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Sample records for non-ionizing radiofrequency fields

  1. Analysis of estimation of electromagnetic dosimetric values from non-ionizing radiofrequency fields in conventional road vehicle environments.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Erik; Iturri, Peio Lopez; Azpilicueta, Leire; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Ramos, Victoria; Gárate, Uxue; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    A high number of wireless technologies can be found operating in vehicular environments with the aim of offering different services. The dosimetric evaluation of this kind of scenarios must be performed in order to assess their compatibility with current exposure limits. In this work, a dosimetric evaluation inside a conventional car is performed, with the aid of an in-house 3D Ray Launching computational code, which has been compared with measurement results of wireless sensor networks located inside the vehicle. These results can aid in an adequate assessment of human exposure to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields, taking into account the impact of the morphology and the topology of the vehicle for current as well as for future exposure limits. PMID:24460417

  2. Genetic damage in human cells exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: a meta-analysis of the data from 88 publications (1990-2011).

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Prihoda, Thomas J

    2012-12-12

    Based on the 'limited' evidence suggesting an association between exposure to radiofrequency fields (RF) emitted from mobile phones and two types of brain cancer, glioma and acoustic neuroma, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified RF as 'possibly carcinogenic to humans' in group 2B. In view of this classification and the positive correlation between increased genetic damage and carcinogenesis, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine whether a significant increase in genetic damage in human cells exposed to RF provides a potential mechanism for its carcinogenic potential. The extent of genetic damage in human cells, assessed from various end-points, viz., single-/double-strand breaks in the DNA, incidence of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges, reported in a total of 88 peer-reviewed scientific publications during 1990-2011 was considered in the meta-analysis. Among the several variables in the experimental protocols used, the influence of five specific variables related to RF exposure characteristics was investigated: (i) frequency, (ii) specific absorption rate, (iii) exposure as continuous wave, pulsed wave and occupationally exposed/mobile phone users, (iv) duration of exposure, and (v) different cell types. The data indicated the following. (1) The magnitude of difference between RF-exposed and sham-/un-exposed controls was small with some exceptions. (2) In certain RF exposure conditions there was a statistically significant increase in genotoxicity assessed from some end-points: the effect was observed in studies with small sample size and was largely influenced by publication bias. Studies conducted within the generally recommended RF exposure guidelines showed a smaller effect. (3) The multiple regression analyses and heterogeneity goodness of fit data indicated that factors other than the above five variables as well as the quality of publications have contributed to the overall results. (4) More importantly, the mean indices for chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange end-points in RF-exposed and sham-/un-exposed controls were within the spontaneous levels reported in a large data-base. Thus, the classification of RF as possibly carcinogenic to humans in group 2B was not supported by genotoxicity-based mechanistic evidence. PMID:23022599

  3. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  4. An historical overview of the activities in the field of exposure and risk assessment of non-ionizing radiation in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Israel, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The exposure and risk evaluation process in Bulgaria concerning non-ionizing radiation health and safety started in the early 1970s. Then, the first research laboratory "Electromagnetic fields in the working environment" was founded in the framework of the Centre of Hygiene, belonging to the Medical Academy, Sofia. The main activities were connected with developing legislation, new equipment for measurement of electromagnetic fields, new methods for measurement and exposure assessment, in vivo and human studies for developing methods, studying the effect of non-ionizing radiation on human body, developing exposure limits. Most of the occupations as metal industry, plastic welding, energetics, physiotherapy, broadcasting, telephone stations, computer industry, etc., have been covered by epidemiological investigations and risk evaluation. In 1986, the ANSI standard for safe use of lasers has been implemented as national legislation that gave the start for studies in the field of risk assessment concerning the use of lasers in industry and medicine. The environmental exposure studies started in 1991 following the very fast implementation of the telecommunication technologies. Now, funds for research are very insignificant, and studies in the field of risk assessment are very few. Nevertheless, Bulgaria has been an active member of the WHO International EMF Project, since 1997, and that gives good opportunity for collaboration with other Member states, and for implementation of new approach in the EMF policy for workers and people's protection against non-ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:26444191

  5. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information-inside hotspots or in search of them-based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km2. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. PMID:23759207

  6. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450?MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields. PMID:26444190

  7. MRI using radiofrequency magnetic field phase gradients.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B

    2010-01-01

    Conventionally, MR images are formed by applying gradients to the main static magnetic field (B0). However, the B0 gradient equipment is expensive, power-hungry, complex, and noisy and can induce eddy currents in nearby conducting structures, including the patient. Here, we describe a new silent, B0 gradient-free MRI principle, Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE), based on phase gradients of the radio-frequency (RF) field. RF phase gradients offer a new method of k-space traversal. Echo trains using at least two different RF phase gradients allow spin phase to accumulate, causing k-space traversal. Two such RF fields provide one-dimensional imaging and three are sufficient for two-dimensional imaging. Since TRASE is a k-space method, analogues of many conventional pulse sequences are possible. Experimental results demonstrate one-dimensional and two-dimensional RF MRI and slice selection using a single-channel, transmit/receive, 0.2 T, permanent magnet, human MR system. The experimentally demonstrated spatial resolution is much higher than that provided by RF receive coil array sensitivity encoding alone but lower than generally achievable with B0 gradients. Potential applications are those in which one or more of the features of simplified equipment, lower costs, silent MRI, or the different physics of the image formation process are particularly advantageous. PMID:19918899

  8. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, Sam Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-15

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an iterative measurement and modeling method for outdoor RF-EMF exposure. • Hotspots are rapidly identified, and accurately characterized. • An accurate graphical representation, or heat map, is created, using kriging. • Random validation shows good correlation (0.7) and low relative errors (2 dB)

  9. International and National Expert Group Evaluations: Biological/Health Effects of Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalaxmi; Scarfi, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    The escalated use of various wireless communication devices, which emit non-ionizing radiofrequency (RF) fields, have raised concerns among the general public regarding the potential adverse effects on human health. During the last six decades, researchers have used different parameters to investigate the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposures of animals and humans or their cells to RF fields. Data reported in peer-reviewed scientific publications were contradictory: some indicated effects while others did not. International organizations have considered all of these data as well as the observations reported in human epidemiological investigations to set-up the guidelines or standards (based on the quality of published studies and the “weight of scientific evidence” approach) for RF exposures in occupationally exposed individuals and the general public. Scientists with relevant expertise in various countries have also considered the published data to provide the required scientific information for policy-makers to develop and disseminate authoritative health information to the general public regarding RF exposures. This paper is a compilation of the conclusions, on the biological effects of RF exposures, from various national and international expert groups, based on their analyses. In general, the expert groups suggested a reduction in exposure levels, precautionary approach, and further research. PMID:25211777

  10. Occupational exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mild, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers occupational exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields in industrial processes in near-field situations where electric and magnetic field strengths are monitored to assess the health hazard. Plastic materials are joined by an RF machine whose electrodes are not shielded and which may produce high level RF fields in the immediate vicinity, exceeding the ANSI standard. A physiotherapist may be exposed to high E and H fields using RF shortwave therapy, the maintenance personnel in FM/TV broadcast towers are subject to intense RF fields, and induction heating equipment used for forging, annealing and brazing can expose operators' hands to magnetic fields.

  11. Radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure and non-specific symptoms of ill health: A systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Roeoesli, Martin

    2008-06-15

    This article is a systematic review of whether everyday exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) causes symptoms, and whether some individuals are able to detect low-level RF-EMF (below the ICNIRP [International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection] guidelines). Peer-reviewed articles published before August 2007 were identified by means of a systematic literature search. Meta-analytic techniques were used to pool the results from studies investigating the ability to discriminate active from sham RF-EMF exposure. RF-EMF discrimination was investigated in seven studies including a total of 182 self-declared electromagnetic hypersensitive (EHS) individuals and 332 non-EHS individuals. The pooled correct field detection rate was 4.2% better than expected by chance (95% CI: -2.1 to 10.5). There was no evidence that EHS individuals could detect presence or absence of RF-EMF better than other persons. There was little evidence that short-term exposure to a mobile phone or base station causes symptoms based on the results of eight randomized trials investigating 194 EHS and 346 non-EHS individuals in a laboratory. Some of the trials provided evidence for the occurrence of nocebo effects. In population based studies an association between symptoms and exposure to RF-EMF in the everyday environment was repeatedly observed. This review showed that the large majority of individuals who claims to be able to detect low level RF-EMF are not able to do so under double-blind conditions. If such individuals exist, they represent a small minority and have not been identified yet. The available observational studies do not allow differentiating between biophysical from EMF and nocebo effects.

  12. [Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on mammalian spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Susa, Martina; Pavici?, Ivan

    2007-12-01

    This article reviews studies about the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic (RF EM) fields on male reproductive system and reproductive health in mammals. According to current data, there are almost 4 million active mobile phone lines in Croatia while this number has risen to 2 billion in the world. Increased use of mobile technology raises scientific and public concern about possible hazardous effects of RF fields on human health. The effects of radiofrequencies on reproductive health and consequences for the offspring are still mainly unknown. A number of in vivo and in vitro studies indicated that RF fields could interact with charged intracellular macromolecular structures. Results of several laboratory studies on animal models showed how the RF fields could affect the mammalian reproductive system and sperm cells. Inasmuch as, in normal physiological conditions spermatogenesis is a balanced process of division, maturation and storage of cells, it is particularly vulnerable to the chemical and physical environmental stimuli. Especially sensitive could be the cytoskeleton, composed of charged proteins; actin, intermedial filaments and microtubules. Cytoskeleton is a functional and structural part of the cell that has important role in the sperm motility, and is actively involved in the morphologic changes that occur during mammalian spermiogenesis. PMID:18063530

  13. 78 FR 33633 - Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ...the human head from cell phones. It stated in pertinent...from electronic product radiation) and of the IEEE and...1310 Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits...radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in...

  14. Biological effects and exposure criteria for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report, which begins with a discussion of fundamental studies at the molecular level, presents a review of the subject matter covered in NCRP Report No. 67 on mechanisms of interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic (RFEM) fields with tissue. The discussion continues to progressively larger scales of interaction, beginning with macromolecular and cellular effects, chromosomal and mutagenic effects, and carcinogenic effects. The scope of the subject matter is then expanded to include systemic effects such as those on reproduction, growth, and development, hematopoiesis and immunology, endocrinology and autonomic nervous function, cardiovascular effects and cerebrovascular effects. The interaction of electromagnetic fields with the central nervous system and special senses is also discussed. Also included are epidemiological studies, a discussion of thermoregulation, and a history of therapeutic applications of RFEM fields. The report concludes with human exposure criteria and rationale.

  15. Radiofrequency fields associated with the Itron smart meter.

    PubMed

    Tell, R A; Sias, G G; Vazquez, A; Sahl, J; Turman, J P; Kavet, R I; Mezei, G

    2012-08-01

    This study examined radiofrequency (RF) emissions from smart electric power meters deployed in two service territories in California for the purpose of evaluating potential human exposure. These meters included transmitters operating in a local area mesh network (RF LAN, ?250 mW); a cell relay, which uses a wireless wide area network (WWAN, ?1 W); and a transmitter serving a home area network (HAN, ?70 mW). In all instances, RF fields were found to comply by a wide margin with the RF exposure limits established by the US Federal Communications Commission. The study included specialised measurement techniques and reported the spatial distribution of the fields near the meters and their duty cycles (typically <1 %) whose value is crucial to assessing time-averaged exposure levels. This study is the first to characterise smart meters as deployed. However, the results are restricted to a single manufacturer's emitters. PMID:22234423

  16. Remotely Triggered Cisplatin Release from Carbon Nanocapsules by Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Guven, Adem; Corr, Stuart J.; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is limited by its peri-vascular sequestration, thus necessitating a strategy to trigger drug release from such intra-tumoral nanocarrier-drug depots. In our efforts to explore remotely-activated nanocarriers, we have developed carbon nanocapsules comprised of an ultrashort carbon nanotube shell (US-tubes) loaded with cisplatin (CDDP@US-tubes) and covered with a Pluronic surfactant wrapping to minimize passive release. We demonstrate here that non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) field activation of the CDDP@US-tubes produces heat that causes Pluronic disruption which triggers cisplatin release in an RF-dependent manner. Furthermore, release-dependent cytotoxicity is demonstrated in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23228421

  17. Remotely triggered cisplatin release from carbon nanocapsules by radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T; Guven, Adem; Phounsavath, Sophia; Corr, Stuart J; Wilson, Lon J; Curley, Steven A

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is limited by its peri-vascular sequestration, thus necessitating a strategy to trigger drug release from such intra-tumoral nanocarrier-drug depots. In our efforts to explore remotely-activated nanocarriers, we have developed carbon nanocapsules comprised of an ultra-short carbon nanotube shell (US-tubes) loaded with cisplatin (CDDP@US-tubes) and covered with a Pluronic surfactant wrapping to minimize passive release. We demonstrate here that non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) field activation of the CDDP@US-tubes produces heat that causes Pluronic disruption which triggers cisplatin release in an RF-dependent manner. Furthermore, release-dependent cytotoxicity is demonstrated in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23228421

  18. Second harmonic acoustic responses induced in matter by quasi continuous radiofrequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-10-01

    We subjected conductive matter and tissue to intermittent continuous-wave radiofrequency fields and investigated whether acoustic responses could be recorded. By placing samples in the near-field of the excitation, we observed frequency-domain acoustic responses from tissues responding to CW radiofrequency excitation. Frequency analysis revealed the generation of 2nd harmonic mechanical waves. This discovery of non-linear responses can lead to alternative measurement concepts of CW radiofrequency deposition in matter and tissues. We offer the theoretical mainframe and discuss sensing applications involving the direct measurement of second harmonic responses representative of CW RF energy deposition in matter.

  19. [Assessment of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields levels in the Taranto area].

    PubMed

    Caputo, F; Sciannamblo, G; Minunni, V; Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; Cianciaruso, G; Martucci, V; L'Abbate, N

    2007-01-01

    Radiofrequencies are extremely common in telecommunication sectors, in industry, in medicine and domestic applications. We carried out an observed study focusing on the punctual monitoring of the electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones handsets or by SRB radiobase stations (transmitters), installed in Taranto and throughout the borough council. The measurement campaigns have been done by ARPA Puglia, Provincial Department of Taranto from November 2005 until March 2007, on 108 transmitting stations, of which 72 are of single installation and 36 of multiple installations, with UMTS, GSM. DCS, DVB-H kind of communication. The monitoring has been done with Wandel & Goltermann EMR-300 devices; the registered frequency is within the interval between 100 KHz and 3GHz and measures have been obtained with precise time interval of 6 minutes. In most of the monitored areas the results respected limit values; only in 2 cases on 108 the attention value has been exceeded, both within borough council area. In the town of Taranto values over 6 V/m fixed by the actual rule haven't been registered in none of the 51 monitored stations. We can, therefore, define within the limits the expositions emitted by the radiobase stations and in the buildings nearby the antennas. PMID:18409953

  20. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-07-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM{sub 010} passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B{sub peak} = 173 mT, in 8{pi}/9 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities.

  1. Effect of a 2.45-GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The potential public health risks of radiofrequency (RF) fields have been discussed at length, especially with the use of mobile phones spreading extensively throughout the world. In order to investigate the properties of RF fields, we examined the effect of 2.45-GHz RF fields at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 and 10 W/kg for 4 and 24 h on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells. Neutrophil chemotaxis was not affected by RF-field exposure, and subsequent phagocytosis was not affected either compared with that under sham exposure conditions. These studies demonstrated an initial immune response in the human body exposed to 2.45-GHz RF fields at the SAR of 2 W/kg, which is the maximum value recommended by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The results of our experiments for RF-field exposure at an SAR under 10 W/kg showed very little or no effects on either chemotaxis or phagocytosis in neutrophil-like human HL-60 cells. PMID:25194051

  2. Effect of a 2.45-GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The potential public health risks of radiofrequency (RF) fields have been discussed at length, especially with the use of mobile phones spreading extensively throughout the world. In order to investigate the properties of RF fields, we examined the effect of 2.45-GHz RF fields at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 and 10 W/kg for 4 and 24 h on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells. Neutrophil chemotaxis was not affected by RF-field exposure, and subsequent phagocytosis was not affected either compared with that under sham exposure conditions. These studies demonstrated an initial immune response in the human body exposed to 2.45-GHz RF fields at the SAR of 2 W/kg, which is the maximum value recommended by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The results of our experiments for RF-field exposure at an SAR under 10 W/kg showed very little or no effects on either chemotaxis or phagocytosis in neutrophil-like human HL-60 cells. PMID:25194051

  3. Diverse Radiofrequency Sensitivity and Radiofrequency Effects of Mobile or Cordless Phone near Fields Exposure in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Geronikolou, Styliani; Zimeras, Stelios; Davos, Constantinos H.; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Tsitomeneas, Stephanos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The impact of electromagnetic fields on health is of increasing scientific interest. The aim of this study was to examine how the Drosophila melanogaster animal model is affected when exposed to portable or mobile phone fields. Methods/Results Two experiments have been designed and performed in the same laboratory conditions. Insect cultures were exposed to the near field of a 2G mobile phone (the GSM 2G networks support and complement in parallel the 3G wide band or in other words the transmission of information via voice signals is served by the 2G technology in both mobile phones generations) and a 1880 MHz cordless phone both digitally modulated by human voice. Comparison with advanced statistics of the egg laying of the second generation exposed and non-exposed cultures showed limited statistical significance for the cordless phone exposed culture and statistical significance for the 900 MHz exposed insects. We calculated by physics, simulated and illustrated in three dimensional figures the calculated near fields of radiation inside the experimenting vials and their difference. Comparison of the power of the two fields showed that the difference between them becomes null when the experimental cylinder radius and the height of the antenna increase. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest a possible radiofrequency sensitivity difference in insects which may be due to the distance from the antenna or to unexplored intimate factors. Comparing the near fields of the two frequencies bands, we see similar not identical geometry in length and height from the antenna and that lower frequencies tend to drive to increased radiofrequency effects. PMID:25402465

  4. Assessment of physiotherapists' occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from shortwave and microwave diathermy devices: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar; Farrow, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed studies reporting the strength of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in physiotherapists' occupational environment. Studies from academic journals published from January 1990 to June 2010 were identified in nine online bibliographic databases. EMF strength was compared with occupational exposure limits (OELs) recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In the reviewed studies, EMFs were measured at different distances (range 0.2 m to 6 m) from the console of diathermy devices, electrodes, and cables. For continuous shortwave diathermy (CSWD) (27.12 megahertz, MHz), measurements of EMFs at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m reported the maximum E field strength as 8197%, 1639%, 295%, and 69%, respectively, and the maximum H field strength as 6250%, 681%, 213%, and 56%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For pulsed shortwave diathermy (PSWD) (27.12 MHz), EMF measurements at < 1 m, 1 m, and, 1.1-1.5 m showed the maximum E field intensity as 1639%, 175%, and 32%, and the maximum H field strength as 1175%, 968%, and 28%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For microwave diathermy (MWD) (2.45 gigahertz, GHz), the maximum power density measured at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m was 200%, <30%, 0.76%, and 0.82%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limit for occupational exposure. RF EMF emissions measured from continuous and pulsed electrotherapeutic diathermy devices may well be higher than OELs at specific distances, i.e., at 1 m, which is currently designated to be a safe distance for physiotherapists. The minimum safe distance for physiotherapists should be revised to at least 2 m for CSWD and 1.5 m for PSWD. The reviewed studies did not provide evidence of exceeding the ICNIRP's reference levels for occupational exposure at 1 m from MWD devices. PMID:23570423

  5. Is fertility reduced among men exposed to radiofrequency fields in the Norwegian Navy?

    PubMed

    Møllerløkken, Ole J; Moen, Bente E

    2008-07-01

    The effects of radiofrequency fields on human health are not well understood, and public concern about negative health effects has been rising. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between workers exposed to electromagnetic fields and their reproductive health. We obtained data using a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study of naval military men, response rate 63% (n = 1487). We asked the respondents about exposure, lifestyle, reproductive health, previous diseases, work and education. An expert group categorized the work categories related to electromagnetic field exposure. We categorized the work categories "tele/communication," "electronics" and "radar/sonar" as being exposed to electromagnetic fields. Logistic regression adjusted for age, ever smoked, military education, and physical exercise at work showed increased risk of infertility among tele/communication odds ratio (OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.85), and radar/sonar odds ratio (OR = 2.28, 95% confidence interval 1.27-4.09). The electronics group had no increased risk. This study shows a possible relationship between exposure to radiofrequency fields during work with radiofrequency equipment and radar and reduced fertility. However, the results must be interpreted with caution. PMID:18240289

  6. Anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as an emerging threat to wildlife orientation.

    PubMed

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2015-06-15

    The rate of scientific activity regarding the effects of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation in the radiofrequency (RF) range on animals and plants has been small despite the fact that this topic is relevant to the fields of experimental biology, ecology and conservation due to its remarkable expansion over the past 20 years. Current evidence indicates that exposure at levels that are found in the environment (in urban areas and near base stations) may particularly alter the receptor organs to orient in the magnetic field of the earth. These results could have important implications for migratory birds and insects, especially in urban areas, but could also apply to birds and insects in natural and protected areas where there are powerful base station emitters of radiofrequencies. Therefore, more research on the effects of electromagnetic radiation in nature is needed to investigate this emerging threat. PMID:25747364

  7. Measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in and around ambulances.

    PubMed

    Boivin, W S; Boyd, S M; Coletta, J A; Neunaber, L M

    1997-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) with medical devices can threaten patient safety. More information is needed regarding circumstances in health care environments in which electromagnetic (EM) field strengths are expected to be high, such as emergency/transport. In ambulances medical devices and communications equipment must function properly in close proximity. This study characterized EM fields in and around ambulances under realistic conditions. Two types of ambulances were surveyed: the advanced life support (ALS) unit and the basic life support (BLS) unit. The surveys were conducted on-site using the ambulance mobile radio as the primary source of EM energy. Broadband field-strength measurements were collected at various locations in and around the ambulance to map interior and exterior EM field distributions. Nine ambulances were surveyed. In addition to the transmitter power and frequency, the field strengths measured were shown to be dependent upon the shielding provided by the ambulance roof and proximity of the measurement probe to the antenna. Field-strength measurements frequently exceeded the 3 V/m standard immunity level for devices set by the IEC Standard 601-1-2. The results indicate that the ambulance environment presents a considerable challenge to medical devices specifically used for emergency medical care. In order to assure their proper operation, medical devices used for transport emergency care must be able to withstand exposure to EM field strengths comparable to those reported in this study. PMID:9099436

  8. A New Imaging Platform for Visualizing Biological Effects of Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Electric-Field Cancer Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Corr, Stuart J.; Shamsudeen, Sabeel; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J.; Keshishian, Vazrik; Yokoi, Kenji; Savage, David J.; Meraz, Ismail M.; Kaluarachchi, Warna; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Raoof, Mustafa; Nguyen, Duy Trac; Zhang, Yingchun; Wilson, Lon J.; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Curley, Steven A.; Serda, Rita E.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel imaging platform to study the biological effects of non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) electric field cancer hyperthermia. This system allows for real-time in vivo intravital microscopy (IVM) imaging of radiofrequency-induced biological alterations such as changes in vessel structure and drug perfusion. Our results indicate that the IVM system is able to handle exposure to high-power electric-fields without inducing significant hardware damage or imaging artifacts. Furthermore, short durations of low-power (< 200 W) radiofrequency exposure increased transport and perfusion of fluorescent tracers into the tumors at temperatures below 41°C. Vessel deformations and blood coagulation were seen for tumor temperatures around 44°C. These results highlight the use of our integrated IVM-RF imaging platform as a powerful new tool to visualize the dynamics and interplay between radiofrequency energy and biological tissues, organs, and tumors. PMID:26308617

  9. A New Imaging Platform for Visualizing Biological Effects of Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Electric-Field Cancer Hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Corr, Stuart J; Shamsudeen, Sabeel; Vergara, Leoncio A; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J; Keshishian, Vazrik; Yokoi, Kenji; Savage, David J; Meraz, Ismail M; Kaluarachchi, Warna; Cisneros, Brandon T; Raoof, Mustafa; Nguyen, Duy Trac; Zhang, Yingchun; Wilson, Lon J; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Curley, Steven A; Serda, Rita E

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel imaging platform to study the biological effects of non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) electric field cancer hyperthermia. This system allows for real-time in vivo intravital microscopy (IVM) imaging of radiofrequency-induced biological alterations such as changes in vessel structure and drug perfusion. Our results indicate that the IVM system is able to handle exposure to high-power electric-fields without inducing significant hardware damage or imaging artifacts. Furthermore, short durations of low-power (< 200 W) radiofrequency exposure increased transport and perfusion of fluorescent tracers into the tumors at temperatures below 41°C. Vessel deformations and blood coagulation were seen for tumor temperatures around 44°C. These results highlight the use of our integrated IVM-RF imaging platform as a powerful new tool to visualize the dynamics and interplay between radiofrequency energy and biological tissues, organs, and tumors. PMID:26308617

  10. Radio-frequency and microwave energies, magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaelson, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of radio frequency, including microwave, radiation are considered. Effects on body temperature, the eye, reproductive systems, internal organs, blood cells, the cardiovascular system, and the central nervous system are included. Generalized effects of electric and magnetic fields are also discussed. Experimentation with animals and clinical studies on humans are cited, and possible mechanisms of the effects observed are suggested.

  11. Electromagnetic field exposure assessment in Europe radiofrequency fields (10?MHz-6?GHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Wiart, Joe; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Thuróczy, György

    2015-01-01

    Average levels of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of the general public in Europe are difficult to summarize, as exposure levels have been reported differently in those studies in which they have been measured, and a large proportion of reported measurements were very low, sometimes falling below detection limits of the equipment used. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the scientific literature on RF EMF exposure in Europe and to characterize exposure within the European population. A comparative analysis of the results of spot or long-term RF EMF measurements in the EU indicated that mean electric field strengths were between 0.08?V/m and 1.8?V/m. The overwhelming majority of measured mean electric field strengths were <1?V/m. It is estimated that <1% were above 6?V/m and <0.1% were above 20?V/m. No exposure levels exceeding European Council recommendations were identified in these surveys. Most population exposures from signals of radio and television broadcast towers were observed to be weak because these transmitters are usually far away from exposed individuals and are spatially sparsely distributed. On the other hand, the contribution made to RF exposure from wireless telecommunications technology is continuously increasing and its contribution was above 60% of the total exposure. According to the European exposure assessment studies identified, three population exposure categories (intermittent variable partial body exposure, intermittent variable low-level whole-body (WB) exposure and continuous low-level WB exposure) were recognized by the authors as informative for possible future risk assessment. PMID:23942394

  12. Alkali-vapor magnetic resonance driven by fictitious radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhivun, Elena; Wickenbrock, Arne; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate an all-optical {sup 133}Cs scalar magnetometer, operating in nonzero magnetic field, in which the magnetic resonance is driven by an effective oscillating magnetic field provided by the AC Stark shift of an intensity-modulated laser beam. We achieve a projected shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 1.7fT/?(Hz) and measure a technical noise floor of 40fT/?(Hz). These results are essentially identical to a coil-driven scalar magnetometer using the same setup. This all-optical scheme offers advantages over traditional coil-driven magnetometers for use in arrays and in magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, e.g., searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  13. Near-field effects in radio-frequency emission from particle showers in a dense medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyneman, Rachel; Wissel, Stephanie; Belov, Konstantin; Vahle, Patricia; Salzberg, David; Romero-Wolf, Andres; SLAC T-510 Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Two mechanisms are expected to produce radio-frequency emission in ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers. Askaryan emission, generated by an overall charge excess, has been studied in beam experiments previously. The emission due to Earth's magnetic field has been inferred from observations by cosmic-ray observatories, but not yet studied in a controlled laboratory environment. The SLAC T-510 experiment recently studied the effects of a magnetic field upon the radio-frequency emission from particle showers in high-density polyethylene as a way to model cosmic ray air showers. Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) and Very High Frequency (VHF) antennas were used to measure the signal from particle showers in the target at different positions. For an overview, see the talk by K. Mulrey in this conference. Several near-field runs were performed with the UHF antenna array closer to the target than in the majority of the data taking. Signal from the two mechanisms, Askaryan and Magnetic, were separated into orthogonal polarizations by the geometry of the system. We report on studies of the electric field for several positions in the near field. Initial results indicate that the electric field as a function of angle behaves consistently as the antennas are moved further from the target.

  14. Intracellular hyperthermia mediated by nanoparticles in radiofrequency fields in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Evan Scott

    Intracellular hyperthermic therapy may prove to be a unique and novel approach to the management of pancreatic cancer. Utilizing the principle of photothermal destruction, selective killing of cancer cells with minimal injury to normal tissues may be possible. This dissertation investigated the role of antibody targeted metal nanoparticles and the cytotoxic effects of nonionizing radiofrequency fields in pancreatic cancer. Cancer cell death was induced by heat release from intracellular metal nanoparticles after radiofrequency field exposure. Fluorescent and gold nanoparticles were delivered with two antibodies, cetuximab and PAM-4, to pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and mouse xenografts in vivo. Selective delivery of these nanoparticles induced cell death in vitro and decreased tumor burden in vivo after whole animal RF field exposure. This occurred through both apoptosis and necrosis. In addition, activated caspase-3 was increased after antibody treatment and RF field exposure. Furthermore, although there was non-specific uptake by the liver and spleen in vivo, there was no evidence of acute or chronic toxicity in the animals. These results are in agreement with the principle that malignant cells are more thermally sensitive than normal cells or tissues. Selective intracellular delivery of metal nanoparticles coupled with whole body RF field exposure may be a beneficial therapy against micrometastases and unresectable pancreatic cancer in the future. Further studies are planned with more specific antibodies, other nanoparticles, and other cancer targets.

  15. Radiofrequency field inhomogeneity compensation in high spatial resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, Alessandro; Mazzuca, Stefano; Del Bene, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) is a non-invasive functional technique, whose mathematical framework falls into the category of linear inverse problems. However, its use in medical diagnostics is hampered by two main problems, both linked to the Fourier-based technique usually implemented for spectra reconstruction: poor spatial resolution and severe blurring in the spatial localization of the reconstructed spectra. Moreover, the intrinsic ill-posedness of the MRSI problem might be worsened by (i) spatially dependent distortions of the static magnetic field (B0) distribution, as well as by (ii) inhomogeneity in the power deposition distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic field (B1). Among several alternative methods, slim (Spectral Localization by IMaging) and bslim (B0 compensated slim) are reconstruction algorithms in which a priori information concerning the spectroscopic target is introduced into the reconstruction kernel. Nonetheless, the influence of the B1 field, particularly when its operating wavelength is close to the size of the human organs being studied, continues to be disregarded. starslim (STAtic and Radiofrequency-compensated slim), an evolution of the slim and bslim methods, is therefore proposed, in which the transformation kernel also includes the B1 field inhomogeneity map, thus allowing almost complete 3D modelling of the MRSI problem. Moreover, an original method for the experimental determination of the B1 field inhomogeneity map specific to the target under evaluation is also included. The compensation capabilities of the proposed method have been tested and illustrated using synthetic raw data reproducing the human brain.

  16. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Wang

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To address concerns on the effect of natural air drying process on EFE, a comparative study was conducted on Nb and the results showed insignificant difference under the experimental conditions. Nb thin films deposited on Cu present a possible alternative to bulk Nb in superconducting cavities. The EFE performance of a preliminary energetically deposited Nb thin film sample are presented.

  17. Breakdown in hydrogen and deuterium gases in static and radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolov, I.; Donkó, Z.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a combined experimental and modeling study of the electrical breakdown of hydrogen and deuterium in static (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) electric fields. For the simulations of the breakdown events, simplified models are used and only electrons are traced by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental DC Paschen curve of hydrogen is used for the determination of the effective secondary electron emission coefficient. A very good agreement between the experimental and the calculated RF breakdown characteristics for hydrogen is found. For deuterium, on the other hand, presently available cross section sets do not allow a reproduction of RF breakdown characteristics.

  18. Lack of teratogenicity after combined exposure of pregnant mice to CDMA and WCDMA radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Jae-Seon; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2009-11-01

    Concern about the possible adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF)-field exposure on public health has increased because of the extensive use of wireless mobile phones and other telecommunication devices in daily life. The murine fetus is a very sensitive indicator of the effects of stress or stimuli in the environment. Therefore, we investigated the teratogenic effects of multi-signal radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) on mouse fetuses. Pregnant mice were simultaneously exposed to two types of RF signals, single code division multiple access (CDMA) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA). Mice received two 45-min RF-field exposures, separated by a 15-min interval, daily throughout the entire gestation period. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg. The animals were killed humanely on the 18th day of gestation and fetuses were examined for mortality, growth retardation, changes in head size and other morphological abnormalities. From the results, we report for the first time that simultaneous experimental exposure to CDMA and WCDMA RF EMFs did not cause any observable adverse effects on mouse fetuses. PMID:19883234

  19. Ionization of N{sub 2} in radio-frequent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Popovi?, M. P.; Vojnovi?, M. M.; Aoneas, M. M.; Vi?i?, M. D.; Popari?, G. B.; Risti?, M. M.

    2014-06-15

    Rate coefficients for the electron impact ionization of the N{sub 2} molecule are calculated in non-equilibrium conditions in the presence of time-dependent electric field. A Monte Carlo simulation has been developed in order to determine non-equilibrium electron energy distribution functions within one period of the radio-frequent (RF) electric field. By using these distribution functions, rate coefficients for ionization of the N{sub 2} molecule have been obtained time resolved within one period in the frequency range from 13.56 up to 500?MHz, at effective reduced electric field values up to 700 Td. This work presents an insight into the temporal characteristics of ionizing process and provides the ionization rate coefficients that can be of great use for correct implementation in modeling RF plasma discharges. A behavior of rate coefficients under the influence of magnitude and frequency of the fields was studied separately revealing some interesting features in time dependence.

  20. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  1. Simulation on Temperature Field of Radiofrequency Lesions System Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, D.; Qian, L.; Qian, Z.; Li, W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly describes the way to get the volume model of damaged region according to the simulation on temperature field of radiofrequency ablation lesion system in curing Parkinson's disease based on finite element method. This volume model reflects, to some degree, the shape and size of the damaged tissue during the treatment with all tendencies in different time or core temperature. By using Pennes equation as heat conduction equation of radiofrequency ablation of biological tissue, the author obtains the temperature distribution field of biological tissue in the method of finite element for solving equations. In order to establish damage models at temperature points of 60°C, 65°C, 70°C, 75°C, 80°C, 85°C and 90 °C while the time points are 30s, 60s, 90s and 120s, Parkinson's disease model of nuclei is reduced to uniform, infinite model with RF pin at the origin. Theoretical simulations of these models are displayed, focusing on a variety of conditions about the effective lesion size on horizontal and vertical. The results show the binary complete quadratic non-linear joint temperature-time models of the maximum damage diameter and maximum height. The models can comprehensively reflect the degeneration of target tissue caused by radio frequency temperature and duration. This lay the foundation for accurately monitor of clinical RF treatment of Parkinson's disease in the future.

  2. Radiofrequency hydrogen ion source with permanent magnets providing axial magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Kohei; Saito, Yuta; Komizunai, Shota; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Uniform axial magnetic field of about 70 G is applied to a radiofrequency (rf) hydrogen ion source by arrays of permanent magnets. The plasma density and electron temperature downstream of the source and near the magnetic filter are compared with those in the previously described ion source, where the axial field has been applied by two solenoids. The source is operated at ?350 kHz and above 10 kW rf power with a field-effect-transistor-based invertor power supply in 1.5 Pa hydrogen. The results show that the plasma density of ?10(19) m(-3) near the source exit and ?10(18) m(-3) near the magnetic filter can be obtained, which are higher than those with the solenoids. PMID:24593564

  3. Radiofrequency hydrogen ion source with permanent magnets providing axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Kohei Saito, Yuta; Komizunai, Shota; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2014-02-15

    Uniform axial magnetic field of about 70 G is applied to a radiofrequency (rf) hydrogen ion source by arrays of permanent magnets. The plasma density and electron temperature downstream of the source and near the magnetic filter are compared with those in the previously described ion source, where the axial field has been applied by two solenoids. The source is operated at ?350 kHz and above 10 kW rf power with a field-effect-transistor-based invertor power supply in 1.5 Pa hydrogen. The results show that the plasma density of ?10{sup 19} m{sup ?3} near the source exit and ?10{sup 18} m{sup ?3} near the magnetic filter can be obtained, which are higher than those with the solenoids.

  4. High mobility flexible graphene field-effect transistors and ambipolar radio-frequency circuits.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yiran; Liang, Xuelei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Li, Wei; Huo, Xiaoye; Peng, Lianmao

    2015-07-01

    Field-effect transistors (GFETs) were fabricated on mechanically flexible substrates using chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. High current density (nearly 200 ?A ?m(-1)) with saturation, almost perfect ambipolar electron-hole behavior, high transconductance (120 ?S ?m(-1)) and good stability over 381 days were obtained. The average carrier mobility for holes (electrons) is 13,540 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (12,300 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) with the highest value over 24,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (20,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) obtained in flexible GFETs. Ambipolar radio-frequency circuits, frequency doubler, were constructed based on the high performed flexible GFET, which show record high output power spectra purity (?97%) and high conversion gain of -13.6 dB. Bending measurements show the flexible GFETs are able to work under modest strain. These results show that flexible GFETs are a very promising option for future flexible radio-frequency electronics. PMID:26061485

  5. Cell bystander effect induced by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Goya, G F; Calatayud, M P; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R

    2015-01-01

    Induced effects by direct exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are a central issue in many fields like radiation protection, clinic diagnosis and oncological therapies. Direct irradiation at certain doses induce cell death, but similar effects can also occur in cells no directly exposed to IR, a mechanism known as bystander effect. Non-IR (radiofrequency waves) can induce the death of cells loaded with MNPs in a focused oncological therapy known as magnetic hyperthermia. Indirect mechanisms are also able to induce the death of unloaded MNPs cells. Using in vitro cell models, we found that colocalization of the MNPs at the lysosomes and the non-increase of the temperature induces bystander effect under non-IR. Our results provide a landscape in which bystander effects are a more general mechanism, up to now only observed and clinically used in the field of radiotherapy.

  6. Tunable Atomic Magnetometer for Detection of Radio-Frequency Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, I.M.; Seltzer, S.J.; Romalis, M.V.; Sauer, K.L.

    2005-08-05

    We describe an alkali-metal magnetometer for detection of weak magnetic fields in the radio-frequency (rf) range. High sensitivity is achieved by tuning the Zeeman resonance of alkali atoms to the rf frequency and partially suppressing spin-exchange collisions in the alkali-metal vapor. We demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at a frequency of 99 kHz with a resonance width of 400 Hz. We also derive a simple analytic expression for the fundamental limit on the sensitivity of the rf magnetometer and show that a sensitivity of about 0.01 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} can be achieved in a practical system with a measurement volume of 200 cm{sup 3}.

  7. Magnetic orientation of garden warblers (Sylvia borin) under 1.4 MHz radiofrequency magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Kavokin, Kirill; Chernetsov, Nikita; Pakhomov, Alexander; Bojarinova, Julia; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Namozov, Barot

    2014-01-01

    We report on the experiments on orientation of a migratory songbird, the garden warbler (Sylvia borin), during the autumn migration period on the Courish Spit, Eastern Baltics. Birds in experimental cages, deprived of visual information, showed the seasonally appropriate direction of intended flight with respect to the magnetic meridian. Weak radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field (190 nT at 1.4 MHz) disrupted this orientation ability. These results may be considered as an independent replication of earlier experiments, performed by the group of R. and W. Wiltschko with European robins (Erithacus rubecula). Confirmed outstanding sensitivity of the birds' magnetic compass to RF fields in the lower megahertz range demands for a revision of one of the mainstream theories of magnetoreception, the radical-pair model of birds' magnetic compass. PMID:24942848

  8. Cell bystander effect induced by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    G. F. Goya; L. Asin; M. P. Calatayud; A. Tres; M. R. Ibarra

    2015-06-03

    Induced effects by direct exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are a central issue in many fields like radiation protection, clinic diagnosis and oncological therapies. Direct irradiation at certain doses induce cell death, but similar effects can also occur in cells no directly exposed to IR, a mechanism known as bystander effect. Non-IR (radiofrequency waves) can induce the death of cells loaded with MNPs in a focused oncological therapy known as magnetic hyperthermia. Indirect mechanisms are also able to induce the death of unloaded MNPs cells. Using in vitro cell models, we found that colocalization of the MNPs at the lysosomes and the non-increase of the temperature induces bystander effect under non-IR. Our results provide a landscape in which bystander effects are a more general mechanism, up to now only observed and clinically used in the field of radiotherapy.

  9. Exposure of biological preparations to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jean Francois; le Bail, Jean-Luc; Bardet, Michel; Tabony, James

    2010-11-01

    There is interest as to whether the electromagnetic fields used in mobile radiotelephony might affect biological processes. Other weak fields such as gravity intervene in a number of physical and biological processes. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, the macroscopic self-organization of microtubules, a major cellular component, is triggered by gravity. We wished to investigate whether self-organization might also be affected by radiotelephone electromagnetic fields. Detecting a possible effect requires removing the obscuring effects triggered by gravity. A simple manner of doing this is by rotating the sample about the horizontal. However, if the external field does not also rotate with the sample, its possible effect might also be averaged down by rotation. Here, we describe an apparatus in which both the sample and an applied radiofrequency electromagnetic field (1.8 GHz) are stationary with respect to one another while undergoing horizontal rotation. The electromagnetic field profile within the apparatus has been measured and the apparatus tested by reproducing the in vitro behavior of microtubule preparations under conditions of weightlessness. Specific adsorption rates of electromagnetic energy within a sample are measured from the initial temperature rise the incident field causes. The apparatus can be readily adapted to expose samples to various other external fields and factors under conditions of weightlessness.

  10. Quantum Control in the Cs 6S1=2 Ground Manifold Using Radio-Frequency and Microwave Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Jessen, Poul S.

    =2 systems in nuclear magnetic resonance [2]. Finally, we implement and test a protocol for randomizedQuantum Control in the Cs 6S1=2 Ground Manifold Using Radio-Frequency and Microwave Magnetic Fields in quantum metrology and tomography. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.170502 PACS numbers: 03.67.Àa, 02.30.Yy, 37

  11. Heating mechanisms for electron swarms in radio-frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujko, S.; Bošnjakovi?, D.; White, R. D.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    Starting from analytical and numerical solutions of the equation for collisionless motion of a single electron in time-varying electric and magnetic fields, we investigate the possible mechanisms for power absorption of electron swarms in neutral gases. A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation is used to investigate the power absorption of electrons in radio-frequency (rf) electric and magnetic fields in collision-dominated regime for Reid’s inelastic ramp model gas and molecular oxygen. It is found that the effect of resonant absorption of energy in oscillating rf electric and magnetic fields observed under conditions when collisions do not occur, carries directly over to the case where collisions control the swarm behavior. In particular, we have observed the periodic structures in the absorbed power versus amplitude of the applied rf magnetic field curve which have a physical origin similar to the oscillatory phenomena observed for collisionless electron motion. The variation of the absorbed power and other transport properties with the field frequency and field amplitudes in varying configurations of rf electric and magnetic fields is addressed using physical arguments.

  12. Motion of free spins and NMR imaging without a radio-frequency magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Kees van Schenk Brill; Jassem Lahfadi; Tarek Khalil; Daniel Grucker

    2015-04-19

    NMR imaging without any radio-frequency magnetic field is explained by a quantum treatment of independent spin~$\\tfrac 12$. The total magnetization is determined by means of their individual wave function. The theoretical treatment, based on fundamental axioms of quantum mechanics and solving explicitly the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with the kinetic energy part which gives the motion of free spins, is recalled. It explains the phase shift of the spin noise spectrum with its amplitude compared to the conventional NMR spectrum. Moreover it explains also the relatively good signal to noise ratio of NMR images obtained without a RF pulse. This derivation should be helpful for new magnetic resonance imaging sequences or for developing quantum computing by NMR.

