregulation capacity vulnerability to low blood pressure may provide experimental evidence

  18. Validation of diffuse correlation spectroscopy for muscle blood flow with concurrent arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Floyd, Thomas F.; Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-02-01

    Calf blood flow was measured simultaneously in healthy human subjects (n = 7) during cuff inflation and deflation using near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI (ASL-MRI). The DCS and ASL-MRI data exhibited highly correlated absolute and relative dynamic flow responses in each individual (p < 0.001). Peak flow variations during hyperemia were also significantly correlated, though more for relative (p = 0.003) than absolute (p = 0.016) flow. Repeated measurement variation was less than 8% for both modalities. The results provide much needed quantitative blood flow validation of the diffuse optical correlation method in humans.

  19. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  20. Investigation of source-detector separation optimization for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor for liver blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J. S.; Akl, T. J.; Coté, G. L.; Wilson, M. A.; Ericson, M. N.

    2011-03-01

    An implanted system is being developed to monitor transplanted liver health during the critical 7-10 day period posttransplantation. The unit will monitor organ perfusion and oxygen consumption using optically-based probes placed on both the inflow and outflow blood vessels, and on the liver parenchymal surface. Sensing probes are based on a 3- wavelength LED source and a photodiode detector. Sample diffuse reflectance is measured at 735, 805, and 940 nm. To ascertain optimal source-to-photodetector spacing for perfusion measurement in blood vessels, an ex vivo study was conducted. In this work, a dye mixture simulating 80% blood oxygen saturation was developed and perfused through excised porcine arteries while collecting data for various preset probe source-to-photodetector spacings. The results from this study demonstrate a decrease in the optical signal with decreasing LED drive current and a reduction in perfusion index signal with increasing probe spacing. They also reveal a 2- to 4-mm optimal range for blood vessel perfusion probe source-to-photodetector spacing that allows for sufficient perfusion signal modulation depth with maximized signal to noise ratio (SNR). These findings are currently being applied to guide electronic configuration and probe placement for in vivo liver perfusion porcine model studies.

  1. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  3. Non-invasive monitoring of spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Bastany, Zoya J R; Askari, Shahbaz; Dumont, Guy A; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Spreading depression (SD), a slow propagating depolarization wave, plays an important role in pathophysiology of different neurological disorders. Yet, research into SD-related disorders has been hampered by the lack of non-invasive recording techniques of SD. Here we compared the manifestations of SD in continuous non-invasive electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings to invasive electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings in order to obtain further insights into generator structures and electrogenic mechanisms of surface recording of SD. SD was induced by KCl application and simultaneous SD recordings were performed by scalp EEG as well as ECoG electrodes of somatosensory neocortex of rats using a novel homemade EEG amplifier, AgCl recording electrodes, and high chloride conductive gel. Different methods were used to analyze the data; including the spectrogram, bi-spectrogram, pattern distribution, relative spectrum power, and multivariable Gaussian fit analysis. The negative direct current (DC) shifts recorded by scalp electrodes exhibited a high homogeneity to those recorded by ECoG electrodes. Furthermore, this novel method of recording and analysis was able to separate SD recorded by scalp electrodes from non-neuronal DC shifts induced by other potential generators, such as the skin, muscles, arteries, dura, etc. These data suggest a novel application for continuous non-invasive monitoring of DC potential changes, such as SD. Non-invasive monitoring of SD would allow early intervention and improve outcome in SD-related neurological disorders. PMID:27397413

  4. Non-invasive assessment of intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Robba, C; Bacigaluppi, S; Cardim, D; Donnelly, J; Bertuccio, A; Czosnyka, M

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is invaluable in the management of neurosurgical and neurological critically ill patients. Invasive measurement of ventricular or parenchymal pressure is considered the gold standard for accurate measurement of ICP but is not always possible due to certain risks. Therefore, the availability of accurate methods to non-invasively estimate ICP has the potential to improve the management of these vulnerable patients. This review provides a comparative description of different methods for non-invasive ICP measurement. Current methods are based on changes associated with increased ICP, both morphological (assessed with magnetic resonance, computed tomography, ultrasound, and fundoscopy) and physiological (assessed with transcranial and ophthalmic Doppler, tympanometry, near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalography, visual-evoked potentials, and otoacoustic emissions assessment). At present, none of the non-invasive techniques alone seem suitable as a substitute for invasive monitoring. However, following the present analysis and considerations upon each technique, we propose a possible flowchart based on the combination of non-invasive techniques including those characterizing morphologic changes (e.g., repetitive US measurements of ONSD) and those characterizing physiological changes (e.g., continuous TCD). Such an integrated approach, which still needs to be validated in clinical practice, could aid in deciding whether to place an invasive monitor, or how to titrate therapy when invasive ICP measurement is contraindicated or unavailable. PMID:26515159

  5. [Pulmonary non invasive infection by Scedosporium apiospermum].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rodrigo; Barros, Manuel; Reyes, Mirtha

    2015-08-01

    We reported a case of non-invasive pulmonary infection by Scedosporium apiospermum in 67 years old female with bronchiectasis and caverns secondary to tuberculosis. Diagnosis was made with lung CT and bronchial lavage cultures. The patient was initially treated with itraconazole for six weeks without success and then voriconazole for 16 weeks, with good clinical response. PMID:26436797

  6. Modulation of Perfusion and Oxygenation by Red Blood Cell Oxygen Affinity during Acute Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    Responses to exchange transfusion using red blood cells (RBCs) with modified hemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model during acute anemia to determine its role on microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation. Allosteric effectors were introduced in the RBCs by electroporation. Inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF) were used to decrease and increase Hb-O2 affinity. In vitro P50s (partial pressure of O2 at 50% Hb saturation) were modified to 10, 25, 45, and 50 mm Hg (normal P50 is 32 mm Hg). Allosteric effectors also decreased the Hill coefficient. Anemic condition was induced by isovolemic hemodilution exchanges using 6% dextran 70 kD to 18% hematocrit (Hct). Modified RBCs (at 18% Hct in 5% albumin solution) were infused by exchange transfusion of 35% of blood volume. Systemic parameters, microvascular perfusion, capillary perfusion (functional capillary density, FCD), and microvascular Po2 levels were measured. RBcs with P50 of 45 mm Hg increased tissue Po2 and decreased O2 delivery (Do2) and extraction (Vo2) and RBCs with P50 of 60 mmHg reduced FCD, microvascular flow, tissue Po2, Do2 and Vo2. Erythrocytes with increased Hb-O2 affinity maintained hemodynamic conditions, Do2 and decreased tissue Po2. This study shows that in an anemic condition, maximal tissue Po2 does not correspond to maximal Do2 and Vo2. PMID:17884988

  7. Assessment of myocardial blood perfusion improved by CD151 in a pig myocardial infarction model

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hou-juan; Liu, Zheng-xiang; Liu, Xiao-chun; Yang, Jun; Liu, Tao; Wen, Sha; Wang, Dao-wen; Zhang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To appraise the efficacy of CD151-induced myocardial therapeutic angiogenesis in a pig myocardial infarction model. Methods: CD151 and anti-CD151 were constructed into the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector. All 26 pigs were subjected to coronary artery ligation or no surgery. Eight weeks after coronary artery ligation, the expression of CD151 was measured by Western blot and immunostaining. Capillary density was evaluated using immunostaining for von Willebrand factor (vWF). 13N-labeled NH3 positron emission computed tomography ([13N]NH3 PET) was measured to assess regional myocardial perfusion and the defect area. Results: CD151 gene delivery could increase the expression of CD151 at protein level. Over-expression of CD151 increased the density of total capillaries in the ischemic myocardium, significantly improved the blood perfusion and reduced the defect area percentage. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the rAAV-mediated CD151 gene delivery promoted efficient neovascularization and increased the blood perfusion after myocardial infarction in pigs. PMID:19079294

  8. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K; Matthew Brothers, R; Diller, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC-skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  9. Design and testing of diffuse reflectance sensor for continuous monitoring of cutaneous blood perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, P.; Talary, M. S.; Caduff, A.

    2009-07-01

    A dual-wavelength reflectance optical sensor for monitoring cutaneous blood perfusion is presented as a part of multisensor glucose monitoring system. A Monte-Carlo simulation of partial differential pathlengths has been used for the optimization of the distance from light source to detector. The simulation indicated that the light pathlength within the upper vascularised skin layers increases before reaching saturation at separation distances larger than 3 mm. Thus the sensor sensitivity does not benefit from larger source-detector distances. At the same time with a higher separation of the detector from the source, the intensity exponentially decreases while undesirable sensitivity to the muscle perfusion increases. The hardware prototype has been developed based on the simulation findings and tested in a laboratory setting and in a home use study by patients with diabetes. For both testing procedures the optical sensor demonstrated high sensitivity to perfusion changes. The effect of initial cutaneous blood increase under the sensor has been observed which can be associated with pressure-induced vasodilation as a response to the sensor application.

  10. Effect of prostaglandins on the blood-aqueous barrier of the perfused cat eye.

    PubMed

    van Alphen, G W; Wilhelm, P

    1978-01-01

    With a technique of direct visualization of the arterially perfused cat eye, the pressure head may be chosen so that fluorescein added to the perfusate just barely stains the ciliary processes. After addition of PGE1, PGE2, PGF2alpha arachidonic acid, or indomethacin, with or without PG's, no more dye emerged from the processes. The addition of acetylcholine in the eserinized eye floods the processes with dye, apparently affecting the pore size of the blood-aqueous barrier; PG's may slightly inhibit, rather than facilitate, the emergence of fluorescein from the processes. It is speculated that in the cat PG's elevate pressure and protein content by backflow from the circle of Hovius, which is the equivalent of Schlemm's canal. PMID:621127

  11. Effect of spinal cord compression on local vascular blood flow and perfusion capacity.

    PubMed

    Alshareef, Mohammed; Krishna, Vibhor; Ferdous, Jahid; Alshareef, Ahmed; Kindy, Mark; Kolachalama, Vijaya B; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading. PMID:25268384

  12. Effect of Spinal Cord Compression on Local Vascular Blood Flow and Perfusion Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Alshareef, Mohammed; Krishna, Vibhor; Ferdous, Jahid; Alshareef, Ahmed; Kindy, Mark; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading. PMID:25268384

  13. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography to assess blood perfusion of skeletal muscles in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Juyeon; Jeon, Sunghoon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated perfusion of skeletal muscle using contrast enhanced ultrasonography in humerus, radius, femur and tibia in normal dogs. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography for each region was performed after injecting 0.5 mL and 1 mL of contrast medium (SonoVue) in every dog. Blood perfusion was assessed quantitatively by measuring the peak intensity, time to the peak intensity and area under the curve from the time-intensity curve. Vascularization in skeletal muscle was qualitatively graded with a score of 0-3 according to the number of vascular signals. A parabolic shape of time-intensity curve was observed from muscles in normal dogs, and time to the peak intensity, the peak intensity and area under the curve of each muscle were not significantly different according to the appendicular regions examined and the dosage of contrast agent administered. This study reports that feasibility of contrast enhanced ultrasonography for assessment of the muscular perfusion in canine appendicular regions. PMID:25754794

  14. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography to assess blood perfusion of skeletal muscles in normal dogs

    PubMed Central

    OH, Juyeon; JEON, Sunghoon; CHOI, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated perfusion of skeletal muscle using contrast enhanced ultrasonography in humerus, radius, femur and tibia in normal dogs. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography for each region was performed after injecting 0.5 mL and 1 mL of contrast medium (SonoVue) in every dog. Blood perfusion was assessed quantitatively by measuring the peak intensity, time to the peak intensity and area under the curve from the time–intensity curve. Vascularization in skeletal muscle was qualitatively graded with a score of 0–3 according to the number of vascular signals. A parabolic shape of time–intensity curve was observed from muscles in normal dogs, and time to the peak intensity, the peak intensity and area under the curve of each muscle were not significantly different according to the appendicular regions examined and the dosage of contrast agent administered. This study reports that feasibility of contrast enhanced ultrasonography for assessment of the muscular perfusion in canine appendicular regions. PMID:25754794

  15. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). PMID:26072438

  16. Ultrasonic non invasive techniques for microbiological instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvira, L.; Sierra, C.; Galán, B.; Resa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Non invasive techniques based on ultrasounds have advantageous features to study, characterize and monitor microbiological and enzymatic reactions. These processes may change the sound speed, viscosity or particle distribution size of the medium where they take place, which makes possible their analysis using ultrasonic techniques. In this work, two different systems for the analysis of microbiological liquid media based on ultrasounds are presented. In first place, an industrial application based on an ultrasonic monitoring technique for microbiological growth detection in milk is shown. Such a system may improve the quality control strategies in food production factories, being able to decrease the time required to detect possible contaminations in packed products. Secondly, a study about the growing of the Escherichia coli DH5 α in different conditions is presented. It is shown that the use of ultrasonic non invasive characterization techniques in combination with other conventional measurements like optical density provides complementary information about the metabolism of these bacteria.