  13. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 58, NUMBER 10 15 MAY 1973 Zero-field level crossing and optical radio-frequency double resonance

    E-print Network

    and optical radio-frequency double resonance studies of the A 2~ + states of OH and on K. R. German *, T. H crossings.7 Re- finements in the zero-field level crossing measurements over our previous work combined hyper- fine measurements for the A state because of its short lifetime. Optical radio-frequency double

  14. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF–exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed. PMID:25835473

  15. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF-exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed. PMID:25835473

  16. 2.45 GHz radiofrequency fields alter gene expression in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanggyu; Johnson, Debra; Dunbar, K; Dong, Hui; Ge, Xijin; Kim, Yeong C; Wing, Claudia; Jayathilaka, Nimanthi; Emmanuel, Nimmi; Zhou, Chenn Q; Gerber, Howard L; Tseng, Charles C; Wang, San Ming

    2005-08-29

    The biological effect of radiofrequency (RF) fields remains controversial. We address this issue by examining whether RF fields can cause changes in gene expression. We used the pulsed RF fields at a frequency of 2.45 GHz that is commonly used in telecommunication to expose cultured human HL-60 cells. We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method to measure the RF effect on gene expression at the genome level. We observed that 221 genes altered their expression after a 2-h exposure. The number of affected genes increased to 759 after a 6-h exposure. Functional classification of the affected genes reveals that apoptosis-related genes were among the upregulated ones and the cell cycle genes among the downregulated ones. We observed no significant increase in the expression of heat shock genes. These results indicate that the RF fields at 2.45 GHz can alter gene expression in cultured human cells through non-thermal mechanism. PMID:16107253

  17. Analysis of auditory evoked potential parameters in the presence of radiofrequency fields using a support vector machines method.

    PubMed

    Maby, E; Le Bouquin Jeannès, R; Liégeois-Chauvel, C; Gourevitch, B; Faucon, G

    2004-07-01

    The paper presents a study of global system for mobile (GSM) phone radiofrequency effects on human cerebral activity. The work was based on the study of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) recorded from healthy humans and epileptic patients. The protocol allowed the comparison of AEPs recorded with or without exposure to electrical fields. Ten variables measured from AEPs were employed in the design of a supervised support vector machines classifier. The classification performance measured the classifier's ability to discriminate features performed with or without radiofrequency exposure. Most significant features were chosen by a backward sequential selection that ranked the variables according to their pertinence for the discrimination. Finally, the most discriminating features were analysed statistically by a Wilcoxon signed rank test. For both populations, the N100 amplitudes were reduced under the influence of GSM radiofrequency (mean attenuation of -0.36 microV for healthy subjects and -0.60 microV for epileptic patients). Healthy subjects showed a N100 latency decrease (-5.23 ms in mean), which could be consistent with mild, localised heating. The auditory cortical activity in humans was modified by GSM phone radiofrequencies, but an effect on brain functionality has not been proven. PMID:15320468

  18. Gene and Protein Expression following Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields from Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Verschaeve, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Since 1999, several articles have been published on genome-wide and/or proteome-wide response after exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields whose signal and intensities were similar to or typical of those of currently used mobile telephones. These studies were performed using powerful high-throughput screening techniques (HTSTs) of transcriptomics and/or proteomics, which allow for the simultaneous screening of the expression of thousands of genes or proteins. Objectives We reviewed these HTST-based studies and compared the results with currently accepted concepts about the effects of RF fields on gene expression. In this article we also discuss these last in light of the recent concept of microwave-assisted chemistry. Discussion To date, the results of HTST-based studies of transcriptomics and/or proteomics after exposure to RF fields relevant to human exposure are still inconclusive, as most of the positive reports are flawed by methodologic imperfections or shortcomings. In addition, when positive findings were reported, no precise response pattern could be identified in a reproducible way. In particular, results from HTST studies tend to exclude the role of a cell stressor for exposure to RF fields at nonthermal intensities. However, on the basis of lessons from microwave-assisted chemistry, we can assume that RF fields might affect heat-sensitive gene or protein expression to an extent larger than would be predicted from temperature change only. But in all likelihood, this would concern intensities higher than those relevant to usual human exposure. Conclusions The precise role of transcriptomics and proteomics in the screening of bioeffects from exposure to RF fields from mobile phones is still uncertain in view of the lack of positively identified phenotypic change and the lack of theoretical, as well as experimental, arguments for specific gene and/or protein response patterns after this kind of exposure. PMID:18795152

  19. Optimized parallel transmit and receive radiofrequency coil for ultrahigh-field MRI of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kyle M; Gati, Joseph S; Barker, Kevin; Everling, Stefan; Menon, Ravi S

    2016-01-15

    Monkeys are a valuable model for investigating the structure and function of the brain. To attain the requisite resolution to resolve fine anatomical detail and map localized brain activation requires radiofrequency (RF) coils that produce high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) both spatially (image SNR) and temporally. Increasing the strength of the static magnetic field is an effective method to improve SNR, yet this comes with commensurate challenges in RF coil design. First, at ultrahigh field strengths, the magnetic field produced by a surface coil in a dielectric medium is asymmetric. In neuroimaging of rhesus macaques, this complex field pattern is compounded by the heterogeneous structure of the head. The confluence of these effects results in a non-uniform flip angle, but more markedly, a suboptimal circularly polarized mode with reduced transmit efficiency. Secondly, susceptibility-induced geometric distortions are exacerbated when performing echo-planar imaging (EPI), which is a standard technique in functional studies. This requires receive coils capable of parallel imaging with low noise amplification during image reconstruction. To address these challenges at 7T, this study presents a parallel (8-channel) transmit coil developed for monkey imaging, along with a highly parallel (24-channel) receive coil. RF shimming with the parallel-transmit coil produced significant advantages-the transmit field was 38% more uniform than a traditional circularly polarized mode and 54% more power-efficient, demonstrating that parallel-transmit coils should be used for monkey imaging at ultrahigh field strengths. The receive coil had the ability to accelerate along an arbitrary axis with at least a three-fold reduction factor, thereby reducing geometric distortions in whole-brain EPI. PMID:26497267

  20. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J.; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P.; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-01-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer. PMID:24206915

  1. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H.; Jarvis, J.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ?10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15?mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  2. Optimization and Validation of Methods for Mapping of the Radiofrequency Transmit Field at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Lutti, Antoine; Hutton, Chloe; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Helms, Gunther; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    MRI techniques such as quantitative imaging and parallel transmit require precise knowledge of the radio-frequency transmit field (). Three published methods were optimized for robust mapping at 3T in the human brain: three-dimensional (3D) actual flip angle imaging (AFI), 3D echo-planar imaging (EPI), and two-dimensional (2D) stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM). We performed a comprehensive comparison of the methods, focusing on artifacts, reproducibility, and accuracy compared to a reference 2D double angle method. For the 3D AFI method, the addition of flow-compensated gradients for diffusion damping reduced the level of physiological artifacts and improved spoiling of transverse coherences. Correction of susceptibility-induced artifacts alleviated image distortions and improved the accuracy of the 3D EPI imaging method. For the 2D STEAM method, averaging over multiple acquisitions reduced the impact of physiological noise and a new calibration method enhanced the accuracy of the maps. After optimization, all methods yielded low noise maps (below 2 percentage units), of the nominal flip angle value (p.u.) with a systematic bias less than 5 p.u. units. Full brain coverage was obtained in less than 5 min. The 3D AFI method required minimal postprocessing and showed little sensitivity to off-resonance and physiological effects. The 3D EPI method showed the highest level of reproducibility. The 2D STEAM method was the most time-efficient technique. Magn Reson Med, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20572153

  3. Derangement of chick embryo retinal differentiation caused by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zareen, Nusrat; Khan, Muhammad Yunus; Ali Minhas, Liaqat

    2009-03-01

    The possible adverse effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted from mobile phones present a major public concern. Biological electrical activities of the human body are vulnerable to interference from oscillatory aspects of EMF, which affect fundamental cellular activities, in particular, the highly active development process of embryos. Some studies highlight the possible health hazards of EMF, while others contest the hypothesis of biological impact of EMF. The present study was designed to observe the histomorphological effects of EMF emitted by a mobile phone on the retinae of developing chicken embryos. Fertilized chicken eggs were exposed to a ringing mobile set on silent tone placed in the incubator at different ages of development. After exposure for the scheduled duration the retinae of the embryos were dissected out and processed for histological examination. The control and experimental embryos were statistically compared for retinal thickness and epithelial pigmentation grades. Contrasting effects of EMF on the retinal histomorphology were noticed, depending on the duration of exposure. The embryos exposed for 10 post-incubation days exhibited decreased retinal growth and mild pigmentation of the epithelium. Growth retardation reallocated to growth enhancement on increasing EMF exposure for 15 post-incubation days, with a shift of pigmentation grade from mild to intense. We conclude that EMF emitted by a mobile phone cause derangement of chicken embryo retinal differentiation. PMID:19243412

  4. Activation of endogenous opioid gene expression in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts by pulsed radiofrequency energy fields

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John; Fray, Linley M; Kubat, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulsed radiofrequency energy (PRFE) fields are being used increasingly for the treatment of pain arising from dermal trauma. However, despite their increased use, little is known about the biological and molecular mechanism(s) responsible for PRFE-mediated analgesia. In general, current therapeutics used for analgesia target either endogenous factors involved in inflammation, or act on endogenous opioid pathways. Methods and Results Using cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), we investigated the effect of PRFE treatment on factors, which are involved in modulating peripheral analgesia in vivo. We found that PRFE treatment did not inhibit cyclooxygenase enzyme activity, but instead had a positive effect on levels of endogenous opioid precursor mRNA (proenkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, prodynorphin) and corresponding opioid peptide. In HEK cells, increases in opioid mRNA were dependent, at least in part, on endothelin-1. In HDF cells, additional pathways also appear to be involved. PRFE treatment was also followed by changes in endogenous expression of several cytokines, including increased levels of interleukin-10 mRNA and decreased levels of interleukin-1? mRNA in both cell types. Conclusion These findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying PRFE-mediated analgesia reported in the clinical setting. PMID:23055776

  5. Effects of field orientation during 700-MHz radiofrequency irradiation of rats.

    PubMed

    Frei, M R; Jauchem, J R; Padilla, J M

    1989-01-01

    Ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to far-field 700-MHz continuous-wave radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in both E and H orientations. Irradiation was conducted at whole-body average specific absorption rates (SARs) of 9.2 and 13.0 W/kg (E and H, respectively) that resulted in approximately equivalent colonic specific heating rates (SHRs). Exposures were performed to repeatedly increase colonic temperature by 1 degree C (38.5 to 39.5 degrees C). Tympanic, tail, left and right subcutaneous (toward and away from RFR source), and colonic temperatures, arterial blood pressure, and respiratory rate were continuously recorded. In spite of equivalent colonic SHRs and the reduced E-orientation average SAR, the right subcutaneous, tympanic, and tail SARs, SHRs and absolute temperature increases were significantly greater in E than in H orientation. The cooling rate at all monitoring sites was also significantly greater in E than in H orientation. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure significantly increased during irradiation; however, changes between orientations were not different. Respiratory rate significantly increased during irradiation in H, but not in E orientation. These results indicate that during resonant frequency irradiation, differences occur in the pattern of heat deposition between E- and H-orientation exposure. When compared with previous investigations performed at supraresonant frequencies, the lower level of cardiovascular change in this study was probably related to the lower periphery-to-core thermal gradient. PMID:2694195

  6. Dominant lethal mutation test in male mice exposed to 900MHz radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunxing; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Chun; He, Qina; Vijayalaxmi; Prihoda, Thomas J; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Adult male ICR mice were exposed to continuous wave 900MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 1.6mW/cm(2) power intensity (whole body average specific absorption rate of 0.731W/kg) for 4 hour/day for 15 days. At the end of exposure, each mouse was caged with 3 mature virgin female mice for mating. After 7 days, each male mouse was transferred to a fresh cage and mated with a second batch of 3 females. This process was repeated for a total of 4 consecutive weeks. Sham exposed male mice and those subjected to an acute 2Gy ?-irradiation (GR) were handled similarly and used as un-exposed and positive controls, respectively. All females were sacrificed on the 18th day of gestation and presumptive mating and, the contents in their uteri were examined. The overall observations during the 4 weeks of mating indicated that the un-exposed female mice mated to RF-exposed male mice showed no significant differences in the percentage of pregnancies, total implants, live implants and dead implants when compared with those mated with sham-exposed mice. In contrast, female mice mated with GR-exposed males showed a consistent pattern of significant differences in the above indices in each and all 4 weeks of mating. Thus, the data indicated an absence of mutagenic potential of RF exposure in the germ cells of male mice. PMID:26433262

  7. Radio-frequency electromagnetic fields associated with cellular-radio cell-site antennas.

    PubMed

    Petersen, R C; Testagrossa, P A

    1992-01-01

    Because of a heightened public awareness of issues pertaining to the use of electromagnetic energy, concurrent with a rapid growth of the cellular telephone industry, a study was initiated to characterize the electromagnetic environment associated with typical cell-site antennas. In particular, the radio-frequency electromagnetic (RF) fields in the vicinity of several antenna towers, ranging in height from 46-82 m, were characterized by measurement. In all cases, the antennas were omnidirectional co-linear arrays. The maximal power densities considered representative of public exposure were found to be less than 100 microW/m2 (10 nW/cm2) per radio channel. Comparison of measured values with the corresponding values that were calculated from the free-space transmission formula indicated that the analytical technique is conservative (i.e., overestimates field levels). The measured and corresponding analytical values were found to be well below accepted exposure limits even when extrapolated to simultaneous and continuous operation of the maximal number of transmitters that would be expected to be installed at a cell-site. Additional measurements were made in the near field of the same antenna type in a roof-mounted configuration. At a distance of 0.7 m from the antenna, the maximal power density in the main beam was found to be less than 30 W/m2 (3 mW/cm2) when normalized to sixteen radio channels (the maximal number used on a single antenna) and less than 30 mW/m2 (3 microW/m2) at 70 m. In all cases, the effective radiated power (ERP) by each radio channel was 100 W referenced to a half-wave dipole. This paper describes the instrumentation and measurement techniques used for this study and provides a summary of the results. PMID:1482416

  8. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1...Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.” Note to Introductory...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  9. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1...Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.” Note to Introductory...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  10. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1...Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.” Note to Introductory...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  11. Occupational exposures to radiofrequency fields: results of an Israeli national survey.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, R; Kavet, R; Shachar, A; Margaliot, M; Kheifets, L

    2015-06-01

    Relatively high exposures to radiofrequency (RF) fields can occur in the broadcast, medical, and communications industries, as well in occupations that use RF emitting equipment (e.g. law enforcement). Information on exposure to workers employed in these industries and occupations is limited. We present results of an Israeli National Survey of occupational RF field levels at frequencies between ~100?kHz and 40?GHz, representing Industrial Heating, Communications, Radar, Research, and Medicine. Almost 4300 measurements from 900 sources across 25 occupations were recorded and categorised as 'routine', 'incidental', or 'unintended'. The occupation-specific geometric means (GMs) of the percentage of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit values (TLVs) for each of the three exposure scenarios are presented together with the geometric standard deviation (GSD). Additionally, we present estimates of occupation-specific annual personal exposures and collective exposures. The vast majority of the GM of routine exposures ranged from a fraction to less than 1% of ACGIH TLVs, except for Walkie-Talkie (GM 94% of ACGIH), Induction Heating (17%), Plastic Welding (11%), Industrial Heating (6%) and Diathermy (6%). The GM of incidental and unintended exposures exceeded the TLV for one and 14 occupations, respectively. In many cases, the within-occupation GSD was very large, and though the medians remained below TLV, variable fractions of these occupations were projected to exceed the TLV. In rank order, Walkie-Talkie, Plastic Welding, and Induction Heating workers had the highest annual cumulative personal exposure. For cumulative collective exposures within an occupation, Walkie-Talkie dominated with 96.3% of the total, reflecting both large population and high personal exposure. A brief exceedance of the TLV does not automatically translate to hazard as RF exposure limits (issued by various bodies, including ACGIH) include a 10-fold safety factor relative to thermal thresholds and are based on a 6?min averaging period. PMID:25978146

  12. In vitro effects of GSM modulated radiofrequency fields on human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, Helga; Novak, Waltraud; Molla-Djafari, Hamid

    2006-04-01

    Despite the important role of the immune system in defending the body against infections and cancer, only few investigations on possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on function of human immune cells have been undertaken. Aim of the present investigation was therefore to assess whether GSM modulated RF fields have adverse effects on the functional competence of human immune cells. Within the frame of the multidisciplinary project "Biological effects of high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF)" sponsored by the National Occupation Hazard Insurance Association (AUVA) in vitro investigations were carried out on human blood cells. Exposure was performed at GSM Basic 1950 MHz, an SAR of 1 mW/g in an intermittent mode (5 min "ON", 10 min "OFF") and a maximum Delta T of 0.06 degrees C for the duration of 8 h. The following immune parameters were evaluated: (1) the intracellular production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon (INF) gamma in lymphocytes, and IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in monocytes were evaluated with monoclonal antibodies. (2) The activity of immune-relevant genes (IL 1-alpha and beta, IL-2, IL-2-receptor, IL-4, macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSF)-receptor, TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha-receptor) and housekeeping genes was analyzed with real time PCR. (3) The cytotoxicity of lymphokine activated killer cells (LAK cells) against a tumor cell line was determined in a flow cytometric test. For each parameter, blood samples of at least 15 donors were evaluated. No statistically significant effects of exposure were found and there is no indication that emissions from mobile phones are associated with adverse effects on the human immune system. PMID:16342197

  13. Field orientation effects during 5.6-GHz radiofrequency irradiation of rats.

    PubMed

    Frei, M R; Jauchem, J R; Price, D L; Padilla, J M

    1990-12-01

    Ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in E and H orientations (long axis parallel to electric and magnetic fields, respectively) to far-field 5.6-GHz continuous-wave radio-frequency radiation (RFR). Power densities were used that resulted in equivalent whole-body average specific absorption rates of 14 W/kg in both orientations (90 mW/cm2 for E and 66 mW/cm2 for H). Irradiation was conducted to increase colonic temperature by 1 degree C (from 38.5 to 39.5 degrees C). During experimentation, arterial blood pressure and respiratory rate and colonic, tympanic, left and right subcutaneous (sides toward and away from RFR source), and tail temperatures were continuously recorded. Results showed no significant difference in the times required to cause a 1 degree C increase or to recover to the initial temperature when irradiation was stopped. Significant differences between E- and H-orientation exposure were seen in the patterns of localized heating. The tail and left subcutaneous temperature increases were significantly greater during E-orientation exposure, the tympanic site showed no difference, and the right subcutaneous temperature increase was significantly greater during H-orientation exposure. Under both exposure conditions, heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure significantly increased during irradiation; however, there were no significant differences between E and H orientation responses. These findings at 5.6 GHz are in contrast to the significant cardiovascular response differences between E- and H-orientation exposure noted during a previous study of irradiation at 2.45 GHz. PMID:2285402

  14. [Ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (comparative risk estimations)].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G

    2012-01-01

    The population has widely used mobile communication for already more than 15 years. It is important to note that the use of mobile communication has sharply changed the conditions of daily exposure of the population to EME We expose our brain daily for the first time in the entire civilization. The mobile phone is an open and uncontrollable source of electromagnetic radiation. The comparative risk estimation for the population of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation was carried out taking into account the real conditions of influence. Comparison of risks for the population of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation leads us to a conclusion that EMF RF exposure in conditions of wide use of mobile communication is potentially more harmful than ionizing radiation influence. PMID:22690585

  15. Circadian Rhythmicity of Antioxidant Markers in Rats Exposed to 1.8 GHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Honglong; Qin, Fenju; Liu, Xueguan; Wang, Jiajun; Cao, Yi; Tong, Jian; Zhao, Heming

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential health risks of exposure to Radiofrequency Fields (RF) emitted by mobile phones are currently of considerable public interest, such as the adverse effects on the circadian rhythmicities of biological systems. To determine whether circadian rhythms of the plasma antioxidants (Mel, GSH-Px and SOD) are affected by RF, we performed a study on male Sprague Dawley rats exposed to the 1.8 GHz RF. Methods: All animals were divided into seven groups. The animals in six groups were exposed to 1.8 GHz RF (201.7 ?W/cm2 power density, 0.05653 W/kg specific absorption rate) at a specific period of the day (3, 7, 11, 15, 19 and 23 h GMT, respectively), for 2 h/day for 32 consecutive days. The rats in the seventh group were used as sham-exposed controls. At the end of last RF exposure, blood samples were collected from each rat every 4 h (total period of 24 h) and also at similar times from sham-exposed animals. The concentrations of three antioxidants (Mel, GSH-Px and SOD) were determined. The data in RF-exposed rats were compared with those in sham-exposed animals. Results: circadian rhythms in the synthesis of Mel and antioxidant enzymes, GSH-Px and SOD, were shifted in RF-exposed rats compared to sham-exposed animals: the Mel, GSH-Px and SOD levels were significantly decreased when RF exposure was given at 23 and 3 h GMT. Conclusion: The overall results indicate that there may be adverse effects of RF exposure on antioxidant function, in terms of both the daily antioxidative levels, as well as the circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25685954

  16. Circadian alterations of reproductive functional markers in male rats exposed to 1800?MHz radiofrequency field.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fenju; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Honglong; Guo, Weiqiang; Chen, Lili; Shen, Ouxi; Sun, Jinpeng; Yi, Cao; Li, Jianxiang; Wang, Jiajun; Tong, Jian

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we explored the circadian effects of daily radiofrequency field (RF) exposure on reproductive functional markers in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals in circadian rhythm (as indicated by melatonin measurements), were divided into several groups and exposed to 1800?MHz RF at 205??w/cm(2) power density (specific absorption rate 0.0405?W/kg) for 2?h/day for 32?days at different zeitgeber time (ZT) points, namely, ZT0, ZT4, ZT8, ZT12, ZT16 and ZT20. Sham-exposed animals were used as controls in the study. From each rat, testicular and epididymis tissues were collected and assessed for testosterone levels, daily sperm production and sperm motility, testis marker enzymes ?-GT and ACP, cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (p450cc) mRNA expression, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mRNA expression. Via these measurements, we confirmed the existence of circadian rhythms in sham-exposed animals. However, rats exposed to RF exhibited a disruption of circadian rhythms, decreased testosterone levels, lower daily sperm production and sperm motility, down-regulated activity of ?-GT and ACP, as well as altered mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 and StAR. All of these observations were more pronounced when rats were exposed to RF at ZT0. Thus, our findings indicate potential adverse effects of RF exposure on male reproductive functional markers, in terms of both the daily overall levels as well as the circadian rhythmicity. PMID:24117058

  17. LSU School of Dentistry Laser Safety : Clinical SAFETY PROCEDURES FOR LASER (NON-IONIZING) RADIATION

    E-print Network

    ) RADIATION 1. PURPOSE This procedure sets forth the Louisiana State University (LSU) System non-ionizing radiation safety policy and procedural requirements of the program. The use of the term non-ionizing radiation in this document is defined as meaning non-ionizing radiation produced as a result of normal

  18. Effects of short- and long-term pulsed radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on night sleep and cognitive functions in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Fritzer, Gunther; Göder, Robert; Friege, Lars; Wachter, Jessica; Hansen, Volkert; Hinze-Selch, Dunja; Aldenhoff, Josef B

    2007-05-01

    There has been wide public discussion on whether the electromagnetic fields of mobile telephones and their base stations affect human sleep or cognitive functioning. As there is evidence for learning and memory-consolidating effects of sleep and particularly of REM sleep, disturbance of sleep by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields might also impair cognitive functions. Previously realized sleep studies yielded inconsistent results regarding short-term exposure. Moreover, data are lacking on the effect that short- and long-term exposure might have on sleep as well as on cognitive functions. Therefore, 10 healthy young male subjects were included and nocturnal sleep was recorded during eight consecutive nights. In the second, third, and last night, we investigated polysomnographic night sleep and cognitive functions. After the adaptation and baseline nights, the participants were exposed to a defined radiofrequency electromagnetic field during the following six nights. We analyzed polysomnographic night sleep according to Rechtschaffen and Kales [1968, Manual of Standardized Terminology, Techniques and Scoring System for Sleep of Human Subjects] as well as by power spectra and correlation dimension. Cognitive functions were investigated by an array of neuropsychological tests. Data analysis was done by comparing the baseline night with the first and last exposure night and the first two sleep cycles of the respective nights. We did not find significant effects, either on conventional sleep parameters or on power spectra and correlation dimension, nor were there any significant effects on cognitive functions. With our results, we are unable to reveal either short-term or cumulative long-term effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on night sleep and cognitive functions in healthy young male subjects. PMID:17216609

  19. Effect of Vapor-Cell Geometry on Rydberg-Atom-Based Measurements of Radio-Frequency Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haoquan; Kumar, Santosh; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P.; Holloway, Christopher L.; Gordon, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    A new approach to detect absolute radio-frequency (rf) electric fields (E-fields) that uses Rydberg atoms at room temperature in vapor cells has been demonstrated recently. The large-transition dipole moments between energetically adjacent Rydberg states enable this technique to make traceable E-field measurements with high sensitivity over a large frequency range from 1 GHz to 1 THz. In this paper, we experimentally investigate how the vapor-cell geometry affects the accuracy of the measurements. We find that the effects of the vapor cell on the measured rf E-field are minimized by making the vapor-cell size small compared to the wavelength of the rf E-field.

  20. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-01

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ?60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz. PMID:26628171

  1. Measurement of Ampère-class pulsed electron beams via field emission from carbon-nanotube cathodes in a radiofrequency gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, D.; Faillace, L.; Hartzell, J.; Panuganti, H.; Boucher, S.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Thangaraj, J. C. T.

    2015-07-01

    Pulsed field emission from cold carbon-nanotube cathodes placed in a radiofrequency resonant cavity was directly measured. The cathodes were located on the backplate of a conventional 1 + /1 2 -cell resonant cavity operating at 1.3-GHz and resulted in the production of bunch train with maximum average current close to 0.7 Ampère. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristic, transverse emittance, and pulse duration are presented and, when possible, compared to numerical simulations. The implications of our results to the promise of high-average-current electron sources are briefly discussed.

  2. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-01

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ˜60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  3. Effects of radiofrequency field on the blood-brain barrier: A systematic review from 2005 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Anne; Cretallaz, Celine; Collin, Alice; Amourette, Christine; Yardin, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    The published results available in 2005 were insufficient to draw firm conclusions concerning the possible non-thermal effects of radiofrequency fields on the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This critical review deals with 16 articles on this topic published since 2005. The methodological quality of these articles was not equivalent. We therefore analysed the underlying methodologies from both their biological and physical aspects. We conclude that recent studies provide no convincing proof of deleterious effects of RF on the integrity of the BBB, for specific absorption rates (SAR) up to 6 W/kg.

  4. Does Exposure to a Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Field Modify Thermal Preference in Juvenile Rats?

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Delanaud, Stéphane; de Seze, René; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Loos, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Some studies have shown that people living near a mobile phone base station may report sleep disturbances and discomfort. Using a rat model, we have previously shown that chronic exposure to a low-intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) was associated with paradoxical sleep (PS) fragmentation and greater vasomotor tone in the tail. Here, we sought to establish whether sleep disturbances might result from the disturbance of thermoregulatory processes by a RF-EMF. We recorded thermal preference and sleep stage distribution in 18 young male Wistar rats. Nine animals were exposed to a low-intensity RF-EMF (900 MHz, 1 V.m?1) for five weeks and nine served as non-exposed controls. Thermal preference was assessed in an experimental chamber comprising three interconnected compartments, in which the air temperatures (Ta) were set to 24°C, 28°C and 31°C. Sleep and tail skin temperature were also recorded. Our results indicated that relative to control group, exposure to RF-EMF at 31°C was associated with a significantly lower tail skin temperature (?1.6°C) which confirmed previous data. During the light period, the exposed group preferred to sleep at Ta?=?31°C and the controls preferred Ta?=?28°C. The mean sleep duration in exposed group was significantly greater (by 15.5%) than in control group (due in turn to a significantly greater amount of slow wave sleep (SWS, +14.6%). Similarly, frequency of SWS was greater in exposed group (by 4.9 episodes.h?1). The PS did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the dark period, there were no significant intergroup differences. We conclude that RF-EMF exposure induced a shift in thermal preference towards higher temperatures. The shift in preferred temperature might result from a cold thermal sensation. The change in sleep stage distribution may involve signals from thermoreceptors in the skin. Modulation of SWS may be a protective adaptation in response to RF-EMF exposure. PMID:24905635

  5. Radio-frequency measurements of UNiX compounds (X= Al, Ga, Ge) in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Charles H; Mcdonald, David R; Zapf, Vivien; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Lacerda, Alex H; Adak, Sourav; Karunakar, Kothapalli; Nakotte, Heinrich; Chang, S; Alsmadi, A M; Alyones, S

    2009-01-01

    We performed radio-frequency (RF) skin-depth measurements of antiferromagnetic UNiX compounds (X=Al, Ga, Ge) in magnetic fields up to 60 T and at temperatures between 1.4 to {approx}60 K. Magnetic fields are applied along different crystallographic directions and RF penetration-depth was measured using a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) circuit. The sample is coupled to the inductive element of a TDO resonant tank circuit, and the shift in the resonant frequency {Delta}f of the circuit is measured. The UNiX compounds exhibit field-induced magnetic transitions at low temperatures, and those transitions are accompanied by a drastic change in {Delta}f. The results of our skin-depth measurements were compared with previously published B-T phase diagrams for these three compounds.

  6. Radio-Frequency, Atmospheric-Pressure Glow Discharges: Producing Methods, Characteristics and Applications in Bio-Medical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He-Ping; Li, Guo; Sun, Wen-Ting; Wang, Sen; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Ziliang; Ding, Nan; Zhao, Hongxin; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2008-02-01

    Radio-frequency (RF), atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metallic electrodes have shown their promising prospects in different fields. In this paper, based on the induced gas discharge approach, the discharge characteristics of RF, APGD plasmas using helium/oxygen mixture as the plasma working-gas are presented. The bio-medical effects of the helium RF APGD plasma jet acting on the gfp DNA and E. coli are also reported. Studies concerning the lethal and sub-lethal effects of the RF APGDs on the molecular and cell levels, which are related with the characteristics of the plasmas and their operation conditions are necessary in the future work based on a closer cooperation between the researchers in the field of the plasma science & technology and of the bio-medical science.

  7. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    The field limit of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of a type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied, taking the effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the product of the superheating field for an ideal flat surface and a suppression factor that contains the effects of nano-defects. A nano-defect is modeled by a triangular groove with a depth smaller than the penetration depth. An analytical formula for the suppression factor of bulk and multilayer superconductors is derived in the framework of the London theory. As an immediate application, the suppression factor of the dirty Nb processed by electropolishing is evaluated by using results of surface topographic study. The estimated field limit is consistent with the present record field of nitrogen-doped Nb cavities. Suppression factors of surfaces of other bulk and multilayer superconductors, and those after various surface processing technologies, can also be evaluated by using the formula.

  8. Tunable Atomic Magnetometer for Detection of Radio-Frequency Magnetic Fields I. M. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer, and M. V. Romalis

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Tunable Atomic Magnetometer for Detection of Radio-Frequency Magnetic Fields I. M. Savukov, S. J (Received 25 January 2005; published 3 August 2005) We describe an alkali-metal magnetometer for detection on the sensitivity of the rf magnetometer and show that a sensitivity of about 0:01 fT=Hz1=2 can be achieved

  9. Radio-frequency dispersive detection of donor atoms in a field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Verduijn, J. Rogge, S.; Vinet, M.

    2014-03-10

    Radio-frequency dispersive read-out can provide a useful probe to nano-scale structures, such as nano-wire devices, especially, when the implementation of charge sensing is not straightforward. Here, we demonstrate dispersive “gate-only” read-out of phosphor donors in a silicon nano-scale transistor. The technique enables access to states that are only tunnel-coupled to one contact, which is not easily achievable by other methods. This allows us to locate individual randomly placed donors in the device channel. Furthermore, the setup is naturally compatible with high bandwidth access to the probed donor states and may aid the implementation of a qubit based on coupled donors.

  10. Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-Loss for Coulomb Scattered Particles from Low Energy up to Relativistic Regime in Space Radiation Environment

    E-print Network

    M. J. Boschini; C. Consolandi; M. Gervasi; S. Giani; D. Grandi; V. Ivanchenko; S. Pensotti; P. G. Rancoita; M. Tacconi

    2014-01-21

    In the space environment, instruments onboard of spacecrafts can be affected by displacement damage due to radiation. The differential scattering cross section for screened nucleus--nucleus interactions - i.e., including the effects due to screened Coulomb nuclear fields -, nuclear stopping powers and non-ionization energy losses are treated from about 50 keV/nucleon up to relativistic energies.

  11. Citrate-capped gold nanoparticle electrophoretic heat production in response to a time-varying radiofrequency electric-field

    PubMed Central

    Corr, Stuart J.; Raoof, Mustafa; Mackeyev, Yuri; Phounsavath, Sophia; Cheney, Matthew A.; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Shur, Michael; Gozin, Michael; McNally, Patrick J.; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of heat production from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) irradiated with radiofrequency (RF) energy has been problematic due to Joule heating of their background ionic buffer suspensions. Insights into the physical heating mechanism of nanomaterials under RF excitations must be obtained if they are to have applications in fields such as nanoparticle-targeted hyperthermia for cancer therapy. By developing a purification protocol which allows for highly-stable and concentrated solutions of citrate-capped AuNPs to be suspended in high-resistivity water, we show herein, for the first time, that heat production is only evident for AuNPs of diameters ? 10 nm, indicating a unique size-dependent heating behavior not previously observed. Heat production has also shown to be linearly dependent on both AuNP concentration and total surface area, and severely attenuated upon AuNP aggregation. These relationships have been further validated using permittivity analysis across a frequency range of 10 MHz to 3 GHz, as well as static conductivity measurements. Theoretical evaluations suggest that the heating mechanism can be modeled by the electrophoretic oscillation of charged AuNPs across finite length scales in response to a time-varying electric field. It is anticipated these results will assist future development of nanoparticle-assisted heat production by RF fields for applications such as targeted cancer hyperthermia. PMID:23795228

  12. Radiofrequency neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Golovac, Stanley

    2010-05-01

    Pain that develops in the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine is typically initiated from a clinical condition called spondylosis. Radiofrequency ablation is a key element in the treatment protocol of patients with spondylosis of the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacroiliac joint pain. A diagnosis can be made by blocking the median branch nerve that innervates each joint. Once this has been confirmed, an ablation procedure can be performed to increase the duration of pain relief desired by the patient with chronic pain originating from spondylosis. Radiofrequency neurolysis is a common technique used in the treatment of chronic pain, particularly facet (zygapophyseal joint) arthralgia. The technique involves an insulated needlelike cannula; x-rays passing through the patient show the projected relative radioopaque bony landmarks and the metallic cannula. PMID:20439016

  13. Evaluation of 3D radio-frequency electromagnetic fields for any matching and coupling conditions by the use of basis functions.

    PubMed

    Tiberi, Gianluigi; Fontana, Nunzia; Monorchio, Agostino; Stara, Riccardo; Retico, Alessandra; Tosetti, Michela

    2015-12-01

    A procedure for evaluating radio-frequency electromagnetic fields in anatomical human models for any matching and coupling conditions is introduced. The procedure resorts to the extraction of basis functions: such basis functions, which represent the fields produced by each individual port without any residual coupling, are derived through an algebraic procedure which uses the S parameter matrix and the fields calculated in one (only) full-wave simulation. The basis functions are then used as building-blocks for calculating the fields for any other S parameter matrix. The proposed approach can be used both for volume coil driven in quadrature and for parallel transmission configuration. PMID:26529200

  14. Evaluation of 3D radio-frequency electromagnetic fields for any matching and coupling conditions by the use of basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, Gianluigi; Fontana, Nunzia; Monorchio, Agostino; Stara, Riccardo; Retico, Alessandra; Tosetti, Michela

    2015-12-01

    A procedure for evaluating radio-frequency electromagnetic fields in anatomical human models for any matching and coupling conditions is introduced. The procedure resorts to the extraction of basis functions: such basis functions, which represent the fields produced by each individual port without any residual coupling, are derived through an algebraic procedure which uses the S parameter matrix and the fields calculated in one (only) full-wave simulation. The basis functions are then used as building-blocks for calculating the fields for any other S parameter matrix. The proposed approach can be used both for volume coil driven in quadrature and for parallel transmission configuration.

  15. Evaluation of Safety and Patient Subjective Efficacy of Using Radiofrequency and Pulsed Magnetic Fields for the Treatment of Striae (Stretch Marks)

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Jeffrey S.; Rothaus, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Stretch marks are common skin disorders that are dermal scars with associated epidermal atrophy. They are of significant concern or psychological concern to many. This manuscript describes the use of multipolar radiofrequency with pulsed magnetic fields that was successfully used to diminish these lesions in 16 subjects undergoing a series of treatments. The improvements noted were statistically significant and no serious adverse events were noted. PMID:25276274

  16. Evaluation of safety and patient subjective efficacy of using radiofrequency and pulsed magnetic fields for the treatment of striae (stretch marks).

    PubMed

    Dover, Jeffrey S; Rothaus, Kenneth; Gold, Michael H

    2014-09-01

    Stretch marks are common skin disorders that are dermal scars with associated epidermal atrophy. They are of significant concern or psychological concern to many. This manuscript describes the use of multipolar radiofrequency with pulsed magnetic fields that was successfully used to diminish these lesions in 16 subjects undergoing a series of treatments. The improvements noted were statistically significant and no serious adverse events were noted. PMID:25276274

  17. Complete description of the interactions of a quadrupolar nucleus with a radiofrequency field. Implications for data fitting.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T Leigh; Goward, Gillian R; Bain, Alex D

    2013-06-01

    We present a theory, with experimental tests, that treats exactly the effect of radiofrequency (RF) fields on quadrupolar nuclei, yet retains the symbolic expressions as much as possible. This provides a mathematical model of these interactions that can be easily connected to state-of-the-art optimization methods, so that chemically-important parameters can be extracted from fits to experimental data. Nuclei with spins >1/2 typically experience a Zeeman interaction with the (possibly anisotropic) local static field, a quadrupole interaction and are manipulated with RF fields. Since RF fields are limited by hardware, they seldom dominate the other interactions of these nuclei and so the spectra show unusual dependence on the pulse width used. The theory is tested with (23)Na NMR nutation spectra of a single crystal of sodium nitrate, in which the RF is comparable with the quadrupole coupling and is not necessarily on resonance with any of the transitions. Both the intensity and phase of all three transitions are followed as a function of flip angle. This provides a more rigorous trial than a powder sample where many of the details are averaged out. The formalism is based on a symbolic approach which encompasses all the published results, yet is easily implemented numerically, since no explicit spin operators or their commutators are needed. The classic perturbation results are also easily derived. There are no restrictions or assumptions on the spin of the nucleus or the relative sizes of the interactions, so the results are completely general, going beyond the standard first-order treatments in the literature. PMID:23611427

  18. Near-field radio-frequency thermo-acoustic imaging based on transmission lines for optimized performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Murad; Kellnberger, Stephan; Sergiadis, George; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-02-01

    Near-field Radio-frequency Thermoacoustic Imaging (NRTI) is an imaging modality that was recently introduced to generate thermoacoustic signals using ultra-short high energy impulses. Because it allows for a higher energy coupling within an ultra-short time, it can achieve higher resolutions and higher signal to noise ratio, compared to traditional thermoacoustic tomography based on radiating sources at single frequencies. As for traditional thermoacoustic imaging the contrast comes from the conductivity and the dielectric properties of the tissues, while the resolution depends on the measured acoustic waves. Since NRTI depends on the efficient generation of high energy short impulses, the ability to control their time width and pulse shape is of high importance. We present here a methodology for generating such impulses based on transmission lines. The ability of such generators to generate impulses in the range of tens of nanoseconds enables high resolution images in the range of tens of microns to hundreds of microns without compromising the amount of the energy coupled. Finally the pulser is used to generate high resolution images of small absorbing insertions, of phantoms with different conductivities and of ex-vivo mouse images. From the phantoms it is possible to see both the capabilities of the system to accurately image small insertions as well as the high quality images generated from imaging phantoms, from ex-vivo mouse images it is possible to see several anatomical characteristics, such as the mouse boundary, the spine and some other characteristics in the mouse abdomens.

  19. Studying gene expression profile of rat neuron exposed to 1800MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields with cDNA microassay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Shuzhi; Xu, Zhengping; Ju, Li; Lu, Deqiang; Yao, Gengdong

    2007-06-25

    A widespread use of mobile phone (MP) evokes a growing concern for their possible adverse effects on human, especially the brain. Gene expression is a unique way of characterizing how cells and organism adapt to changes in the external environment, so the aim of this investigation was to determine whether 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF) can influence the gene expression of neuron. Affymetrix Rat Neurobiology U34 array was applied to investigate the changes of gene expression in rat neuron after exposed to the pulsed RF EMF at a frequency of 1800 MHz modulated by 217 Hz which is commonly used in MP. Among 1200 candidate genes, 24 up-regulated genes and 10 down-regulated genes were identified after 24-h intermittent exposure at an average special absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg, which are associated with multiple cellular functions (cytoskeleton, signal transduction pathway, metabolism, etc.) after functional classification. The results were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR). The present results indicated that the gene expression of rat neuron could be altered by exposure to RF EMF under our experimental conditions. PMID:17449163

  20. Effects of early-onset radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure (GSM 900 MHz) on behavior and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Klose, Melanie; Grote, Karen; Spathmann, Oliver; Streckert, Joachim; Clemens, Markus; Hansen, Volkert W; Lerchl, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Female Wistar rats, from an age of 14 days to 19 months, were exposed in the head region for 2 h per day, 5 days per week, to a GSM-modulated 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF). The average specific absorption rates (SAR) in the brain were 0 (sham), 0.7, 2.5 and 10 W/kg. To ensure a primary exposure of the head region, rats were fixed in restraining tubes of different sizes according to their increasing body weight. During the experiment, a set of 4 behavioral and learning tests (rotarod, Morris water maze, 8-arm radial maze, open field) were performed 3 times in juvenile, adult and presenile rats. In these tests, no profound differences could be identified between the groups. Only presenile rats of the cage control group showed a lower activity in two of these tests compared to the other groups presumably due to the lack of daily handling. The rotarod data revealed on some testing days significantly longer holding times for the sham-exposed rat vs. the exposed rat, but these findings were not consistent. During the first year, body weights of sham-exposed and exposed rats were not different from those of the cage controls, and thereafter only marginally lower, so that the effect of stress as confounder was probably negligible. The results of this study do not indicate harmful effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure even when begun at an early age on subsequent development, learning skills and behavior in rats, even at relatively high SAR values. PMID:25251701

  1. Detection of radio-frequency magnetic fields using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Acosta, V. M.; Rochester, S. M.; Budker, D.; Pustelny, S.; Yashchuk, V. V.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a room-temperature alkali-metal atomic magnetometer for detection of small, high-frequency magnetic fields. The magnetometer operates by detecting optical rotation due to the precession of an aligned ground state in the presence of a small oscillating magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the magnetometer can be adjusted to any desired value by tuning the bias magnetic field. Based on experimentally measured signal-to-noise ratio, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 100 pG/{radical}(Hz) (rms) in a 3.5-cm-diameter paraffin coated cell. Assuming detection at the photon shot-noise limit, we project a sensitivity as low as 25 pG/{radical}(Hz) (rms)

  2. [Levels of the electromagnetic field in the vicinity of therapeutic devices using radiofrequency and microwaves].

    PubMed

    Scandurra, G

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an analysis made on the electromagnetic field levels around RF and MW equipment used for medical purposes to achieve induced thermogenesis in body areas affected by disease. An irradiation diagram was constructed for some of the most widely used devices in clinical practice and measurements were made on RF devices to identify the influence of obstacles in determining electric field levels, such as accessories or persons present in the working environment. Electric field and power density levels were checked, as can be measured at a distance of 100 cm at identical selected power during a typical "lumbar-dorsal spine" treatment using different types of RF and MW devices, to identify the different degree of electromagnetic pollution that each of the devices causes. PMID:2593971

  3. Study of Oxidative Stress in Human Lens Epithelial Cells Exposed to 1.8 GHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shuang; Yu, Yibo; Zhang, Yidong; Wu, Wei; Lai, Kairan; Yao, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of the present study were to determine oxidative stress and to explore possible reasons of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase in human lens epithelial (HLE) B3 cells exposed to low intensity 1.8 GHz radiofrequency fields (RF). Methods The HLE B3 cells were divided into RF exposure and RF sham-exposure groups. The RF exposure intensity was at specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2, 3, or 4 W/kg. The ROS levels were measured by a fluorescent probe 2?7?-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay in the HLE B3 cells exposed to 1.8 GHz RF for 0.5, 1, and 1.5 h. Lipid peroxidation and cellular viability were detected by an MDA test and Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays, respectively, in the HLE B3 cells exposed to 1.8 GHz RF for 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. The mRNA expression of SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and GPx1 genes and the expression of SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and GPx1 proteins was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot assays in the HLE B3 cells exposed to 1.8 GHz RF for 1 h. Results The ROS and MDA levels significantly increased (P<0.05) in the RF exposure group and that the cellular viability, mRNA expression of four genes, and expression of four proteins significantly decreased (P<0.05) compared with the RF sham-exposure group. Conclusions Oxidative stress is present in HLE B3 cells exposed to 1.8 GHz low-intensity RF and that the increased production of ROS may be related to down-regulation of four antioxidant enzyme genes induced by RF exposure. PMID:23991100

  4. Searching for the Perfect Wave: The Effect of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields on Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gherardini, Lisa; Ciuti, Gastone; Tognarelli, Selene; Cinti, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing concern in the population about the effects that environmental exposure to any source of “uncontrolled” radiation may have on public health. Anxiety arises from the controversial knowledge about the effect of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure to cells and organisms but most of all concerning the possible causal relation to human diseases. Here we reviewed those in vitro and in vivo and epidemiological works that gave a new insight about the effect of radio frequency (RF) exposure, relating to intracellular molecular pathways that lead to biological and functional outcomes. It appears that a thorough application of standardized protocols is the key to reliable data acquisition and interpretation that could contribute a clearer picture for scientists and lay public. Moreover, specific tuning of experimental and clinical RF exposure might lead to beneficial health effects. PMID:24681584

  5. Conduct of a personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field measurement study: proposed study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of new wireless communication technologies that emit radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is ongoing, but little is known about the RF-EMF exposure distribution in the general population. Previous attempts to measure personal exposure to RF-EMF have used different measurement protocols and analysis methods making comparisons between exposure situations across different study populations very difficult. As a result, observed differences in exposure levels between study populations may not reflect real exposure differences but may be in part, or wholly due to methodological differences. Methods The aim of this paper is to develop a study protocol for future personal RF-EMF exposure studies based on experience drawn from previous research. Using the current knowledge base, we propose procedures for the measurement of personal exposure to RF-EMF, data collection, data management and analysis, and methods for the selection and instruction of study participants. Results We have identified two basic types of personal RF-EMF measurement studies: population surveys and microenvironmental measurements. In the case of a population survey, the unit of observation is the individual and a randomly selected representative sample of the population is needed to obtain reliable results. For microenvironmental measurements, study participants are selected in order to represent typical behaviours in different microenvironments. These two study types require different methods and procedures. Conclusion Applying our proposed common core procedures in future personal measurement studies will allow direct comparisons of personal RF-EMF exposures in different populations and study areas. PMID:20487532

  6. New-generation radiofrequency technology.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Nils; Sadick, Neil S

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) technology has become a standard treatment in aesthetic medicine with many indications due to its versatility, efficacy, and safety. It is used worldwide for cellulite reduction; acne scar revision; and treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids, rosacea, and inflammatory acne in all skin types. However, the most common indication for RF technology is the nonablative tightening of tissue to improve skin laxity and reduce wrinkles. Radiofrequency devices are classified as unipolar, bipolar, or multipolar depending on the number of electrodes used. Additional modalities include fractional RF; sublative RF; phase-controlled RF; and combination RF therapies that apply light, massage, or pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs). This article reviews studies and case series on these devices. Radiofrequency technology for aesthetic medicine has seen rapid advancements since it was used for skin tightening in 2003. Future developments will continue to keep RF technology at the forefront of the dermatologist's armamentarium for skin tightening and rejuvenation. PMID:23461058

  7. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eghlidospour, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Yousefi, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  8. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  9. Analysis of gene expression in a human-derived glial cell line exposed to 2.45 GHz continuous radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Tomonori; Kiyokawa, Tomoko; Narita, Eijiro; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Taki, Masao; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones has aroused public concern regarding the potential health risks of radiofrequency (RF) fields. We investigated the effects of exposure to RF fields (2.45 GHz, continuous wave) at specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1, 5, and 10 W/kg for 1, 4, and 24 h on gene expression in a normal human glial cell line, SVGp12, using DNA microarray. Microarray analysis revealed 23 assigned gene spots and 5 non-assigned gene spots as prospective altered gene spots. Twenty-two genes out of the 23 assigned gene spots were further analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to validate the results of microarray, and no significant alterations in gene expression were observed. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, we found no evidence that exposure to RF fields affected gene expression in SVGp12 cells. PMID:21343680

  10. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  11. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  12. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  13. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  14. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP...

  15. Comparison of S-band radio-frequency field emission performance of nitrogen-doped nanocrystalline diamond before and after O2/Ar plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wenhong; Xiong, Ying; Wang, Bing; Li, Xiangkun; Xu, Li

    2015-08-01

    The effect of surface nanostructuring via reactive O2/Ar plasma etching on the S-band radio-frequency (RF) field emission performance for nitrogen-doped nanocrystalline diamond (N-NCD) films was preliminarily investigated. A transition in terms of surface morphology, from dense flower-like aggregated shape having low roughness (?41 nm) to uniform porous structure with increased surface roughness (?104 nm), was observed after plasma etching. Raman spectra revealed there was no obvious change in the bonding characteristics between the pristine and nanostructured N-NCD films. At surface RF gradient of 72.1 MV/m, maximum current density of 80.2 mA/cm2 was reached for the nanostructured N-NCD cathode, increasing about 41% compared to that of the pristine N-NCD cathode. Furthermore, the mechanism in the enhanced RF field emission was tentatively discussed through the measured Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) features.

  16. [Patient exposure to electromagnetic fields in magnetic resonance scanners: a review].

    PubMed

    Guibelalde del Castillo, E

    2013-12-01

    The use of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the low frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and static fields, radiofrequencies (RF), and microwaves is fundamental both in modern communication systems and in diagnostic medical imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proliferation of these applications in recent decades has led to intense activity in developing regulations to guarantee their safety and to the establishment of guidelines and legal recommendations for the public, workers, and patients. In April 2012 it was foreseen that the European Parliament and Council would approve and publish a directive on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields, which would modify Directive 2004/40/EC. New studies related to the exposure to electromagnetic radiation and its impact on health published in recent years have led to a new postponement, and it is now foreseen that the directive will come into effect in October 2013. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the new version of the directive is the exclusion of the limits of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the clinical use of MRI. In exchange for this exception, physicians and experts in protection against non-ionizing radiation are asked to make additional efforts to train workers exposed to non-ionizing radiation and to establish mechanisms to guarantee the correct application of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in patients, along similar lines to the principles of justification and optimization established for ionizing radiation. On the basis of the most recently published studies, this article reviews some safety-related aspects to take into account when examining patients with MRI with high magnetic fields. PMID:24246885

  17. 2-GHz band CW and W-CDMA modulated radiofrequency fields have no significant effect on cell proliferation and gene expression profile in human cells.

    PubMed

    Sekijima, Masaru; Takeda, Hiroshi; Yasunaga, Katsuaki; Sakuma, Noriko; Hirose, Hideki; Nojima, Toshio; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which radiofrequency (RF) fields exert their activity, and the changes in both cell proliferation and the gene expression profile in the human cell lines, A172 (glioblastoma), H4 (neuroglioma), and IMR-90 (fibroblasts from normal fetal lung) following exposure to 2.1425 GHz continuous wave (CW) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) RF fields at three field levels. During the incubation phase, cells were exposed at the specific absorption rates (SARs) of 80, 250, or 800 mW/kg with both CW and W-CDMA RF fields for up to 96 h. Heat shock treatment was used as the positive control. No significant differences in cell growth or viability were observed between any test group exposed to W-CDMA or CW radiation and the sham-exposed negative controls. Using the Affymetrix Human Genome Array, only a very small (< 1%) number of available genes (ca. 16,000 to 19,000) exhibited altered expression in each experiment. The results confirm that low-level exposure to 2.1425 GHz CW and W-CDMA RF fields for up to 96 h did not act as an acute cytotoxicant in either cell proliferation or the gene expression profile. These results suggest that RF exposure up to the limit of whole-body average SAR levels as specified in the ICNIRP guidelines is unlikely to elicit a general stress response in the tested cell lines under these conditions. PMID:20215713

  18. Effect of long-term (2 years) exposure of mouse brains to global system for mobile communication (GSM) radiofrequency fields on astrocytic immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Court-Kowalski, Stefan; Finnie, John W; Manavis, Jim; Blumbergs, Peter C; Helps, Stephen C; Vink, Robert

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to determine whether long-term (2 years) brain exposure to mobile telephone radiofrequency (RF) fields produces any astrocytic activation as these glia react to a wide range of neural perturbations by astrogliosis. Using a purpose-designed exposure system at 900?MHz, mice were given a single, far-field whole body exposure at a specific absorption rate of 4?W/kg on five successive days per week for 104 weeks. Control mice were sham-exposed or freely mobile in a cage to control any stress caused by immobilization in the exposure module. Brains were perfusion-fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and three coronal levels immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These brain slices were then examined by light microscopy and the amount of this immunomarker quantified using a color deconvolution method. There was no change in astrocytic GFAP immunostaining in brains after long-term exposure to mobile telephony microwaves compared to control (sham-exposed or freely moving caged mice). It was concluded that long-term (2 years) exposure of murine brains to mobile telephone RF fields did not produce any astrocytic reaction (astrogliosis) detectable by GFAP immunostaining. PMID:25703451

  19. Coupling of physical characteristics of non-ionizing irradiation to specific mechanisms of cell death: are we there yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of the various specific" triggers" and mechanisms of cell life and death responses suggests that certain non-ionizing irradiation spectra and other physical signals could be coupled with specific cellular "triggers" to improve diagnostic or treatment effects. Genetic, chemical and/or physical modifications of specific extrinsic cellular "triggers" have centered on chemical binding of specific molecules to specific receptors, i.e. chemical " triggers" thus allowing development of specific drugs to counteract the initiating function of the "triggers" in single cells. Investigations of non-ionizing irradiation effects on cells and tissues indicate that their "triggers" involve intimate interactions of linked components of the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton in tissues. Therefore, the search for single "triggers" that may work well for chemical "triggers" in single cells in culture may not be effective for discovery of the mechanisms that initiate sensing of the stimulations of non-ionizing irradiation and mechanical force.

  20. Optimization of cross-polarization at low radiofrequency fields for sensitivity enhancement in solid-state NMR of membrane proteins reconstituted in magnetically aligned bicelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroloff, Sophie N.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2015-07-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) of oriented membrane proteins (MPs) is capable of providing structural and dynamic information at nearly physiological conditions. However, NMR experiments performed on oriented membrane proteins generally suffer from low sensitivity. Moreover, utilization of high-power radiofrequency (RF) irradiations for magnetization transfer may give rise to sample heating, thereby decreasing the efficiency of conventional cross-polarization schemes. Here we have optimized the recently developed repetitive cross-polarization (REP-CP) sequence (Tang et al., 2011) to further increase the magnetization transfer efficiency for membrane proteins reconstituted in magnetically aligned bicelles and compared its performance to single-contact Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (CP), CP-MOIST and the adiabatic transfer. It has been found that employing the REP-CP sequence at RF amplitudes of 19 kHz instead of the commonly used higher RF fields (>45 kHz) enhances the efficiency of REP-CP. An additional 30% signal can be obtained as compared to the previously published REP-CP, and 20% when compared to the re-optimized REP-CP at 50 kHz RF fields. Moreover, the 15N signal gain of low-power REP-CP was found to be 40% over the adiabatic CP and up to 80% over CP-MOIST. Thus, the low-power REP-CP sequence surpasses all of the previous CP schemes in addition of having the tremendous advantage of reducing the RF powers by a factor of seven, thereby preserving the liquid-like bicelle sample. By contrast, in purely static (NAL crystal) and semi-rigid systems (Pf1 phage), the adiabatic CP was found to be more effective. Periodic oscillations of the intensity profile (distinct from the transient oscillations) as a function of the CP contact time and B1 RF field strengths were observed during the REP-CP optimization with the oscillations becoming more pronounced with lower RF fields. Many-spin simulations were performed to explain the oscillations and their periodicity.

  1. Personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field measurements in The Netherlands: exposure level and variability for everyday activities, times of day and types of area.

    PubMed

    Bolte, John F B; Eikelboom, Tessa

    2012-11-01

    Knowledge of the exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields is necessary for epidemiological studies on possible health effects. The main goal of this study is to determine the exposure level and spatial and temporal variances during 39 everyday activities in 12 frequency bands used in mobile telecommunication and broadcasting. Therefore, 24 h measurements were gathered from 98 volunteers living in or near Amsterdam and Purmerend, The Netherlands. They carried an activity diary to be kept to the minute, a GPS logger sampling at an interval of 1 s, and an EME Spy exposimeter with a detection limit of 0.0066 mW/m(2) sampling at an interval of 10s in 12 frequency bands. The mean exposure over 24 h, excluding own mobile phone use, was 0.180 mW/m(2). During daytime exposure was about the same, but during night it was about half, and in the evening it was about twice as high. The main contribution to environmental exposure (calling by participant not included) is from calling with mobile phones (37.5%), from cordless DECT phones and their docking stations (31.7%), and from the base stations (12.7%). The exposure to mobile phone base stations increases with the percentage of urban ground use, which is an indication for high people density. In agreement, the highest mean exposure relates to the activities with high people density, such as travelling by public transport, visiting social events, pubs or shopping malls. Exposure at home depends mainly on exposure from people calling in the neighbourhood of the participant and thus on the number of persons in a household. In addition just the possession of DECT docking stations leads to exposure as most models transmit continuously in stand-by. Also wireless internet routers continuously transmit in the WiFi band. Though the highest exposure peaks in the WiFi band, up to 0.265 W/m(2), come from stray radiation of microwave ovens. The mean total exposure largely depends on phone calls of a high exposure level and short duration. These calls lead to potentially high contrasts as well in exposure levels between sessions of the same activity as between persons, thus posing a challenge for personal exposure prediction. PMID:22906414

  2. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  3. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna; Wu, Deyi; Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK(a)) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na(6)Al(6)Si(10)O(32)·12H(2)O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Å × 4.5 Å [100] and 2.8 Å × 4.8 Å [101]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k(ow) value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained by modified zeolite. Based on the different adsorption behavior, the uptake of non-ionizable pollutants was thought to be a single partitioning process into the surfactant bilayer. For ionizable compounds, however, interaction of the phenol group(s) with the positively charged "head" of surfactant additionally functions. PMID:22771348

  4. Radiofrequency in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Karen L; Weiss, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for noninvasive methods of facial and body rejuvenation has experienced exponential growth over the last decade. There is a particular interest in safe and effective ways to decrease skin laxity and smooth irregular body contours and texture without downtime. These noninvasive treatments are being sought after because less time for recovery means less time lost from work and social endeavors. Radiofrequency (RF) treatments are traditionally titrated to be nonablative and are optimal for those wishing to avoid recovery time. Not only is there minimal recovery but also a high level of safety with aesthetic RF treatments. PMID:24267424

  5. The Role of the Location of Personal Exposimeters on the Human Body in Their Use for Assessing Exposure to the Electromagnetic Field in the Radiofrequency Range 98–2450?MHz and Compliance Analysis: Evaluation by Virtual Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zradzi?ski, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiofrequency (98–2450?MHz range) personal exposimeters to measure the electric field (E-field) in far-field exposure conditions was modelled numerically using human body model Gustav and finite integration technique software. Calculations with 256 models of exposure scenarios show that the human body has a significant influence on the results of measurements using a single body-worn exposimeter in various locations near the body ((from ?96 to +133)%, measurement errors with respect to the unperturbed E-field value). When an exposure assessment involves the exposure limitations provided for the strength of an unperturbed E-field. To improve the application of exposimeters in compliance tests, such discrepancies in the results of measurements by a body-worn exposimeter may be compensated by using of a correction factor applied to the measurement results or alternatively to the exposure limit values. The location of a single exposimeter on the waist to the back side of the human body or on the front of the chest reduces the range of exposure assessments uncertainty (covering various exposure conditions). However, still the uncertainty of exposure assessments using a single exposimeter remains significantly higher than the assessment of the unperturbed E-field using spot measurements. PMID:25879021

  6. Radiofrequency Initiation and Radiofrequency Sustainment of Laser Initiated Seeded High

    E-print Network

    Scharer, John E.

    radiofrequency initiation of high pressure(l-70 Ton) inductive plasma discharges in argon, nitrogen, air, decontaminating environmental waste and gaseous pollution. The ap- plication of these plasma sources require

  7. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.; Adam, Jost; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-03-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity of cells at rates of more than 10 000/s. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum, it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations, making them incompatible with other state-of-the-art flow cytometers. Here, we introduce a method for performing complete angular scattering spectrum measurements at high throughput combining techniques from the field of scattering flow-cytometry and radiofrequency communications. Termed Radiofrequency Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering, this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we use this technique to perform scattering measurements over a range of 30° from a tapered optical fiber at a scan rate of 250 kHz.

  8. Longevity of radiofrequency identification device microchips in citrus trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term identification of individual plants in the field is an important part of many types of botanical and horticultural research. In a previous report, we described methods for using implanted radiofrequency (RFID) microchips to tag citrus trees for field research. This report provides an upd...

  9. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...absorption due to exposure to RF electromagnetic energy. The SAR limits to...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP Report...

  10. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...absorption due to exposure to RF electromagnetic energy. The SAR limits to...Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz...the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements...Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP Report...

  11. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  12. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  13. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Hall, Simon B. (Palmerston North, NZ)

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  14. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Hall, Simon B. (Palmerston North, NZ)

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  15. Exposure to non-ionizing radiation provokes changes in rat thyroid morphology and expression of HSP-90.

    PubMed

    Misa-Agustiño, Maria J; Jorge-Mora, Teresa; Jorge-Barreiro, Francisco J; Suarez-Quintanilla, Juan; Moreno-Piquero, Eduardo; Ares-Pena, Francisco J; López-Martín, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Non-ionizing radiation at 2.45?GHz may modify the morphology and expression of genes that codify heat shock proteins (HSP) in the thyroid gland. Diathermy is the therapeutic application of non-ionizing radiation to humans for its beneficial effects in rheumatological and musculo-skeletal pain processes. We used a diathermy model on laboratory rats subjected to maximum exposure in the left front leg, in order to study the effects of radiation on the nearby thyroid tissue. Fifty-six rats were individually exposed once or repeatedly (10 times in two weeks) for 30?min to 2.45?GHz radiation in a commercial chamber at different non-thermal specific absorption rates (SARs), which were calculated using the finite difference time domain technique. We used immunohistochemistry methods to study the expression of HSP-90 and morphological changes in thyroid gland tissues. Ninety minutes after radiation with the highest SAR, the central and peripheral follicles presented increased size and the thickness of the peripheral septa had decreased. Twenty-four hours after radiation, only peripheral follicles radiated at 12?W were found to be smaller. Peripheral follicles increased in size with repeated exposure at 3?W power. Morphological changes in the thyroid tissue may indicate a glandular response to acute or repeated stress from radiation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Further research is needed to determine if the effect of this physical agent over time may cause disease in the human thyroid gland. PMID:25649190

  16. Numerical optimization of a three-channel radiofrequency coil for open, vertical-field, MR-guided, focused ultrasound surgery using the hybrid method of moment/finite difference time domain method.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xuegang; Wang, Di; Han, Jijun; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-07-01

    The numerical optimization of a three-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil with a physical aperture for the open, vertical-field, MR-guided, focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) system using the hybrid method of moment (MoM)/finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is reported. The numerical simulation of the current density distribution on an RF coil with a complicated irregular structure was performed using MoM. The electromagnetic field simulation containing the full coil-tissue interactions within the region of interest was accomplished using the FDTD method. Huygens' equivalent box with six surfaces smoothly connected the MoM and FDTD method. An electromagnetic model of the human pelvic region was reconstructed and loaded in the FDTD zone to optimize the three-channel RF coil and compensate for the lower sensitivity at the vertical field. In addition, the numerical MoM was used to model the resonance, decoupling and impedance matching of the RF coil in compliance with engineering practices. A prototype RF coil was constructed to verify the simulation results. The results demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio and the homogeneity of the B(1) field were both greatly improved compared with previously published results. PMID:22161891

  17. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    E-print Network

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  18. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L. (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  19. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  20. Dosimetry associated with exposure to non-ionizing radiation: very low frequency to microwaves.

    PubMed

    Guy, A W

    1987-12-01

    The interpretation of the effects in biological systems exposed to electromagnetic (EM) fields requires knowledge of the internal fields and absorbed energy. The quantification of the specific absorption rate (SAR) is called dosimetry. The SAR given in units of watts per kilogram is a complex function of the source configuration, shape and size of the exposed subjects, orientation of the subject with respect to the source, and the frequency. The average and maximum SAR in the exposed subject may vary over many orders of magnitude for a given exposure level. In order to relate observed biological effects in exposed laboratory animals to safe exposure levels for man, both the fields within the environment and SAR within the exposed tissues must be determined. The environmental fields and the SAR can often be determined from EM theory, but in most cases one must rely on instrumentation such as field survey meters for quantifying the exposure fields and electric field probes, thermocouples, thermistors, fiber optic probes, thermography, and calorimetry for quantifying the SAR in the tissues or equivalent models. A combination of techniques, each valid for a particular model over a particular frequency range, have been used to determine average and peak SARs in humans and animals exposed to plane wave radiation. Though it has been considerably more difficult to quantify these quantities for near field and partial-body exposure conditions, progress is continually being made in this area. PMID:3679822

  1. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... exposure limits. The criteria listed in table 1 shall be used to evaluate the environmental impact of human... 1500 MHz, exposure limits for field strength and power density are also generally based on...

  2. Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-Loss of Electrons with Low and Relativistic Energies in Materials and Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, M. J.; Consolandi, C.; Gervasi, M.; Giani, S.; Grandi, D.; Ivanchenko, V.; Nieminem, P.; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P. G.; Tacconi, M.

    2012-08-01

    The treatment of the electron-nucleus interaction based on the Matt differential cross section was extended to account for effects due to screened Coulomb potentials, finite sizes and finite rest masses of nuclei for electrons above 200keV and up to ultra high energies. This treatment allows one to determine both the total and differential cross sections, thus, subsequently to calculate the resulting nuclear and non-ionizing stopping powers. Above a few hundreds of MeV, neglecting the effect due to finite rest masses of recoil nuclei the stopping power and NIEL result to be largely underestimated. While, above a few tens of MeV, the finite size ofthe nuclear target prevents a further large increase of stopping powers which approach almost constant values.

  3. METHODS OF RADIO-FREQUENCY CURRENT DRIVE

    E-print Network

    -670 Radio-frequency waves can penetrate thermonuclear plasmas, depositing momentum and energy with great. INTRODUCTION Using radio-frequency (rf) waves to drive the toroidal current in tokamak reactors is attractiveMETHODS OF RADIO-FREQUENCY CURRENT DRIVE N. J. FISCH* Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

  4. Red eyes of PC users due to the effects of non-ionized electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Huizar-Gonzalez, A. A.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Cardoza-Rodriguez, A. R.

    2007-03-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the appearance of redness on the surface of the eye on PC users due to the exposition to low frequency electromagnetic fields LF, VLF and ELF that VDTs with TRC monitors radiate, based on the measurement of the level of pigmentation and temperature. The total of the samples was analyzed using digital processing of images extracting the component of red color of the sclera. We demonstrated that under the same ergonomics and operating conditions, TRC monitors cause a higher heating and greater pigmentation in the users eyes as compared to LCD screens, due to the higher low frequency radiation.

  5. The role of cell hydration in realization of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR).

    PubMed

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-09-01

    The weak knowledge on the nature of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological effects of NIR such as static magnetic field, infrasound frequency of mechanical vibration, extremely low frequency of electromagnetic fields and microwave serves as a main barrier for adequate dosimetry from the point of Public Health. The difficulty lies in the fact that the biological effects of NIR depend not only on their thermodynamic characteristics but also on their frequency and intensity "windows", chemical and physical composition of the surrounding medium, as well as on the initial metabolic state of the organism. Therefore, only biomarker can be used for adequate estimation of biological effect of NIR on organisms. Because of the absence of such biomarker(s), organizations having the mission to monitor hazardous effects of NIR traditionally base their instruction on thermodynamic characteristics of NIR. Based on the high sensitivity to NIR of both aqua medium structure and cell hydration, it is suggested that cell bathing medium is one of the primary targets and cell hydration is a biomarker for NIR effects on cells and organisms. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of literature and our own experimental data on the effects of NIR on plants' seeds germination, microbe growth and development, snail neurons and heart muscle, rat's brain and heart tissues. PMID:26444193

  6. Fervent: chemistry-coupled, ionizing and non-ionizing radiative feedback in hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczynski, C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a radiative transfer code module for the magnetohydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 4. It is coupled to an efficient chemical network which explicitly tracks the three hydrogen species H, H2, H+ as well as C+ and CO. The module is geared towards modelling all relevant thermal feedback processes of massive stars, and is able to follow the non-equilibrium time-dependent thermal and chemical state of the present-day interstellar medium as well as that of dense molecular clouds. We describe in detail the implementation of all relevant thermal stellar feedback mechanisms, i.e. photoelectric, photoionization and H2 dissociation heating as well as pumping of molecular hydrogen by UV photons. All included radiative feedback processes are extensively tested. We also compare our module to dedicated photodissociation region (PDR) codes and find good agreement in our modelled hydrogen species once our radiative transfer solution reaches equilibrium. In addition, we show that the implemented radiative feedback physics is insensitive to the spatial resolution of the code and show under which conditions it is possible to obtain well-converged evolution in time. Finally, we briefly explore the robustness of our scheme for treating combined ionizing and non-ionizing radiation.

  7. "Magic" radio-frequency dressing for trapped atomic microwave clocks

    E-print Network

    Kazakov, Georgy A

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed to use magnetically trapped atomic ensembles to enhance the interrogation time in microwave clocks. To mitigate the perturbing effects of the magnetic trap, "near-magic field" configurations are employed, where the involved clock transition becomes independent of the atoms potential energy to first order. Still, higher order effects are a dominating source for dephasing, limiting the perfomance of this approach. Here we propose a simple method to cancel the energy dependence to both, first and second order, using weak radio-frequency dressing. We give values for dressing frequencies, amplitudes, and trapping fields for 87Rb atoms and investigate quantitatively the robustness of these "second-order magic" conditions to variations of the system parameters. We conclude that radio-frequency dressing can suppress field-induced dephasing by at least one order of magnitude for typical experimental parameters.

  8. Discharge regime of non-ambipolarity with a self-induced steady-state magnetic field in plasma sources with localized radio-frequency power deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivarova, A.; Lishev, St.; Todorov, D.; Paunska, Ts.

    2015-10-01

    Involving the idea for the Biermann effect known from space physics as well as recent discussions on non-ambipolarity of the electron and ion fluxes in low-pressure discharges, the study builds the discharge pattern in a source with localized RF power deposition outside the region of high electron density. A vortex dc current flowing in an RF discharge and a steady-state magnetic field induced by this current govern the discharge behavior. Owing to a shift in the positions of the electron-density and plasma-potential maxima, the dc current is driven with the purpose of keeping the conservativity of the dc field in the discharge. The results present the spatial structure of a discharge in a regime of non-ambipolarity of the electron and ion fluxes, including its modifications by the magnetic field.

  9. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...is capable of emitting radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. Radiofrequency devices include, but are...thereof which in use emits radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. [35 FR 7898, May 22, 1970, as...

  10. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...is capable of emitting radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. Radiofrequency devices include, but are...thereof which in use emits radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. [35 FR 7898, May 22, 1970, as...

  11. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...is capable of emitting radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. Radiofrequency devices include, but are...thereof which in use emits radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. [35 FR 7898, May 22, 1970, as...

  12. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...is capable of emitting radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. Radiofrequency devices include, but are...thereof which in use emits radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. [35 FR 7898, May 22, 1970, as...

  13. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...is capable of emitting radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. Radiofrequency devices include, but are...thereof which in use emits radiofrequency energy by radiation, conduction, or other means. [35 FR 7898, May 22, 1970, as...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400... § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400... § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400... § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400... § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400... § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  19. Evaluation of electric and magnetic fields distribution and SAR induced in 3D models of water containers by radiofrequency radiation using FDTD and FEM simulation techniques

    E-print Network

    Abdelsamie, Maher A A; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Dzulkifly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two software packages using different numerical techniques FEKO 6.3 with Finite-Element Method (FEM) and XFDTD 7 with Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) were used to assess exposure of 3D models of square, rectangular, and pyramidal shaped water containers to electromagnetic waves at 300, 900, and 2400 MHz frequencies. Using the FEM simulation technique, the peak electric field of 25, 4.5, and 2 V/m at 300 MHz and 15.75, 1.5, and 1.75 V/m at 900 MHz were observed in pyramidal, rectangular, and square shaped 3D container models, respectively. The FDTD simulation method confirmed a peak electric field of 12.782, 10.907, and 10.625 V/m at 2400 MHz in the pyramidal, square, and rectangular shaped 3D models, respectively. The study demonstrated an exceptionally high level of electric field in the water in the two identical pyramid shaped 3D models analyzed using the two different simulation techniques. Both FEM and FDTD simulation techniques indicated variations in the distribution of elect...

  20. Computational modelling of temperature rises in the eye in the near field of radiofrequency sources at 380, 900 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, P. R.

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports calculations of the temperature rises induced in the eye and lens by near-field exposure to radiation from communication handsets, using the finite difference time domain method and classical bioheat equation. Various models are compared, including the analytic solution for a sphere, a finite element model of an isolated eye and a modern model of the whole head. The role of the blood supply to the choroid in moderating temperature is discussed. Three different frequencies are considered, namely 380 MHz (used by TETRA), and 900 and 1800 MHz (used by GSM mobile phones). At 380 MHz, monopole and helical antennas are compared. An 'equivalent blood flow' is derived for the choroid in order to facilitate comparison of the whole head and isolated eye models. In the whole head model, the heating of the lens receives a significant contribution from energy absorbed outside the eye. The temperature rise in the lens is compared to the ICNIRP-recommended average specific energy absorption rate (SAR) and the SAR averaged over the eye alone. The temperature rise may reach 1.4 °C at the ICNIRP occupational exposure limit if an antenna is placed less than 24 mm from the eye and the exposure is sufficiently prolonged.

  1. Design and Evaluation of a Hybrid Radiofrequency Applicator for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and RF Induced Hyperthermia: Electromagnetic Field Simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and Proof-of-Concept at 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0?7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0?=?7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (?T?=?8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm3 iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX/RX applicator that supports MR imaging, MR thermometry and targeted RF heating in one device. PMID:23613896

  2. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  3. Ocular effects of radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, J A

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy has been reported to cause a variety of ocular effects, primarily cataracts but also effects on the retina, cornea, and other ocular systems. Cataracts have been observed in experimental animals when one eye was exposed to a localized, very high RF field and the other eye was the unexposed control. The results show that 2450 MHz exposures for >or=30 min at power densities causing extremely high dose rates (>or=150 W/kg) and temperatures (>or=41 degrees C) in or near the lens caused cataracts in the rabbit eye. However, cataracts were not observed in the monkey eye exposed to similar exposure conditions, reflecting the different patterns of energy absorption (SAR, specific absorption rate) distribution, due to their different facial structure. Since the monkey head is similar in structure to the human head, the nonhuman primate study showed that the incident power density levels causing cataracts in rabbits and other laboratory animals cannot be directly extrapolated to primates, including human beings. It is reasonable to assume that an SAR that would induce temperatures >or=41 degrees C in or near the lens in the human eye would produce cataracts by the same mechanism (heating) that caused cataracts in the rabbit lens; however, such an exposure would greatly exceed the currently allowable limits for human exposure and would be expected to cause unacceptable effects in other parts of the eye and face. Other ocular effects including corneal lesions, retinal effects, and changes in vascular permeability, have been observed after localized exposure of the eye of laboratory animals to both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed wave (PW) exposures, but the inconsistencies in these results, the failure to independently confirm corneal lesions after CW exposure, the failure to independently confirm retinal effects after PW exposure, and the absence of functional changes in vision are reasons why these ocular effects are not useful in defining an adverse effect level for RF exposure. While cataracts develop after localized exposure of the eye at SARs >or= 150 W/kg, whole body exposure at much lower levels (14-42 W/kg) is lethal to rabbits. Two studies reported cataracts in this animal after 30 daily exposures at SARs at the upper end of the lethal range, e.g., 38-42 W/kg; however, long term exposure of rabbits (23 h/day, 6 months) at 1.5 W/kg (17 W/kg in the rabbit head) did not cause cataracts or other ocular effects. A long term (1-4 years) investigation of monkeys exposed at high SARs (20 and 40 W/kg to the monkey face) found no cataracts or other ocular effects or change in visual capability. The results of these long term studies support the conclusion that clinically significant ocular effects, including cataracts, have not been confirmed in human populations exposed for long periods of time to low level RF energy. The results of four recent human studies show that there is no clear evidence of an association between RF exposure and ocular cancer. PMID:14628311

  4. Electromagnetic Fields

    MedlinePLUS

    Electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) are areas of energy that surround electrical devices. Everyday sources of EMFs ... phones cause cancer. They give off radio-frequency energy (RF), a form of electromagnetic radiation. Scientists need ...

  5. Radiofrequency heating pathways for gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.; Ackerson, C. J.

    2014-07-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry which may affect thermal dissipation include the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell. Aspects of RF which may affect thermal dissipation include power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments.

  6. Non-invasive radiofrequency ablation of malignancies mediated by quantum dots, gold nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S; Curley, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Various types of nanoparticles efficiently heat in radiofrequency fields, which can potentially be used to produce cancer cell cytotoxicity within minutes. Multifunctional and targeted nanoparticles have demonstrated effective cancer control in vivo without significant toxicity associated with radiofrequency field exposure. Importantly, animals treated systemically with targeted nanoparticles smaller than 50 nm demonstrate tumor necrosis after radiofrequency field exposure without acute or chronic toxicity to normal tissues. Likewise, the future holds great promise for multifunctional imaging as well as multimodality therapy with chemotherapeutic molecules and ionizing radiation sensitizing agents attached to nanoparticle constructs. However, the appropriate balance of safety and efficacy for diagnosis, therapy, and therapeutic monitoring with these nanoparticles remains to be fully elucidated. PMID:22826886

  7. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices...Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile...

  8. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices...Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile...

  9. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices...Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile...

  10. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices...Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile...

  11. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices...Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile...

  12. Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Although surgical resection remains the best option as potentially curative therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma, radiofrequency thermal ablation has begun to receive much attention as an effective minimally invasive technique for the local control of unresectable malignant hepatic tumors. Most recent radiofrequency devices equipped with a powerful generator and larger needle electrode permit larger thermal lesions, up to 5 cm in diameter, with a single ablation. In this article, the author reviews the technical developments and early clinical results obtained with radiofrequency ablation techniques. PMID:11752952

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency upper thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, H A

    1996-04-01

    Between June 1979 and May 1994, I performed 148 unilateral or bilateral sympathectomies on 247 limbs in 110 patients using a percutaneous radiofrequency technique, usually on an outpatient surgery basis. Patient ages ranged from 10 to 81 years, with 45 male and 65 female patients. Four patients had unsuccessfully undergone prior open surgical sympathectomy. Patients suffered from hyperhidrosis, vascular occlusion, Raynaud's disease or other chronic vasculopathies, painful causalgia or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, or Prinzmetal's angina. The sympathectomy technique has evolved over this 15-year period and is currently in its third phase. Changes in the procedure were based on anatomic and clinical/radiographic correlations and careful patient follow-up. Current modifications have reduced the frequency of both early and late failures. The present technique (Phase III) relies on neuroleptanalgesia with superficial local anesthesia only and does not require general anesthesia, intubation, or lung collapse. Two 18-gauge radiofrequency TIC needle electrodes (Radionics, Burlington, MA) are used. A series of three lesions is rostrocaudally made at each of the ganglion sites selected in an attempt to destroy the entire fusiform ganglion. Lesion sites are targeted by C-arm fluoroscopy and electrical stimulation, which produces a threshold of sensory awareness of > 1.0 V. Lesion effectiveness is monitored by bilateral finger plethysmography and hand skin temperature measurement. With the Phase III technique, the sympathetic activity in 96% of operated limbs after 2 years and in 91% of operated limbs after 3 years continues to be completely or largely interrupted. By comparison, I achieved similar success in 83 and 72% operated limbs with the Phase I technique and in 77 and 71% with the Phase II technique. Symptomatic pneumothorax, in six patients, has been the only serious complication. When necessary, a subsequent operation can easily be performed and is effective. PMID:8692390

  14. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  15. Magic radio-frequency dressing of nuclear spins in high-accuracy optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2012-11-30

    A Zeeman-insensitive optical clock atomic transition is engineered when nuclear spins are dressed by a nonresonant radio-frequency field. For fermionic species as (87)Sr, (171)Yb, and (199)Hg, particular ratios between the radio-frequency driving amplitude and frequency lead to "magic" magnetic values where a net cancelation of the Zeeman clock shift and a complete reduction of first-order magnetic variations are produced within a relative uncertainty below the 10(-18) level. An Autler-Townes continued fraction describing a semiclassical radio-frequency dressed spin is numerically computed and compared to an analytical quantum description including higher-order magnetic field corrections to the dressed energies. PMID:23368116

  16. Public Exposure from Indoor Radiofrequency Radiation in the City of Hebron, West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Sharabati, Afefeh; ALMasri, Hussien

    2015-08-01

    This work presents the results of measured indoor exposure levels to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitting sources in one of the major cities in the West Bank-the city of Hebron. Investigated RF emitters include FM, TV broadcasting stations, mobile telephony base stations, cordless phones [Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT)], and wireless local area networks (WLAN). Measurements of power density were conducted in 343 locations representing different site categories in the city. The maximum total power density found at any location was about 2.3 × 10 W m with a corresponding exposure quotient of about 0.01. This value is well below unity, indicating compliance with the guidelines of the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The average total exposure from all RF sources was 0.08 × 10 W m. The relative contributions from different sources to the total exposure in terms of exposure quotient were evaluated and found to be 46% from FM radio, 26% from GSM900, 15% from DECT phones, 9% from WLAN, 3% from unknown sources, and 1% from TV broadcasting. RF sources located outdoors contribute about 73% to the population exposure indoors. PMID:26107432

  17. Epidemiology of Health Effects of Radiofrequency Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ahlbom, Anders; Green, Adele; Kheifets, Leeka; Savitz, David; Swerdlow, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    We have undertaken a comprehensive review of epidemiologic studies about the effects of radiofrequency fields (RFs) on human health in order to summarize the current state of knowledge, explain the methodologic issues that are involved, and aid in the planning of future studies. There have been a large number of occupational studies over several decades, particularly on cancer, cardiovascular disease, adverse reproductive outcome, and cataract, in relation to RF exposure. More recently, there have been studies of residential exposure, mainly from radio and television transmitters, and especially focusing on leukemia. There have also been studies of mobile telephone users, particularly on brain tumors and less often on other cancers and on symptoms. Results of these studies to date give no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relation between RF exposure and any adverse health effect. On the other hand, the studies have too many deficiencies to rule out an association. A key concern across all studies is the quality of assessment of RF exposure. Despite the ubiquity of new technologies using RFs, little is known about population exposure from RF sources and even less about the relative importance of different sources. Other cautions are that mobile phone studies to date have been able to address only relatively short lag periods, that almost no data are available on the consequences of childhood exposure, and that published data largely concentrate on a small number of outcomes, especially brain tumor and leukemia. PMID:15579422

  18. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabala, Dana; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia

    2013-11-01

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  19. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dabala, Dana; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia

    2013-11-13

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  20. Radiofrequence ablation of liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian-Xin; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Piao, Da-Xun

    2002-06-01

    Primary and secondary malignant liver cancer are some of most common malignant tumors in the world. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not very effective against them. Surgical resection has been considered the only potentially curtive option, but the majority of patients are not candidates for resection because of tumor size, location near major intrahepatic blood vessels and bile ducts, precluding a margin-negative resection, cirrhotic, hepatitis virus infection or multifocial. Radiofrequence ablation (RFA), which is a new evolving effective and minimally invasive technique, can produce coagulative necrosis of malignant tumors. RFA should be used percutaneously, laparascopically, or during the open laparotomy under the guidance of ultrasound, CT scan and MRI. RFA has lots of advantages superior to other local therapies including lower complications, reduced costs and hospital stays, and the possibility of repeated treatment. In general, RFA is a safe, effective treatment for unresectable malignant liver tumors less than 7.0 cm in diameter. We review the principle, mechanism, procedures and experience with RFA for treating malignant liver tumors. PMID:12046057

  1. Radiofrequence ablation of liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian-Xin; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Piao, Da-Xun

    2002-01-01

    Primary and secondary malignant liver cancers are some of most common malignant tumors in the world. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not very effective against them. Surgical resection has been considered the only potentially curtive option, but the majority of patients are not candidates for resection because of tumor size, location near major intrahepatic blood vessels and bile ducts, precluding a margin-negative resection, cirrhotic, hepatitis virus infection or multifocial. Radiofrequence ablation (RFA), which is a new evolving effective and minimally invasive technique, can produce coagulative necrosis of malignant tumors. RFA should be used percutaneously, laparscopically, or during the open laparotomy under the guidance of ultrasound, CT scan and MRI. RFA has lots of advantages superior to other local therapies including lower complications, reduced costs and hospital stays, and the possibility of repeated treatment. In general, RFA is a safe, effective treatment for unresectable malignant liver tumors less than 7.0 cm in diameter. We review the principle, mechanism, procedures and experience with RFA for treating malignant liver tumors. PMID:12046057

  2. SU-E-J-160: Comparing the Setup Accuracy of Non-Ionizing Patient Localization Systems with CBCT to Reduce Imaging Dose in Prone Breast Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E; Yamamoto, T; Mayadev, J; Dieterich, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CBCT is the current gold standard to verify prone breast patient setup. We investigated in a phantom if non-ionizing localization systems can replace ionizing localization systems for prone breast treatments. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was positioned on a prone breast board. Electromagnetic transponders were attached on the left chest surface. The CT images of the phantom were imported to the treatment planning system. The isocenter was set to the center of the transponders. The positions of the isocenter and transponders transferred to the transponder tracking system. The posterior phantom surface was contoured and exported to the optical surface tracking system. A CBCT was taken for the initial setup alignment on the treatment machine. Using the electromagnetic and optical localization systems, the deviation of the phantom setup from the original CT images was measured. This was compared with the difference between the original CT and kV-CBCT images. Results: For the electromagnetic localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 1.5 mm, 0.0 mm and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions. For the optical localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 2.0 mm, ?2.0 mm and 0.1 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. For the CBCT, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 4.0 mm, 1.0 mm and ?1.0 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. The measured values from the non-ionizing localization systems differed from those with the CBCT less than 3.0 mm in all directions. Conclusions: This phantom study showed the feasibility of using a combination of non-ionizing localization systems to achieve a similar setup accuracy as CBCT for prone breast patients. This could potentially eliminate imaging dose. As a next step, we are expanding this study to actual patients. This work has been in part supported by Departmental Research Award RODEPT1-JS001, Department of Radiation Oncology, UC Davis Medical Center.