  17. [Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2015-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prognosis and management of chronic liver diseases depend on the amount of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy has long remained the gold standard for assessment of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy is an invasive procedure with associated morbidity, it is rarely the cause for mortality, and has a few limitations. During the past two decades, in an attempt to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods for the evaluation of liver fibrosis have been developed, mainly in the field of viral hepatitis. This review will focus on different methods available for non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis including a biological approach which quantifies serum levels of biomarkers of fibrosis and physical techniques which measure liver stiffness by transient elastography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance based elastography, their accuracy, advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25962254

  18. [Non-invasive assessment of fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2015-04-01

    As the result of various harmful effects (infectious agents, metabolic diseases, unhealthy diet, obesity, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) hepatic damage may develop, which can progress towards liver steatosis, and fibrosis as well. The most common etiological factors of liver damages are hepatitis B and C infection, alcohol consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic liver diseases. Due to the dangers and complications of liver biopsy, studies are focused on non-invasive markers and radiological imaging for liver steatosis, progression of fatty liver, activity of the necroinflammation and the severity of the fibrosis. Authors review the possibilities of non-invasive assessment of liver steatosis. The statistical features of the probes (positive, negative predictive values, sensitivity, specificity) are reviewed. The role of radiological imaging is also discussed. Although the non-invasive methods discussed in this article are useful to assess liver steatosis, further studies are needed to validate to follow progression of the diseases and to control therapeutic response. PMID:25819147

  19. Physiology of non-invasive respiratory support.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Stamatia; Panitch, Howard B

    2016-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is used in neonates to treat extrathoracic and intrathoracic airway obstruction, parenchymal lung disease and disorders of control of breathing. Avoidance of airway intubation is associated with a reduction in the incidence of chronic lung disease among preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) may help establish and maintain functional residual capacity (FRC), decrease respiratory work, and improve gas exchange. Other modes of non-invasive ventilation, which include heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula therapy (HHHFNC), nasal intermittent mandatory ventilation (NIMV), non-invasive pressure support ventilation (NI-PSV), and bi-level CPAP (SiPAP™), have also been shown to provide additional benefit in improving breathing patterns, reducing work of breathing, and increasing gas exchange when compared with nCPAP. Newer modes, such as neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA), hold the promise of improving patient-ventilator synchrony and so might ultimately improve outcomes for preterm infants with respiratory distress. PMID:26923501

  20. A review on the non-invasive evaluation of skeletal muscle oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Aziz, N. A.; Laili, A. R.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct a feasibility study of non-invasive evaluation in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This non-invasive evaluation could extract many information using a safe non-invasive method regarding to the oxygenation and microcirculation status in human blood muscle. This brief review highlights the progress of the application of NIRS to evaluate skeletal muscle oxygenation in various activity of human nature from the historical point of view to the present advancement. Since the discovery of non-invasive optical method during 1992, there are many non-invasive techniques uses optical properties on human subject such as near infrared spectroscopy NIRS, optical topography, functional near infrared spectroscopy fNIRS and imaging fNIRI. Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the light absorption potential (LAP) towards chromophores content inside human muscle. Modified beer lambert law was studied in order to build a better understanding toward LAP between chromophores under tissue multilayers in human muscle. This paper will describe the NIRS principle and the basis for its proposed used in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This will cover the advantages and limitation of such application. Thus, these non-invasive techniques could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  1. Blood flow redistribution and ventilation-perfusion mismatch during embolic pulmonary arterial occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, K. S.; Clark, A. R.; Tawhai, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism causes redistribution of blood in the lung, which impairs ventilation/perfusion matching and gas exchange and can elevate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) by increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). An anatomically-based multi-scale model of the human pulmonary circulation was used to simulate pre- and post-occlusion flow, to study blood flow redistribution in the presence of an embolus, and to evaluate whether reduction in perfused vascular bed is sufficient to increase PAP to hypertensive levels, or whether other vasoconstrictive mechanisms are necessary. A model of oxygen transfer from air to blood was included to assess the impact of vascular occlusion on oxygen exchange. Emboli of 5, 7, and 10 mm radius were introduced to occlude increasing proportions of the vasculature. Blood flow redistribution was calculated after arterial occlusion, giving predictions of PAP, PVR, flow redistribution, and micro-circulatory flow dynamics. Because of the large flow reserve capacity (via both capillary recruitment and distension), approximately 55% of the vasculature was occluded before PAP reached clinically significant levels indicative of hypertension. In contrast, model predictions showed that even relatively low levels of occlusion could cause localized oxygen deficit. Flow preferentially redistributed to gravitationally non-dependent regions regardless of occlusion location, due to the greater potential for capillary recruitment in this region. Red blood cell transit times decreased below the minimum time for oxygen saturation (<0.25 s) and capillary pressures became high enough to initiate cell damage (which may result in edema) only after ~80% of the lung was occluded. PMID:22140626

  2. Instrumentation for Non-Invasive Assessment of Cardiovascular Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    It is critically important to be able to assess alterations in cardiovascular regulation during and after space flight. We propose to develop an instrument for the non-invasive assessment of such alterations that can be used on the ground and potentially during space flight. This instrumentation would be used by the Cardiovascular Alterations Team at multiple sites for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system and the evaluation of countermeasures. In particular, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team will use this instrumentation in conjunction with ground-based human bed-rest studies and during application of acute stresses e.g., tilt, lower body negative pressure, and exercise. In future studies, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team anticipates using this instrumentation to study astronauts before and after space flight and ultimately, during space flight. The instrumentation may also be used by the Bone Demineralization/Calcium Metabolism Team, the Neurovestibular Team and the Human Performance Factors, Sleep and Chronobiology Team to measure changes in autonomic nervous function. The instrumentation will be based on a powerful new technology - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - which has been developed in our laboratory. CSI provides a non-invasive approach for the study of alterations in cardiovascular regulation. This approach involves the analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in physiologic signals such as heart rate and non-invasively measured arterial blood pressure in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of multiple physiologic mechanisms, CSI provides a closed-loop model of the cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject.

  3. Quantifying Single Microvessel Permeability in Isolated Blood-perfused Rat Lung Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The isolated blood-perfused lung preparation is widely used to visualize and define signaling in single microvessels. By coupling this preparation with real time imaging, it becomes feasible to determine permeability changes in individual pulmonary microvessels. Herein we describe steps to isolate rat lungs and perfuse them with autologous blood. Then, we outline steps to infuse fluorophores or agents via a microcatheter into a small lung region. Using these procedures described, we determined permeability increases in rat lung microvessels in response to infusions of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The data revealed that lipopolysaccharide increased fluid leak across both venular and capillary microvessel segments. Thus, this method makes it possible to compare permeability responses among vascular segments and thus, define any heterogeneity in the response. While commonly used methods to define lung permeability require postprocessing of lung tissue samples, the use of real time imaging obviates this requirement as evident from the present method. Thus, the isolated lung preparation combined with real time imaging offers several advantages over traditional methods to determine lung microvascular permeability, yet is a straightforward method to develop and implement. PMID:25045895

  4. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  5. The functional state of the isolated rabbit kidney perfused with autologous blood.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Y; Vandenreyt, I; Bipat, R; Toelsie, J; Van Damme, B; Steels, P

    2000-08-01

    This report describes the technique and procedure for perfusing an isolated rabbit kidney with 25 ml heparinized autologous blood in a closed circuit including a pump and an oxygenator. The duration of the operative ischaemia was 5-8 min; the perfusion lasted 2.5 hours. An additional infusion was made to compensate for urinary losses. Renal blood flow increased progressively from 2.01+/-0.1 to 2.65+/-0.22* ml/g kidney weight (kw) per min (*P<0.05). Between the first (P1) and the last (P4) urine collection period the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) fell from 288+/-25 to 217+/-38* microl/g kw per min, urine flow from 5.58+/-1.13 to 4.91+/-0.75 microl/g kw per min, Na+ excretion from 1.07+/-0.19 to 0.63+/-0.12* micromol/g kw per min, K+ excretion from 0.46+/-0.03 to 0.28+/-0.05* micromol/g kw per min, P excretion from 2.5+/-0.2 to 2.0+/-0.5 microg/g kw per min, Ca excretion from 0.4+/-0.1 to 0.12+/-0.05* microg/g kw per min, creatinine excretion from 6.94+/-0.32 to 5.68+/-0.54 microg/g kw per min, glucose excretion from 18.2+/-3.2 to 1.6+/-0.5* microg/g kw per min, the free water clearance (CH2O) from -6.57+/-0.85 to -5.10+/-1.31 microl/g kw per min and urine osmolality from 600+/-52 to 590+/-105 mOsm/kg, urea excretion from 0.75+/-0.16 to 0.95+/-0.13 micromol/g kw per min. Excretion of glucose, P or Ca was observed only above a given plasma threshold value, and no transport maximum was found for glucose or P. Ca reabsorption paralleled the Na reabsorption. The proximal tubule pressure, measured within the 1st h of perfusion, was 12.5+/-1.1 mm Hg. Histological examination at the end of the perfusion showed dilatation of the tubules as in the non-perfused kidneys, and the presence of numerous bacteria. Hypertonic urine (380-1110 mOsm/kg) was observed in the presence of vasopressin, in the latter's absence the urine was hypotonic urine (206-278 mOsm/kg). There was no correlation between renal plasma flow and the GFR. CH2O increased with increasing filtered Na+ load. In

  6. Brief ex vivo perfusion with heparinized and/or citrated whole blood enhances tolerance of free muscle flaps to prolonged ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J D; Li, X; Cooley, B C

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the use of heparinized and/or citrated whole blood as a perfusate for enhancing muscle tolerance to warm ischemia. Unilateral cutaneous trunci muscle flaps were harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats and stored for 10 hr at 22-24 degrees C prior to transplantation to the groin. One group served as a non-perfused control. In three experimental groups, the flaps were hand-perfused ex vivo with 1.0 ml of heparinized, citrated, or heparinized and citrated autogenous whole blood at physiological pressures. Perfusion was administered over a 10-min period 5 hr into the ischemic period. Flaps were revascularized on the femoral vessels and then harvested 48 hr following revascularization. Tissue injury was assessed by calculation of flap weight change (indicator of tissue edema), histochemical evaluation of muscle dehydrogenase activity (nitroblue tetrazolium assay), and light microscopy. All perfused groups had significantly higher muscle dehydrogenase activity compared with non-perfused controls (P < 0.005). Perfusion with combined heparin-citrated blood was significantly more protective than perfusion with either anticoagulant alone (P < 0.025). The only statistically significant reduction in percent flap edema was seen in the combined heparin-citrate perfusion of flaps compared with nonperfused controls (P < 0.05). Histologic evaluation confirmed a reduction in tissue edema in the perfused flaps. We conclude that mid-ischemic perfusion with heparinized and/or citrated blood limits the deleterious effects of extended warm ischemia. PMID:10231122

  7. Use of Doppler ultrasound for non-invasive urodynamic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Hideo; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Uematsu, Katsutoshi; Sasaki, Katsumi; Inoue, Miyabi; Kumon, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: A totally non-invasive transperineal urodynamic technique using Doppler ultrasonography has been developed. Methods: Since normal urine does not have blood cells, urine was thought not to produce the Doppler effects. However, basic studies confirmed that the decrease of pressure at high velocity (Bernouilli effect) caused dissolved gas to form microbubbles, which are detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects sat and the probe was advanced via remote control to achieve gentle contact with the perineal skin. The digital uroflow data signals and the color Doppler ultrasound video images were processed on a personal computer. The flow-velocity curves from two sites; the distal prostatic urethra just above the external sphincter (V1) and the sphincteric urethra (V2) were plotted against time. The parameters of both the pressure-flow studies and the Doppler ultrasound urodynamic studies were compared in men who had various degrees of obstruction. Results: Functional cross-sectional area at prostatic urethra (A1), calculated by Qmax/V1, was lower in the group of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) vs. control group. Velocity ratio (VR), which was calculated by V1/V2, was the parameter having the best correlation with BOO index, though A1 had a similar correlation. This method is viable to diagnose the degree of BOO. Conclusions: The development of non-invasive Doppler ultrasound videourodynamics (Doppler UDS) will dramatically expand the information on voiding function. PMID:19468440