  3. Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD) Edgar Y. Choueiri

    E-print Network

    Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD) Edgar Y. Choueiri and Kurt A electrodeless accelerator concept that relies on an RF-assisted discharge, an applied magnetic field, and electromagnetic acceleration using an inductive coil is presented. The advantages of this concept include

  4. Reverse Polarized Inductive Coupling to Transmit and Receive Radiofrequency Coil Arrays

    E-print Network

    Atalar, Ergin

    that an ICRF decoupled from the transmit field using back-to-back diodes is called a receptively coupled RF polarization through RF transmit-array systems. ``Wireless'' active catheter tracking (4) and fiducial markerReverse Polarized Inductive Coupling to Transmit and Receive Radiofrequency Coil Arrays Haydar

  5. Models of radiofrequency coupling for negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Petrenko, S.

    2012-02-15

    Radiofrequency heating for ICP (inductively coupled plasma) ion sources depends on the source operating pressure, the presence or absence of a Faraday shield, the driver coil geometry, the frequency used, and the magnetic field configuration: in negative ion source a magnetic filter seems necessary for H{sup -} survival. The result of single particle simulations showing the possibility of electron acceleration in the preglow regime and for reasonable driver chamber radius (15 cm) is reported, also as a function of the static external magnetic field. An effective plasma conductivity, depending not only from electron density, temperature, and rf field but also on static magnetic field is here presented and compared to previous models. Use of this conductivity and of multiphysics tools for a plasma transport and heating model is shown and discussed for a small source.

  6. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. (a) Specific absorption rate (SAR) shall be used to evaluate the environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b) within...

  7. SOME UNSOLVED CHALLENGES IN RADIO-FREQUENCY HEATING AND

    E-print Network

    in the electronic version. I. INTRODUCTION There are many methods by which radio-frequency (rf) waves driveSOME UNSOLVED CHALLENGES IN RADIO-FREQUENCY HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE N. J. FISCH* Princeton Plasma, 2013 doi:10.13182/FST13-682 Several unsolved challenges in radio-frequency heating and current drive

  8. A practical method to evaluate radiofrequency exposure of mast workers.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Tommi; Hietanen, Maila

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields in telecommunication transmitter masts is a challenging task. For conventional field strength measurements using manually operated instruments, it is difficult to document the locations of measurements while climbing up a mast. Logging RF dosemeters worn by the workers, on the other hand, do not give any information about the location of the exposure. In this study, a practical method was developed and applied to assess mast workers' exposure to RF fields and the corresponding location. This method uses a logging dosemeter for personal RF exposure evaluation and two logging barometers to determine the corresponding height of the worker's position on the mast. The procedure is not intended to be used for compliance assessments, but to indicate locations where stricter assessments are needed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by making measurements in a TV and radio transmitting mast. PMID:19054796

  9. EFFECT OF RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION ON THERMOREGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past 30 years there have been numerous studies on the patho-physiological effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation. t is clear that the majority of these effects can be attributed to the thermogenic action of RF radiation. uring exposure to RF radiation the the...

  10. Radiofrequency identification technology: protecting the drug supply.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The FDA has stepped up its efforts to improve the safety and security of the nation's drug supply by encouraging the use of a state-of-the-art technology that tags product packaging electronically. The technology, called radiofrequency identification, or RFID, allows manufacturers and distributors to more precisely track drug products through the supply chain. PMID:16121424

  11. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant osteolyses.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Gatti, Carlo; Melazzini, Mario; Bernardo, Giovanni; Strada, Mariarosa; Teragni, Cristina; Delmonte, Angelo; Tagliaferri, Carlo; Bonezzi, Cesare; Barbieri, Massimo; Bernardo, Antonio; Fratino, Pietro

    2003-01-01

    Metastases are the most common neoplastic pathology involving the skeletal system. The hallmark of skeletal metastases is pain that often compromises the patient's quality of life. Radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy are the cornerstones of the treatment, but these techniques are not completely effective. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) may offer an alternative to conventional therapies for pain control. At present, the main field of application of RFA is the treatment of primary or secondary tumors of the liver but, recently, the technique has been effectively used to treat various other tumors in organs such as the prostate, kidney, lung, brain, pancreas and breast and to control pain caused by osteoid osteomas. Five patients with six painful bone metastases underwent RFA. The patients were three women and two men, aged 40-77 years (mean: 63.4). The radiofrequency system consists of an insulated 18-gauge needle electrode attached to a 500-kHz RF generator (Radionics, Burlington, Mass, USA). Four of our five patients rapidly obtained pain relief. One patient was completely pain free within 48 hours of the procedure and the control of pain persisted for 88 weeks. Another three patients obtained at least fifty percent pain reduction that lasted, on average, 12 weeks. Our preliminary results confirm that ultrasound-guided RFA is a simple and safe technique for treating painful superficial bone metastases. PMID:14981955

  12. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  13. Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation

    E-print Network

    Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

    2012-05-01

    We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

  14. Resonance Retrieval of Stored Coherence in a Radiofrequency-optical Double Resonance Experiment

    E-print Network

    Djokic, Vladimir; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We study the storage of coherences in atomic rubidium vapor with a three-level coupling scheme with two ground states and one electronically excited state driven by one optical (control) and one radiofrequency field. We initially store an atomic ground state coherence in the system. When retrieving the atomic coherence with a subsequent optical pulse, a second (signal) optical beam is created whose difference frequency to the control field is found to be determined by the atomic ground states Raman transition frequency.

  15. Minimum exposure limits and measured relationships between the vitamin D, erythema and international commission on non-ionizing radiation protection solar ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio; Butler, Harry; Turner, Joanna; Wainwright, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has established guidelines for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in outdoor occupational settings. Spectrally weighted ICNIRP ultraviolet exposures received by the skin or eye in an 8 h period are limited to 30 J m(-2). In this study, the time required to reach the ICNIRP exposure limit was measured daily in 10 min intervals upon a horizontal plane at a subtropical Australian latitude over a full year and compared with the effective Vitamin D dose received to one-quarter of the available skin surface area for all six Fitzpatrick skin types. The comparison of measured solar ultraviolet exposures for the full range of sky conditions in the 2009 measurement period, including a major September continental dust event, show a clear relationship between the weighted ICNIRP and the effective vitamin D dose. Our results show that the horizontal plane ICNIRP ultraviolet exposure may be used under these conditions to provide minimum guidelines for the healthy moderation of vitamin D, scalable to each of the six Fitzpatrick skin types. PMID:25407011

  16. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  17. Radiofrequency-oxidation treatment of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Young, Chris; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal-chemical treatment technology using radiofrequency heating and oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, ozone and a combination of both) was used for the treatment of sewage sludge. This was to evaluate the process effectiveness on cell disintegration and nutrient release of sludge, physical property changes such as particle size distribution, dewaterability and settleability, and their inter-relationships. The effectiveness of treatment processes was in the following order, from the most to least: thermal-oxidation process, oxidation process and thermal process. The thermal-oxidation process greatly increased cell disintegration and nutrient release, improved settleability, and decreased particle sizes. The treatment scheme involving ozone addition followed by hydrogen peroxide and radiofrequency heating yielded the highest soluble chemical oxygen demand, volatile fatty acids, ammonia and metals, while proffering the shortest capillary suction time and excellent settling properties. PMID:26233925

  18. Tunable Radio-frequency Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anne-Marie; Saint-Jean Rondeau, Olivier; Camirand-Lemyre, Julien; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Manipulating the spin of single electrons in quantum dots is a promising avenue for quantum information processing. As the readout of the spins is performed via spin-to-charge conversion, establishing a charge sensing technique that is fast and highly sensitive is crucial. For this reason, radio-frequency quantum point contact charge sensors have become widespread. Here we present a tunable quantum point contact charge sensor using a cryogenic variable capacitor, tunable from 2 to 12 pF. We obtain optimal impedance matching for different quantum dot devices over a frequency range from 125 to 210 MHz. The flexibility of our setup allows the integration of radio-frequency charge sensors to a variety of nanostructures.

  19. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation for Uterine Adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    Pontrelli, Giovanni; Campana, Colette; Steinkasserer, Martin; Ercoli, Alfredo; Minelli, Luca; Bergamini, Valentino; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Symptomatic uterine adenomyosis, unresponsive to medical therapy, is a challenging condition for patients who desire to preserve their uterus. This study was an evaluation of the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation of symptomatic nodular uterine adenomyosis. Methods: Fifteen women with symptomatic nodular adenomyosis, who had no plans for pregnancy but declined hysterectomy, underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. Ultrasonography was performed at baseline and at postoperative follow-ups at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The impact of uterine adenomyosis–related symptoms was assessed according to the visual analog scale. Results: The median number of nodular lesions treated per patient was 1 (range, 1–2). The median baseline volume of the adenomyosis area was 60 cm3 (range, 18–128). The median reduction in volume was 32, 49.4, 59.6, and 65.4% at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, respectively. A significant progressive improvement in the symptoms score was observed at the 4 follow-ups. Conclusion: In this study, laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation reduced uterine adenomyosis–related symptoms and volume, with significant relief of symptoms.

  20. Parallel plate radiofrequency ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    An 8-cm-diam. argon ion thruster is described. It is operated by applying 100 to 160 Mhz rf power across a thin plasma volume in a strongly divergent static magnetic field. No cathode or electron emitter is required to sustain a continuous wave plasma discharge over a broad range of propellant gas flow. Preliminary results indicate that a large fraction of the incident power is being reflected by impedance mismatching in the coupling structure. Resonance effects due to plasma thickness, magnetic field strength, and distribution are presented. Typical discharge losses obtained to date are 500 to 600 W per beam ampere at extracted beam currents up to 60 mA.

  1. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlösser, Magnus; Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  2. Radiofrequency energy exposure from the Trilliant smart meter.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kenneth R; Tell, Richard A

    2013-08-01

    This paper reviews radiofrequency (RF) field levels produced by electric utility meters equipped with RF transceivers (so-called Smart Meters), focusing on meters from one manufacturer (Trilliant, Redwood City, CA, USA, and Granby, QC, Canada). The RF transmission levels are summarized based on publicly available data submitted to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission supplemented by limited independent measurements. As with other Smart Meters, this meter incorporates a low powered radiofrequency transceiver used for a neighborhood mesh network, in the present case using ZigBee-compliant physical and medium access layers, operating in the 2.45 GHz unlicensed band but with a proprietary network architecture. Simple calculations based on a free space propagation model indicate that peak RF field intensities are in the range of 10 mW m or less at a distance of more than 1-2 m from the meters. However, the duty cycle of transmission from the meters is very low (< 1%). Limited measurements identified pulses from the meter that were consistent with data reported by the vendor to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. Limited measurements conducted in two houses with the meters were unable to clearly distinguish emissions from the meters from the considerable electromagnetic clutter in the same frequency range from other sources, including Wi-Fi routers and, when it was activated, a microwave oven. These preliminary measurements disclosed the difficulties that would be encountered in characterizing the RF exposures from these meters in homes in the face of background signals from other household devices in the same frequency range. An appendix provides an introduction to Smart Meter technology. The RF transmitters in wireless-equipped Smart Meters operate at similar power levels and in similar frequency ranges as many other digital communications devices in common use, and their exposure levels are very far below U.S. and international exposure limits. PMID:23799502

  3. Use of Semiflexible Applicators for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffke, G. Gebauer, B.; Knollmann, F.D.; Helmberger, T.; Ricke, J.; Oettle, H.; Felix, R.; Stroszczynski, C.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using new MRI-compatible semiflexible applicators in a closed-bore high-field MRI scanner. Methods. We treated 8 patients with 12 malignant liver tumors of different origin (5 colorectal carcinoma, 2 cholangiocellular carcinoma, 1 breast cancer) under MRI guidance. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed using 5 cm Rita Starburst Semi-Flex applicators (Rita Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) which are suitable for MR- and CT-guided interventions and a 150 W RF generator. All interventions were performed in a closed-bore 1.5 T high-field MRI scanner for MRI-guided RFA using fast T1-weighted gradient echo sequences and T2-weighted ultra-turbo spin echo sequences. Control and follow-up MRI examinations were performed on the next day, at 6 weeks, and every 3 months after RFA. Control MRI were performed as double-contrast MRI examinations (enhancement with iron oxide and gadopentetate dimeglumine). All interventions were performed with the patient under local anesthesia and analgo-sedation. Results. The mean diameter of the treated hepatic tumors was 2.4 cm ({+-}0.6 cm, range 1.0-3.2 cm). The mean diameter of induced necrosis was 3.1 cm ({+-}0.4 cm). We achieved complete ablation in all patients. Follow-up examinations over a duration of 7 months ({+-}1.3 months, range 4-9 month) showed a local control rate of 100% in this group of patients. All interventions were performed without major complications; only 2 subcapsular hematomas were documented. Conclusion. RFA of liver tumors using semiflexible applicators in closed-bore 1.5 T scanner systems is feasible. These applicators might simplify the RFA of liver tumors under MRI control. The stiff distal part of the applicator facilitates its repositioning.

  4. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    E-print Network

    J. Avva; J. M. Kovac; C. Miki; D. Saltzberg; A. G. Vieregg

    2015-12-02

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. Assuming a reliable extrapolation to higher frequencies, the measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as a promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  5. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  10. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4100 Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus....

  11. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4100 Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus....

  12. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1.1310 Section 1.1310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits....

  13. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1.1310 Section 1.1310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation exposure...

  14. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1.1310 Section 1.1310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. The criteria listed in...

  15. Radio-Frequency Rectification on Membrane Bound Pores

    E-print Network

    Sujatha Ramachandran; Robert H. Blick; Daniel W. van der Weide

    2007-09-12

    We present measurements on direct radio-frequency pumping of ion channels and pores bound in bilipid membranes. We make use of newly developed microcoaxes, which allow delivering the high frequency signal in close proximity to the membrane bound proteins and ion channels. We find rectification of the radio-frequency signal, which is used to pump ions through the channels and pores.

  16. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2... defined. As used in this part, a radiofrequency device is any device which in its operation is capable of... throughout this chapter. (b) The incidental, unintentional and intentional radiators defined in part 15...

  17. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2... defined. As used in this part, a radiofrequency device is any device which in its operation is capable of... throughout this chapter. (b) The incidental, unintentional and intentional radiators defined in part 15...

  18. High-resolution MRI encoding using radiofrequency phase gradients.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B; Deng, Qunli; Volotovskyy, Vyacheslav; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-11-01

    Although MRI offers highly diagnostic medical imagery, patient access to this modality worldwide is very limited when compared with X-ray or ultrasound. One reason for this is the expense and complexity of the equipment used to generate the switched magnetic fields necessary for MRI encoding. These field gradients are also responsible for intense acoustic noise and have the potential to induce nerve stimulation. We present results with a new MRI encoding principle which operates entirely without the use of conventional B0 field gradients. This new approach--'Transmit Array Spatial Encoding' (TRASE)--uses only the resonant radiofrequency (RF) field to produce Fourier spatial encoding equivalent to conventional MRI. k-space traversal (image encoding) is achieved by spin refocusing with phase gradient transmit fields in spin echo trains. A transmit coil array, driven by just a single transmitter channel, was constructed to produce four phase gradient fields, which allows the encoding of two orthogonal spatial axes. High-resolution two-dimensional-encoded in vivo MR images of hand and wrist were obtained at 0.2 T. TRASE exploits RF field phase gradients, and offers the possibility of very low-cost diagnostics and novel experiments exploiting unique capabilities, such as imaging without disturbance of the main B0 magnetic field. Lower field imaging (<1 T) and micro-imaging are favorable application domains as, in both cases, it is technically easier to achieve the short RF pulses desirable for long echo trains, and also to limit RF power deposition. As TRASE is simply an alternative mechanism (and technology) of moving through k space, there are many close analogies between it and conventional B0 -encoded techniques. TRASE is compatible with both B0 gradient encoding and parallel imaging, and so hybrid sequences containing all three spatial encoding approaches are possible. PMID:24019215

  19. Pushing the limits of radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Tara; Diaz, Rodolfo E

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report it was shown that the channel capacity of an in vivo communication link using microscopic antennas at radiofrequency is severely limited by the requirement not to damage the tissue surrounding the antennas. For dipole-like antennas the strong electric field dissipates too much power into body tissues. Loop-type antennas have a strong magnetic near field and so dissipate much less power into the surrounding tissues but they require such a large current that the antenna temperature is raised to the thermal damage threshold of the tissue. The only solution was increasing the antenna size into hundreds of microns, which makes reporting on an individual neuron impossible. However, recently demonstrated true magnetic antennas offer an alternative not covered in the previous report. The near field of these antennas is dominated by the magnetic field yet they don't require large currents. Thus they combine the best characteristics of dipoles and loops. By calculating the coupling between identical magnetic antennas inside a model of the body medium we show an increase in the power transfer of up to 8 orders of magnitude higher than could be realized with the loops and dipoles, making the microscopic RF in-vivo transmitting antenna possible. PMID:26035824

  20. Pushing the limits of radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Tara; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report it was shown that the channel capacity of an in vivo communication link using microscopic antennas at radiofrequency is severely limited by the requirement not to damage the tissue surrounding the antennas. For dipole-like antennas the strong electric field dissipates too much power into body tissues. Loop-type antennas have a strong magnetic near field and so dissipate much less power into the surrounding tissues but they require such a large current that the antenna temperature is raised to the thermal damage threshold of the tissue. The only solution was increasing the antenna size into hundreds of microns, which makes reporting on an individual neuron impossible. However, recently demonstrated true magnetic antennas offer an alternative not covered in the previous report. The near field of these antennas is dominated by the magnetic field yet they don’t require large currents. Thus they combine the best characteristics of dipoles and loops. By calculating the coupling between identical magnetic antennas inside a model of the body medium we show an increase in the power transfer of up to 8 orders of magnitude higher than could be realized with the loops and dipoles, making the microscopic RF in-vivo transmitting antenna possible. PMID:26035824

  1. Evaluation of stray radiofrequency radiation emitted by electrosurgical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, M.; Maggi, S.

    2006-07-01

    Electrosurgery refers to the passage of a high-frequency, high-voltage electrical current through the body to achieve the desired surgical effects. At the same time, these procedures are accompanied by a general increase of the electromagnetic field in an operating room that may expose both patients and personnel to relatively high levels of radiofrequency radiation. In the first part of this study, we have taken into account the radiation emitted by different monopolar electrosurgical devices, evaluating the electromagnetic field strength delivered by an electrosurgical handle and straying from units and other electrosurgical accessories. As a summary, in the worst case a surgeon's hands are exposed to a continuous and pulsed RF wave whose magnetic field strength is 0.75 A m-1 (E-field 400 V m-1). Occasionally stray radiation may exceed ICNIRP's occupational exposure guidelines, especially close to the patient return plate. In the second part of this paper, we have analysed areas of particular concern to prevent electromagnetic interference with some life-support devices (ventilators and electrocardiographic devices), which have failed to operate correctly. Most clinically relevant interference occurred when an electrosurgery device was used within 0.3 m of medical equipment. In the appendix, we suggest some practical recommendations intended to minimize the potential for electromagnetic hazards due to therapeutic application of RF energy.

  2. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumours: current status

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for thoracic tumours has emerged as a minimally invasive therapy option for primary and secondary lung tumours and has gained increasing acceptance for pain palliation. The procedure is well tolerated and the complication rates are low. RFA provides the opportunity for localized tissue destruction of limited tumour volumes with medium and long term follow-up data suggesting that survival figures do parallel those of non-surgical treatment modalities. The purpose of this article is to review the status of RFA in lung tumours, to emphasize its place in symptomatic palliation and to discuss its potential role in conjunction with radiation or systemic therapy. PMID:18331970

  3. Radiofrequency: an update on latest innovations.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil S; Malerich, Sarah A; Nassar, Amer H; Dorizas, Andrew S

    2014-11-01

    As the aging population in our society continues to grow, new technologies and procedures promising a more youthful appearance are continuously sought. The utilization of radiofrequency technology remains a novel method for the treatment of many aesthetic and medical dermatological indications. Innovative applications are constantly identified, expanding treatment options for various patient concerns including aging of the hands, cellulite, non-invasive lipolysis, and postpartum skin laxity. Non-invasive treatments are ideal for busy patients seeking minimal recovery time and so called lunch-time procedures. Furthermore, new developments in treatment devices enhance efficacy while decreasing patient discomfort. PMID:25607698

  4. Looking at the other side of the coin: the search for possible biopositive cognitive effects of the exposure to 900 MHz GSM mobile phone radiofrequency radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although exposure to electromagnetic radiation in radiofrequency range has caused a great deal of concern globally, radiofrequency radiation has many critical applications in both telecommunication and non-communication fields. The induction of adaptive response phenomena by exposure to radiofrequency radiation as either increased resistance to a subsequent dose of ionizing radiation or resistance to a bacterial infection has been reported recently. Interestingly, the potential beneficial effects of mobile phone radiofrequency radiation are not only limited to the induction of adaptive phenomena. It has previously been indicated that the visual reaction time of university students significantly decreased after a 10 min exposure to radiofrequency radiation emitted by a mobile phone. Furthermore, it has been revealed that occupational exposures to radar radiations decreased the reaction time in radar workers. Based on these findings, it can be hypothesized that in special circumstances, these exposures might lead to a better response of humans to different hazards. Other investigators have also provided evidence that confirms the induction of RF-induced cognitive benefits. Furthermore, some recent reports have indicated that RF radiation may play a role in protecting against cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease. In this light, a challenging issue will arise if there are other RF-induced stimulating effects. It is also challenging to explore the potential applications of these effects. Further research may shed light on dark areas of the health effects of short and long-term human exposure to radiofrequency radiation. PMID:24843789

  5. Looking at the other side of the coin: the search for possible biopositive cognitive effects of the exposure to 900 MHz GSM mobile phone radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Tavakkoli-Golpayegani, Ali; Haghani, Masoud; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Although exposure to electromagnetic radiation in radiofrequency range has caused a great deal of concern globally, radiofrequency radiation has many critical applications in both telecommunication and non-communication fields. The induction of adaptive response phenomena by exposure to radiofrequency radiation as either increased resistance to a subsequent dose of ionizing radiation or resistance to a bacterial infection has been reported recently. Interestingly, the potential beneficial effects of mobile phone radiofrequency radiation are not only limited to the induction of adaptive phenomena. It has previously been indicated that the visual reaction time of university students significantly decreased after a 10 min exposure to radiofrequency radiation emitted by a mobile phone. Furthermore, it has been revealed that occupational exposures to radar radiations decreased the reaction time in radar workers. Based on these findings, it can be hypothesized that in special circumstances, these exposures might lead to a better response of humans to different hazards. Other investigators have also provided evidence that confirms the induction of RF-induced cognitive benefits. Furthermore, some recent reports have indicated that RF radiation may play a role in protecting against cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. In this light, a challenging issue will arise if there are other RF-induced stimulating effects. It is also challenging to explore the potential applications of these effects. Further research may shed light on dark areas of the health effects of short and long-term human exposure to radiofrequency radiation. PMID:24843789

  6. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Pokushalov, E. A.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using 123I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  7. Radio-frequency dressed state potentials for neutral atoms

    E-print Network

    S. Hofferberth; I. Lesanovsky; B. Fischer; J. Verdu; J. Schmiedmayer

    2006-08-29

    Potentials for atoms can be created by external fields acting on properties like magnetic moment, charge, polarizability, or by oscillating fields which couple internal states. The most prominent realization of the latter is the optical dipole potential formed by coupling ground and electronically excited states of an atom with light. Here we present an experimental investigation of the remarkable properties of potentials derived from radio-frequency (RF) coupling between electronic ground states. The coupling is magnetic and the vector character allows to design state dependent potential landscapes. On atom chips this enables robust coherent atom manipulation on much smaller spatial scales than possible with static fields alone. We find no additional heating or collisional loss up to densities approaching $10^{15}$ atoms / cm$^3$ compared to static magnetic traps. We demonstrate the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates in RF potentials and investigate the difference in the interference between two independently created and two coherently split condensates in identical traps. All together this makes RF dressing a powerful new tool for micro manipulation of atomic and molecular systems.

  8. A survey of the urban radiofrequency (RF) environment.

    PubMed

    Tell, Richard A; Kavet, Robert

    2014-12-01

    In 1980, Tell and Mantiply published a study of radiofrequency (RF) fields measured across 15 major metropolitan areas in the USA. They required a van fully equipped with instrumentation and computing capability for their measurements. This study aimed to assess whether and how hand-held instrumentation available today would facilitate and enhance the efficiency of large-scale surveys of ambient RF fields. In addition, the data would provide a suggestion as to how the profile of ambient RF fields has changed with respect to frequency content and magnitude. Not unexpectedly, the relative power densities were orders of magnitude lower than the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for the general public, with a maximum time-averaged value across the VHF-FM-UHF-cellular bands of 0.12 % of the MPE (AM's contribution was negligible). In both the 1980 and the present study, the power density in the FM band was a major contributor to overall power density, but over time, power densities in the VHF and UHF band decreased and increased, respectively. From the perspective of absolute power density, the wideband values in the 1980 study, this study and any number of assessments conducted in European nations are not generally different from one another. PMID:24567499

  9. Numerical investigation on electrical characterization of a capacitive coupled radio-frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; He, X.; Chen, J. P.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the main electrical features of capacitive coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharges in gas. A two-dimensional, time-dependent fluid model was established. Capacitive coupled plasmas (CCP) were produced by applying radio-frequency voltage to a pair of parallel plate electrodes which are separated from the plasma by dielectric layers. The electron equation and the electron transport equations were solved and yielded the electron number density and electron temperature. The electrostatic field was obtained by the solution of the Poisson equation. The distribution of electron temperature and electron number density was studied under different conditions: radio-frequency applied voltages (VRF=100-2000V), frequencies (f=3.0-40.68MHz), pressures (p=0.001-1torr), and gas species (O2, Ar, He, N2). The results show that electron number density presents a minimum near the electrodes, and presents a maximum between the positive and the negative electrodes. The distinguishing feature of CCP is the presence of oscillating sheaths near electrodes where displacement current dominates conduction current. These informations will help us to analyze the characters of CCP for application.

  10. Teratogenic effects of 27. 12 MHz radiofrequency radiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lary, J.M.; Conover, D.L.; Foley, E.D.; Hanser, P.L.

    1982-12-01

    High-intensity 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation was determined to be teratogenic in rats during most of the gestation period. Eight groups of pregnant rats were exposed to a magnetic field strength of 55 amps/meter and an electric field strength of 300 volts/meter on gestation days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, or 15. Exposures ceased once the dam's colonic temperature reached 43.0 degrees C (about 20-40 minutes' duration). Eight matching control groups were sham-irradiated for 30 minutes at 0 amps/meter and 0 volts/meter. An additional group of pregnant rats received no treatment. With one exception, no significant differences occurred between sham-irradiated and untreated control groups. RF exposure, however, caused a significant incidence of fetal malformations throughout the postimplantation period (days 7 through 15). It also caused a low but significant incidence of preimplantation malformations. Fetal weight and crown-rump length were reduced in all postimplantation exposure groups but were not affected by preimplantation exposure. The incidence of dead or resorbed fetuses was significantly increased in rats irradiated on days 7 or 9. The effects observed appeared to be caused by RF-induced hyperthermia in the treated dams. Since a number of industrial, scientific, and medical devices operating at or near 27.12 MHz can cause hyperthermia in humans, women of childbearing age should avoid exposure to RF-radiation levels that exceed current US occupational standards.

  11. Cell oxidation-reduction imbalance after modulated radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Ana Marija; Pavicic, Ivan; Trosic, Ivancica

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate an influence of modulated radiofrequency field (RF) of 1800?MHz, strength of 30?V/m on oxidation-reduction processes within the cell. The assigned RF field was generated within Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell equipped by signal generator, modulator, and amplifier. Cell line V79, was irradiated for 10, 30, and 60?min, specific absorption rate was calculated to be 1.6?W/kg. Cell metabolic activity and viability was determined by MTT assay. In order to define total protein content, colorimetric method was used. Concentration of oxidised proteins was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) marked with fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate were measured by means of plate reader device. In comparison with control cell samples, metabolic activity and total protein content in exposed cells did not differ significantly. Concentrations of carbonyl derivates, a product of protein oxidation, insignificantly but continuously increase with duration of exposure. In exposed samples, ROS level significantly (p?

  12. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guo; Li Heping; Wang Sen; Sun Wenting; Bao Chengyu; Wang Liyan; Zhao Hongxin; Xing Xinhui

    2008-06-02

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  13. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Sen; Zhao, Hong-Xin; Sun, Wen-Ting; Xing, Xin-Hui; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2008-06-01

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  14. Emerging indications of endoscopic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Becq, Aymeric; Camus, Marine; Rahmi, Gabriel; de Parades, Vincent; Marteau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-validated treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Other indications of endoscopic RFA are under evaluation. Results Four prospective studies (total 69 patients) have shown that RFA achieved complete remission of early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia at a rate of 80%, but with a substantial risk of stricture. In the setting of gastric antral vascular ectasia, two prospective monocenter studies, and a retrospective multicenter study, (total 51 patients), suggest that RFA is efficacious in terms of reducing transfusion dependency. In the setting of chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy, a prospective monocenter study and a retrospective multicenter study (total 56 patients) suggest that RFA is an efficient treatment. A retrospective comparative study (64 patients) suggests that RFA improves stents patency in malignant biliary strictures. Conclusions Endoscopic RFA is an upcoming treatment modality in early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia, as well as in gastric, rectal, and biliary diseases. PMID:26279839

  15. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  16. Radio-frequency low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R; Mora, José; Maestre, Haroldo; Corral, Pablo

    2014-06-15

    A method for retrieving low-coherence interferograms, based on the use of a microwave photonics filter, is proposed and demonstrated. The method is equivalent to the double-interferometer technique, with the scanning interferometer replaced by an analog fiber-optics link and the visibility recorded as the amplitude of its radio-frequency (RF) response. As a low-coherence interferometry system, it shows a decrease of resolution induced by the fiber's third-order dispersion (?3). As a displacement sensor, it provides highly linear and slope-scalable readouts of the interferometer's optical path difference in terms of RF, even in the presence of third-order dispersion. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrate 20-?m displacement readouts using C-band EDFA sources and standard single-mode fiber. PMID:24978555

  17. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R E; Sebastian, T

    2013-01-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps. PMID:24346503

  18. Optical generation of radio-frequency power

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Meyer, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    An optical technique for high-power radio-frequency (RF) signal generation is described. The technique uses a unique photodetector based on a traveling-wave design driven by an appropriately modulated light source. The traveling-wave photodetector (TWPD) exhibits simultaneously a theoretical quantum efficiency approaching 100 % and a very large electrical bandwidth. Additionally, it is capable of dissipating the high-power levels required for the RF generation technique. The modulated light source is formed by either the beating together of two lasers or by the direct modulation of a light source. A system example is given which predicts RF power levels of 100`s of mW`s at millimeter wave frequencies with a theoretical ``wall-plug`` efficiency approaching 34%.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Anthony

    2002-12-04

    Surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and local radiation have been the conventional treatments for localized solid cancer. Because certain patients are not candidates for tumor resection and because many tumors are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and radiation, there has been an impetus to develop alternative therapies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive therapy for localized solid cancers that has gained considerable attention in the last 12 years. Advantages of minimally invasive therapies over surgery include less recovery time, lower morbidity and mortality, eligibility of more patients, and lower cost. RFA has been applied most extensively to inoperable hepatic tumors. It is investigational for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, and adrenal gland. This colloquium will review the mechanism, techniques, limitations, and clinical applications of RFA. The ultimate role that RFA will play in cancer therapy will depend on the results of long-term follow-up and prospective randomized trials.

  20. Local Recurrence After Hepatic Radiofrequency Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mulier, Stefaan; Ni, Yicheng; Jamart, Jacques; Ruers, Theo; Marchal, Guy; Michel, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that influence local recurrence after radiofrequency coagulation of liver tumors. Summary Background Data: Local recurrence rate varies widely between 2% and 60%. Apart from tumor size as an important risk factor for local recurrence, little is known about the impact of other factors. Methods: An exhaustive literature search was carried out for the period from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2004. Only series with a minimal follow-up of 6 months and/or mean follow-up of 12 months were included. Univariate and multivariate meta-analyses were carried out. Results: Ninety-five independent series were included, allowing the analysis of the local recurrence rate of 5224 treated liver tumors. In a univariate analysis, tumor-dependent factors with significantly less local recurrences were: smaller size, neuroendocrine metastases, nonsubcapsular location, and location away from large vessels. Physician-dependent favorable factors were: surgical (open or laparoscopic) approach, vascular occlusion, general anesthesia, a 1-cm intentional margin, and a greater physician experience. In a multivariate analysis, significantly less local recurrences were observed for small size (P < 0.001) and a surgical (versus percutaneous) approach (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiofrequency coagulation by laparoscopy or laparotomy results in superior local control, independent of tumor size. The percutaneous route should mainly be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate a laparoscopy or laparotomy. The short-term benefits of less invasiveness for the percutaneous route do not outweigh the longer-term higher risk of local recurrence. PMID:16041205

  1. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Verschaeve, L. . E-mail: luc.verschaeve@vito.be

    2005-09-01

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Loewenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance. One such study is now being planned.

  2. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: A Guide for Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Plug-ins EHC Component EPC Project Topic Title Comparative Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Full Reports Research Review Dec. 2, 2008 Appendixes Dec. 2, 2008 Related Products for this Topic Disposition of Comments Report ...

  4. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    E-print Network

    Schirotzek, Andre

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents experiments investigating the phase diagram of ultracold atomic Fermi gases using radio-frequency spectroscopy. The tunability of many experimental parameters including the temperature, the interparticle ...

  5. Radiofrequency detector coil performance maps for parallel MRI applications

    E-print Network

    Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2006-01-01

    Parallel MRI techniques allow acceleration of MR imaging beyond traditional speed limits. In parallel MRI, arrays of radiofrequency (RF) detector coil arrays are used to perform some degree of spatial encoding which ...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is desired. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  7. Physiologic regulation in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelson, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields have been demonstrated to elicit thermoregulatory responses, neuroendocrine, neurochemical modulations, and behavioral reactions. These physiologic regulatory processes are exquisitely tuned, interrelated functions that constitute sensitive indicators of organismic responses to radiofrequency energy absorption (the radiofrequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum includes as one part microwaves). Assessment of the integration and correlation of these functions relative to the thermal inputs and homeokinetic reactions of the individual subjected to radiofrequency energy should permit differentiation between potential hazards that might compromise the individual's ability to maintain normal physiologic function and effects that are compensated by physiologic redundancy.

  8. Radiofrequency transmission line for bioluminescent Vibrio sp. irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Velardi, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the study and the analyses of a transmission line for radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of bacteria belonging to Vibrio harveyi-related strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with many marine organisms. The bioluminescence represents a new biologic indicator which is useful for studying the behaviour of living samples in the presence of RF waves due to the modern communication systems. A suitable transmission line, used as an irradiating cell and tested up to the maximum frequency used by the global system for mobile communications and universal mobile telecommunications system transmissions, was characterized. In this experiment, the RF voltage applied to the transmission line was 1 V. Due to short dimensions of the line and the applied high frequencies, standing waves were produced in addition to progressing waves and the electric field strength varies particularly along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic field map was not strongly linked to the electric one due to the presence of standing waves and of the outgoing irradiation. RF fields were measured by two homemade suitable probes able to diagnostic fields of high frequency. The field measurements were performed without any specimens inside the line. Being our sample made of living matter, the real field was modified and its value was estimated by a simulation code. The bioluminescence experiments were performed only at 900 MHz for two different measured electric fields, 53 and 140 V/m. The light emission was measured right from the beginning and after 7 and 25 h. Under RF irradiation, we found that the bioluminescence activity decreased. Compared with the control sample, the diminution was 6.8% and 44% after 7 and 25 h of irradiation, respectively, both with the low or high field. No changes of the survival factor for all the samples were observed. Besides, to understand the emission processes, we operated the deconvolution of the spectra by two Gaussian curves. The Gaussian peaks were approximately centered at 460 nm and 490 nm. The 490 nm peak was higher than the control one. Under RF, the 490 nm peak decreased compared to the 460 nm one. The decreasing was stronger for the sample in the higher field. The ratio of the emission area of the 490 nm to 460 nm was 5 for the control sample. It decreased up to 1.6 for the samples under RF. The bioluminescence improves the DNA repair by photoreactivation, and there is evidence that photolyase is preferentially activated by blue/violet light. Our finding suggests that RF exposure may stimulate DNA repair by shifting the emission spectra from blue/green (490 nm) to blue/violet (460 nm).

  9. Measured radiofrequency exposure during various mobile-phone use scenarios.

    PubMed

    Kelsh, Michael A; Shum, Mona; Sheppard, Asher R; McNeely, Mark; Kuster, Niels; Lau, Edmund; Weidling, Ryan; Fordyce, Tiffani; Kühn, Sven; Sulser, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of mobile phone users have relied on self reporting or billing records to assess exposure. Herein, we report quantitative measurements of mobile-phone power output as a function of phone technology, environmental terrain, and handset design. Radiofrequency (RF) output data were collected using software-modified phones that recorded power control settings, coupled with a mobile system that recorded and analyzed RF fields measured in a phantom head placed in a vehicle. Data collected from three distinct routes (urban, suburban, and rural) were summarized as averages of peak levels and overall averages of RF power output, and were analyzed using analysis of variance methods. Technology was the strongest predictor of RF power output. The older analog technology produced the highest RF levels, whereas CDMA had the lowest, with GSM and TDMA showing similar intermediate levels. We observed generally higher RF power output in rural areas. There was good correlation between average power control settings in the software-modified phones and power measurements in the phantoms. Our findings suggest that phone technology, and to a lesser extent, degree of urbanization, are the two stronger influences on RF power output. Software-modified phones should be useful for improving epidemiologic exposure assessment. PMID:20551994

  10. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Okhapkin, M. V.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Peik, E.

    2012-06-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 105 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10-7 to 10-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  11. Radiofrequency signal affects alpha band in resting electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Rania; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Hugueville, Laurent; Ducorps, Antoine; Lemaréchal, Jean-Didier; Thuróczy, György; de Seze, René; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human resting EEG with a control of some parameters that are known to affect alpha band, such as electrode impedance, salivary cortisol, and caffeine. Eyes-open and eyes-closed resting EEG data were recorded in 26 healthy young subjects under two conditions: sham exposure and real exposure in double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover design. Spectral power of EEG rhythms was calculated for the alpha band (8-12 Hz). Saliva samples were collected before and after the study. Salivary cortisol and caffeine were assessed by ELISA and HPLC, respectively. The electrode impedance was recorded at the beginning of each run. Compared with the sham session, the exposure session showed a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) decrease of the alpha band spectral power during closed-eyes condition. This effect persisted in the postexposure session (P < 0.0001). No significant changes were detected in electrode impedance, salivary cortisol, and caffeine in the sham session compared with the exposure one. These results suggest that GSM-EMFs of a mobile phone affect the alpha band within spectral power of resting human EEG. PMID:25695646

  12. Fast and quiet MRI using a swept radiofrequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Park, Jang-Yeon; Garwood, Michael

    2006-08-01

    A novel fast and quiet method of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced which creates new opportunities for imaging in medicine and materials science. The method is called SWIFT, sweep imaging with Fourier transformation. In SWIFT, time-domain signals are acquired in a time-shared manner during a swept radiofrequency excitation of the nuclear spins. With negligible time between excitation and signal acquisition, new possibilities exist for imaging objects consisting of spins with extremely fast transverse relaxation rates, such as macromolecules, semi-solids, and quadrupolar nuclei. The field gradient used for spatial-encoding is not pulsed on and off, but rather is stepped in orientation in an incremental manner, which results in low acoustic noise. This unique acquisition method is expected to be relatively insensitive to sample motion, which is important for imaging live objects. Additionally, the frequency-swept excitation distributes the signal energy in time and thus dynamic range requirements for proper signal digitization are reduced compared with conventional MRI. For demonstration, images of a plastic object and cortical bone are shown.

  13. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Muhammed Hasanato, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  14. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  15. Radio-Frequency Plasma Cleaning of a Penning Malmberg Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Martin, James; Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Radio-frequency-generated plasma has been demonstrated to be a promising means of cleaning the interior surfaces of a Penning-Malmberg trap that is used in experiments on the confinement of antimatter. {Such a trap was reported in Modified Penning-Malmberg Trap for Storing Antiprotons (MFS-31780), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 66.} Cleaning of the interior surfaces is necessary to minimize numbers of contaminant atoms and molecules, which reduce confinement times by engaging in matter/antimatter-annihilation reactions with confined antimatter particles. A modified Penning-Malmberg trap like the one described in the cited prior article includes several collinear ring electrodes (some of which are segmented) inside a tubular vacuum chamber, as illustrated in Figure 1. During operation of the trap, a small cloud of charged antiparticles (e.g., antiprotons or positrons) is confined to a spheroidal central region by means of a magnetic field in combination with DC and radiofrequency (RF) electric fields applied via the electrodes. In the present developmental method of cleaning by use of RF-generated plasma, one evacuates the vacuum chamber, backfills the chamber with hydrogen at a suitable low pressure, and uses an RF-signal generator and baluns to apply RF voltages to the ring electrodes. Each ring is excited in the polarity opposite that of the adjacent ring. The electric field generated by the RF signal creates a discharge in the low-pressure gas. The RF power and gas pressure are adjusted so that the plasma generated in the discharge (see Figure 2) physically and chemically attacks any solid, liquid, and gaseous contaminant layers on the electrode surfaces. The products of the physical and chemical cleaning reactions are gaseous and are removed by the vacuum pumps.

  16. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  17. Boltzmann expansion in a radiofrequency conical helicon thruster operating in xenon and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Boswell, R.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-06-01

    A low pressure (˜0.5 mTorr in xenon and ˜1 mTorr in argon) Boltzmann expansion is experimentally observed on axis within a magnetized (60 to 180 G) radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) conical helicon thruster for input powers up to 900 W using plasma parameters measured with a Langmuir probe. The axial forces, respectively, resulting from the electron and magnetic field pressures are directly measured using a thrust balance for constant maximum plasma pressure and show a higher fuel efficiency for argon compared to xenon.

  18. Boltzmann expansion in a radiofrequency conical helicon thruster operating in xenon and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, C.; Boswell, R.; Takahashi, K.; Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-9579

    2013-06-03

    A low pressure ({approx}0.5 mTorr in xenon and {approx}1 mTorr in argon) Boltzmann expansion is experimentally observed on axis within a magnetized (60 to 180 G) radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) conical helicon thruster for input powers up to 900 W using plasma parameters measured with a Langmuir probe. The axial forces, respectively, resulting from the electron and magnetic field pressures are directly measured using a thrust balance for constant maximum plasma pressure and show a higher fuel efficiency for argon compared to xenon.

  19. Effects of acute exposure to ultrahigh radiofrequency radiation on three antenna engineers.

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, C J

    1997-01-01

    Three men were accidentally exposed to high levels of ultrahigh frequency radiofrequency radiation (785 MHz mean frequency) while working on a television mast. They experienced an immediate sensation of intense heating of the parts of the body in the electromagnetic field followed by a variety of symptoms and signs which included pain, headache, numbness, and parasthesiae, malaise, diarrhoea, and skin erythema. The most notable problem was that of acute then chronic headache involving the part of the head which was most exposed. PMID:9166136

  20. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of a Small Renal Mass Complicated by Appendiceal Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Judith; Bex, Axel; Prevoo, Warner

    2012-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained wide acceptance as nephron-sparing therapy for small renal masses in select patients. Generally, it is a safe procedure with minor morbidity and acceptable short-term oncologic outcome. However, as a result of the close proximity of vital structures, such as the bowel, ureter, and large vessels, to the ablative field, complications regarding these structures may occur. This is the first article describing appendiceal perforation as a complication of computed tomography-guided RFA despite hydrodissection. When performing this innovative and promising procedure one should be aware of the possibility of particular minor and even major complications.

  1. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  2. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  3. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  4. Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Flanagin, Brody A; Lindskog, Dieter M

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been increasingly used in the treatment of osteoid osteoma (OO), as this method has provided satisfactory results with minimal morbidity. RFA traditionally has been performed by radiologists under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Advances in intraoperative imaging techniques now allow orthopedic oncologists to perform image-guided RFA in the operating room. We conducted a study to evaluate the efficacy of a novel technique that uses intraoperative CT-guided RFA to treat OO. We reviewed 28 consecutive cases of OO treated with intraoperative RFA by a single surgeon between September 2004 and December 2008. Primary or secondary success was defined as complete pain relief without evidence of recurrence after the first or second procedure, respectively. Failure was defined as the continued presence of symptoms combined with radiographic evidence of recurrence. Primary success rate was 92.8%. Two patients had a recurrence and underwent a successful second RFA. Our success rates are similar to those in the radiology literature. Further studies are needed to validate the efficacy of this novel technique. PMID:25750946

  5. CUTANEOUS REMODELING AND PHOTOREJUVENATION USING RADIOFREQUENCY DEVICES

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed Lotfy

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) is electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range of 3-300GHz. The primary effects of RF energy on living tissue are considered to be thermal. The goal of the new devices based on these frequency ranges is to heat specific layers of the skin. The directed use of RF can induce dermal heating and cause collagen degeneration. Wound healing mechanisms promote the remodeling of collagen and wound contraction, which ultimately clinically enhances the appearance of mild to moderate skin laxity. Preliminary studies have reported efficacy in the treatment of laxity that involves the periorbital area and jowls. Because RF energy is not dependent on specific chromophore interaction, epidermal melanin is not at risk of destruction and treatment of all skin types is possible. As such, radiofrequency-based systems have been used successfully for nonablative skin rejuvenation, atrophic scar revision and treatment of unwanted hair, vascular lesions and inflammatory acne. The use of RF is becoming more popular, although a misunderstanding exists regarding the mechanisms and limitations of its actions. This concise review serves as an introduction and guide to many aspects of RF in the non ablative rejuvenation of skin. PMID:20161847

  6. Current oncologic applications of radiofrequency ablation therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Green, Sari; Elliot, Angelina; McGahan, John P; Khatri, Vijay P

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) uses high frequency alternating current to heat a volume of tissue around a needle electrode to induce focal coagulative necrosis with minimal injury to surrounding tissues. RFA can be performed via an open, laparoscopic, or image guided percutaneous approach and be performed under general or local anesthesia. Advances in delivery mechanisms, electrode designs, and higher power generators have increased the maximum volume that can be ablated, while maximizing oncological outcomes. In general, RFA is used to control local tumor growth, prevent recurrence, palliate symptoms, and improve survival in a subset of patients that are not candidates for surgical resection. It’s equivalence to surgical resection has yet to be proven in large randomized control trials. Currently, the use of RFA has been well described as a primary or adjuvant treatment modality of limited but unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastasis, especially colorectal cancer metastases, primary lung tumors, renal cell carcinoma, boney metastasis and osteoid osteomas. The role of RFA in the primary treatment of early stage breast cancer is still evolving. This review will discuss the general features of RFA and outline its role in commonly encountered solid tumors. PMID:23671734

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  8. Osteoid Osteoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Seyran, Metin; Tekin, Ali Ça?r?; Ada?, Müjdat; Bayraktar, Mehmet Kür?ad; Co?kun, Ünsal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Our aim is to evaluate the results of treatment with computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteomas which were localized in a difficult area for operation. Materials and Methods. Glenoid, distal tibia, humerus shaft, proximal humerus, and in third finger of the hand proximal phalanx were involved in one patient. Proximal femur was involved in three patients, distal femur was involved in three patients, and proximal tibia was involved in two patients. 9 males and 4 females were aged 4 to 34 years (mean age: 18.5 years). All patients had pain and were evaluated with X-rays, CT, bone scintigraphy, and MRI. In all patients, RF ablation was performed with local anesthesia. The lesion heated to 90°C for 6 minutes. Results. All of the patients achieved complete pain relief after ablation and were fully weight bearing without any support. In all patients, there was soft tissue edema after the procedure. During follow-up, all patients were free from the pain and there was no sign about the tumor. There was no other complication after the process. Conclusion. CT guided RFA is a minimally invasive, safe, and cost-effective treatment for osteoid osteoma placed in difficult area for surgery. PMID:25705522

  9. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with pulsed radiofrequency helps relieve postoperative complications of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W-X; Wang, Q; He, M-W; Yang, L-Q; Wu, B-S; Ni, J-X

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a sudden, severe condition characterized by stabbing and recurrent pain. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) are common surgical interventions used to treat trigeminal neuralgia. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and associated complications of a combination of RFT and PRF in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous RFT of the Gasserian ganglion was performed on 80 patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were randomly assigned to either group A (RFT at 70°C) or group B (RFT at 75°C). Patients in each group were divided into 2 subgroups, receiving percutaneous RFT (240 s) with or without PRF (42°C, 2 Hz, 240 s). Six months later, pain relief and complication status were evaluated. There was no significant difference in visual analogue scores among groups with RFT at 70° or 75°C, with or without PRF. Data showed that facial numbness and postoperative masticatory muscle weakness recovered more rapidly in patients receiving combined RFT and PRF treatment. Decreased corneal reflex was relieved to a significantly greater extent in groups receiving PRF than those without. Thus, compared to the use of RFT at 75°C alone, the combination of PRF and RFT helped eliminate postoperative complications, such as facial numbness, masticatory muscle weakness, and decreased corneal reflex, indicating that it could be useful for surgically treating trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26214440

  10. Comparison of Wet Radiofrequency Ablation with Dry Radiofrequency Ablation and Radiofrequency Ablation Using Hypertonic Saline Preinjection: Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Se Hyung; Shin, Kyung Sook; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Hee Sun; Hur, Hurn; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2004-01-01

    Objective We wished to compare the in-vitro efficiency of wet radiofrequency (RF) ablation with the efficiency of dry RF ablation and RF ablation with preinjection of NaCl solutions using excised bovine liver. Materials and Methods Radiofrequency was applied to excised bovine livers in a monopolar mode for 10 minutes using a 200 W generator and a perfused-cooled electrode with or without injection or slow infusion of NaCl solutions. After placing the perfused-cooled electrode in the explanted liver, 50 ablation zones were created with five different regimens: group A; standard dry RF ablation, group B; RF ablation with 11 mL of 5% NaCl solution preinjection, group C; RF ablation with infusion of 11 mL of 5% NaCl solution at a rate of 1 mL/min, group D; RFA with 6 mL of 36% NaCl solution preinjection, group E; RF ablation with infusion of 6 mL of 36% NaCl solution at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. In groups C and E, infusion of the NaCl solutions was started 1 min before RF ablation and then maintained during RF ablation (wet RF ablation). During RF ablation, we measured the tissue temperature at 15 mm from the electrode. The dimensions of the ablation zones and changes in impedance, current and liver temperature during RF ablation were then compared between the groups. Results With injection or infusion of NaCl solutions, the mean initial tissue impedance prior to RF ablation was significantly less in groups B, C, D, and E (43-75 ?) than for group A (80 ?) (p < 0.05). During RF ablation, the tissue impedance was well controlled in groups C and E, but it was often rapidly increased to more than 200 ? in groups A and B. In group D, the impedance was well controlled in six of ten trials but it was increased in four trials (40%) 7 min after starting RF ablation. As consequences, the mean current was higher for groups C, D, and E than for the other groups: 401 ± 145 mA in group A, 287 ± 32 mA in group B, 1907 ± 96 mA in group C, 1649 ± 514 mA in group D, and 1968 ± 108 mA in group E (p < 0.05). In addition, the volumes of RF-induced coagulation necrosis were greater in groups C and E than in group D, which was greater than in groups A and B than in group E (p < 0.05); 14.3 ± 3.0 cm3 in group A; 12.4 ± 3.8 cm3 in group B; 80.9 ± 9.9 cm3 in group C; 45.3 ± 11.3 cm3 in group D and 81.6 ± 8.6 cm3 in group E. The tissue temperature measured at 15 mm from the electrode was higher in groups C, D and E than other groups (p < 0.05): 53 ± 12? in group A, 42 ± 2? in group B, 93 ± 8? in group C; 79 ± 12? in group D and 83 ± 8? in group E. Conclusion Wet RF ablation with 5% or 36% NaCl solutions shows better efficiency in creating a large ablation zone than does dry RF ablation or RF ablation with preinjection of NaCl solutions. PMID:15637476

  11. 75 FR 80827 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs...entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs...December 22, 2008). FDA has identified RFID as a promising technology to be used...

  12. 77 FR 74668 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ...entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs...entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs...December 23, 2010). FDA has identified RFID as a promising technology to be used...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  15. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies...THE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency...

  16. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies...THE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  20. Radiofrequency for the treatment of skin laxity: mith or truth*

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Angélica Rodrigues; Soares, Viviane Pinheiro Campos; da Silva, Fernanda Souza; Moreira, Tatiane da Silva

    2015-01-01

    The nonablative radiofrequency is a procedure commonly used for the treatment of skin laxity from an increase in tissue temperature. The goal is to induce thermal damage to thus stimulate neocollagenesis in deep layers of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. However, many of these devices haven't been tested and their parameters are still not accepted by the scientific community. Because of this, it is necessary to review the literature regarding the physiological effects and parameters for application of radiofrequency and methodological quality and level of evidence of studies. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, PEDro, SciELO, PubMed, LILACS and CAPES and experimental studies in humans, which used radiofrequency devices as treatment for facial or body laxity, were selected. The results showed that the main physiological effect is to stimulate collagen synthesis. There was no homogeneity between studies in relation to most of the parameters used and the methodological quality of studies and level of evidence for using radiofrequency are low. This fact complicates the determination of effective parameters for clinical use of this device in the treatment of skin laxity. The analyzed studies suggest that radiofrequency is effective, however the physiological mechanisms and the required parameters are not clear in the literature. PMID:26560216

  1. A unique complication of radiofrequency therapy to the tongue base

    PubMed Central

    Tornari, Chrysostomos; Wong, Gentle; Arora, Asit; Kotecha, Bhik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation treatment of the tongue base can be used either alone or as part of a multilevel approach in the treatment of snoring. This involves the generation of thermal energy around the circumvallate papillae of the tongue. Potential complications include ulceration, dysphagia, haematoma and abscess formation. Presentation of case We present the case of a 50-year-old patient who developed an anterior neck swelling following a second application of radiofrequency ablation therapy to the tongue base for snoring. This was secondary to an infection of a previously undiagnosed thyroglossal cyst. The patient made a full recovery following intravenous antibiotic therapy and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. Discussion Thyroglossal tract remnants are thought to be present in seven percent of the adult population. An infection in a thyroglossal tract cyst has not previously been reported following radiofrequency ablation of the tongue base. Given the relatively high complication rate of tongue base radiofrequency ablation in some series, this complication may be under-recognised. Conclusion An infected thyroglossal tract cyst should be suspected in patients with anterior neck swellings following radiofrequency ablation therapy to the tongue base. We advise caution when performing this procedure on patients with known thyroglossal tract remnants though there is insufficient evidence to suggest that this procedure is contraindicated. PMID:25603484

  2. 78 FR 33633 - Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... the measurement procedure to be used for SAR measurement in the human head from cell phones. It stated... they could all be impacted by our rule revisions. Satellite Telecommunications Providers. Two economic census categories address the satellite industry. The first category has a small business size...

  3. Radio-frequency induced ground state degeneracy in a Chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    E-print Network

    Q. Beaufils; T. Zanon; R. Chicireanu; B. Laburthe-Tolra; E. Marechal; L. Vernac; J. -C. Keller; O. Gorceix

    2008-09-29

    We study the effect of strong radio-frequency (rf) fields on a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), in a regime where the rf frequency is much larger than the Larmor frequency. We use the modification of the Land\\'{e} factor by the rf field to bring all Zeeman states to degeneracy, despite the presence of a static magnetic field of up to 100 mG. This is demonstrated by analyzing the trajectories of the atoms under the influence of dressed magnetic potentials in the strong field regime. We investigate the problem of adiabaticity of the rf dressing process, and relate it to how close the dressed states are to degeneracy. Finally, we measure the lifetime of the rf dressed BECs, and identify a new rf-assisted two-body loss process induced by dipole-dipole interactions.

  4. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile... exposure prior to equipment authorization or use if they operate at frequencies of 1.5 GHz or below...

  5. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable... to routine environmental evaluation for RF exposure prior to equipment authorization or use....

  6. Water-Cooled Radiofrequency: A Neuroablative or a Neuromodulatory Modality with Broader Applications?

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Khalid; Benzon, Honorio T.; Walega, David

    2011-01-01

    We report the successful use of water-cooled radiofrequency where more traditional forms of neuroablation—conventional and pulsed radiofrequency—had failed to achieve adequate pain relief. We also discuss the mechanism of neural damage with water cooled radiofrequency and discuss why this technique may have a broader role in the management of a wide array of pain syndromes. PMID:22606384

  7. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, Claude (Berkeley, CA); Martinis, John M. (Berkeley, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  8. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  9. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  10. Thermal Protection with 5% Dextrose Solution Blanket During Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Enn Alexandria Neeman, Ziv; Lee, Fred T.; Kam, Anthony; Wood, Brad

    2006-12-15

    A serious complication for any thermal radiofrequency ablation is thermal injury to adjacent structures, particularly the bowel, which can result in additional major surgery or death. Several methods using air, gas, fluid, or thermometry to protect adjacent structures from thermal injury have been reported. In the cases presented in this report, 5% dextrose water (D5W) was instilled to prevent injury to the bowel and diaphragm during radiofrequency ablation. Creating an Insulating envelope or moving organs with D5W might reduce risk for complications such as bowel perforation.

  11. Differentially-Enhanced Sideband Imaging via Radio-frequency Encoding

    E-print Network

    Fard, A M; Jalali, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a microscope paradigm that performs differential interference imaging with high sensitivity via optical amplification and radio-frequency (RF) heterodyne detection. This method, termed differentially-enhanced sideband imaging via radio-frequency encoding (DESIRE), uniquely exploits frequency-to-space mapping technique to encode the image of an object onto the RF sidebands of an illumination beam. As a proof-of-concept, we show validation experiment by implementing radio frequency (f = 15 GHz) phase modulation in conjunction with spectrally-encoded laser scanning technique to acquire one-dimensional image of a barcode-like object using a commercial RF spectrum analyzer.

  12. Numerical analysis of radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2012-01-15

    A new finite element numerical scheme for analyzing self-consistent radio-frequency (RF) sheath-plasma interaction problems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is applied to various problems represented by simplified models for the tokamak scrape-off layer. The present code incorporates a modified boundary condition, which is called a sheath boundary condition, that couples the radio-frequency waves and sheaths at the material boundaries by treating the sheath as a thin vacuum layer. A series of numerical analyses in one- and two-dimensional domains show several important physical properties, such as the existence of multiple roots, hysteresis effects, presence and characteristics of the sheath-plasma waves, and the phase shift of a reflected slow wave, some of which are newly identified by introducing a spatially varying plasma density and background magnetic field.

  13. Multi-functional liposomes showing radiofrequency-triggered release and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor multi-mechanism therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Feifei; Su, Xiangjie; Cao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-01

    Recently, nanoplatforms with multiple functions, such as tumor-targeting drug carriers, MRI, optical imaging, thermal therapy etc., have become popular in the field of cancer research. The present study reports a novel multi-functional liposome for cancer theranostics. A dual targeted drug delivery with radiofrequency-triggered drug release and imaging based on the magnetic field influence was used advantageously for tumor multi-mechanism therapy. In this system, the surface of fullerene (C60) was decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles, and PEGylation formed a hybrid nanosystem (C60-Fe3O4-PEG2000). Thermosensitive liposomes (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) with DSPE-PEG2000-folate wrapped up the hybrid nanosystem and docetaxel (DTX), which were designed to combine features of biological and physical (magnetic) drug targeting for fullerene radiofrequency-triggered drug release. The magnetic liposomes not only served as powerful tumor diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, but also as powerful agents for photothermal ablation of tumors. Furthermore, a remarkable thermal therapy combined chemotherapy multi-functional liposome nanoplatform converted radiofrequency energy into thermal energy to release drugs from thermosensitive liposomes, which was also observed during both in vitro and in vivo treatment. The multi-functional liposomes also could selectively kill cancer cells in highly localized regions via their excellent active tumor targeting and magnetic targeted abilities.

  14. Radiotelemetry and wildlife: Highlighting a gap in the knowledge on radiofrequency radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Radio transmitters and associated devices may induce negative effects that can bias the results of ongoing research. The main documented effects of radio transmitters on animals include reduced survival, decreased productivity, changes in behaviour and movement patterns and a biased sex ratio. The only factors that have claimed responsibility for these possible damages are the weight of the radio transmitter and associated devices, and the attachment type. The electromagnetic radiation produced by radio transmitters has not been considered so far in research. There have been no studies evaluating the effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency signals) necessary for tracking, although the problems found were significantly associated with the length of time that animals had been carrying their radio transmitters. Similar problems as those in radiotracked animals have been found in numerous studies with animals exposed to radiofrequency radiation for a sufficient amount of time. Laboratory scientists investigating the orientation of animals know they have to shield the place where experiments are performed to prevent interference from man-made radiation, as anthropogenic signals may distort the results. It is paradoxical that, at the same time, field scientists investigating the movements and other aspects of animal biology are providing animals with radio transmitters that emit the same type of radiation, since this may affect the results concerning their orientation and movement. This paper identifies gaps in the knowledge that should be investigated in-depth. The possibility that the radiofrequency radiation from radiotracking devices is responsible for the findings should be considered. Considering this factor may allow researchers to best understand the long-term effects found. PMID:26615484

  15. Radiofrequency and pulsed radiofrequency treatment of chronic pain syndromes: the available evidence.

    PubMed

    van Boxem, Koen; van Eerd, Maarten; Brinkhuizen, Tjinta; Brinkhuize, Tjinta; Patijn, Jacob; van Kleef, Maarten; van Zundert, Jan

    2008-01-01

    There are currently 6 reviews on (pulsed) radiofrequency (RF) for the management of spinal pain. Two reviews on interventional pain management techniques in general also discuss RF. The outcomes of those reviews depend on the type of studies included and the opinion of the reviewers, which may result in different evidence levels. Radiofrequency denervation at the cervical and lumbar level has produced the most solid evidence. The differences in treatment outcome registered in the 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding lumbar facet denervation can be attributed to differences in patient selection and/or inappropriate technique. There is not sufficient evidence supporting the use of RF facet denervation for the management of cervicogenic headache. The studies examining the management of cervical radicular pain suggest a comparable efficacy for RF and pulsed RF (PRF). The PRF treatment is supposed to be safer and therefore should be preferred. The superiority of RF treatment adjacent to the lumbar dorsal root ganglion for the management of lumbar radicular pain has not been demonstrated in an RCT. Information regarding RF treatment of sacroiliac joint pain is accumulating. No randomized sham-controlled trials on the value of RF treatment of the Gasserian ganglion for the management of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia have been published. One RCT indicates superiority of RF over PRF for the management of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Future research to confirm or deny the efficacy of (P)RF should be conducted in carefully selected patient populations. The tests used for patient inclusion in such a trial could potentially help the clinician in selecting patients for this type of treatment. The value of PRF treatment of the peripheral nerves also needs to be confirmed in well-designed trials. PMID:18721175

  16. 77 FR 43535 - Grantee Codes for Certified Radiofrequency Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Grantee Codes for Certified Radiofrequency Equipment AGENCY: Federal Communications... grantee codes must consist of only three characters. This action will permit the Commission to issue longer grantee codes, thus greatly increasing the supply of available codes and ensuring that it...

  17. 77 FR 43535 - Grantee Codes for Certified Radiofrequency Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ...COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 [FCC 12-60] Grantee Codes for Certified Radiofrequency Equipment...to remove the restriction that grantee codes must consist of only three characters...the Commission to issue longer grantee codes, thus greatly increasing the supply...

  18. Optimization of the generator settings for endobiliary radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Leblanc, Sarah; Vienne, Ariane; Rouquette, Alexandre; Beuvon, Frederic; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimal generator settings for endobiliary radiofrequency ablation. METHODS: Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation was performed in live swine on the ampulla of Vater, the common bile duct and in the hepatic parenchyma. Radiofrequency ablation time, “effect”, and power were allowed to vary. The animals were sacrificed two hours after the procedure. Histopathological assessment of the depth of the thermal lesions was performed. RESULTS: Twenty-five radiofrequency bursts were applied in three swine. In the ampulla of Vater (n = 3), necrosis of the duodenal wall was observed starting with an effect set at 8, power output set at 10 W, and a 30 s shot duration, whereas superficial mucosal damage of up to 350 ?m in depth was recorded for an effect set at 8, power output set at 6 W and a 30 s shot duration. In the common bile duct (n = 4), a 1070 ?m, safe and efficient ablation was obtained for an effect set at 8, a power output of 8 W, and an ablation time of 30 s. Within the hepatic parenchyma (n = 18), the depth of tissue damage varied from 1620 ?m (effect = 8, power = 10 W, ablation time = 15 s) to 4480 ?m (effect = 8, power = 8 W, ablation time = 90 s). CONCLUSION: The duration of the catheter application appeared to be the most important parameter influencing the depth of the thermal injury during endobiliary radiofrequency ablation. In healthy swine, the currently recommended settings of the generator may induce severe, supratherapeutic tissue damage in the biliary tree, especially in the high-risk area of the ampulla of Vater. PMID:26566429

  19. Multisource, Phase-controlled Radiofrequency for Treatment of Skin Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Moraga, Javier; Muñoz, Estefania; Cornejo Navarro, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between degrees of clinical improvement and microscopic changes detected using confocal microscopy at the temperature gradients reached in patients treated for skin laxity with a phase-controlled, multisource radiofrequency system. Design and setting: Patients with skin laxity in the abdominal area were treated in six sessions with radiofrequency (the first 4 sessions were held at 2-week intervals and the 2 remaining sessions at 3-week intervals). Patients attended monitoring at 6, 9, and 12 months. Participants: 33 patients (all women). Measurements: The authors recorded the following: variations in weight, measurements of the contour of the treated area and control area, evaluation of clinical improvement by the clinician and by the patient, images taken using an infrared camera, temperature (before, immediately after, and 20 minutes after the procedure), and confocal microscopy images (before treatment and at 6, 9, and 12 months). The degree of clinical improvement was contrasted by two external observers (clinicians). The procedure was performed using a new phase-controlled, multipolar radiofrequency system. Results: The results reveal a greater degree of clinical improvement in patients with surface temperature increases greater than 11.5ºC at the end of the procedure and remaining greater than 4.5ºC 20 minutes later. These changes induced by radiofrequency were contrasted with the structural improvements observed at the dermal-epidermal junction using confocal microscopy. Changes are more intense and are statistically correlated with patients who show a greater degree of improvement and have higher temperature gradients at the end of the procedure and 20 minutes later. Conclusion: Monitoring and the use of parameters to evaluate end-point values in skin quality treatment by multisource, phased-controlled radiofrequency can help optimize aesthetic outcome. PMID:21278896

  20. Reduction of the radiofrequency heating of metallic devices using a dual-drive birdcage coil.

    PubMed

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Turk, Esra Abaci; Oto, Cagdas; Algin, Oktay; Atalar, Ergin

    2013-03-01

    In this work, it is demonstrated that a dual-drive birdcage coil can be used to reduce the radiofrequency heating of metallic devices during magnetic resonance imaging. By controlling the excitation currents of the two channels of a birdcage coil, the radiofrequency current that is induced near the lead tip could be set to zero. To monitor the current, the image artifacts near the lead tips were measured. The electric field distribution was controlled using a dual-drive birdcage coil. With this method, the lead currents and the lead tip temperatures were reduced substantially [<0.3 °C for an applied 4.4 W/kg SAR compared to >4.9 °C using quadrature excitation], as demonstrated by phantom and animal experiments. The homogeneity of the flip angle distribution was preserved, as shown by volunteer experiments. The normalized root-mean-square error of the flip angle distribution was less than 10% for all excitations. The average specific absorption rate increased as a trade-off for using different excitation patterns. PMID:22576183

  1. Nursing and quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation before and after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Pavelková, Zde?ka; Bulava, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The importance of nursing and patient quality of life is a top concern for medical professionals. Therefore, participation by medical professionals in raising awareness and continuously supporting improvements in nursing care is an essential part of improving patient quality of life. Modern medical techniques and procedures are changing rapidly, particularly in the field of cardiology. This has resulted in changing roles and increased responsibility for nurses and confirms the necessity for changing the perception of nurses relative to their role in the medical environment and to patient care. This paper presents the results from the first phase of a research project and focuses on quality of life and problematic areas associated with the needs of patients with atrial fibrillation before and after radiofrequency catheter ablation. Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common supraventricular arrhythmias. Its incidence in the general population has risen significantly over the last twenty years. The objective of this research was to assess those areas, which are considered by patients to be problematic before therapeutic intervention. The research was realized through a quantitative survey using a modified questionnaire. Results showed that AF reduced the quality of life both physically and psychologically (i.e. increased levels of anxiety and depression). Results also showed that radiofrequency catheter ablation was able to alleviate symptoms associated with AF and was also able to increase patient quality of life. PMID:25433354

  2. Modular System Concept For Soil Heating Using Radio-Frequency Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Frank; Lippik, Dirk; Heimbold, Tilo; Roland, Ulf; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Schenk, Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Soil is one of the most important natural resources and its exploitation, preservation and regeneration are huge challenges for modern industrial society. For this reason it is essential to have innovative, efficient, cost-effective and reliable technologies for the decontamination and soil remediation. These technologies should be flexibly applicable for a wide spectrum of contaminants. Beside other biological, physical and chemical methods, research on thermally-supported soil remediation methods has increased over the last years. Due to a controlled heating of soil, the mobility of pollutants, their water solubility and their vapor pressures can be enhanced. To support biodegradation of pollutants, the maximum activity of most microorganisms can be realized by moderate heating independent of ambient temperature and seasonal conditions. A new technological approach for direct heating of large volumes of contaminated soil using radio-frequency (RF) energy is described. This method can be used to thermally enhance a variety of remediation techniques such as biodegradation and soil vapor extraction. The technical basis, a container-based modular and mobile radio-frequency platform is presented and the benefits of this platform working under harsh field conditions are demonstrated. Additionally, aspects of electromagnetic compatibility, system reliability and safety are discussed.

  3. Radio-frequency driven dipole-dipole interactions in spatially separated volumes

    E-print Network

    Atreju Tauschinsky; C. S. E. van Ditzhuijzen; L. D. Noordam; H. B. van Linden van den Heuvell

    2008-10-14

    Radio-frequency (rf) fields in the MHz range are used to induce resonant energy transfer between cold Rydberg atoms in spatially separated volumes. After laser preparation of the Rydberg atoms, dipole-dipole coupling excites the 49s atoms in one cylinder to the 49p state while the 41d atoms in the second cylinder are transferred down to the 42p state. The energy exchanged between the atoms in this process is 33 GHz. An external rf-field brings this energy transfer into resonance. The strength of the interaction has been investigated as a function of amplitude (0-1 V/cm) and frequency (1-30 MHz) of the rf-field and as a function of a static field offset. Multi-photon transitions up to fifth order as well as selection rules prohibiting the process at certain fields have been observed. The width of the resonances has been reduced compared to earlier results by switching off external magnetic fields of the magneto-optical trap, making sub-MHz spectroscopy possible. All features are well reproduced by theoretical calculations taking the strong ac-Stark shift due to the rf-field into account.

  4. Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation in Painful Myeloma of the Clavicle

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farnad; Vakily, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient had myeloma. He had severe pain in the left clavicle that did not respond to radiotherapy; therefore, it was treated with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA). Under fluoroscopic guidance, two RF needles at a distance of 1.5 cm from each other were inserted into the mass and conventional radiofrequency (90? and 60 seconds) at two different depths (1 cm apart) was applied. Then, 2 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine along with triamcinolone 40 mg was injected in each needle. The visual analogue pain score (VAS from 0 to 10) was decreased from 8 to 0. In the next 3 months of follow-up, the patient was very satisfied with the procedure and the mass gradually became smaller. There were no complications. This study shows that RFTA could be a useful method for pain management in painful osteolytic myeloma lesions in the clavicle. PMID:24478905

  5. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A.; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  6. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  7. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-21

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  8. Radiofrequency ablation for treatment of hypersplenism: A feasible therapeutic option

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Guilherme Lopes P; Bernardes, Joao Paulo G; Rovella, Marcello S; Andrade, Raphael G; Viana, Publio Cesar C; Herman, Paulo; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with hypersplenism secondary to portal hypertension due to hepato-splenic schistosomiasis, which was accompanied by severe and refractory thrombocytopenia. We performed spleen ablation and measured the total spleen and ablated volumes with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and volumetry. No major complications occurred, thrombocytopenia was resolved, and platelet levels remained stable, which allowed for early treatment of the patient’s underlying disease. Previous work has shown that splenic radiofrequency ablation is an attractive alternative treatment for hypersplenism induced by liver cirrhosis. We aimed to contribute to the currently sparse literature evaluating the role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the management of hypersplenism. We conclude that splenic RFA appears to be a viable and promising option for the treatment of hypersplenism. PMID:26034376

  9. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  10. Radio-frequency dressing of multiple Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Anderson, R. P.; Hanna, Thomas M.; Tiesinga, E.; Julienne, P. S.; Hall, D. S.

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate and theoretically analyze the dressing of several proximate Feshbach resonances in R87b using radio-frequency (rf) radiation. We present accurate measurements and characterizations of the resonances, and the dramatic changes in scattering properties that can arise through the rf dressing. Our scattering theory analysis yields quantitative agreement with the experimental data. We also present a simple interpretation of our results in terms of rf-coupled bound states interacting with the collision threshold.

  11. Perforated-Layer Implementation Of Radio-Frequency Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1996-01-01

    Luneberg-type radio-frequency dielectric lenses made of stacked perforated circular dielectric sheets, according to proposal. Perforation pattern designed to achieve required spatial variation of permittivity. Consists of round holes distributed across face of each sheet in "Swiss-cheese" pattern, plus straight or curved slots that break up outer parts into petals in "daisy-wheel" pattern. Holes and slots made by numerically controlled machining.

  12. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsushima, Shigenori; Tanaka, Osamu; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We describe a 71-year-old woman with a hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RF) with a single internally cooled electrode under computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Nine months after the procedure, CT images showed herniation of the large intestine into the right pleural cavity. To our knowledge this complication of RF performed with a single internally cooled electrode under CT guidance has not been previously reported.

  13. [Atrio-oesophageal fistula after radiofrequency ablation: predominant neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Ouchikhe, A; Maindivide, J; Le Bivic, J-L; Roux, L; Vincent, J-F

    2008-06-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for septic shock and meningitis. He had undergone, three weeks earlier, a radiofrequency ablation for drug-refractory atrial fibrillation. A polymicrobian septicemy suggested a digestive etiology. A CT scan suggested an atrio-oesophageal fistula with cerebral and renal emboli. The patient deceased from brain death. The diagnosis of atrio-oesophageal fistula was confirmed by autopsy. PMID:18472388

  14. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams.

  15. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-12-31

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams.

  16. Surface Impedance Measurements of Single Crystal MgB2 Films for Radiofrequency Superconductivity Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Binping Xiao, Xin Zhao, Joshua Spradlin, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, Teng Tan, Xi Xiaoxing

    2012-07-01

    We report microstructure analyses and superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) measurements of large scale epitaxial MgB{sub 2} films. MgB{sub 2} films on 5 cm dia. sapphire disks were fabricated by a Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) technique. The electron-beam backscattering diffraction (EBSD) results suggest that the film is a single crystal complying with a MgB{sub 2}(0001) {parallel} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) epitaxial relationship. The SRF properties of different film thicknesses (200 nm and 350 nm) were evaluated under different temperatures and applied fields at 7.4 GHz. A surface resistance of 9 {+-} 2 {mu}{Omega} has been observed at 2.2 K.

  17. Ultra-sensitive high-density Rb-87 radio-frequency magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, I.; Boshier, M. G.; Karaulanov, T.

    2014-01-13

    Radio-frequency (RF) atomic magnetometers (AMs) can be used in many applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear quadrupole resonance. High-density AMs provide both superior sensitivity and large bandwidth. Previously, high-density potassium AMs were demonstrated, but these magnetometers have various disadvantages, such as high-temperature of operation and bulky design. We demonstrate a rubidium-87 RF AM with 5 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} sensitivity (3 fT Hz{sup 1/2} probe noise), which is comparable to that of the best potassium magnetometers. Our magnetometer also features a simple fiber-optic design, providing maximum flexibility for magnetic-field measurements.

  18. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in a radio-frequency driven negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Tarnev, Kh.; Paunska, Ts.; Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2014-02-01

    Results from initial stage of modeling of the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions currently under development in Consorzio RFX (Padova) regarding ITER are presented. A 2D model developed within the fluid plasma theory for low-pressure discharges (free-fall regime maintenance) is applied to the gas-discharge conditions planned and required for the SPIDER source: gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and radio-frequency (rf) power of 100 kW absorbed in a single driver. The results are for the spatial distribution of the plasma characteristics (charged particle densities, electron temperature and electron energy flux, plasma potential, and dc electric field) with conclusions for the role of the electron energy flux in the formation of the discharge structure.

  19. Scientific basis for the Soviet and Russian radiofrequency standards for the general public.

    PubMed

    Repacholi, Michael; Grigoriev, Yuri; Buschmann, Jochen; Pioli, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    The former Soviet Union (USSR) and the USA were the first countries to introduce standards limiting exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields. However, the exposure limits in the USSR standards were always much lower than those in the USA and other countries. The objective of this article is to provide a history of the development of the Soviet and Russian RF standards. In addition, we summarize the scientific evidence used to develop the original USSR RF and subsequent Russian public health standards, as well as the mobile telecommunications standard published in 2003, but we do not critique them. We also describe the protective approaches used by the Soviet and Russian scientists for setting their limits. A translation of the papers of the key studies used to develop their standards is available in the online version of this publication. PMID:22753071

  20. Improved fluid simulations of radio-frequency plasmas using energy dependent ion mobilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo; Ennis, Gerard J.; MacGearailt, Niall

    2013-05-15

    Symmetric and asymmetric capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas in oxygen at 40 Pa, 300 V voltage amplitude and a discharge gap of 40 mm are investigated by means of one-dimensional numerical semi-kinetic fluid modeling on the basis of a simplified reaction scheme including the dominant positive and negative ions, background gas, and electrons. An improved treatment, by accounting for the dependence of ion mobilities on E/N, is compared to the standard approach, based on using zero-field mobility values only. The charged particle dynamics as a result of direct electron impact ionization of oxygen, secondary electron release from the electrodes, the spatial distribution of all involved particles as well as impact of geometry and model modification on ion energies is analyzed and compared to independent simulations and experiments.

  1. Efficiency and safety of new radiofrequency identification system in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Ryoji; Torikai, Kota; Hasegawa, Takashi; Sakamaki, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency identification (RFID) applications have the capability to obtain real-time information on the location and properties of tagged people or objects. The efficiency and safety of the new RFID system (UHF band, 953 MHz) were tested in our hospital. We examined whether 1 to 4 persons and medical equipment with IC tags were captured by RFID readers in a laboratory. We next tested whether electric signals produced by RFID could affect medical devices. New radio frequency tags provided extensive patient identification and helped track capital equipment within a laboratory. Electric fields produced by the new RFID did not significantly affect medical devices in our hospital. New RFID system was safe and useful for tracking people and medical equipments in a hospital. As healthcare systems today involve increasingly complex and interrelated processes, the new RFID technologies may enhance patient safety, and wellness, and reduce staff workloads in a hospital. PMID:23920806

  2. 21 CFR 870.2910 - Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2910 Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver....

  3. Radiofrequency heating of nanomaterials for cancer treatment: Progress, controversies, and future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Hui-jiuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Alfadhl, Yasir; Yu, Junsheng; Wen, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the application of nanomaterials to biological and biomedicine areas has attracted intensive interest. One of the hot topics is the nanomaterial mediated radiofrequency (RF) hyperthermia or ablation, i.e., using RF fields/waves to heat tumor tissues treated with nanomaterials to destroy cancerous cells while minimizing the side-heating effect. However, there are currently many contradictive results reported concerning the heating effect of nanomaterials under a RF field. This paper provided a comprehensive review to nanomaterial mediated RF ablation from both experimental and theoretical aspects. Three heating mechanisms were discussed, i.e., laser heating, magnetic field heating, and electric field heating in RF spectrum, with the focus on the last one. The results showed that while diluted pure metallic nanoparticles could be heated significantly by a laser through the surface plasmon resonance, they cannot be easily heated by a RF electric field. Further studies are proposed focusing on nanoparticle structure and morphology, electromagnetic frequency and localized heating effect to pave the way for future development.

  4. Racetrack microtron radio-frequency system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Mitra, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    The design and construction progress of a prototype rf system to drive the Los Alamos-NBS racetrack microtron (RTM) electron accelerator is described. The rf system requires 450-kW cw at 2380 MHz from a single klystron. The output from the klystron is split three ways to drive a capture section, a preaccelerator section, and the main accelerator section. The fields in each section are phase- and amplitude-controlled to tight tolerances. Temperature control of the accelerator sections also is linked to the amplitude-control system, because the system's average power is so high.

  5. Tailored RF Pulse for Magnetization Inversion at Ultrahigh Field

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    ) transmit field is severely inhomoge- neous at ultrahigh field due to both RF penetration and RF coil design to produce inversion pulses tailored to take into account the heterogeneity of the RF transmit field at 7 T (WIPA) The radiofrequency (RF) transmit field is severely inhomo- geneous at ultrahigh field due to both

  6. Dielectric supported radio-frequency cavities

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Lee, Terry G. (Cupertino, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A device which improves the electrical and thermomechanical performance of an RF cavity, for example, in a disk-loaded accelerating structure. A washer made of polycrystalline diamond is brazed in the middle to a copper disk washer and at the outer edge to the plane wave transformer tank wall, thus dissipating heat from the copper disk to the outer tank wall while at the same time providing strong mechanical support to the metal disk. The washer structure eliminates the longitudinal connecting rods and cooling channels used in the currently available cavities, and as a result minimizes problems such as shunt impedance degradation and field distortion in the plane wave transformer, and mechanical deflection and uneven cooling of the disk assembly.

  7. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices. 2.1091 Section 2.1091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure...

  8. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices. 2.1093 Section 2.1093 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure...

  9. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation, including microwave frequencies, may be safely used for heating food under the following conditions: (a) The radiation... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of...

  10. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation, including microwave frequencies, may be safely used for heating food under the following conditions: (a) The radiation... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of...

  11. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation, including microwave frequencies, may be safely used for heating food under the following conditions: (a) The radiation... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of...

  12. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. 179.30 Section 179.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of...

  13. Nonlinear Exothermic Contributions to RadioFrequency Bonding of Adhesives 1

    E-print Network

    Nonlinear Exothermic Contributions to Radio­Frequency Bonding of Adhesives 1 H.T. Banks 2 S This work describes an effort to model the radio­frequency curing of epoxy adhesives in bonding of an internal exothermic reaction which takes place as the adhesive cures. Key words: radio

  14. Numerical studies of current generation by radio-frequency traveling waves

    E-print Network

    Karney, Charles

    Numerical studies of current generation by radio-frequency traveling waves Charles F. F. Karney January 1979; final manuscript received 7 May 1979) By injecting radio-frequency traveling waves of the fusion power output. Recently,' the damping of high-phase-velocity radio- frequency traveling waves has

  15. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices. 2.1093 Section 2.1093 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure...

  16. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices. 2.1091 Section 2.1091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure...