  8. [Non invasive ventilation in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Laetitia; Della Santa, Vincent; Hanhart, Walter-Alexandre

    2015-08-12

    Before the development of non invasive ventilation (NIV), endotracheal intubation was the only ventilatory therapy available in case of severe respiratory distress and acute respiratory failure. NIV used to be employed in intensive care settings only. Nowadays, the use of NIV has been democratized to include the emergency room, and the pre-hospital care setting for treatment of acute respiratory failure. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute exacerbation of COPD are indications of choice, since NIV improves mortality. The efficiency of the therapy depends on early treatment; however, endotracheal intubation should not be delayed when it becomes necessary. PMID:26449102

  9. Paeonol Protects Rat Heart by Improving Regional Blood Perfusion during No-Reflow

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lina; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Weng, Weiliang; Zhao, Le; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Jinyan; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    No-reflow phenomenon, defined as inadequate perfusion of myocardium without evident artery obstruction, occurs at a high incidence after coronary revascularization. The mechanisms underlying no-reflow is only partially understood. It is commonly caused by the swelling of endothelial cells, neutrophil accumulation, and vasoconstriction, which are all related to acute inflammation. Persistent no-reflow can lead to hospitalization and mortality. However, an effective preventive intervention has not yet been established. We have previously found that paeonol, an active extraction from the root of Paeonia suffruticosa, can benefit the heart function by inhibiting tissue damage after ischemia, reducing inflammation, and inducing vasodilatation. To further investigate the potential cardioprotective action of paeonol on no-reflow, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury (left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 4 h followed by reperfusion for 8 h), and I/R injury pretreated with paeonol at two different doses. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to monitor regional blood perfusion and cardiac functions. Our data indicated that paeonol treatment significantly reduces myocardial infarct area and no-reflow area (n = 8; p < 0.05). Regional myocardial perfusion (A·β) and cardiac functions such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and fractional shortening were elevated by paeonol (n = 8; p < 0.05). Paeonol also lowered the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, cardiac troponin T, and C-reactive protein, as indices of myocardial injury. Paeonol exerts beneficial effects on attenuating I/R-associated no-reflow injuries, and may be considered as a potential preventive treatment for cardiac diseases or post-coronary revascularization in which no-reflow often occurs. PMID:27493631

  10. Paeonol Protects Rat Heart by Improving Regional Blood Perfusion during No-Reflow.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Weng, Weiliang; Zhao, Le; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Jinyan; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    No-reflow phenomenon, defined as inadequate perfusion of myocardium without evident artery obstruction, occurs at a high incidence after coronary revascularization. The mechanisms underlying no-reflow is only partially understood. It is commonly caused by the swelling of endothelial cells, neutrophil accumulation, and vasoconstriction, which are all related to acute inflammation. Persistent no-reflow can lead to hospitalization and mortality. However, an effective preventive intervention has not yet been established. We have previously found that paeonol, an active extraction from the root of Paeonia suffruticosa, can benefit the heart function by inhibiting tissue damage after ischemia, reducing inflammation, and inducing vasodilatation. To further investigate the potential cardioprotective action of paeonol on no-reflow, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury (left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 4 h followed by reperfusion for 8 h), and I/R injury pretreated with paeonol at two different doses. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to monitor regional blood perfusion and cardiac functions. Our data indicated that paeonol treatment significantly reduces myocardial infarct area and no-reflow area (n = 8; p < 0.05). Regional myocardial perfusion (A·β) and cardiac functions such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and fractional shortening were elevated by paeonol (n = 8; p < 0.05). Paeonol also lowered the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, cardiac troponin T, and C-reactive protein, as indices of myocardial injury. Paeonol exerts beneficial effects on attenuating I/R-associated no-reflow injuries, and may be considered as a potential preventive treatment for cardiac diseases or post-coronary revascularization in which no-reflow often occurs. PMID:27493631

  11. Evaluation of CT Perfusion Biomarkers of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bauman, Glenn; Crukley, Cathie; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Yartsev, Slav

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor hypoxia is associated with treatment resistance to cancer therapies. Hypoxia can be investigated by immunohistopathologic methods but such procedure is invasive. A non-invasive method to interrogate tumor hypoxia is an attractive option as such method can provide information before, during, and after treatment for personalized therapies. Our study evaluated the correlations between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and immunohistopathologic measurement of tumor hypoxia. Methods Wistar rats, 18 controls and 19 treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), implanted with the C6 glioma tumor were imaged using CT perfusion on average every five days to monitor tumor growth. A final CT perfusion scan and the brain were obtained on average 14 days (8–22 days) after tumor implantation. Tumor hypoxia was detected immunohistopathologically with pimonidazole. The tumor, necrotic, and pimonidazole-positive areas on histology samples were measured. Percent necrotic area and percent hypoxic areas were calculated. Tumor volume (TV), blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were obtained from the CT perfusion studies. Correlations between CT perfusion parameters and histological parameters were assessed by Spearman’s ρ correlation. A Bonferroni-corrected P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results BF and BV showed significant correlations with percent hypoxic area ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.81, P < 0.001, respectively, for control animals and ρ = -0.7, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.6, P = 0.003, respectively, for all animals, while TV and BV were correlated (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.01 and ρ = -0.43, P = 0.043, respectively) with percent necrotic area. PS was not correlated with either percent necrotic or percent hypoxic areas. Conclusions Percent hypoxic area provided significant correlations with BF and BV, suggesting that CT perfusion parameters are potential non-invasive imaging biomarkers of tumor

  12. Absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow in neurologically normal volunteers: dynamic-susceptibility contrast MRI-perfusion compared with computed tomography (CT)-perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ziegelitz, Doerthe; Starck, Göran; Mikkelsen, Irene K; Tullberg, Mats; Edsbagge, Mikael; Wikkelsö, Carsten; Forssell-Aronson, Eva; Holtås, Stig; Knutsson, Linda

    2009-07-01

    To improve the reproducibility of arterial input function (AIF) registration and absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in dynamic-susceptibility MRI-perfusion (MRP) at 1.5T, we rescaled the AIF by use of a venous output function (VOF). We compared CBF estimates of 20 healthy, elderly volunteers, obtained by computed tomography (CT)-perfusion (CTP) and MRP on two consecutive days. MRP, calculated without the AIF correction, did not result in any significant correlation with CTP. The rescaled MRP showed fair to moderate correlation with CTP for the central gray matter (GM) and the whole brain. Our results indicate that the method used for correction of partial volume effects (PVEs) improves MRP experiments by reducing AIF-introduced variance at 1.5T. PMID:19253361

  13. An original versatile nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood roller pump for extracorporeal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves; Wang, Shigang; Ündar, Akif

    2014-06-01

    Currently, only a small number of centrifugal pumps are being used for hemodynamic and/or respiratory support, but all of them have limitations. This article aims to present the Rhône-Poulenc 06 nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood pump. This pump was developed in France in the 1970s and used for decades in perfusion for cardiopulmonary bypass procedures, cardiac or lung assist as well as venovenous bypass during liver transplant. The intrinsic properties of this pump allowed us to describe a new technique for extracorporeal lung support in the 1980s, using a single cannula tidal flow venovenous bypass. This pump compared favorably with conventional pumps in terms of flow and pressure, hemolysis, pulsatility, safety, and cost-effectiveness. We believe that this simple pump could be an alternative to more sophisticated and expensive devices. PMID:24125196

  14. Three-dimensional analysis for radio-frequency ablation of liver tumor with blood perfusion effect.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Tony W H; Chou, C W; Tsai, S F; Liang, P C

    2005-08-01

    Increase of temperature above 50 approximately 60 degrees C for few minutes by the emitted radio-frequency (RF) energy has been shown to be able to denaturate the intracellular proteins and destruct membranes of tumor cells. To improve the efficacy of this thermal therapy, it is important to investigate factors that may affect the RF heating characteristics for the hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors. In order to make sure the applied RF energy is adequate to ablate the target tumor, a 3D thermoelectric analysis for the system consisting of liver, liver arteries and 4 mm diameter tumor is conducted. The effect of blood perfusion is addressed in this study. PMID:16298845

  15. [Non-invasive prenatal testing: challenges for future implementation].

    PubMed

    Henneman, Lidewij; Page-Chrisiaens, G C M L Lieve; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) is an accurate and safe test in which blood from the pregnant woman is used to investigate if the unborn child possibly has trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome) or trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Since April 2014 the NIPT has been available in the Netherlands as part of the TRIDENT implementation project for those in whom the first trimester combined test showed an elevated risk (> 1:200) of trisomy, or on medical indication, as an alternative to chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis. Since the introduction of the NIPT the use of these invasive tests, which are associated with a risk of miscarriage, has fallen steeply. The NIPT may replace the combined test. Also the number of conditions that is tested for can be increased. Modification of current prenatal screening will require extensive discussion, but whatever the modification, careful counseling remains essential to facilitate pregnant women's autonomous reproductive decision making. PMID:26530119

  16. Ultrahigh-speed non-invasive widefield angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Klein, Thomas; Grajciar, Branislav; Schmoll, Tilman; Wieser, Wolfgang; Andre, Raphael; Huber, Robert; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2012-07-01

    Retinal and choroidal vascular imaging is an important diagnostic benefit for ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. The current gold standard for vessel visualization is fluorescence angiography. We present a potential non-invasive alternative to image blood vessels based on functional Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). For OCT to compete with the field of view and resolution of angiography while maintaining motion artifacts to a minimum, ultrahigh-speed imaging has to be introduced. We employ Fourier domain mode locking swept source technology that offers high quality imaging at an A-scan rate of up to 1.68 MHz. We present retinal angiogram over ˜48 deg acquired in a few seconds in a single recording without the need of image stitching. OCT at 1060 nm allows for high penetration in the choroid and efficient separate characterization of the retinal and choroidal vascularization.

  17. Non-Invasive Imaging of Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Enrico; Moroni, Francesco; Pedrotti, Patrizia; Scotti, Isabella; Magnoni, Marco; Bozzolo, Enrica P.; Rimoldi, Ornella E.; Camici, Paolo G.

    2014-01-01

    In large-vessel vasculitides, inflammatory infiltrates may cause thickening of the involved arterial vessel wall leading to progressive stenosis and occlusion. Dilatation, aneurysm formation, and thrombosis may also ensue. Activated macrophages and T lymphocytes are fundamental elements in vascular inflammation. The amount and density of the inflammatory infiltrate is directly linked to local disease activity. Additionally, patients with autoimmune disorders have an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk compared with age-matched healthy individuals as a consequence of accelerated atherosclerosis. Molecular imaging techniques targeting activated macrophages, neovascularization, or increased cellular metabolic activity can represent effective means of non-invasive detection of vascular inflammation. In the present review, novel non-invasive imaging tools that have been successfully tested in humans will be presented. These include contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, which allows detection of neovessels within the wall of inflamed arteries; contrast-enhanced CV magnetic resonance that can detect increased thickness of the arterial wall, usually associated with edema, or mural enhancement using T2 and post-contrast T1-weighted sequences, respectively; and positron emission tomography associated with radio-tracers such as [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose and the new [11C]-PK11195 in combination with computed tomography angiography to detect activated macrophages within the vessel wall. Imaging techniques are useful in the diagnostic work-up of large- and medium-vessel vasculitides, to monitor disease activity and the response to treatments. Finally, molecular imaging targets can provide new clues about the pathogenesis and evolution of immune-mediated disorders involving arterial vessels. PMID:25183963

  18. The effect of prolonged perfusion with a membrane oxygenator (PPMO) on white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Bergman, P; Belboul, A; Friberg, L G; al-Khaja, N; Mellgren, G; Roberts, D

    1994-01-01

    Preserving the rheological properties of whole blood cells is vital for their smooth passage in the capillaries without causing blockage and disturbances in the microcirculation. To evaluate the effect of mechanical trauma on the rheology of white blood cells during prolonged perfusion with membrane oxygenation (PPMO), 16 in vitro experiments were conducted for 72 hours. The St George Carrimed Filtrometer was used to estimate the plasma white cell filtration rates (P-WFR). Also an in vitro estimation of the ability of individual cells to pass through capillaries, the white blood cell clogging rate (WBC-CR), the number of clogging particles (WBC-CP), the total white blood cell count (T-WBC) and two in vitro estimations to assess the effect of aggregates and stiff cells in blocking the microcirculation were performed. The traumatized white cells reduced their mean P-WFR by 37% +/- 9, 72% +/- 2 and 76% +/- 2 at 24, 48 and 72 hours respectively (p < 0.001). The mean WBC-CR was increased to 15.2 +/- 1.5, 32.6 +/- 2.2 and 40.3 +/- 8.3 x 10(2)%/ml at 24, 48 and 72 hours respectively (p < 0.001). The mean WBC-CP was increased to 6.6 +/- 1.5, 9.7 +/- 1.2 and 13.9 +/- 2.1 x 10(6)/ml at 24 hours (p < 0.05), 48 and 72 hours respectively (p < 0.001). The T-WBC was decreased to 55% +/- 0.3, 23% +/- 0.2 and 14% +/- 0.1 and 14% +/- 0.1 at 24, 48 and 72 hours respectively (p < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8161866

  19. Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rats for Prediction of the Fate of Grafted Kidneys from Cardiac Death Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Iwai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Masaki; Teratani, Takumi; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yokawa, Takashi; Kuroda, Kagayaki; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Okumi, Masayoshi; Yazawa, Koji; Rakugi, Hiromi; Nonomura, Norio; Takahara, Shiro; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess cardiac death (CD) kidney grafts before transplantation to determine whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and diffusion MRI techniques can predict damage to these grafts after transplantation. We assessed CD kidney tissue by BOLD and diffusion MRI. We also examined pathological and gene expression changes in CD kidney grafts before and after transplantation. Although there was significantly more red cell congestion (RCC) in the inner stripe of the outer medulla (IS) in both 1 h after cardiac death (CD1h) and CD2h kidneys destined for grafts before transplantation compared with CD0h (p<0.05), CD2h, but not CD1h, kidney grafts had significantly different RCC in the IS 2 days after transplantation (p<0.05). Consistent with these pathological findings, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) gene expression was increased only in the cortex and medulla of CD2h kidney grafts after transplantation. BOLD MRI successfully and non-invasively imaged and quantified RCC in the IS in both CD1h and CD2h kidney grafts (p<0.05). Diffusion MRI also non-invasively assessed increased the apparent diffusion coefficient in the IS and decreased it in the outer stripe (OS) of CD2h grafts, in concordance with interstitial edema in the IS and tubule cellular edema in the OS. These two types of edema in the outer medulla could explain the prolonged RCC in the IS only of CD2h kidney grafts, creating part of a vicious cycle inhibiting red cells coming out of capillary vessels in the IS. Perfusion with University of Wisconsin solution before MRI measurements did not diminish the difference in tissue damage between CD1h and CD2h kidney grafts. BOLD and diffusion MRI, which are readily available non-invasive tools for evaluating CD kidney grafts tissue damage, can predict prolonged organ damage, and therefore the outcome, of transplanted CD kidney grafts. PMID:23667641

  20. Non-invasive biosensor and wilreless interrogating system for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Saukesi, K.

    2002-11-01

    Hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease in blood sugar - is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This paper presents the development of a non-invasive sensor with miniaturized telemetry device in a wrist-watch for monitoring glucose concentration in blood. The sensor concept is based on optical chiralit of glucose level in the interstitial fluid. The wrist watch consists of a laser power source of the wavelength compatible with the glucose. A nanofilm with specific chirality is placed at the bottom of the watch. The light then passes through the film and illuminates a small area on the skin.It has been documented that there is certain concentration of sugar level is taken by the intertitial fluid from the blood stream and deposit a portion of it at the dead skin. The wrist-watch when in contact with the outer skin of the human will thus monitor the glucose concentration. A wireless monitoring system in the watch then downloads the data from the watch to a Palm or laptop computer.

  1. Reducing body fat with altitude hypoxia training in swimmers: role of blood perfusion to skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Michael; Liao, Chin-An; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Wen-Chih; Hou, Chien-Wen; Yu, Szu-Hsien; Harris, M Brennan; Hsu, Tung-Shiung; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-28

    Swimmers tend to have greater body fat than athletes from other sports. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in body composition after altitude hypoxia exposure and the role of blood distribution to the skeletal muscle in swimmers. With a constant training volume of 12.3 km/day, young male swimmers (N = 10, 14.8 ± 0.5 years) moved from sea-level to a higher altitude of 2,300 meters. Body composition was measured before and after translocation to altitude using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) along with 8 control male subjects who resided at sea level for the same period of time. To determine the effects of hypoxia on muscle blood perfusion, total hemoglobin concentration (THC) was traced by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the triceps and quadriceps muscles under glucose-ingested and insulin-secreted conditions during hypoxia exposure (16% O2) after training. While no change in body composition was found in the control group, subjects who trained at altitude had unequivocally decreased fat mass (-1.7 ± 0.3 kg, -11.4%) with increased lean mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 kg, +1.5%). Arterial oxygen saturation significantly decreased with increased plasma lactate during hypoxia recovery mimicking 2,300 meters at altitude (~93% versus ~97%). Intriguingly, hypoxia resulted in elevated muscle THC, and sympathetic nervous activities occurred in parallel with greater-percent oxygen saturation in both muscle groups. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that increased blood distribution to the skeletal muscle under postprandial condition may contribute to the reciprocally increased muscle mass and decreased body mass after a 3-week altitude exposure in swimmers. PMID:23347012

  2. Compact Laser Doppler Flowmeter (LDF) Fundus Camera for the Assessment of Retinal Blood Perfusion in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Christophe; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Amoos, Serge; Loeuillet, Corinne; Bernabei, Mario; Geiser, Martial

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive techniques for ocular blood perfusion assessment are of crucial importance for exploring microvascular alterations related to systemic and ocular diseases. However, few techniques adapted to rodents are available and most are invasive or not specifically focused on the optic nerve head (ONH), choroid or retinal circulation. Here we present the results obtained with a new rodent-adapted compact fundus camera based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Methods A confocal miniature flowmeter was fixed to a specially designed 3D rotating mechanical arm and adjusted on a rodent stereotaxic table in order to accurately point the laser beam at the retinal region of interest. The linearity of the LDF measurements was assessed using a rotating Teflon wheel and a flow of microspheres in a glass capillary. In vivo reproducibility was assessed in Wistar rats with repeated measurements (inter-session and inter-day) of retinal arteries and ONH blood velocity in six and ten rats, respectively. These parameters were also recorded during an acute intraocular pressure increase to 150 mmHg and after heart arrest (n = 5 rats). Results The perfusion measurements showed perfect linearity between LDF velocity and Teflon wheel or microsphere speed. Intraclass correlation coefficients for retinal arteries and ONH velocity (0.82 and 0.86, respectively) indicated strong inter-session repeatability and stability. Inter-day reproducibility was good (0.79 and 0.7, respectively). Upon ocular blood flow cessation, the retinal artery velocity signal substantially decreased, whereas the ONH signal did not significantly vary, suggesting that it could mostly be attributed to tissue light scattering. Conclusion We have demonstrated that, while not adapted for ONH blood perfusion assessment, this device allows pertinent, stable and repeatable measurements of retinal blood perfusion in rats. PMID:26226150

  3. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  4. Tissue Damage Characterization Using Non-invasive Optical Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David

    The ability to determine the degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is essential for proper wound assessment and a significant factor for determining patient treatment and morbidity. Accurate characterization of tissue damage is critical for a number of medical applications including surgical removal of nonviable tissue, severity assessment of subcutaneous ulcers, and depth assessment of visually open wounds. The main objective of this research was to develop a non-invasive method for identifying the extent of tissue damage underneath intact skin that is not apparent upon visual examination. This work investigated the relationship between tissue optical properties, blood flow, and tissue viability by testing the hypotheses that (a) changes in tissue oxygenation and/or microcirculatory blood flow measurable by Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) differ between healthy and damaged tissue and (b) the magnitude of those changes differs for different degrees of tissue damage. This was accomplished by developing and validating a procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation dynamics at multiple depths (up to 1 centimeter) using non-invasive DCS and DNIRS technologies. Due to the lack of pressure ulcer animal models that are compatible with our optical systems, a proof of concept was conducted in a porcine burn model prior to conducting clinical trials in order to assess the efficacy of the system in-vivo. A reduction in total hemoglobin was observed for superficial (5%) and deep burns (35%) along with a statistically significant difference between the optical properties of superficial and deep burns (p < 0.05). Burn depth and viable vessel density were estimated via histological samples. 42% of vessels in the dermal layer were viable for superficial burns, compared to 25% for deep burns. The differences detected in optical properties and hemoglobin content by optical measurements

  5. [The effect of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ozyılmaz, Ezgi; Kaya, Akın

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative respiratory failure is related with the highest mortality and morbidity among all perioperative complications. The most common underlying mechanism of postoperative respiratory failure is the development of atelectasis. Anaesthesia, medications which cause respiratory depression, high FiO2 use, postoperative pain and disruption of muscle forces due to surgery leads to decrease in functional residual capacity and results in atelectasis formation. Atelectasis causes severe hypoxemia due to ventilation, perfusion mismatch, shunt and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Intrathoracic positive pressure is an effective therapeutic option in both prevention and treatment of atelectasis. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is related with a lower mortality and morbidity rate due to lack of any potential complication risks of endotracheal intubation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation can be applied as prophylactic or curative. Both of these techniques are related with lower reintubation rates, nosocomial infections, duration of hospitalization and mortality in patients with postoperative respiratory failure. The differences of this therapy from standard application and potential complications should be well known in order to improve prognosis in these group of patients. The primary aim of this review is to underline the pathogenesis of postoperative respiratory failure. The secondary aim is to clarify the optimum method, effect and complications of non-invasive mechanical ventilation therapy under the light of the studies which was performed in specific patient groups. PMID:22779943

  6. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  7. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. PMID:16306271

  8. CT perfusion cerebral blood volume does not always predict infarct core in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    d'Esterre, Christopher D; Roversi, Gloria; Padroni, Marina; Bernardoni, Andrea; Tamborino, Carmine; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Marcello, Onofrio; Saletti, Andrea; Ceruti, Stefano; Lee, Ting Yim; Fainardi, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the practical clinical utility of the CT perfusion (CTP) cerebral blood volume (CBV) parameter for differentiating salvageable from non-salvageable tissue in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Fifty-five patients with AIS were imaged within 6 h from onset using CTP. Admission CBV defect (CBVD) volume was outlined using previously established gray and white matter CBV thresholds for infarct core. Admission cerebral blood flow (CBF) hypoperfusion and CBF/CBV mismatch were visually evaluated. Truncation of the ischemic time-density curve (ITDC) and hypervolemia status at admission, recanalization at 24-h CT angiography, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) at 24 h and/or 7-day non-contrast CT (NCCT), final infarct volume as indicated by 3-month NCCT defect (NCCTD) and 3-month modified Rankin Score were determined. Patients with recanalization and no truncation had the highest correlation (R = 0.81) and regression slope (0.80) between CBVD and NCCTD. Regression slopes were close to zero for patients with admission hypervolemia with/without recanalization. Hypervolemia underestimated (p = 0.02), while recanalization and ITDC truncation overestimated (p = 0.03) the NCCTD. Among patients with confirmed recanalization at 24 h, 38 % patients had an admission CBF/CBV mismatch within normal appearing areas on respective NCCT. 83 % of these patients developed infarction in admission hypervolemic CBF/CBV mismatch tissue. A reduction in CBV is a valuable predictor of infarct core when the acquisition of ITDC data is complete and hypervolemia is absent within the tissue destined to infarct. Raised or normal CBV is not always indicative of salvageable tissue, contrary to the current definition of penumbra. PMID:25981225

  9. Transient finite element analysis of thermal methods used to estimate SAR and blood flow in homogeneously and nonhomogeneously perfused tumour models.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Z; Mechling, J A; Jones, E L; Strohbehn, J W

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent finite element model was developed to evaluate thermal techniques for estimating blood flow and specific absorption rate (SAR). In these computer simulations, homogeneously and nonhomogeneously perfused tumour models were heated by a 915 MHz interstitial microwave antenna array. Representative blood flow values were assigned within the tumour, and the applied SAR distribution was based on a previously developed antenna theory. SAR values were estimated from the power-on transient temperatures, and blood flow values were estimated from thermal clearance data after power was discontinued. These estimated parameters were then compared to the known 'true' blood flow and SAR values throughout the treatment region. SAR values could be predicted with reasonable accuracy throughout most of the heated region independent of local blood flow. For a homogeneous model, thermal clearance was found to yield reasonably accurate blood flow estimates at high perfusion rates and less accurate estimates at lower perfusion rates. However, for the inhomogeneous model, the blood perfusion estimates were generally poor, and an average blood flow value for the tumour was obtained with little ability to resolve the differences in perfusion between regions. Using temperatures observed early in the cool-down curve resulted in improved spatial resolution, but increased the contribution of thermal conduction to the blood flow estimates. A single time-constant exponential thermal decay curve was found to be a necessary but not sufficient condition for reliable blood flow estimates using this technique. PMID:3171254