  17. Subfemtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Subfemtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance S 20 November 2006 A radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer is developed for detection of nuclearHz 14 N NQR frequency of ammonium nitrate. A potential application of the magnetometer is detection

  18. Detection of NMR signals with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer I.M. Savukov 1

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Detection of NMR signals with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer I.M. Savukov 1 , S.J. Seltzer of proton NMR signals with a radio-frequency (rf) atomic magnetometer tuned to the NMR frequency of 62 kHz. High-frequency operation of the atomic magnetometer makes it relatively insensitive to ambient magnetic

  19. Room temperature femtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer W. Chalupczak,1

    E-print Network

    Room temperature femtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer W. Chalupczak,1 R. M. Godun,1 S online 12 June 2012) A radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz1/2 in a range of 10­500 kHz is demonstrated. The magnetometer is operated in the orientation configuration

  20. Radiofrequency for the Treatment of Lumbar Radicular Pain: Impact on Surgical Indications

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, José Manuel; Carnota, Ana Isabel; Failde, Inmaculada; Torres, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. Quasiexperimental study. Objective. To investigate whether radiofrequency treatment can preclude the need for spinal surgery in both the short term and long term. Background. Radiofrequency is commonly used to treat lumbosacral radicular pain. Only few studies have evaluated its effects on surgical indications. Methods. We conducted a quasiexperimental study of 43 patients who had been scheduled for spinal surgery. Radiofrequency was indicated for 25 patients. The primary endpoint was the decision of the patient to reject spinal surgery 1 month and 1 year after treatment (pulsed radiofrequency of dorsal root ganglion, 76%; conventional radiofrequency of the medial branch, 12%; combined technique, 12%). The primary endpoint was the decision of the patient to reject spinal surgery 1 month and 1 year after treatment. In addition, we also evaluated adverse effects, ODI, NRS. Results. We observed after treatment with radiofrequency 80% of patients rejected spinal surgery in the short term and 76% in the long term. We conclude that radiofrequency is a useful treatment strategy that can achieve very similar outcomes to spinal surgery. Patients also reported a very high level of satisfaction (84% satisfied/very satisfied). We also found that optimization of the electrical parameters of the radiofrequency improved the outcome of this technique. PMID:26351581

  1. Cooled radiofrequency denervation for treatment of sacroiliac joint pain: two-year results from 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kok-Yuen; Hadi, Mohamed Abdul; Pasutharnchat, Koravee; Tan, Kian-Hian

    2013-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint pain is a common cause of chronic low back pain. Different techniques for radiofrequency denervation of the sacroiliac joint have been used to treat this condition. However, results have been inconsistent because the variable sensory supply to the sacroiliac joint is difficult to disrupt completely using conventional radiofrequency. Cooled radiofrequency is a novel technique that uses internally cooled radiofrequency probes to enlarge lesion size, thereby increasing the chance of completely denervating the sacroiliac joint. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cooled radiofrequency denervation using the SInergy™ cooled radiofrequency system for sacroiliac joint pain. Methods The charts of 20 patients with chronic sacroiliac joint pain who had undergone denervation using the SInergy™ cooled radiofrequency system were reviewed at two years following the procedure. Outcome measures included the Numeric Rating Scale for pain intensity, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Global Perceived Effect for patient satisfaction. Results Fifteen of 20 patients showed a significant reduction in pain (a decrease of at least three points on the Numeric Rating Scale). Mean Numeric Rating Scale for pain decreased from 7.4 ± 1.4 to 3.1 ± 2.5, mean Patient Global Impression of Change was “improved” (1.4 ± 1.5), and Global Perceived Effect was reported to be positive in 16 patients at two years following the procedure. Conclusion Cooled radiofrequency denervation showed long-term efficacy for up to two years in the treatment of sacroiliac joint pain. PMID:23869175

  2. Electromagnetic Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from GSM Mobile Phones Decreases the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Smj; Gholampour, M; Haghani, M; Mortazavi, G; Mortazavi, Ar

    2014-09-01

    Mobile phones are two-way radios that emit electromagnetic radiation in microwave range. As the number of mobile phone users has reached 6 billion, the bioeffects of exposure to mobile phone radiation and mobile phone electromagnetic interference with electronic equipment have received more attention, globally. As self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes control, home blood glucose testing kits are very popular. The main goal of this study was to investigate if radiofrequency radiation emitted from a common GSM mobile phone can alter the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Forty five female nondiabetic students aged 17-20 years old participated in this study. For Control-EMF group (30 students), blood glucose concentration for each individual was measured in presence and absence of radiofrequency radiation emitted by a common GSM mobile phone (HTC touch, Diamond 2) while the phone was ringing. For Control- Repeat group (15 students), two repeated measurements were performed for each participant in the absence of electromagnetic fields. The magnitude of the changes between glucose levels in two repeated measurements (|?C|) in Control-Repeat group was 1.07 ± 0.88 mg/dl while this magnitude for Control-EMF group was 7.53 ± 4.76 mg/dl (P < 0.001, two-tailed test). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the electromagnetic interference in home blood glucose monitors. It can be concluded that electromagnetic interference from mobile phones has an adverse effect on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. We suggest that mobile phones should be used at least 50 cm away from home blood glucose monitors. PMID:25505778

  3. Fast radio-frequency amplitude modulation in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance: Theory and experiments

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Fast radio-frequency amplitude modulation in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic of this experiment has been the poor efficiency of the radio-frequency pulses used in converting multiple-modulated radio-frequency pulses, and which can yield substantial signal and even resolution enhancements over

  4. Radiofrequency ablation for oral and maxillofacial pathologies: A description of the technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Rahul; Stevens, Timothy W.; Herford, Alan S.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) refers to a high-frequency current that heats and coagulates tissue. In the standard RFA setup, three components are used: a generator, an active electrode, and a dispersive electrode. RFA has garnered support in many of the surgical fields as an alternative to traditional procedures used in tumor removal. Other methods can prove to be more invasive and disfiguring to the patient, in addition to the unwarranted side effects; however, RFA provides a more localized treatment, resulting in decreased co-morbidity to the patient. Currently, its use in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is limited, as its technology has not reached our field. By describing its limited use to the optics community, we hope to expand its uses and provide patients with one more alternative treatment option. Methods and Uses: We will describe the use of RFA on three types of pathology: lymphangioma, rhabdomyoscarcoma, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and neoplastic osseous metastasis. The majority of treatments geared towards these pathologies involve surgical resection, followed by reconstruction. However, damage to vital structures coupled with esthetic disfigurement makes RFA a more valuable alternative. In many of the cases, the tumors were successfully removed without recurrence. Conclusion: While the use of RFA has been scarce in our field, we believe that with more exposure it can gain momentum as an alternative to current treatment options. However, there are improvements that we feel can be made, helping to maximize its effectiveness.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Thyroid Nodules: Basic Principles and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Baek, Jung Hwan; Ha, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been gaining popularity as a minimally invasive treatment for benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. RF ablation of benign nodules demonstrated volume reductions of 33–58% after one month and 51–85% after six months, while solving nodule-related clinical problems. RF ablation has recently shown positive short-term results for locoregional control as well as symptom improvement in patients with recurrent thyroid cancers. This paper reviews the basic physics, indications, patient preparation, devices, procedures, clinical results, and complications of RF ablation. PMID:23133449

  6. A novel "cooled-wet" electrode for radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Y; Miao, Y; Mulier, S; Yu, J; Baert, A L; Marchal, G

    2000-01-01

    In the light of growing demands for improved applicability of radiofrequency ablation (RFA), recently we have developed a novel "cooled-wet" electrode by taking the advantages of both internally cooled and saline-enhanced electrodes. The efficacy of the electrode was evaluated in both ex vivo and in vivo liver RFA under both low and high power output levels. The ablation volume created with the "cooled-wet" electrode appeared to be much larger than that reported up to now with the use of other monopolar electrodes. The mechanisms on how this device optimizes the RF energy delivery are also discussed. PMID:10823647

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2010-09-01

    SQUIDs are an attractive candidate for the amplification of low-level rf and microwave signals. Compared to semiconductor amplifiers, they offer lower noise and much lower power dissipation. Especially at frequencies below 1 GHz, the improvement in noise temperature compared to the best cold semiconductor amplifiers can be as high as 50; noise temperatures only slightly above the quantum limit have been achieved in this frequency range. This article will review the current status of radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs and provide detailed discussions of amplifier noise temperature, input and output impedance, and nonlinearities.

  8. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  9. Silicon nanowire based radio-frequency spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Bill; Vo, Trung D; Pelusi, Mark D; Monat, Christelle; Xu, Dan-Xia; Densmore, Adam; Ma, Rubin; Janz, Siegfried; Moss, David J; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2010-09-13

    We demonstrate a terahertz bandwidth silicon nanowire based radio-frequency spectrum analyzer using cross-phase modulation. We show that the device provides accurate characterization of 640Gbaud on-off-keyed data stream and demonstrate its potential for optical time-division multiplexing optimization and optical performance monitoring of ultrahigh speed signals on a silicon chip. We analyze the impact of free carrier effects on our device, and find that the efficiency of the device is not reduced by two-photon or free-carrier absorption, nor its accuracy compromised by free-carrier cross-chirp. PMID:20940910

  10. Measuring Radiofrequency and Microwave Radiation from Varying Signal Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bette; Gaul, W. C.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the process of measuring radiofrequency and microwave radiation from various signal strengths. The topics include: 1) Limits and Guidelines; 2) Typical Variable Standard (IEEE) Frequency Dependent; 3) FCC Standard 47 CFR 1.1310; 4) Compliance Follows Unity Rule; 5) Multiple Sources Contribute; 6) Types of RF Signals; 7) Interfering Radiations; 8) Different Frequencies Different Powers; 9) Power Summing - Peak Power; 10) Contribution from Various Single Sources; 11) Total Power from Multiple Sources; 12) Are You Out of Compliance?; and 13) In Compliance.

  11. Multiplexing of Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Pellerano, F. A.; Stahle, C. M.; Aidala, K.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present results on wavelength division multiplexing of radio-frequency single electron transistors. We use a network of resonant impedance matching circuits to direct applied rf carrier waves to different transistors depending on carrier frequency. A two-channel demonstration of this concept using discrete components successfully reconstructed input signals with small levels of cross coupling. A lithographic version of the rf circuits had measured parameters in agreement with electromagnetic modeling, with reduced cross capacitance and inductance, and should allow 20 to 50 channels to be multiplexed.

  12. Black phosphorus radio-frequency transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Wang, Xiaomu; Xia, Fengnian; Wang, Luhao; Jiang, Hao; Xia, Qiangfei; Chin, Matthew L; Dubey, Madan; Han, Shu-jen

    2014-11-12

    Few-layer and thin film forms of layered black phosphorus (BP) have recently emerged as a promising material for applications in high performance nanoelectronics and infrared optoelectronics. Layered BP thin films offer a moderate bandgap of around 0.3 eV and high carrier mobility, which lead to transistors with decent on-off ratios and high on-state current densities. Here, we demonstrate the gigahertz frequency operation of BP field-effect transistors for the first time. The BP transistors demonstrated here show respectable current saturation with an on-off ratio that exceeds 2 × 10(3). We achieved a current density in excess of 270 mA/mm and DC transconductance above 180 mS/mm for hole conduction. Using standard high frequency characterization techniques, we measured a short-circuit current-gain cutoff frequency fT of 12 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency fmax of 20 GHz in 300 nm channel length devices. BP devices may offer advantages over graphene transistors for high frequency electronics in terms of voltage and power gain due to the good current saturation properties arising from their finite bandgap, thus can be considered as a promising candidate for the future high performance thin film electronics technology for operation in the multi-GHz frequency range and beyond. PMID:25347787

  13. A Surgical Device for Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Liver Tumours

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, I; Correia, D; Soares, A J M; Góes, J A; da Rocha, A F; Schutt, D; Haemmerich, D

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has become an accepted treatment option of patients with primary and metastatic liver tumours. We propose an ablation electrode array consisting of 4–8 blade shaped electrodes arrangend in a circular geometry for the treatment of large liver tumours. We developed a 3D code based on the finite difference method to evaluate the effect of diFferent numbers of electrodes (4, 6 and 8) and electrode distance on lesion size. The configuration with six electrodes can ablate a volume of 70 × 70 × 40 mm3 in approximately 5 minutes, with tissue temperature above 50 °C throughout the treatment volume. We then performed an experimental study in polyacrylamide gel in order to validate the theoretical results. The average temperature error between the simulation and the experiment was 3.8% at the center of the electrode array. This study shows that the proposed device potencially allows more rapid treatment of large tumours compared to current radiofrequency ablation devices. PMID:18812644

  14. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  15. Architecture of the pulmonary veins: relevance to radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S; Cabrera, J; Tran, V; Farre, J; Anderson, R; Sanchez-Quintana, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Radiofrequency ablation of tissues in pulmonary veins can eliminate paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.?OBJECTIVE—To explore the characteristics of normal pulmonary veins so as to provide more information relevant to radiofrequency ablation.?METHODS—20 structurally normal heart specimens were examined grossly. Histological sections were made from 65 pulmonary veins.?RESULTS—The longest myocardial sleeves were found in the superior veins. The sleeves were thickest at the venoatrial junction in the left superior pulmonary veins. For the superior veins, the sleeves were thickest along the inferior walls and thinnest superiorly. The sleeves were composed mainly of circularly or spirally oriented bundles of myocytes with additional bundles that were longitudinally or obliquely oriented, sometimes forming mesh-like arrangements. Fibrotic changes estimated at between 5% and 70% across three transverse sections were seen in 17 veins that were from individuals aged 30 to 72 years.?CONCLUSIONS—The myocardial architecture in normal pulmonary veins is highly variable. The complex arrangement, stretch, and increase in fibrosis may produce greater non-uniform anisotropic properties.???Keywords: arrhythmias; catheter ablation; fibrillation; cardiac veins PMID:11514476

  16. Percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency microdebridement for recalcitrant proximal plantar fasciosis.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Matthew D; Hyer, Christopher F; Philbin, Terrence M

    2011-01-01

    Success rates for traditional methods of surgical intervention for chronic plantar fasciosis are low, and associated with high rates of complications and long recovery times. The purpose of this prospective case series was to assess the effectiveness of percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency microfasciotomy for the treatment of recalcitrant proximal plantar fasciosis in 21 patients. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score was 22.10 ± 12.96 (out of a possible 68 points) and the mean postoperative AOFAS hindfoot score was 59.57 ± 13.23 points, and this difference was statistically significant (P < .0001). A total of 7 (33.33%) patients experienced satisfactory pain relief within 1 to 4 weeks and 10 (47.62%) did so within 1 to 4 months, whereas 2 (9.52%) patients required longer than 4 months, and 2 (9.52%) others never attained satisfactory relief of symptoms. Fourteen (66.67%) patients subjectively rated their outcome as excellent, 4 (19.05%) as good, 1 (4.76%) as fair, and 2 (9.52%) as poor. One (4.76%) patient experienced iatrogenic flexor hallucis longus tendonitis. The results of this clinical investigation indicate that bipolar radiofrequency microdebridement plantar fasciotomy safely alleviates recalcitrant heel pain. The technique is minimally invasive and simple to perform, and it spares the overall integrity of the plantar fascia without being associated with undue complications. PMID:21354000

  17. Radio-frequency identification: its potential in healthcare.

    PubMed

    2005-05-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology is just starting to make inroads into healthcare. RFID uses radio-frequency tags attached to people or objects to provide identification, tracking, security, and other functions that fall under the general heading of automatic identification and data capture (AIDC). In the retail supply chain, RFID is already well established as a way to reduce theft and track objects from manufacture through shipment to delivery. In healthcare, basic RFID is already being used to track patients for anti-elopement and anti-abduction programs. As more sophisticated systems move into hospitals, RFID is also beginning to see use to provide more extensive patient identification than traditional bar coding can, and to track and locate capital equipment within the hospital. In years to come, RFID could be used for a variety of applications, including tracking and matching blood for transfusions, tracking pharmaceuticals, and combating the counterfeiting of medical products. RFID may ultimately be used for many of the functions currently carried out using bar coding--but not until the cost of RFID comes down. For the foreseeable future, the two technologies are likely to be used in tandem in many hospitals. In this article, we describe the components and operation of RFID systems and detail the different ways in which these systems are being used, and could be used, in hospitals. PMID:16048121

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Young; Kwak, Byung Kook

    2014-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional mathematical model for the study of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with blood flow for varicose vein. The model designed to analyze temperature distribution heated by radiofrequency energy and cooled by blood flow includes a cylindrically symmetric blood vessel with a homogeneous vein wall. The simulated blood velocity conditions are U = 0, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 40?mm/s. The lower the blood velocity, the higher the temperature in the vein wall and the greater the tissue damage. The region that is influenced by temperature in the case of the stagnant flow occupies approximately 28.5% of the whole geometry, while the region that is influenced by temperature in the case of continuously moving electrode against the flow direction is about 50%. The generated RF energy induces a temperature rise of the blood in the lumen and leads to an occlusion of the blood vessel. The result of the study demonstrated that higher blood velocity led to smaller thermal region and lower ablation efficiency. Since the peak temperature along the venous wall depends on the blood velocity and pullback velocity, the temperature distribution in the model influences ablation efficiency. The vein wall absorbs more energy in the low pullback velocity than in the high one. PMID:25587351

  19. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  20. The Biological Effects of Quadripolar Radiofrequency Sequential Application: A Human Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Faga, Angela; Scevola, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: An experimental study was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of an innovative quadripolar variable electrode configuration radiofrequency device with objective measurements in an ex vivo and in vivo human experimental model. Background data: Nonablative radiofrequency applications are well-established anti-ageing procedures for cosmetic skin tightening. Methods: The study was performed in two steps: ex vivo and in vivo assessments. In the ex vivo assessments the radiofrequency applications were performed on human full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue specimens harvested during surgery for body contouring. In the in vivo assessments the applications were performed on two volunteer patients scheduled for body contouring surgery at the end of the study. The assessment methods were: clinical examination and medical photography, temperature measurement with thermal imaging scan, and light microscopy histological examination. Results: The ex vivo assessments allowed for identification of the effective safety range for human application. The in vivo assessments allowed for demonstration of the biological effects of sequential radiofrequency applications. After a course of radiofrequency applications, the collagen fibers underwent an immediate heat-induced rearrangement and were partially denaturated and progressively metabolized by the macrophages. An overall thickening and spatial rearrangement was appreciated both in the collagen and elastic fibers, the latter displaying a juvenile reticular pattern. A late onset in the macrophage activation after sequential radiofrequency applications was appreciated. Conclusions: Our data confirm the effectiveness of sequential radiofrequency applications in obtaining attenuation of the skin wrinkles by an overall skin tightening. PMID:25244081

  1. Effect of Addition of Nitrogen to a Capacitively Radio-Frequency Hydrogen Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianzhu; Yao, Fubao; Zhao, Guoming; Hao, Yingying; Sun, Qian

    2014-03-01

    A hybrid PIC/MC model is developed in this work for H2-xN2 capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharges in which we take into account 43 kinds of collisions reaction processes between charged particles (e-, H+3, H+2, H+, N+2, N+) and ground-state molecules (H2, N2). In addition, the mean energies and densities of electrons and ions (H+3, H+2, H+), and electric field distributions in the H2-N2 CCRF discharge are simulated by this model. Furthermore, the effects of addition of a variable percentage of nitrogen (0-30%) into the H2 discharge on the plasma processes and discharge characteristics are studied. It is shown that by increasing the percentage of nitrogen added to the system, the RF sheath thickness will narrow, the sheath electric field will be enhanced, and the mean energy of hydrogen ions impacting the electrodes will be increased. Because the electron impact ionization and dissociative ionization rates increase when N2 is added to the system, the electron mean density will increase while the electron mean energy and hydrogen ion density near the electrodes will decrease. This work aims to provide a theoretical basis for experimental studies and technological developments with regard to H2-N2 CCRF plasmas.

  2. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  3. Radio-frequency excitation of harmonic microwave radiation from a Penning reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J.P.; Wharton, C.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Experimental results on multiple-harmonic emission at 8.8 GHz from a Penning reflex discharge (PRD) are reported. Observations of the frequency spectra of microwave emission showed copius harmonic generation of frequencies having two completely different origins: (1) spontaneously excited high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and (2) high harmonics of the frequency of an injected signal independent of the magnetic field strength, a phenomenon reported here for the first time. For spontaneous harmonic emission there was a current threshold, whose magnitude depended on gas pressure and magnetic field strength. When a signal was injected, however, high harmonics (up to the 18th) could be seen at discharge currents well below this threshold value. Comparisons between the two types of radiation are made and discussion of possible mechanisms is provided. It is concluded that the coupling efficiency of the radio-frequency (rf)-excited emission is dependent on the relationship between the rf drive frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency. Finite Larmor radius effects may also influence this coupling. The plasma sheath size will also be a factor in the transfer of energy from the probe to the bulk plasma. Results which seek to elucidate these effects are presented.

  4. Modeling of EEG electrode artifacts and thermal ripples in human radiofrequency exposure studies.

    PubMed

    Murbach, Manuel; Neufeld, Esra; Christopoulou, Maria; Achermann, Peter; Kuster, Niels

    2014-05-01

    The effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on wake and sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) have been in focus since mobile phone usage became pervasive. It has been hypothesized that effects may be explained by (1) enhanced induced fields due to RF coupling with the electrode assembly, (2) the subsequent temperature increase around the electrodes, or (3) RF induced thermal pulsing caused by localized exposure in the head. We evaluated these three hypotheses by means of both numerical and experimental assessments made with appropriate phantoms and anatomical human models. Typical and worst-case electrode placements were examined at 900 and 2140?MHz. Our results indicate that hypothesis 1 can be rejected, as the induced fields cause <20% increase in the 10?g-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR). Simulations with an anatomical model indicate that hypothesis 2 is also not supported, as the realistic worst-case electrode placement results in a maximum skin temperature increase of 0.31?°C while brain temperature elevations remained <0.1?°C. These local short-term temperature elevations are unlikely to change brain physiology during the time period from minutes to several hours after exposure. The maximum observed temperature ripple due to RF pulses is <0.001?°C for GSM-like signals and <0.004?°C for 20-fold higher pulse energy, and offers no support for hypothesis 3. Thus, the mechanism of interaction between RF and changes in the EEG power spectrum remains unknown. PMID:24523224

  5. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Colas, Laurent Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Kubi?, Martin; Milanesio, Daniele; Heuraux, Stéphane

    2014-06-15

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.

  6. Energetic electron avalanches and mode transitions in planar inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas operated in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Niemi, K.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-07-25

    Space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements reveal that in certain parameter regimes, inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas exhibit three distinct operation modes. At low powers, the plasma operates as an alpha-mode capacitively coupled plasma driven through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath potential in front of the antenna. At high powers, the plasma operates in inductive mode sustained through induced electric fields due to the time varying currents and associated magnetic fields from the antenna. At intermediate powers, close to the often observed capacitive to inductive (E-H) transition regime, energetic electron avalanches are identified to play a significant role in plasma sustainment, similar to gamma-mode capacitively coupled plasmas. These energetic electrons traverse the whole plasma gap, potentially influencing plasma surface interactions as exploited in technological applications.

  7. A review of selected biological effects and dosimetric data useful for development of radiofrequency safety standards for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Tell, R A; Harlen, F

    1979-12-01

    This report examines the bases for developing radiofrequency exposure standards which can be related to the thermogenic properties of electromagnetic fields. A review of selected biological effects, including dosimetric data and simulation of human thermodyanmic characteristics that are pertinent to standards development, is presented. Based on the analogy of thermal-stress standards that have been developed for hot industrial environments, limits on increases of body temperature are proposed as criteria for limiting exposure to radiofrequency fields, i.e., occupational exposures involving deep heating of the whole body should not increase core temperature in excess of 1 degree C. Since energy deposition from exposure to some RF fields is likely to be non-uniform and may be high in tissues that are not adapted to high rates of absorption or dissipation of thermalizing energy, means are needed to adjust focal thermal loading against the whole-body averages. A limit on core temperature is inadequate when focal elevations of temperature are close to the limits for protein denaturation, as may well occur even though the core temperature may rise less than 1 degree C. Safety limits for the general population are also discussed and here the permissible thermal load should be low enough to cause no more than an insignificant increase in core temperature. Areas needing further research to reduce the uncertainties in developing safe exposure limits for man are delineated. Even in highly adverse environmental conditions the gross thermal load and consequential heat stress from exposure to radiofrequency fields at the 10 mW/cm2 level will be small compared with that generated by any physical effort. On the basis of available data, it is concluded that the safe value for continuous exposure to 10 mW/cm2, widely used in Western countries, appears to provide an adequate margin of safety for both occupational and environmental exposure for frequencies above about 1 GHz. This limit may well be too high (perhaps by an order of magnitude) for some frequencies below 1 GHz where body resonances cause a significant increase in energy deposition and where local temperature rises occur. At the same time the present averaging period of 0.1 h seems unjustifiably short. PMID:397349

  8. Atrial flutter: arrhythmia circuit and basis for radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Földesi, Csaba; Pandozi, Claudio; Peichl, Petr; Bulava, Alan; Castro, Antonio; Lamberti, Filippo; Calò, Leonardo; Loricchio, Maria Luisa; Santini, Massimo

    2003-06-01

    The term atrial flutter was introduced 90 years ago for an arrhythmia with a unique electrocardiographic pattern. The development of endocardial mapping techniques in the last decade allowed the detailed characterization of the tachycardia circuit and the identification of the cavotricuspid isthmus as its critical part. This review stresses the position of atrial flutter in the new classification of atrial tachycardias and focuses on its unique electrophysiological characteristics and different variants described in humans. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation across the cavotricuspid isthmus constitutes a feasible and safe therapy, which prevents flutter recurrences during the long-term follow-up. This paper describes the different techniques that validate bidirectional isthmus block, which is an important endpoint for successful ablation. PMID:12898804

  9. Effective Treatment of Chronic Radiation Proctitis Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Becker, Laren; Chen, Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Figueiredo, Marisa; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopic argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocautery are currently preferred treatments for chronic radiation proctitis, but ulcerations and strictures frequently occur. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been successful for mucosal ablation in the esophagus. Here we report the efficacy of RFA with the BarRx Halo90 system in three patients with bleeding from chronic radiation proctitis. In all cases, the procedure was well tolerated and hemostasis was achieved after 1 or 2 RFA sessions. Re-epithelialization of squamous mucosa was observed over areas of prior hemorrhage. No stricturing or ulceration was seen on follow-up up to 19 months after RFA treatment. Real-time endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) visualized epithelialization and subsurface tissue microvasculature pre- and post-treatment, demonstrating its potential for follow-up assessment of endoscopic therapies. PMID:20593010

  10. Effects of radiofrequency hyperthermia on the healthy canine cornea

    SciTech Connect

    Glaze, M.B.; Turk, M.A.

    1986-04-01

    Radiofrequency hyperthermia was used to induce axial corneal lesions in the eyes of 10 dogs. Clinical observations were continued for up to 6 months, using biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Eyes were harvested at intervals for light and electron microscopic evaluation. Clinical alterations included immediate corneal opacification and epithelial disruption at the site of electrode contact. Ulcerative keratitis persisted for 4 to 6 days, accompanied by anterior uveitis. Additional corneal changes included stromal thinning, edema, and vascularization. Final evaluation revealed negligible alterations in corneal contour or clarity 6 months after treatment. Microscopically, epithelial and superficial stromal necrosis preceded epithelial loss. Stromal alterations included edema (associated with focal endothelial detachments), vascularization, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Recovery was characterized by keratocytic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, epithelial proliferation, and stromal condensation.

  11. Ethical implications of implantable radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kenneth R; Jaeger, Jan

    2008-08-01

    This article reviews the use of implantable radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags in humans, focusing on the VeriChip (VeriChip Corporation, Delray Beach, FL) and the associated VeriMed patient identification system. In addition, various nonmedical applications for implanted RFID tags in humans have been proposed. The technology offers important health and nonhealth benefits, but raises ethical concerns, including privacy and the potential for coercive implantation of RFID tags in individuals. A national discussion is needed to identify the limits of acceptable use of implantable RFID tags in humans before their use becomes widespread and it becomes too late to prevent misuse of this useful but ethically problematic technology. PMID:18802863

  12. Reactivable passive radio-frequency identification temperature indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windl, Roman; Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Suess, Dieter; Huber, Thomas; Vogler, Christoph; Satz, Armin

    2015-05-01

    A low cost, passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) temperature indicator with (re-) activation at any point of time is presented. The capability to detect a temperature excursion is realized by magnets and a solution with a melting point at the critical temperature. As the critical temperature is exceeded, a magnetic indicator switches to non-reversible and this can be monitored via a giant magnetoresistance sensor connected to a RFID tag. Depending on the solutions or metal alloys, detection of critical temperatures in a wide range from below 0 °C and up to more than 100 °C is possible. The information if a threshold temperature was exceeded (indicator state) as well as the identification number, current temperature, and user defined data can be obtained via RFID.

  13. Laparoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Milic, Andrea; Asch, Murray R. Hawrylyshyn, Peter A.; Allen, Lisa M.; Colgan, Terence J.; Kachura, John R.; Hayeems, Eran B.

    2006-08-15

    Four patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids measuring less than 6 cm underwent laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using multiprobe-array electrodes. Follow-up of the treated fibroids was performed with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and patients' symptoms were assessed by telephone interviews. The procedure was initially technically successful in 3 of the 4 patients and MRI studies at 1 month demonstrated complete fibroid ablation. Symptom improvement, including a decrease in menstrual bleeding and pain, was achieved in 2 patients at 3 months. At 7 months, 1 of these 2 patients experienced symptom worsening which correlated with recurrent fibroid on MRI. The third, initially technically successfully treated patient did not experience any symptom relief after the procedure and was ultimately diagnosed with adenomyosis. Our preliminary results suggest that RFA is a technically feasible treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in appropriately selected patients.

  14. Bronchopleural Fistula After Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, Mathieu; Cornelis, Francois; Descat, Edouard; Ferron, Stephane; Carteret, Thibault; Castagnede, Hugues; Palussiere, Jean

    2011-02-15

    The present article describes two cases of bronchopleural fistula (BPF) occurring after radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors. Both procedures were carried out using expandable multitined electrodes, with no coagulation of the needle track. After both ablations, ground-glass opacities encompassed the nodules and abutted the visceral pleura. The first patient had a delayed pneumothorax, and the second had a recurrent pneumothorax. Both cases of BPF were diagnosed on follow-up computed tomography chest scans (i.e., visibility of a distinct channel between the lung or a peripheral bronchus and the pleura) and were successfully treated with chest tubes alone. Our goal is to highlight the fact that BPF can occur without needle-track coagulation and to suggest that minimally invasive treatment is sufficient to cure BPFs of this specific origin.

  15. Radiofrequency ablation for neuroendocrine liver metastases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Helen; Nicholson, Patrick; Winter, Des C; O'Shea, Donal; O'Toole, Dermot; Geoghegan, Justin; Maguire, Donal; Hoti, Emir; Traynor, Oscar; Cantwell, Colin P

    2015-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) ablation in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) liver metastases. A systematic review was performed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Eight studies were included (N = 301). Twenty-six percent of RF ablation procedures were percutaneous (n = 156), with the remainder conducted at surgery. Forty-eight percent of patients had a concomitant liver resection. Fifty-four percent of patients presented with symptoms, with 92% reporting symptom improvement following RF ablation (alone or in combination with surgery). The median duration of symptom improvement was 14-27 months. However, recurrence was common (63%-87%). RF ablation can provide symptomatic relief in NET liver metastases alone or in combination with surgery. PMID:25840836

  16. Characteristics of Radio-Frequency Circuits Utilizing Ferroelectric Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Michael; Gui, Xiao; MacLeod, Todd; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    Ferroelectric capacitors, most commonly used in memory circuits and variable components, were studied in simple analog radio-frequency circuits such as the RLC resonator and Colpitts oscillator. The goal was to characterize the RF circuits in terms of frequency of oscillation, gain, etc, using ferroelectric capacitors. Frequencies of oscillation of both circuits were measured and studied a more accurate resonant frequency can be obtained using the ferroelectric capacitors. Many experiments were conducted and data collected. A model to simulate the experimental results will be developed. Discrepancies in gain and frequency in these RF circuits when conventional capacitors are replaced with ferroelectric ones were studied. These results will enable circuit designers to anticipate the effects of using ferroelectric components in their radio- frequency applications.

  17. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  18. Novel Treatment of Neck Wrinkles with an Intradermal Radiofrequency Device

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Moo Yeol; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwun; Kim, Hyuk; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Won-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Neck wrinkles commonly develop owing to the aging process. However, recently, the number of patients with neck wrinkles has been increasing. Also, an increasing number of young patients have presented with this condition, possibly because of the effect of the head-down posture that they adopt when using their computer or smartphone. We report two cases of young adults with a prominent neck wrinkle. In case 1, a 29-year-old woman with a neck wrinkle was treated with six intradermal radiofrequency (RF) procedures. Her neck wrinkle was significantly improved with the RF treatment. In case 2, a 32-year-old woman with a wrinkle and generalized light brownish tiny papules on the neck was treated with three intradermal RF procedures simultaneously with 30% glycolic acid peeling. Her wrinkle and skin tone were improved dramatically. We conclude that intradermal RF has a considerable efficacy for reducing neck wrinkles. PMID:25673937

  19. Current status of radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K; Choi, Dongil

    2010-01-01

    Loco-regional treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are important alternatives to curative transplantation or resection. Among them, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is accepted as the most popular technique showing excellent local tumor control and acceptable morbidity. The current role of RFA is well documented in the evidence-based practice guidelines of European Association of Study of Liver, American Association of Study of the Liver Disease and Japanese academic societies. Several randomized controlled trials have confirmed that RFA is superior to percutaneous ethanol injections in terms of local tumor control and survival. The overall survival after RFA is comparable to after surgical resection in a selected group of patients with smaller (< 3 cm) tumors. Currently, the clinical benefits of combined RFA with transarterial chemoembolization for intermediate stage HCC are increasingly being explored. Here we review the ongoing technical advancements of RFA and future potential. PMID:21160861

  20. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Brehmer, Bernhard; Mahnken, Andreas Horst

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming more and more established in the treatment of various neoplasms, including retroperitoneal tumors of the kidneys and the adrenal glands. We report the case of RFA in a patient suffering from the third relapse of a retroperitoneal liposarcoma in the left psoas muscle. After repeated surgical resection and supportive radiation therapy of a primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma and two surgically treated recurrences, including replacement of the ureter by a fraction of the ileum, there was no option for further surgery. Thus, we considered RFA as the most suitable treatment option. Monopolar RFA was performed in a single session with a 2-cm umbrella-shaped LeVeen probe. During a 27-month follow-up period the patient remained free of tumor.

  1. Effect of the levitating microparticle cloud on radiofrequency argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mitic, S.; Pustylnik, M. Y.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-06-16

    The effect of a levitating cloud of microparticles on the parameters of a radiofrequency (RF) plasma has been studied by means of two experimental techniques. Axial distributions of 1s excited states of argon were measured by a self-absorption method. A correction of a standard self-absorption method for the extinction of the light by the levitating microparticles is proposed. In addition the electron temperature was estimated using the optical emission spectroscopy. Measurements at the same discharge conditions in a microparticle-free discharge and discharge, containing a cloud of levitating microparticles, revealed the non-local influence of the microparticle cloud on the discharge plasma. The most probable cause of this influence is the disturbance of the ionization balance by the levitating microparticles.

  2. Factors Limiting Complete Tumor Ablation by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulet, Erwan Aube, Christophe; Pessaux, Patrick; Lebigot, Jerome; Lhermitte, Emilie; Oberti, Frederic; Ponthieux, Anne; Cales, Paul; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiological or physical factors to predict the risk of residual mass or local recurrence of primary and secondary hepatic tumors treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eighty-two patients, with 146 lesions (80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 66 metastases), were treated by RFA. Morphological parameters of the lesions included size, location, number, ultrasound echogenicity, computed tomography density, and magnetic resonance signal intensity were obtained before and after treatment. Parameters of the generator were recorded during radiofrequency application. The recurrence-free group was statistically compared to the recurrence and residual mass groups on all these parameters. Twenty residual masses were detected. Twenty-nine lesions recurred after a mean follow-up of 18 months. Size was a predictive parameter. Patients' sex and age and the echogenicity and density of lesions were significantly different for the recurrence and residual mass groups compared to the recurrence-free group (p < 0.05). The presence of an enhanced ring on the magnetic resonance control was more frequent in the recurrence and residual mass groups. In the group of patients with residual lesions, analysis of physical parameters showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the time necessary for the temperature to rise. In conclusion, this study confirms risk factors of recurrence such as the size of the tumor and emphasizes other factors such as a posttreatment enhanced ring and an increase in the time necessary for the rise in temperature. These factors should be taken into consideration when performing RFA and during follow-up.

  3. Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation of Unresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinomas: A Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Haidu, Marion; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Schullian, Peter Widmann, Gerlig; Klaus, Alexander Weiss, Helmut Margreiter, Raimund; Bale, Reto

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment effects, complications, and outcome of percutaneous stereotactic radiofrequency ablation (SRFA) of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Patients and Methods: Eleven consecutive patients (nine men and two women) with a total of 36 inoperable ICCs (18 initial lesions, 16 lesions newly detected during follow-up, and two local recurrences) underwent SRFA between December 2004 and June 2010. Two different radiofrequency ablation (RFA) devices with internally cooled electrodes were used. Tumor diameters ranged from 0.5 to 10 cm (median 3.0 cm). A total of 23 SRFA sessions were performed. The efficacy of SRFA was evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months. Results: Primary technical effectiveness rate was 92%. Further follow-up every 3 months revealed three local recurrences (8%), two of which were successfully retreated, resulting in a secondary technical effectiveness rate of 98%. After a total of 23 RFA sessions, three major complications occurred (13%) that could be managed interventionally. Mean follow-up time was 35 months (range 12-81 months). One- and 3-year overall survival rates were 91 and 71%, respectively. The median overall survival was 60 months (according to the life table method). Eight (73%) of 11 patients were still alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: SRFA is effective in the treatment of unresectable ICC even if the tumor is large and located close to major vessels. SRFA shows a survival benefit compared to other palliative treatment options and may also be considered as the first-line local treatment of ICCs in selected patients.

  4. Ultrasonography guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Zhou, Li-Yan; Dong, Man-Ku; Wang, Ping; Ji, Min; Li, Xiao-Ou; Chen, Chang-Wei; Liu, Zi-Pei; Xu, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Wen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Hepatic cavernous hemangioma (HCH) is the most common benign tumor of the liver and its management is still controversial. Recent success in situ radiofrequency ablation of hepatic malignancies has led us to consider using this technique in patients with HCH. This study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and complications of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (PRFA) under ultrasonography guidance in patients with HCH. METHODS: Twelve patients (four men and eight women, age ranged 33-56 years, mean age was 41.7 years) with 15 hepatic cavernous hemangiomas (2.5 cm to 9.5 cm) were treated using the RF-2000 generator and 10-needle LeVeen electrode percutaneously guided by B-ultrasound. Lesions larger than 3 cm were treated by multiple overlapping ablations that encompass the entire lesion as well as a rim of normal liver tissue (approximately 0.5 cm). RESULTS: All the patients who received PRFA therapy had no severe pain, bleeding or bile leakage during and after the procedures. Nine to 34 months’ follow-up (mean, 21 months) by ultrasound and/or spiral CT scan demonstrated that the ablated lesions in this group were shrunk remarkably, and the shrunken range was 38%-79% (mean, 67% per 21 months). The contrast enhancement was disappeared within the tumor or at its periphery in all cases on spiral CT scans obtained 3 to 6 months after treatment. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that PRFA therapy is a mini-invasive, simple, safe, and effective method for the treatment of selected patients with HCH. PMID:12970923

  5. Radio-Frequency Driven Dielectric Heaters for Non-Nuclear Testing in Nuclear Core Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Godfroy, Thomas J. (Inventor); Bitteker, Leo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are provided through which a radiofrequency dielectric heater has a cylindrical form factor, a variable thermal energy deposition through variations in geometry and composition of a dielectric, and/or has a thermally isolated power input.

  6. Computer simulation of a novel technique for Radio-Frequency Ablation of ventricular arrhythmias

    E-print Network

    Rosbury, Tamara S

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) is a rapid arrhythmia, most commonly due to reentrant electrical activity in the heart. A common treatment for VT is Radio-Frequency Ablation (RFA), which is minimally invasive, but requires ...

  7. Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

    1989-04-01

    AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation-protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A Practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

  8. Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

    1989-04-01

    AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

  9. Percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy: A comparison of radiofrequency denervation versus phenol neurolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haynsworth, R.F. Jr.; Noe, C.E. )

    1991-03-01

    A new percutaneous approach to sympathectomy using radiofrequency denervation has seemed to offer longer duration and less incidence of postsympathetic neuralgia as compared to phenol sympathetic blocks. To compare these techniques, 17 patients underwent either phenol lumbar sympathetic blocks (n = 9) or radiofrequency denervation (n = 8). Duration of sympathetic block was followed by a sweat test and temperature measurements. Results indicate that 89% of patients in the phenol group showed signs of sympathetic blockade after 8 weeks, as compared to 12% in the radiofrequency group (P less than 0.05). Although the incidence of post sympathetic neuralgia appears to be less with radiofrequency denervation, further refinement of needle placement to ensure complete lesioning of the sympathetic chain will be required before the technique can offer advantages over current phenol techniques.

  10. APPLICATION OF A FINITE-DIFFERENCE TECHNIQUE TO THE HUMAN RADIOFREQUENCY DOSIMETRY PROBLEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A powerful finite difference numerical technique has been applied to the human radiofrequency dosimetry problem. The method possesses inherent advantages over the method of moments approach in that its implementation requires much less computer memory. Consequently, it has the ca...

  11. Radiofrequency energy ablation in a child with an implanted vagus nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    Radolec, Mackenzy M; Beerman, Lee B; Arora, Gaurav

    2015-10-01

    An 8-year-old girl with supraventricular tachycardia and an implanted vagus nerve stimulator underwent radiofrequency ablation of her supraventricular tachycardia substrate. No known literature exists addressing the potential interaction of these two technologies, although there are reported cases of interaction between radiofrequency and other implanted stimulating devices such as pacemakers. The procedure was performed successfully without observed interaction, and the patient's family reported no significant change in frequency of seizure control. PMID:25599662

  12. Sympathetic Cooling of 4 Ions in a Radio-Frequency Trap

    E-print Network

    Schiller, Stephan

    Sympathetic Cooling of 4 He Ions in a Radio-Frequency Trap B. Roth, U. Fro¨hlich, and S. Schiller in a linear radio-frequency trap, by sympathetic cooling via laser-cooled 9Be. Stable crystals containing up as coolant. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.053001 PACS numbers: 32.80.Pj, 42.50.­p The two-body Coulomb system

  13. Radiofrequency ablation of benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers: consensus statement and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyung; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Kyu Sun; Baek, Seon Mi; Lee, Younghen; Chong, Semin; Sim, Jung Suk; Huh, Jung Yin; Bae, Jae-Ik; Kim, Kyung Tae; Han, Song Yee; Bae, Min Young; Kim, Yoon Suk; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Thermal ablation using radiofrequency is a new, minimally invasive modality employed as an alternative to surgery in patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the optimal use of radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies, and expert consensus. PMID:22438678

  14. Computer modeling of electrical and thermal performance during bipolar pulsed radiofrequency for pain relief

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Juan J.; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan J.; Muñoz, Víctor; Berjano, Enrique

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Pulsed RF (PRF) is a nonablative technique for treating neuropathic pain. Bipolar PRF application is currently aimed at creating a “strip lesion” to connect the electrode tips; however, the electrical and thermal performance during bipolar PRF is currently unknown. The objective of this paper was to study the temperature and electric field distributions during bipolar PRF. Methods: The authors developed computer models to study temperature and electric field distributions during bipolar PRF and to assess the possible ablative thermal effect caused by the accumulated temperature spikes, along with any possible electroporation effects caused by the electrical field. The authors also modeled the bipolar ablative mode, known as bipolar Continuous Radiofrequency (CRF), in order to compare both techniques. Results: There were important differences between CRF and PRF in terms of electrical and thermal performance. In bipolar CRF: (1) the initial temperature of the tissue impacts on temperature progress and hence on the thermal lesion dimension; and (2) at 37?°C, 6-min of bipolar CRF creates a strip thermal lesion between the electrodes when these are separated by a distance of up to 20 mm. In bipolar PRF: (1) an interelectrode distance shorter than 5 mm produces thermal damage (i.e., ablative effect) in the intervening tissue after 6 min of bipolar RF; and (2) the possible electroporation effect (electric fields higher than 150 kV m{sup ?1}) would be exclusively circumscribed to a very small zone of tissue around the electrode tip. Conclusions: The results suggest that (1) the clinical parameters considered to be suitable for bipolar CRF should not necessarily be considered valid for bipolar PRF, and vice versa; and (2) the ablative effect of the CRF mode is mainly due to its much greater level of delivered energy than is the case in PRF, and therefore at same applied energy levels, CRF, and PRF are expected to result in same outcomes in terms of thermal damage zone dimension.

  15. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no exposure, 50-minute cell phone exposure was associated with increased brain glucose metabolism in the region closest to the antenna. This finding is of unknown clinical significance.

  16. An evaluation of safety guidelines to restrict exposure to stray radiofrequency radiation from short-wave diathermy units.

    PubMed

    Shields, Nora; O'Hare, Neil; Gormley, John

    2004-07-01

    Short-wave diathermy (SWD), a form of radiofrequency radiation used therapeutically by physiotherapists, may be applied in continuous (CSWD) or pulsed (PSWD) mode using either capacitive or inductive methods. Stray radiation emitted by these units may exceed exposure guidelines close to the equipment. Discrepant guidelines exist on a safe distance from an operating unit for operators and other personnel. Stray electric (E-field) and magnetic (H-field) field strengths from 10 SWD units in six departments were examined using a PMM 8053 meter and two isotropic probes (EP-330, HP-032). A 5 l saline phantom completed the patient circuit. Measurements were recorded in eight directions between 0.5 m and 2 m at hip and eye levels while the units operated at maximum output and data compared to current guidelines. Results found stray fields from capacitive CSWD fell below operator limits at 2 m (E-field 4.8-39.8 V/m; H-field 0.015-0.072 A/m) and at 1 m for inductive CSWD (E-field 0-36 V/m; H-field 0.01-0.065 A/m). Capacitive PSWD fields fell below the limits at 1.5 m (E-field 1.2-19.9 V/m; H-field 0.002-0.045 A/m) and at 1m for inductive PSWD (E-field 0.74.0 V/m; H-field 0.009-0.03 A/m). An extra 0.5 m was required before fields fell below the guidelines for other personnel. These results demonstrate, under a worst case scenario, emissions from SWD exceed the guidelines for operators at distances currently recommended as safe. Future guidelines should include recommendations for personnel other than physiotherapists. PMID:15285261

  17. Percutaneous microwave ablation vs radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Loukia S; Botsa, Evanthia; Thanou, Ioanna; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Thanos, Loukas

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancer ranks fifth among cancers and is related to chronic viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, steatohepatitis and liver autoimmunity. Surgical resection and orthotopic liver transplantation have curative potential, but fewer than 20% of patients are suitable candidates. Interventional treatments are offered to the vast majority of patients. Radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are among the therapeutic modalities, with similar indications which include the presence of up to three lesions, smaller than 3 cm in size, and the absence of extrahepatic disease. The therapeutic effect of both methods relies on thermal injury, but MWA uses an electromagnetic field as opposed to electrical current used in RFA. Unlike MWA, the effect of RFA is partially limited by the heat-sink effect and increased impedance of the ablated tissue. Compared with RFA, MWA attains a more predictable ablation zone, permits simultaneous treatment of multiple lesions, and achieves larger coagulation volumes in a shorter procedural time. Major complications of both methods are comparable and infrequent (approximately 2%-3%), and they include haemorrhage, infection/abscess, visceral organ injury, liver failure, and pneumothorax. RFA may incur the additional complication of skin burns. Nevertheless, there is no compelling evidence for differences in clinical outcomes, including local recurrence rates and survival. PMID:26052394

  18. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, A.; Alfuhaid, S. A.; Cambier, J.-L.; Panesi, M.