  10. The roadmap for estimation of cell-type-specific neuronal activity from non-invasive measurements.

    PubMed

    Uhlirova, Hana; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Tian, Peifang; Sakadžić, Sava; Gagnon, Louis; Thunemann, Martin; Desjardins, Michèle; Saisan, Payam A; Nizar, Krystal; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Hagler, Donald J; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Silva, Gabriel A; Masliah, Eliezer; Kleinfeld, David; Vinogradov, Sergei; Buxton, Richard B; Einevoll, Gaute T; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The computational properties of the human brain arise from an intricate interplay between billions of neurons connected in complex networks. However, our ability to study these networks in healthy human brain is limited by the necessity to use non-invasive technologies. This is in contrast to animal models where a rich, detailed view of cellular-level brain function with cell-type-specific molecular identity has become available due to recent advances in microscopic optical imaging and genetics. Thus, a central challenge facing neuroscience today is leveraging these mechanistic insights from animal studies to accurately draw physiological inferences from non-invasive signals in humans. On the essential path towards this goal is the development of a detailed 'bottom-up' forward model bridging neuronal activity at the level of cell-type-specific populations to non-invasive imaging signals. The general idea is that specific neuronal cell types have identifiable signatures in the way they drive changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (measurable with quantitative functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and electrical currents/potentials (measurable with magneto/electroencephalography). This forward model would then provide the 'ground truth' for the development of new tools for tackling the inverse problem-estimation of neuronal activity from multimodal non-invasive imaging data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574309

  11. Non-Invasive Assessment of Liver Function

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Steve; Colmenero, Jordi; Everson, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review It is our opinion that there is an unmet need in Hepatology for a minimally- or noninvasive test of liver function and physiology. Quantitative liver function tests (QLFTs) define the severity and prognosis of liver disease by measuring the clearance of substrates whose uptake or metabolism is dependent upon liver perfusion or hepatocyte function. Substrates with high affinity hepatic transporters exhibit high “first-pass” hepatic extraction and their clearance measures hepatic perfusion. In contrast, substrates metabolized by the liver have low first-pass extraction and their clearance measures specific drug metabolizing pathways. Recent Findings We highlight one QLFT, the dual cholate test, and introduce the concept of a disease severity index (DSI) linked to clinical outcome that quantifies the simultaneous processes of hepatocyte uptake, clearance from the systemic circulation, clearance from the portal circulation, and portal-systemic shunting. Summary It is our opinion that dual cholate is a relevant test for defining disease severity, monitoring the natural course of disease progression, and quantifying the response to therapy. PMID:25714706

  12. Effects of thromboxane A2 analogue on vascular resistance distribution and permeability in isolated blood-perfused dog lungs.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, T; Wang, H G; Yamaguchi, Y; Hayashi, T; Saeki, Y; Tanaka, S; Koyama, S

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) on the distribution of vascular resistance, lung weight, and microvascular permeability in isolated dog lungs perfused at a constant pressure with autologous blood. The stable TxA2 analogue (STA2; 30 micrograms, n = 5) caused an increase in pulmonary capillary pressure (Pc) assessed as double-occlusion pressure to 14.0 +/- 0.4 mmHg from the baseline of 7.9 +/- 0.3 mmHg with progressive lung weight gain. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased threefold exclusively due to pulmonary venoconstriction. Pulmonary venoconstriction was confirmed in lungs perfused in a reverse direction from the pulmonary vein to the artery (n = 5), as evidenced by marked precapillary vasoconstriction and a sustained lung weight loss. Furthermore, in lungs perfused at a constant blood flow (n = 5), STA2 also caused selective pulmonary venoconstriction. Vascular permeability measured by the capillary filtration coefficient and the isogravimetric Pc at 30 and 60 min after STA2 infusion did not change significantly from baseline in any lungs studied. Moreover, elevation of Pc by raising the venous reservoir of the intact lobes (n = 5) to the same level as the STA2 lungs caused a greater or similar weight gain compared with the STA2 lungs. Thus, we conclude that TxA2 constricts selectively the pulmonary vein resulting in an increase in Pc and lung weight gain without significant changes in vascular permeability in isolated blood-perfused dog lungs. PMID:7564480

  13. Non invasive monitoring in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Subu, Awni M; Rehder, Kyle J; Cheifetz, Ira M; Turner, David A

    2014-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary monitoring is a key component in the evaluation and management of critically ill patients. Clinicians typically rely on a combination of invasive and non-invasive monitoring to assess cardiac output and adequacy of ventilation. Recent technological advances have led to the introduction: of continuous non-invasive monitors that allow for data to be obtained at the bedside of critically ill patients. These advances help to identify hemodynamic changes and allow for interventions before complications occur. In this manuscript, we highlight several important methods of non-invasive cardiopulmonary monitoring, including capnography, transcutaneous monitoring, pulse oximetry, and near infrared spectroscopy. PMID:25119483

  14. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Péclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Péclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction IT of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio IN of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters ITand IN but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged.

  15. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  16. Improving non-invasive ventilation documentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew; Elkheir, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Record keeping for patients on non-invasive ventilation (NIV) at St. Georges Hospital is poor. The initial NIV prescription is often not recorded, and changes to the NIV prescription or the rationale for the changes (ABG results) are also poorly documented. This leads to confusion for nurses/doctors as to what the correct settings are, meaning patients could receive ineffective ventilation. The use of NIV is also poorly recorded by nursing staff meaning that doctors are unsure if the prescribed NIV is being achieved. This can lead to treatment being escalated unnecessarily in the event of treatment failure. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is the provision of ventilatory support in the form of positive pressure via the patient's upper airway using a mask or similar device. NIV is indicated for treatment of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, of which there are many causes, though COPD is the indication in up to 70% of cases.[1] British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines for NIV suggest that the rationale for commencing a patient on NIV and the proposed settings should be clearly documented.[2] Clinicians cannot effectively tailor changes to the patients NIV settings if this information is not clearly recorded, which could lead to increased time requiring NIV or NIV failure. Three main areas were considered important to measure for this project. The initial prescription of the NIV, changes to the NIV settings, and nursing documentation surrounding NIV. A baseline measurement of NIV documentation for two weeks found NIV documentation to globally very poor. NIV was formally prescribed 29% of the time, full detail of intended settings were documented 57% of the time, the decision to commence NIV was discussed with the respiratory consultant/SpR just 29% of the time and on no occasion was a decision regarding escalation of treatment recorded. Eighteen changes were made to the NIV settings. These were formally prescribed 22% of the time and detail of the intended

  17. Non-invasive Renal Denervation: Update on External Ultrasound Approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Ott, Christian; Bramlage, Peter

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, intravenous renal denervation (RDN) has emerged as an alternative to pharmacological treatment in patients with resistant hypertension, but currently involves an invasive and technically challenging procedure. The Surround Sound™ system utilises externally delivered ultrasound to achieve RDN using a completely non-invasive, automated real-time tracking system coupled with a therapeutic delivery module thereby addressing these limitations. A brief history, technical overview and summary of preclinical and clinical studies of the KonaMedical Surround Sound™ system are presented. A literature search using the terms "renal denervation", "resistant hypertension" and "external ultrasound" was performed using PubMed, and references retrieved were selected based on relevancy and year of publication (date range 1991-2015). The Surround Sound™ system appears to be a promising approach to RDN which eliminates several of the factors currently limiting the intravenous approach. So far, it has demonstrated efficacy for reducing blood pressure in resistant hypertension patients with minimal adverse effects. Several double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trials are currently underway to confirm the validity of these findings. PMID:27137523

  18. Public viewpoints on new non-invasive prenatal genetic tests.

    PubMed

    Farrimond, Hannah R; Kelly, Susan E

    2013-08-01

    Prenatal screening programmes have been critiqued for their routine implementation according to clinical rationale without public debate. A new approach, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD), promises diagnosis of fetal genetic disorders from a sample of maternal blood without the miscarriage risk of current invasive prenatal tests (e.g. amniocentesis). Little research has investigated the attitudes of wider publics to NIPD. This study used Q-methodology, which combines factor analysis with qualitative comments, to identify four distinct "viewpoints" amongst 71 UK men and women: 1. NIPD as a new tool in the ongoing societal discrimination against the disabled; 2. NIPD as a positive clinical application offering peace of mind in pregnancy; 3. NIPD as a medical option justified for severe disorders only; and 4. NIPD as a valid expansion of personal choice. Concerns included the "trivialisation of testing" and the implications of commercial/direct-to-consumer tests. Q-methodology has considerable potential to identify viewpoints and frame public debate about new technologies. PMID:23885055

  19. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  20. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  1. Modern non-invasive mechanical ventilation turns 25.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-11-01

    The history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation goes back more than 100 years, but it was not until 1987 when what we could call "modern" non-invasive mechanical ventilation was developed. The description of Delaubier and Rideau of a patient with Duchenne's disease who had been effectively ventilated through a nasal mask marked the start of a new era in the history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Over these last 25years, we have witnessed exponential growth in its use, field of activity and technological advances on an exciting fast-paced track. We believe that it is time to review the main milestones that have marked the development of non-invasive mechanical ventilation to date, while paying homage to this therapeutic method that has contributed so much to the advancement of respiratory medicine in the last 25years. PMID:23347549

  2. Paradox: increased blood perfusion to the face enhances protection against frostbite while it lowers wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    A model of facial heat exchange in cold and windy environments is presented. The tissue is depicted as a hollow cylinder and the model includes heat conduction and heat transport by blood circulation from the warmer core. A steady-state solution facilitating the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) as a function of the effective wind velocity, air temperature and blood perfusion rate was obtained. The results quantify and demonstrate the elevation of skin temperatures caused by increased flow of warmer blood from the inner core to the face. Elevated facial temperatures, while enhancing protection against frostbite and other cold-related injuries, also increase heat loss to the colder environment. Paradoxically, such elevated facial temperatures cause WCETs, as estimated by the prevailing definition, to attain lower rather than higher values, indicating, in fact, increased risk of frostbite. The results of this study should be useful in understanding and quantifying the effects of blood perfusion in protection against cold-related injuries. They should also be considered in the re-evaluation and re-formulation of the concept of wind chill, which has been a useful cold weather indicator for decades. PMID:17333290

  3. Paradox: increased blood perfusion to the face enhances protection against frostbite while it lowers wind chill equivalent temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    A model of facial heat exchange in cold and windy environments is presented. The tissue is depicted as a hollow cylinder and the model includes heat conduction and heat transport by blood circulation from the warmer core. A steady-state solution facilitating the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) as a function of the effective wind velocity, air temperature and blood perfusion rate was obtained. The results quantify and demonstrate the elevation of skin temperatures caused by increased flow of warmer blood from the inner core to the face. Elevated facial temperatures, while enhancing protection against frostbite and other cold-related injuries, also increase heat loss to the colder environment. Paradoxically, such elevated facial temperatures cause WCETs, as estimated by the prevailing definition, to attain lower rather than higher values, indicating, in fact, increased risk of frostbite. The results of this study should be useful in understanding and quantifying the effects of blood perfusion in protection against cold-related injuries. They should also be considered in the re-evaluation and re-formulation of the concept of wind chill, which has been a useful cold weather indicator for decades.

  4. A computer controlled non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring system.

    PubMed

    McMenemin, I M; Kenny, G N

    1988-10-01

    A system for the non-invasive monitoring, recording and storing haemodynamic indices has been developed using an Apple II microcomputer, a Dinamap automatic arterial pressure monitor and a non-invasive cardiac output monitor based on bio-electrical impedance. This system was used during the induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Numerical and graphical displays of heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance are available. A print-out of data can be produced for later analysis. PMID:3190976

  5. Variability in platelet responses to collagen--comparison between whole blood perfusions, traditional platelet function tests and PFA-100.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, A; Beer, J H; Siljander, P; Syrjälä, M; Lassila, R

    2001-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the results obtained in platelet function tests and whole blood perfusions are associated with those in platelet function analyser (PFA)-100. We used collagen type I monomers and fibrils to analyse the distinct roles of glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa and other collagen receptors in flowing blood under a high shear rate (1600/s) and in aggregation studies. Also, anticoagulation [citrate vs. D-phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1 arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK)] was varied to enhance the functions of GP Ia/IIa, since it has been shown that the cation-poor environment of citrated blood impairs GP Ia/IIa-dependent platelet recruitment. Large interindividual variability (45-fold) was detected in deposition of platelets in whole blood perfusions over collagen monomers, whereas this variation was only fourfold in fibrils. In PFA, this variation was reduced to 2.5-fold. However, platelet deposition on monomers is associated with epinephrine-enhanced PFA (r=-.49, P<.03), whereas platelet deposition on fibrils is correlated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-enhanced PFA (r=-.47, P<.05), suggesting a distinct synergism between epinephrine and monomers (GP Ia/IIa) as well as ADP with fibrils (other collagen receptors). Donors with 807 C/C polymorphism of GP Ia (n=14) had longer lag phase in aggregation experiments compared with C/T (n=7) both by monomers and fibrils (P<.04), but these polymorphisms with their mild impact on GP Ia/IIa activity did not markedly differ in other tests. In conclusion, the results obtained in perfusion studies and PFA experiments correlated, but PFA fails to reveal the large-scale variability related to collagen-induced platelet responses. PMID:11457470

  6. Cortical perfusion index: A predictor of acute rejection in transplanted kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.; Oster, Z.H.; Anaise, D.; Wein, S.; Waltzer, W.; Gonder, A.; Cooch, E.; Rapaport, F.T.

    1985-05-01

    The presently available non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of acute rejection crisis (ARC) of renal transplants are not satisfactory. However, the need for such a test is of paramount clinical importance. A prospective study of 74 post-transplantation events in renal allograft recipients was performed. Clinical, surgical exploration and biopsy data were correlated with TC-99m DTPA scintigraphy using the following indices: Global perfusion index (GPI), cortical perfusion index (CPI), medullary perfusion index (MPI), the peak-to-plateau ratio (P/P), iliac artery peak to renal peak time (delta-P) and washout half-time (T1/2). Of the 74 events, 24 were proven to be due to acute rejection crisis (ARC), 13 were of ureteral obstruction, 18 various nephropathies and 19 in stable renal transplant function. The P/P, delta-P and T1/2 were not good predictors of ARC; the sensitivity was 79%, 79% and 80% respectively. The sensitivity of the GPI was 58% and the specificity was 87%. The cortical perfusion index rated better: specificity=84% and sensitivity=87%. However, the best indicator of ARC seemed to be the percent increase in cortical perfusion index over previous values obtained during stable graft function. Thus the sensitivity was found to be 91% and specificity was 96%. The difference between global and cortical perfusion indices reflects shunting of blood for cortex to medulla. This study suggest that the cortical perfusion index (CPI) and the percent increase in CPI can be used to non-invasively diagnose acute renal allograft rejection.

  7. Abolished ventilation and perfusion of lung caused by blood clot in the left main bronchus: auto-downregulation of pulmonary arterial blood supply.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, P; Bergmann, A; Henriksen, J H

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the lungs possess arterial autoregulation associated with bronchial obstruction. A patient with pneumonia and congestive heart failure unexpectedly developed frequent haemoptysis. High-resolution CT and diagnostic CT were performed as well as ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy with single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT. V/Q SPECT/CT demonstrated abolished ventilation due to obstruction of the left main bronchus and markedly reduced perfusion of the entire left lung, a condition that was completely reversed after removal of a blood clot. We present the first pictorially documented case of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and flow shift in a main pulmonary artery due to a complete intrinsic obstruction of the ipsilateral main bronchus. The condition is reversible, contingent on being relieved within a few days. PMID:26374773

  8. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)(-1), cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min(-1)). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This

  9. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)-1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min-1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that

  10. Inosculation of blood vessels allows early perfusion and vitality of bladder grafts--implications for bioengineered bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Stephanie L; So, Michelle; Hambro, Shannon; Nolta, Jan A; Kurzrock, Eric A

    2015-06-01

    Bioengineered bladder tissue is needed for patients with neurogenic bladder disease as well as for cancer. Current technologies in bladder tissue engineering have been hampered by an inability to efficiently initiate blood supply to the graft, ultimately leading to complications that include graft contraction, ischemia, and perforation. To date, the biological mechanisms of vascularization on transplant have not been suitably investigated for urologic tissues. To better understand the mechanisms of neovascularization on bladder wall transplant, a chimeric mouse model was generated such that angiogenesis and vasculogenesis could be independently assessed in vivo. Green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic mice received bone marrow transplants from β-galactosidase (LacZ) transgenic animals and then subsequent bladder wall transplants from wild-type donor mice. Before euthanization, the aorta was infused with fluorescent microbeads (fluorospheres) to identify perfused vessels. The contributions of GFP (angiogenesis) and LacZ (vasculogenesis) to the formation of CD31-expressing blood vessels within the wild-type graft were evaluated by immunohistochemistry at different time points and locations within the graft (proximal, middle, and distal) to provide a spatiotemporal analysis of neovascularization. The GFP index, a measure of angiogenic host ingrowth, was significantly higher at proximal versus mid or distal regions in animals 2-16 weeks post-transplant. However, GFP index did not increase over time in any area. Within 7 days post-transplant, perfusion of primarily wild-type, donor blood vessels in the most distal areas of the graft was observed by intraluminal fluorospheres. In addition, chimeric host-donor (GFP-wild type) blood vessels were evident in proximal areas. The contribution of vasculogenesis to vascularization of the graft was limited, as LacZ cells were not specifically associated with the endothelial cells of blood vessels, but rather found primarily

  11. Modeling of a three-source perfusion and blood oxygenation sensor for transplant monitoring using multilayer Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Lee, Seungjoon; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2004-06-01

    A Multi-Layer Monte Carlo (MLMC) model was developed to predict the results of in vivo blood perfusion and oxygenation measurement of transplanted organs as measured by an indwelling optical sensor. A sensor has been developed which uses three-source excitation in the red and infrared ranges (660, 810, 940 nm). In vitro data was taken using this sensor by changing the oxygenation state of whole blood and passing it through a single-tube pump system wrapped in bovine liver tissue. The collected data showed that the red signal increased as blood oxygenation increased and infrared signal decreased. The center wavelength of 810 nanometers was shown to be quite indifferent to blood oxygenation change. A model was developed using MLMC code that sampled the wavelength range from 600-1000 nanometers every 6 nanometers. Using scattering and absorption data for blood and liver tissue within this wavelength range, a five-layer model was developed (tissue, clear tubing, blood, clear tubing, tissue). The theoretical data generated from this model was compared to the in vitro data and showed good correlation with changing blood oxygenation.

  12. Dynamic subcortical blood flow during male sexual activity with ecological validity: a perfusion fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Janniko R; Farrell, Michael J; Boessen, Ruud; Denton, Derek A; Gavrilescu, Maria; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Egan, Gary F

    2010-03-01

    This study used arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to measure brain perfusion in a group of healthy men under conditions that closely resembled customary sexual behavior. Serial perfusion measures for 30 min during two self-limited periods of partnered penis stimulation, and during post-stimulatory periods, revealed novel sexual activity-related cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes, mainly in subcortical parts of the brain. Ventral pallidum rCBF was highest during the onset of penile erection, and lowest after the termination of penis stimulation. The perceived level of sexual arousal showed the strongest positive association with rCBF in the right basal forebrain. In addition, our results demonstrate that distinct subregions of the hypothalamus and cingulate cortex subserve opposite functions during human male sexual behavior. The lateral hypothalamus and anterior part of the middle cingulate cortex showed increased rCBF correlated with penile erection. By contrast, the anteroventral hypothalamus and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex exhibited rCBF changes correlated with penile detumescence after penile stimulation. Continuous rapid and high-resolution brain perfusion imaging during normal sexual activity has provided novel insights into the central mechanisms that control male sexual arousal. PMID:20006720

  13. Non-invasive imaging of allogeneic transplanted skin graft by 131I-anti-TLR5 mAb.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Yang, Guangjie; Liang, Ting; Zhang, Chao; Song, Jing; Han, Jiankui; Hou, Guihua

    2014-12-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake can be used for the non-invasive detection and monitoring of allograft rejection by activated leucocytes, this non-specific accumulation is easily impaired by immunosuppressants. Our aim was to evaluate a (131)I-radiolabelled anti-Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) mAb for non-invasive in vivo graft visualization and quantification in allogeneic transplantation mice model, compared with the non-specific radiotracer (18)F-FDG under using of immunosuppressant. Labelling, binding, and stability studies were performed. BALB/c mice transplanted with C57BL/6 skin grafts, with or without rapamycin treatment (named as allo-treated group or allo-rejection group), were injected with (131)I-anti-TLR5 mAb, (18)F-FDG, or mouse isotype (131)I-IgG, respectively. Whole-body phosphor-autoradiography and ex vivo biodistribution studies were obtained. Whole-body phosphor-autoradiography showed (131)I-anti-TLR5 mAb uptake into organs that were well perfused with blood at 1 hr and showed clear graft images from 12 hrs onwards. The (131)I-anti-TLR5 mAb had significantly higher graft uptake and target-to-non-target ratio in the allo-treated group, as determined by semi-quantification of phosphor-autoradiography images; these results were consistent with ex vivo biodistribution studies. However, high (18)F-FDG uptake was not observed in the allo-treated group. The highest allograft-skin-to-native-skin ratio (A:N) of (131)I-anti-TLR5 mAb uptake was significantly higher than the ratio for (18)F-FDG (7.68 versus 1.16, respectively). (131)I-anti-TLR5 mAb uptake in the grafts significantly correlated with TLR5 expression in the allograft area. The accumulation of (131)I-IgG was comparable in both groups. We conclude that radiolabelled anti-TLR5 mAb is capable of detecting allograft with high target specificity after treatment with the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin. PMID:25283154

  14. State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Spain: Invasive and Non-Invasive Techniques for Monitoring Respiratory Variables

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Christian; Blanch, Lluis; Murias, Gaston; Luján, Manel

    2010-01-01

    The interest in measuring physiological parameters (especially arterial blood gases) has grown progressively in parallel to the development of new technologies. Physiological parameters were first measured invasively and at discrete time points; however, it was clearly desirable to measure them continuously and non-invasively. The development of intensive care units promoted the use of ventilators via oral intubation ventilators via oral intubation and mechanical respiratory variables were progressively studied. Later, the knowledge gained in the hospital was applied to out-of-hospital management. In the present paper we review the invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables. PMID:22399898

  15. Photometric sensor system for a non-invasive real-time hemoglobin monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Kraitl, Jens; Schnurstein, Kirstin; Ewald, Hartmut

    2013-03-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is an important component of red blood cells. The primary function of Hb is the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the tissue and carbon dioxide back to the lungs. The Hb concentration in human blood is an important parameter in evaluating the physiological status of an individual and an essential parameter in every blood count. Invasive methods are used to measure the Hb concentration, whereby blood is taken from the patient and subsequently analyzed. Apart from the discomfort of drawing blood samples, an added disadvantage of this method is the delay between the blood collection and its analysis, which does not allow real time patient monitoring in critical situations. A non-invasive method allows pain free continuous on-line patient monitoring with minimum risk of infection and facilitates real time data monitoring allowing immediate clinical reaction to the measured data.