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled system of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.

  19. A Method for Safety Testing of Radiofrequency/Microwave-Emitting Devices Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Leeor; Cho, Gene Y.; Yang, Xing; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Deniz, Cem M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Strict regulations are imposed on the amount of radiofrequency (RF) energy that devices can emit to prevent excessive deposition of RF energy into the body. In this study, we investigated the application of MR temperature mapping and 10-g average specific absorption rate (SAR) computation for safety evaluation of RF-emitting devices. Methods Quantification of the RF power deposition was shown for an MRI-compatible dipole antenna and a non–MRI-compatible mobile phone via phantom temperature change measurements. Validation of the MR temperature mapping method was demonstrated by comparison with physical temperature measurements and electromagnetic field simulations. MR temperature measurements alongside physical property measurements were used to reconstruct 10-g average SAR. Results The maximum temperature change for a dipole antenna and the maximum 10-g average SAR were 1.83° C and 12.4 W/kg, respectively, for simulations and 1.73° C and 11.9 W/kg, respectively, for experiments. The difference between MR and probe thermometry was <0.15° C. The maximum temperature change and the maximum 10-g average SAR for a cell phone radiating at maximum output for 15 min was 1.7° C and 0.54 W/kg, respectively. Conclusion Information acquired using MR temperature mapping and thermal property measurements can assess RF/microwave safety with high resolution and fidelity. PMID:25424724

  20. Short-duration exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation alters the chlorophyll fluorescence of duckweeds (Lemna minor).

    PubMed

    Senavirathna, Mudalige Don Hiranya Jayasanka; Takashi, Asaeda; Kimura, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Plants growing in natural environments are exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitted by various communication network base stations. The environmental concentration of this radiation is increasing rapidly with the congested deployment of base stations. Although numerous scientific studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of EMR on the physiology of humans and animals, there have been few attempts to investigate the effects of EMR on plants. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of EMR on photosynthesis by investigating the chlorophyll fluorescence (ChF) parameters of duckweed fronds. During the experiment, the fronds were tested with 2, 2.5, 3.5, 5.5 and 8?GHz EMR frequencies, which are not widely studied even though there is a potentially large concentration of these frequencies in the environment. The duckweed fronds were exposed to EMR for 30?min, 1?h and 24?h durations with electric field strength of 45-50?V/m for each frequency. The results indicated that exposure to EMR causes a change in the non-photochemical quenching of the duckweeds. The changes varied with the frequency of the EMR and were time-varying within a particular frequency. The temperature remained unchanged in the duckweed fronds upon exposure to EMR, which confirms that the effect is non-thermal. PMID:24131393

  1. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  2. Modification of surface properties of bell metal by radiofrequency plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutia, Joyanti; Choudhury, Arup Jyoti; Pal, Arup Ratan; Gogoi, Dolly

    2012-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) plasma polymerization is a convenient thin film deposition process as it facilitates the synthesis of polymer films with stable physico-chemical properties suitable for various applications in microelectronic, optical, and biomedical fields. The unique properties of these plasma polymerized films as compared to the conventional ones are strongly related to the proper adjustment of the external plasma discharge parameters and selection of suitable monomer. It is also important to study the fundamental chemistry of RF plasma polymerization process, so that one can successfully correlate the internal features of the discharge with the film properties and explore their possible technological applications. The possibility of using styrene-based plasma polymer (SPP) films on bell metal as protective coatings is explored in this work. Depositions of the films are carried out in RF Ar/styrene discharge at working pressure of 1.2 × 10-1 mbar and at the RF power range of 20 to 110 W. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to study the active species generated during plasma polymerization, while Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used to analyze the internal chemical structures of the films. The protective performances of the SPP films are attempted to correlate with the results obtained from OES, FT-IR, and XPS analyses.

  3. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  4. Workgroup Report: Base Stations and Wireless Networks—Radiofrequency (RF) Exposures and Health Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, Peter A.; van Deventer, T. Emilie; Repacholi, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the airwaves—wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephony (i.e., construction and operation of telephones or telephonic systems). Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. The World Health Organization convened an expert workshop to discuss the current state of cellular-telephone health issues, and this article brings together several of the key points that were addressed. The possibility of RF health effects has been investigated in epidemiology studies of cellular telephone users and workers in RF occupations, in experiments with animals exposed to cell-phone RF, and via biophysical consideration of cell-phone RF electric-field intensity and the effect of RF modulation schemes. As summarized here, these separate avenues of scientific investigation provide little support for adverse health effects arising from RF exposure at levels below current international standards. Moreover, radio and television broadcast waves have exposed populations to RF for > 50 years with little evidence of deleterious health consequences. Despite unavoidable uncertainty, current scientific data are consistent with the conclusion that public exposures to permissible RF levels from mobile telephony and base stations are not likely to adversely affect human health. PMID:17431492

  5. Optical fiber sensors-based temperature distribution measurement in ex vivo radiofrequency ablation with submillimeter resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Tosi, Daniele; Braschi, Giovanni; Gallati, Mario; Cigada, Alfredo; Busca, Giorgio; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-11-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) induces a high-temperature field in a biological tissue having steep spatial (up to 6°C/mm) and temporal (up to 1°C/s) gradients. Applied in cancer care, RFTA produces a localized heating, cytotoxic for tumor cells, and is able to treat tumors with sizes up to 3 to 5 cm in diameter. The online measurement of temperature distribution at the RFTA point of care has been previously carried out with miniature thermocouples and optical fiber sensors, which exhibit problems of size, alteration of RFTA pattern, hysteresis, and sensor density worse than 1 sensor/cm. In this work, we apply a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) with a submillimeter spatial resolution for the monitoring of RFTA in porcine liver tissue. The DTS demodulates the chaotic Rayleigh backscattering pattern with an interferometric setup to obtain the real-time temperature distribution. A measurement chamber has been set up with the fiber crossing the tissue along different diameters. Several experiments have been carried out measuring the space-time evolution of temperature during RFTA. The present work showcases the temperature monitoring in RFTA with an unprecedented spatial resolution and is exportable to in vivo measurement; the acquired data can be particularly useful for the validation of RFTA computational models.

  6. Histological and cytological examination of rat reproductive tissue after short-time intermittent radiofrequency exposure.

    PubMed

    Troši?, Ivan?ica; Matauši?-Pišl, Mirjana; Pavi?i?, Ivan; Marjanovi?, Ana Marija

    2013-12-01

    The unfavourable outcomes of mobile phone use on male fertility have still not been fully elaborated. To establish the potentially adverse effects of everyday exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RF) on humans, we performed a controlled animal study that aimed to investigate the influence of RF radiation on rat testis histology as well as the amount, mobility, and structure of epididymal free sperm cell population. Eighteen adult male rats were divided into two groups of nine. One group comprised sham-exposed control animals, while the other group endured total body irradiation for an hour daily during two weeks. A 915 MHz RF field, power density of 2.4 W m(-2) and strength of 30 V m(-1) was generated in a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was 0.6 W kg(-1). Body mass and temperature were measured before and after each exposure treatment. Immediately after the last exposure, the animals were sacrificed and testes removed and prepared for histological analysis. The free sperm cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and their quantity, quality, and morphology were microscopically determined using a haemocytometer. No statistically significant alteration in any of the endpoints was observed. This study found no evidence of an unfavourable effect of the applied RF radiation on testicular function or structure. Based on these results, we can conclude that short-time intermittent exposure to RF radiation does not represent a significant risk factor for rat reproductive functions. PMID:24384757

  7. Factors that influence the radiofrequency power output of GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Erdreich, Linda S; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Barraj, Leila; McNeely, Mark; Shum, Mona; Sheppard, Asher R; Kelsh, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Epidemiological studies of mobile phone use and risk of brain cancer have relied on self-reported use, years as a subscriber, and billing records as exposure surrogates without addressing the level of radiofrequency (RF) power output. The objective of this study was to measure environmental, behavioral and engineering factors affecting the RF power output of GSM mobile phones during operation. We estimated the RF-field exposure of volunteer subjects who made mobile phone calls using software-modified phones (SMPs) that recorded output power settings. Subjects recruited from three geographic areas in the U.S. were instructed to log information (place, time, etc.) for each call made and received during a 5-day period. The largest factor affecting energy output was study area, followed by user movement and location (inside or outside), use of a hands-free device, and urbanicity, although the two latter factors accounted for trivial parts of overall variance. Although some highly statistically significant differences were identified, the effects on average energy output rate were usually less than 50% and were generally comparable to the standard deviation. These results provide information applicable to improving the precision of exposure metrics for epidemiological studies of GSM mobile phones and may have broader application for other mobile phone systems and geographic locations. PMID:17638408

  8. Workgroup report: base stations and wireless networks-radiofrequency (RF) exposures and health consequences.

    PubMed

    Valberg, Peter A; van Deventer, T Emilie; Repacholi, Michael H

    2007-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the air waves--wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephone (i.e., construction and operation of telephones or telephone systems). Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. The World Health Organization convened an expert workshop to discuss the current state of cellular-telephone health issues, and this article brings together several of the key points that were addressed. The possibility of RF health effects has been investigated in epidemiology studies of cellular telephone users and workers in RF occupations, in experiments with animals exposed to cell-phone RF, and via biophysical consideration of cell-phone RF electric-field intensity and the effect of RF modulation schemes. As summarized here, these separate avenues of scientific investigation provide little support for adverse health effects arising from RF exposure at levels below current international standards. Moreover, radio and television broadcast waves have exposed populations to RF for > 50 years with little evidence of deleterious health consequences. Despite unavoidable uncertainty, current scientific data are consistent with the conclusion that public exposures to permissible RF levels from mobile telephone and base stations are not likely to adversely affect human health. PMID:17431492

  9. Thermoregulatory responses of rats exposed to 9. 3-GHz radio-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, M.R.; Jauchem, J.R.; Heinmets, F.

    1987-10-15

    Ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in H orientation to far-field 9.3-GHz continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed (2 microseconds 500 pps) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at average power densities of 30 and 60 mW/sq. cm (whole-body average specific absorption rates of 9.3 and 18.6 W/kg, respectively). Irradiation was conducted to cyclicly increase colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5 C. Colonic, tympanic, and subcutaneous temperatures, ECG, blood pressure, and respiratory rate were continuously recorded during experimentation. At both power densities, the subcutaneous and tympanic temperature increases significantly exceeded the colonic temperature increase. At both exposure levels, heart rate increased significantly during irradiation and returned to baseline when exposure was discontinued. Blood pressure and respiratory rate did not significantly change during irradiation. There were no significant differences between the effects of CW and pulsed RFR exposure. The levels of subcutaneous heating and heart rate change were greater, and the times required to achieve and to recover from a 1 C colonic temperature increase were longer than in previous studies conducted at 2.8 GHz. Results of these studies indicate that the carrier frequency used during irradiation markedly affects the pattern of heat distribution and the physiological responses of RF-irradiated animals.

  10. Quantitative evaluations of mechanisms of radiofrequency interactions with biological molecules and processes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Asher R; Swicord, Mays L; Balzano, Quirino

    2008-10-01

    The complexity of interactions of electromagnetic fields up to 10(12) Hz with the ions, atoms, and molecules of biological systems has given rise to a large number of established and proposed biophysical mechanisms applicable over a wide range of time and distance scales, field amplitudes, frequencies, and waveforms. This review focuses on the physical principles that guide quantitative assessment of mechanisms applicable for exposures at or below the level of endogenous electric fields associated with development, wound healing, and excitation of muscles and the nervous system (generally, 1 to 10(2) V m(-1)), with emphasis on conditions where temperature increases are insignificant (<1 K). Experiment and theory demonstrate possible demodulation at membrane barriers for frequencies < or =10 MHz, but not at higher frequencies. Although signal levels somewhat below system noise can be detected, signal-to-noise ratios substantially less than 0.1 cannot be overcome by cooperativity, signal averaging, coherent detection, or by nonlinear dynamical systems. Sensory systems and possible effects on biological magnetite suggest paradigms for extreme sensitivity at lower frequencies, but there are no known radiofrequency (RF) analogues. At the molecular level, vibrational modes are so overdamped by water molecules that excitation of molecular modes below the far infrared cannot occur. Two RF mechanisms plausibly may affect biological matter under common exposure conditions. For frequencies below approximately 150 MHz, shifts in the rate of chemical reactions can be mediated by radical pairs and, at all frequencies, dielectric and resistive heating can raise temperature and increase the entropy of the affected biological system. PMID:18784511

  11. Development of a novel radio-frequency negative hydrogen ion source in conically converging configuration.

    PubMed

    Jung, B K; Dang, J J; An, Y H; Chung, K J; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Volume-produced negative ion source still requires enhancement of current density with lower input RF (radio-frequency) power in lower operating pressure for various applications. To confirm recent observation of efficient negative ion production with a short cylindrical chamber with smaller effective plasma size, the RF-driven transformer-coupled plasma H(-) ion source at Seoul National University is modified by adopting a newly designed quartz RF window to reduce the chamber length. Experiments with the reduced chamber length show a few times enhancement of H(-) ion beam current compared to that extracted from the previous chamber design, which is consistent with the measured H(-) ion population. Nevertheless, decrease in H(-) ion beam current observed in low pressure regime below ?5 mTorr owing to insufficient filtering of high energy electrons in the extraction region needs to be resolved to address the usefulness of electron temperature control by the change of geometrical configuration of the discharge chamber. A new discharge chamber with conically converging configuration has been developed, in which the chamber diameter decreases as approaching to the extraction region away from the planar RF antenna such that stronger filter magnetic field can be utilized to prohibit high energy electrons from transporting to the extraction region. First experimental results for the H(-) ion beam extraction with this configuration show that higher magnetic filter field makes peak negative beam currents happen in lower operating pressure. However, overall decrease in H(-) ion beam current due to the change of chamber geometry still requires further study of geometrical effect on particle transport and optimization of magnetic field in this novel configuration. PMID:24593552

  12. Radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation exposure inside the metro tube infrastructure in Warszawa.

    PubMed

    Gryz, Krzysztof; Karpowicz, Jolanta

    2015-09-01

    Antennas from various wireless communications systems [e.g. mobile phones base transceiver stations (BTS) and handsets used by passengers, public Internet access, staff radiophone transmitters used between engine-drivers and traffic operators] emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) are used inside underground metro public transportation. Frequency-selective exposimetric investigations of RF-EMR exposure inside the metro infrastructure in Warsaw (inside metro cars passing between stations and on platforms) were performed. The statistical parameters of exposure to the E-field were analyzed for each frequency range and for a total value (representing the wide-band result of measurements of complex exposure). The recorded exposimetric profiles showed the dominant RF-EMR sources: handsets and BTS of mobile communication systems (GSM 900 and UMTS 2100) and local wireless Internet access (WiFi 2G). Investigations showed that the GSM 900 system is the dominant source of exposure - BTS (incessantly active) on platforms, and handsets - used by passengers present nearby during the tube drive. The recorded E-field varies between sources (for BTS were: medians - 0.22?V/m and 75th percentile - 0.37?V/m; and for handsets: medians - 0.28?V/m and 75th percentile - 0.47?V/m). Maximum levels (peaks) of exposure recorded from mobile handsets exceeded 10?V/m (upper limit of used exposimeters). Broadband measurements of E-field, including the dominant signal emitted by staff radiophones (151?MHz), showed that the level of this exposure of engine-drivers does not exceed 2.5?V/m. PMID:26444204

  13. OFDR based distributed temperature sensor using the three-channel simultaneous radio-frequency lock-in technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-09-01

    Weak signal detection for single-mode fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) is a key technology to achieve better performance. A hybrid technique combining the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) and the three-channel simultaneous radio-frequency (RF) lock-in amplifier (LIA) is presented to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the measured spontaneous Raman backscattered light. The field programmable gate array (FPGA) based RF-LIA is designed with a novel and simple structure. The measurement frequency range is achieved from 1 kHz to 100 MHz. Experimental results show that the backscattered light signal of picowatt level can be detected with high SNR. With a 2.5 km single-mode fiber, a 1064 nm laser source, and the measurement time of 500 s, this sensing system can reach a spatial resolution of 0.93 m and a temperature resolution of about 0.2°C.

  14. Wireless Chalcogenide Nanoionic-Based Radio-Frequency Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    A new nonvolatile nanoionic switch is powered and controlled through wireless radio-frequency (RF) transmission. A thin layer of chalcogenide glass doped with a metal ion, such as silver, comprises the operational portion of the switch. For the switch to function, an oxidizable electrode is made positive (anode) with respect to an opposing electrode (cathode) when sufficient bias, typically on the order of a few tenths of a volt or more, is applied. This action causes the metal ions to flow toward the cathode through a coordinated hopping mechanism. At the cathode, a reduction reaction occurs to form a metal deposit. This metal deposit creates a conductive path that bridges the gap between electrodes to turn the switch on. Once this conductive path is formed, no further power is required to maintain it. To reverse this process, the metal deposit is made positive with respect to the original oxidizable electrode, causing the dissolution of the metal bridge thereby turning the switch off. Once the metal deposit has been completely dissolved, the process self-terminates. This switching process features the following attributes. It requires very little to change states (i.e., on and off). Furthermore, no power is required to maintain the states; hence, the state of the switch is nonvolatile. Because of these attributes the integration of a rectenna to provide the necessary power and control is unique to this embodiment. A rectenna, or rectifying antenna, generates DC power from an incident RF signal. The low voltages and power required for the nanoionic switch control are easily generated from this system and provide the switch with a novel capability to be operated and powered from an external wireless device. In one realization, an RF signal of a specific frequency can be used to set the switch into an off state, while another frequency can be used to set the switch to an on state. The wireless, miniaturized, and nomoving- part features of this switch make it suitable for applications such as integration into garments, RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags, and conformal structures (e.g., aircraft wings, sounding rockets contours, etc). In the case of RFID tags the innovation will provide countermeasures to attempts for identity theft and other uninvited attempts for retrieval of information. It could also be applicable to the automotive industry as well as the aerospace industry for collision avoidance and phased array radar systems, respectively

  15. Investigation of the superconducting properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    Radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities are widely used to increase the energy of a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The maximum gradients of cavities made of bulk niobium have constantly improved over the last ten years and they are approaching the theoretical limit of the material. Nevertheless, rf tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q-drop"), characterized by a marked increase of the surface resistance at high rf fields, in absence of field emission. A low temperature "in-situ" baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied by several laboratories to reduce those losses and improve the cavity's quality factor. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the Q-drop and the baking effect. We investigated the effect of baking on niobium material parameters by measuring the temperature dependence of a cavity's surface impedance and comparing it with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity. It was found that baking allows interstitial oxygen to diffuse from the surface deeper into the bulk. This produces a significant reduction of the normal electrons' mean free path, which causes an increase of the quality factor. The optimum baking parameters are 120°C for 24-48 h. We were also able to identify the origin of the Q-drop as due to a high magnetic field, rather then electric field, by measuring the quality factor of a cavity as function of the rf field in a resonant mode with only magnetic field present on the surface. With the aid of a thermometry system, we were able to localize the losses in the high magnetic field region. We measured the Q-drop in cavities which had undergone different treatments, such as anodization, electropolishing and post-purification, and with different metallurgical properties and we study the effectiveness of baking in each case. As a result, none of the models proposed so far can explain all the experimental observations. We elaborated a model proposing a reduction of the lower critical field due to oxygen contamination as the cause for the Q-drop, and the dilution of oxygen into the bulk during bake-out as the cause for its recovery.

  16. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, A.; Rahimi, S.; Talebi, A.; Soleimani, A.; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz). Materials and Methods Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer’s antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T), the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz) as stimuli. Results The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions. PMID:26396969

  17. Heat Sink Effect on Tumor Ablation Characteristics as Observed in Monopolar Radiofrequency, Bipolar Radiofrequency, and Microwave, Using Ex Vivo Calf Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C.; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices. With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0?mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30?mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored. With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres. Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected. Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W)?=?13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1?+?T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1?+?T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5. MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink. PMID:25738477

  18. Radio-frequency capacitance spectroscopy of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Frake, James C.; Kano, Shinya; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Griffiths, Jonathan; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka; Smith, Charles G.; Buitelaar, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen great progress in our understanding of the electronic properties of nanomaterials in which at least one dimension measures less than 100?nm. However, contacting true nanometer scale materials such as individual molecules or nanoparticles remains a challenge as even state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques such as electron-beam lithography have a resolution of a few nm at best. Here we present a fabrication and measurement technique that allows high sensitivity and high bandwidth readout of discrete quantum states of metallic nanoparticles which does not require nm resolution or precision. This is achieved by coupling the nanoparticles to resonant electrical circuits and measurement of the phase of a reflected radio-frequency signal. This requires only a single tunnel contact to the nanoparticles thus simplifying device fabrication and improving yield and reliability. The technique is demonstrated by measurements on 2.7?nm thiol coated gold nanoparticles which are shown to be in excellent quantitative agreement with theory. PMID:26042729

  19. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huettner, Andrew M.; Mickevicius, Nikolai J.; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  20. Value of radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kai; Ma, Kuan-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant disease that substantially affects public health worldwide. It is especially prevalent in east Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where the main etiology is the endemic status of chronic hepatitis B. Effective treatments with curative intent for early HCC include liver transplantation, liver resection (LR), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). RFA has become the most widely used local thermal ablation method in recent years because of its technical ease, safety, satisfactory local tumor control, and minimally invasive nature. This technique has also emerged as an important treatment strategy for HCC in recent years. RFA, liver transplantation, and hepatectomy can be complementary to one another in the treatment of HCC, and the outcome benefits have been demonstrated by numerous clinical studies. As a pretransplantation bridge therapy, RFA extends the average waiting time without increasing the risk of dropout or death. In contrast to LR, RFA causes almost no intra-abdominal adhesion, thus producing favorable conditions for subsequent liver transplantation. Many studies have demonstrated mutual interactions between RFA and hepatectomy, effectively expanding the operative indications for patients with HCC and enhancing the efficacy of these approaches. However, treated tumor tissue remains within the body after RFA, and residual tumors or satellite nodules can limit the effectiveness of this treatment. Therefore, future research should focus on this issue. PMID:24876721

  1. Complications of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Razafindratsira, Tsiriniaina; Isambert, Milène; Evrard, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Background Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (IRFA) of liver metastases can be used to treat patients with complex tumours that are unsuitable for parenchymal resection alone. This systematic review assesses the frequency, patterns and severity of complications associated with this procedure. Methods We carried out a bibliographic search on MEDLINE focused on IRFA for liver metastases, excluding hepatocarcinomas, and on intraoperative use, excluding percutaneous application. Results Thirty papers published between 1999 and 2007 were analysed. They covered a total of 2822 patients and 1755 IRFA procedures. The indications and techniques for IRFA differ from those for percutaneous treatment, as do associated results and complications. Specific complications associated with IRFA, such as liver abscesses, biliary stenoses and vascular thromboses, are directly correlated with the indications and associated procedures. Published results should be interpreted with caution as IRFA can be used alone or combined with parenchymal resection. Conclusions Specific complications related to IRFA are rare, especially for lesions of <35 mm in size located far from a main biliary duct, when additional septic procedures are not used. A lesion-by-lesion approach based on the benefit : risk ratio should therefore be used in the process of making surgical decisions. Combining resection with IRFA leads to higher morbidity, especially in difficult patients with numerous bilateral lesions, but may be necessary to achieve R0 (microscopically negative margins) outcomes. PMID:21159099

  2. PET guidance for liver radiofrequency ablation: an evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Peng; Dandekar, Omkar; Mahmoud, Faaiza; Widlus, David; Malloy, Patrick; Shekhar, Raj

    2007-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is emerging as the primary mode of treatment of unresectable malignant liver tumors. With current intraoperative imaging modalities, quick, precise, and complete localization of lesions remains a challenge for liver RFA. Fusion of intraoperative CT and preoperative PET images, which relies on PET and CT registration, can produce a new image with complementary metabolic and anatomic data and thus greatly improve the targeting accuracy. Unlike neurological images, alignment of abdominal images by combined PET/CT scanner is prone to errors as a result of large nonrigid misalignment in abdominal images. Our use of a normalized mutual information-based 3D nonrigid registration technique has proven powerful for whole-body PET and CT registration. We demonstrate here that this technique is capable of acceptable abdominal PET and CT registration as well. In five clinical cases, both qualitative and quantitative validation showed that the registration is robust and accurate. Quantitative accuracy was evaluated by comparison between the result from the algorithm and clinical experts. The accuracy of registration is much less than the allowable margin in liver RFA. Study findings show the technique's potential to enable the augmentation of intraoperative CT with preoperative PET to reduce procedure time, avoid repeating procedures, provide clinicians with complementary functional/anatomic maps, avoid omitting dispersed small lesions, and improve the accuracy of tumor targeting in liver RFA.

  3. Nanoscale radiofrequency impedance sensors with unconditionally stable tuning

    PubMed Central

    Requa, M. V.; Fraikin, J.-L.; Stanton, M. A.; Cleland, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    Impedance sensors perform an important role in a number of biosensing applications, including particle counting, sizing, and velocimetry. Detection of nanoparticles, or changes in, e.g., the interfacial Debye–Hückel layer, can also be performed using nanoscale impedance sensors. One method for monitoring changes in the local impedance is to use radiofrequency reflectometry, which when combined with an impedance-matched sensor can afford very high sensitivity with very large detection bandwidth. Maintaining sensitivity and dynamic range, however, requires continuous tuning of the impedance matching network. Here we demonstrate a dual feedback tuning circuit, which allows us to maintain near-perfect impedance matching, even in the presence of long-term drifts in sensor impedance. We apply this tuning technique to a nanoscale interdigitated impedance sensor, designed to allow the direct detection of nanoparticles or real-time monitoring of molecular surface binding. We demonstrate optimal performance of the nanoscale sensor and tuned impedance network both when modulating the concentration of saline to which the sensor is exposed and when electronically switching between sensors configured in a two-element differential array, achieving a stabilization response time of <20 ms. PMID:19902001

  4. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Schmidt, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Singer, W.

    2015-07-02

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 722 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structure have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysis of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young's modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson's ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.

  5. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Schmidt, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Singer, W.

    2015-07-02

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 722 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structure have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysismore »of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young's modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson's ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.« less

  6. Thermal modeling of lesion growth with radiofrequency ablation devices

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Isaac A; Nguyen, Uyen D

    2004-01-01

    Background Temperature is a frequently used parameter to describe the predicted size of lesions computed by computational models. In many cases, however, temperature correlates poorly with lesion size. Although many studies have been conducted to characterize the relationship between time-temperature exposure of tissue heating to cell damage, to date these relationships have not been employed in a finite element model. Methods We present an axisymmetric two-dimensional finite element model that calculates cell damage in tissues and compare lesion sizes using common tissue damage and iso-temperature contour definitions. The model accounts for both temperature-dependent changes in the electrical conductivity of tissue as well as tissue damage-dependent changes in local tissue perfusion. The data is validated using excised porcine liver tissues. Results The data demonstrate the size of thermal lesions is grossly overestimated when calculated using traditional temperature isocontours of 42°C and 47°C. The computational model results predicted lesion dimensions that were within 5% of the experimental measurements. Conclusion When modeling radiofrequency ablation problems, temperature isotherms may not be representative of actual tissue damage patterns. PMID:15298708

  7. Further studies of human whole-body radiofrequency absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Hill, D A

    1985-01-01

    Further studies of human whole-body radiofrequency (RF) absorption rates were carried out using a TEM-cell exposure system. Experiments were done at one frequency near the grounded resonance frequency (approximately 40 MHz), and at several below-resonance frequencies. Absorption rates are small for the K and H orientations of the body, even when grounded. For the body trunk in an E orientation, the absorption rate of a sitting person is about half of the rate for the same person standing with arms at the sides; the latter in turn is about half the rate for the same subject standing with arms over the head. Two-body interactions cause no increase in absorption rates for grounded people. They do, however, increase the absorption rates for subjects in an E orientation in free space; the largest interaction occurs when one subject is lambda/2 behind the other (as seen by the incident wave). When these results are applied to practical occupational exposure situations, the whole-body specific absorption rate does not exceed the ANSI limit of 0.4 W/kg for exposures permitted by the ANSI standard (C95.1-1982) at frequencies from 7 to 40 MHz. PMID:3977967

  8. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  9. [Radiofrequency in the treatment of the renal neoplasias].

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Fulvio; Granata, Antonio; Mereghetti, Marco; D'Amelio, Alessandro; Meloni, Maria Franca

    2015-01-01

    The tumors of the kidney are around the 3% of the neoplasia in adult patients and, at the postmortem examination, the renal neoplasias has a frequency of 1/300 for tumors diameter of 1 to 2 cms. In the treatment of the small neoplasias, techniques of nephron sparing and enucleation are used. These techniques have shown the same therapeutic effectiveness of the radical nephrectomy in patients with tumors smaller than 4 centimeters, with reduction of morbidity. However, there are few clinical situation in which the surgery has a high risk: patients with solitary kidney, chronic renal failure, multiple localizations involving also contralateral kidney, in patients with other malignancies and in von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome. Recently, percutaneous mininvasive techniques have been applied (ex. thermoablation): these techniques allow to reduce the duration of general anesthesia, they offer the possibility to use spinal anaesthesia (besides deep sedation and general anaesthesia) with reduction in mortality during surgery. The most commonly used among interstitial therapies is the radiofrequency (RF), which changes electromagnetic waves into heat. RF used both tomography and ultrasound-guided. The latter is the most recommended because it allows to follow the procedure in real-time. The treatment of renal tumors with RF, in which surgery is inadvisable, is safe and effective especially in peripheral and/or exophytic lesions lower than 4 cm. However the larger tumors can also be treated successfully with combined therapy or multiple sessions. PMID:26093131

  10. Experimental study of a high intensity radio-frequency cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaid, Ramzi; Ban, G.; Cam, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Within the framework of the DESIR/SPIRAL-2 project, a radio-frequency quadrupole cooler named SHIRaC has been studied. SHIRaC is a key device of SPIRAL-2, designed to enhance the beam quality required by DESIR. The preliminary study and development of this device has been carried out at Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de CAEN (LPC Caen), France. The goal of this paper is to present the experimental studies conducted on a SHIRaC prototype. The main peculiarity of this cooler is its efficient handling and cooling of ion beams with currents going up as high as 1 ? A which has never before been achieved in any of the previous coolers. Much effort has been made lately into these studies for development of appropriate optics, vacuum and rf systems which allow cooling of beams of large emittance (˜80 ? mm mrad ) and high current. The dependencies of SHIRaC's transmission and the cooled beam parameters in terms of geometrical transverse emittance and the longitudinal energy spread have also been discussed. Investigation of beam purity at optimum cooling condition has also been done. Results from the experiments indicate that an emittance reduction of less than 2.5 ? mm mrad and a longitudinal energy spread reduction of less than 4 eV are obtained with more than 70% of ion transmission. The emittance is at expected values whereas the energy spread is not.

  11. Sustained 35-GHz radiofrequency irradiation induces circulatory failure.

    PubMed

    Frei, M R; Ryan, K L; Berger, R E; Jauchem, J R

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the thermal distribution and concomitant cardiovascular changes produced by whole-body exposure of ketamine-anesthetized rats to radiofrequency radiation of millimeter wave (MMW) length. Rats (n = 13) were implanted with a flow probe on the superior mesenteric artery and with a catheter in the carotid artery for the measurement of arterial blood pressure. Temperature was measured at five sites: left (Tsl) and right subcutaneous (sides toward and away From the MMW source, respectively), colonic (Tc), tympanic, and tail. The animals were exposed until death to MMW (35 GHz) at a power density that resulted in a whole-body specific absorption rate of 13 W/kg. During irradiation, the Tsl increase was significantly greater than the Tc increase. Heart rate increased throughout irradiation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) as well maintained until Tsl reached 42 degrees C, at which point MAP declined until death. Mesenteric vascular resistance tended to increase during the early stages of irradiation but began to decrease at Tsl > or = 41 degrees C. The declines in both mesenteric vascular resistance and MAP began at Tc < 37.5 degrees C; death occurred at Tc = 40.3 +/- .3 degrees C and Tsl = 48.0 +/- .4 degrees C. These data indicate that circulatory failure and subsequent death may occur when skin temperature is rapidly elevated, even in the presence of relatively normal Tc. PMID:8564558

  12. A comparative study of radiofrequency antennas for Helicon plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melazzi, D.; Lancellotti, V.

    2015-04-01

    Since Helicon plasma sources can efficiently couple power and generate high-density plasma, they have received interest also as spacecraft propulsive devices, among other applications. In order to maximize the power deposited into the plasma, it is necessary to assess the performance of the radiofrequency (RF) antenna that drives the discharge, as typical plasma parameters (e.g. the density) are varied. For this reason, we have conducted a comparative analysis of three Helicon sources which feature different RF antennas, namely, the single-loop, the Nagoya type-III and the fractional helix. These antennas are compared in terms of input impedance and induced current density; in particular, the real part of the impedance constitutes a measure of the antenna ability to couple power into the plasma. The results presented in this work have been obtained through a full-wave approach which (being hinged on the numerical solution of a system of integral equations) allows computing the antenna current and impedance self-consistently. Our findings indicate that certain combinations of plasma parameters can indeed maximize the real part of the input impedance and, thus, the deposited power, and that one of the three antennas analyzed performs best for a given plasma. Furthermore, unlike other strategies which rely on approximate antenna models, our approach enables us to reveal that the antenna current density is not spatially uniform, and that a correlation exists between the plasma parameters and the spatial distribution of the current density.

  13. Development of A Pulse Radio-Frequency Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shou-Guo; Zhao, Ling-Li; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2013-09-01

    A small pulse plasma jet was driven by new developed radio-frequency (RF) power supply of 6.78 MHz. In contrast to the conventional RF 13.56 MHz atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), the power supply was highly simplified by eliminating the matching unit of the RF power supply and using a new circuit, moreover, a pulse controller was added to the circuit to produce the pulse discharge. The plasma jet was operated in a capacitively coupled manner and exhibited low power requirement of 5 W at atmospheric pressure using argon as a carrier gas. The pulse plasma plume temperature remained at less than 45 °C for an extended period of operation without using water to cool the electrodes. Optical emission spectrum measured at a wide range of 200-1000 nm indicated various excited species which were helpful in applying the plasma jet for surface sterilization to human skin or other sensitive materials. Institude of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, China.

  14. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma under CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Morassi, L G; Kokkinis, K; Karargyris, O; Vlachou, I; Kalokairinou, K; Pneumaticos, S G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Osteoid osteoma (OO) accounts for approximately 10–12% of all benign bone tumours and 3% of all bone tumours. Spinal involvement appears in 10–25% of all cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the treatment of spinal OOs and report our experience. Methods: 13 patients suffering from spinal OO and treated at the authors' institution using CT-guided RF ablation were retrospectively evaluated. The RF probe was introduced through a 11-G Jamshidi® needle, and the lesion was heated at 90?°C for 6?min. Results: All procedures were considered technically successful as the correct positioning of the probe was proven by CT. 11 of the 13 patients reported pain relief after RF ablation. In two cases, RF ablation was repeated 1 month after the first procedure. Pain relief was achieved in both cases after the second procedure. No recurrence was reported throughout the follow-up. No complications like skin burn, soft-tissue haematoma, infection, vessel damage or neurological deficit were reported. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spinal OOs. Advances in knowledge: The data of this study support the efficacy and safety of the recently applied CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation technique for the treatment of spinal OOs. PMID:24712322

  15. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura; Baere, Thierry de; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-02-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumour ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of liver malignancies. Among these methods, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RFA is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options [1, 2]. In addition, RFA is considered a viable alternate to surgery (1) for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer, and (2) for patients deemed ineligible for surgical resection because of extent and location of the disease or concurrent medical conditions [3]. These guidelines were written to be used in quality-improvement programs to assess RFA of HCC and liver metastases. The most important processes of care are (1) patient selection, (2) performing the procedure, and (3) monitoring the patient. The outcome measures or indicators for these processes are indications, success rates, and complication rates.

  16. Software-assisted post-interventional assessment of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Christian; Geisler, Benjamin; Bruners, Philipp; Isfort, Peter; Na, Hong-Sik; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard procedure for minimally invasive tumor treatment in clinical practice. Due to its common technical procedure, low complication rate, and low cost, RFA has become an alternative to surgical resection in the liver. To evaluate the therapy success of RFA, thorough follow-up imaging is essential. Conventionally, shape, size, and position of tumor and coagulation are visually compared in a side-by-side manner using pre- and post-interventional images. To objectify the verification of the treatment success, a novel software assistant allowing for fast and accurate comparison of tumor and coagulation is proposed. In this work, the clinical value of the proposed assessment software is evaluated. In a retrospective clinical study, 39 cases of hepatic tumor ablation are evaluated using the prototype software and conventional image comparison by four radiologists with different levels of experience. The cases are randomized and evaluated in two sessions to avoid any recall-bias. Self-confidence of correct diagnosis (local recurrence vs. no local recurrence) on a six-point scale is given for each case by the radiologists. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as receiver operating curves are calculated for both methods. It is shown that the software-assisted method allows physicians to correctly identify local tumor recurrence with a higher percentage than the conventional method (sensitivity: 0.6 vs. 0.35), whereas the percentage of correctly identified successful ablations is slightly reduced (specificity: 0.83 vs. 0.89).

  17. Long-term effect of radiofrequency turbinoplasty in nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Akdag, Mehmet; Dasdag, Suleyman; Ozkurt, Fazil Emre; Celik, Mehmet Yusuf; Degirmenci, Aydin; Demir, Huseyin; Meric, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate long term (two years) effect of radiofrequency tissue volume reduction (RFVTR) on nasal obstruction associated with inferior turbinate hypertrophy, which is not respond to medical treatment. This retrospective study carried out on 98 patients with nasal obstruction treated by RFVTR (56 males, 42 females, from 17 to 70 years of age). Visual analogue scales (VAS) and nasal endoscopic view score (NES) were used for nasal obstruction to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. Results of one, three, six, twelve and twenty four months after RFVTR treatment were compared with pre-exposure values. Turbinate edema and nasal obstruction in the treated patients were recovered after one month of treatment (p < 0.01). Maximum improvement were determined at the end of third month (p < 0.01). However, eficacy of RFVTR declined twelve months after treatment. Final percentage of imrovement was found as 51 % at the end of second year of treatment because of co-factors was not eliminated by some patients. On the other hand, no statistical significant difference was observed between the right and left nasal cavity (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the result of this study indicated that patients who have not eliminate co-factors such as smoking, obesity and allergic rhinitis may need re-application of RFTVR. However, further studies on radiofrequecy energy level and elimination of other co-factors are necessary to illuminate the eficacy of RFVTR.

  18. Surgical and Pathological Changes after Radiofrequency Ablation of Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinja, Chiara; Bernardi, Stella; Fabris, Bruno; Eramo, Rita; Makovac, Petra; Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Piscopello, Lanfranco; Barro, Enrica; de Manzini, Nicolò; Bonazza, Deborah; Pinamonti, Maurizio; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Stacul, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been recently advocated as an effective technique for the treatment of symptomatic benign thyroid nodules. It is not known to what extent it may affect any subsequent thyroid surgery and/or histological diagnosis. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 64 symptomatic Thy2 nodules (benign nodules) and 6 symptomatic Thy3 nodules (follicular lesions/follicular neoplasms). Two Thy3 nodules regrew after the procedure, and these patients accepted to undergo a total thyroidectomy. Here we present how RFA has affected the operation and the final pathological features of the surgically removed nodules. Results and Conclusions. RFA is effective for the treatment of Thy2 nodules, but it should not be recommended as first-line therapy for the treatment of Thy3 nodules (irrespective of their mutational status), as it delays surgery in case of malignancy. Moreover, it is unknown whether RFA might promote residual tumor progression or neoplastic progression of Thy3 lesions. Nevertheless, here we show for the first time that one session of RFA does not affect subsequent thyroid surgery and/or histological diagnosis. PMID:26265914

  19. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteoma: How we do it

    PubMed Central

    Jankharia, Bhavin; Burute, Nishigandha

    2009-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To describe our technique for performing radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in osteoid osteoma and to evaluate the results of treatment. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients in whom RFA was performed for osteoid osteomas between October 2005 and February 2008. The lesions were located in the femur (n = 22), tibia (n = 10), humerus (n = 2), acetabulum (n = 2), radius (n = 1), fibula (n = 1), patella (n = 1), and calcaneum (n = 1). The procedure was performed using a standard technique. Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients, with intranidal localization of the needle and complete ablation. All patients were fully weight bearing 2–3 h after the procedure. Successful pain relief was achieved in all patients within 48 h. Immediate complications included a case of minor thermal skin burn and a small cortical chip fracture, which healed on its own. There were no delayed complications. The average follow-up period was 12 months. Two patients (5% of cases) had recurrence of pain after intervals of 5 and 8 months, respectively, following the ablation; this was due to recurrence of the lesion. Complete pain relief was however achieved after a second ablation in both cases. Thus, our primary and secondary clinical success rates were 95 and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: RFA is a safe, quick, minimally invasive, and extremely effective method for the management of osteoid osteomas. PMID:19774138

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of osseous metastases for the palliation of pain

    PubMed Central

    Mylona, S.; Galani, P.; Tzavoulis, D.; Kalioras, V.; Tanteles, S.; Pomoni, M.