  16. Non-invasive Thrombolysis using Microtripsy: A Parameter Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Jin, Lifang; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Owens, Gabe E.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue by well-controlled acoustic cavitation using microsecond-long, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. The feasibility of using histotripsy as a non-invasive, drug-free, and image-guided thrombolysis method has been shown previously. A new histotripsy approach, termed Microtripsy, has recently been investigated for the thrombolysis application to improve treatment accuracy and avoid potential vessel damage. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulse repetition frequency (PRF) on microtripsy thrombolysis. Microtripsy thrombolysis treatments using different PRFs (5, 50, and 100 Hz) and doses (20, 50, and 100 pulses) were performed on blood clots in an in vitro vessel flow model. To quantitatively evaluate the microtripsy thrombolysis effect, the location of focal cavitation, the incident rate of pre-focal cavitation on the vessel wall, the size and location of the resulting flow channel, and the generated clot debris particles were measured. The results demonstrated that focal cavitation was always well-confined in the vessel lumen without contacting the vessel wall for all PRFs. Pre-focal cavitation on the front vessel wall was never observed at 5Hz PRF, but occasionally observed at PRFs of 50 Hz (1.2%) and 100 Hz (5.4%). However, the observed pre-focal cavitation was weak and didn’t significantly impact the focal cavitation. Results further demonstrated that, although the extent of clot fractionation per pulse was the highest at 5 Hz PRF at the beginning of treatment (<20 pulses), 100 Hz PRF generated the largest flow channels with a much shorter treatment time. Finally, results showed fewer large debris particles were generated at a higher PRF. Overall, the results of this study suggest that a higher PRF (50 or 100 Hz) may be a better choice for microtripsy thrombolysis to use clinically due to the larger resulting flow channel, shorter treatment time, and smaller debris particles. PMID:26670850

  17. Non-invasive measurements of tissue hemodynamics with hybrid diffuse optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut

    Diffuse optical techniques were used to measure hemodynamics of tissues non-invasively. Spectroscopy and tomography of the brain, muscle and implanted tumors were carried out in animal models and humans. Two qualitatively different methods, diffuse optical tomography and diffuse correlation tomography, were hybridized permitting simultaneous measurement of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation and blood flow. This combination of information was processed further to derive estimates of oxygen metabolism (e.g. CMRO 2) in tissue. The diffuse correlation measurements of blood flow were demonstrated in human tissues, for the first time, demonstrating continous, non-invasive imaging of oxygen metabolism in large tissue volumes several centimeters below the tissue surface. The bulk of these investigations focussed on cerebral hemodynamics. Extensive validation of this methodology was carried out in in vivo rat brain models. Three dimensional images of deep tissue hemodynamics in middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression (CSD) were obtained. CSD hemodynamics were found to depend strongly on partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The technique was then adapted for measurement of human brain. All optical spectroscopic measurements of CMRO2 during functional activation were obtained through intact human skull non-invasively. Finally, a high spatio-temporal resolution measurement of cerebral blood flow due to somatosensory cortex activation following electrical forepaw stimulation in rats was carried out with laser speckle flowmetry. New analysis methods were introduced for laser speckle flowmetry. In other organs, deep tissue hemodynamics were measured on human calf muscle during exercise and cuff-ischemia and were shown to have some clinical utility for peripheral vascular disease. In mice tumor models, the measured hemodynamics were shown to be predictive of photodynamic therapy efficacy, again suggesting promise of clinical utility

  18. Evidence of an association between cardiac-locomotor synchronization and lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Shinta; Nishida, Yusuke; Mizushima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the occurrence of cardiac-locomotor synchronization (CLS) improves lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy men were studied while performing two treadmill protocols. The CLS protocol involved subjects walking at the frequency of their heart rate (HR) to induce CLS. The free protocol (reference) involved subjects walking at a self-selected cadence. The treadmill load was identical in the two protocols. Electrocardiographic signals for HR, foot switch signals for step rate and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals for total haemoglobin (total Hb) in the lower leg muscles were measured continuously for 10 min after HR reached a steady state. [Results] The mean HR and mean step rate did not differ between the CLS and free protocols. However, total Hb was significantly higher in the CLS protocol than in the free protocol. The rate of increase in total Hb positively correlated with the strength of CLS. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the occurrence of CLS enhances lower leg muscle blood perfusion by increasing the strength of CLS during walking. PMID:26180328

  19. Investigation of Hepatic Blood Perfusion by Laser Speckle Imaging and Changes of Hepatic Vasoactive Substances in Mice after Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiao-jing; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shu-you; Li, Shun-yue

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on hepatic blood perfusion (HBP) and vascular regulation. We investigated 60 male anesthetized mice under the following 3 conditions: without EA stimulation (control group); EA stimulation at Zusanli (ST36 group); EA stimulation at nonacupoint (NA group) during 30 min. The HBP was measured using the laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI). The level of nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and noradrenaline (NE) in liver tissue was detected by biochemical methods. Results were as follows. At each time point, HBP increase in ST36 group was higher than that in the NA group in anesthetized mice. HBP gradually decreased during 30 min in control group. The level of NO in ST36 group was higher than that in NA group. The level of both ET-1 and NE was the highest in control group, followed by NA group and ST36 group. It is concluded that EA at ST36 could increase HBP possibly by increasing the blood flow velocity (BFV), changing vascular activity, increasing the level of NO, and inhibiting the level of ET-1 in liver tissue. PMID:25140188

  20. Potential of optical microangiography to monitor cerebral blood perfusion and vascular plasticity following traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Alkayed, Nabil; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-07-01

    Optical microanglography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging modality capable of volumetric imaging of dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, with an imaging depth up to 2.00 mm beneath the tissue surface. We report the use of OMAG to monitor the cerebral blood flow (CBF) over the cortex of mouse brain upon traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the cranium left intact, for a period of two weeks on the same animal. We show the ability of OMAG to repeatedly image 3-D cerebral vasculatures during pre- and post-traumatic phases, and to visualize the changes of regulated CBF and the vascular plasticity after TBI. The results indicate the potential of OMAG to explore the mechanism involved in the rehabilitation of TBI.

  1. Non-invasive, external ultrasonic lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kyle M; Coleman, William P; Benchetrit, Arie

    2009-12-01

    Numerous nonsurgical techniques and devices have sought to reproduce the effectiveness of liposuction. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these has fallen short of adequate results or has been plagued with complications. UltraShape (UltraShape; Yoqneam, Israel) is a device that is able to accomplish the reduction of the subcutaneous fat with a procedure that is both comfortable and leads to good patient satisfaction. Its design of a nonthermal ultrasonic energy is able to produce cavitation leading to fat cell lysis while sparing adjacent blood vessels and nerves. Although the results are not equivalent to surgical results, this device will offer a safe and effective alternative for patients who are apprehensive about undergoing liposuction. PMID:20123426

  2. Blood Pressure is Associated With Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations in Patients With T2DM as Revealed by Perfusion Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenqing; Rao, Hengyi; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension are both associated with cognitive impairment and brain function abnormalities. We investigated whether abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) patterns exists in T2DM patients and possible relationships between aberrant CBF and cognitive performance. Furthermore, we examined the influence of hypertension on CBF alterations in T2DM patients. T2DM patients (n = 38) and non-T2DM subjects (n = 40) were recruited from clinics, hospitals, and normal community health screenings. Cerebral blood flow images were collected and analyzed using arterial spin labeling perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regions with major CBF differences between T2DM patients and non-T2DM controls were detected via 1-way ANOVA. The interaction effects between hypertension and T2DM for CBF alterations were also examined. Correlation analyses illustrated the association between CBF values and cognitive performance and between CBF and blood pressure. Compared with non-T2DM controls, T2DM patients exhibited decreased CBF, primarily in the visual area and the default mode network (DMN); decreased CBF in these regions was correlated with cognitive performance. There was a significant interaction effect between hypertension and diabetes for CBF in the precuneus and the middle occipital gyrus. Additionally, blood pressure correlated negatively with CBF in T2DM patients. T2DM patients exhibited reduced CBF in the visual area and DMN. Hypertension may facilitate a CBF decrease in the setting of diabetes. T2DM patients may benefit from blood pressure control to maintain their brain perfusion through CBF preservation. PMID:26632913

  3. Topical use of Rectogesic® and Emla® to improve cutaneous blood perfusion following thermal injury. A comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tagkalakis, P; Dionyssopoulos, A; Karkavelas, G; Demiri, E

    2015-06-30

    Early post-burn ischemic necrosis of the skin is of particular interest in modern burn research. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that blood perfusion could be improved by the topical application of vasoactive substances. A sample of 55 wistar rats was used to investigate the effect of 0,4% nitroglycerin ointment (Rectogesic(®)) comparatively to no application and placebo. The beneficiary action of 5% prilocaine/lidocaine cream (EMLA(®)) in burn blood perfusion was also tested comparatively to Rectogesic(®). Both preparations were tested respectively to non burned controls. Laser Doppler assessment of blood flow at 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after preparation application, demonstrated that the use of Rectogesic(®) improved perfusion at all measurements compared to placebo and to no preparation application (p&0,05). There was no statistical significant difference in the effect of the two preparations. PMID:27252612

  4. Topical use of Rectogesic® and Emla® to improve cutaneous blood perfusion following thermal injury. A comparative experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Tagkalakis, P.; Dionyssopoulos, A.; Karkavelas, G.; Demiri, E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Early post-burn ischemic necrosis of the skin is of particular interest in modern burn research. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that blood perfusion could be improved by the topical application of vasoactive substances. A sample of 55 wistar rats was used to investigate the effect of 0,4% nitroglycerin ointment (Rectogesic®) comparatively to no application and placebo. The beneficiary action of 5% prilocaine/lidocaine cream (EMLA®) in burn blood perfusion was also tested comparatively to Rectogesic®. Both preparations were tested respectively to non burned controls. Laser Doppler assessment of blood flow at 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after preparation application, demonstrated that the use of Rectogesic® improved perfusion at all measurements compared to placebo and to no preparation application (p&0,05). There was no statistical significant difference in the effect of the two preparations. PMID:27252612

  5. Non-invasive subcutaneous fat reduction: a review.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J; Verne, S; Griffith, R; Falto-Aizpurua, L; Nouri, K

    2015-09-01

    The risks, financial costs and lengthy downtime associated with surgical procedures for fat reduction have led to the development of a number of non-invasive techniques. Non-invasive body contouring now represents the fastest growing area of aesthetic medicine. There are currently four leading non-invasive techniques for reducing localized subcutaneous adipose tissue: low-level laser therapy (LLLT), cryolipolysis, radio frequency (RF) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). To review and compare leading techniques and clinical outcomes of non-invasive subcutaneous fat reduction. The terms 'non-invasive', 'low-level laser', 'cryolipolysis', 'ultrasound' and 'radio frequency' were combined with 'lipolysis', 'fat reduction' or 'body contour' during separate searches in the PubMed database. We identified 31 studies (27 prospective clinical studies and four retrospective chart reviews) with a total of 2937 patients that had been treated with LLLT (n = 1114), cryolipolysis (n = 706), HIFU (n = 843) or RF (n = 116) or other techniques (n = 158) for fat reduction or body contouring. A majority of these patients experienced significant and satisfying results without any serious adverse effects. The studies investigating these devices have all varied in treatment regimen, body locations, follow-up times or outcome operationalization. Each technique differs in offered advantages and severity of adverse effects. However, multiple non-invasive devices are safe and effective for circumferential reduction in local fat tissue by 2 cm or more across the abdomen, hips and thighs. Results are consistent and reproducible for each device and none are associated with any serious or permanent adverse effects. PMID:25664493

  6. Non-invasive Markers of Liver Fibrosis: Adjuncts or Alternatives to Liver Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jun L.; Pavlides, Michael; Moolla, Ahmad; Ryan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis reflects sustained liver injury often from multiple, simultaneous factors. Whilst the presence of mild fibrosis on biopsy can be a reassuring finding, the identification of advanced fibrosis is critical to the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This necessity has lead to a reliance on liver biopsy which itself is an imperfect test and poorly accepted by patients. The development of robust tools to non-invasively assess liver fibrosis has dramatically enhanced clinical decision making in patients with chronic liver disease, allowing a rapid and informed judgment of disease stage and prognosis. Should a liver biopsy be required, the appropriateness is clearer and the diagnostic yield is greater with the use of these adjuncts. While a number of non-invasive liver fibrosis markers are now used in routine practice, a steady stream of innovative approaches exists. With improvement in the reliability, reproducibility and feasibility of these markers, their potential role in disease management is increasing. Moreover, their adoption into clinical trials as outcome measures reflects their validity and dynamic nature. This review will summarize and appraise the current and novel non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis, both blood and imaging based, and look at their prospective application in everyday clinical care. PMID:27378924

  7. Assessment of lung function using a non-invasive oscillating gas-forcing technique☆

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Lei; Clifton, David A.; Hahn, Clive E.W.; Farmery, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional methods for monitoring lung function can require complex, or special, gas analysers, and may therefore not be practical in clinical areas such as the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating theatre. The system proposed in this article is a compact and non-invasive system for the measurement and monitoring of lung variables, such as alveolar volume, airway dead space, and pulmonary blood flow. In contrast with conventional methods, the compact apparatus and non-invasive nature of the proposed method could eventually allow it to be used in the ICU, as well as in general clinical settings. We also propose a novel tidal ventilation model using a non-invasive oscillating gas-forcing technique, where both nitrous oxide and oxygen are used as indicator gases. Experimental results are obtained from healthy volunteers, and are compared with those obtained using a conventional continuous ventilation model. Our findings show that the proposed technique can be used to assess lung function, and has several advantages over conventional methods such as compact and portable apparatus, easy usage, and quick estimation of cardiopulmonary variables. PMID:23702307

  8. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P.; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  9. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation.