    2007-01-01

    A number of different methods have been proposed for pain relief in cancer patients with bone metastases, each with different indications, contraindications and complications (systemic analgesics, bisphosphonates, antitumor chemotherapy, radiotherapy, systemic radio-isotopes, local surgery and vertebroplasty). The ideal treatment has to be fast, safe, effective and tolerable for the patient. CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation may fulfill these criteria. Our experience in the treatment of 30 patients (34 lesions) with painful bone metastases using RF ablation was assessed. There was a significant decrease in the mean past-24-h Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) score for worst pain, for average pain and for pain interference during daily life (4.7, 4.8 and 5.3 units respectively) 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. There was a marked decrease (3 out of 30 patients 4 and 8 weeks after treatment) in the use of analgesics. CT-guided RF ablation appears to be effective for treatment of painful bone metastases. PMID:18030464

  1. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  2. Lymphoma development of simultaneously combined exposure to two radiofrequency signals in AKR/J mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Jin, Yeung Bae; Lee, Jae-Seon; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Tae-Hong; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Choi, Hyung Do; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2011-09-01

    There are public concerns regarding possible carcinogenic or cancer-promoting effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) because of the extensive use of wireless mobile phones and other telecommunication devices in daily life. However, so far it is unclear if non-thermal exposure of single EMF exposure in animal studies has a direct influence on carcinogenesis. Here, carcinogenic effects of combined signal RF-EMFs on AKR/J mice, which were used for the lymphoma animal model, were investigated. Six-week-old AKR/J mice were simultaneously exposed to two types of RF signals: single code division multiple access (CDMA) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA). AKR/J mice were exposed to combined RF-EMFs for 45 min/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 42 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA and WCDMA fields was 2.0 W/kg each, 4.0 W/kg in total. When we examined final survival, lymphoma incidence, and splenomegaly incidence, no differences were found between sham- and RF-exposed mice. However, occurrence of metastasis infiltration to the brain in lymphoma-bearing mice was significantly different in RF-exposed mice when compared to sham-exposed mice, even though no consistent correlation (increase or decrease) was observed between male and female mice. However, infiltration occurrence to liver, lung, and spleen was not different between the groups. From the results, we suggested that simultaneous exposure to CDMA and WCDMA RF-EMFs did not affect lymphoma development in AKR/J mice. PMID:21437920

  3. Metabolic and vasomotor responses of rhesus monkeys exposed to 225-MHz radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Lotz, W G; Saxton, J L

    1987-01-01

    A previous study showed a substantial increase in the colonic temperature of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) exposed to radiofrequency (RF) fields at a frequency near whole-body resonance and specific absorption rates (SAR) of 2-3 W/kg. The present experiments were conducted to determine the metabolic and vasomotor responses during exposures to similar RF fields. We exposed five adult male rhesus monkeys to 225 MHz radiation (E orientation) in an anechoic chamber. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured before, during, and after RF exposure. Colonic, tail and leg skin temperatures were continuously monitored with RF-nonperturbing probes. The monkeys were irradiated at two carefully-controlled ambient temperatures, either cool (20 degrees C) or thermoneutral (26 degrees C). Power densities ranged from 0 (sham) to 10.0 mW/cm2 with an average whole-body SAR of 0.285 (W/kg)/(mW/cm2). We used two experimental protocols, each of which began with a 120-min pre-exposure equilibration period. One protocol involved repetitive 10-min RF exposures at successively higher power densities with a recovery period between exposures. In the second protocol, a 120-min RF exposure permitted the measurement of steady-state thermoregulatory responses. Metabolic and vasomotor adjustments in the rhesus monkey exposed to 225 MHz occurred during brief or sustained exposures at SARs at or above 1.4 W/kg. The SAR required to produce a given response varied with ambient temperature. Metabolic and vasomotor responses were coordinated effectively to produce a stable deep body temperature. The results show that the thermoregulatory response of the rhesus monkey to an RF exposure at a resonant frequency limits storage of heat in the body. However, substantial increases in colonic temperature were not prevented by such responses, even in a cool environment. PMID:3580001

  4. Effect of vortex hotspots on the radio-frequency surface resistance of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Gurevich, G. Ciovati

    2013-02-01

    We present detailed experimental and theoretical investigations of hotspots produced by trapped vortex bundles and their effect on the radio-frequency (rf) surface resistance R{sub s} of superconductors at low temperatures. Our measurements of R{sub s}, combined with the temperature mapping and laser scanning of a 2.36-mm-thick Nb plate incorporated into a 3.3-GHz Nb resonator cavity cooled by the superfluid He at 2 K, revealed spatial scales and temperature distributions of hotspots and showed that they can be moved or split by thermal gradients produced by the scanning laser beam. These results, along with the observed hysteretic field dependence of R{sub s} which can be tuned by the scanning laser beam, show that the hotspots in our Nb sample are due to trapped vortex bundles which contain ?10{sup 6} vortices spread over regions ?0.1–1 cm. We calculated the frequency dependence of the rf power dissipated by oscillating vortex segments trapped between nanoscale pinning centers, taking into account all bending modes and the nonlocal line tension of the vortex driven by rf Meissner currents. We also calculated the temperature distributions caused by trapped vortex hotspots, and suggested a method of reconstructing the spatial distribution of vortex dissipation sources from the observed temperature maps. Vortex hotspots can dominate the residual surface resistance at low temperatures and give rise to a significant dependence of R{sub s} on the rf field amplitude H{sub p}, which can have important implications for the rf resonating cavities used in particle accelerators and for thin-film structures used in quantum computing and photon detectors.

  5. Metabolic and vasomotor responses of rhesus monkeys exposed to 225-MHz radiofrequency energy. [Macaca mulatta

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A previous study showed a substantial increase in the colonic temperature of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) exposed to radiofrequency (RF) fields at a frequency near whole-body resonance and specific absorption rates (SAR) of 2-3 W/kg. The present experiments were conducted to determine the metabolic and vasomotor responses during exposures to similar RF fields. We exposed five adult male rhesus monkeys to 225 MHz radiation (E orientation) in an anechoic chamber. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured before, during, and after RF exposure. Colonic, tail and leg skin temperatures were continuously monitored with RF-nonperturbing probes. The monkeys were irradiated at two carefully-controlled ambient temperatures, either cool (20 degrees C) or thermoneutral (26 degrees C). Power densities ranged from 0 (sham) to 10.0 mW/cm2 with an average whole-body SAR of 0.285 (W/kg)/(mW/cm2). We used two experimental protocols, each of which began with a 120-min pre-exposure equilibration period. One protocol involved repetitive 10-min RF exposures at successively higher power densities with a recovery period between exposures. In the second protocol, a 120-min RF exposure permitted the measurement of steady-state thermoregulatory responses. Metabolic and vasomotor adjustments in the rhesus monkey exposed to 225 MHz occurred during brief or sustained exposures at SARs at or above 1.4 W/kg. The SAR required to produce a given response varied with ambient temperature. Metabolic and vasomotor responses were coordinated effectively to produce a stable deep body temperature. The results show that the thermoregulatory response of the rhesus monkey to an RF exposure at a resonant frequency limits storage of heat in the body. However, substantial increases in colonic temperature were not prevented by such responses, even in a cool environment.

  6. Target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis in the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daying; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xuexue; Sheng, Mulan

    2015-01-01

    Both target radiofrequency thermocoagulation and collagenase chemonucleolysis are effective micro-invasive therapy means for lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. In order to analyze the clinical effects of target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis on lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, the contents of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan were measured and the histological changes of nucleus pulposus was detected in the vitro experiments. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation reduced the hydrolyzation of herniated nucleus pulposus caused by collagenase, as well as the content of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, 236 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis. The efficiency was evaluated according to Macnab criteria, and the index of lumbar disc herniation (IDH) was compared pre-operation with 3 months post-operation. The post-operative good rate was 66.5% (157/236) at 2 weeks post-operation, and 88.1% (208/236) at 3 months post-operation. In the post-operative follow-up exam, 86.8% of the re-examined cases demonstrated smaller or ablated protrusion, with reduced IDH values from pre-operation, which was statistically significant. No serious complications were detected intra-operatively and post-operatively. In conclusion, target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis was an effective and safe method for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:25785026

  7. Non-invasive ultrasound-based temperature imaging for monitoring radiofrequency heating—phantom results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. J.; Varghese, T.; Madsen, E. L.; Zagzebski, J. A.

    2007-08-01

    Minimally invasive therapies (such as radiofrequency ablation) are becoming more commonly used in the United States for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas and liver metastases. Unfortunately, these procedures suffer from high recurrence rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (~34-55%) or metastases following ablation therapy. The ability to perform real-time temperature imaging while a patient is undergoing radiofrequency ablation could provide a significant reduction in these recurrence rates. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of ultrasound-based temperature imaging on a tissue-mimicking phantom undergoing radiofrequency heating. Ultrasound echo signals undergo time shifts with increasing temperature, which are tracked using 2D correlation-based speckle tracking methods. Time shifts or displacements in the echo signal are accumulated, and the gradient of these time shifts are related to changes in the temperature of the tissue-mimicking phantom material using a calibration curve generated from experimental data. A tissue-mimicking phantom was developed that can undergo repeated radiofrequency heating procedures. Both sound speed and thermal expansion changes of the tissue-mimicking material were measured experimentally and utilized to generate the calibration curve relating temperature to the displacement gradient. Temperature maps were obtained, and specific regions-of-interest on the temperature maps were compared to invasive temperatures obtained using fiber-optic temperature probes at the same location. Temperature elevation during a radiofrequency ablation procedure on the phantom was successfully tracked to within ±0.5 °C.

  8. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4?ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics.

  9. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4?ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics. PMID:25581847

  10. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  11. Target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis in the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daying; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xuexue; Sheng, Mulan

    2015-01-01

    Both target radiofrequency thermocoagulation and collagenase chemonucleolysis are effective micro-invasive therapy means for lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. In order to analyze the clinical effects of target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis on lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, the contents of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan were measured and the histological changes of nucleus pulposus was detected in the vitro experiments. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation reduced the hydrolyzation of herniated nucleus pulposus caused by collagenase, as well as the content of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, 236 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis. The efficiency was evaluated according to Macnab criteria, and the index of lumbar disc herniation (IDH) was compared pre-operation with 3 months post-operation. The post-operative good rate was 66.5% (157/236) at 2 weeks post-operation, and 88.1% (208/236) at 3 months post-operation. In the post-operative follow-up exam, 86.8% of the re-examined cases demonstrated smaller or ablated protrusion, with reduced IDH values from pre-operation, which was statistically significant. No serious complications were detected intra-operatively and post-operatively. In conclusion, target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis was an effective and safe method for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:25785026

  12. Evidence for thermal boundary resistance effects on superconducting radiofrequency cavity performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Vincenzo; Rossi, Antonio Alessandro; Stark, Sergey Yu; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-08-01

    The majority of the literature on superconducting cavities for particle accelerators concentrates on the interaction of a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field with a superconductor cooled in liquid helium, generally either at a fixed temperature of 4.2 K or 1.8 K, basing the analysis of experimental results on the assumption that the superconductor is at the same temperature as the infinite reservoir of liquid helium. Only a limited number of papers have extended their analysis to the more complex overall system composed of an RF field, a superconductor and liquid helium. Only a few papers have analyzed, for example, the problem of the Kapitza resistance, i.e. the thermal boundary resistance between the superconductor and the superfluid helium. Among them, the general conclusion is that the Kapitza resistance, one of the most controversial and less understood topics in physics, is generally negligible, or not relevant for the performance enhancement of cavities. In our work presented here, studying the performance of 6 GHz niobium (Nb) test cavities, we have discovered and studied a new effect consisting of an abrupt change in the surface resistance versus temperature at the superfluid helium lambda transition T?. This abrupt change (or ‘jump’) clearly appears when the RF measurement of a cavity is performed at constant power rather than at a constant field. We have correlated this jump to a change in the thermal exchange regime across the lambda transition, and, through a simple thermal model and further reasonable assumptions, we have calculated the thermal boundary resistance between niobium and liquid helium in the temperature range between 4.2 K and 1.8 K. We find that the absolute values of the thermal resistance both above and below the lambda point are fully compatible with the data reported in the literature for heat transfer to pool boiling helium I (HeI) above T? and for the Kapitza interface resistance (below T?) between a polished metal surface and superfluid HeII. Finally, based on the well-documented evidence that the surface status of metal to liquid helium influences the heat exchange towards the fluid, and specifically the Kapitza resistance below T?, we have tested an anodization process external to the cavity, comparing the performances of the cavity before and after external anodization. The tests were done without breaking the vacuum inside the cavity or modifying the inner superconducting layer in any way, and were repeated on different samples. The results show that when the cavity is externally anodized, both the Q-factor and the maximum accelerating field increase. Again, when the oxide layer is removed, the Q-factor shifts towards a lower level and the maximum accelerating field is also reduced.

  13. Effectiveness of impedance monitoring during radiofrequency ablation for predicting popping

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Hiroya; Aihara, Tsukasa; Ikuta, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of impedance monitoring for predicting popping during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using internally cooled electrodes. METHODS: We reviewed 140 patients (94 males, 46 females; age range 73.0 ± 11.1 year) who underwent RFA between February 2006 and November 2008 with a modified protocol using a limited power delivery rather than a conventional one to avoid popping. All the patients provided their written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board. Intraprocedural impedances were measured for the study subjects, and the tumors were classified into three types according to the characteristics of their impedance curves: increasing, flat, or decreasing. The tumors were further sorted into seven subtypes (A-G) depending on the curvature of the impedance curve’s increase or decrease. Relative popping rates were determined for the three types and seven subtypes. A chi-square test was performed to estimate statistical significance. RESULTS: A total of 148 nodules treated by RFA were analyzed. The study samples included 132 nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma, 14 nodules of metastatic liver cancer, and two nodules of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The numbers of nodules with each impedance curve type were as follows: 37 increasing-type nodules, 43 flat-type nodules, and 68 decreasing-type nodules. Popping occurrence rates were 24.3%, 46.5% and 64.7%, respectively. Flat-type nodules exhibited a significantly higher rate of popping compared to increasing-type nodules (P = 0.039). Decreasing-type nodules exhibited a significantly higher rate of popping compared to increasing-type nodules (P < 0.0001). Notably, nodules that showed a sharp decrease in impedance in the latter ablation period (subtype E) exhibited a significantly higher rate of popping compared to other subtypes. CONCLUSION: Intraprocedural impedance monitoring can be a useful tool to predict the occurrence of popping during liver tumor RFA performed with internally cooled electrodes. PMID:23139602

  14. Outcome after Radiofrequency Ablation of Sarcoma Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Koelblinger, Claus; Strauss, Sandra; Gillams, Alice

    2013-05-14

    PurposeResection is the mainstay of management in patients with sarcoma lung metastases, but there is a limit to how many resections can be performed. Some patients with inoperable disease have small-volume lung metastases that are amenable to thermal ablation. We report our results after radiofrequency ablation (RFA).MethodsThis is a retrospective study of patients treated from 2007 to 2012 in whom the intention was to treat all sites of disease and who had a minimum CT follow-up of 4 months. Treatment was performed under general anesthesia/conscious sedation using cool-tip RFA. Follow-up CT scans were analyzed for local control. Primary tumor type, location, grade, disease-free interval, prior resection/chemotherapy, number and size of lung tumors, uni- or bilateral disease, complications, and overall and progression-free survival were recorded.ResultsTwenty-two patients [15 women; median age 48 (range 10–78) years] with 55 lung metastases were treated in 30 sessions. Mean and median tumor size and initial number were 0.9 cm and 0.7 (range 0.5–2) cm, and 2.5 and 1 (1–7) respectively. Median CT and clinical follow-up were 12 (4–54) and 20 (8–63) months, respectively. Primary local control rate was 52 of 55 (95 %). There were 2 of 30 (6.6 %) Common Terminology Criteria grade 3 complications with no long-term sequelae. Mean (median not reached) and 2- and 3-year overall survival were 51 months, and 94 and 85 %. Median and 1- and 2-year progression-free survival were 12 months, and 53 and 23 %. Prior disease-free interval was the only significant factor to affect overall survival.ConclusionRFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with small-volume sarcoma metastases.

  15. Nanoionics-Based Switches for Radio-Frequency Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Lee, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Nanoionics-based devices have shown promise as alternatives to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and semiconductor diode devices for switching radio-frequency (RF) signals in diverse systems. Examples of systems that utilize RF switches include phase shifters for electronically steerable phased-array antennas, multiplexers, cellular telephones and other radio transceivers, and other portable electronic devices. Semiconductor diode switches can operate at low potentials (about 1 to 3 V) and high speeds (switching times of the order of nanoseconds) but are characterized by significant insertion loss, high DC power consumption, low isolation, and generation of third-order harmonics and intermodulation distortion (IMD). MEMS-based switches feature low insertion loss (of the order of 0.2 dB), low DC power consumption (picowatts), high isolation (>30 dB), and low IMD, but contain moving parts, are not highly reliable, and must be operated at high actuation potentials (20 to 60 V) generated and applied by use of complex circuitry. In addition, fabrication of MEMS is complex, involving many processing steps. Nanoionics-based switches offer the superior RF performance and low power consumption of MEMS switches, without need for the high potentials and complex circuitry necessary for operation of MEMS switches. At the same time, nanoionics-based switches offer the high switching speed of semiconductor devices. Also, like semiconductor devices, nanoionics-based switches can be fabricated relatively inexpensively by use of conventional integrated-circuit fabrication techniques. More over, nanoionics-based switches have simple planar structures that can easily be integrated into RF power-distribution circuits.

  16. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

    2009-11-11

    This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

  17. Patterns of complications following intraoperative radiofrequency ablation for liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Desolneux, Grégoire; Vara, Jeremy; Razafindratsira, Tsiriniaina; Isambert, Milène; Brouste, Véronique; McKelvie-Sebileau, Pippa; Evrard, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (IRFA) is added to surgery to obtain hepatic clearance of liver metastases. Complications occurring in IRFA should differ from those associated with wedge or anatomic liver resection. Methods Patients with liver metastases treated with IRFA from 2000 to 2010 were retrospectively analysed. Postoperative outcomes are reported according to the Clavien–Dindo system of classification. Results A total of 151 patients underwent 173 procedures for 430 metastases. Of these, 97 procedures involved IRFA plus liver resection and 76 involved IRFA only. The median number of lesions treated by IRFA was two (range: 1–11). A total of 123 (71.1%) procedures were carried out in patients who had received preoperative chemotherapy. The mortality rate was 1.2%. Thirty (39.5%) IRFA-only patients and 45 (46.4%) IRFA-plus-resection patients presented complications. Immediate complications (n = 4) were associated with IRFA plus resection. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, previous abdominal surgery or hepatic resection, body mass index, number of IRFA procedures, portal pedicle clamping, total vascular exclusion and preoperative chemotherapy were not associated with a greater number of complications of Grade III or higher severity. Length of surgery >4?h [odds ratio (OR) 2.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–6.3; P < 0.05] and an associated contaminating procedure (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.53–9.06; P < 0.005) led to a greater frequency of complications of Grade III or higher. Conclusions Mortality and morbidity after IRFA, with or without resection, are low. Nevertheless, long interventions and concurrent bowel operations increase the risk for septic complications. PMID:24830798

  18. Screen printed flexible radiofrequency identification tag for oxygen monitoring.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Olmos, A; Fernández-Salmerón, J; Lopez-Ruiz, N; Rivadeneyra Torres, A; Capitan-Vallvey, L F; Palma, A J

    2013-11-19

    In this work, a radiofrequency identification (RFID) tag with an optical indicator for the measurement of gaseous oxygen is described. It consists of an O2 sensing membrane of PtOEP together with a full electronic system for RFID communication, all printed on a flexible substrate. The membrane is excited by an LED at 385 nm wavelength and the intensity of the luminescence generated is registered by means of a digital color detector. The output data corresponding to the red coordinate of the RGB color space is directly related to the concentration of O2, and it is sent to a microcontroller. The RFID tag is designed and implemented by screen printing on a flexible substrate for the wireless transmission of the measurement to a remote reader. It can operate in both active and passive mode, obtaining the power supply from the electromagnetic waves of the RFID reader or from a small battery, respectively. This system has been fully characterized and calibrated including temperature drifts, showing a high-resolution performance that allows measurement of very low values of oxygen content. Therefore this system is perfectly suitable for its use in modified atmosphere packaging where the oxygen concentration is reduced below 2%. As the reading of the O2 concentration inside the envelope is carried out with an external RFID reader using wireless communication, there is no need for perforations for probes or wires, so the packaging remains completely closed. With the presented device, a limit of detection of 40 ppm and a resolution as low as 0.1 ppm of O2 can be reached with a low power consumption of 3.55 mA. PMID:24116378

  19. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  20. Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Gomez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stephane; Descat, Edouard; Fonck, Marianne; Brouste, Veronique; Avril, Antoine

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002-2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2-8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19-33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2-23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

  1. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  2. Rapid progression of hepatocellular carcinoma after Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ruzzenente, Andrea; de Manzoni, Giovanni; Molfetta, Matteo; Pachera, Silvia; Genco, Bruno; Donataccio, Matteo; Guglielmi, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients and to describe the treatment related complications (mainly the rapid intrahepatic neoplastic progression). METHODS: Eighty-seven consecutive cirrhotic patients with 104 HCC (mean diameter 3.9 cm, 1.3 SD) were submitted to RFA between January 1998 and June 2003. In all cases RFA was performed with percutaneous approach under ultrasound guidance using expandable electrode needles. Treatment efficacy (necrosis and recurrence) was estimated with dual phase computed tomography (CT) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level. RESULTS: Complete necrosis rate after single or multiple treatment was 100%, 87.7% and 57.1% in HCC smaller than 3 cm, between 3 and 5 cm and larger than 5 cm respectively (P = 0.02). Seventeen lesions of 88(19.3%) developed local recurrence after complete necrosis during a mean follow up of 19.2 mo. There were no treatment-related deaths in 130 procedures and major complications occurred in 8 patients (6.1 %). In 4 patients, although complete local necrosis was achieved, we observed rapid intrahepatic neoplastic progression after treatment. Risk factors for rapid neoplastic progression were high preoperative AFP values and location of the tumor near segmental portal branches. CONCLUSION: RFA is an effective treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 5 cm with complete necrosis in more than 80% of lesions. Patients with elevated AFP levels and tumors located near the main portal branch are at risk for rapid neoplastic progression after RFA. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the incidence and pathogenesis of this underestimated complication. PMID:15069713

  3. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of weakly bound molecules in spin-orbit-coupled atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Pu, Han; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Shi-Guo; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2012-11-01

    We investigate theoretically radio-frequency spectroscopy of weakly bound molecules in an ultracold spin-orbit-coupled atomic Fermi gas. We consider two cases with either equal Rashba and Dresselhaus coupling or pure Rashba coupling. The former system has been realized very recently at Shanxi University [Wang , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.095301 109, 095301 (2012)] and MIT [Cheuk , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.095302 109, 095302 (2012)]. We predict realistic radio-frequency signals for revealing the unique properties of anisotropic molecules formed by spin-orbit coupling.

  4. Combined MRI and Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Renal Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolas I.; Sabharwal, Tarun; Gangi, Afshin; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-15

    Percutaneous CT- and ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been shown to have very promising medium-term results. We present a unique case of recurrent RCC after partial nephrectomy in a patient with a single kidney and impaired renal function. This tumor could not be visualized either with CT or with ultrasound. A combination of magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopic guidance was used, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, to ablate the tumor with radiofrequency. The patient was cancer-free and off dialysis at 30-month follow up.

  5. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Itoh, Kyo

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  6. Radio-frequency radiation energy transfer in an ionospheric layer with random small-scale inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Zabotin, N.A.

    1994-06-01

    The equation of radiation energy balance in a randomly inhomogeneous plane-stratified plasma layer was derived based on the phenomenological approach. The use of the small-angle scattering approximation in the invariate ray coordinates allows it to be transformed into a drift-type equation. The latter describes the deformation of the spatial distribution of the radio-frequency radiation energy due to multiple scattering by anisotropic inhomogeneities. Two effects are investigated numerically: shift of the radio wave arrival angles under a slightly oblique propagation, and variation of the intensity of the radio-frequency radiation reflected from a plasma layer.

  7. Left-sided atrial flutter originating in the coronary sinus after radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Alejandro; Shorofsky, Stephen R; Dickfeld, Timm M; Anand, Rishi; Saliaris, Anastasios P; Saba, Magdi

    2010-10-01

    We describe a case of atypical atrial flutter presenting 1 year after radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Electrophysiologic study showed a reentry circuit involving the inferolateral aspect of the mitral annulus and the coronary sinus (CS); however, a mitral isthmus line did not terminate the arrhythmia. Participation of the proximal CS musculature in the circuit suggested a possible target for ablation. Radiofrequency energy applications from within the CS terminated the tachycardia. Mapping and ablation within the CS should be considered in patients with post-AF ablation arrhythmias, particularly when the mitral annulus appears to be involved in the tachycardia circuit. PMID:20230470

  8. Regression of calcinosis following treatment with radiofrequency thermoablation for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rending; Jiang, Tianan; Chen, Zhimin; Chen, Jianghua

    2013-01-01

    We herein present the case of a 41-year-old man who was misdiagnosed with a recurrent right shoulder tumor and underwent surgery twice. The pathological diagnosis was calcinosis. Secondary hyperparathyroidism was confirmed on further examination and the patient was therefore treated with two sessions of percutaneous ultrasonographically-guided radiofrequency tissue ablation. During the 20-month follow-up, the patient underwent four-hour hemodialysis three times a week. The calcinosis nearly completely resolved, and the PTH level was mildly elevated without the administration of any further medical therapy. Percutaneous ultrasonographically-guided radiofrequency tissue ablation is a feasible, safe and effective nonsurgical alternative treatment for secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:23448769

  9. Endoscopic 3D-OCT reveals buried glands following radiofrequency ablation of Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Becker, Lauren; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Huang, Qin; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) with high-grade dysplasia is generally treated by endoscopic mucosal resection or esophagectomy. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a recent treatment that allows broad and superficial ablation for BE. Endoscopic three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) is a volumetric imaging technique that is uniquely suited for follow-up surveillance of RFA treatment. 3D-OCT uses a thin fiberoptic imaging catheter placed down the working channel of a conventional endoscope. 3D-OCT enables en face and cross-sectional evaluation of the esophagus for detection of residual BE, neo-squamous mucosa, or buried BE glands. Patients who had undergone RFA treatment with the BARRX HALO90 system were recruited and imaged with endoscopic 3D-OCT before and after (3-25 months) RFA treatment. 3D-OCT findings were compared to pinch biopsy to confirm the presence or absence of squamous epithelium or buried BE glands following RFA. Gastric, BE, and squamous epithelium were readily distinguished from 3D-OCT over a large volumetric field of view (8mmx20mmx1.6 mm) with ~5?m axial resolution. In all patients, neosquamous epithelium (NSE) was observed in regions previously treated with RFA. A small number of isolated glands were found buried beneath the regenerated NSE and lamina propria. NSE is a marker of successful ablative therapy, while buried glands may have malignant potential and are difficult to detect using conventional video endoscopy and random biopsy. Buried glands were not observed with pinch biopsy due to their extremely sparse distribution. These results indicate a potential benefit of endoscopic 3D-OCT for follow-up assessment of ablative treatments for BE.

  10. Influence of Surgical Staples on Radiofrequency Ablation Using Multitined Expandable Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuhara, Yusuke Shimizu, Tadashi; Abo, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Yu; Kato, Fumi; Kodama, Yoshihisa; Shirato, Hiroki

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. During radiofrequency ablation (RFA), there is a risk that the multitined expandable electrode will come into contact with one of the surgical staples used to treat local recurrence after surgical operations. Our objective was to evaluate whether a surgical staple would influence the RFA of egg white using a multitined expandable electrode. Methods. Multitined expandable electrodes, LeVeen needles (expandable diameter 3.0 cm), were sunk into an egg white bath with (a) no surgical staple, (b) a surgical staple touching one of the tines, or (c) a surgical staple touching two of the tines simultaneously. By connecting the LeVeen needle and copper plate at the bottom of the bath, RFA was then performed on the egg whites as a substitute for human tissue. Ten egg white baths were ablated under each of conditions (a), (b), and (c), for a total of 30 sets of coagulated egg white. Results. There was no significant difference in the time from the power-on to the roll-off (i.e., the completion and shutting off of the electric circuit) or in the maximum diameter of the thermal lesion between conditions (a) and (b) or (a) and (c). However, the minimum diameter of the thermal lesion was significantly smaller in (c) compared with (a) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Surgical staples have the capacity to interfere with the electromagnetic field and decrease the minimum diameter of the thermal lesion in the event that a staple touches two of the tines of a multitined expandable electrode during RFA. Although the difference might be small enough to be neglected under many clinical circumstances, we recommend that, if possible, the tines not be expanded near metallic material.

  11. Current sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-Frequency Assisted Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    The inductive formation of current sheets in a conical theta pinch FARAD (Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge) thruster is investigated experimentally with time-integrated photography. The goal is to help in understanding the mechanisms and conditions controlling the strength and extent of the current sheet, which are two indices important for FARAD as a propulsion concept. The profiles of these two indices along the inside walls of the conical acceleration coil are assumed to be related to the profiles of the strength and extent of the luminosity pattern derived from photographs of the discharge. The variations of these profiles as a function of uniform back-fill neutral pressure (with no background magnetic field and all parameters held constant) provided the first clues on the nature and qualitative dependencies of current sheet formation. It was found that there is an optimal pressure for which both indices reach a maximum and that the rate of change in these indices with pressure differs on either side of this optimal pressure. This allowed the inference that current sheet formation follows a Townsend-like breakdown mechanism modified by the existence of a finite pressure-dependent radio-frequency-generated electron density background. The observation that the effective location of the luminosity pattern favors the exit-half of the conical coil is explained as the result of the tendency of the inductive discharge circuit to operate near its minimal self-inductance. Movement of the peak in the luminosity pattern towards the upstream side of the cone with increasing pressure is believed to result from the need of the circuit to compensate for the increase in background plasma resistivity due to increasing pressure.

  12. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant value to depths greater than the SRF active layer thickness. Certain irradiation conditions resulted in values consistent with formation of delta NbN. Under certain irradiation conditions, XRD data were consistent only with delta NbN on top of Nb metal. Funding: authored by Jefferson Science Associates LLC under US DOE Contract De-AC05-06OR23177. We are indebted to Prof. P. Schaaf (Goettingen) for the simulation code and helpful discussions.

  13. Case 222: Pericardioesophageal Fistula after Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph M; Sukov, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    History A 56-year-old woman presented to the emergency department after a cross-country flight. While in flight, she experienced sudden onset of epigastric and midsternal chest pain with shortness of breath. Her symptoms improved markedly after she received oxygen on board, and she finished the flight without further incident. Once home later that night, the pain recurred, and she was taken to the hospital. Her history included chronic pain syndrome, hypertension, and refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, for which she had undergone radiofrequency ablation on two occasions. Her most recent ablation was 1 month prior. Upon arrival in the emergency department, her vital signs were within normal limits, and an electrocardiogram was unchanged from baseline. A chest radiograph obtained at the time of physical examination was unchanged from baseline. Given her recent travel history, there was suspicion for a pulmonary embolism. Ventilation-perfusion imaging and lower extremity Doppler ultrasonography were performed (images not shown) and revealed no evidence of pulmonary embolism or lower extremity thrombus. Because of the patient's clinical stability and because her symptoms had improved, she declined admission for observation and returned home against medical advice. The patient returned to the emergency department 2 days later in severe distress, with unstable vital signs, a jaundiced appearance, and substantial pain in her chest and abdomen. Her creatinine level was 4.4 mg/dL (388.9 ?mol/L) (increased from 0.9 mg/dL [79.6 ?mol/L] 2 days prior). Frontal and lateral radiographs of the chest were obtained and indicated increasing pericardial effusion. Bedside echocardiography enabled confirmation of these radiographic findings, and pericardiocentesis was performed. The patient's condition immediately improved, and she was admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit. Her symptoms recurred 3 days later, and a pericardial drain was placed. Fluid cultures were preliminarily positive for enterococcus and gram-negative rods. After drain placement, she was scheduled for definitive treatment of recurrent symptomatic effusion. The preoperative work-up included a water-soluble contrast material-enhanced (iodixanol, 320 mg of iodine per milliliter) esophagram with computed tomography (CT) of the chest performed immediately thereafter. PMID:26402497

  14. Intracellular gold nanoparticles enhance non-invasive radiofrequency thermal destruction of human gastrointestinal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Christopher J; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Curley, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    Background Novel approaches to treat human cancer that are effective with minimal toxicity profiles are needed. We evaluated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in human hepatocellular and pancreatic cancer cells to determine: 1) absence of intrinsic cytotoxicity of the GNPs and 2) external radiofrequency (RF) field-induced heating of intracellular GNPs to produce thermal destruction of malignant cells. GNPs (5 nm diameter) were added to 2 human cancer cell lines (Panc-1, Hep3B). 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and propidium iodide-fluorescence associated cell sorting (PI-FACS) assessed cell proliferation and GNP-related cytotoxicity. Other GNP-treated cells were exposed to a 13.56 MHz RF field for 1, 2, or 5 minutes, and then incubated for 24 hours. PI-FACS measured RF-induced cytotoxicity. Results GNPs had no impact on cellular proliferation by MTT assay. PI-FACS confirmed that GNPs alone produced no cytotoxicity. A GNP dose-dependent RF-induced cytotoxicity was observed. For Hep3B cells treated with a 67 ?M/L dose of GNPs, cytotoxicity at 1, 2 and 5 minutes of RF was 99.0%, 98.5%, and 99.8%. For Panc-1 cells treated at the 67 ?M/L dose, cytotoxicity at 1, 2, and 5 minutes of RF was 98.5%, 98.7%, and 96.5%. Lower doses of GNPs were associated with significantly lower rates of RF-induced thermal cytotoxicity for each cell line (P < 0.01). Cells not treated with GNPs but treated with RF for identical time-points had less cytotoxicity (Hep3B: 17.6%, 21%, and 75%; Panc-1: 15.3%, 26.4%, and 39.8%, all P < 0.01). Conclusion We demonstrate that GNPs 1) have no intrinsic cytotoxicity or anti-proliferative effects in two human cancer cell lines in vitro and 2) GNPs release heat in a focused external RF field. This RF-induced heat release is lethal to cancer cells bearing intracellular GNPs in vitro. PMID:18234109

  15. Radiated radiofrequency immunity testing of automated external defibrillators - modifications of applicable standards are needed

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We studied the worst-case radiated radiofrequency (RF) susceptibility of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) based on the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements of a current standard for cardiac defibrillators, IEC 60601-2-4. Square wave modulation was used to mimic cardiac physiological frequencies of 1 - 3 Hz. Deviations from the IEC standard were a lower frequency limit of 30 MHz to explore frequencies where the patient-connected leads could resonate. Also testing up to 20 V/m was performed. We tested AEDs with ventricular fibrillation (V-Fib) and normal sinus rhythm signals on the patient leads to enable testing for false negatives (inappropriate "no shock advised" by the AED). Methods We performed radiated exposures in a 10 meter anechoic chamber using two broadband antennas to generate E fields in the 30 - 2500 MHz frequency range at 1% frequency steps. An AED patient simulator was housed in a shielded box and delivered normal and fibrillation waveforms to the AED's patient leads. We developed a technique to screen ECG waveforms stored in each AED for electromagnetic interference at all frequencies without waiting for the long cycle times between analyses (normally 20 to over 200 s). Results Five of the seven AEDs tested were susceptible to RF interference, primarily at frequencies below 80 MHz. Some induced errors could cause AEDs to malfunction and effectively inhibit operator prompts to deliver a shock to a patient experiencing lethal fibrillation. Failures occurred in some AEDs exposed to E fields between 3 V/m and 20 V/m, in the 38 - 50 MHz range. These occurred when the patient simulator was delivering a V-Fib waveform to the AED. Also, we found it is not possible to test modern battery-only-operated AEDs for EMI using a patient simulator if the IEC 60601-2-4 defibrillator standard's simulated patient load is used. Conclusions AEDs experienced potentially life-threatening false-negative failures from radiated RF, primarily below the lower frequency limit of present AED standards. Field strengths causing failures were at levels as low as 3 V/m at frequencies below 80 MHz where resonance of the patient leads and the AED input circuitry occurred. This plus problems with the standard's' prescribed patient load make changes to the standard necessary. PMID:21801368

  16. REDUCTION IN METABOLIC HEAT PRODUCTION DURING EXPOSURE TO RADIO-FREQUENCY RADIATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 10 C and exposed to 600 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation while metabolic rate (MR) was measured by indirect calorimetry. RF radiation exposures were made in a waveguide-type system which permitted the con...

  17. Floating low-temperature radio-frequency plasma oxidation of polycrystalline silicon-germanium

    E-print Network

    Floating low-temperature radio-frequency plasma oxidation of polycrystalline silicon at low temperature by floating plasma oxidation using an inductively coupled radio fre- quency rf source Received 26 March 1998; accepted for publication 16 May 1998 Low temperature oxide formation

  18. Method for Automated Monitoring of Hand Hygiene Adherence without Radio-Frequency Identification

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, Philip M.; Hlady, Christopher S.; Severson, Monica A.; Segre, Alberto M.; Herman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts to automatically measure hand hygiene activity depend on radio-frequency identification equipment or similar technology that can be expensive to install. We have developed a method for automatically tracking the use of hand hygiene dispensers before healthcare workers enter (or after they exit) patient rooms that is easily and quickly deployed without permanent hardware. PMID:20973724

  19. Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge Edgar Y. Choueiri and Kurt A. Polzin

    E-print Network

    Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge Edgar Y. Choueiri and Kurt A. Polzin Abstract A new electrodeless accelerator concept that relies on an RF-assisted discharge, an applied magnetic eld, and electromagnetic acceleration using an inductive coil is presented. The presence

  20. Mitral isthmus conduction block: intriguing result of radiofrequency catheter ablation for a left concealed accessory pathway.

    PubMed

    Bulava, Alan; Hanis, Jiri; Sitek, David

    2010-04-01

    We report on our experience with complete mitral isthmus conduction block achieved inadvertently during radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation for a left lateral concealed accessory pathway (AP) mimicking concentric retrograde activation. This rare condition should be acknowledged to avoid misdiagnosis of another concomitant AP and to avoid RF applications in inappropriate areas. PMID:20019014

  1. BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE MOUSE, HAMSTER, AND RAT EXPOSED TO RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: AN INTERSPECIES COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colonic temperatures of BALB/c and CBA/J mice, golden hamsters, and Sprague-Dawley rats were taken immediately after exposure for 90 min to radiofrequency (RF) radiation. Exposures were made in 2450 MHz (mouse and hamster) or 600 MHz (rat) waveguide exposure systems while the dos...

  2. COMPARATIVE THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO PASSIVE HEAT LOADING BY EXPOSURE TO RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colonic and tail skin temperature of the unrestrained Fischer rat were measured immediately after a 90 min exposure to 600 MHz radiofrequency radiation in a waveguide-type system. Ambient temperature (Ta) was maintained at either 20, 28, or 35 C. The specific absorption rate (SAR...

  3. DOSE DEPENDENCE OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS EXPOSED TO MODULATED RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at 915 and at 147 MHz, when sinusoidally amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, has been shown to enhance release of calcium ions from neuroblastoma cells in culture. he dose response is unusual, consisting of two power density 'windows' in which enhanc...

  4. CONTROL OF ENERGY ABSORPTION RATE IN TRANSMISSION LINE RADIOFREQUENCY EXPOSURE SYSTEMS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A frequent problem in the radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of experimental animals in health effects studies is the temporal variation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) with animal movement. An RF power controller which regulates the energy absorption rate has been designed fo...

  5. Ion beam properties after mass filtering with a linear radiofrequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bollen, G.; Lincoln, D. L.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Ringle, R.; Savory, J.; Schwarz, S.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of ion beams passing through a linear radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter were investigated with special attention to their dependence on the mass resolving power. Experimentally, an increase of the transverse emittance was observed as the mass-to-charge selectivity of the mass filter was raised. The experimental behavior was confirmed by beam transport simulations.

  6. SCALING THE PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO RADIOFREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION: CONSEQUENCES OF BODY SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have demonstrated that a comparative analysis of the physiological effects of exposure of laboratory mammals to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) may be useful in predicting exposure thresholds for humans if the effect is assumed to be due only to heating...

  7. Reduction of the Radiofrequency Heating of Metallic Devices Using a Dual-Drive Birdcage Coil

    E-print Network

    Atalar, Ergin

    2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Key words: RF safety; transmit arrays; dual-drive birdcage coil; implant a method based on the use of linearly polarized birdcage coils (4) to min- imize radiofrequency (RF on an entire plane, the location of the me- tallic device was coincided with this plane, and the RF heating

  8. Effect of fibrous capsule formation on doxorubicin distribution in radiofrequency ablated rat livers

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jinming

    ablation of solid tumors, followed by 2) the implantation of a polymer millirod drug delivery de- vice radiofrequency ablation and intratumoral drug delivery in rat livers, with special atten- tion to wound ablation and polymer millirod implantation, as well as the impact this natural corollary has on drug

  9. Plasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya

    E-print Network

    electromagnetic noise is required.6 The present work suggests a steady-state cathode- less plasma thruster, whichPlasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya Department Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 Received 19 August 2005; accepted 22

  10. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. 179.30 Section 179.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) IRRADIATION IN THE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING...

  11. High-temperature superconducting multi-band radio-frequency metamaterial atoms

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    High-temperature superconducting multi-band radio-frequency metamaterial atoms Behnood G. Ghamsari-fabricated compact high-temperature superconducting (HTS) metamaterial atom operating at a frequency as low as $53 not compromised the quality of our spiral metamaterial atom and a Q as high as $1000 for the fundamental mode

  12. Plasma resistivity profile measurement from an external radio-frequency magnetic coil

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    - pressed as R / fgeom , where is the skin depth. The skin depth characterizes the depth of penetrationPlasma resistivity profile measurement from an external radio-frequency magnetic coil John T (Presented on 20 April 2004; published 7 October 2004) Plasma resistivity is obtained by measuring the change

  13. TEMPERATURE REGULATION IN THE UNRESTRAINED RABBIT DURING EXPOSURE TO 600 MHZ RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six male New Zealand white rabbits were individually exposed to 600 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation for 90 min in a waveguide exposure system at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 or 30 C. Immediately after exposure, the rabbit was removed from the exposure chamber and its colon...

  14. DETECTION OF RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION-INDUCED WHOLE BODY HEATING FOLLOWING CHEMICAL IMPAIRMENT OF THERMOREGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heating by radiofrequency (RF) radiation at high intensities can cause biological changes by whole-body hyperthermia or by altered thermal gradients within the body. However, there have been reports of effects at low intensities of RF radiation without evidence of increased tempe...

  15. An assessment of the impact of radiofrequency interference on microwave SETI searches.

    PubMed

    Klein, M J; Gulkis, S; Olsen, E T; Armstrong, E F; Jackson, E B

    1992-01-01

    Investigations are carried out at JPL on radiofrequency interferences at very low levels (-130 to -180 dBm) in various bands, especially the 1-2 GHz band. Extrapolation of interferences in the years to come is attempted. PMID:11537163

  16. Stress (Tako-Tsubo) Cardiomyopathy Following Radiofrequency Ablation of a Liver Tumor: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Park, Eun-Ah

    2011-02-15

    Stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction occurring in the absence of obstructive coronary disease. It is precipitated by acute emotional or physical stress. We present a case of stress cardiomyopathy which developed during hepatic radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Synthesis of Spinel Ferrites in Radiofrequency Thermal Plasma Reactor J. Szpvlgyi1,2

    E-print Network

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    solutions and - sol-gel processing. Another synthesis route involves thermal decomposi- tion of metal nitrate solutions at high temperatures. First step of the process is the evaporation of solvent followedSynthesis of Spinel Ferrites in Radiofrequency Thermal Plasma Reactor J. Szépvölgyi1,2 , L. Gál1

  18. Injection of Subphrenic Saline During Radiofrequency Ablation to Minimize Diaphragmatic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Baljendra S.; Hunter, David W.

    2003-06-15

    An 82-year-old man with a history of colorectal cancer presented with metastatic disease to the liver (Couinaud segment 8). We describe the techniques that we employed to successfully perform radiofrequency ablation of a liver metastasis near the dome of the diaphragm utilizing subphrenic infusion of normal saline. The aim of this technique was to prevent thermal injury of the diaphragm.

  19. CHRONIC EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 100-MHZ (CW) RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary approach was employed to assess the possible biological effects of chronic exposure of rats to 100-MHz continuous wave (CW) radiofrequency (RF) radiation. A group of 20 time-bred rats were exposed in a transverse electronmagnetic mode (TEM) transmission line t...

  20. A high-performance cryogenic amplifier based on a radio-frequency single electron transistor

    E-print Network

    A high-performance cryogenic amplifier based on a radio-frequency single electron transistor K, Sweden Received 23 May 2002; accepted 24 October 2002 We demonstrate a high-performance cryogenic-chip integrability, make it a good candidate for a general-purpose cryogenic amplifier for high impedance sources. We