    PubMed

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A

    2015-12-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  10. Non-invasive brain stimulation in early rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Blesneag, A V; Popa, L; Stan, A D

    2015-01-01

    The new tendency in rehabilitation involves non-invasive tools that, if applied early after stroke, promote neurorecovery. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation may correct the disruption of cortical excitability and effectively contribute to the restoration of movement and speech. The present paper analyses the results of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) trials, highlighting different aspects related to the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation frequency, transcranial direct current stimulation polarity, the period and stimulation places in acute and subacute ischemic strokes. The risk of adverse events, the association with motor or language recovery specific training, and the cumulative positive effect evaluation are also discussed. PMID:26361512

  11. Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-11-03

    An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

  12. Effects of some anesthetic agents on skin microcirculation evaluated by laser Doppler perfusion imaging in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anesthetic agents alter microcirculation, influencing tissue oxygenation and delivery of vital substrates. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging is a widespread technique in the field of microvascular research that can evaluate noninvasively and in real time the effects of environmental conditions, physical manipulations, diseases and treatments on peripheral perfusion. This study aims to evaluate laser Doppler perfusion imaging as a means to detect changes in skin microcirculation induced by some popular anesthetic agents in a murine model. Twenty-four age- and gender-matched healthy CD1 mice were examined by laser Doppler perfusion imaging. The skin microcirculatory response was measured at the level of plantar surfaces during isoflurane anesthesia with or without subsequent dexmedetomidine or acepromazine. At the end of the procedure, dexmedetomidine was reversed by atipamezole administration. Results In all mice, skin blood flow under isoflurane anesthesia did not show significant differences over time (P = 0.1). The serial perfusion pattern and values following acepromazine or dexmedetomidine administration differed significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusions We standardized a reliable laser Doppler perfusion imaging protocol to non-invasively assess changes in skin microcirculation induced by anesthesia in mice, considering the advantages and drawbacks of this technique and its translational value. PMID:24341447

  13. Non-invasive model-based estimation of aortic pulse pressure using suprasystolic brachial pressure waveforms.

    PubMed

    Lowe, A; Harrison, W; El-Aklouk, E; Ruygrok, P; Al-Jumaily, A M

    2009-09-18

    Elevated central arterial (aortic) blood pressure is related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods of non-invasively estimating this pressure would therefore be helpful in clinical practice. To achieve this goal, a physics-based model is derived to correlate the arterial pressure under a suprasystolic upper-arm cuff to the aortic pressure. The model assumptions are particularly applicable to the measurement method and result in a time-domain relation with two parameters, namely, the wave propagation transit time and the reflection coefficient at the cuff. Central pressures estimated by the model were derived from completely automatic, non-invasive measurement of brachial blood pressure and suprasystolic waveform and were compared to simultaneous invasive catheter measurements in 16 subjects. Systolic blood pressure agreement, mean (standard deviation) of difference was -1 (7)mmHg. Diastolic blood pressure agreement was 4 (4)mmHg. Correlation between estimated and actual central waveforms was greater than 90%. Individualization of model parameters did not significantly improve systolic and diastolic pressure agreement, but increased waveform correlation. Further research is necessary to confirm that more accurate brachial pressure measurement improves central pressure estimation. PMID:19665136

  14. Temperature-dependent versus constant-rate blood perfusion modelling in ferromagnetic thermoseed hyperthermia: results with a model of the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, D T; Vanderby, R; Klein, S A; Beckman, W A; Steeves, R A; Frye, D M; Paliwal, B R

    1994-01-01

    Finite-element solutions to the Pennes bioheat equation are obtained with a model of a tumour-containing, human prostate and surrounding normal tissues. Simulations of ferromagnetic hyperthermia treatments are conducted on the tissue model in which the prostate is implanted with an irregularly spaced array of thermoseeds. Several combinations of thermoseed temperatures with different Curie points are investigated. Non-uniform, constant-rate blood perfusion models are studied and compared with temperature-dependent descriptions of blood perfusion. Blood perfusions in the temperature-dependent models initially increase with tissue temperature and then decrease at higher temperatures. Simulations with temperature-dependent versus constant-rate blood perfusion models reveal significant differences in temperature distributions in and surrounding the tumour-containing prostate. Results from the simulations include differences (between temperature-dependent and constant-rate models) in (1) the percentage of normal tissue volume and tumour volume at temperatures > 42 degrees C, and (2) temperature descriptors in the tumour (subscript t) and normal (subscript n) tissues including Tmax.t, Tmin.t and Tmax.n. Isotherms and grey-scale contours in the tumour and surrounding normal tissues are presented for four simulations that model a combination of high-temperature thermoseeds. Several simulations show that Tmin.t is between 1.7 and 2.6 degrees C higher and Tmax.n is between 2.1 and 3.3 degrees C higher with a temperature-dependent versus a comparable constant-rate blood perfusion model. The same simulations reveal that the percentages of tumour volume at temperatures > 42 degrees C are between 0 and 68% higher with the temperature-dependent versus the constant-rate perfusion model over all seed combinations studied. In summary, a numerical method is presented which makes it possible to investigate temperature-dependent, continuous functions of blood perfusion in simulations

  15. Non-invasive method of measuring cerebral spinal fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor); Lambert, James L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides a method of non-invasively determining intracranial pressure from measurements of an eye. A parameter of an optic nerve of the eye is determined, along with an intraocular pressure of the eye. The intracranial pressure may be determined from the intraocular pressure and the parameter.

  16. Non-invasive Prediction of Pork Loin Tenderness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to develop a non-invasive method to predict tenderness of pork loins. Boneless pork loins (n = 901) were evaluated either on line on the loin boning and trimming line of large-scale commercial plants (n = 465) or at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center abattoir ...

  17. NON-INVASIVE NEUROTOXICITY ASSAY USING LARVAL MEDAKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a method for non-invasive electrophysiological analysis of rapid escape responses in intact, freely behaving larval medaka (Oryzias latipes) before and after short-term exposure to environmental toxicants. ecordings are obtained as a larval medaka swims in a small cham...

  18. Non-invasive treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, DONG

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) presents a strong clinical challenge especially for the treatment of the associated epilepsy. Epilepsy in FCD is often treatment-resistant and constitutes 50% of treatment-resistant cases. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely used in the treatment of FCD. However, evidence to suggest their specific effect on the treatment of FCD remains to be established. In view of this resistance, several alternative treatments have been suggested. Although treatment currently involves surgical management, non-invasive treatments have been identified. The aim of the present review, was to assess non-invasive management strategies including, i) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, ii) ketogenic diet (KD), and iii) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). In addition, we discussed the literature available regarding the use of AEDs in FCD. Experiments conducted with mammals detailing rapamycin gene mutations in FCD have produced vital information for exploring treatment options using mTOR inhibitors. Of note is the importance of KD in children with FCD. This diet has been shown to modify disease progression by attenuating chromatin modification, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell. FCD has also been studied widely with neurostimulation techniques. The outcomes of these techniques have been found to be variable. For widespread dysplasias, VNS has been shown to produce responder rates of >50%. Nevertheless, non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation techniques such as transcutaneous VNS and non-invasive VNS are gaining better patient compatibility, albeit their efficacy remains to be established. PMID:27168769

  19. Reliable, Low Mass, Non-Invasive Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, F.; Tovey, M.

    1999-01-01

    Mass is a major driver for future spacecraft and missions exposed to high radiation levels (i.e. Europa Orbiter) present even more challenge. A variety of non-invasive measurement techniques are in development that enables determination of pressures within a propulsion network.

  20. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, Richard M.; Packer, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  1. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1984-10-30

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

  2. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  3. Strategies for non-invasive delivery of biologics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seung Woo; Hil-lal, Taslim A; Byun, Youngro

    2012-07-01

    Macromolecular therapeutics, in particular, many biologics, is the most advancing category of drugs over conventional chemical drugs. The potency and specificity of the biologics for curing certain disease made them to be a leading compound in the pharmaceutical industry. However, due to their intrinsic nature, including high molecular weight, hydrophilicity and instability, they are difficult to be administered via non-invasive route. This is a major quest especially in biologics, as they are frequently used clinically for chronic disorders, which requires long-term administration. Therefore, many efforts have been made to develop formulation for non-invasive administration, in attempt to improve patient compliance and convenience. In this review, strategies for non-invasive delivery, in particular, oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery, that are recently adopted for delivery of biologics are discussed. Insulin, calcitonin and heparin were mainly focused for the discussion as they could represent protein, polypeptide and polysaccharide drugs, respectively. Many recent attempts for non-invasive delivery of biologics are compared to provide an insight of developing successful delivery system. PMID:22632037

  4. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  5. Pulse-pressure-enhancing controller for better physiologic perfusion of rotary blood pumps based on speed modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Ruan, Xiaodong; Fu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Sufficient pulsation is important for physiologic perfusion if adequate flow is to be guaranteed. A fuzzy control method for rotary blood pumps using active speed modulation is proposed in this article. It maintains the mean aortic pressure to provide sufficient perfusion while it simultaneously enhances the pulse pressure. The controller uses the indices extracted from the aortic pressure as feedback to determine the amplitude and offset of the rectangular speed modulation waveform, which is synchronous with the cardiac cycle. An additional algorithm is included to prevent regurgitation. The controller is tested both in a baroreflex-cardiovascular model and in a preliminary in vitro experiment. Simulation results demonstrate that the controller is able to increase the pulse pressure to approximately 20 mm Hg and at the same time maintains the mean pressure at 100 mm Hg, when heart failure occurs. It is also quite robust under various physiologic disturbances. Experimental results show that the speed modulation can be implemented in real pumps and that the controller is feasible in practice. PMID:24614360

  6. MR mapping of temperature and perfusion for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Vlad, Julia; Lange, Thomas; Wust, Peter; Felix, Roland

    2001-05-01

    The promising results, recently obtained in phantom experiments employing the MR-based proton resonance frequency (PRF) method as a non-invasive tool for the temperature monitoring of hyperthermia therapy, are not easily reproduced in vivo. One of the reasons is the impact of perfusion changes on the PRF-measured temperature. In our experiments in vivo, heat was supplied on one side of the volunteers knee or pelvis by a rubber hose with circulating warm water (50iC). The PRF method was calibrated by the constant temperature sensitivity of pure water of 0.011 ppm/iC. MR mapping of perfusion changes was based on T2*-weighted tracking of the first-pass kinetics of contrast agent. The hemodynamic parameters of regional blood volume (rBV) and mean transit time (MTT) were extracted by fitting pixel-by-pixel the first- pass kinetics to the gamma-variate model. Special attention was directed to improve a quality of the automatic non-linear fit at low signal-to-noise values. The distributions of PRF- based temperature changes show large areas of apparently high temperature elevations (exceeding 10iC) in regions close to the heat source, and others with just as large temperature decays in more distant regions. Areas of apparently high temperature elevations correlate with areas of blood flow increase and vice versa. In conclusion, the visible heat- induced PRF changes in vivo are primarily perfusion changes, which mask the much smaller true temperature changes.

  7. A Glucose Sensing Contact Lens: A Non-Invasive Technique for Continuous Physiological Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a range of glucose sensing contact lenses, using a daily, disposable contact lens embedded with newly developed boronic acid containing fluorophores. Our findings show that our approach may be suitable for the continuous monitoring of tear glucose levels in the range 50–1000 μM, which typically track blood glucose levels, which are ≈5–10 fold higher. Our non-invasive approach may well offer an alternative solution to current invasive glucose monitoring techniques for diabetes, such as “finger pricking.” PMID:27340364

  8. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to measure carboxy- and methemoglobin concentration non-invasively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Kraitl, Jens; Gewiss, Helge; Kamysek, Svend; Brock, Beate; Ewald, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    This paper will describe a novel multi-wavelength photometric method to measure carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. COHb and MetHb are so called dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives and they are not able to carry oxygen. Standard pulse oximeters are only able to measure two derivatives, namely oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) but the presence of other derivatives in the blood may distort the readings. The paper presents a new approach of a noninvasive sensor system to measure COHb and MetHb and the validation in vivo and in vitro.

  9. Validation of a non-invasive arterial monitor GATE model for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giansiracusa, P. J.; Peake, D. J.; Sobott, B. A.; O'Keefe, G.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-02-01

    The Non-Invasive Arterial Monitor (NIAM3) is an SiPM based detector system designed for calibrating Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) images without invasive blood sampling. By imaging the radial and ulnar arteries in the wrist directly with a custom built PET system the resultant PET images can be calibrated. An integral step in the development of a complex detector system is the creation of a model which accurately reflects the physical reality being studied. This paper describes the development of a simulation for NIAM which shows good agreement between the model and physical detector setup.

  10. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer. PMID:11702193